Science.gov

Sample records for kevlar

  1. Kevlar Cable Development Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    1 *II. BRAID DEVELOPMENTS ........................................................... 1 A...57 B. Braided Rope ................................................................. 57 IX. HIGH STRENGTH ROPE...Electromechanical Kevlar 29 Cable- Braid vs. Serves........................... 72 C. Fairings

  2. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  3. Detonation nanodiamonds for doping Kevlar.

    PubMed

    Comet, Marc; Pichot, Vincent; Siegert, Benny; Britz, Fabienne; Spitzer, Denis

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on the first attempt to enclose diamond nanoparticles--produced by detonation--into a Kevlar matrix. A nanocomposite material (40 wt% diamond) was prepared by precipitation from an acidic solution of Kevlar containing dispersed nanodiamonds. In this material, the diamond nanoparticles (Ø = 4 nm) are entirely wrapped in a Kevlar layer about 1 nm thick. In order to understand the interactions between the nanodiamond surface and the polymer, the oxygenated surface functional groups of nanodiamond were identified and titrated by Boehm's method which revealed the exclusive presence of carboxyl groups (0.85 sites per nm2). The hydrogen interactions between these groups and the amide groups of Kevlar destroy the "rod-like" structure and the classical three-dimensional organization of this polymer. The distortion of Kevlar macromolecules allows the wrapping of nanodiamonds and leads to submicrometric assemblies, giving a cauliflower structure reminding a fractal object. Due to this structure, the macroscopic hardness of Kevlar doped by nanodiamonds (1.03 GPa) is smaller than the one of pure Kevlar (2.31 GPa). To our knowledge, this result is the first illustration of the change of the mechanical properties induced by doping the Kevlar with nanoparticles.

  4. Lightweight engine containment. [Kevlar shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. T.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar fabric styles and weaves were studied, as well as methods of application for advanced gas turbine engines. The Kevlar material was subjected to high speed impacts by simple projectiles fired from a rifle, as well as more complex shapes such as fan blades released from gas turbine rotors in a spin pit. Just contained data was developed for a variety of weave and/or application techniques, and a comparative containment weight efficiency was established for Kevlar containment applications. The data generated during these tests is being incorporated into an analytical design system so that blade containment trade-off studies between Kevlar and metal case engine structures can be made. Laboratory tests and engine environment tests were performed to determine the survivability of Kevlar in a gas turbine environment.

  5. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  6. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix from Research to Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    protective transformations are applied to application binaries before they are deployed. Salient features of Kevlar include applying high- entropy ...variety of classes. Kevlar uses novel, fine-grained, high- entropy diversification transformations to prevent an attacker from successfully exploiting...Kevlar include applying high- entropy randomization techniques, automated program repairs, leveraging highly-optimized virtual machine technology, and in

  7. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  8. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix for Research to Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    entropy randomization techniques, automated program repairs leveraging highly-optimized virtual machine technology, and developing a novel framework...attacker from exploiting residual vulnerabilities in a wide variety of classes. Helix/Kevlar uses novel, fine-grained, high- entropy diversification...the Air Force, and IARPA). Salient features of Helix/Kevlar include developing high- entropy randomization techniques, automated program repairs

  9. The mechanical response of woven Kevlar fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Woven Kevlar fabrics exhibit a number of beneficial mechanical properties which include strength, flexibility, and relatively low density. The desire to engineer or design Kevlar fabrics for specific applications has stimulated interest in the development of theoretical models which relate their effective mechanical properties to specific aspects of the fabric morphology and microstructure. In this work the author provides a theoretical investigation of the large deformation elastic response of a plane woven Kevlar fabric and compares these theoretical results with experimental data obtained from uniaxially loaded Kevlar fabrics. The theoretical analysis assumes the woven fabric to be a regular networkmore » of orthogonal interlaced yarns and the individual yarns are modeled as extensible elastica, thus coupling stretching and bending effects at the outset. This comparison of experiment with theory indicates that the deformation of woven fabric can be quite accurately predicted by modeling the individual yarns as extensible elastica. 2 refs., 1 fig.« less

  10. Experimental analysis of graphene nanocomposite on Kevlar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, S.; Gunasekar, P.; Nithya, S.; Durga Revanth, G.; Anudeep, A. V. S. C.

    2017-08-01

    Graphene nanocomposite is a two dimensional structure which has intense role in material science. This paper investigates the topological property of the graphene nanocomposite doped in Kevlar fiber by direct mixing process. The Kevlar fiber by direct mixing process. The Kevlar fiber taken as the specimen which is fabricated by vacuum bag moulding process. Epoxy used as resin and HY951 as hardener. Three different specimens are fabricated based on the percentage of graphene nanocomposite 2%, 5%, 10% and 20% respectively. We witnessed the strength of the Kevlar fiber is increased when it is treated with nanocomposite. The percentage of the nanocomposite increase the strength of the fiber is increased. However as the nanocomposite beyond 5% the strength of fiber is dropped. In addition, we also seen the interfacial property of the fiber is dropped when the nanocomposite is added beyond threshold limit.

  11. Fabrication of Graphene on Kevlar Supercapacitor Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    fabricated with graphene to investigate its applicability for energy storage devices, as this carbon- based material has a large surface area and...Distribution List 14 iv List of Figures Figure 1. Dip-and-dry technique applied to Kevlar- based electrodes...2  Figure 2. Three-electrode system used for the CV measurements. The (1) working electrode was the Kevlar- based electrode; (2) the counter

  12. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  13. Impact behaviour of auxetic Kevlar®/ epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Chalivendra, V. B.; Kim, Y. K.

    2017-10-01

    Experimental study was performed to investigate fracture and impact properties of novel Auxetic Kevlar® laminated composites. For comparison, standard Kevlar® woven composites with and without polyurethane surface treatment were also considered in this study. For these three composites, short nylon fibers of two different fiber lengths and three different fiber densities were flocked between laminates. Vacuum infusion process along with optimized compaction was employed to fabricate composites. The double cantilever beam configuration was used to investigate the fracture properties. The Auxetic Kevlar® composites showed a significant improvement of 225% in fracture toughness compared to regular woven Kevlar® composites. Furthermore, the initiation toughness was increased by 577% with the application of flocking in Auxetic Kevlar®. During impact testing, the Auxetic Kevlar® reinforced composites showed a significant reduction in damaged area compared to woven counterpart. On the other hand, the reduction in damaged area influenced the reduction in impact energy absorption.

  14. Kevlar support for thermal isolation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.

    1992-01-01

    A cryogenic support is developed that rigidly attaches two U-shaped aluminum beams to each other with strands of Kevlar. The Kevlar creates a very strong and stiff coupling between the beams while allowing only very minor heat flow between them. Measurements at room temperature and at 77 K confirm the stiffness and strength of the support.

  15. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon-coated conductive Kevlar fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Conductive carbon material-coated Kevlar fibers were fabricated through layer-by-layer spray coating. Polyurethane was used as the interlayer between the Kevlar fiber and carbon materials to bind the carbon materials to the Kevlar fiber. Strongly adhering single-walled carbon nanotube coatings yielded a durable conductivity of 65 S/cm without significant mechanical degradation. In addition, the properties remained stable after bending or water washing cycles. The coated fibers were analyzed using scanning electron microcopy and a knot test. The as-produced fiber had a knot efficiency of 23%, which is more than four times higher than that of carbon fibers. The spray-coating of graphene nanoribbons onto Kevlar fibers was also investigated. These flexible coated-Kevlar fibers have the potential to be used for conductive wires in wearable electronics and battery-heated armors. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. The effect of oxygen-plasma treatment on Kevlar fibers and the properties of Kevlar fibers/bismaleimide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Min; Gu, Aijuan; Liang, Guozheng; Yuan, Li

    2011-02-01

    The effect of oxygen-plasma treatment for Kevlar fibers on the interfacial adhesion and typical macro-properties of Kevlar fiber/bismaleimide composites was intensively studied. It is found that oxygen-plasma treatment significantly affects the interfacial adhesion by changing the chemistry and morphology of the surfaces of the fibers, and thus leading to improved interlaminar shear strength, water resistance and dielectric properties of the composites. However, the improvement is closely related to the treatment power and time. The best condition for treating Kevlar fiber is 70 W for 5 min. Oxygen-plasma treatment provides an effective technique for overcoming the poor interfacial adhesion of Kevlar fiber based composites, and thus showing great potential in fabricating high performance copper clad laminates.

  17. Laser Cutting of Multilayered Kevlar Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Al-Sulaiman, F.; Karakas, C.; Ahsan, M.

    2007-12-01

    Laser cutting of Kevlar plates, consisting of multilayered laminates, with different thicknesses are carried out. A mathematical model is developed to predict the kerf width, thermal efficiency, and specific energy requirements during cutting. Optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) are employed to obtain the micrographs of the cutting sections. The kerf width size is measured and compared with the predictions. A factorial analysis is carried out to assess the affecting parameters on the mean kerf width and dimensionless damage sizes. It is found that the kerf width and damage sizes changes sharply when increasing cutting speed from 0.03 to 0.08 m/s. Thermal efficiency of the cutting process increases with increasing thickness and cutting speed while specific energy reduces with increasing thickness. The main effects of cutting parameters are found to be significant on the mean kerf width and dimensionless damage sizes, which is more pronounced for the workpiece bottom surface, where locally distributed char formation and sideways burning are observed.

  18. Metallization of Kevlar fibers with gold.

    PubMed

    Little, Brian K; Li, Yunfeng; Cammarata, V; Broughton, R; Mills, G

    2011-06-01

    Electrochemical gold plating processes were examined for the metallization of Kevlar yarn. Conventional Sn(2+)/Pd(2+) surface activation coupled with electroless Ni deposition rendered the fibers conductive enough to serve as cathodes for electrochemical plating. The resulting coatings were quantified gravimetrically and characterized via adhesion tests together with XRD, SEM, TEM; the coatings effect on fiber strength was also probed. XRD data showed that metallic Pd formed during surface activation whereas amorphous phases and trace amounts of pure Ni metal were plated via the electroless process. Electrodeposition in a thiosulfate bath was the most efficient Au coating process as compared with the analogous electroless procedure, and with electroplating using a commercial cyanide method. Strongly adhering coatings resulted upon metallization with three consecutive electrodepositions, which produced conductive fibers able to sustain power outputs in the range of 1 W. On the other hand, metallization affected the tensile strength of the fiber and defects present in the metal deposits make questionable the effectiveness of the coatings as protective barriers. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of Kevlar: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wening, J V; Marquardt, H; Katzer, A; Jungbluth, K H; Marquardt, H

    1995-03-01

    Toxicity and mutagenicity of Kevlar 49 (PPPT; poly-para-phenylene-terephthalamide) was tested in six strains of Salmonella typhimurium (Ames test; TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102, TA1535, TA1537) with and without an external metabolic activation system (S9), as well as in a mammalian cell mutagenesis assay using V79 Chinese hamster cells. For the Ames test, liquid preincubation, which is considered particularly sensitive, was used. The cells were incubated for 24 h at a temperature of 37 degrees C either directly with Kevlar49 or with ethanol- or chloroform-extracted Kevlar49. The experiments were performed at least twice. The Ames test with six different Salmonella typhimurium strains featuring either base pair substitution or frameshift mutations revealed no cytotoxic or mutagenic activity of Kevlar49. In the mammalian cell mutagenesis assay, using 8-azaguanine (AG) as a selective agent, Kevlar49 was also devoid of cytotoxic or mutagenic activity. Both tests have to be regarded as an initial exploratory screening due to the chosen testing conditions and should be supplemented by tests at different temperatures.

  20. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  1. Tendon cell outgrowth rates and morphology associated with kevlar-49.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M; Gordon, K E

    1988-12-01

    A rat tendon cell model was used to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of kevlar-49. The cell response to kevlar was compared to carbon AS-4 and nylon sutures. Three trials were run and cell growth rates were statistically similar for all the materials tested. A separate experiment was conducted in which the same fiber materials were placed in the same Petri dish. Again, the rates were similar for each material. Finally, the cells were observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the three classic cell morphologies associated with this tendon cell model were observed. Also, cellular attachment to the fiber and cellular encapsulation of the fiber were identical for the three materials tested. Kevlar-49 proved to be comparable to carbon AS4 and nylon sutures in terms of cellular response and cell outgrowth rates.

  2. Condition Assessment of Kevlar Composite Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes the following main concepts. Goal: To evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential NDE tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar. Objective: Test a series of strand samples that have been aged under various conditions and evaluate differences and trends in the Raman response. Hypothesis: Reduction in strength associated with stress rupture may manifest from changes in the polymer at a molecular level. If so, than these changes may effect the vibrational characteristics of the material, and consequently the Raman spectra produced from the material. Problem Statement: Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) on the space shuttles are greater than 25 years old. Stress rupture phenomena is not well understood for COPVs. Other COPVs are planned for hydrogen-fueled vehicles using Carbon composite material. Raman spectroscopy is being explored as an non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique to predict the onset of stress rupture in Kevlar composite materials. Test aged Kevlar strands to discover trends in the Raman response. Strength reduction in Kevlar polymer will manifest itself on the Raman spectra. Conclusions: Raman spectroscopy has shown relative changes in the intensity and FWHM of the 1613 cm(exp -1) peak. Reduction in relative intensity for creep, fleet leader, and SIM specimens compared to the virgin strands. Increase in FWHM has been observed for the creep and fleet leader specimens compared to the virgin strands. Changes in the Raman spectra may result from redistributing loads within the material due to the disruption of hydrogen bonding between crystallites or defects in the crystallites from aging the Kevlar strands. Peak shifting has not been observed to date. Analysis is ongoing. Stress measurements may provide a tool in the short term.

  3. The effect of configuration on strength, durability, and handle of Kevlar fabric-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, L. L.; Munson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Five Kevlar based laminates and three Kevlar based coated materials were designed, hand made, and tested against comparative conventional Dacron based materials for strength, peel, tear, puncture, creases, and handle. Emphasis was placed on evaluating geometric orientation of constituents, use of elastomeric film in place of high modulus films, and the use of flying thread loom bias reinforcement of Kevlar yarns. Whereas, the performance of the Kevlar laminates was severely degraded by crease effects, significant gains in overall performance factors were shown for the coated Kevlar materials.

  4. Thermoelastic characteristics testing on kevlar samples for spacecraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crema, L. Balis; Barboni, R.; Castellani, A.; Peroni, I.

    The tensile properties, the thermal expansion coefficient and the thermal conductivity of woven roving (WR) reinforced Kevlar fabrics were experimentally determined. Theoretical values for tensile Young's modulus were calculated by simulating a fabric as an equivalent cross-ply laminate. As thermal expansion coefficient concerns the fabrics have shown an isotropic behaviour. The thermal conductivity normal to fabric plane has also been determined.

  5. What's new in intraperitoneal test on Kevlar (asbestos substitute)?

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, O A; Müller, K M

    1989-09-01

    The intraperitoneal test is a suitable experimental method for studying the different patterns of morphological reaction to foreign body substances of various kinds and concentrations as well as their transport within and elimination from the organism, Kevlar fibres are synthetic aromatic polyamid (aramid) fibres which, investigated by means of the intraperitoneal test in Wistar rats, show distinct pathogenetic reaction patterns: 1. In the early stage after application, the formation of multinucleated giant cells with phagocytosis of the amber-coloured Kevlar fibres, and an inflammatory reaction are foremost features. 2. The typical feature of the second stage is the development of granulomas with central necrosis indicating the cytotoxic nature of Kevlar fibres. 3. The third stage is dominated by the mesenchymal activation with capsular structures of collagenous fibres. Besides granulomatous foci, a slight submesothelial fibrosis is observed. 4. Fragments of Kevlar fibres are drained through lymphatic pathways and stored in lymph nodes where they lead to inflammatory reactions. 5. The reactive granulomatous changes in the greater omentum of rats are accompanied by proliferative mesothelial changes which, in one cases, even led to the development of a multilocular mesothelioma.

  6. Pulmonary response to inhaled Kevlar aramid synthetic fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, K P; Kelly, D P; Kennedy, G L

    1983-11-01

    Groups of male rats were exposed to specially prepared ultrafine Kevlar pulp fibers (du Pont's registered trademark for certain aramid fibers) at atmospheric concentrations of either 0.1, 0.5, 3.0, or 18 mg/m3 for 2 weeks. Rats were killed at 0 and 2 weeks and 3 and 6 months postexposure (PE) except the rats exposed to 18 mg/m3, which were killed 0, 4, and 14 days and 1, 3, and 6 months PE. Another group of male rats was exposed to 18 mg/m3 (respirable dust approximately 2.5 mg/m3) of commercial Kevlar fibers for 2 weeks and were killed at 0 and 2 weeks and 3 and 6 months PE. Inhaled ultrafine Kevlar fibers were mostly phagocytized by alveolar macrophages (dust cells) in the alveolar ducts and adjoining alveoli after exposure to either 0.1 or 0.5 micrograms/m3. Most dust cells had disappeared and lungs showed a normal appearance throughout 6 months PE. The pulmonary response almost satisfied the biological criteria for a nuisance dust. Rats exposed to 3 mg/m3 ultrafine Kevlar fibers revealed occasional patchy thickening of alveolar ducts with dust cells and inflammatory cells but with no collagen fibers deposited throughout 6 months PE. After exposure to 18 mg/m3 ultrafine Kevlar, the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and adjoining alveoli showed granulomatous lesions with dust cells by 2 weeks PE. The granulomatous lesions converted to patchy fibrotic thickening with dust cells after 1 month PE. The fibrotic lesions were markedly reduced in cellularity, size, and numbers from 3 to 6 months PE but revealed networks of reticulum fibers with slight collagen fiber deposition.

  7. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after three years' service, and found to be performing satisfactorily. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft, including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 150 C service aft engine fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  8. Development of failure criterion for Kevlar-epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is discussed. In particular, emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Kevlar-49 fabric (Style 285)/Narmco 5208 Epoxy. The quadratic-failure criterion with F(12)=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the Kevlar/Epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was re-cast into an operationally easier form, providing the engineer with design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from unidirectional prepregs. In the form presented no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exists at present to generalize this approach for all undirectional prepregs and its use must be restricted to the generic materials investigated to-date.

  9. Diffuse Reflectance FT-IR Of Surface Modified Kevlar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benrashid, R.; Tesoro, G.; McKenzie, M. T., Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance FT-IR (DRIFT) has been applied to the characterization of surface modified Kevlar 29 and 49 fibers. The surface modifications include amination and sulfonation. The standard DRIFT experiment has been modified in the manner first described by Koenig et.al. 1 who used a KBR overlayer to enhance surface functional IR bands. The results from the DRIFT experiment have been correlated with those from a standard dye test. The results for degree of modification are in reasonable agreement between the two measurement approaches. However, the dye experiment is time-consuming and inconvenient. DRIFT has been shown to be useful in characterizing modified Kevlar surfaces in as-used conditions.

  10. A comparison of wire- and Kevlar-reinforced provisional restorations.

    PubMed

    Powell, D B; Nicholls, J I; Yuodelis, R A; Strygler, H

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel wire 0.036 inch in diameter was compared with Kevlar 49 polyaramid fiber as a means of reinforcing a four-unit posterior provisional fixed restoration with 2 pontics. Three reinforcement patterns for wire and two for Kevlar 49 were evaluated and compared with the control, which was an unreinforced provisional restoration. A central tensile load was placed on the cemented provisional restoration and the variables were measured: (1) the initial stiffness; (2) the load at initial fracture; and (3) the unit toughness, or the energy stored in the beam at a point where the load had undergone a 1.0-mm deflection. Statistical analysis showed (1) the bent wire configuration had a significantly higher initial stiffness (P < or = .05), (2) there was no difference between designs for load at initial fracture, and (3) the bent wire had a significantly higher unit toughness value (P < or = .05).

  11. [Surface grafting modification and stabilization of Kevlar fiber].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-ying; Fu, Ming-lian; Wang, Can-yao; Wang, Liang-en

    2005-11-01

    Chemical disposal was used to bring the activity group onto the surface of Kevlar fiber for the purpose of surface grafting modification. The interfacial constitution of the grafting of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) onto Kevlar fiber was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In the mean time, hexyl-lactam stabilization and poly-glycol (400, PEG) stabilization on the grafted product were also studied. The effects of different nTDI:nPEG ratios on the production's interfacial constitution was analysed. It is concluded that the stabilization took place on the surface. The intensity of the bands relented at about 3300 cm(-1) and was reinforced at about 1700-1720 cm(-1) when the ratio of nTDI:nPEG = 1:3, but when the ratio is 1:1 and 1:2, the bands at about 3 300 and 1700-1720 cm(-1) are almost the same.

  12. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  13. Optical holographic structural analysis of Kevlar rocket motor cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. J.

    1981-05-01

    The methodology of applying optical holography to evaluation of subscale Kevlar 49 composite pressure vessels is explored. The results and advantages of the holographic technique are discussed. The cases utilized were of similar design, but each had specific design features, the effects of which are reviewed. Burst testing results are presented in conjunction with the holographic fringe patterns obtained during progressive pressurization. Examples of quantitative data extracted by analysis of fringe fields are included.

  14. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosey, W. D.

    1985-07-01

    Composite structures are often desirable for their strength and weight characteristics. Since composites are not as well characterized mechanically as metallic or ceramic structures, much work has been performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to obtain that characterization and to develop methods of determining the mechanical properties of a composite nondestructively. Most of the work to date has been performed on nonenclosed structures. One notable exception has been the holographic evaluation of spherical Kevlar-epoxy composite pressure vessels. Several promising nondestructive evaluation techniques have been used to locate flaws and predict the integrity of the composite. Several of these include thermography, Moire interferometry, ultrasonic stress wave factor, ultrasonic C-scan image enhancement, radiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance. As a first step in this transfer and development of NDE techniques, known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy, filament-wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber instead of the higher strength Kevlar 40 fiber, and an alternate high-void-content winding pattern. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite. Preparation has been made at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and at the University of Delaware, to examine the specimens using various NDE techniques. This work is a compilation of interim project reports in partial fulfillment of the contracts between Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, the University of Delaware, and Y-12 Plant.

  15. Analysis methods for Kevlar shield response to rotor fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstle, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Several empirical and analytical approaches to rotor burst shield sizing are compared and principal differences in metal and fabric dynamic behavior are discussed. The application of transient structural response computer programs to predict Kevlar containment limits is described. For preliminary shield sizing, present analytical methods are useful if insufficient test data for empirical modeling are available. To provide other information useful for engineering design, analytical methods require further developments in material characterization, failure criteria, loads definition, and post-impact fragment trajectory prediction.

  16. Feasibility of Kevlar 49/PMR-15 Polyimide for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Kevlar 49 aramid organic fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide laminates were characterized to determine the applicability of the material to high temperature aerospace structures. Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy laminates were fabricated and characterized for comparison with the Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide material. Flexural strengths and moduli and interlaminar shear strengths were determined from 75 F to 600 F for the PMR-15 and from 75 F to 450 F for the Kevlar/3501-6 epoxy material. The effects of hydrothermal and long-term elevated temperature exposures on the flexural strengths and moduli and the interlaminar shear strengths were also studied.

  17. Feasibility of Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Kevlar 49 aramid organic fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide laminates were characterized to determine the applicability of the material to high temperature aerospace structures. Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy laminates were fabricated and characterized for comparison with the Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide material. Flexural strengths and moduli and interlaminar shear strengths were determined from 75 to 600 F for the PMR-15 and from 75 to 450 F for the Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy material. The study also included the effects of hydrothermal and long-term elevated temperature exposures on the flexural strengths and moduli and the interlaminar shear strengths.

  18. Interfacial characteristics of an epoxy composite reinforced with phosphoric acid-functionalized Kevlar fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Xia, Y. C.

    2010-07-01

    A Kevlar fiber was functionalized with the phosphoric acid (PA) of different concentrations. The surface characteristics of the fiber were examined by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the PA functionalization considerably increased the bond strength between the Kevlar fiber and an epoxy matrix.

  19. Direct Functionalization of Kevlar (registered trademark) with Copolymers Containing Sulfonyl Nitrene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    phenylene terephthalamide) (Kevlar®) fibers via thermal generation of an electrophilic nitrene, while preserving the mechanical properties of the...poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (Kevlar®) fibers via thermal generation of an electrophilic nitrene, while preserving the mechanical properties of...radiation, plasma, or chemical radical generation,12 conventional solution-based electrophilic aromatic substitution,13 silanation,14 or hydrolysis with

  20. Effect of Kevlar and carbon fibres on tensile properties of oil palm/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, S. M. M.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Jawaid, M.; Cardona, F.; Ishak, M. R.; Yusof, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid composites with natural and synthetic fibers have captured the interests of many researchers. In this work, Kevlar/oil palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB)/Kevlar and carbon/oil palm EFB hybrid/carbon composites were prepared using hand lay-up technique by keeping the oil palm EFB fiber as the core material. The tensile properties which include tensile strength, tensile modulus and elongation at break were investigated. It is observed that the tensile strength and modulus for carbon/oil palm EFB/carbon hybrid composites were much higher as compared with Kevlar/oil palm EFB/Kevlar hybrid composites. However, the elongation at break for Kevlar/oil palm EFB/Kevlar hybrid composites exhibited higher value as compared to carbon/oil palm EFB/carbon hybrid composites and oil palm EFB/epoxy composites. The tensile strength for carbon/oil palm EFB/carbon hybrid composites is 93.6 MPa and the tensile modulus for carbon/oil palm EFB/carbon hybrid composites is 6.5 GPa. The elongation at break for Kevlar/oil palm EFB/Kevlar hybrid composites is 3.6%.

  1. Intricacies of Using Kevlar and Thermal Knives in a Deployable Release System: Issues and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Alphonso C.; Hair, Jason H.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The utilization of Kevlar cord and thermal knives in a deployable release system produces a number of issues that must be addressed in the design of the system. This paper proposes design considerations that minimize the major issues, thermal knife failure, Kevlar cord relaxation, and the measurement of the cord tension. Design practices can minimize the potential for thermal knife laminate and element damage that result in failure of the knife. A process for in-situ inspection of the knife with resistance, rather than continuity, checks and 10x zoom optical imaging can detect damaged knives. Tests allow the characterization of the behavior of the particular Kevlar cord in use and the development of specific pre-stretching techniques and initial tension values needed to meet requirements. A new method can accurately measure the tension of the Kevlar cord using a guitar tuner, because more conventional methods do not apply to arimid cords such as Kevlar.

  2. Intricacies of Using Kevlar Cord and Thermal Knives in a Deployable Release System: Issues and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Alphonso; Hair, Jason H.

    2002-01-01

    The utilization of Kevlar cord and thermal knives in a deployable release system produces a number of issues that must be addressed in the design of the system. This paper proposes design considerations that minimize the major issues, thermal knife failure, Kevlar cord relaxation, and the measurement of the cord tension. Design practices can minimize the potential for thermal knife laminate and element damage that result in failure of the knife. A process for in-situ inspection of the knife with resistance, rather than continuity, checks and 10x zoom optical imaging can detect damaged knives. Tests allow the characterization of the behavior of the particular Kevlar cord in use and the development of specific prestretching techniques and initial tension values needed to meet requirements. A new method can accurately measure the tension of the Kevlar cord using a guitar tuner, because more conventional methods do not apply to arimid cords such as Kevlar.

  3. Intricacies of Using Kevlar Cord and Thermal Knives in a Deployable Release System: Issues and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Alphonso; Hair, Jason H.

    2002-04-01

    The utilization of Kevlar cord and thermal knives in a deployable release system produces a number of issues that must be addressed in the design of the system. This paper proposes design considerations that minimize the major issues, thermal knife failure, Kevlar cord relaxation, and the measurement of the cord tension. Design practices can minimize the potential for thermal knife laminate and element damage that result in failure of the knife. A process for in-situ inspection of the knife with resistance, rather than continuity, checks and 10x zoom optical imaging can detect damaged knives. Tests allow the characterization of the behavior of the particular Kevlar cord in use and the development of specific prestretching techniques and initial tension values needed to meet requirements. A new method can accurately measure the tension of the Kevlar cord using a guitar tuner, because more conventional methods do not apply to arimid cords such as Kevlar.

  4. A Kinematic, Kevlar(registered) Suspension System for an ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Jackson, Michael L.; Shirron, Peter J.; Tuttle, James G.

    2003-01-01

    The High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) will use identical Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) to cool their bolometer detectors to 200mK and 100mK, respectively. In order to minimize thermal loads on the salt pill, a Kevlar@ suspension system is used to hold it in place. An innovative, kinematic suspension system is presented. The suspension system is unique in that it consists or two parts that can be assembled and tensioned offline, and later bolted onto the salt pill. The resulting assembly constrains each degree of freedom only once, yielding a kinematic, tensile structure.

  5. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and prediction of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1990-01-01

    The thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material were studied. The four orthotropic material properties, S sub 11, S sub 12, S sub 22, and S sub 66, were characterized by 20 minute static creep tests on unidirectional (0) sub 8, (10) sub 8, and (90) sub 16 lamina specimens. The Time-Temperature Superposition-Principle (TTSP) was used successfully to accelerate the characterization process. A nonlinear constitutive model was developed to describe the stress dependent viscoelastic response for each of the material properties. A numerical procedure to predict long term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use. The final phase involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperatures and load level for 4 to 5 weeks. These results were compared with the VCAP program predictions to verify the testing procedure and to check the numerical procedure used in the program. The actual tests and predictions agreed for all test cases which included 1, 2, 3, and 4 fiber direction laminates.

  6. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three l-1011's, were inspected after 8 years service. The fairings had accumulated a total of 62,000 hours, with one ship set having 20,850 hours service. Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structures.

  7. Investigation of Kevlar fabric-based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.; Rueter, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated, and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar-based materials are compared with conventional Dacron-reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed, and considerable quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided.

  8. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.W.; Mak, H.K.; Lachman, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette.

  9. Radiation exposure reduction by use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal nursery.

    PubMed

    Herman, M W; Mak, H K; Lachman, R S

    1987-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether the use of Kevlar cassettes in the neonatal intensive care nursery would reduce radiation exposure to patients. The radiation dose to the neonates was measured by using thermoluminescent dosimeters. In addition, the attenuation of the Kevlar cassettes and the sensitivity of the film-screen combination were compared with the previously used system. The greatest radiation reduction using a mobile X-ray unit was 27%; based on sensitivity measurements, the theoretical reduction averaged 38%. The reduction in radiation exposure resulted from reduced attenuation by the Kevlar cassette.

  10. Fracto-emission from single fibres of Kevlar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jahan-Latibari, A.; Jensen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    Fracto-emission (FE) is the emission of particles (e.g. electrons, ions and photons) during and following fracture. In this paper, we present data on electron emission (EE) and positive ion emission (PIE) from the tensile fracture of Kevlar single fibers. The fibers were initially fractured in pure tension, where a stranded form of fracture was observed, often with multiple peaks spread over several hundred microseconds. The loading condition was then changed by stretching and breaking the fibers over a dull metal edge. With this change in the loading, different forms of fracture were observed, each with distinctive forms of emission curves. When fracture was accompanied by extensive fibril formation, total emission was high and both EE and PIE decay times were long relative to fractures in which little fibril formation occurred. The results of this study suggest that FE has some applicability as a tool for the detection of fracture mechanisms of single fibers.

  11. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodies commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 9 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 70,000 hours, with one ship set having over 24,000 hours service. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  12. Investigation of Kevlar fabric based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported in detail. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar based materials are compared with conventional, Dacron reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed and quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided. The investigation shows that single ply laminates of Kevlar and plastic films offer significant strength to weight improvements, are less permeable than two ply coated materials, but have a lower flex life.

  13. The development and evaluation of advanced Kevlar sandwich structure for application to rotorcraft airframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguet, Pierre; Llorente, Steven; Fay, Russell

    1991-05-01

    The results of an evaluation of DuPont Kevlar-based material systems in sandwich structure designed for rotorcraft primary airframe structure are presented in this report. The focus of this work has been to evaluate the durability and compression strength of thin-gage Kevlar sandwich panels and investigate means of improvement. It was found that sandwich panels made with Kevlar 149 fibers can be as strong as Kevlar 49 structures but have reduced compression stiffness properties at typical operating strain levels. Thermal cycling was found to affect permeability but not strength in thin facesheet sandwich structure. Any increased permeability can be prevented with the use of an interleaf or surfacing plies. The surfacing plies investigated also had a beneficial effect on sandwich strength due to their stabilizing effect on the facesheet in compression. Finally, a previously developed model was used to analyze the residual strength of a sandwich panel after impact damage.

  14. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  15. An experimental study of the effects of water repellant treatment on the acoustic properties of Kevlar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. D.; Parrott, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The treatment consisted of immersing samples of Kevlar in a solution of distilled water and Zepel. The samples were then drained, dried in a circulating over, and cured. Flow resistance tests showed approximately one percent decrease in flow resistance of the samples. Also there was a density increase of about three percent. It was found that the treatment caused a change in the texture of the samples. There were significant changes in the acoustic properties of the treated Kevlar over the frequency range 0.5 to 3.5 kHz. In general it was found that the propagation constant and characteristic impedance increased with increasing frequency. The real and imaginary components of the propagation constant for the treated Kevlar exhibited a decrease of 8 to 12 percent relative to that for the untreated Kevlar at the higher frequencies. The magnitude of the reactance component of the characteristic impedance decreased by about 40 percent at the higher frequencies.

  16. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 6 years' service. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings.

  17. Producibility and Serviceability of Kevlar-49 Structures Made on Hot Layup Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    changes for a typical airframe composite part and established improved machining practices for Kevlar-49. Some of the more signifi- cant conclusions...reverse side if necessary 8nd identify by block number) Composite Materials Inlet Fairing Helicopters Hot Layup Tools (HLT) Kevlar -49 20. ABSTRACT...CLASSlFlCATlON OF THIS PAGE(Whm Data Bnlorod) 0 Demonstrate the low cost aspects of using Hot Layup Tools (HLT) to fabricate composite structures. a

  18. Kevlar/PMR-15 reduced drag DC-9 reverser stang fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A reduced drag fairing for the afterbody enclosing the thrust reverser actuators on the DC-9 has been developed with Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite material. The improved fairing reduces airplane drag 1% compared to the production baseline. Use of composites reduces weight 40% compared to an equivalent metal fairing. The Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite is an organic matrix material system that can be used at temperatures up to 500 F.

  19. Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    GF, Moss WC, Cleveland RO, Tanzi RE, Stanton PK, McKee AC. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast... traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is largely undefined. Along with reducing mortality, in preliminary experiments Kevlar vests significantly protected...mitigation strategies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Kevlar Vests, Neuroprotection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  20. Unhole and open hole compressive behaviours of hybrid Kevlar/glass fibre reinforced silica nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaari, Norazean; Jumahat, Aidah

    2018-06-01

    The paper presents the effects of hybridization and silica nanoparticles on unhole and open hole compressive behaviours of woven Kevlar/glass fibre hybrid composite laminates. Residual compressive strength and stiffness were determined from an open hole compression (OHC) test conducted according to ASTM D6484-09, whereas the fractured surface behaviour was observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Silica nanoparticles were mixed into the epoxy resins using vacuum mechanical stirrer. Then, composite laminates were prepared using vacuum bagging method. Three different silica nanoparticles contents (5 wt%, 13 wt% and 25 wt%) were incorporated into the resin system with three different hybrid system (20:80, 50:50 and 80:20 of Kevlar fibres to glass fibres ratio). Results showed that the lowest compressive strength was observed in Kevlar fibre reinforced polymer. Therefore, hybridization of glass fibres with Kevlar fibres reduced the compressive strength of hybrid composites. However, the incorporation of silica nanoparticles into the epoxy resins improved the compressive properties of the hybrid composites. From the observation of the fractured surface, different fracture behaviours were observed in both Kevlar fibre and glass fibre composites. Fibre barrelling and crimping was observed in Kevlar fibres while glass fibres showed a fibre fracture with serrated and rough surfaces.

  1. In-line Kevlar filters for microfiltration of transuranic-containing liquid streams.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G J; Beddingfield, D H; Lieberman, J L; Curtis, J M; Ficklin, A C

    1992-06-01

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant has numerous ongoing efforts to minimize the generation of residue and waste and to improve safety and health. Spent polypropylene liquid filters held for plutonium recovery, known as "residue," or as transuranic mixed waste contribute to storage capacity problems and create radiation safety and health considerations. An in-line process-liquid filter made of Kevlar polymer fiber has been evaluated for its potential to: (1) minimize filter residue, (2) recover economically viable quantities of plutonium, (3) minimize liquid storage tank and process-stream radioactivity, and (4) reduce potential personnel radiation exposure associated with these sources. Kevlar filters were rated to less than or equal to 1 mu nominal filtration and are capable of reducing undissolved plutonium particles to more than 10 times below the economic discard limit, however produced high back-pressures and are not yet acid resistant. Kevlar filters performed independent of loaded particles serving as a sieve. Polypropylene filters removed molybdenum particles at efficiencies equal to Kevlar filters only after loading molybdenum during recirculation events. Kevlars' high-efficiency microfiltration of process-liquid streams for the removal of actinides has the potential to reduce personnel radiation exposure by a factor of 6 or greater, while simultaneously achieving a reduction in the generation of filter residue and waste by a factor of 7. Insoluble plutonium may be recoverable from Kevlar filters by incineration.

  2. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    is unlimited. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar ®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites The views, opinions...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 ballistics, composites, Kevlar , material models, microstructural defects REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11... Kevlar ®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites Report Title Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation

  3. The behavior of Kevlar fibers under environmental-stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark Charles

    There are a myriad of mechanisms by which polymers can degrade and fail. It is therefore important to understand the physical mechanics, chemistry, their interactions, and kinetics. This pursuit becomes more than just "academic" because these mechanisms might just change with service conditions (i.e. environment and loading). If one does not understand these processes from the molecular to macroscopic scale it would be exceedingly difficult to gain information from accelerated testing because the mechanisms just might change from one condition to another. The purpose of this study was to probe these processes on scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic in environmental stress conditions. This study reports the results of environmental-stress degradation of Kevlar 49 fibers. The environmental agent of focus was the ubiquitous air pollutant complex NOsb{x}. Other materials and environments were investigated to a lesser extent for purposes of comparison. Mechanical property (i.e., short-term strength, modulus, and creep lifetime) degradation was examined using single fiber, yarn, and epoxy coated yarn (composite) specimens under environmental-stress conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were employed to examine and compare the appearance of fracture features resulting from the various testing conditions. Atomic force microscopy augmented these studies with detailed topographical mappings and measures of the fracture surface frictional and modulus properties. Molecular processes (i.e., chain scission and other mechanical-chemical reactions) were probed by measures of changes in viscosity average molecular weight and the infrared spectra. It was demonstrated that environmental-stress degradation effects do occur in the Kevlar-NOsb{x} gas system. Strength decay in environmentally exposed unloaded fibers was demonstrated and a synergistic response in creep reduced fiber lifetimes by three orders of magnitude at moderate loadings. That is to say, the

  4. Investigation on the Crack Behaviour in Kevlar 49 Based Composite Materials using Extended Finite Element Method for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Danish; Sekhar Dondapati, Raja; Kumar, Abhinav

    2017-08-01

    Ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) is extensively observed in materials under cryogenic temperatures, thereby observing brittle failure due to the non-resistance of crack propagation. Owing to its outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, Kevlar 49 composites are widely used in aerospace applications under cryogenic temperatures. Therefore, in this paper, involving the assumption of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), mechanical characterization of Kevlar 49 composite is done using Extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) technique in Abaqus/CAE software. Further, the failure of Kevlar 49 composites due to the propagation of crack at room temperature and the cryogenic temperature is investigated. Stress, strain and strain energy density as a function of the width of the Kevlar specimen is predicted, indicates that Kevlar 49 composites are suitable for use under cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after five years' service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left-hand and right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 150 C (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 40,534 hours, with one ship set having 16,091 hours service as of Feb. 11, 1979. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings.

  6. Temperature Effects on the Impact Behavior of Fiberglass and Fiberglass/Kevlar Sandwich Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorsen, Aaron; Salehi-Khojn, Amin; Mahinfalah, Mohammad; Nakhaei-Jazar, Reza

    2006-11-01

    Impact tests were performed on sandwich composites with Fiberglass and Fiberglass/Kevlar face sheets subjected to varied temperatures. A number of specimens were tested at -50 to 120 °C temperature range and at 20, 30, and 45 J low velocity energy levels. Impact properties of the sandwich composites that were evaluated include maximum normal and shear stresses, maximum energy absorption, non-dimensional parameters (AEMP, PI, and RD), and compression after impact strength. Composite specimens tested have a urethane foam filled honeycomb center sandwiched between a variation of four layered Fiberglass and Kevlar/Fiberglass face sheets in a thermoset polymer epoxy matrix. Results showed that the impact performance of these sandwich composites changed over the range of temperature considered and with the addition of a Kevlar layer.

  7. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after four years' service, and found to be performing satisfactorily. The Kevlar-49 components were all found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. A concurrent investigation was conducted on Kevlar-49/epoxy coupons exposed to an outdoor environment over a three year period at various locations providing a variety of climatic conditions. Weight changes and retention of mechanical properties were determined after one and three years exposure. A net weight loss occurred due to ultraviolet effects on the unpainted specimens. Mechanical property retentions were satisfactory with most specimens retaining well over 80% of their original value.

  8. Why does Kevlar decompose, while Nomex does not, when treated with aqueous chlorine solutions?

    PubMed

    Akdag, Akin; Kocer, Hasan B; Worley, S D; Broughton, R M; Webb, T R; Bray, Travis H

    2007-05-24

    Kevlar and Nomex are high-performance polymers which have wide varieties of applications in daily life. Recently, they have been proposed to be biocidal materials when reacted with household bleach (sodium hypochlorite solution) because they contain amide moieties which can be chlorinated to generate biocidal N-halamine functional groups. Although Nomex can be chlorinated without any significant decomposition, Kevlar decomposes under the same chlorination conditions. In this study, two mimics for each of the polymers were synthesized to simulate the carboxylate and diaminophenylene components of the materials. It was found that the p-diaminophenylene component of the Kevlar mimic is oxidized to a quinone-type structure upon treatment with hypochlorous acid, which then decomposes. However, such a mechanism for the Nomex mimic is not possible. In this paper, based upon these observations, a plausible answer will be provided to the title question.

  9. Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates and thermal stress formed at cutting sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.

    2012-02-01

    Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates is carried out and thermal stress field developed in the cutting region is predicted using the finite element code. Temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. The morphological changes in the cutting section are examined by incorporating optical and scanning electron microscopes. It is found that temperature predictions agree well with the thermocouple data. High values of von Mises stress are observed at the cutting edges and at the mid-thickness of the Kevlar laminate due to thermal compression formed in this region. The laser cut edges are free from whiskers; however, striation formation and some small sideways burning is observed at the kerf edges.

  10. Mechanical tensile testing of titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Martinez, R. M.; Shirron, P.; Tuttle, J.; Galassi, N. M.; McGuinness, D. S.; Puckett, D.; Francis, J. J.; Flom, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  11. Mechanical Tensile Testing of Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Bryan L.; Martinez, Raul M.; Shirron, Peter; Tuttle, Jim; Galassi, Nicholas M.; Mcguinness, Daniel S.; Puckett, David; Francis, John J.; Flom, Yury

    2011-01-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thennal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  12. Long term elongation of Kevlar-49 single fiber at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, A.; Canonica, L.; Cariello, M.; Cereseto, R.; Di Domizio, S.; Pallavicini, M.

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the rate of elongation of a loaded Kevlar-49 fiber as a function of time at 4.2 K. The result puts a worst case upper limit of 0.028% in the elongation rate ΔL/L for a 0.5 mm diameter fiber kept under a constant tension of 2.7 kg for 8 months. A value that is probably closer to reality is actually 0.004%. This result proves that Kevlar-49 can be safely used in cryogenic applications in which high mechanical stability under stress is required.

  13. Fracture resistance of Kevlar-reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) resin: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Berrong, J M; Weed, R M; Young, J M

    1990-01-01

    The reinforcing effect of Kevlar fibers incorporated in processed poly(methyl methacrylate) resin samples was studied using 0% (controls), 0.5%, 1%, and 2% by weight of the added fibers. The samples were subjected to impact testing to determine fracture resistance, and sample groups were statistically compared using an ANOVA. Each reinforced sample had significantly greater fracture resistance (P less than 0.05) than the control, and no difference was found either within or between control groups. The use of reinforcing Kevlar fibers appears to enhance the fracture resistance of acrylic resin denture base materials.

  14. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  15. Laser circular cutting of Kevlar sheets: Analysis of thermal stress filed and assessment of cutting geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.; Karatas, C.

    2017-11-01

    A Kevlar laminate has negative thermal expansion coefficient, which makes it difficult to machine at room temperaures using the conventional cutting tools. Contararily, laser machining of a Kevlar laminate provides advantages over the conventional methods because of the non-mechanical contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. In the present study, laser circular cutting of Kevlar laminate is considered. The experiment is carried out to examine and evaluate the cutting sections. Temperature and stress fields formed in the cutting section are simulated in line with the experimental study. The influence of hole diameters on temperature and stress fields are investigated incorporating two different hole diameters. It is found that the Kevlar laminate cutting section is free from large size asperities such as large scale sideways burnings and attachemnt of charred residues. The maximum temperature along the cutting circumference remains higher for the large diameter hole than that of the small diameter hole. Temperature decay is sharp around the cutting section in the region where the cutting terminates. This, in turn, results in high temperature gradients and the thermal strain in the cutting region. von Mises stress remains high in the region where temperature gradients are high. von Mises stress follows similar to the trend of temperature decay around the cutting edges.

  16. Local Strain Measurement of Kevlar Strand with Fiber Optic Bragg Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    1987 DuPont manufactured 4560 denier Kevlar/Epoxy Strands were instrumented with nine and three sensors each. Stress tests were performed at 30,45,60,70 and 80% of ultimate strength with dwell times of 10,000 seconds. FBG showed uneven stress levels which is contrary to conventional observation.

  17. Local strain measurement of Kevlar strand with fiber optic Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    1987 DuPont manufactured 4560 denier Kevlar/Epoxy Strands were instrumented with nine and three sensors each. Stress tests were performed at 30,45,60,70 and 80% of ultimate strength with dwell times of 10,000 seconds. FBG showed uneven stress levels which is contrary to conventional observation.

  18. Evaluation of mechanical properties of hybrid fiber (hemp, jute, kevlar) reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresha, K. V.; Shivanand, H. K.; Amith, A.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    In today's world composites play wide role in all the engineering fields. The reinforcement of composites decides the properties of the material. Natural fiber composites compared to synthetic fiber possesses poor mechanical properties. The solution for this problem is to use combination of natural fiber and synthetic fiber. Hybridization helps to improve the overall mechanical properties of the material. In this study, hybrid reinforced composites of Hemp fabric/Kevlar fabric/Epoxy and Jute fabric/ Kevlar fabric/Epoxy composites are fabricated using Simple hand layup technique followed by Vacuum bagging process. Appropriate test methods as per standards and guidelines are followed to analyze mechanical behavior of the composites. The mechanical characteristics like tensile, compression and flexural properties of the hybrid reinforced composites are tested as per the ASTM standards by series of tensile test; compression test and three point bending tests were conducted on the hybrid composites. A quantitative relationship between the Hemp fabric/Kevlar fabric/Epoxy and Jute/ Kevlar fabric/Epoxy has been established with constant thickness.

  19. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 10 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left-hand and right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The three L-1011s include one each in service with Eastern, Air Canada, and TWA. The fairings have accumulated a total of 79,568 hours, with one ship set having nearly 28,000 hours service. The inspections were conducted at the airlines' major maintenance bases with the participation of Lockheed Engineering. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history obtained in this program indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  20. The Effect of Weaving on the Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fibers at Different Loading Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    The Effect of Weaving on the Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fibers at Different Loading Rates by Brett Sanborn, Nicole Racine, and Tusit...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-6280 December 2012 The Effect of Weaving on the Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fibers at Different Loading Rates...Effect of Weaving on the Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fibers at Different Loading Rates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 1120-1120-99 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. A new and innovative use of the thermal knife and Kevlar cord components in a restraint and release system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Alphonso C.

    2001-09-01

    A Kevlar cord and two thermal knives are key components in the Solar Array Restraint and Release System (SARRS) on the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The SARRS uses a 25-foot (7.62 m) length Kevlar cord that encircles the spacecraft and secures the solar panels in stowed configuration for launch. Once in orbit, one of two redundantly configured thermal knives severs the Kevlar cord and permits the panels to deploy. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the design, development test results, and the various innovations that were created during the development of this novel use of the thermal knife and Kevlar cord.

  2. A New and Innovative Use of the Thermal Knife and Kevlar Cord Components in a Restraint and Release System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Alphonso; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Kevlar cord and two thermal knives are key components in the Soar Array Restraint and Release System (SARRS) on the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The SARRS uses a 25-foot (7.62 m) length Kevlar cord that encircles the spacecraft and secures the solar panels in stowed configuration for launch. Once in orbit, one of two redundantly configured thermal knives severs the Kevlar cord and permits the panels to deploy. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the design, development test results, and the various innovations that were created during the development of this novel use of the thermal knife and Kevlar cord.

  3. Electron-beam-induced post-grafting polymerization of acrylic acid onto the surface of Kevlar fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lu; Hu, Jiangtao; Ma, Hongjuan; Wu, Guozhong

    2018-04-01

    The surface of Kevlar fibers was successfully modified by electron beam (EB)-induced post-grafting of acrylic acid (AA). The generation of radicals in the fibers was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements, and the concentration of radicals was shown to increase as the absorbed dose increased, but decrease with increasing temperature. The influence of the synthesis conditions on the degree of grafting was also investigated. The surface microstructure and chemical composition of the modified Kevlar fibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SEM images revealed that the surface of the grafted fibers was rougher than those of the pristine and irradiated fibers. XPS analysis confirmed an increase in C(O)OH groups on the surface of the Kevlar fibers, suggesting successful grafting of AA. These results indicate that EB-induced post-grafting polymerization is effective for modifying the surface properties of Kevlar fibers.

  4. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar (registered trademark)-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    of coarser-scale materials and structures containing Kevlar fibers (e.g., yarns, fabrics, plies, lamina, and laminates ). Journal of Materials...Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar -Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, J.S...extensive set of molecular-level computational analyses regarding the role of various microstructural/morphological defects on the Kevlar fiber

  5. Metal-organic framework superhydrophobic coating on Kevlar fabric with efficient drag reduction and wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deke; Guo, Zhiguang

    2018-06-01

    Superhydrophobic layers are extremely essential for protecting material surface in various applications. In this study, a stable superhydrophobic mixed matrix surface with a 152.2° contact angle can be fabricated through the technology of layer-by-layer hot-pressing (HoP), and then modified by 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES) on the ZIF-8@Kevlar fabric surface. The morphology and chemical composition were analyzed by the means of SEM, XRD and FTIR. The obtained superhydrophobic coatings showed excellent antiwear performance and drag reduction under desired working conditions. Moreover, we successfully applied superhydrophobic F-ZIF-8@Kevlar fabric in the alcohol adsorbent with high removal capacity, and it can be reused for several times without serious efficiency loss.

  6. [The research on the surfacial modification of organic high-performance Kevlar fiber].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-ying; Fu, Ming-lian; Cai, Wei-long; Wang, Can-yao; Wang, Liang-en

    2004-04-01

    In the paper the authors tried to use chemical disposal to bring the activity mass onto the surface of Kevlar fiber with the purpose of surface graft modification. In the paper the authors used the FTIR spectra to discuss the graft of toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate onto Kevlar fiber. The authors studied and analysed the effect of hydrolytic time on the content of -O-H group of the production, and the effect of hydrolyzation and hexyl-lactam steadily disposing on the graft reaction. The result showed that the content of -O-H group increased after hydrolyzation, it's helpful for the graft reaction, and hexyl-lactam steadily disposing made the graf product more stable. Through the research the authors came to the conclusion that by bringing some activity masses onto the fiber surface the authors can improve the interface of fiber/resin effectively.

  7. Acoustic behavior of a fibrous bulk material. [Kevlar 29 sound absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical model is presented describing the acoustic behavior of Kevlar 29, a bulk absorbing material. The model is based on an approximate solution to the one-dimensional equations representing conservation of fluctuating mass, momentum and energy. By treating the material as a momentum sink, theoretical expressions of the material complex propagation constants and characteristic impedance were derived in terms of a single constant. Evaluating the constant at a single frequency for a particular specimen, excellent agreement between prediction and measurement was achieved for a large range of sound frequencies and material porosities and thicknesses. Results show that Kevlar 29 absorbs sound efficiently even at low frequencies. This is explained in terms of a frequency dependent material phase speed.

  8. Fracture toughness of Kevlar 29/poly(methyl methacrylate) composite materials for surgical implantations.

    PubMed

    Pourdeyhimi, B; Robinson, H H; Schwartz, P; Wagner, H D

    1986-01-01

    A study of the fracture behaviour of Kevlar 29 reinforced dental cement is undertaken using both linear elastic and nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Results from both approaches--of which the nonlinear elastic is believed to be more appropriate--indicate that a reinforcing effect is obtained for the fracture toughness even at very low fibre content. The flexural strength and modulus are apparently not improved, however, by the incorporation of Kevlar 29 fibres in the PMMA cement, probably because of the presence of voids, the poor fibre/matrix interfacial bonding and unsatisfying cement mixing practice. When compared to other PMMA composite cements, the present system appears to be probably more effective than carbon/PMMA, for example, in terms of fracture toughness. More experimental and analytical work is needed so as to optimize the mechanical properties with respect to structural parameters and cement preparation technique.

  9. Pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials on laser irradiating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-ping; Wei, Cheng-hua; Zhou, Meng-lian; Ma, Zhi-liang; Song, Ming-ying; Wu, Li-xiong

    2017-05-01

    The pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials are valuable to study in a case of high temperature rising rate for its widely application. Distinguishing from the Thermal Gravimetric Analysis method, an apparatus is built to research the pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials irradiated by laser in order to offer a high temperature rising rate of the sample. By deploying the apparatus, a near real-time gas pressure response can be obtained. The sample mass is weighted before laser irradiating and after an experiment finished. Then, the gas products molecular weight and the sample mass loss evolution are derived. It is found that the pressure and mass of the gas products increase with the laser power if it is less than 240W, while the molecular weight varies inversely. The variation tendency is confusing while the laser power is bigger than 240W. It needs more deeper investigations to bring it to light.

  10. [Imaging of alloplastic ligament implant. An in vivo and in vitro study exemplified by Kevlar].

    PubMed

    Wening, J V; Katzer, A; Nicolas, V; Hahn, M; Jungbluth, K H; Kratzer A [corrected to Katzer, A

    1994-04-01

    Neither native X-ray nor CT or NMR allow to evaluate intraarticular implantation results of Kevlar -49 directly. In animal trials, the course of an artificial ligament may only be presumed from connective tissue ingrowth. Although soft tissue structure appears much better in NMR than in CT, direct proof of ligament continuity is still impossible. As soon as the connective tissue becomes continuous, it appears clearly and allows indirect evaluation of the prosthesis, as integrity can be judged by its shape like in natural cruciate ligament. Anatomic preparations show that connective tissue fills up the small space between the two cords of a Kevlar -49 two bundle prosthesis eight weeks after implantation, so that imaging systems show only one intraarticular bundle.

  11. Application of Diffuse Reflectance FT-IR Spectroscopy for the Surface Study of Kevlar Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzi, E. G.; Ishida, H.; Koenig, J. L.

    1985-12-01

    The surfaces of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, being used in high-performance composite materials, have been characterized by diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Enhancement of the surface selectivity of the technique has been achieved using KBr overlayers. The water absorbed by both the skin and the core of the fibers has been characterized by using this technique and the accessibility of the fiber functional groups has been evaluated.

  12. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  13. Quantifying Damage at Multiple Loading Rates to Kevlar KM2 Fibers Due to Weaving and Finishing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    ARL-TR-6465 June 2013 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES...ARL-TR-6465 June 2013 Quantifying Damage at Multiple Loading Rates to Kevlar KM2 Fibers Due to Weaving and Finishing Brett D. Sanborn...OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) June 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES

  14. Fabrication of T142 Tank Track Pads for Evaluation of a Rubber-Kevlar Composite Compound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    fully developed with highly saturated rubbers such as butyl or ROYALENE® ( EPDM ) A-3 ...PERIOD COVERED Fabrication of T142 Tank Track Pads for Evaluation of a Rubber -Kevlar Composite FINAL Compound S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR...developed for evaluation in T142 tank track pads. Bonding of the rubber to the fiber was achieved by addition of bonding agents to the compound. 175, T142

  15. Multiscale modeling of interwoven Kevlar fibers based on random walk to predict yarn structural response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, Stephen

    Kevlar is the most common high-end plastic filament yarn used in body armor, tire reinforcement, and wear resistant applications. Kevlar is a trade name for an aramid fiber. These are fibers in which the chain molecules are highly oriented along the fiber axis, so the strength of the chemical bond can be exploited. The bulk material is extruded into filaments that are bound together into yarn, which may be chorded with other materials as in car tires, woven into a fabric, or layered in an epoxy to make composite panels. The high tensile strength to low weight ratio makes this material ideal for designs that decrease weight and inertia, such as automobile tires, body panels, and body armor. For designs that use Kevlar, increasing the strength, or tenacity, to weight ratio would improve performance or reduce cost of all products that are based on this material. This thesis computationally and experimentally investigates the tenacity and stiffness of Kevlar yarns with varying twist ratios. The test boundary conditions were replicated with a geometrically accurate finite element model, resulting in a customized code that can reproduce tortuous filaments in a yarn was developed. The solid model geometry capturing filament tortuosity was implemented through a random walk method of axial geometry creation. A finite element analysis successfully recreated the yarn strength and stiffness dependency observed during the tests. The physics applied in the finite element model was reproduced in an analytical equation that was able to predict the failure strength and strain dependency of twist ratio. The analytical solution can be employed to optimize yarn design for high strength applications.

  16. Studying Some of Electrical and Mechanical Properties for Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafeeq, Sewench N.; Hussein, Samah M.

    2011-12-01

    As ordinary known the ability of synthesizing electrical conducting polymer composites is possible but with poor mechanical properties, for the solution of this problem, we carried out this study in order to obtain that both properties. Three methods were applied for preparing the conductive polyaniline (PANI) composites using Kevlar fiber fabric as substrate for the deposition of the PANI at one time and the prepared composite (EP/Kevlar fiber) at others. The chemical oxidative method was adopted for polymerization of the aniline and simultaneously protonated of PANI with a hydrochloric acid at concentration (1M). Two kinds of oxidation agents (FeCl3.6H2O) and ((NH4)2S2O8) were used. The electrical measurements indicate the effect of each preparation method, kind of oxidant agent and the kind of mat erial which PANI deposited on the electrical results. The conductivity results showed that the prepared composites lie within semiconductors region. Temperature—dependence of electric conductivity results showed semiconductors and conductors behavior of this material within the applied temperature ranges. The mechan ical property (tensile strength) was studied. X-ray diffraction study showed the crystalline structure for EP/Kevlar fiber/PANI composites prepared by the three methods. These results gave optimism to the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with excellent mechanical properties..

  17. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system.

  18. Smart wearable Kevlar-based safeguarding electronic textile with excellent sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Shouhu; Liu, Mei; Bai, Linfeng; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Sang, Min; Jiang, Wanquan; Gong, Xinglong

    2017-03-29

    A novel S-ST/MWCNT/Kevlar-based wearable electronic textile (WET) with enhanced safeguarding performance and force sensing ability was fabricated. Stab resistance performance tests under quasi-static and dynamic conditions show that the maximum resistance force and penetration impact energy for the WET are 18 N and 11.76 J, which represent a 90% and 50% increment with respect to the neat Kevlar, respectively. Dynamic impact resistance tests show that the WET absorbs all the impact energy. The maximum resistance force of the WET is 1052 N, which represents an improvement of about 190% with respect to neat Kevlar. With the incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), the WET can achieve a stable electrical conductivity of ∼10 -2 S m -1 , and the conductivity is highly sensitive to external mechanic forces. Notably, the sensing fabric also exhibits an outstanding ability to detect and analyze external forces. In addition, it can be fixed at any position of the human body and exhibits an ideal monitoring performance. Because of its flexibility, high sensitivity to various types of deformations and excellent safeguarding performance, the WET has a strong potential for wearable monitoring devices that simultaneously provide body protection and monitor the movements of the human body under various conditions.

  19. The Layer of Kevlar Angle-interlock Woven Fabric Effect on the Tensile Properties of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wan-Chen; Guo, Xu-Yi; Yan, Tao; Zhang, Shang-Yong

    2017-09-01

    This article is based on the structure of three-dimensional angle-interlock longitudinal.The 3-layer, 5-layer, 7-layer and 9-layer of angle-interlock 3D fabrics are woven on sample weaving machine respectively with the 1500D Kevlar fiber twist filament produced by United States DuPont. At the same time, Kevlar plain weave fabric is woven, and three, five, seven and nine layers’ fabric are to be compared. In the process of VARTM composite technology, epoxy resin is matrix material, acetone is diluent, triethylene tetramine is curing agent and the five different fabrics are the reinforced materials respectively. Finally, eight different three-dimensional woven fabric composites were prepared. In this paper, the tensile properties of eight kinds of three-dimensional woven fabric composites were tested respectively.Finally, it is concluded that the five-layer angle-interlock woven fabric prepared by Kevlar fiber shows the best tensile property.

  20. Kevlar/PMR-15 polyimide matrix composite for a complex shaped DC-9 drag reduction fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, R. T.; Mccarthy, R. F.; Willer, M. S.; Hrach, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program was established by NASA to improve the fuel efficiency of commercial transport aircraft and thereby to reduce the amount of fuel consumed by the air transportation industry. One of the final items developed by the program is an improved fairing which is the aft closure for the thrust reverser actuators on the JT8D nacelles on DC-9 aircraft. The reduced-drag fairing uses, in the interest of weight savings, an advanced composite construction. The composite material contains Kevlar 49 fibers in a PMR-15 matrix. Attention is given to the aerodynamic configuration, the material system, and aspects of fabrication development.

  1. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.; Antonucci, V.

    2014-05-01

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  2. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Antonucci, V.

    2014-05-15

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  3. Impact behavior of f-silica and amine terminated polybutadiene co-acrylonitrile rubber modified novolac epoxy/Kevlar nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavita, Pal, Vijayeta; Tiwari, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, nano-fumed silica treated with 3-Glycidoxypropyl trimethoxy silane (f-silica) was used as a nanoreinforcement in the fabrication of amine terminated polybutadiene co-acrylonitrile rubber (ATBN) modified Kevlar/epoxy based nanocomposites. Nanocomposites with different f-silica loading (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt. %) and having same ATBN (10 wt. %) were made and characterized by Izod impact test for evaluating impact strength values. All the nanocomposites showed better impact strength than neat Kevlar/novolac epoxy based composite.

  4. The Influence of impact on Composite Armour System Kevlar-29/polyester-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhan, A. A.; Abu Talib, A. R.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Zahari, R.

    2012-09-01

    An experimental investigation of high velocity impact responses of composite laminated plates using a helium gas gun has been presented in this paper. The aim of this study was to develop the novel composite structure that meets the specific requirements of ballistic resistance which used for body protections, vehicles and other applications. Thus the high velocity impact tests were performed on composite Kevlar-29 fiber/polyester resin with alumina powder (Al2O3). The impact test was conducted by using a cylindrical steel projectile of 7.62mm diameter at a velocity range of 160-400 m/s. The results (shown in this work) are in terms of varying plate thickness and the amount of energy absorbed by the laminated plates meanwhile we obtained that the 12mm thickness of composite plate suitable for impact loading up to 200m/s impact velocity. Therefore this composite structure (it is used to reduce the amount of Kevlar) considered most economical armoure products. We used the ANSYS AUTODYN 3D- v.12 software for our simulations. The results have been obtained a4.1% maximum errors with experimental work of energy absorption.

  5. Stress transfer in microdroplet tensile test: PVC-coated and uncoated Kevlar-29 single fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenkun, Lei; Quan, Wang; Yilan, Kang; Wei, Qiu; Xuemin, Pan

    2010-11-01

    The single fiber/microdroplet tensile test is applied for evaluating the interfacial mechanics between a fiber and a resin substrate. It is used to investigate the influence of a polymer coating on a Kevlar-29 fiber surface, specifically the stress transfer between the fiber and epoxy resin in a microdroplet. Unlike usual tests, this new test ensures a symmetrical axial stress on the embedded fiber and reduces the stress singularity that appears at the embedded fiber entry. Using a homemade loading device, symmetrical tensile tests are performed on a Kevlar-29 fiber with or without polyvinylchloride (PVC) coating, the surface of which is in contact with two epoxy resin microdroplets during curing. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber are recorded by micro-Raman Spectroscopy under different strain levels. Then they are transformed to the distributions of fiber axis stress based on the relationship between stress and Raman shift. The Raman results reveal that the fiber axial stresses increase with the applied loads, and the antisymmetric interfacial shear stresses, obtained by a straightforward balance of shear-to-axial forces argument, lead to the appearance of shear stress concentrations at a distance to the embedded fiber entry. The load is transferred from the outer fiber to the embedded fiber in the epoxy microdroplet. As is observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), the existence of a flexible polymer coating on the fiber surface reduces the stress transfer efficiency.

  6. Ballistic Impact Response of Kevlar 49 and Zylon under Conditions Representing Jet Engine Fan Containment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    A ballistic impact test program was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situation. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  7. Novel nanocomposite Kevlar fabric membranes: Fabrication characterization, and performance in oil/water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimnezhad, Hanieh; Rajabi, Laleh; Salehi, Ehsan; Derakhshan, Ali Ashraf; Azimi, Sara

    2014-02-01

    Nanocomposite membranes with hydrophilic surface were fabricated for separation of oil (n-hexane) from oil/water emulsion. Three different nanomaterials namely, para-aminobenzoate alumoxane (PAB-A), boehmite-epoxide and polycitrate alumoxane (PC-A) were coated on the Kevlar fabric (support), according to a three-step dip-coating protocol. FTIR, SEM, TEM, UV/vis spectrophotometer, and wettability analyses were used to characterize the composite membranes. The three coating layers interacted chemically with one another and also physically with the Kevlar fabric. Water uptake measurements indicated that the membrane is a hydrophilic one. SEM and TEM analyses showed the smooth surface of the composite membrane and three-dimensional dendrimeric hyper-branched structure of (PC-A), respectively. A dead-end filtration setup was applied to test the membranes performance under natural gravity force. Effect of pH as an important variable affecting separation process was investigated with the neutral pH provided the optimum condition for the separation. Oil rejection and permeate fluxes were also monitored. The optimum flux and rejection obtained, were 7392 (Lm-2 h-1) and 89.06% at pH 7, respectively. Fouling occurred as a gel layer on the membrane surface. The deposited oil droplets on the surface of the membrane were successfully washed away with satisfactory permeate flux recovery (FRR = 88.88% at neutral pH), using hot distilled water and acidic solution as eluents.

  8. Comparison of impact strength of acrylic resin reinforced with kevlar and polyethylene fibres.

    PubMed

    Kamath, G; Bhargava, K

    2002-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the impact strengths of heat-activated acrylic resins reinforced with Kevlar fibres, polyethylene fibres and unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin. Each of three groups had 25 specimens. Brass rods of uniform length of 40 mm and diameter of 8 mm were used to prepare the moulds. A combination of long fibres (40 mm length) and short fibres (6 mm length) were used. The total amount of fibres incorporated was limited to 2% by weight of the resin matrix. Short and long fibres of equal weight were incorporated. The short fibres were mixed with polymer and monomer and packed into the mould, while, the long axis of the specimen, perpendicular to the applied force. The specimens were then processed. Impact strength testing was done on Hounsfield's impact testing machine. Kevlar fibre reinforced heat activated acrylic resin specimens recorded higher mean impact strength of 0.8464 Joules, while polyethylene fibres reinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.7596 joules. The unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.3440 Joules.

  9. Measurements on radiation shielding efficacy of Polyethylene and Kevlar in the ISS (Columbus)

    PubMed Central

    Di Fino, L.; Larosa, M.; Zaconte, V.; Casolino, M.; Picozza, P.; Narici, L.

    2014-01-01

    The study and optimization of material effectiveness as radiation shield is a mandatory step toward human space exploration. Passive radiation shielding is one of the most important element in the entire radiation countermeasures package. Crewmembers will never experience direct exposure to space radiation; they will be either inside some shelter (the spacecraft, a ‘base’) or in an EVA (Extra Vehicular Activity) suit. Understanding the radiation shielding features of materials is therefore an important step toward an optimization of shelters and suits construction in the quest for an integrated solution for radiation countermeasures. Materials are usually tested for their radiation shielding effectiveness first with Monte Carlo simulations, then on ground, using particle accelerators and a number of specific ions known to be abundant in space, and finally in space. Highly hydrogenated materials perform best as radiation shields. Polyethylene is right now seen as the material that merges a high level of hydrogenation, an easiness of handling and machining as well as an affordable cost, and it is often referred as a sort of ‘standard’ to which compare other materials' effectiveness. Kevlar has recently shown very interesting radiation shielding properties, and it is also known to have important characteristics toward debris shielding, and can be used, for example, in space suits. We have measured in the ISS the effectiveness of polyethylene and kevlar using three detectors of the ALTEA system [ 1– 3] from 8 June 2012 to 13 November 2012, in Express Rack 3 in Columbus. These active detectors are able to provide the radiation quality parameters in any orbital region; being identical, they are also suitable to be used in parallel (one for the unshielded baseline, two measuring radiation with two different amounts of the same material: 5 and 10 g/cm2). A strong similarity of the shielding behavior between polyethylene and kevlar is documented. We measured

  10. Flight service evaluation of kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft: Flight service report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 7 years service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a slid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 422 K service aft engine fairing. The three L-1011s include one each in service with Eastern, Air Canada, and TWA. The fairings have accumulated a total of 52,500 hours, with one ship set having 17.700 hours service. The inspections were conducted at the airlines' major maintenance bases with the participation of Lockheed Engineering. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  11. Design and Analysis of Drive Shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, P.; Gobinath, R.; Kumar, L. Ajith; Jenish, D. Xavier

    2017-05-01

    In automobile industry drive shaft is one of the most important components to transmit power form the engine to rear wheel through the differential gear. Generally steel drive shaft is used in automobile industry, nowadays they are more interested to replace steel drive shaft with that of composite drive shaft. The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the composite drive shaft using to find out the best replacement for conventional steel drive shaft. The uses of advanced composite materials such as Kevlar, Graphite, Carbon and Glass with proper resins ware resulted in remarkable achievements in automobile industry because of its greater specific strength and specific modulus, improved fatigue and corrosion resistances and reduction in energy requirements due to reduction in weight as compared to steel shaft. This paper is to presents, the modeling and analysis of drive shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a composite material and to find best replacement for conventional steel drive shafts with an Kevlar/epoxy or Glass/Epoxy resin composite drive shaft. Modeling is done using CATIA software and Analysis is carried out by using ANSYS 10.0 software for easy understanding. The composite drive shaft reduces the weight by 81.67 % for Kevlar/Epoxy and 72.66% for Glass/Epoxy when compared with conventional steel drive shaft.

  12. Biomimetic Hybridization of Kevlar into Silk Fibroin: Nanofibrous Strategy for Improved Mechanic Properties of Flexible Composites and Filtration Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lili; Han, Xiangsheng; Zong, Lu; Li, Mingjie; You, Jun; Wu, Xiaochen; Li, Chaoxu

    2017-08-22

    Silk, one of the strongest natural biopolymers, was hybridized with Kevlar, one of the strongest synthetic polymers, through a biomimetic nanofibrous strategy. Regenerated silk materials have outstanding properties in transparency, biocompatibility, biodegradability and sustainability, and promising applications as diverse as in pharmaceutics, electronics, photonic devices and membranes. To compete with super mechanic properties of their natural counterpart, regenerated silk materials have been hybridized with inorganic fillers such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, but frequently lose essential mechanic flexibility. Inspired by the nanofibrous strategy of natural biomaterials (e.g., silk fibers, hemp and byssal threads of mussels) for fantastic mechanic properties, Kevlar was integrated in regenerated silk materials by combining nanometric fibrillation with proper hydrothermal treatments. The resultant hybrid films showed an ultimate stress and Young's modulus two times as high as those of pure regenerated SF films. This is not only because of the reinforcing effect of Kevlar nanofibrils, but also because of the increasing content of silk β-sheets. When introducing Kevlar nanofibrils into the membranes of silk nanofibrils assembled by regenerated silk fibroin, the improved mechanic properties further enabled potential applications as pressure-driven nanofiltration membranes and flexible substrates of electronic devices.

  13. Kevlar® as a Potential Accident Radiation Dosimeter for First Responders, Law Enforcement and Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Benevides, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    Today the armed forces and law enforcement personnel wear body armor, helmets, and flak jackets composed substantially of Kevlar® fiber to prevent bodily injury or death resulting from physical, ballistic, stab, and slash attacks. Therefore, there is a high probability that during a radiation accident or its aftermath, the Kevlar®-composed body armor will be irradiated. Preliminary study with samples of Kevlar® foundation fabric obtained from body armor used by the U.S. Marine Corps has shown that all samples evaluated demonstrated an EPR signal, and this signal increased with radiation dose. Based on these results, the authors predict that, with individual calibration, exposure at dose above 1 Gy can be reliably detected in Kevlar® samples obtained from body armor. As a result of these measurements, a post-event reconstruction of exposure dose can be obtained by taking various samples throughout the armor body and helmet worn by the same irradiated individual. The doses can be used to create a whole-body dose map that would be of vital importance in a case of a partial body or heterogeneous exposure.

  14. Design, fabrication and structural optimization of tubular carbon/Kevlar®/PMMA/graphene nanoplate composite for bone fixation prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, F; Ajeli, S; Semnani, D; Jahanshahi, M; Emadi, R

    2018-05-02

    The present work investigates the mechanical properties of tubular carbon/Kevlar ® composite coated with poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene nanoplates as used in the internal fixation of bones. Carbon fibers are good candidates for developing high-strength biomaterials and due to better stress transfer and electrical properties, they can enhance tissue formation. In order to improve carbon brittleness, ductile Kevlar ® was added to the composite. The tubular carbon/Kevlar ® composites have been prepared with tailorable braiding technology by changing the fiber pattern and angle in the composite structure and the number of composite layers. Fuzzy analyses are used for optimizing the tailorable parameters of 80 prepared samples and then mechanical properties of selected samples are discussed from the viewpoint of mechanical properties required for a bone fixation device. Experimental results showed that with optimizing braiding parameters the desired composite structure with mechanical properties close to bone properties could be produced. Results showed that carbon/Kevlar ® braid's physical properties, fiber composite distribution and diameter uniformity resulted in matrix uniformity, which enhanced strength and modulus due to better ability for distributing stress on the composite. Finally, as graphene nanoplates demonstrated their potential properties to improve wound healing intended for bone replacement, so reinforcing the PMMA matrix with graphene nanoplates enhanced the composite quality, for use as an implant.

  15. Clinical, biomechanical and morphological assessment of anterior cruciate ligament Kevlar®-based artificial prosthesis in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    de la Garza-Castro, Santiago; González-Rivera, Carlos E; Vílchez-Cavazos, Félix; Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Barrera-Flores, Francisco J; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Soto-Dominguez, Adolfo; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos; Mendoza-Lemus, Oscar F

    2017-07-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of a Kevlar®-based prosthetic ligament as a synthetic graft of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in an experimental animal model in rabbits. A total of 27 knees of rabbits randomly divided into 3 groups (control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with a Kevlar® prosthesis) were analyzed using clinical, biomechanical and morphological tests at 6, 12 and 18 weeks postprocedure. The mean displacement in mechanical testing was 0.73 ± 0.06 mm, 1.58 ± 0.19 mm and 0.94 ± 0.20 mm for the control, ACL excision and ACL replacement with synthetic prosthesis groups, respectively. The results showed an improvement in the stability of the knee with the use of the Kevlar® synthetic prosthesis in the biomechanical testing (p<0.05) compared with rabbits that underwent ACL excision, in addition to displacements that were larger but comparable to that in the control group (p>0.05), between the replacement group and the control group. The histological study revealed a good morphological adaptation of the synthetic material to the knee. This study proposes a new animal model for the placement and evaluation of Kevlar®-based synthetic ACL implants. The studied prosthesis showed promising behavior in the clinical and biomechanical tests and in the histological analysis. This study lays the foundation for further basic and clinical studies of artificial ACL prostheses using this material.

  16. Teaching learning algorithm based optimization of kerf deviations in pulsed Nd:YAG laser cutting of Kevlar-29 composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Girish Dutt; Pandey, Arun Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Kevlar is the most popular aramid fiber and most commonly used in different technologically advanced industries for various applications. But the precise cutting of Kevlar composite laminates is a difficult task. The conventional cutting methods face various defects such as delamination, burr formation, fiber pullout with poor surface quality and their mechanical performance is greatly affected by these defects. The laser beam machining may be an alternative of the conventional cutting processes due to its non-contact nature, requirement of low specific energy with higher production rate. But this process also faces some problems that may be minimized by operating the machine at optimum parameters levels. This research paper examines the effective utilization of the Nd:YAG laser cutting system on difficult-to-cut Kevlar-29 composite laminates. The objective of the proposed work is to find the optimum process parameters settings for getting the minimum kerf deviations at both sides. The experiments have been conducted on Kevlar-29 composite laminates having thickness 1.25 mm by using Box-Benkhen design with two center points. The experimental data have been used for the optimization by using the proposed methodology. For the optimization, Teaching learning Algorithm based approach has been employed to obtain the minimum kerf deviation at bottom and top sides. A self coded Matlab program has been developed by using the proposed methodology and this program has been used for the optimization. Finally, the confirmation tests have been performed to compare the experimental and optimum results obtained by the proposed methodology. The comparison results show that the machining performance in the laser beam cutting process has been remarkably improved through proposed approach. Finally, the influence of different laser cutting parameters such as lamp current, pulse frequency, pulse width, compressed air pressure and cutting speed on top kerf deviation and bottom kerf

  17. An investigation of the compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rosen, B. W.; Rice, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the effect of a wide range of variables including matrix properties, interface properties, fiber prestressing, secondary reinforcement, and others on the ultimate compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites. Scanning electron microscopy is used to assess the resulting failure surfaces. In addition, a theoretical study is conducted to determine the influence of fiber anisotropy and lack of perfect bond between fiber and matrix on the shear mode microbuckling. The experimental evaluation of the effect of various constituent and process characteristics on the behavior of these unidirectional composites in compression did not reveal any substantial increase in strength. However, theoretical evaluations indicate that the high degree of fiber anisotropy results in a significant drop in the predicted stress level for internal instability. Scanning electron microscope data analysis suggests that internal fiber failure and smooth surface debonding could be responsible for the measured low compressive strengths.

  18. Predicting the mechanical behaviour of Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy filament-wound tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazeneuve, C.; Joguet, P.; Maile, J. C.; Oytana, C.

    1992-11-01

    The axial, hoop and shear moduli and failure conditions of carbon/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy filament-wound tubes have been determined through respective applications of internal pressure, tension and torsion. The introduction in the laminated plate theory of a gradual reduction in individual moduli makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the theory and enables accurate predictions to be made of the linear and non-linear stress/strain curves of 90 deg +/- 0/90 deg tubes. The existence of a dominant layer in the failure of the multilayered tubes has been shown experimentally. When associated with a failure criterion applied to the dominant layer, the new model permits the prediction of tube failure. Agreement between calculated and experimental data is better than 5 percent.

  19. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels were inspected and found to be performing satisfactorily after two years flight service on an Eastern and an Air Canada L-1011. Six panels are on each aircraft including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 300 F service aft engine fairings. Some of the panels were removed from the aircraft to permit inspection of inner surfaces and fastener hole conditions. Minor defects such as surface cracks due to impact damage, small delaminated areas, elongation and fraying of fastener holes, were noted. None of these defects were considered serious enough to warrant corrective action in the opinion of airline personnel. The defects are typical for the most part of defects noted on similar fiberglass parts.

  20. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The

  1. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  2. Ballistic performance of a Kevlar-29 woven fibre composite under varied temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soykasap, O.; Colakoglu, M.

    2010-05-01

    Armours are usually manufactured from polymer matrix composites and used for both military and non-military purposes in different seasons, climates, and regions. The mechanical properties of the composites depend on temperature, which also affects their ballistic characteristics. The armour is used to absorb the kinetic energy of a projectile without any major injury to a person. Therefore, besides a high strength and lightness, a high damping capacity is required to absorb the impact energy transferred by the projectile. The ballistic properties of a Kevlar 29/polyvinyl butyral composite are investigated under varied temperatures in this study. The elastic modulus of the composite is determined from the natural frequency of composite specimens at different temperatures by using a damping monitoring method. Then, the backside deformation of composite plates is analysed experimentally and numerically employing the finite-element program Abaqus. The experimental and numeric results obtained are in good agreement.

  3. Hybrid Composite Laminates Reinforced with Kevlar/Carbon/Glass Woven Fabrics for Ballistic Impact Testing

    PubMed Central

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Abdul Jalil, Nawal Aswan; Abang Abdul Majid, Dayang Laila

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers. PMID:24955400

  4. Hybrid composite laminates reinforced with Kevlar/carbon/glass woven fabrics for ballistic impact testing.

    PubMed

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Jalil, Nawal Aswan Abdul; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  5. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  6. Tissue biocompatibility of kevlar aramid fibers and polymethylmethacrylate, composites in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J D; Mullarky, R H; Ryan, D E

    1987-01-01

    Two groups of female NZW rabbits were implanted in the paravertebral muscles with aramid (du Pont Kevlar aramid 49) fibers and aramid-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composites for 14 and 28 days. Rabbits were killed at these times periods, necropsies performed, sites scored for gross tissue response, and tissue specimens containing the implants removed for histopathological evaluation. A mild fibrous tissue reaction was observed around all implants containing aramid fiber similar to that observed around the silicone control implant. Some foreign body giant cells were also present adjacent to the fibers. An intense necrotic inflammatory reaction was present around the positive control material (PVC Y-78). The tissue response to implantation of aramid fiber and fiber-PMMA composites indicates that aramid is a biocompatible material.

  7. Multi-response parametric optimization in drilling of bamboo/Kevlar fiber reinforced sandwich composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Thingujam Jackson; Samanta, Sutanu

    2016-09-01

    In the present work an attempt was made towards parametric optimization of drilling bamboo/Kevlar K29 fiber reinforced sandwich composite to minimize the delamination occurred during the drilling process and also to maximize the tensile strength of the drilled composite. The spindle speed and the feed rate of the drilling operation are taken as the input parameters. The influence of these parameters on delamination and tensile strength of the drilled composite studied and analysed using Taguchi GRA and ANOVA technique. The results show that both the response parameters i.e. delamination and tensile strength are more influenced by feed rate than spindle speed. The percentage contribution of feed rate and spindle speed on response parameters are 13.88% and 81.74% respectively.

  8. Experimental determinations of the eigenmodes for composite bars made with carbon and Kevlar-carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miriţoiu, C. M.; Stănescu, M. M.; Burada, C. O.; Bolcu, D.; Roşca, V.

    2015-11-01

    For modal identification, the single-point excitation method has been widely used in modal tests and it consists in applying a force in a given point and recording the vibratory structure response in all interest points, including the excitation point. There will be presented the experimental recordings for the studied bars (with Kevlar-carbon or carbon fibers), the frequency response function in Cartesian and polar coordinates. By using the frequency response functions we determine the eigenparameters for each bar. We present the final panel of the eigenmodes (with the damping factors, eigenfrequencies and critical damping) for each considered bar. Using the eigenfrequency of the first determined eigenmode, the bars stiffness has been determined. The presented bars can be used in practical engineering for: car or bus body parts, planes body parts, bullet-proof vests, reinforcements for sandwich beams, and so on.

  9. Stress transfer of a Kevlar 49 fiber pullout test studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Quan; Qiu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The interfacial stress transfer behavior of a Kevlar 49 aramid fiber-epoxy matrix was studied with fiber pullout tests, the fibers of which were stretched by a homemade microloading device. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber were recorded by micro-Raman spectroscopy, under different strain levels. Then, the fiber axial stress was obtained by the relationship between the stress and Raman shift of the aramid fiber. Experimental results revealed that the fiber axial stress increased significantly with the load. The shear stress concentration occurred at the fiber entry to the epoxy resin. Thus, interfacial friction stages exist in the debonded fiber segment, and the interfacial friction shear stress is constant within one stage. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical model predictions.

  10. Improvement of interfacial adhesion and nondestructive damage evaluation for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers/epoxy composites using micromechanical techniques and surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-15

    Comparison of interfacial properties and microfailure mechanisms of oxygen-plasma treated poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO, Zylon) and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA, Kevlar) fibers/epoxy composites were investigated using a micromechanical technique and nondestructive acoustic emission (AE). The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and work of adhesion, Wa, of PBO or Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites increased with oxygen-plasma treatment, due to induced hydrogen and covalent bondings at their interface. Plasma-treated Kevlar fiber showed the maximum critical surface tension and polar term, whereas the untreated PBO fiber showed the minimum values. The work of adhesion and the polar term were proportional to the IFSS directly for both PBO and Kevlar fibers. The microfibril fracture pattern of two plasma-treated fibers appeared obviously. Unlike in slow cooling, in rapid cooling, case kink band and kicking in PBO fiber appeared, whereas buckling in the Kevlar fiber was observed mainly due to compressive and residual stresses. Based on the propagation of microfibril failure toward the core region, the number of AE events for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers increased significantly compared to the untreated case. The results of nondestructive AE were consistent with microfailure modes.

  11. Development of a Continuum Damage Mechanics Material Model of a Graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) Hybrid Fabric for Simulating the Impact Response of Energy Absorbing Kevlar(Registered Trademark) Hybrid Fabric for Simulating the Impact Response of Energy Absorbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Littell, Justin D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development of input properties for a continuum damage mechanics based material model, Mat 58, within LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) to simulate the response of a graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) hybrid plain weave fabric. A limited set of material characterization tests were performed on the hybrid graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) fabric. Simple finite element models were executed in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) to simulate the material characterization tests and to verify the Mat 58 material model. Once verified, the Mat 58 model was used in finite element models of two composite energy absorbers: a conical-shaped design, designated the "conusoid," fabricated of four layers of hybrid graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) fabric; and, a sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich design, designated the "sinusoid," fabricated of the same hybrid fabric face sheets with a foam core. Dynamic crush tests were performed on components of the two energy absorbers, which were designed to limit average vertical accelerations to 25- to 40-g, to minimize peak crush loads, and to generate relatively long crush stroke values under dynamic loading conditions. Finite element models of the two energy absorbers utilized the Mat 58 model that had been verified through material characterization testing. Excellent predictions of the dynamic crushing response were obtained.

  12. A novel Ag catalyzation process using swelling impregnation method for electroless Ni deposition on Kevlar® fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongwei; Bai, Ruicheng; Shao, Qinsi; Gao, Yufang; Li, Aijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    A novel Ag catalyzation process using swelling impregnation pretreatment method was developed for electroless nickel (EN) deposition on Kevlar fiber. Firstly, the fiber was immersed into an aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution of silver nitrate to impart silver nitrate into the inner part of the fiber near the surface. Subsequently silver nitrate was reduced to metal silver nanoparticles on the fiber surface by treatment with aqueous solution of sodium borohydride. After electroless plating, a dense and homogeneous nickel coating was obtained on the fiber surface. The silver nanoparticles formed at the fiber surface functioned as a catalyst for electroless deposition as well as an anchor for the plated layer. The study also revealed that the incorporation of surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in electroless nickel plating bath can enhance the adhesion strength of EN layer with the fiber surface and minimize the surface roughness of the EN coating. The Ni plated Kevlar fiber possessed excellent corrosion resistance and high tensile strength.

  13. Elevated Temperature Ballistic Impact Testing of PBO and Kevlar Fabrics for Application in Supersonic Jet Engine Fan Containment Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Ballistic impact tests were conducted on fabric made from both Poly(phenylene benzobizoxazole) (PBO) and Kevlar 29 which were selected to be similar in weave pattern, areal density, and fiber denier. The projectiles were 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) long aluminum cylinders with a diameter of 1.27 cm (0.5 in.). The fabric specimens were clamped on four sides in a 30.5-cm- (12-in.-) square frame. Tests on PBO were conducted at room temperature and at 260 C (500 F). A number of PBO specimens were aged in air at 204 and 260 C (400 and 500 F) before impact testing. Kevlar specimens were tested only at room temperature and with no aging. The PBO absorbed significantly more energy than the Kevlar at both room and elevated temperatures. However, after aging at temperatures of 204 C (400 F) and above, the PBO fabric lost almost all of its energy absorbing ability. It was concluded that PBO fabric is not a feasible candidate for fan containment system applications in supersonic jet engines where operating temperatures exceed this level.

  14. [Research on the modification of Kevlar fiber by polypropylene glycol and cis-2-butene-1,4-diol].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-ying; Wang, Can-yao; Fu, Ming-lian; Cai, Wei-long; Wang, Liang-en

    2005-03-01

    The mechanism of the modification of Kevlar fiber by polypropylene glycol(PPG) and cis-2-butene-1, 4-diol was studied in the paper, the authors learned the esterification of toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate (TDI) onto Kevlar fiber by infrared spectrum. In the mean time, the infrared spectrograms of the productions which steadily disposed by PPG and butendiol were analysed respectively, the result showed that the intensity of the bands was reinforced at about 1700-1720 cm(-1) after the samples were steadily disposed, that is to say, the group of --NCO has been stabilized into --NHCO group, the effect of steady disposal was obvious; but the disposal effect of butendiol was apparently better than PPG's at the same condition. Finally, the authors compared the influence of different mol rates between TDI and butendiol on the productions. Based onthe consequence, excessive butendiol would prevent the Kevlar fiber from farther reaction, therefore, the mol rate between TDI and butendiol should approach 1:1.

  15. Pulmonary cellular effects in rats following aerosol exposures to ultrafine Kevlar aramid fibrils: evidence for biodegradability of inhaled fibrils.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Kellar, K A; Hartsky, M A

    1992-10-01

    Previous chronic inhalation studies have shown that high concentrations of Kevlar fibrils produced fibrosis and cystic keratinizing tumors in rats following 2-year inhalation exposures. The current studies were undertaken to evaluate mechanisms and to assess the toxicity of inhaled Kevlar fibrils relative to other reference materials. Rats were exposed to ultrafine Kevlar fibers (fibrils) for 3 or 5 days at concentrations ranging from 600-1300 fibers/cc (gravimetric concentrations ranging from 2-13 mg/m3). A complete characterization of the fiber aerosol and dose was carried out. These measurements included gravimetric concentrations, mass median aerodynamic diameter, fiber number, and count median lengths and diameters of the aerosol. Following exposures, cells and fluids from groups of sham- and fiber-exposed animals were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein, and N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) values were measured in BAL fluids at several time points postexposure. Alveolar macrophages were cultured and studied for morphology, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis by scanning electron microscopy. The lungs of additional exposed animals were processed for deposition, cell labeling, retained dose, and lung clearance studies, as well as fiber dimensions (from digested lung tissue), histopathology, and transmission electron microscopy. Five-day exposures to Kevlar fibrils elicited a transient granulocytic inflammatory response with concomitant increases in BAL fluid levels of alkaline phosphatase, NAG, LDH, and protein. Unlike the data from silica and asbestos exposures where inflammation persisted, biochemical parameters returned to control levels at time intervals between 1 week and 1 month postexposure. Macrophage function in Kevlar-exposed alveolar macrophages was not significantly different from sham controls at any time period. Cell labeling studies were carried out immediately after exposure, as well as 1

  16. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Rahul S.; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  17. Application of pattern recognition techniques to acousto-ultrasonic testing of Kevlar composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.

    An acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of panels fabricated from woven Kevlar and PVB/phenolic resin is being conducted. The panels were fabricated with various simulated defects. They were examined by pulsing with one acoustic emission sensor, and detecting the signal with another sensor, on the same side of the panel at a fixed distance. The acoustic emission signals were filtered through high (400-600 KHz), low (100-300 KHz) and wide (100-1200 KHz) bandpass filters. Acoustic emission signal parameters, including amplitude, counts, rise time, duration, 'energy', rms, and counts to peak, were recorded. These were statistically analyzed to determine which of the AE parameters best characterize the simulated defects. The wideband filtered acoustic emission signal was also digitized and recorded for further processing. Seventy-one features of the signals in both the time and frequency domains were calculated and compared to determine which subset of these features uniquely characterize the defects in the panels. The objective of the program is to develop a database of AE signal parameters and features to be used in pattern recognition as an inspection tool for material fabricated from these materials.

  18. In-Situ NDE Characterization of Kevlar and Carbon Composite Micromechanics for Improved COPV Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a subtask of a multi-center project to advance the state-of-the-art by developing NDE techniques that are capable of evaluating stress rupture (SR) degradation in Kevlar/epoxy (K/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and damage progression in carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPVs. In this subtask, acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of K/Ep and C/Ep composite tow materials-of-construction used in COPV fabrication were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of composite tow was gained by monitoring AE event rate, energy, source location, and frequency. Source location based on arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to background and grip noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation.

  19. Raman measurements of Kevlar-29 fiber pull-out test at different strain levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan; Lei, Zhenkun; Kang, Yilan; Qiu, Wei

    2008-11-01

    This paper adopted Kevlar-29 fiber monofilament embedding technology to prepare fiber/ epoxy resin tensile specimen. The specimen was pulled on a homemade and portable mini-loading device. At the same time micro-Raman spectroscopy is introduced to detect the distributions of stress on the embedded fiber at different strain levels. The characteristic peak shift of the 1610 cm-1 in Raman band has a linear relationship with the strain or stress. The experimental results show that the fiber axial stress decreases gradually from the embedded fiber-start to the embedded fiber-end at the same strain level. At different strain levels, the fiber axial stress increases along with the applied load. It reveals that there is a larger fiber axial stress distribution under a larger strain level. And the stress transfer is realized gradually from the embedded fiber-start to the fiber-end. Stress concentration exists in the embedded fiber-end, which is a dangerous region for interfacial debonding easily.

  20. Evaluation of Thin Kevlar-Epoxy Fabric Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of 4-ply Kevlar-49-epoxy panels loaded by in-plane shear are presented. Approximately one-half of the panels are thin-core sandwich panels and the other panels are solid-laminate panels. Selected panels were impacted with an aluminum sphere at a velocity of either 150 or 220 ft/sec. The strength of panels impacted at 150 ft/sec was not reduced when compared to the strength of the undamaged panels, but the strength of panels impacted at 220 ft/sec was reduced by 27 to 40 percent. Results are presented for panels that were cyclically loaded from a load less than the buckling load to a load in the postbuckling load range. The thin-core sandwich panels had a lower fatigue life than the solid panels. The residual strength of the solid and sandwich panels cycled more than one million cycles exceeded the baseline undamaged panel strengths. The effect of hysteresis in the response of the sandwich panels is not significant. Results of a nonlinear finite element analysis conducted for each panel design are presented.

  1. Time-Dependent Behavior of High-Strength Kevlar and Vectran Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2014-01-01

    High-strength Kevlar and Vectran webbings are currently being used by both NASA and industry as the primary load-bearing structure in inflatable space habitation modules. The time-dependent behavior of high-strength webbing architectures is a vital area of research that is providing critical material data to guide a more robust design process for this class of structures. This paper details the results of a series of time-dependent tests on 1-inch wide webbing including an initial set of comparative tests between specimens that underwent realtime and accelerated creep at 65 and 70% of their ultimate tensile strength. Variability in the ultimate tensile strength of the webbings is investigated and compared with variability in the creep life response. Additional testing studied the effects of load and displacement rate, specimen length and the time-dependent effects of preconditioning the webbings. The creep test facilities, instrumentation and test procedures are also detailed. The accelerated creep tests display consistently longer times to failure than their real-time counterparts; however, several factors were identified that may contribute to the observed disparity. Test setup and instrumentation, grip type, loading scheme, thermal environment and accelerated test postprocessing along with material variability are among these factors. Their effects are discussed and future work is detailed for the exploration and elimination of some of these factors in order to achieve a higher fidelity comparison.

  2. Vacuum infusion method for woven carbon/Kevlar reinforced hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, N.; Majid, D. L.; Uda, N.; Zahari, R.; Yidris, N.

    2017-12-01

    The vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VaRTM) or Vacuum Infusion (VI) is one of the fabrication methods used for composite materials. Compared to other methods, this process costs lower than using prepregs because it does not need to use the autoclave to cure. Moreover, composites fabricated using this VI method exhibit superior mechanical properties than those made through hand layup process. In this study, the VI method is used in fabricating woven carbon/Kevlar fibre cloth with epoxy matrix. This paper reports the detailed methods on fabricating the hybrid composite using VI process and several precautions that need to be taken to avoid any damage to the properties of the composite material. The result highlights that the successfully fabricated composite has approximately 60% of fibres weight fraction. Since the composites produced by the VI process have a higher fibre percentage, this process should be considered for composites used in applications that are susceptible to the conditions where the fibres need to be the dominant element such as in tension loading.

  3. Kevlar based nanofibrous particles as robust, effective and recyclable absorbents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chuanxiong; Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Cheng, Chong; Ma, Lang; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-11-15

    Developing robust and recyclable absorbents for water purification is of great demand to control water pollution and to provide sustainable water resources. Herein, for the first time, we reported the fabrication of Kevlar nanofiber (KNF) based composite particles for water purification. Both the KNF and KNF-carbon nanotube composite particles can be produced in large-scale by automatic injection of casting solution into ethanol. The resulted nanofibrous particles showed high adsorption capacities towards various pollutants, including metal ions, phenylic compounds and various dyes. Meanwhile, the adsorption process towards dyes was found to fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, while the adsorption speed was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Furthermore, the adsorption capacities of the nanofibrous particles could be easily recovered by washing with ethanol. In general, the KNF based particles integrate the advantages of easy production, robust and effective adsorption performances, as well as good recyclability, which can be used as robust absorbents to remove toxic molecules and forward the application of absorbents in water purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lung response to ultrafine Kevlar aramid synthetic fibrils following 2-year inhalation exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, K P; Kelly, D P; O'Neal, F O; Stadler, J C; Kennedy, G L

    1988-07-01

    Four groups of 100 male and 100 female rats were exposed to ultrafine Kevlar fibrils at concentrations of 0, 2.5, 25, and 100 fibrils/cc for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 years. One group was exposed to 400 fibrils/cc for 1 year and allowed to recover for 1 year. At 2.5 fibrils/cc, the lungs had normal alveolar architecture with a few dust-laden macrophages (dust cell response) in the alveolar airspaces. At 25 fibrils/cc, the lungs showed a dust cell response, slight Type II pneumocyte hyperplasia, alveolar bronchiolarization, and a negligible amount of collagenized fibrosis in the alveolar duct region. At 100 fibrils/cc, the same pulmonary responses were seen as at 25 fibrils/cc. In addition, cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (CKSCC) was found in 4 female rats, but not in male rats. Female rats had more prominent foamy alveolar macrophages, cholesterol granulomas, and alveolar bronchiolarization. These pulmonary lesions were related to the development of CKSCC. The lung tumors were derived from metaplastic squamous cells in areas of alveolar bronchiolarization. At 400 fibrils/cc following 1 year of recovery, the lung dust content, average fiber length, and the pulmonary lesions were markedly reduced, but slight centriacinar emphysema and minimal collagenized fibrosis were found in the alveolar duct region. One male and 6 female rats developed CKSCC. The lung tumors were a unique type of experimentally induced tumors in the rats and have not been seen as spontaneous tumors in man or animals. Therefore, the relevance of this type of lung tumor to the human situation is minimal.

  5. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  6. Tests of shielding effectiveness of Kevlar and Nextel onboard the International Space Station and the Foton-M3 capsule.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Bengin, V; Casolino, M; Roca, V; Zanini, A; Durante, M

    2010-08-01

    Radiation assessment and protection in space is the first step in planning future missions to the Moon and Mars, where mission and number of space travelers will increase and the protection of the geomagnetic shielding against the cosmic radiation will be absent. In this framework, the shielding effectiveness of two flexible materials, Kevlar and Nextel, were tested, which are largely used in the construction of spacecrafts. Accelerator-based tests clearly demonstrated that Kevlar is an excellent shield for heavy ions, close to polyethylene, whereas Nextel shows poor shielding characteristics. Measurements on flight performed onboard of the International Space Station and of the Foton-M3 capsule have been carried out with special attention to the neutron component; shielded and unshielded detectors (thermoluminescence dosemeters, bubble detectors) were exposed to a real radiation environment to test the shielding properties of the materials under study. The results indicate no significant effects of shielding, suggesting that thin shields in low-Earth Orbit have little effect on absorbed dose.

  7. Effect of Mesoscale and Multiscale Modeling on the Performance of Kevlar Woven Fabric Subjected to Ballistic Impact: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Huang, Zhengxiang; Zu, Xudong; Gu, Xiaohui; Xiao, Qiangqiang

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an optimal finite element model of Kevlar woven fabric that is more computational efficient compared with existing models was developed to simulate ballistic impact onto fabric. Kevlar woven fabric was modeled to yarn level architecture by using the hybrid elements analysis (HEA), which uses solid elements in modeling the yarns at the impact region and uses shell elements in modeling the yarns away from the impact region. Three HEA configurations were constructed, in which the solid element region was set as about one, two, and three times that of the projectile's diameter with impact velocities of 30 m/s (non-perforation case) and 200 m/s (perforation case) to determine the optimal ratio between the solid element region and the shell element region. To further reduce computational time and to maintain the necessary accuracy, three multiscale models were presented also. These multiscale models combine the local region with the yarn level architecture by using the HEA approach and the global region with homogenous level architecture. The effect of the varying ratios of the local and global area on the ballistic performance of fabric was discussed. The deformation and damage mechanisms of fabric were analyzed and compared among numerical models. Simulation results indicate that the multiscale model based on HEA accurately reproduces the baseline results and obviously decreases computational time.

  8. Analysis of Potential for Titanium Liner Buckling after Proof in a Large Kevlar/Epoxy COPV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the potential for liner buckling in a 40-in Kevlar49/epoxy overwrapped spherical pressure vessel (COPV) due to long, local depressions or valleys in the titanium liner, which appeared after proof testing (autofrettage). We begin by presenting the geometric characteristics of approximately 20 mil (0.02 in.) deep depressions measured by laser profilometry in several vessels. While such depths were more typical, depths of more than 40 mils (0.02 in.) were seen near the equator in one particular vessel. Such depressions are largely the result of overlap of the edges of overwrap bands (with rectangular cross-section prepreg tows) from the first or second wrap patterns particularly where they start and end. We then discuss the physical mechanisms of formation of the depressions during the autofrettage process in terms of uneven void compaction in the overwrap around the tow overlap lines and the resulting 10-fold increase in through-thickness stiffness of the overwrap. We consider the effects of liner plastic yielding mechanisms in the liner on residual bending moments and interface pressures with the overwrap both at the peak proof pressure (approx.6500 psi) and when reducing the pressure to 0 psi. During depressurization the Bauschinger phenomenon becomes very important whereby extensive yielding in tension reduces the magnitude of the yield threshold in compression by 30 to 40%, compared to the virgin annealed state of the liner titanium. In the absence of a depression, the liner is elastically stable in compression even at liner overwrap interface pressures nominally 6 times the approx. 1000 psi interface pressure that exists at 0 psi. Using a model based on a plate-on-an-elastic-foundation, we develop an extensive analysis of the possible destabilizing effects of a frozen-in valley. The analysis treats the modifying effects of the residual bending moments and interface pressures remaining after the proof hold as well as the Bauschinger effect on the

  9. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Kevlar Tethers on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper I examined the effects of impacts of polymer tethers on aluminum plates using the SPHC hydrodynamic code. In this paper I apply tether models to a new target - models of Space Shuttle tiles developed during the STS 107 accident investigation. In this three-dimensional simulation, a short tether fragment strikes a single tile supported on an aluminum backing plate. A tile of the LI-900 material is modeled. Penetration and damage to the tile and the backwall are characterized for three normal impact velocities. The tether is modeled as a bundle of eight 1-mm strands, with the bundle having dimensions 2-mm x 4-mm x 20-cm. The bulk material properties used are those of Kevlar(TradeMark) 49, for which a Mie-Gruneisen multiphase equation of state (eos) is used. In addition, the strength model is applied in a linear sense, such that tensile loads along the strand length are supported, but there is no strength in the lateral directions. Tile models include the various layers making up the tile structure. The outermost layer is a relatively dense borosilicate glass, known as RCG, 0.5-mm thick. The RCG layer is present on the top and four sides of the tile. Below this coating is the bulk of the tile, 1.8- in thick, made of LI-900, a product consisting of rigidized fiberous silica with a density of 9 lWft3. Below the main insulating layer is a bottom layer of the same material that has been treated to increase its density by approximately 69% to improve its strength. This densified layer is bonded to a Strain Isolation Pad (SIP), modeled as a refractory felt fabric. The SIP is bonded to an aluminum 2024 wall 0.1-in thick. The tile and backwall materials use a Me-Gruneisen multiphase eos, with the exception of the SIP felt, which uses a fabric equation of state. Fabrics must be crushed to the full bulk material density before bulk material properties and a Mie-Gruneisen eos are applied. Tether fragment impact speeds of 3,7, and 10 km/s are simulated, with

  10. Evaluation of Material Models within LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) for a Kevlar/Epoxy Composite Honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanco, Michael A.; Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The performance of material models to simulate a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was evaluated using the nonlinear explicit dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). Prototypes of the DEA concept were manufactured using a Kevlar/Epoxy composite material in which the fibers are oriented at +/-45 degrees with respect to the loading axis. The development of the DEA has included laboratory tests at subcomponent and component levels such as three-point bend testing of single hexagonal cells, dynamic crush testing of single multi-cell components, and impact testing of a full-scale fuselage section fitted with a system of DEA components onto multi-terrain environments. Due to the thin nature of the cell walls, the DEA was modeled using shell elements. In an attempt to simulate the dynamic response of the DEA, it was first represented using *MAT_LAMINATED_COMPOSITE_FABRIC, or *MAT_58, in LS-DYNA. Values for each parameter within the material model were generated such that an in-plane isotropic configuration for the DEA material was assumed. Analytical predictions showed that the load-deflection behavior of a single-cell during three-point bending was within the range of test data, but predicted the DEA crush response to be very stiff. In addition, a *MAT_PIECEWISE_LINEAR_PLASTICITY, or *MAT_24, material model in LS-DYNA was developed, which represented the Kevlar/Epoxy composite as an isotropic elastic-plastic material with input from +/-45 degrees tensile coupon data. The predicted crush response matched that of the test and localized folding patterns of the DEA were captured under compression, but the model failed to predict the single-cell three-point bending response.

  11. AZ-2000-IECW and StaMet Black Kapton Options for Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor MLI Kevlar/Polyimide Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    AZ-2000-IECW white paint and StaMet black Kapton have been evaluated for the Kevlar/polyimide shells that enclose the Solar Probe Plus Magnetometer (MAG) sensors and multilayer insulation. Flight qualification testing on AZ-2000-IECW painted Kevlar/polyimide laminate was completed at Goddard Space Flight Center. This paint potentially meets all the requirements. However, it has no flight heritage. StaMet is hotter in the sun, and is specular. The results of the MAG thermal balance test show StaMet meets the thermal requirement and heater power budget. The mission prefers to fly StaMet after evaluating the risks of AZ-2000-IECW flaking and glint from StaMet to the Star Trackers.

  12. Etude comparative sur la propagation de l'endommagement apres impact des composites carbone/epoxy renforces par piquage au fil Kevlar et titane-nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, Pierre-Luc

    Composite laminates have strong in-plane mechanical properties, but they are generally weaker through their thickness. This specificity makes the laminates prone to delamination, particularly under low-velocity impact loads. Consequently numerous research efforts have been dedicated to developing interlaminar reinforcing methods, such as transverse stitching. The present project proposes the use of the stitching technique combined with a special stitching thread made of superelastic TiNi alloy. This technology is intended to improve the delamination toughness in composite laminates loaded in bending. In the first part of this study a numerical model was developed for analyzing composite structures. The 3-D finite element model was built with the ANSYS commercial software using 20-node solid and 8-node shell elements. The progressive damage modeling technique was used, allowing the prediction of delamination propagation in a laminate submitted to various loading modes. The model was validated for a plate under quasi-static traction load, and it was then used to simulate three-point bending tests. Secondly, carbon/epoxy composite panels were fabricated, with each panel containing unstitched and stitched specimens. Two different materials were used for the stitching thread: superelastic TiNi wires and Kevlar threads as a reference. Some stitched specimens were cut in slices in order to make some observations of the internal stitch using an optical microscope. Standardized low-velocity impact tests and compression after impact tests were carried out on stitched and unstitched specimens (ASTM D7136 and D7137). The Kevlar reinforcements have shown great performance in reducing the delaminated zone after impact, as well as in improving the residual compression strength. The TiNi reinforcements provided encouraging results during the impact tests, though being less effective than the Kevlar threads. During the compression after impact tests, only a slight difference could

  13. A spectral profile multiplexed FBG sensor network with application to strain measurement in a Kevlar woven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guodong; Hackney, Drew; Pankow, Mark; Peters, Kara

    2017-04-01

    A spectral profile division multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network is described in this paper. The unique spectral profile of each sensor in the network is identified as a distinct feature to be interrogated. Spectrum overlap is allowed under working conditions. Thus, a specific wavelength window does not need to be allocated to each sensor as in a wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) network. When the sensors are serially connected in the network, the spectrum output is expressed through a truncated series. To track the wavelength shift of each sensor, the identification problem is transformed to a nonlinear optimization problem, which is then solved by a modified dynamic multi-swarm particle swarm optimizer (DMS-PSO). To demonstrate the application of the developed network, a network consisting of four FBGs was integrated into a Kevlar woven fabric, which was under a quasi-static load imposed by an impactor head. Due to the substantial radial strain in the fabric, the spectrums of different FBGs were found to overlap during the loading process. With the developed interrogating method, the overlapped spectrum would be distinguished thus the wavelength shift of each sensor can be monitored.

  14. Effect and origin of the structure of hyperbranched polysiloxane on the surface and integrated performances of grafted Kevlar fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongrui; Yuan, Li; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan

    2014-11-01

    Four hyperbranched polysiloxanes (HPSis) with different molecular weights and concentration ratios of double bonds to epoxy groups (1:6.5-1:0.7) were synthesized and characterized. Each HPSi was facilely grafted onto surfaces of Kevlar fibers (KFs) to develop novel modified fibers (HPSi-g-KFs). The structures and integrated properties of HPSi-g-KFs as well as the origin behind were systematically investigated. Results show that HPSi-g-KFs have much rougher surface morphologies, and their surface free energies are as high as about 1.7 times that of KFs, showing greatly improved wettability. Besides, HPSi-g-KFs have excellent UV resistance after 168 h UV irradiation, the retentions of tenacity, energy to break, modulus and break extension are as high as 92, 86, 95 and 96%, respectively, while those of KFs are 66-85%. In addition, compared with KFs, HPSi-g-KFs have higher tensile tenacity and energy to break with similar modulus and break extension, much better thermal stability and flame retardancy. The nature of HPSi has different influence on different property of fibers, the HPSi with smaller molecular weight and more epoxy groups is beneficial to prepare HPSi-g-KFs with better wettability, while that with larger molecular weight and more double bonds tends to prepare HPSi-g-KF with better flame retardancy and UV resistance.

  15. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Sometimes lifetime testing is performed on an actual COPV in service in an effort to validate the reliability model that is the basis for certifying the continued flight worthiness of its sisters. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49(registered TradeMark)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the data base and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one nine , that is, reducing the probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several would be necessary.

  16. Bayes Analysis and Reliability Implications of Stress-Rupture Testing a Kevlar/Epoxy COPV Using Temperature and Pressure Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Kezirian, Michael T.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) that have survived a long service time under pressure generally must be recertified before service is extended. Flight certification is dependent on the reliability analysis to quantify the risk of stress rupture failure in existing flight vessels. Full certification of this reliability model would require a statistically significant number of lifetime tests to be performed and is impractical given the cost and limited flight hardware for certification testing purposes. One approach to confirm the reliability model is to perform a stress rupture test on a flight COPV. Currently, testing of such a Kevlar49 (Dupont)/epoxy COPV is nearing completion. The present paper focuses on a Bayesian statistical approach to analyze the possible failure time results of this test and to assess the implications in choosing between possible model parameter values that in the past have had significant uncertainty. The key uncertain parameters in this case are the actual fiber stress ratio at operating pressure, and the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime; the former has been uncertain due to ambiguities in interpreting the original and a duplicate burst test. The latter has been uncertain due to major differences between COPVs in the database and the actual COPVs in service. Any information obtained that clarifies and eliminates uncertainty in these parameters will have a major effect on the predicted reliability of the service COPVs going forward. The key result is that the longer the vessel survives, the more likely the more optimistic stress ratio model is correct. At the time of writing, the resulting effect on predicted future reliability is dramatic, increasing it by about one "nine," that is, reducing the predicted probability of failure by an order of magnitude. However, testing one vessel does not change the uncertainty on the Weibull shape parameter for lifetime since testing several vessels would be necessary.

  17. Deposition, clearance, and shortening of Kevlar para-aramid fibrils in acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D P; Merriman, E A; Kennedy, G L; Lee, K P

    1993-10-01

    The deposition and clearance of lung-deposited Kevlar para-aramid fibrils (subfibers) have been investigated as part of a subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity testing program. Fibrils recovered from lung tissue in para-aramid-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats were microscopically counted and measured after exposures to airborne fibrils which were about 12 microns median length (ML) and < 0.3 micron median diameter. In each of three studies lung-recovered fibrils were progressively shorter with increasing residence time in the lungs. Twenty-eight days after a single 6-hr exposure at 400 respirable fibrils per cubic centimeter (f/cm3) the ML of recovered fibrils decreased to about 5 microns. Twenty-four months after a 3-week exposure to 25 or 400 f/cm3, fibrils reached about 2 microns ML. After 2 years of continuous exposure at 2.5, 25, or 100 f/cm3 or 1 year exposure plus 1 year recovery at 400 f/cm3, fibril ML approached 4 microns. In the 2-year study, the lung-fiber accumulation rate/exposure concentration was similar for the three highest concentrations and was about 3 x greater than that seen at 2.5 f/cm3, indicating that concentrations of about 25 f/cm3 or more may overwhelm clearance mechanisms. Time required for fibrils to be reduced to < 5 microns in the lung was markedly less at lower exposure concentration and shorter exposure time. The primary shortening mechanism is proposed to be long fibril cutting by enzymatic attack at fibril defects. However, length-selective fibril deposition and clearance may contribute to shortening in the first few days after exposure. The enzymatic cutting hypothesis is supported by measured increases in numbers of short fibers following cessation of exposures, continued shortening of the fibril length distribution up to 2 years following exposure, and in vitro fibril shortening after 3 months in a proteolytic enzyme preparation. The conclusion is that para-aramid fibrils are less durable in the lungs of rats than expected from

  18. Kevlar Overwrap Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Manager, ARDE, INC. as Prime Contractor/Principal Investigator, Physics International as subcontractor for failure modeling computer calculations and Air...Force Astronautics Laboratory (EAFB) for full scale composite vessel testing. In addition, important contributions were made by Dr. Yen Pan...34 0 AND 22" 0 PSC VESSEL TESTS E-i E.1 - FULL SCALE COMPOSITE VESSEL E-1 TESTS - INSTRUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS/PROCEDURES E.2 - 16" 0 AND 22" 0 PSC

  19. A comparative study on the tensile and impact properties of Kevlar, carbon, and S-glass/epoxy composites reinforced with SiC particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, Mehmet; Alsaadi, Mohamad; Erkliğ, Ahmet

    2018-02-01

    Present study compares the tensile and impact characteristics of Kevlar, carbon and glass fiber reinforced composites with addition of microscale silicon carbide (SiC) within the common matrix of epoxy. The variation of tensile and impact strength values was explored for different content of SiC in the epoxy resin by weight (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%). Resulting failure characteristics were identified by assisting Charpy impact tests. The influence of interfacial adhesion between particle and fiber/matrix on failure and tensile properties was discussed from obtained results and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) figures. It is concluded from results that the content of SiC particles, and fiber types used as reinforcement are major parameters those effecting on tensile and impact resistance of composites as a result of different interface strength properties between particle-matrix and particle-fiber.

  20. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90–100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene. PMID:28074877

  1. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, Doyoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90-100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  2. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-11

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90-100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  3. Differential water sorption studies on Kevlar 49 and As-polymerized poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide): determination of water transport properties.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Damian A; MacElroy, J M Don

    2007-11-06

    Water vapor sorption experiments have been conducted on Kevlar 49 at 30 degrees C over a range of water vapor pressures in 0-90% of saturation and on the as-polymerized form of the material at 30, 45, and 60 degrees C over a series of water vapor pressures of 0-60%, 0-25%, and 0-15%, respectively. For each of the differential steps in water vapor pressure, dynamic uptake curves were generated and analyzed according to a number of different mathematical models, including Fickian, Coaxial cylindrical, and intercalation models. The intercalation model was demonstrated to be the most successful model and considered two time-scales involved in the diffusion process, i.e., a penetrant-diffusive time-scale and a polymer-local-matrix-relaxation time-scale. The success of this model reinforces previously reported adsorption and desorption isotherms which suggested that water may penetrate into the surface layers of the polymer crystallite through a process known as intercalation.

  4. Eddy Current COPV Overwrap and Liner Thickness Measurement System and Data Analysis for 40-Inch Kevlar COPVs SN002 and SN027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the health assessment of flight spare 40in diameter Kevlar composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) SN002 and SN027 an eddy current characterization of the composite and liner thickness change during pressurization was requested under WSTF-TP-1085-07.A, "Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Propulsion System P/N MC282-0082-0101 S/N 002 and Orbital Maneuvering System P/N MC282-0082-001 S/N 027 COPV Health Assessment." The through the thickness strains have been determined to be an important parameter in the analysis of the reliability and likelihood of stress rupture failure. Eddy current techniques provide a means to measure these thicknesses changes based upon the change in impedance of an eddy current sensor mounted on the exterior of the vessel. Careful probe and technique design have resulted in the capability to independently measure the liner and overwrap thickness changes to better than +/- 0.0005 in. at each sensor location. Descriptions of the inspection system and test results are discussed.

  5. Etude de l'effet du vieillissement sur les proprietes d'un tissu en melange KevlarRTM-PBI utilise dans le revetement exterieur des habits de protection contre le feu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Carlos

    The aim of this work is to study and model the effect of three aging factors, temperature, humidity and light radiation, on the properties of a fabric made of a blend of KevlarRTM and PBI fibers frequently used to manufacture fire-protective garments. Accelarated-aging treatments carried out at carefully chosen conditions for the three factors resulted in a sizeable loss of mechanical performance. The breaking force of both the fabric and the yarns extracted from it decreases to less than 50% after one month of continuous exposure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) tests performed on thermally-aged samples indicated an increase of the crystallinity of the fabric, whereas the disappearance of Raman spectral lines suggested instead a reduction of the crystallinity following thermal aging. To explain these seemingly contradictory results, a hypothesis was introduced, stating that two different processes occurred simultaneously during thermal aging. The first one, an increase of size of the crystallites in the direction of the fibers' axis, accounted for the increase in crystallinity observed in XRD tests. The second one, an increase in the gap separating lamellar crystallites that causes a non-measurable reduction of the crystallinity of the sample, was highlighted by the Raman analyses. The results of the dielectric spectroscopy analyses carried out on thermally-aged samples confirmed the XRD results showing a significant change in the Kevlar's morphology during thermal aging. Despite the important decrease of the breaking force that ensued thermal aging, no evidence of a chemical structure modification of KevlarRTM was found. On the other hand, differential thermal analyses conducted on thermally aged fabric samples indicated a reduction of the glass transition temperature of the other component of the blend, namely the PBI, a fact that suggests a decrease of molecular weight after thermal aging. Infrared spectroscopy analyses performed on samples exposed to high humidity

  6. Study on mechanical properties and damage behaviors of Kevlar fiber reinforced epoxy composites by digital image correlation technique under optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Shao, Wenquan; Ji, Hongwei

    2010-10-01

    Kevlar fiber-reinforced epoxy (KFRE) composites are widely used in the fields of aerospace, weapon, shipping, and civil industry, due to their outstanding capabilities. In this paper, mechanical properties and damage behaviors of KFRE laminate (02/902) were tested and studied under tension condition. To precisely measure the tensile mechanical properties of the material and investigate its micro-scale damage evolution, a micro-image measuring system with in-situ tensile device was designed. The measuring system, by which the in-situ tensile test can be carried out and surface morphology evolution of the tensile specimen can be visually monitored and recorded during the process of loading, includes an ultra-long working distance zoom microscope and a in-situ tensile loading device. In this study, a digital image correlation method (DICM) was used to calculate the deformation of the tensile specimen under different load levels according to the temporal series images captured by an optical microscope and CCD camera. Then, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the KFRE was obtained accordingly. The damage progresses of the KFRE laminates were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that: (1) the KFRE laminate (02/902) is almost elastic, its failure mode is brittle tensile fracture.(2) Mechanical properties parameters of the material are as follows: elastic modulus is 14- 16GPa, and tensile ultimate stress is 450-480 Mpa respectively. (3) The damage evolution of the material is that cracks appear in epoxy matrix firstly, then, with the increasing of the tensile loading, matrix cracks add up and extend along a 45° angle direction with tensile load. Furthermore, decohesion between matrix and fibers as well as delamination occurs. Eventually, fibers break and the material is damaged.

  7. Fabrication and Synthesis of Highly Ordered Nickel Cobalt Sulfide Nanowire-Grown Woven Kevlar Fiber/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Polyester Composites.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K; Kim, DoYoung; Roh, Hyung Doh; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-10-18

    Well-aligned NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires, synthesized hydrothermally on the surface of woven Kevlar fiber (WKF), were used to fabricate composites with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) dispersed in polyester resin (PES) by means of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. The NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires were synthesized with three precursor concentrations. Nanowire growth was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hierarchical and high growth density of the nanowires led to exceptional mechanical properties of the composites. Compared with bare WKF/PES, the tensile strength and absorbed impact energy were enhanced by 96.2% and 92.3%, respectively, for WKF/NiCo 2 S 4 /rGO (1.5%)/PES. The synergistic effect of NiCo 2 S 4 nanowires and rGO in the fabricated composites improved the electrical conductivity of insulating WKF/PES composites, reducing the resistance to ∼10 3 Ω. Joule heating performance depended strongly on the precursor concentration of the nanowires and the presence of rGO in the composite. A maximum surface temperature of 163 °C was obtained under low-voltage (5 V) application. The Joule heating performance of the composites was demonstrated in a surface deicing experiment; we observed that 17 g of ice melted from the surface of the composite in 14 min under an applied voltage of 5 V at -28 °C. The excellent performance of WKF/NiCo 2 S 4 /rGO/PES composites shows great potential for aerospace structural applications requiring outstanding mechanical properties and Joule heating capability for deicing of surfaces.

  8. Use of Raman Spectroscopy and Delta Volume Growth from Void Collapse to Assess Overwrap Stress Gradients Compromising the Reliability of Large Kevlar/Epoxy COPVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are frequently used for storing pressurized gases aboard spacecraft and aircraft when weight saving is desirable compared to all-metal versions. Failure mechanisms in fibrous COPVs and variability in lifetime can be very different from their metallic counterparts; in the former, catastrophic stress-rupture can occur with virtually no warning, whereas in latter, a leak before burst design philosophy can be implemented. Qualification and certification typically requires only one burst test on a production sample (possibly after several pressure cycles) and the vessel need only meet a design burst strength (the maximum operating pressure divided by a knockdown factor). Typically there is no requirement to assess variability in burst strength or lifetime, much less determine production and materials processing parameters important to control of such variability. Characterizing such variability and its source is crucial to models for calculating required reliability over a given lifetime (e.g. R = 0.9999 for 15 years). In this paper we present a case study of how lack of control of certain process parameters in COPV manufacturing can result in variations among vessels and between production runs that can greatly increase uncertainty and reduce reliability. The vessels considered are 40-inch ( NASA Glenn Research center, Cleveland, OH, 44135 29,500 in3 ) spherical COPVs with a 0.74 in. thick Kevlar49/epoxy overwrap and with a titanium liner of which 34 were originally produced. Two burst tests were eventually performed that unexpectedly differed by almost 5%, and were 10% lower than anticipated from burst tests on 26-inch sister vessels similar in every detail. A major observation from measurements made during proof testing (autofrettage) of the 40-inch vessels was that permanent volume growth from liner yielding varied by a factor of more than two (150 in3 to 360 in3 ), which suggests large differences in the residual

  9. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  10. Use of CYPRES™ cutters with a Kevlar clamp band for hold-down and release of the Icarus De-Orbit Sail payload on TechDemoSat-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, J.; Hobbs, S.; Roberts, P.; Juanes-Vallejo, C.; Robinson, F.; Sewell, R.; Snapir, B.; Llop, J. Virgili; Patel, M.

    2014-07-01

    TechDemoSat-1 is a UK-funded technology demonstration satellite, carrying 8 payloads provided by UK organisations, which is due to be launched in the first quarter of 2014. Cranfield University has supplied a De-Orbit Sail (DOS) payload to allow the mission to comply with end-of-life debris mitigation guidelines. The payload provides a passive, simple, and low-cost means of mitigating debris proliferation in Low Earth Orbit, by enhancing spacecraft aerodynamic drag at end-of-life and reducing time to natural orbital decay and re-entry. This paper describes the use of small commercial electro-explosive devices (EEDs), produced for use as parachute tether-cutters in reserve chute deployment systems, as low-cost but high-reliability release mechanisms for space applications. A testing campaign, including thermal vacuum and mechanical vibration, is described, which demonstrates the suitability of these CYPRES™ cutters, with a flexible Kevlar clamp band, for use as a hold-down and release mechanism (HDRM) for a deployable de-orbit sail. The HDRM is designed to be three-failure-tolerant, highly reliable, yet simple and low-cost.

  11. Versatile Experimental Kevlar Array Hydrophones: USRD Type H78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-05

    the design of a small deop-submergence noise-measuring hydropl,one for the infra - sonic and low-audio frequency range, three hydrophone...llenriquez and L.-E. Ivey, -Standard Ilydrophone for the Infrasonic and Audio- F.-equency Range at H~ydrostatic Pressure to 10,000 psig," J. A cous. qoc. Am...Piezoelectric Ceramic Ilydrophone for Infrasonic and Audio Frequencies IJSRD Type 1148," NRL Report 7260, 15 Mar. 1971. 9. S.W. Meeks and R.W. Timme, "Effects

  12. Transverse Compression Response of a Multi-Ply Kevlar Vest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    S BAZHENOV KOSYGIN STREET 4 117 977 MOSCOW RUSSIA 1 UNIV POLITECNICA MADRID B PARGA-LANDA ARQUITECTURA CONSTRUC ETSI NAVALES...28040 MADRID SPAIN 1 UNIV POLITECNICA MADRID F HERNANDEZ-OLIVARES CONSTRUC TEC ARQUITEC ETS ARQUITECTURA AV JUAN DE HERRERA 4

  13. Military Adaptation of Kevlar for Portable Bridge Reinforcement Cables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-18

    WMOFE P T GIBSON OAAKO-78-C-O0ZM UNCLASSIFIED II *3fllIIlfIIIIIIIIflf mhhhhmhm EEIIEIIIEIIII lElllIIhlEllEI EllllEElhlllIE EIIEIIIEIIIII EEllhhEhI 11111...COMMAND FORT BELVOIR, VIRGINIA 22060 L I- ,.- C1 . UNCLASS IF IFfl SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Date Entered)REDISUCON II . REPORT NUMBER... ii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

  14. Development of a Kevlar/PMR-15 reduced drag DC-9 nacelle fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, R. T.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an advanced composite fairing designed to reduce drag on DC-9 nacelles as a part of the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program. This fairing is the aft enclosure for the thrust reverser actuator system on JT8D engine nacelles and is subjected to a 500 F exhaust flow during the reverse thrust. A reduced-drag configuration was developed by using in-flight tuft surveys for flow visualization in order to identify areas with low-quality flow, and then modifying the aerodynamic lines to improve the flow. A fabrication method for molding the part in an autoclave was developed; this material system is suitable for 500 F. The resultant composite fairing reduces the overall aircraft drag 1% with a weight reduction of 40% when compared with a metal component.

  15. Composite Stress Rupture NDE Research and Development Project (Kevlar[R] and Carbon)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring (SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  16. Plain-Woven, 600-Denier Kevlar KM2 Fabric Under Quasistatic, Uniaxial Tension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    KOSYGIN STREET 4 117 977 MOSCOW RUSSIA 1 UNIV POLITECNICA MADRID B PARGA-LANDA ARQUITECTURA CONSTRUC ETSI NAVALES 28040...MADRID SPAIN 1 UNIV POLITECNICA MADRID F HERNANDEZ-OLIVARES CONSTRUC TEC ARQUITEC ETS ARQUITECTURA AV JUAN DE HERRERA 4 28040 MADRID

  17. Fiber-Level Modeling of Dynamic Strength of Kevlar (registered trademark) KM2 Ballistic Fabric

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Ballistic-Performance Optimization of a Hybrid Carbon - Nanotube /E-glass Reinforced Poly-Vinyl-Ester-Epoxy-Matrix Com- posite Armor, J. Mater. Sci...2007, 42, p 5347–5359 4. M. Grujicic, W.C. Bell, L.L. Thompson, K.L. Koudela, and B.A. Cheeseman, Ballistic-Protection Performance of Carbon - Nanotube ...Armor via the Use of a Carbon - Nanotube Forest-Mat Strike Face, Mater. Des. Appl., 2008, 222, p 15–28 6. Y. Wang and X. Sun, Determining the Geometry

  18. 40-in. OMS Kevlar(Registered Trademark) COPV S/N 007 Stress Rupture Test NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nate; Forth, Scott; Leifeste, Mark; Gallus, Tim; Yoder, Tommy; Keddy, Chris; Mandaras, Eric; Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Philip; hide

    2010-01-01

    The presentation examines pretest nondestructive evaluation (NDE), including external/internal visual inspection, raman spectroscopy, laser shearography, and laser profilometry; real-time NDE including eddy current, acoustic emission (AE), and real-time portable raman spectroscopy; and AE application to carbon/epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels.

  19. The Veil of Kevlar: An Analysis of the Female Engagement Teams in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    body fat , have lighter frames and less bone density, and contain smaller vital organs as in heart or lungs necessary for severe aerobic activity. 75... shamefulness of sex was focused most intensely on the shamefulness of the female body, which had to be totally concealed.”161 Women and particularly the

  20. Design Guide for Selection and Specification of Kevlar Rope for Ocean Engineering and Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    public rtoieco cnd sol . It i Idim .buttm Is ul"rnimi.. OCEAN ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECT OFFICE CHESAPEAKE DIVISION NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING...be to have no more than one layer. This is impractical for oceano - graphic purposes. Assuming a need to spooi many layers of rope under tension

  1. Low cost tooling material and process for graphite and Kevlar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, William I.

    1987-01-01

    An Extruded Sheet Tooling Compound (ESTC) was developed for use in quickly building low cost molds for fabricating composites. The ESTC is a very highly mineral-filled resin system formed into a 6 mm thick sheet. The sheet is laid on the pattern, vacuum (bag) is applied to remove air from the pattern surface, and the assembly is heat cured. The formed ESTC is then backed and/or framed and ready for use. The cured ESTC exhibits low coefficient of thermal expansion and maintains strength at temperatures of 180 to 200 C. Tools were made and used successfully for: Compression molding of high strength epoxy sheet molding compound, stamping of aluminum, resin transfer molding of polyester, and liquid resin molding of polyester. Several variations of ESTC can be made for specific requirements. Higher thermal conductivity can be achieved by using an aluminum particle filler. Room temperature gel is possible to allow use of foam patterns.

  2. Simulation of Hypervelocity Impact on Aluminum-Nextel-Kevlar Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for hypervelocity impact simulation. The method combines the general contact-impact capabilities of particle codes with the true Lagrangian kinematics of large strain finite element formulations. Unlike some alternative schemes which couple Lagrangian finite element models with smooth particle hydrodynamics, the present formulation makes no use of slidelines or penalty forces. The method has been implemented in a parallel, three dimensional computer code. Simulations of three dimensional orbital debris impact problems using this parallel hybrid particle-finite element code, show good agreement with experiment and good speedup in parallel computation. The simulations included single and multi-plate shields as well as aluminum and composite shielding materials. at an impact velocity of eleven kilometers per second.

  3. Kevlar Vest Protection against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    F. S., Invest. Ophthal- mol. Vis. Sci. 2003, 44, 3219–3225. [52] Sun , Y., Jin , K., Xie, L., Childs, J., Mao, X. O., Logvinova, A., Greenberg, D. A...traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the Department of Defense. Clin. Neuropsychol. 23, 1291–1298. Jin , K., Zhu, Y., Sun , Y., Mao, X. O., Xie, L., and...task-specific neurobehavioral experience. Neurosci. Lett. 431, 226–230. Jin , K., Zhu, Y., Sun , Y., Mao, X. O., Xie, L., and Greenberg, D. A. (2002

  4. Power generation from base excitation of a Kevlar composite beam with ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-04-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanotubes with piezoelectric properties have gained interest in the fabrication of small scale power harvesting systems. However, the practical applications of the nanoscale materials in structures with true mechanical strengths have not yet been demonstrated. In this paper, piezoelectric ZnO nanowires are integrated into the fiber reinforced polymer composites serving as an active phase to convert the induced strain energy from ambient vibration into electrical energy. Arrays of ZnO nanowires are grown vertically aligned on aramid fibers through a low-cost hydrothermal process. The modified fabrics with ZnO nanowires whiskers are then placed between two carbon fabrics as the top and the bottom electrodes. Finally, vacuum resin transfer molding technique is utilized to fabricate these multiscale composites. The fabricated composites are subjected to a base excitation using a shaker to generate charge due to the direct piezoelectric effect of ZnO nanowires. Measuring the generated potential difference between the two electrodes showed the energy harvesting application of these multiscale composites in addition to their superior mechanical properties. These results propose a new generation of power harvesting systems with enhanced mechanical properties.

  5. Hybridized Thermoplastic Aramids: Enabling Material Technology For Future Force Headgear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    keeping the complete helmet weight the same. Design Material Rolled steel Hadfield Steel Kevlar 29/PVB Phenolic Kevlar 129/PVB...Material Rolled steel Hadfield Steel Kevlar 29/PVB Phenolic Kevlar 129/PVB phenolic Thermoplastic aramid Twaron/PVB phenolic ...Deflection RESULTS Improved Fiber, Fiber Architecture, and Matrix Materials Enable Performance Enhancement PASGT: 19 Ply S735 Kevlar with PVB Phenolic

  6. Effect of Strain Rates and Pre-Twist on Tensile Strength of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    cardboard tabs at a standard gage length of 5.2 mm for testing using 3M DP8005 epoxy . The cardboard tabs were glued to stainless steel setscrews so that...did not pull out of the glue . If pullout were evident, the force would rise followed by a flat portion where the fiber takes a small amount of load...until the fiber comes back into contact with the glue followed by another rise and so on until failure. Figure 5. Raw data from a high-rate

  7. Performance Characteristics of 5 Ft Diameter Nylon and Kevlar Hemisflo Ribbon Parachutes at Dynamic Pressures up to 6000 PSF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    Pederson , Paul E.: Study of Parachute Performance at Low Supersonic Deployment Speeds; Effects^ of ChäTigincj Seale and Clustering...Air Force Aeronautical Systems Division Technical Report 61-186, (AD 267 502), July 1961. Pederson , P.E.: Study of Parachute... rl " VO VP m o in n .H o in ir> vo 00 i—t rr o o o o o o o o o 00 o o o o o o o o o <N

  8. Use of LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to Assess the Energy Absorption Performance of a Shell-Based Kevlar(TradeMark)/Epoxy Composite Honeycomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanco, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The forward and vertical impact stability of a composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was evaluated during a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter at NASA Langley?s Landing and Impact Research Facility. The lower skin of the helicopter was retrofitted with DEA components to protect the airframe subfloor upon impact and to mitigate loads transmitted to Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) occupants. To facilitate the design of the DEA for this test, an analytical study was conducted using LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to evaluate the performance of a shell-based DEA incorporating different angular cell orientations as well as simultaneous vertical and forward impact conditions. By conducting this study, guidance was provided in obtaining an optimum design for the DEA that would dissipate the kinetic energy of the airframe while maintaining forward and vertical impact stability.

  9. NiTi SMA Wires Coupled with Kevlar Fabric: a Real Application of an Innovative Aircraft LE Slat System in SMAHC Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, M.; Marulo, F.; Russo, S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates experimentally and numerically the response of a smart hybrid thermoplastic aircraft slat system subjected to a short-duration and high-frequency event like a birdstrike. The focus of the paper is to exploit the ability that superelastic shape memory alloys have to absorb and dissipate energy compared to conventional composite structures. The final objective of the work is to develop an innovative thermoplastic wing leading edge slat able to resist to an impact of 4-lb (1.8 kg) bird at speed of 350 kts (132 m/s), as requested by the aeronautical requirements. Aircraft leading edges must be certified for a proven level of bird impact resistance. In particular, the main structural requirement is to protect the torsion box and control devices from any significant damage caused by birdstrike in order to allow the aircraft to land safely. A clear increase of the composites toughness and higher absorbed energy levels before failure were also observed. This is due to the fact that SMA wires can absorb kinetic energy during the impact due to their remarkably large failure and recoverable strain and to their superelastic and hysteretic behaviour. The activities have been performed within the European Project COALESCE "Cost Efficient Advanced Leading Edge Structure", funded by the Seventh Framework Program Theme 7 Transport (incl. Aeronautics).

  10. Effects of Weave Styles and Crimp Gradients on Damage Tolerance and Energy-Absorption Capacities of Woven Kevlar/Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Technology Office ( Neil J. Dubois (00T1)) and the Office of Naval Research. The principal investigator was Paul V. Cavallaro (Code 7023). The...Office (RDRL-RO-EN (D. Stepp, W. Mullins)) 2 Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility, Natick, MA (B. Avellini, L. Caulfield, T. Hart, C. Heath

  11. High-Strength Hybrid Textile Composites with Carbon, Kevlar, and E-Glass Fibers for Impact-Resistant Structures. A Review.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka, P.; Dixit, A.; Mali, H. S.

    2017-11-01

    The paper reviews the characterization of high-performance hybrid textile composites and their hybridization effects of composite's behavior. Considered are research works based on the finite-element modeling, simulation, and experimental characterization of various mechanical properties of such composites.

  12. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 742 - Anti-Terrorism Controls: North Korea, Syria and Sudan Contract Sanctity Dates and Related Policies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... organic and inorganic fibers (kevlar) described in ECCN 1C210. (i) [Reserved] (ii) Syria. Applications for...) Contract sanctity date for high strength organic and inorganic fibers (kevlar) described in ECCN 1C210 that... Supplement. (B) Contract sanctity date for all other high strength organic and inorganic fibers (kevlar...

  13. [Research on structure of MC-nylon 6/aramid composites by spectroanalysis method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Can-Yao; Zheng, Yu-Ying

    2008-01-01

    The Kevlar fiber, treated with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and caprolactam, was used to reinforce MC nylon 6. XPS showed the change in chemical components and spectra after fiber was treated. IR showed that the spectra of Kevlar fiber and MC-nylon 6 were incorporated purely when they were mixed, while the treated Kevlar fiber provided the activation in the ring-opening polymerization of caprolactam, and the amide groups of graft chains could form strong hydrogen bonds with matrix. These graft chains and hydrogen bonds would contribute to improving interfacial bonding between MC-nylon 6 and Kevlar fiber. XRD indicated that the induction of Kevlar fiber had no effect on the cryastalline style of MC-nylon 6 obviously, however, the crystals had better seasonal structure. The crystals of MC-nylon 6/Kevlar fiber composites were more perfect than that of MC-nylon 6/Kevlar untreated fiber composites with the same amount of Kevlar fiber. The increase of Kevlar fiber contributed to forming perfect a spherulite when the mass concentration of Kevlar fiber was less than 2%, however, the more the Kevlar fiber, the less the content of a spherulite when the mass concentration of Kevlar fiber was more than 2%.

  14. Tensile Properties of Dyneema SK76 Single Fibers at Multiple Loading Rates Using a Direct Gripping Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    lower density compared with aramid fibers such as Kevlar and Twaron. Numerical modeling is used to design more effective fiber-based composite armor...in measuring fibers and doing experiments. vi INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 1. Introduction Aramid fibers such as Kevlar (DuPont) and Twaron...methyl methacrylate blocks. The efficacy of this method to grip Kevlar fibers has been rigorously studied using a variety of statistical methods at

  15. Effect of Boundary Conditions on the Back Face Deformations of Flat UHMWPE Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Zhang [2] carried out a numerical study of the effects of clamping type and clamping pressure on the ballistic performance of woven Kevlar , and found...effects of composite size were also studied. Singletary [5] studied the effects of boundary conditions and panel sizes on V50 for Kevlar KM2 fabric. The...on the BFD in flat UHMWPE panels. UHMWPE possesses high tenacity and high strength compared to Kevlar , as a result of which it is the material of

  16. Application of a Meso-scale Based Ballistic Fabric Model to the Development of Advanced Lightweight Engine Fan Blade-Out Containment Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    composed of a basic metallic shell structure with a dry Kevlar wrap around it is considered. The fan blade is made of titanium alloy modeled by a Johnson...material. A multilayered Kevlar woven dry fabric structure is wrapped around the thin aluminum shell to form a soft hybrid fan case. A woven fabric material...debris protection fan case composed of a basic metallic shell structure with a dry Kevlar wrap around it is considered. The fan blade is made of titanium

  17. Fiber Reinforcement of Gun Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-02

    finish, glass Keviar 1.5 mm Aromatic polyamide, DuPont Kevlar 29 Pulp Type 1979 Kynol 0.9 mm Cross linked amorphous phenolic polymer, 1Iarbison...meniscus even appears to indicate repulsion. Also, single fibers were dipped into molten TNT, with results shown in Fig. 6. Kevlar was the fiber type...slowly cooled, while observations were made. Figure 7 depicts the results of one such experiment. Again, Kevlar was used. The droplet shown resulted

  18. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    9 Moh), derived composites can be machined only with great difficulty, with diamond-tipped tools. 2.4 Aramid Fibres These fibres are the latest type...between fibrils. Failed specimens often give the appearance of broomsticks due to this failure mode. Machining of Kevlar composites requires careful...Compressive Strength of Kevlar 49/Epoxy Composites , Composites , vol. 6, pp. 217-225, 1975. 13. Anon., A Guide to Cutting and Machining Kevlar Aramid, Du

  19. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  20. Application of the Integral Theory of Impact to the Qualification of Materials and the Development of a Simplified Rod Penetrator Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    Kevlar target. This composite is a woven fabric produced by DuPont and consists of aramid ( Kevlar ) fibers treated with an epoxy resin and molded into...between layers was employed. Kevlar has a value of E~p comparable to steel and a large component of E~e D. Summary of Qualification Tests A summary of...34 STEEL BALL 0 .156" STEEL BALL1 p/dO X.k WC ball I theory Steel ball theory .0 20 100 1000 Velocity, ft/sec Figure 17 34 KEVLAR TARGET RIGID, EPOXY RESIN

  1. State-of-the-Art Review on Composite Material Fatigue/Damage Tolerance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Automobile Structures," Plastic Rubber Material Application, Vol. 3, No. 2, May 1978. 148. Nguyen, D.T., Arora, J.S., and Belegundu, A.D., "Design...Vanthier, D., " Kunststoff -Verstaerkung MIT Kevlar 49," [Reinforcing Plastics With "Kevlar" 49], Plastverarbeiter, Vol. 31, No. 9, September 1980. 232

  2. Wright St Univ Participation in AFRL University Engineering Design Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    18 Figure 9: Loading results from 10 min. heat treatment cure on 1 square inch Kevlar Patch, air cool, and concrete...loading and Average for Three Trials of 10 min heat treatment cure, 1 square inch Kevlar Patch, air cool, and concrete...19 Figure 11: Loading results from 10 min. heat treatment cure on 1 square

  3. LWH and ACH Helmet Hardware Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    initial attempts to perform impact tests using screws mounted in Kevlar composite panels resulted in little damage to the screws, but a lot of...stiffer and stronger than Kevlar panels, does not plastically deform (and therefore Figure 11. Typical ductile fracture surface resulting from a

  4. Development of lightweight reinforced plastic laminates for spacecraft interior applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Lightweight, Kevlar - reinforced laminating systems that are non-burning, generate little smoke in the space shuttle environment, and are physically equivalent to the fiberglass/polyimide system used in the Apollo program for non-structural cabin panels, racks, etc. Resin systems representing five generic classes were screened as matrices for Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates. Of the systems evaluated, the polyimides were the most promising with the phenolics a close second. Skybond 703 was selected as the most promising resin candidate. With the exception of compression strength, all program goals of physical and mechanical properties were exceeded. Several prototype space shuttle mobility and translation handrail segments were manufactured using Kevlar/epoxy and Kevlar-graphite/epoxy. This application shows significant weight savings over the baseline aluminum configuration used previous. The hybrid Kevlar-graphite/epoxy is more suitable from a processing standpoint.

  5. Orientational alignment in solids from bidimensional isotropic-anisotropic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: applications to the analysis of aramide fibers.

    PubMed

    Sachleben, J R; Frydman, L

    1997-02-01

    The use of two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectroscopy for the analysis of orientational alignment in solids is presented. The theoretical background and advantages of this natural-abundance 13C NMR method of measurement are discussed, and demonstrated with a series of powder and single-crystal variable-angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) experiments on model systems. The technique is subsequently employed to analyze the orientational distributions of three polymer fibers: Kevlar 29, Kevlar 49 and Kevlar 149. Using complementary two-dimensional NMR data recorded on synthetic samples of poly(p-phenyleneterephthalamide), the precursor of Kevlar, it was found that these commercial fibers possess molecules distributed over a very narrow orientational range with respect to the macroscopic director. The widths measured for these director distribution arrangements were (12 +/- 1.5) degrees for Kevlar 29, (15 +/- 1.5) degrees for Kevlar 49, and (8 +/- 1.5) degrees for Kevlar 149. These figures compare well with previous results obtained for non-commercial fiber samples derived from the same polymer.

  6. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  7. Static behavior and the effects of thermal cycling in hybrid laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T. M.; Daniel, I. M.; Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    Static stiffness, strength and ultimate strain after thermal cycling were investigated for graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy angle-ply laminates. Tensile stress-strain curves to failure and uniaxial tensile properties were determined, and theoretical predictions of modulus, Poisson's ratio and ultimate strain, based on linear lamination theory, constituent ply properties and measured strength, were made. No significant influence on tensile stress properties due to stacking sequence variations was observed. In general, specimens containing two 0-degree Kevlar or S-glass plies were found to behave linearly to failure, while specimens containing 4 0-degree Kevlar or S-glass plies showed some nonlinear behavior.

  8. Compression of Composite Materials: A Review,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    epoxy tension face, . and a plexiglass core under the specimen gage-section. A Kevlar /glass phenolic hybrid composite system was evaluated in the...epoxy [0116 specimens, S2/SP-250 7 glass/epoxy [0/±45/9012s specimens, Kevlar 285 weave/Cycom 4143 Aramid/epoxy specimens, unidirectional FP alumina...bundles tested erc- E-glass, T300 graphite, T700 graphite, P75 graphite, Kevlar 49, and FP alumina. " -1. They observed that bundle failure

  9. Innovative Life Cycle Management Systems for Composites. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    of the window were not yet identified with a particular batch, but we knew that they would be required to be Kevlar -29 and Polyester. From this plan...materials and processes and has selected Kevlar batch #139 as one of the starting materials. (KevIar was chosen as the only material in this example to...assigned to the flow diagram by clicking on a material icon. The accompanying control panel allowed the user I, I to inspect the batches of Kevlar in

  10. Measurements of the response of transport aircraft ceiling panels to fuel pool fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the responses of various aircraft ceiling panel configurations to a simulated post-crash fire. Attention was given to one currently used and four new ceiling configurations exposed to a fuel pool fire in a circulated air enclosure. The tests were controlled to accurately represent conditions in a real fire. The panels were constructed of fiberglass-epoxy, graphite-phenolic resin, fiberglass-phenolic resin, Kevlar-epoxy, and Kevlar-phenolic resin materials. The phenolic resin-backed sheets performed the best under the circumstances, except when combined with Kevlar, which became porous when charred.

  11. Overview of NASA White Sands Test Facility Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines the White Sands Test Facility testing of Composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV). A COPV is typically a metallic liner overwrapped with a fiber epoxy matrix. There is a weight advantage over the traditional all metal design. The presentation shows pictures of the facilities at White Sands, and then examines some of the testing performed. The tests include fluids compatibility, and Kevlar COPV. Data for the Kevlar tests are given, and an analysis is reviewed. There is also a comparison between Carbon COPVs and the Kevlar COPVs.

  12. Synthesis of high crystallinity ZnO nanowire array on polymer substrate and flexible fiber-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinmei; Wu, Weiwei; Bai, Suo; Qin, Yong

    2011-11-01

    Well aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays are grown on Kevlar fiber and Kapton film via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. These NWs have better crystallinity than those synthesized through the low-temperature hydrothermal method. The average length and diameter of ZnO NWs grown on Kevlar fiber can be controlled from 0.5 to 2.76 μm and 30 to 300 nm, respectively. A flexible ultraviolet (UV) sensor based on Kevlar fiber/ZnO NWs hybrid structure is made to detect UV illumination quantificationally.

  13. A mathematical model for the stressed state analysis of cylindrical laminated-composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Roman; Matyja, Tomasz

    An algorithm and a computer program have been developed for calculating the strength of pressure vessels made of laminated composites. Numerical results for pressure vessels of Kevlar 49 laminates are compared with experimental data in the literature.

  14. Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Brooks, Thomas M. B.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper will present an overview of efforts to investigate the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of Kevlar materials. Raman spectroscopy is a laser technique that is sensitive to molecular interactions in materials such as Kevlar, graphite and carbon used in composite materials. The overall goal of this research reported here is to evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Characterization of the Raman spectra of Kevlar yarn and strands will be presented and compared with analytical models provided in the literature. Results of testing to investigate the effects of creep and high-temperature aging on the Raman spectra will be presented.

  15. Further studies of a trussed-web girder composed of reinforced plastics.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-01-01

    Three single section and one trisection girder, s eight feet long were fabricated and load tested to determine the deflection, strain, and creep characteristics of the members. One specimen fabricated with stranded elements composed of Kevlar 49 inst...

  16. Plaster core washout tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Keir, A. R.; Teramura, K.

    1977-01-01

    Tool powered by pressurized water or air removes water soluble plaster lining from Kevlar/epoxy duct. Rotating plastic cutterhead with sealed end fitting connects flexible shaft that allows tool to be used with curved ducts.

  17. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  18. 78 FR 37785 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 196-Fort Worth, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... carrying cases, wrist straps, screws, power supplies, nickel/ cadmium batteries, lithium/ion batteries, other batteries, antenna assemblies, audio flex assemblies, bridge flex assemblies, interplex assembly... components and materials sourced from abroad include: labels, battery adhesives, decals, Kevlar protective...

  19. Thumbnail Sketches: The Chemistry of Printed Circuit Substrates: Some of the Latest Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses some of the latest developments in the chemistry of printed circuit substrates. Topics considered include soldering, dicy (a catalyst), Kevlar (an aramid polymer fiber), maleimide copolymers, and flexible circuits. (JN)

  20. Investigation of the Minimum Deployment Time of a Foam/Fabric Composite Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Kevlar Fabric! use xperienced, trained personnel. The pres- Polyurethane Foam Composites. TR M-272/ADA076310 sure containers should be adequately...evaluated. High molecular ponent foam producing materials. (Polyurethanes, weight resin performed best because its solubility char- epoxies, phenolics , and...that was coated to a total Because earlier CERL tests had established the weight of about 10 oz/sq yd (237 gm/m 2 ). strength of Kevlar * fabric, it was

  1. Miniature Autonomous Rocket Recovery System (MARRS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    composed of approximately 4 to 6 cubic centimeters of FFFF black powder. C. Rocket System Structure The rocket body was an epoxy-laden phenolic ... Kevlar line upon which was the lower main parachute; a 50” Rocket Rage Parachute. The booster had a 70” Rocket Rage parachute. In order to protect...the parachutes from burns, the parachutes were wrapped in protective Kevlar cloth and a layer of flame-retardant cellulose was packed in between the

  2. New Materials and Construction for Improved Helmets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    Kevlar fabric armor have been examined Iy .\\N1N’i and ot~wrlaboatores. he consensus has selected thle same phenol ic/polyvvinyl butyral I es inl USed...Helmet kevlar fabric laminates u,,ing phenolic /polyvinyl butyral resin withstand thermol stressing ’ad have low water absorption (2.5 percent in 24 hours...basis of laboratory te!sts for fragment protection capabilities and for durability. The mate- rials considered were (1) phenolic /polyvinyl butyral

  3. Confined Tension and Triaxial Extension Tests on Eglin High-Strength Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-17

    specimen were filled with Devcon 5-Minute epoxy . We encased the specimen in a liquid-tight flexible jacket to exclude the confining fluid from any...sealed to the steel endcaps with epoxy and wire clamps. Figure 3. Schematic diagram of test specimen prepared for TXE testing. TXE tests are...150 MPa – we wrapped two Kevlar jackets (0.01 in thick) around the specimen prior to installing the polyolefin jacket (0.02 in thick). The Kevlar

  4. THz QCL-based active imaging dedicated to non-destructive testing of composite materials used in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destic, F.; Petitjean, Y.; Massenot, S.; Mollier, J.-C.; Barbieri, S.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a CW raster-scanning THz imaging setup, used to perform Non-Destructive Testing of KevlarTMand carbon fibre samples. The setup uses a 2.5 THz Quantum Cascade Laser as a source. Delamination defect in a Kevlar sample was detected showing a sensitivity to laser polarization orientation. Detection of a break in a carbon/epoxy sample was also performed.

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Fragment Penetration of Thin Structural Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    his direction and assistance provided during the program. The following are registered trade names: Kevlar-29, 3M Co., Scotchply, Owens Corning Fiberglass...grains, are used. Composite laminates such as Owens Corning Fiberglass (R) panels, 3M Scotchply 1002 (R) panels and Kevlar-29 (R) reinforced plastic...results [2]: 1. Owens Corning Fiberglass (OCF) Structural Panels. Woven S-2 glass and a typical resin type, contert, sizing, and cure cycle at 220

  6. Thin Film Composite Materials, Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    were Kevlar coated with silicone, EPDM , or neoprene rubber , with the following results: 1. Tensile testing of coated Kevlar fabric is very difficult...Monte, CA, but the samples were not large enough for our testing program. e. EPDM . This is a rubber compound which consists of ;n ethylene propylene...materials. 2. A method was developed for measuring water vapor permeability. Neoprene and EPDM are promising as coatings with good water resistance; however

  7. A Study of Intumescent Reaction Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    Neoprene Fibers Considered Asbestos Metal Fiber (Steel Wool) Kevlar Mica Glass Fiber Mineral Wool Graphite Refrasil -7- • . . . ’ .. I , "’ - . NADC-84 170...Kevlar o Flexible Epoxy e Metal Fiber (Steel Wool) * Mineral Wool Fillers * Borax * Sodium Metasilicate * Ammonium Phosphate o Aluminum Sulfate...reference tables in Section 2.0] . The mineral wool appears to be the least effec- tive of the five fibers. To optimize thermal performance for a set of

  8. High-Intensity Sound in Air Saturated, Fibrous Bulk Porous Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-03

    Albany Industrial Fabrics, Johns - Manville Fiberglass, and Scott Paper Company. The author is very thankful for their contributions. September 1982...Batted Kevlar 29 and Johns - Manville 88 1000 Fiberglass 111-2 Photographs of Scottfelt 900-Z-2 and Blachford 89 Acoustical Foam 111-3 Block Diagram of...112 for Three Porosities of Scottfelt IV-3 Measured DC Flow Resistivity versus Particle Velocity 113 for Globe-Albany Kevlar 29, Johns - Manville 1000

  9. STIR: Tailored Interfaces for High Strength Composites Across Strain Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-02

    following by the nanowire growth . For the seeding process, the fibers were dipped into a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles (2nm diameter) that was...to the fabric prior to nanowire growth . The synthesis of ZnO nanowire on Kevlar fabric surface was conducted in two steps; initial seeding and...Patterson, Mohammad H. Malakooti, Henry A. Sodano. Modification of Pullout Behavior of Kevlar Fabric by Zinc Oxide Nanowire Reinforcement, Proceedings of

  10. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  11. Enhanced stab resistance of armor composites with functionalized silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Clements, Floria; Rangari, Vijaya; Dhanak, Vinod; Beamson, Graham

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally shear thickening fluid (STF) reinforced with Kevlar has been used to develop flexible armor. At the core of the STF-Kevlar composites is a mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and silica particles. This mixture is often known as STF and is consisted of approximately 45 wt % PEG and 55 wt % silica. During rheological tests, STF shows instantaneous spike in viscosity above a critical shear rate. Fabrication of STF-Kevlar composites requires preparation of STF, dilution with ethanol, and then impregnation with Kevlar. In the current approach, nanoscale silica particles were dispersed directly into a mixture of PEG and ethanol through a sonic cavitation process. Two types of silica nanoparticles were used in the investigation: 30 nm crystalline silica and 7 nm amorphous silica. The admixture was then reinforced with Kevlar fabric to produce flexible armor composites. In the next step, silica particles are functionalized with a silane coupling agent to enhance bonding between silica and PEG. The performance of the resulting armor composites improved significantly. As evidenced by National Institute of Justice spike tests, the energy required for zero-layer penetration (i.e., no penetration) jumped twofold: from 12 to 25 J cm2/g. The source of this improvement has been traced to the formation of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds between silica and PEG and superior coating of Kevlar filaments with particles. Fourier transform infrared, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy studies were performed to examine chemical bonds, elemental composition, and particle dispersion responsible for such improvement. In summary, our experiments have demonstrated that functionalization of silica particles followed by direct dispersion into PEG resulted in superior Kevlar composites having much higher spike resistance.

  12. Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor for Personal Ballistic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fábio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lima, Édio Pereira; da Luz, Fernanda Santos

    2017-10-01

    Lighter and less expensive polymer composites reinforced with natural fibers have been investigated as possible components of a multilayered armor system (MAS) for personal protection against high-velocity ammunition. Their ballistic performance was consistently found comparable with that of conventional Kevlar® synthetic aramid fiber. Among the numerous existing natural fibers with the potential for reinforcing polymer composites to replace Kevlar® in MAS, mallow fiber has not been fully investigated. Thus, the objective of this work is to evaluate the ballistic performance of epoxy composites reinforced with 30 vol.% of aligned mallow fibers as a second MAS layer backing a front ceramic plate. The results using high-velocity 7.62 ammunition show a similar indentation to a Kevlar® layer with the same thickness. An impedance matching calculation supports the similar ballistic performance of mallow fiber composite and Kevlar®. Reduced MAS costs associated with the mallow fiber composite are practical advantages over Kevlar®.

  13. Nanofibrous polymeric beads from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-08-16

    Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the beads were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the beads displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the beads possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the beads still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the beads were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the beads showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the beads showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber beads, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields.

  14. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  15. The effect of reinforcement on the tear properties of flexible circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, A. E.

    The tear properties of Kapton flexible circuitry are very poor. To better understand the properties of flex circuits and how to reinforce them, four different reinforcing materials were applied to a typical flex circuit and the tear properties were measured. Teflon film, nylon fabric, glass fabric and Kevlar fabric were all laminated to a flex circuit with Pyralux (a Dupont tradename) adhesive. The fabrics were laminated in both a 0/90 and a + or - 45 configuration. Five tests wereperformed, Graves, crescent, trousers, tensile and single edge notch (SEN). Of the four materials used for reinforcement, Kevlar clearly showed the greatest overall improvement in tear properties. However, Kevlar also provided the greatest processing difficulties. All of the reinforced circuits had an increase in thickness which resulted in an unacceptable loss of flexibility.

  16. The role of fiber and matrix in crash energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.; Bird, R. K.; Modlin, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on tube specimens fabricated from graphite/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and hybrid combinations of graphite-Kevlar/epoxy to examine the influence the fiber and matrix constitutive properties and laminate architecture have on energy absorption. Fiber and matrix ultimate failure strain were determined to significantly effect energy absorption. The energy absorption capability of high ultimate failure strain materials (AS-6/F185 and AS-6/HST-7) was less than materials having lower ultimate failure strain. Lamina stacking sequence had up to a 300 percent change in energy absorption for the materials tested. Hybridizing with graphite and Kevlar reinforcements resulted in materials with high energy absorption capabilities that have postcrushing integrity.

  17. Abrasion of Candidate Spacesuit Fabrics by Simulated Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rogers, Kerry J.; Sheehy, Brennan H.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar (DuPont), Vectran (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), Orthofabric, and Tyvek (DuPont)) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran and Kevlar suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.

  18. Composite containment systems for jet engine fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. T.

    1981-01-01

    The use of composites in fan blade containment systems is investigated and the associated structural benefits of the composite system design are identified. Two basic types of containment structures were investigated. The short finned concept was evaluated using Kevlar/epoxy laminates for fins which were mounted in a 6061 T-6 aluminum ring. The long fin concept was evaluated with Kevlar/epoxy, 6Al4V titanium, and 2024 T-3 aluminum fins. The unfinned configurations consisted of the base-line steel sheet, a circumferentially oriented aluminum honeycomb, and a Kevlar cloth filled ring. Results obtained show that a substantial reduction in the fan blade containment system weight is possible. Minimization of damage within the engine arising from impact interaction between blade debris and the engine structure is also achieved.

  19. ASRM Case Insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, W. F. S.; Bell, M.

    1993-01-01

    The ASRM Case Insulation Program used design of experiments to develop a high performance case insulation. The program traded-off more than thirty properties in areas of ablation performance, material properties, processibility, bonding/aging. Kevlar pulp was found to be the most significant factor. The low-molecular weight ethylene propylene diene monomer, EPDM was the second most significant factor. The curative was the third most significant factor. The tackifier was the fourth most significant factor. The stripwinding process for applying the insulation onto the case inner surfaces was also studied. The parameters selected for experiment were extruder speed, upper roller temperature and extruder nozzle temperature. The extrudability results showed that non-Kevlar filled formulations displayed optimum edges but poor thickness continuity. High Kevlar filled formulations displayed optimum thickness continuity but poor strip edge ratings.

  20. ASRM Case Insulation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, W. F. S.; Bell, M.

    1993-06-01

    The ASRM Case Insulation Program used design of experiments to develop a high performance case insulation. The program traded-off more than thirty properties in areas of ablation performance, material properties, processibility, bonding/aging. Kevlar pulp was found to be the most significant factor. The low-molecular weight ethylene propylene diene monomer, EPDM was the second most significant factor. The curative was the third most significant factor. The tackifier was the fourth most significant factor. The stripwinding process for applying the insulation onto the case inner surfaces was also studied. The parameters selected for experiment were extruder speed, upper roller temperature and extruder nozzle temperature. The extrudability results showed that non-Kevlar filled formulations displayed optimum edges but poor thickness continuity. High Kevlar filled formulations displayed optimum thickness continuity but poor strip edge ratings.

  1. A study of the effects of long-term exposure to fuels and fluids on the behavior of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic testing and evaluation of graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy material systems after subjecting test specimens to prolonged exposure to several laboratory-controlled environments deemed typical of normal aircraft operations is discussed. It is noted that specimen immersion in water or water-based fluids resulted in the greatest effect on the mechanical properties tested. Also, the environmental fluids showed a tendency to affect Kevlar/epoxy systems at an earlier exposure period than the graphite/epoxy systems. Results also indicate mechanical property strength retention generally being lower for the Kevlar/epoxy systems when compared to the corresponding graphite/epoxy systems in similar environments, after prolonged exposure.

  2. Finite element analysis for the evaluation of protective functions of helmets against ballistic impact.

    PubMed

    Lee, H P; Gong, S W

    2010-10-01

    The ballistic impact of a human head model protected by a Personnel Armor System Ground Troops Kevlar® helmet is analysed using the finite element method. The emphasis is to examine the effect of the interior cushioning system as a shock absorber in mitigating ballistic impact to the head. The simulations of the frontal and side impacts of the full metal jacket (FMJ) and fragment-simulating projectile (FSP) were carried out using LS-DYNA. It was found that the Kevlar® helmet with its interior nylon and leather strap was able to defeat both the FMJ and FSP without the projectiles penetrating the helmet. However, the head injuries caused by the FMJ impact can be fatal due to the high stiffness of the interior strap. The bulge section at the side of the Kevlar® helmet had more room for deformation that resulted in less serious head injuries.

  3. Tribological study of non-asbestos fiber reinforced phenolic composites for braking applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, P.; Dharani, L.R.; Blum, F.D.

    A cashew modified phenolic resin was used as the binder to prepare several different nonasbestos fiber reinforced composite friction materials. Friction-wear tests were conducted at various loads, speeds and temperatures on a Chase friction testing machine. The fade and wear characteristics of glass and carbon fiber reinforced friction materials were studied. The wear rates of hybrid composites containing Kevlar{reg_sign} (registered trademark of E.I. duPont de Nemours) pulp were compared to those of control composites without Kevlar{reg_sign} pulp.

  4. Burn/Blast Tests of Miscellaneous Graphite Composite Parts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    accommodate the size of the test fixture sample holder. The QCSEE fan blade consisted of various layers of KEVLAR (polyaramid fiber), S-glass, AS graphite...panel tested was a 14-ply laminate of W-134 graphite and MXG 6070 modified phenolic resin. This was an experimental formulation pro- posed as an...166/X-130 T-Section T-300/5209 epoxy 17 x 26 20 1122 skin-to-spar ST-163/X-127 QCSEE Kevlar /AS/Glass/B/PR 24 x 29 20 1204 fan blade BT-164/X-128 Le1C

  5. A Ballistic Material Model for Cross-Plied Unidirectional Ultra-High Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Fiber-Reinforced Armor-Grade Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    strength polymeric fibers such as aramid (e.g. Kevlar ®, Twaron®, etc.) or oriented polyethy- lene fibers (e.g. Spectra®, Dyneema®, etc.) with an... phenolic -poly-vinyl-butyral resin and on 0◦/90◦ cross- plied oriented polyethylene fiber-reinforced vinyl-ester resin are widely used in hard personnel...are: (a) poly-aramids (e.g. Kevlar ®, Twaron®, Technora®); (b) highly oriented ultra-highmolecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE (e.g. Spectra®, Dyneema

  6. Investigation of Surface Preparations to Enhance Photon Doppler Velocimetry Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    of Angle, Surface Profilometery, and Optical Photography at 10-, 20-, and 40-Times Magnifications 53 Appendix J. Kevlar Reflected Power... applicability to measure many velocities that the Army is interested in: floor accelerations due to an under- vehicle mine blast;4 material deformations from...x … x F HB-26 x … … … … x … x G Al2O3 x … … … … … … … H Polyethylene x … … … … x … … I Kevlar x … … … … … … x J Mild Steel … … … … … x

  7. Strain rate effects on mechanical properties of fiber composites, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the strain rate effects in fiber composites. Unidirectional composite specimens of boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy were tested to determine longitudinal, transverse and intralaminar (in-plane) shear properties. In the Longitudinal direction the Kevlar/epoxy shows a definite increase in both modulus and strength with strain rate. In the transverse direction, a general trend toward higher strength with strain rate is noticed. The intralaminar shear moduli and strengths of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy show a definite rise with strain rate.

  8. Preliminary investigation of crack arrest in composite laminates containing buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of some hybrid buffer strip laminates and the crack arrest potential of laminates containing buffer strips were determined. The hybrid laminates consisted of graphite with either S-glass, E-glass, or Kevlar. Unnotched tensile coupons and center-cracked fracture coupons were tested. Elastic properties, complete stress/strain curves, and critical stress intensity values are given. The measured elastic properties compare well with those calculated by classical lamination theory for laminates with linear stress/strain behavior. The glass hybrids had more delamination and higher fracture toughness than the all-graphite or the Kevlar hybrid.

  9. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  10. Tribo-performance evaluation of ecofriendly brake friction composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Tej; Grewal, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the potential of natural fibre in brake friction materials. Natural fibre filled ecofriendly brake friction materials were developed without Kevlar fibre evaluated for tribo-performance on a chase friction testing machine following SAE J 661a standard. Experimental results indicated that natural fibre enhances the fade performance, but depresses the friction and wear performance, whereas Kevlar fibre improves the friction, wear and recovery performance but depresses the fade performance. Also the results revealed that with the increase in natural fibre content, the friction and fade performances enhanced.

  11. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  12. Application of acoustic emission to the study of microfissure damage to composites used in the aeronautic and space industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perami, R.; Grezes-Besset, R.; Prince, W.

    The use of AE to study microcracking in hybrid glass-carbon and kevlar laminates relevant to the aerospace industry was experimentally studied. It was found that some plastics reinforced by high-modulus fibers are especially prone to progressive cracking. The use of AE and permeability variations to analyze cracking under loads, fatigue, and aging of the composites is shown.

  13. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    equivalent to a domestic lifeboat.” Figure 1. ARKTOS evacuation craft drawing. The ARKTOS consists of a permanently linked pair of laminated e...glass/ Kevlar -hybrid hulls. On land motive power is provided by a track system, and water jets for propulsion in the water. Each hull is independently

  14. Numerical Study of Head/Helmet Interaction Due to Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    unidirectional laminate sheets. The MAT_162 material model in LS-DYNA is used to account for the effects of strain rate and strain softening after damage...C., Tan V., Lee H., 2008, “Ballistic Impact of a KEVLAR Helmet: Experimental and Simulations”, International Journal of Impact Engineering, 35, pp

  15. Impact resistance and interlaminar fracture toughness of through-the-thickness reinforced graphite/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.; Funk, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Five through-the-thickness stitch configurations are analyzed to determine the effect of impact resistance and interlaminar fracture toughness on T3000/3501-6 graphite/epoxy. The test specimens were stitched with either polyester or Kevlar yarns and with various stitch parameters. Tension and compression mechanical, impact and compression-after-impact, and double cantilever beam tests were conducted. It is observed that the stitched laminates have tension and compression strengths 20-25 percent lower than the strengths of unstitched laminates, the tension strength of stitched laminates is reduced with increasing number of stitches, and the compression strength increases as the number of stitches are increased. The impact data reveal that the Kevlar stitched laminates have less damage than unstitched laminates; the most effective configuration for suppressing impact damage and improving interlaminar fracture toughness consists of Kevlar yarns 1/4 inch apart with eight stitches per inch. The mode 1 critical strain energy release rate for the 1/4 inch Kevlar eight stitch laminate was calculated as 30 times higher than that of the unstitched.

  16. Advanced Design Composite Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    been selected for ADCA applications. These are graphite (PAN)/ epoxy, graphite (PAN)/polyimide, Kevlar /epoxy, f ibergl ass/epoxy, and quartz...Aluminum Alloy Aluminum Alloy ACG (commercial grade) Nomex HRP Fiberglass/ Phenolic HRH Fiberglass/Polyimide Graphite/epoxy Graphi te/Polyimide

  17. Influence of Processing in the Solid State Morphology of ABPBI/PBT polymeric Composite Films: X-Ray Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    ratio is substantially superior to that of steel. Examples of HSHM fibers are: Kevlar , Poly(p-Benzamide), and Poly(p- phenylene Benzobisthiazole). The...is amorphous, but pressure treatment with phenol at 290-3050C for two hours causes it to crystallize. A marked increase in crystallinity of poly(p

  18. Test Methods for Composites: A Status Report. Volume 2. Compression Test Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    glass and Kevlar fibers in a phenolic matrix) were relatively thick (24 plies), and more importantly, failed at very low compressive strength levels...ICH LAMINATE SPECIMEN TEST METHOD ........................................ 29 2.4 RECOMMENDATIONS...Thickness in the Middle of the Gage Section, for Four Laminate Thicknesses [711 ................... 143 52. Axial Stress Distributions in an AS4/3502 Carbon

  19. Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Kevlar KM2® Style 705 PVB phenolic woven aramid composite was included. A developmental unidirectional thermoplastic aramid fiber, Honeywell...Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates by...Unidirectional Composite Laminates Lionel R. Vargas-Gonzalez, Shawn M. Walsh, and James C. Gurganus Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  20. Multi-fiber strains measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy: Principles and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Yunfeng; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei; Bai, Ruixiang; Chen, Xiaogang

    2016-02-01

    Based on widely used axial strain measurement method of Kevlar single fiber, an original theoretical model and measurement principle of application of micro-Raman spectroscopy to multi-fiber strains in a fiber bundle were established. The relationship between the nominal Raman shift of fiber bundle and the multi-fiber strains was deduced. The proposed principle for multi-fiber strains measurement is consistent with two special cases: single fiber deformation and multi-fiber deformation under equal strain. It is found experimentally that the distribution of Raman scattering intensity of a Kevlar 49 fiber as a function of distance between a fiber and the laser spot center follows a Gaussian function. Combining the Raman-shift/strain relationship of the Kevlar 49 single fiber and the uniaxial tension measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the Raman shift as a function of strain was obtained. Then the Raman peak at 1610 cm-1 for the Kevlar 49 fiber was fitted to a Lorentzian function and the FWHM showed a quadratic increase with the fiber strain. Finally, a dual-fiber tensile experiment was performed to verify the adequacy of the Raman technique for the measurement of multi-fiber strains.

  1. A spaceworthy ADR - Recent developments. [Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for X ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides T.; Warner, Brent A.; Sansebastian, Marcelino; Kunes, Evan

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments concerning the performance and reliability of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for the AXAF X-ray spectrometer are considered. They include a procedure for growing the salt pill around a harness made up of 6080 gold-plated copper wires, a totally modular gas gap heat switch, and a suspension system utilizing Kevlar fibers.

  2. SRB thermal curtain design support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Carl A.; Lundblad, Wayne E.; Koenig, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improvements in SRB Thermal Curtain were identified by thermal design featuring: selection of materials capable of thermal protection and service temperatures by tri-layering quartz, S2 glass, and Kevlar in thinner cross section; weaving in single piece (instead of 24 sections) to achieve improved strength; and weaving to reduce manufacturing cost with angle interlock construction.

  3. Development of fiber shields for engine containment. [mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, R. J.; Davidson, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted in translational launchers and spin pits to generate empirical data used in the design of a Kevlar shield for containing engine burst debris. Methods are given for modeling the relationship of fragment characteristics to shielding requirements. The change in relative importance of shield mounting provisions as fragment energy is increased is discussed.

  4. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  5. Tribology and Friction of Soft Materials: Mississippi State Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-18

    elastomers , foams, and fabrics. B. Develop internal state variable (ISV) material model. Model will be calibrated using database and verified...Rubbers Natural rubber Santoprene (Vulcanized Elastomer ) Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR) Foams Polypropylene Foam Polyurethane Foam Fabrics Kevlar...Axially symmetric model PC Disk PC Numerical Implementation in FEM Codes Experiment SEM Optical methods ISV Model Void Nucleation FEM Analysis

  6. An Operational Summary of the BERMEX81-V3 Experiment: 17-19 September 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    1979 and 1980) were to utilize the Versatile Experimental Kevlar Array (VEKA-3B), a two-hydrophone, vertically moored system with an RF telemetry link to...the nose and tail sections of a MK35 tor- pedo . Operational parameters of the BTS 9029 are presented in Table C-3. The BTS 9029 system was fully

  7. Reconsiderations: "Brave Words"--Rehabilitating the Veteran-Writer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Liam

    2012-01-01

    From September 2008 to July 2009, the author traded academic robes for the Army Combat Uniform issued to US Navy personnel deploying to Afghanistan. Along with using the ceramic and Kevlar body armor he learned to don at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, he metaphorically defended himself from the disruption to his personal and professional life that…

  8. A facile synthetic route to poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) with dual functional groups.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuming; Wang, Wenbin; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Liqun; Wan, Xinhua

    2014-09-07

    Claisen rearrangement reaction was employed for the first time to obtain a novel PPTA bearing reactive allyl and hydroxyl groups which may act as a sizing agent of Kevlar fibers to improve the interface structure and interfacial adhesion of rubber or epoxy based composites.

  9. Proceedings and Minutes of the National Interagency Coordination Group Meeting - Low Altitude Direct Strike Lightning Characterization Program Held in Saint Louis, Missouri on 28-29 January 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Gallon External Fuel Tank. a. This is a filament-wound fuel tank with nomex honeycomb core, inner layers of Kevlar and glass , outer layers of...MD 20910 Dr. A. Carro FAA Technical Center Mr. Jack Lippert ACT-340 AFWAL/FIEA Atlantic City Airport, NJ 08405 Air Force Wright Aeronautical Lab

  10. Evaluation of composite flattened tubular specimen. [fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    Flattened tubular specimens of graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, Kevlar-49/epoxy, and graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid materials were evaluated under static and cyclic uniaxial tensile loading and compared directly with flat coupon data of the same materials generated under corresponding loading conditions. Additional development for the refinement of the flattened specimen configuration and fabrication was required. Statically tested graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, and Kevlar 49/epoxy flattened tube specimens exhibit somewhat higher average strengths than their corresponding flat coupons. Flattened tube specimens of the graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid and the graphite/epoxy flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes with consequential lower strength than the corresponding flat coupons. Fatigue tested flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes resulting in lower fatigue strengths than the corresponding flat coupons.

  11. Producibility aspects of advanced composites for an L-1011 Aileron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hamersveld, J.; Fogg, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    The design of advanced composite aileron suitable for long-term service on transport aircraft includes Kevlar 49 fabric skins on honeycomb sandwich covers, hybrid graphite/Kevlar 49 ribs and spars, and graphite/epoxy fittings. Weight and cost savings of 28 and 20 percent, respectively, are predicted by comparison with the production metallic aileron. The structural integrity of the design has been substantiated by analysis and static tests of subcomponents. The producibility considerations played a key role in the selection of design concepts with potential for low-cost production. Simplicity in fabrication is a major factor in achieving low cost using advanced tooling and manufacturing methods such as net molding to size, draping, forming broadgoods, and cocuring components. A broadgoods dispensing machine capable of handling unidirectional and bidirectional prepreg materials in widths ranging from 12 to 42 inches is used for rapid layup of component kits and covers. Existing large autoclaves, platen presses, and shop facilities are fully exploited.

  12. Parametric design analysis of a hybrid composite flywheel using a laminated central disc and a filament wound outer ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmer, R. P.

    1980-09-01

    A hybrid flywheel design concept based on the use of a laminated central disk with a filament-wound outer ring is analyzed for several different combinations of composite materials. Some of the results of this study are: (1) an optimized E-glass disk with Kevlar-49 outer ring offers the prospect of 30% additional energy density over a laminated disk without a ring; (2) a laminated S2-glass disk is capable of storing more energy per unit mass than an E-glass disk because of its higher tensile strength; and (3) the use of wound graphite outer rings with S2-glass disks leads to substantial reductions in the size of the interference fit while offering still higher energy densities than for a Kevlar-49 outer ring.

  13. Residual stresses and their effects in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Hwang, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses in composite laminates are caused by the anisotropy in expansional properties of constituent unidirectional plies. The effect of these residual stresses on dimensional stability is studied through the warping of unsymmetric (0 sub 4/90 sub 4)sub T graphite/epoxy laminates while their effect on ply failure is analyzed for (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate. The classical laminated plate theory is used to predict the warping of small and large panels. The change of warping does not indicate a noticeable stress relaxation at 75 C while it is very sensitive to moisture content and hence to environment. A prolonged gellation at the initial cure temperature reduces residual stresses while postcure does not. The matrix/interface cracking in dry (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate is shown to be the result of the residual stress exceeding the transverse strength.

  14. Investigation into Composites Property Effect on the Forming Limits of Multi-Layer Hybrid Sheets Using Hydroforming Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shichen; Lang, Lihui; Guan, Shiwei; Alexandrov, Seigei; Zeng, Yipan

    2018-04-01

    Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs) such as Kevlar reinforced aluminum laminate (ARALL), Carbon reinforced aluminum laminate (CARALL), and Glass reinforced aluminum laminate (GLARE) offer great potential for weight reduction applications in automobile and aerospace construction. In order to investigate the feasibility for utilizing such materials in the form of laminates, sheet hydroforming technology are studied under the condition of uniform blank holder force for three-layered aluminum and aluminum-composite laminates using orthogonal carbon and Kevlar as well as glass fiber in the middle. The experimental results validate the finite element results and they exhibited that the forming limit of glass fiber in the middle is the highest among the studied materials, while carbon fiber material performs the worst. Furthermore, the crack modes are different for the three kinds of fiber materials investigated in the research. This study provides fundamental guidance for the selection of multi-layer sheet materials in the future manufacturing field.

  15. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites.

  16. Effects of fatigue and environment on residual strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fatigue, moisture conditioning, and heating on the residual tension strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels were evaluated using specimens made with T300/5208 graphite epoxy in a 16-ply quasi-isotropic layup, with two different buffer strip materials, Kevlar-49 or S-glass. It was found that, for panels subjected to fatigue loading, the residual strengths were not significantly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panels by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results, but increased the residual strengths of the Kevlar-49 buffer strip panels slightly. For both buffer strip materials, the heat increased the residual strengths of the buffer strip panels slightly over the ambient results.

  17. Material properties and laser cutting of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Chieh; Cheng, Wing

    Laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) has been used successfully for many material cutting, drilling, metal welding and heat treating applications. However, laser cutting of polymer composites were attempted with varying degrees of success. Because composites are heterogeneous, the energy applied by laser could result in severe resin degradation before fibers were cut. In this study, cutting of glass, Kevlar, and graphite composites were evaluated based on their material properties and laser cutting parameters. A transient heat transfer analysis was used to determine the relative heat affected zones of these composites. Kevlar composites can be cut very well while graphite composites are difficult to cut. Though the cutting process is much more complicated in reality, the analysis provides a semi-quantitative perspective on the characteristics and limitations of laser cutting of different composites.

  18. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  19. Dynamic stress analysis of smooth and notched fiber composite flexural specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dynamic stress field in smooth and notched fiber composite (Charpy-type) specimens is reported in this paper. The analysis is performed with the aid of the direct transient response analysis solution sequence of MSC/NASTRAN. Three unidirectional composites were chosen for the study. They are S-Glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and T-300/Epoxy composite systems. The specimens are subjected to an impact load which is modeled as a triangular impulse with a maximum of 2000 lb and a duration of 1 ms. The results are compared with those of static analysis of the specimens subjected to a peak load of 2000 lb. For the geometry and type of materials studied, the static analysis results gave close conservative estimates for the dynamic stresses. Another interesting inference from the study is that the impact induced effects are felt by S-Glass/Epoxy specimens sooner than Kevlar/Epoxy or T-300/Epoxy specimens.

  20. Development of advanced lightweight containment systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C.

    1981-01-01

    Parametric type data were obtained on advanced lightweight containment systems. These data were used to generate design methods and procedures necessary for the successful development of such systems. The methods were then demonstrated through the design of a lightweight containment system for a CF6 size engine. The containment concept evaluated consisted basically of a lightweight structural sandwich shell wrapped with dry Kevlar cloth. The initial testing was directed towards the determination of the amount of Kevlar required to result in threshold containment for a specific set of test conditions. A relationship was then developed between the thickness required and the energy of the released blade so that the data could be used to design for conditions other than those tested.

  1. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    This first interim report presents the technical background for including environmental effects in the design of helicopter composite structures, and test results after approximately two year field exposure of components and panels. Composite structural components were removed from Sikorsky S-76 helicopters commercially operated in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Fatigue tests were conducted for a graphite/epoxy tail rotor spar and static test for a graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy stabilizer. Graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy panels are being exposed to the outdoor environment in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm Beach, Florida. For this reporting period the two year panels were returned, moisture measurements taken, and strength tests conducted. Results are compared with initial type certificate strengths for components and with initial laboratory coupon tests for the exposed panels. Comparisons are also presented with predicted and measured moisture contents.

  2. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    This first interim report presents the technical background for including environmental effects in the design of helicopter composite structures, and test results after approximately two year field exposure of components and panels. Composite structural components were removed from Sikorsky S-76 helicopters commercially operated in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Fatigue tests were conducted for a graphite/epoxy tail rotor spar and static test for a graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy stabilizer. Graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy panels are being exposed to the outdoor environment in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm Beach, Florida. For this reporting period the two year panels were returned, moisture measurements taken, and strength tests conducted. Results are compared with initial type certificate strengths for components and with initial laboratory coupon tests for the exposed panels. Comparisons are also presented with predicted and measured moisture contents.

  3. A robust and stretchable superhydrophobic PDMS/PVDF@KNFs membrane for oil/water separation and flame retardancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Deke; Gou, Xuelian; Wu, Daheng; Guo, Zhiguang

    2018-04-05

    The wide application of superhydrophobic membranes has been limited due to their complicated preparation technology and weak durability. Inspired by the mechanical flexibility of nanofibrous biomaterials, nanofibrils have been successfully generated from Kevlar, which is one of the strongest synthetic fibers, by appropriate hydrothermal treatment. In this study, a robust superhydrophobic PDMS/PVDF@KNFs membrane is prepared via a simple one-step process and subsequent curing without combination with inorganic fillers. The as-prepared PDMS/PVDF@KNFs membrane not only shows efficient oil/water separation ability and oil absorption capacity but also has excellent superhydrophobicity stability after deformation. The resultant membrane shows stretchability, flexibility and flame retardance because of the reinforcing effect and the excellent flame retardancy of Kevlar. We believe that this simple fabrication of PDMS/PVDF@KNFs has promising applications in filtering membranes and wearable devices.

  4. Influence on grip of knife handle surface characteristics and wearing protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Claudon, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    Ten subjects were asked to apply maximum torques on knife handles with either their bare hand or their hand wearing a Kevlar fibre protective glove. Four knife handles (2 roughnesses, 2 hardnesses) were tested. Surface electromyograms of 6 upper limb and shoulder muscles were recorded and subject opinions on both knife handle hardness and friction in the hand were also assessed. The results revealed the significant influence of wearing gloves (p<0.0001), knife type (p<0.0005) and handle hardness (p<0.005) on the applied torque. Wearing Kevlar fibre gloves greatly increased the torque independently of the other two parameters. Under the bare hand condition, a 90 degrees ShA slightly rough handle provided the greatest torque. Subject opinion agreed with the observed effects on recorded torque values except for the hardness factor, for which a preference for the 70 degrees ShA value over the 90 degrees ShA value emerged.

  5. Modelling poly(p-phenylene teraphthalamide) at Extreme Tensile Loading using Reactive Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Dundar

    2015-03-01

    Aromatic polyamides classified as rigid-rod polymers due to orientation of their monomers. Because of their excellent mechanical and thermal properties, aramids are widely used in the industry. For example DuPont's brand Kevlar, for its commercial aromatic polyamide polymer, due to wide usage of this polymer in ballistic applications, habitually used as a nickname for bulletproof vests. In order to engineer these ballistic fabrics, material properties of aramid fibers should be studied. In this work we focused on the poly(p-phenylene teraphthalamide) PPTA fiber, known as brand name Kevlar. We employed Reactive potentials to simulate PPTA polymer under tensile loading. We first simulated both amorphous and crystalline phases of PPTA. We also introduced defects with varying densities. We further analysed the recorded atomic positions data to understand how tensile load distributed and failure mechanisms at extreme tensile loads. This work supported by TUBITAK under Grant No: 113F358.

  6. Full-field fabric stress mapping by micro Raman spectroscopy in a yarn push-out test.

    PubMed

    Lei, Z K; Qin, F Y; Fang, Q C; Bai, R X; Qiu, W; Chen, X

    2018-02-01

    The full-field stress distribution of a two-dimensional plain fabric was mapped using micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) through a novel yarn push-out test, simulating a quasi-static projectile impact on the fabric. The stress-strain relationship for a single yarn was established using a digital image correlation method in a single-yarn tensile test. The relationship between Raman peak shift and aramid Kevlar 49 yarn stress was established using MRS in a single-yarn tensile test. An out-of-plane loading test was conducted on an aramid Kevlar 49 plain fabric, and the yarn stress was measured using MRS. From the full-field fabric stress distribution, it can be observed that there is a cross-shaped distribution of high yarn stress; this result would be helpful in further studies on load transfer on a fabric during a projectile impact.

  7. 2005 22nd International Symposium on Ballistics. Volume 1 - Tuesday

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-18

    Electric Power in Active Armour Applications, Martin van de Voorde, R. Boeschoten, TNO Defence, Security and Safety Prevention of Sympathetic Detonation...and Kevlar®/Steel Armor - Experimental Data and Hydrocode Modeling with Eulerian and Lagrangian Methods, Dale S. Preece, Vanessa S. Berg, and Loyd R...Applications, Martin van de Voorde, R. Boeschoten, TNO Defence, Security and Safety Prevention of Sympathetic Detonation Between Reactive Armor Sandwiches

  8. Mechanical property characterization of intraply hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to characterize the mechanical properties of intraply hybrids made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix (primary composites) hybridized with varying amounts of secondary composites made from S-glass or Kevlar 49 fibers. The tests were conducted using thin laminates having the same thickness. The specimens for these tests were instrumented with strain gages to determine stress-strain behavior. Significant results are included.

  9. The Effect of Strike Face Geometry on the Dynamic Delamination of Composite Back Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    behind the ceramic (Zuogang et al. 2010). In many cases, Kevlar , S-2 glass, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, or a similar high- performance...composite laminate is used as the strike face backing or “backer”. The latter will be the focus in this report. Woven fabrics have interlacing fibers...over other weaves. Woven fabrics also have better fracture toughness than unidirectional and cross- ply laminates (Kim and Sham 2000). However, a

  10. Analysis of dynamic properties for a composite laminated beam at intermediate strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. C.; Pendleton, R. L.; Dolan, D. F.

    The dynamic mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite laminate in flexural vibration has been investigated. The effects of fiber orientation and vibration frequency for both unidirectional tape and Kevlar fabric were studied both analytically and experimentally. Measurement of storage and loss moduli were presented for laminated double cantilever beams of fiber reinforced composite with frequency range from 8 to 1230 Hz (up to 5th mode).

  11. Laser cutting plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancleave, R. A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000 watt CO2 laser was demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics were laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposal tooling made from acrylic.

  12. Composite material embedded fiber-optic Fabry-Perot strain rosette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valis, Thomas; Hogg, Dayle; Measures, Raymond M.

    1990-12-01

    A fiber-optic strain rosette is embedded in Kevlar/epoxy. The individual arms of the rosette are fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers operated in reflection-mode with gauge (i.e., cavity) lengths of approximately 5 mm. Procedures for manufacturing the cavities, and bending the fibers, to form a strain rosette are described. Experimental results showing 2D interlaminar strain-tensor measurement are presented. The sensor is also tested as a surface adhered device.

  13. Additional results on space environmental effects on polymer matrix composites: Experiment A0180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Additional experimental results on the atomic oxygen erosion of boron, Kevlar, and graphite fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites are presented. Damage of composite laminates due to micrometeoroid/debris impacts is also examined with particular emphasis on the relationship between damage area and actual hole size due to particle penetration. Special attention is given to one micrometeoroid impact on an aluminum base plate which resulted in ejecta visible on an adjoining vertical flange structure.

  14. Mechanical and electrical properties of laminates for high performance printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiles, Chester L.

    The physical and electrical properties of laminate boards intended for high-performance applications are reviewed with particular reference to the coefficient of thermal expansion, dielectric constant, and characteristic impedance. It is shown, in particular, that the electrical properties can be tailored to some extent by using various conbinations of basic board materials, such as copper foil, fiberglass fabric, glass fabric, epoxy resin, polyimide resin, aluminum sheet, Kevlar and quartz fabrics, copper-invar-copper, and alumina-ceramic.

  15. Ballistic Performance of Alimina/S-2 Glass-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composite Hybrid Lightweight Armor Against Armor Piercing (AP) and Non-AP Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    and a phenolic -resin based polymeric matrix. Such armor panels offer superior protection against fragmented ballistic threats when compared to...database does not contain a material model for the HJ1 composite but provides a model for a Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Polymer (KFRP) containing 53 vol... phenolic resin and epoxy yield stresses and then with a ratio of the S-2 glass and aramid fibers volume fractions. To test the validity of the

  16. Effect of Damage on Strength and Durability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    sheets and different core materials. The HRP core has a phenolic resin matrix, the NP core has nylon modified phenolic base resin matrix and TPC core...core are 25% to 65% higher than those of NP or TPC cores. The phenolic resin of the HRP makes core stiff and brittle, resulting in cracking on impact...characteristics of graphite laminates can be improved by inserting glass or Kevlar fibers to form a hybrid laminate system. However, since glass and

  17. Safety, Health and Environmental Hazards Associated with Composites: A Complete Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    evolve (Ballinger 2). Likewise, important fiber materials such as glass, carbon/graphite, aramid ( Kevlar ), and boron are prevalent in the industry. Each...absorption. Skin irritation or sensitization may result from extended exposure (Ballinger 2). Polyurethanes and Urea-/ Phenol -formaldehyde - These resin systems...percent scrap in the formation of laminate lay-ups (Lee 24). Because of limited applications, this is regarded as waste. In the future, this level of waste

  18. Fast Burn Booster Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-21

    phenolic resin. The warp/fill primary structure laminate plies are laid up next followed by the exit cone bias involute. The subassembly was vacuum bagged...CARBON FIBER/EPOXT 7075-T73 ALUMINUM 7kCo4x>€ axmjtuma* ROUNDING RING CARBON PHENOLIC INVOLUTE CARBON PHENOLIC LAMINATED INSULATION. MXSI-55...DESIGNS AND CURRENT STATUS *n ,.Wn„nd Composite Case. The older Sentry motor design employed a hybrid ( Kevlar -graphlte) fUament-wound ewe. *« S

  19. Putting Lives on the Line: The Fast Rope Glove Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    conductivity. They were 1) Silica Aerogel , 2) Silica/Ceramic NASA Q-Fiber and 3) Nomex/Kevlar. Silica Aerogel has the lowest thermal conductivity...of any known solid and was recently made into a viable material by the company Aspen Aerogel .3 The other materials have lower conductivity than the...blend and a silica aerogel pad that could be incorporated into the palms and finger pads of the glove. For this evaluation, we tested: • The Superior

  20. Design and Testing of Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Determination and Stabilization Systems That Are Based on Magnetic Sensing and Actuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-27

    than a liability. It stabilizes yaw and pitch by using a badminton -birdie type configuration, one like that pictured in Fig. 2. The basic principal...of metal or Kevlar that resemble the tape in a carpenter’s retractable tape measure. Fig. 2. Badminton -birdie-type spacecraft pitch-yaw stabilization...A second design uses a new passive aerodynamic pitch-yaw stabilization system. This latter system is based on the concept of a badminton birdie and

  1. Aerodynamic and Thermal Performance Characteristics of Supersonic-X Type Decelerators at Mach Number 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    SUPERSONIC -X TYPE DECELERATORS AT MACH NUMBER 8 t’z.r I # I JJ’, o,. VON KARMAN GAS DYNAMICS FACILITY ARNOLD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT CENTER AIR FORCE...AERODYNAMIC AND THERMAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF SUPERSONIC - X TYPE DECELERATORS AT MACH NUMBER 8 ’ 7 AU THORCs,: p ; J . D. Corce , ARO, Inc...pe r fo rmance cha rac t e r i s t i c s of model nylon, Kevlar 29, and Bisbenzimidazobenzophenanthroline Supersonic -X type parachutes behind a

  2. Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-11

    Yong and H.T. Hahn, "Kevlar/Vinyl Ester Composites with SiC Nanoparticles ," SAMPE 2004 Proc. ( CD ROM), May 2004. C-6. M. Lui and H.T. Hahn...34 Nanoparticle -Based Mitigation of fiber Print-Through in Composite Mirrors," Proc. American Society for Composites, 20’h Technical Conference ( CD ROM), Sept. 2005...the graphene layers. Microwave radiation aids in drying and results in further separation of the sheets. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the

  3. Development Of An 80'-Diameter Ribbon Drogue Parachute For The NASA X-38 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behr, Vance L.; Wolf, Dean F.; Rutledge, Bruce A.; Hillebrandt, F. David

    2001-01-01

    The NASA X-38 program required a larger, more robust drogue parachute. A multi-organizational team from NASA, Sandia National Laboratories, United Space Alliance, and Pioneer Aerospace Corporation has developed and tested a new 80-ft.-dia., quarter-spherical, ribbon drogue parachute. The design requirements, design specifics, margin analyses, and results of testing are all discussed herein. Some of the weight advantages of switching from Kevlar to Zylon for radial, line and riser materials are presented.

  4. Bioinspired, Mobile Robots With High Stability, Functionality and Low Cost

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-19

    actuators with complex actuating modes (e.g., extending and multiple bending modes; Figure 5-3). Figure 5-1. (left panel) 3D printed molds...failure (e.g., cellulose , KevlarTM, polystyrene). We designed a two part mold (Figure 6-a) to pattern the exterior and interior pleating and then...variety of objects. The 3D molding technique used to fabricate this actuator, however, limits the pneumatic channel geometry. To achieve pneu-net

  5. Materials and process optimization for dual-shell satellite antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaski, Darcy R.; van Oyen, Hans J.; Nissan, Sorin J.

    A comprehensive, design-optimization test program was conducted for satellite antenna reflectors composed of two offset paraboloidal Kevlar-reinforced sandwich shells separated by a circular sandwich structure. In addition to standard mechanical properties testing, coefficient of thermal expansion and hygroscopic tests were conducted to predict reflector surface accuracy in the thermal cycling environment of orbital space. Attention was given to the relative placement of components during assembly, in view of reflector surface measurements.

  6. Development of a four-frequency selective surface prototype spacecraft antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    NASA-JPL's four-frequency telecommunication system design entails the creation and integration of a frequency-selective surface (FSS) subreflector into the high-gain antenna subsystem. The FSS design, which incorporates a periodic array of conducting elements on a kevlar/polymer composite structure, will be able to multiplex S, X, Ku, and Ka frequency-band wavelengths. Accounts are presented of the FSS's development, mechanical testing, and electrical testing.

  7. Fatigue life of fibre reinforced plastics at 295 K after thermal cycling between 295 K and 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belisario, G.; Caproni, F.; Marchetti, E.

    Results of low cycle three-point end fatigue tests at 295 K are reported. These were obtained from fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) flat specimens made of epoxy matrix reinforced with glass rovings only or glass rovings and Kevlar cloth. It is shown that previous thermal cycles between 295 K and 77 K exert an influence on the fatigue life as well on the acoustic emission results.

  8. Next Generation HeliMag UXO Mapping Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Ancillary instrumentation records aircraft height above ground and attitude. A fluxgate magnetometer is used to allow for aeromagnetic compensation of... Magnetometer System WWII World War II WAA wide area assessment ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Next Generation HeliMag Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) Mapping...for deployment of seven total-field magnetometers on a Kevlar reinforced boom mounted on a Bell 206L helicopter. The objectives of this

  9. Next Generation HeliMag UXO Mapping Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    fluxgate magnetometer is used to allow for aeromagnetic compensation of the data as well as to provide redundant attitude information. 2.1.4 Telemetry...sensor operator from the helicopter. Based on a survey design study , the number of magnetometers was increased from 7 to 13, decreasing the across... magnetometers on a Kevlar reinforced boom mounted on a Bell 206L helicopter. The objectives of this demonstration were too:  Improve data acquisition speeds

  10. Meteoroid and Debris Impact Features Documented on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    surfaces was very different from the hole production (penetration) mechanism in true thin films; the laminated structure was never actually penetrated...16 METEOROID & DEBRIS SPECIAL INVESTIGATION GROUP Impacts into laminated polymeric films, such as the Kapton test specimens on experiment A0138...several layers of carbon, glass, and/or Kevlar woven fiber cloth laminated together with resin binders. Impact features in these materials were

  11. Effects Of Rapid Crushing On Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental study described in NASA technical memorandum performed to determine whether crash energy-absorption capabilities of graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy composite materials are functions of speed of crushing. Additional objective to develop understanding of mechanisms of crushing. Technology applied to enhancement of safety and crashworthiness of automobiles, design of energy-absorbing devices in machinery, and problems involving explosions and impacts.

  12. Applications of Composite Materials in Helicopter Construction (Les Applications des Materiaux Composite dans la Construction des Helicopteres),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-21

    TRANSLATION TITLE: APPLICATIONS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN HELICOPTER CONSTRUCTION LES APPLICATIONS DES MATERTAUX COMWSITE DANS LA CONSTRUCTION DES...International Symposium on Design and Use of Kevlar in Aircraft, Geneva, 12 October 1982 [Beziac, Gilbert;* Les applications des mat6riaux composite...the pilot’s orders to the engine and the rotors. --Rear rotor Conventional or "faired propeller" type with its overall pitch control --Vibration

  13. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of Polymer Nanocomposites for Solid Rocket Motor Internal Insulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    combustion chamber. Kevlar®-filled ethylene-propylene-diene rubber ( EPDM ) is the baseline insulation material for solid rocket motor cases. A novel...filled EPDM is the industry standard for this application. Since the elastic modulus of rubbers is low, they also act as absorbers during...Santoprene® thermoplastic rubber is already demonstrating their performance capability to replace EPDM in automotive weather seal applications [18]. An

  14. Fracto-emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Fracto-emission (FE) is the emission of particles and photons during and following crack propagation. Electrons (EE), positive ions (PIE), and excited and ground state neutrals (NE) were observed. Results of a number of experiments involving principally graphite/epoxy composites and Kevlar single fibers are presented. The physical processes responsible for EE and PIE are discussed as well as FE from fiber- and particulate-reinforced composites.

  15. QM-8 field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Elgie

    1989-01-01

    The pre-launch functioning data of the Field Joint Protection System (JPS) used on QM-8 are presented. Also included is the post fire condition of the JPS components following the test firing of the motor. The JPS components are: field joint heaters; field joint sensors; field joint moisture seal; moisture seal kevlar retaining straps; field joint external extruded cork insulation; vent valve; power cables; and igniter heater.

  16. Composites review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordonneau, A.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and applications of composite materials are reviewed. Glass, carbon, Kevlar, ceramic, whisker, and metal fibers are discussed along with polyester, epoxy, polyimide, Peek, carbon, ceramic, and metal matrices. The quantitative distribution of high technology fiber in various applications is given. The role of aerospace industry in the development and promotion of composite utilization is discussed. Consumption trends indicate a rapid development of the composite market.

  17. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    was selected as the composite material. This selection was based upon the following advantages in comparison to aluminum: 0 Stiffness to weight...closer to titanium than aluminum. Other composite candidate materials considered ( glass , Kevlar and metal matrix) did not offer all of these...of the bearing support ring, and the attachment of the bearing support ring to the composite gimbal base plate. A thermal test structure, which

  18. Flight Set 360L002 (STS-27) field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Elgie

    1989-01-01

    This report contains the pre-launch functioning data of the Field Joint Protection System (JPS) used on STS-27. Also included is the post flight condition of the JPS components following the launch and recovery of the two redesigned solid rocket motors (RSRM) boosters. The JPS components are: (1) field joint heaters; (2) field joint sensors; (3) field joint moisture seal; (4) moisture seal Kevlar retaining straps; (5) field joint external insulation; (6) vent valve; (7) power cables; and (8) igniter heater.

  19. A (13)C NMR analysis of the effects of electron radiation on graphite/polyetherimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1989-01-01

    Initial investigations have been made into the use of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the characterization of radiation effects in graphite and Kevlar fibers, polymers, and the fiber/matrix interface in graphite/polyetherimide composites. Sample preparation techniques were refined. Essential equipment has been procured. A new NMR probe was constructed to increase the proton signal-to-noise ratio. Problem areas have been identified and plans developed to resolve them.

  20. Virtual Prototyping for Personal Protective Equipment and Workplaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    Basket Weave Kevlar-29 Fabric Loosely Draped over 20% Ordnance Gelatin Block Subject to Non-Perforating Impact by .38 Special (130-grain FMJ...Fabric and fabric-like materials are very difficult to model because of the dynamic properties of folding, draping , and stretching. How these...Targets Bare Targets with Insitu Instrumentation V7 Instrumented Targets with Loosely Draped Clothing SL Instrumented Targets with Body Armor

  1. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  2. Designing dual-plate meteoroid shields: A new analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, H. F.; Bamford, R.; Chen, R.

    1982-01-01

    Physics governing ultrahigh velocity impacts onto dual-plate meteor armor is discussed. Meteoroid shield design methodologies are considered: failure mechanisms, qualitative features of effective meteoroid shield designs, evaluating/processing meteoroid threat models, and quantitative techniques for optimizing effective meteoroid shield designs. Related investigations are included: use of Kevlar cloth/epoxy panels in meteoroid shields for the Halley's Comet intercept vehicle, mirror exposure dynamics, and evaluation of ion fields produced around the Halley Intercept Mission vehicle by meteoroid impacts.

  3. Arms Control and Nonproliferation: A Catalog of Treaties and Agreements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-09

    security and control over nuclear weapons and fissile materials. These projects provided Russia with bullet-proof Kevlar blankets, secure canisters ...U.S. security concerns. The United States and Soviet Union began to sign agreements limiting their strategic offensive nuclear weapons in the early...U.S.-Russian relationship. At the same time, however, the two sides began to cooperate on securing and eliminating Soviet-era nuclear , chemical, and

  4. Preparation for foam composites. [using polybenzimidazole for fireproofing panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Methods were developed for the fabrication of fire resistant panels utilizing polybenzimidazole (PBI) and Kerimid 601 resins along with glass, quartz, and Kevlar reinforcements. Stitched truss structure, both unfilled and filled with PBI foam, were successfully fabricated and tested. Second generation structures were then selected, fabricated, and tested, with a PBI/glass skin/PBI foam sandwich structure emerging as the optimum panel concept. Mechanical properties, smoke generation, and fire resistance were determined for the candidate panels.

  5. Absorption Of Crushing Energy In Square Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of crash-energy-absorbing capabilities of square-cross-section tubes of two matrix/fiber composite materials. Both graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy tubes crushed in progressive and stable manner. Ratio between width of cross section and thickness of wall determined to affect energy-absorption significantly. As ratio decreases, energy-absorption capability increases non-linearly. Useful in building energy-absorbing composite structures.

  6. Proceedings of the Critical Review: Techniques for the Characterization of Composite Materials, held Cambridge, Massachusetts, 8-10 June 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    systems were used in this study : SP2)J/E-glass and Fiberite 934/ Kevlar 49. The SP250 resin is a diglycidvl ether of bis;,hennl A (DGEBA)/Epoxy...silane coupling agents to the epoxy resin, and the influence of water pH were particularly studied . The theory of generalized fracture mechanics is...the absorbed moisture water molecules are much more restricted in motion than for free water . Although further laboratory studies are needed to better

  7. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) FY 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-12

    nuclear submarine non-metallic, light weight, high strength piping . Includes the development of adequate fabrication procedures for attaching pipe ...waste heat economizer methods, require development. Improved conventional and hybrid heat pipes and/or two phase transport devices 149 IF are required...DESCRIPTION: A need exists to conceive, design, fabricate and test a method of adjusting the length of the individual legs of nylon or Kevlar rope sling

  8. Stress analysis of advanced attack helicopter composite main rotor blade root end lug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) composite main rotor blade root end lug is described. The stress concentration factor determined from a finite element analysis is compared to an empirical value used in the lug design. The analysis and test data indicate that the stress concentration is primarily a function of configuration and independent of the range of material properties typical of Kevlar-49/epoxy and glass epoxy.

  9. Torsional actuation with extension-torsion composite coupling and a magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Christopher M.; Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1995-04-01

    An analytical-experimental study of using magnetostrictive actuators in conjunction with an extension-torsion coupled composite tube to actuate a rotor blade trailing-edge flap to actively control helicopter vibration is presented. Thin walled beam analysis based on Vlasov theory was used to predict the induced twist and extension in a composite tube with magnetostrictive actuation. The study achieved good correlation between theory and experiment. The Kevlar-epoxy systems showed good correlation between measured and predicted twist values.

  10. Biopersistence of inhaled organic and inorganic fibers in the lungs of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Warheit, D B; Hartsky, M A; McHugh, T A; Kellar, K A

    1994-01-01

    Fiber dimension and durability are recognized as important features in influencing the development of pulmonary carcinogenic and fibrogenic effects. Using a short-term inhalation bioassay, we have studied pulmonary deposition and clearance patterns and evaluated and compared the pulmonary toxicity of two previously tested reference materials, an inhaled organic fiber, Kevlar para-aramid fibrils, and an inorganic fiber, wollastonite. Rats were exposed for 5 days to aerosols of Kevlar fibrils (900-1344 f/cc; 9-11 mg/m3) or wollastonite fibers (800 f/cc; 115 mg/m3). The lungs of exposed rats were digested to quantify dose, fiber dimensional changes over time, and clearance kinetics. The results showed that inhaled wollastonite fibers were cleared rapidly with a retention half-time of < 1 week. Mean fiber lengths decreased from 11 microns to 6 microns over a 1-month period, and fiber diameters increased from 0.5 micron to 1.0 micron in the same time. Fiber clearance studies with Kevlar showed a transient increase in the numbers of retained fibrils at 1 week postexposure, with rapid clearance of fibers thereafter, and retention half-time of 30 days. A progressive decrease in the mean lengths from 12.5 microns to 7.5 microns and mean diameters from 0.33 micron to 0.23 micron was recorded 6 months after exposure to inhaled Kevlar fibrils. The percentages of fibers > 15 microns in length decreased from 30% immediately after exposure to 5% after 6 months; the percentages of fibers in the 4 to 7 microns range increased from 25 to 55% in the same period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:7882921

  11. The U.S. Army Laboratories at Watertown, Massachusetts. Contributions to Science and Technology: A History,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    national center of excellence in structural materials research, as applied to Army systems . Its contributions to materials science and technology are...1970s. Watertown played a major role in applying S-2 glass, Kevlar and Spectra to Army systems . The desirable properties in a fiber for armor...of the latest technology which can be applied to Army systems , but also to guide the R&D and to stir the competitive juices of industry. More recent

  12. LWH and ACH Helmet Hardware Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    stiffer and stronger than Kevlar panels, does not plastically deform (and therefore Figure 11. Typical ductile fracture surface resulting from a...striker from deflecting. The substrate is ¼ inch thick fiberglass plate supported on a base plate of 5083 aluminum alloy . Figure 13. Close ups of...project. We note that the impact damage to the top of the screw heads, is entirely plastic deformation of the slot and top of the head, and is clearly

  13. LWH & ACH Helmet Hardware Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    stiffer and stronger than Kevlar panels, does not plastically deform (and therefore Figure 11. Typical ductile fracture surface resulting from a...striker from deflecting. The substrate is ¼ inch thick fiberglass plate supported on a base plate of 5083 aluminum alloy . Figure 13. Close ups of...project. We note that the impact damage to the top of the screw heads, is entirely plastic deformation of the slot and top of the head, and is clearly

  14. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  15. Axial-Compressive Behavior, Including Kink-Band Formation and Propagation, of Single p-Phenylene Terephthalamide (PPTA) Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    material models to describe the behavior of fibers and structures under high -rate loading conditions. With the utility of the CAE methods and tools largely...phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA), available commercially as Kevlar, Twaron, Technora, and so forth, are characterized by high specific axial stiffness...and high specific tensile strength. These fibers are often referred to as “ballistic fibers” since they are commonly used in different ballistic- and

  16. Glove Testing for Performance Against Flying Glass Shards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    superior dexterity to those with leather palms could still provide protection from flying shards of glass. 15. SUBJECT TERMS PPE...test glove was subject to significant scorching. It was decided that a woven Kevlar® fiber glove with a leather layer, covering both the palm and... leather -palmed gloves were considered too bulky for use by personnel with small hands, greatly decreasing dexterity. The wearer could not

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on Mobility and Control in Challenging Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-20

    1.18 h (V) -3.48 Electronic Nervous Systems Activating Nitinol With Electronic Neurons Controlling Walking With EN Networks ele dep prot ret forward...command backward command Myomorphic Actuators •Artificial Muscle Nitinol : 50/50 Alloy of Nickel and Titanium. • Two stable crystalline states • State...an electrical current through it causing conversion to austenite and shorteningText Kevlar “Tendon” Crimp Connector Teflon Coated Nitinol Current

  18. Armored garment for protecting

    DOEpatents

    Purvis, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Jones, II, Jack F.; Whinery, Larry D [Albuquerque, NM; Brazfield, Richard [Albuquerque, NM; Lawrie, Catherine [Tijeras, NM; Lawrie, David [Tijeras, NM; Preece, Dale S [Watkins, CO

    2009-08-11

    A lightweight, armored protective garment for protecting an arm or leg from blast superheated gases, blast overpressure shock, shrapnel, and spall from a explosive device, such as a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG) or a roadside Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The garment has a ballistic sleeve made of a ballistic fabric, such as an aramid fiber (e.g., KEVLAR.RTM.) cloth, that prevents thermal burns from the blast superheated gases, while providing some protection from fragments. Additionally, the garment has two or more rigid armor inserts that cover the upper and lower arm and protect against high-velocity projectiles, shrapnel and spall. The rigid inserts can be made of multiple plies of a carbon/epoxy composite laminate. The combination of 6 layers of KEVLAR.RTM. fabric and 28 plies of carbon/epoxy laminate inserts (with the inserts being sandwiched in-between the KEVLAR.RTM. layers), can meet the level IIIA fragmentation minimum V.sub.50 requirements for the US Interceptor Outer Tactical Vest.

  19. Thermal cycling tests on surface-mount assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, C. W.

    1988-03-01

    The capability of surface-mount (SM) solder joints to withstand various thermal cycle stresses was evaluated through electrical circuit resistance changes of a test pattern and by visual examination for cracks in the solder after exposure to thermal cycling. The joints connected different electrical components, primarily leadless-chip carriers (LCCs), and printed wiring-board (PWB) pads on different laminate substrates. Laminate compositions were epoxy-glass and polyimide-glass with and without copper/Invar/copper (CIC) inner layers, polyimide-quartz, epoxy-Kevlar, and polyimide-Kevlar. The most resistant joints were between small LCCs (24 and 48 pins) and polyimide-glass laminate with CIC inner layers. Processing in joint formation was found to be an important part of joint resistant. Thermal cycling was varied with respect to both time and temperature. A few resistors, capacitors, and inductors showed opens after 500 30-min cycles between -65 C and 125 C. Appreciable moisture contents were measured for laminate materials, especially those of polyimide-Kevlar after equilibration in 100 percent relative humidity at room temperature. If not removed or reduced, moisture can cause delamination in vapor-phase soldering.

  20. Optical properties of extended-chain polymers under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Rafael G.; Eby, R. K.

    1995-09-01

    Birefringence and x-ray diffraction experiments have been carried out on Kevlar 49(superscript R) fibers under tensile stress to monitor structure changes under the stress field. The origin of the observed birefringence is discussed in some detail. Results from theoretical calculations using semi-empirical molecular orbital techniques are presented and contrasted to the experimental observations. The calculations involved the estimation of chain polarizability and were performed under simulated stress conditions using the AM1 Hamiltonian in MOPAC. Polarizability is then used to calculate the birefringence as a function of tensile stress, by using existing internal field theory. This theoretical approach is applied to predict the optical properties of highly oriented extended-chain polyethylene, as well as those for poly(p' phenylene therephtalamide); the latter being the base polymer in Kevlar fibers. Results reveal reasonable birefringence predictions when compared to available experimental results in the literature. Also, it is found that the contribution from orienting crystallites under the stress field, to the measured birefringence in Kevlar fibers, is only a small fraction of the total. However, the calculations predict a significant contribution from deformation (extension) at the molecular level.

  1. Accelerator-based tests of radiation shielding properties of materials used in human space infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, C; Briccarello, M; Destefanis, R; Faraud, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Guarnieri, V; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Rusek, A; Scampoli, P; Durante, M

    2008-03-01

    Shielding is the only practical countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during space travel. It is well known that light, hydrogenated materials, such as water and polyethylene, provide the best shielding against space radiation. Kevlar and Nextel are two materials of great interest for spacecraft shielding because of their known ability to protect human space infrastructures from meteoroids and debris. We measured the response to simulated heavy-ion cosmic radiation of these shielding materials and compared it to polyethylene, Lucite (PMMA), and aluminum. As proxy to galactic nuclei we used 1 GeV n iron or titanium ions. Both physics and biology tests were performed. The results show that Kevlar, which is rich in carbon atoms (about 50% in number), is an excellent space radiation shielding material. Physics tests show that its effectiveness is close (80-90%) to that of polyethylene, and biology data suggest that it can reduce the chromosomal damage more efficiently than PMMA. Nextel is less efficient as a radiation shield, and the expected reduction on dose is roughly half that provided by the same mass of polyethylene. Both Kevlar and Nextel are more effective than aluminum in the attenuation of heavy-ion dose.

  2. Fatigue of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy panels with either S-Glass or Kevlar-49 buffer strips is studied. Buffer strip panels are fatigued and tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels are made with 45/0/-45/90 sub 2s layup with either S-Glass or Kevlar-49 buffer strip material. The buffer strips are parallel to the loading direction and made by replacing narrow strips of the 0-degree graphite plies with strips of either 0-degree S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on a one-for-one basis. The panels are subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum MINITWIST, the shortened version of the standardized load program for the wing lower surface of a transport aircraft. Two levels of maximum strain are used in the spectrum with three durations of the fatigue spectrum. One group of panels is preloaded prior to the application of the fatigue cycling. The preload consists of statistically loading the spectrum in tension until the crack-tip damage zone reaches the ajacent buffer strips. After fatigue loading, all specimens are statistically loaded in tension to failure to determine their residual strengths.

  3. Effects of moisture, elevated temperature, and fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading combined with moisture and heat on the behavior of graphite epoxy panels with either Kevlar-49 or S-glass buffer strips were studied. Buffer strip panels, that had a slit in the center to represent damage, were moisture conditioned or heated, fatigue loaded, and then tested in tension to measure their residual strength. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading direction and were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with Kevlar-49 epoxy or S-glass epoxy on a 1-for-1 basis. The panels were subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum. One group of panels was preconditioned by soaking in 60 C water to produce a 1 percent weight gain then tested at room temperature. One group was heated to 82 C during the fatigue loading. Another group was moisture conditioned and then tested at 82 C. The residual strengths of the buffer panels were not highly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panel by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results. The moisture conditioning did not have a large effect on the Kevlar-49 panels.

  4. Improvements to constitutive material model for fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Mihai I.

    2011-12-01

    The high strength to weight ratio of woven fabric offers a cost effective solution to be used in a containment system for aircraft propulsion engines. Currently, Kevlar is the only Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved fabric for usage in systems intended to mitigate fan blade-out events. This research builds on an earlier constitutive model of Kevlar 49 fabric developed at Arizona State University (ASU) with the addition of new and improved modeling details. Latest stress strain experiments provided new and valuable data used to modify the material model post peak behavior. These changes reveal an overall improvement of the Finite Element (FE) model's ability to predict experimental results. First, the steel projectile is modeled using Johnson-Cook material model and provides a more realistic behavior in the FE ballistic models. This is particularly noticeable when comparing FE models with laboratory tests where large deformations in projectiles are observed. Second, follow-up analysis of the results obtained through the new picture frame tests conducted at ASU provides new values for the shear moduli and corresponding strains. The new approach for analysis of data from picture frame tests combines digital image analysis and a two-level factorial optimization formulation. Finally, an additional improvement in the material model for Kevlar involves checking the convergence at variation of mesh density of fabrics. The study performed and described herein shows the converging trend, therefore validating the FE model.

  5. Progress report 3 of cooperative program for design, fabrication, and testing of high modulus composite helicopter shafting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. C.; Baker, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the third phase of work, the objective of which was to overcome the excessive brittleness of the previously developed UH-1 helicopter tail rotor drive shaft design which demonstrated a shaft train weight savings of 53.1% over the current 2024-T3 aluminum shaft train. A materials impact program demonstrated exceptionally noteworthy performance of two woven constructions containing E-glass and PRD 49-III (designation later changed to KEVLAR 49) fibers in an epoxy resin matrix. Thermoplastic matrices and PRD 49-III fiber provided impact resistance at low weight which was superior to composites having the same fiber in a thermoset resin matrix. A design, fabrication, and test program showed that shaft impact resistance could be improved over the previously developed graphite composite design at a cost in shaft train rate savings. The shaft train weight savings of the most impact tolerant construction was 4.0% over the current aluminum shaft train. Alternating plies of graphite and glass appear to provide substantially greater tube impact durability than that provided by hybridization of the two fibers into one tape wound to a ply design equivalent in strength and stiffness to that of the alternating ply design. Recommendations were made to continue research work to exploit the potential for more impact-durable structures through the use of KEVLAR 49 fiber, woven structures, thermoplastic matrices and THORNEL 50-S/KEVLAR 49 blends with thermoset matrices.

  6. Study to investigate design, fabrication and test of low cost concepts for large hybrid composite helicopter fuselage, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, K. M.; Lucas, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a frame/stringer/skin fabrication technique for composite airframe construction was studied as a low cost approach to the manufacture of large helicopter airframe components. A center cabin aluminum airframe section of the Sikorsky CH-53D helicopter was selected for evaluation as a composite structure. The design, as developed, is composed of a woven KEVLAR-49/epoxy skin and graphite/epoxy frames and stringers. To support the selection of this specific design concept a materials study was conducted to develop and select a cure compatible graphite and KEVLAR-49/epoxy resin system, and a foam system capable of maintaining shape and integrity under the processing conditions established. The materials selected were, Narmco 5209/Thornel T-300 graphite, Narmco 5209/KEVLAR-49 woven fabric, and Stathane 8747 polyurethane foam. Eight specimens were fabricated, representative of the frame, stringer, and splice joint attachments. Evaluation of the results of analysis and test indicate that design predictions are good to excellent except for some conservatism of the complex frame splice.

  7. The Effect on the Flexural Strength, Flexural Modulus and Compressive Strength of Fibre Reinforced Acrylic with That of Plain Unfilled Acrylic Resin – An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 – carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 – polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results: The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. Conclusion: The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged. PMID:25954696

  8. The effect on the flexural strength, flexural modulus and compressive strength of fibre reinforced acrylic with that of plain unfilled acrylic resin - an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Mohamed, Shamaz; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 - carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 - polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged.

  9. [Organic artificial fibers: properties and toxicity].

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, A; Campopiano, A; Olori, A; Basili, F; Boccanera, S

    2007-01-01

    Now among asbestos substitutes, the man-made organic fibers (MMOFs) find interesting applications on the industrial side. This class includes aramidic, polyacrylic, polyamides, polyolefins and polyvinylic fibers and it has been listed in category 3 of IARC classification (not classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans). The aim of this study is to provide a panoramic regarding the toxicity of MMOFs present on the market according to their chemical-physical properties. Three materials have been taken in to consideration: the polyacrylonitrile (PAN), the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and the Kevlar. Each of them has been observed by the Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy to estimate the morphology and the mean diameter. The obtained mean diameter of fibers is 10.50 microm for the PAN, 16.60 microm for the PVA and 11.61 microm for the Kevlar. The last one presents fibrils having a diameters in the range 0.2-1.6 microm. The ability of the Kevlar to produce fibrils with dimensions less than 1 microm, after abrasion or mechanical stress of other kind, is the cause of numerous studies based on the evaluation of their biosolubility. Finally we show some spectra obtained from the analysis of these fibers through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR).

  10. A deflectable guiding catheter for real-time MRI-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jamie A; Saikus, Christina E; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Wu, Vincent; Sonmez, Merdim; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Colyer, Jessica H; Lederman, Robert J; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-04-01

    To design a deflectable guiding catheter that omits long metallic components yet preserves mechanical properties to facilitate therapeutic interventional MRI procedures. The catheter shaft incorporated Kevlar braiding. A 180° deflection was attained with a 5-cm nitinol slotted tube, a nitinol spring, and a Kevlar pull string. We tested three designs: passive, passive incorporating an inductively coupled coil, and active receiver. We characterized mechanical properties, MRI properties, RF induced heating, and in vivo performance in swine. Torque and tip deflection force were satisfactory. Representative procedures included hepatic and azygos vein access, laser cardiac septostomy, and atrial septal defect crossing. Visualization was best in the active configuration, delineating profile and tip orientation. The passive configuration could be used in tandem with an active guidewire to overcome its limited conspicuity. There was no RF-induced heating in all configurations under expected use conditions in vitro and in vivo. Kevlar and short nitinol component substitutions preserved mechanical properties. The active design offered the best visibility and usability but reintroduced metal conductors. We describe versatile deflectable guiding catheters with a 0.057" lumen for interventional MRI catheterization. Implementations are feasible using active, inductive, and passive visualization strategies to suit application requirements. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A deflectable guiding catheter for real-time MRI-guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnakaya, Kanishka; Wu, Vincent; Sonmez, Merdim; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Colyer, Jessica H.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To design a deflectable guiding catheter that omits long metallic components yet preserves mechanical properties to facilitate therapeutic interventional MRI procedures. Materials and Methods The catheter shaft incorporated Kevlar braiding. 180° deflection was attained with a 5 cm nitinol slotted tube, a nitinol spring, and a Kevlar pull string. We tested three designs: passive, passive incorporating an inductively-coupled coil, and active receiver. We characterized mechanical properties, MRI properties, RF induced heating, and in vivo performance in swine. Results Torque and tip deflection force were satisfactory. Representative procedures included hepatic and azygos vein access, laser cardiac septostomy, and atrial septal defect crossing. Visualization was best in the active configuration, delineating profile and tip orientation. The passive configuration could be used in tandem with an active guidewire to overcome its limited conspicuity. There was no RF-induced heating in all configurations under expected use conditions in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Kevlar and short nitinol component substitutions preserved mechanical properties. The active design offered the best visibility and usability but reintroduced metal conductors. We describe versatile deflectable guiding catheters with a 0.057” lumen for interventional MRI catheterization. Implementations are feasible using active, inductive, and passive visualization strategies to suit application requirements. PMID:22128071

  12. Material Issues in Space Shuttle Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Jensen, Brian J.; Gates, Thomas S.; Morgan, Roger J.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) store gases used in four subsystems for NASA's Space Shuttle Fleet. While there are 24 COPV on each Orbiter ranging in size from 19-40", stress rupture failure of a pressurized Orbiter COPV on the ground or in flight is a catastrophic hazard and would likely lead to significant damage/loss of vehicle and/or life and is categorized as a Crit 1 failure. These vessels were manufactured during the late 1970's and into the early 1980's using Titanium liners, Kevlar 49 fiber, epoxy matrix resin, and polyurethane coating. The COPVs are pressurized periodically to 3-5ksi and therefore experience significant strain in the composite overwrap. Similar composite vessels were developed in a variety of DOE Programs (primarily at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories or LLNL), as well as for NASA Space Shuttle Fleet Leader COPV program. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) formed an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team whose primary focus was to investigate whether or not enough composite life remained in the Shuttle COPV in order to provide a strategic rationale for continued COPV use aboard the Space Shuttle Fleet with the existing 25-year-old vessels. Several material science issues were examined and will be discussed in this presentation including morphological changes to Kevlar 49 fiber under stress, manufacturing changes in Kevlar 49 and their effect on morphology and tensile strength, epoxy resin strain, composite creep, degradation of polyurethane coatings, and Titanium yield characteristics.

  13. Long Term Displacement Data of Woven Fabric Webbings Under Constant Load for Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Lucy, Melvin H.; Grondin, Trevor A.; Whitley, Karen S.; Duncan, Quinton; Plant, James V.

    2014-01-01

    Inflatable modules for space applications offer weight and launch volume savings relative to current metallic modules. Limited data exist on the creep behavior of the restraint layer of inflatable modules. Long-term displacement and strain data of two high strength woven fabric webbings, Kevlar and Vectran, under constant load is presented. The creep behavior of webbings is required by designers to help determine service life parameters of inflatable modules. Four groups of different webbings with different loads were defined for this study. Group 1 consisted of 4K Kevlar webbings loaded to 33% ultimate tensile strength and 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 27% ultimate tensile strength, group 2 consisted of 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 40% and 43% ultimate tensile strength, and 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 50% ultimate tensile strength, group 3 consisted of 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 52% ultimate tensile strength and 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 60% ultimate tensile strength, and group 4 consisted of 12.5K Kevlar webbings loaded to 22% ultimate tensile strength, and 12.5K Vectran webbings loaded to 22% ultimate tensile strength. The uniquely designed test facility, hardware, displacement measuring devices, and test data are presented. Test data indicate that immediately after loading all webbings stretch an inch or more, however as time increases displacement values significantly decrease to fall within a range of several hundredth of an inch over the remainder of test period. Webbings in group 1 exhibit near constant displacements and strains over a 17-month period. Data acquisition was suspended after the 17th month, however webbings continue to sustain load without any local webbing damage as of the 21st month of testing. Webbings in group 2 exhibit a combination of initial constant displacement and subsequent increases in displacement rates over a 16-month period. Webbings in group 3 exhibit steady increases in displacement rates leading to webbing failure

  14. The energy dissipative mechanisms of the particle-fiber interface in a textile composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Quinn Patrick

    Impact resistant fabrics comprised of woven high performance fibers (e.g., Kevlar) have exhibited improved energy dissipative capability with the inclusion of nano- to micrometer sized particles. Upon impact, the particles embed and gouge adjacent fiber surfaces. While the particle-fiber interactions appear to be a primary mechanism for the increase in energy dissipation, the fundamentals of the nano- to micrometer sized gouging response of high performance fibers and the dissipation of energy due to particle gouging have not been studied previously. In this research, nanoindentation and nanoscratching techniques, which exploit probe sizes in the range of nano- to micrometers, were used to study the particle-fiber contact and develop nanoscale structure-property relationships of single Kevlar fibers. Atomic force microscopy based methods were used to create high resolution stiffness maps of fiber cross-sections, the results of which indicated that the stiffness of Kevlar 49 fibers is independent of radial position, while Kevlar KM2 fibers exhibit a reduced stiffness "shell" region (up to ˜300-350 nm thick). Instrumented indentation was used to evaluate the local response of Kevlar fibers with respect to orientation and contact size. For radial indentation, modifications to the traditional indentation analysis were developed to account for fiber curvature and finite size effects. A critical contact size was established above which the fiber response was independent of indenter size. This "homogeneous" response was used to estimate the local material properties of the Kevlar fibers through the application of an analytical model for indentation of a transversely isotropic material. The local properties of both fibers differed from their previously measured bulk properties, which was likely due, at least in part, to the deformation mechanisms of the fiber microstructure during indentation. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests were then conducted to study the

  15. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  16. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  17. Ten-year ground exposure of composite materials used on the Bell Model 206L helicopter flight service program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    Residual strength results are presented for four composite material systems that have been exposed for up to 10 years to the environment at five different locations on the North American continent. The exposure locations are near where the Bell Model 206L helicopters, which participated in a flight service program sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and the U.S. Army, were flying in daily commercial service. The composite material systems are (1) Kevlar-49 fabric/F-185 epoxy; (2) Kevlar-49 fabric/LRF-277 epoxy; (3) Kevlar-49 fabric/CE-306 epoxy; and (4) T-300 graphite/E-788 epoxy. Six replicates of each material were removed and tested after 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 years of exposure. The average baseline strength was determined from testing six as-fabricated specimens. More than 1700 specimens have been tested. All specimens that were tested to determine their strength were painted with a polyurethane paint. Each set of specimens also included an unpainted panel for observing the weathering effects on the composite materials. A statistically based procedure has been used to determine the strength value above which at least 90 percent of the population is expected to fall with a 95-percent confidence level. The computed compression strengths are 80 to 90 percent of the baseline (no-exposure) strengths. The resulting compression strengths are approximately 8 percent below the population mean strengths. The computed short-beam-shear strengths are 83 to 92 percent of the baseline (no-exposure) strengths. The computed tension strength of all materials is 93 to 97 percent of the baseline (no-exposure) strengths.

  18. Effects of temperature and humidity cycling on the strengths of textile reinforced carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Furrow, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of the combined effects of temperature and humidity cycling on AS4/3501-6 composites (unstitched, Kevlar 29 stitched, and S-2 glass stitched uniweave fabric) and AS4/E905L composites (2-D, S-2 glass stitched 2-D, and 3-D braided fabric). The AS4/3501-6 uniweave material had a quasi-isotropic layup, whereas the AS4/E905L materials were braided in a (+/-30 deg/0 deg)(sub s) orientation. Data presented include compression strengths and compression-compression fatigue results for uncycled composites and cycled composites (160, 480, 720, and 1280 cycles from 140 deg F at 95 percent relative humidity to -67 deg F). To observe the presence of microcracking within the laminates, photomicrographs were taken of each material type at the end of each cycling period. Microcracks were found to be more prevalent within stitched laminates, predominantly around individual stitches. The glass stitched laminates showed significant microcracking even before cycling. Less microcracking was evident in the Kevlar stitched materials, whereas the unstitched uniweave material developed microcracks only after cycling. The 3-D braid did not develop microcracks. The static compression strengths of the unstitched and Kevlar stitched uniweave materials were degraded by about 10 percent after 1280 temperature/humidity cycles, whereas the reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched uniweave was less than 3 percent. The reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched 2-D braid was less than 8 percent. The unstitched 2-D and 3-D braids did not lose strength from temperature/humidity cycling. The compression-compression fatigue properties of all six material types were not affected by temperature/humidity cycling.

  19. Analysis of dynamic properties for a composite robotic arm at intermediate strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jin-Chein

    The dynamic mechanical properties of any structure are governed by the storage moduli representing the stiffness and loss moduli representing the internal damping capacity. The dynamic mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite laminate in flexural vibration has been investigated. This study presents the results of a theoretical and experimental effort to determine the dynamic properties of multilaminate composites. The effects of fiber orientation and vibration frequency for both unidirectional tape and Kevlar fabric were studied both analytically and experimentally. Measurement of storage and loss moduli were presented for laminated double cantilever beams of fiber reinforced composite with frequency range from 8 to 1230 Hz (up to 5th mode).

  20. A Protection And Detection Surface (PADS) for damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Prasad, C. B.; Biggers, S. B.

    1990-01-01

    A protection and detection surface (PADS) concept was studied for application to composite primary aircraft structures. A Kevlar-epoxy woven face sheet with a Rohacell foam core was found to be the most effective PADS configuration among the configurations evaluated. The weight of the PADS configuration was estimated to be approximately 17 percent of the structural weight. The PADS configuration was bonded to graphite-epoxy base laminates, and up to a 70 percent improvement in compression-after-impact failure strains was observed.

  1. Impact tests on fibrous composite sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of low velocity impact on the strength of laminates fabricated from graphite/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite materials was studied. The test laminates were loaded statically either in uniaxial tension or compression when impact occurred to evaluate the effect of loading on the initiation of damage and/or failure. Typical aircraft service conditions such as runway debris encountered during landing were simulated by impacting 1.27-cm-diameter projectiles normal to the plane of the test laminates at velocities between 5.2 and 48.8 m/s.

  2. Critical temperatures of hybrid laminates using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockalingam, S.; Mathew, T. C.; Singh, G.; Rao, G. V.

    1992-06-01

    Thermal buckling of antisymmetric cross-ply hybrid laminates is investigated. A one-dimensional finite element based on first-order shear deformation theory, having two nodes and six degrees of freedom per node, namely axial displacement, transverse displacements and rotation of the normal to the beam axis and their derivatives with respect to beam coordinate axis, is employed for this purpose. Various types of hybrid laminates with different combination of glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy are considered. Effects of slenderness ratio, boundary conditions and lay-ups are studied in detail.

  3. Evaluation of energy absorption of new concepts of aircraft composite subfloor intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E.; Carden, Huey D.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-one composite aircraft subfloor intersection specimens were tested to determine the effects of geometry and material on the energy absorbing behavior, failure characteristics, and post-crush structural integrity of the specimens. The intersections were constructed of twelve ply + or - 45 sub 6 laminates of either Kevlar 49/934 or AS-4/934 graphite-epoxy in heights of 4, 8, and 12 inches. The geometry of the specimens varied in the designs of the intersection attachment angle. Four different geometries were tested.

  4. A Protection And Detection Surface (PADS) for damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Prasad, Chunchu B.; Biggers, Sherrill B.

    1990-01-01

    A protection and detection surface (PADS) concept was studied for application to composite primary aircraft structures. A Kevlar-epoxy woven face sheet with a Rohacell foam core was found to be the most effective PADS configuration among the configurations evaluated. The weight of the PADS configuration was estimated to be approximately 17 pct of the structural weight. The PADS configuration was bonded to graphite-epoxy base laminates, and up to a 70 pct improvement in compression-after-impact failure strains was observed.

  5. Composite monocoque frame for a mountain bicycle: Testing and calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castejón, L.; Miravete, A.; Ullod, J.; Larrodé, E.

    1994-05-01

    The present paper shows the way in which a monocoque frame of a mountain bicycle made of carbon fiber and kevlar laminate, a poliurethane foam core and different metallic stiffeners were analyzed. The study was performed in two parts, namely, a first part in which the bicycle was tested considering several static and dynamic cases and a second part carried out by using the F.E.M., from which vibration frequencies and modes were obtained, as well as the foam optimization to be used in the core. It was also possible to compare the results obtained in both parts.

  6. Innovative Energy Absorbing Mounting Systems for High Mass Rotorcraft Payloads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    that a maximum SEA value of 21.5 J/g can be achieved with a ±45° FMC tube and an aramid/ phenolic hexagonal honeycomb core with a crush stress of 10...Table 3. Optimized TTSRD tube SEA values (J/g) for various tube material systems. Carbon FMC Carbon/ Epoxy E-Glass/ Epoxy Kevlar / Epoxy Max...material systems considered in the present study, the crush tube concept had a maximum SEA of 21.5 J/g with a ±45° FMC tube and an aramid/ phenolic

  7. Study of noise reduction characteristics of composite fiber-reinforced panels, interior panel configurations, and the application of the tuned damper concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lameris, J.; Stevenson, S.; Streeter, B.

    1982-01-01

    The application of fiber reinforced composite materials, such as graphite epoxy and Kevlar, for secondary or primary structures developing in the commercial airplane industry was investigated. A composite panel program was initiated to study the effects of some of the parameters that affect noise reduction of these panels. The fiber materials and the ply orientation were chosen to be variables in the test program. It was found that increasing the damping characteristics of a structural panel will reduce the vibration amplitudes at resonant frequencies with attendant reductions in sound reduction. Test results for a dynamic absorber, a tuned damper, are presented and evaluated.

  8. Terahertz NDE of Stressed Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels - Initial Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Anatasi, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Terahertz radiation nondestructive evaluation was applied to a set of Kevlar composite overwrapped pressure vessel bottles that had undergone a series of thermal and pressure tests to simulate stress rupture effects. The bottles in these nondestructive evaluation tests were bottles that had not ruptured but had survived various times at the elevated load and temperature levels. Some of the bottles showed evidence of minor composite failures. The terahertz radiation did detect visible surface flaws, but did not detect any internal chemical or material degradation of the thin overwraps.

  9. Thermoplastic polymides and composites therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new class polyimide and polyimide precursors based on diaryl oxyalkylene diamines, such as 1,3-bis[4-aminophenoxy]-2,2-dimethyl propane, a process for their preparation and their use as the continuous phase for the manufacture of composites and composite laminates reinforced by reinforcing agents such as carbon fibers, Kevlar.TM., and other similar high strength reinforcing agents. The polyimides and molecular composites obtained from the diamines according to the invention show thermoplastic properties, excellent flex fatigue and fracture resistance, and excellent thermal and oxidative stability.

  10. Military Uniforms: Issues Related to the Supply of Flame Resistant Fibers for the Production of Military Uniforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-30

    fibers. A variety of fibers may be used to create a fabric blend, including FR rayon, Nomex®, Twaron®, Kevlar®, FR cotton, polybenzimidazole ( PBI ...as meta-aramids (e.g., Nomex®), modacrylic, PBI , and FR-treated cotton. o For example, the Army is currently testing fabrics in an attempt to...considering fabric blends containing FR-treated cotton as a potential alternative. o The Marine Corps uses PBI fibers in its balaclava (a protective

  11. Development of technology for the fabrication of reliable laminar flow control panels on subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using porous composite materials (Kevlar, Doweave, and Leno Weave) as lightweight, efficient laminar flow control (LFC) surface materials is compared to the metallic 319L stainless Dynapore surfaces and electron beam drilled composite surfaces. Areas investigated include: (1) selection of the LFC-suitable surface materials, structural materials, and fabrication techniques for the LFC aircraft skins; (2) aerodynamic static air flow test results in terms of pressure drop through the LFC panel and the corresponding effective porosity; (3) structural design definition and analyses of the panels, and (4) contamination effects on static drop and effective porosity. Conclusions are presented and discussed.

  12. Experimental-theoretical investigation of the vibration characteristics of rotating composite box beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the study was to predict the effect of elastic couplings on the free vibration characteristics of thin-walled composite box beams and to correlate the results with experimental data. The free vibration characteristics of coupled thin-walled composite beams under rotation were determined using the Galerkin method. The theoretical results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data obtained for graphite/epoxy, kevlar/epoxy, and glass/epoxy composite beams in an in-vacuo test facility at different rotational speeds.

  13. Gel Spun PAN/CNT Based Carbon Fibers with Honey-Comb Cross-Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-13

    samples were prepared by mounting a single filament on a copper 3-post TEM grid (Omniprobe) and curing in epoxy (Gatan). The carbon fiber was then... Kevlar ® 49 [28], Zylon® [29], T300 [2], IM10 [30], M60J [31], YS-95A [32] were obtained from the data sheets of these fibers from the respective...made contained 60 vol% fibers in epoxy matrix. Fiber compressive strength may be dependent on fiber structure as well as fiber geometry. Kumar et al

  14. Polysiloxane-Based Organoclay Nanocomposites as Flame Retardants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    g-K; Total HR¼ 12.4 J=g-K) and Poly(p-phenyleneterephthalamide) ( KEVLAR ; HRC¼ 302 J=g-K; Total HR¼ 14.8 J=g-K)[27]. Cloisite 30b has previously been...magadiite nanolayers in an elastomeric epoxy polymer. Chem. Mater. 1998, 10 (7), 1820–1826. 14. Pashaei, S.; Siddaramaiah; Syed, A.A. Thermal...Babaluo, A.A. Investigation on the mechanical and thermal properties of intercalated epoxy =layered silicate nano- composites. Inter. J. Polym

  15. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  16. Natural Vibration Analysis of Clamped Rectangular Orthotropic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dalaei, m.; kerr, a. d.

    The natural vibrations of clamped rectangular orthotropic plates are analyzed using the extended Kantorovich method. The developed iterative scheme converges very rapidly to the final result. The obtained natural frequencies are evaluated for a square plate made of Kevlar 49 Epoxy and the obtained results are compared with those published by Kanazawa and Kawai, and by Leissa. The agreement was found to be very close. As there are no exact analytical solutions for clamped rectangular plates, the generated closed form expression for the natural modes, and the corresponding natural frequencies, are very suitable for use in engineering analyses.

  17. Global method for measuring stress in polymer fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G.; Andreopoulos, A. G.; Parthenios, J.; Galiotis, C.

    2005-09-01

    In this work, a methodology is presented for evaluating the interfacial shear stress as well as the corresponding axial stress in full polymer fiber reinforced materials under elevated temperatures. Its validity was confirmed by deriving interfacial shear and axial stress expressions for embedded Kevlar® 29 fibers within an epoxy matrix by means of Raman microscopy. This approach can be established to other systems such as carbon or polyethylene fiber composites, for which the observed Raman bands are both stress and temperature sensitive.

  18. A composite thin vacuum window for the CLAS photon tagger at Jefferson lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S. K.; Crannell, Hall; O'Brien, J. T.; Sober, D. I.

    1999-01-01

    The construction of a thin vacuum window, currently in use on the CLAS photon tagging system at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, is described. A layer of woven Kevlar cloth supports a much thinner membrane of aluminized Mylar. Notable features of this particular window include its overall length (9.6 m), and the fact that the entire load is supported by the epoxy seal with no mechanical clamping around the edges. Results from a diverse program of materials testing, including a clear dependence of leak rate on relative humidity, are also reported.

  19. Free radicals in the stratosphere - A new observational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Hazen, N. L.; Mclaren, B. E.; Rowe, S. P.; Schiller, C. M.; Schwab, M. J.; Solomon, L.; Thompson, E. E.; Weinstock, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to in situ observations of trace reactive species in the stratosphere is described. A balloon-borne system, floating 40 kilometers above the earth's surface, successfully lowered and then retracted a cluster of instruments a distance of 12 kilometers on a filament of Kevlar. This instrument cluster is capable of detecting gas-phase free radicals at the part-per-trillion level. The suspended instrument array has excellent stability and has been used to measured atomic oxygen concentrations in the stratosphere.

  20. Deformation and failure information from composite materials via acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews some principles of applying acoustic emission (AE) to the study of fiber-composite materials and structures. This review covers the basics of using AE to monitor the deformation and fracture processes that occur when fiber-composite materials are stressed. Also, new results in some areas of current research interest are presented. The following areas are emphasized: study of couplants for AE testing of composites, evaluation of a special immersion-type AE transducer, and wave propagation complications and the development of techniques for locating AE sources in Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pre

  1. Experimental investigation of the crashworthiness of scaled composite sailplane fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kampf, Karl-Peter; Crawley, Edward F.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The crash dynamics and energy absorption of composite sailplane fuselage segments undergoing nose-down impact were investigated. More than 10 quarter-scale structurally similar test articles, typical of high-performance sailplane designs, were tested. Fuselages segments were fabricated of combinations of fiberglass, graphite, Kevlar, and Spectra fabric materials. Quasistatic and dynamic tests were conducted. The quasistatic tests were found to replicate the strain history and failure modes observed in the dynamic tests. Failure modes of the quarter-scale model were qualitatively compared with full-scale crash evidence and quantitatively compared with current design criteria. By combining material and structural improvements, substantial increases in crashworthiness were demonstrated.

  2. Helicopter crashworthiness research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Carden, Huey D.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from the U.S. Army-Aerostructures Directorate/NASA-Langley Research Center joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness. Through the on-going research program an in-depth understanding was developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  3. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  4. Flammability Characteristics of Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Thick Vertical Sheet of Kevlar/Phenolio-PVB ( Owens - Corning $pall Liner), MTL A4) 3 12 Chemical Heat Release Rate During Fire Propagation for a 40 0.61 m...Long, 0.10 m Wide and 3 mm Thick Vertical Sheet of S-2/Phenolic ( Owens - Corning ), MTL #5) 13 Chemical Heac Release Rate During Fire Propagation for 41...Materials T eohnology Laboratory (AKTL) by Owens - Corning Corporation; 3. NTL #3: S-2 fiberglabs/polyestel’, flame retardant, prepreg, formulated for

  5. Characterization of multiaxial warp knit composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Hasko, Gregory H.; Cano, Roberto J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to characterize the mechanical behavior and damage tolerance of two multiaxial warp knit fabrics to determine the acceptability of these fabrics for high performance composite applications. The tests performed included compression, tension, open hole compression, compression after impact and compression-compression fatigue. Tests were performed on as-fabricated fabrics and on multi-layer fabrics that were stitched together with either carbon or Kevlar stitching yarn. Results of processing studies for vacuum impregnation with Hercules 3501-6 epoxy resin and pressure impregnation with Dow Tactix 138/H41 epoxy resin and British Petroleum BP E905L epoxy resin are presented.

  6. Hugoniot-based equations of state for two filled EPDM rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A. H.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Orler, E. B.; Bartram, B. D.; Gustavsen, R. L.

    2014-05-01

    Particle-filled elastomers are commonly used as engineering components due to their ability to provide structural support via their elastic mechanical response. Even small amounts of particle fillers are known to increase the mechanical strength of elastomers due to polymer-filler interactions. In this work, the shock response of two filled (SiO2 or silica and KevlarTMfillers) ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) rubbers were studied using single and two-stage gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. Hugoniot states were determined using standard plate impact methods. Both filled-EPDM elastomers exhibit high compressibility under shock loading and have a response similar to adiprene rubber.

  7. A Cryogenic, Insulating Suspension System for the High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC)and Submillemeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Jackson, Michael L.; Shirron, Peter J.; Tuttle, James G.

    2002-01-01

    The High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) will use identical Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) to cool their detectors to 200mK and 100mK, respectively. In order to minimize thermal loads on the salt pill, a Kevlar suspension system is used to hold it in place. An innovative, kinematic suspension system is presented. The suspension system is unique in that it consists of two parts that can be assembled and tensioned offline, and later bolted onto the salt pill.

  8. Acoustic method of damage sensing in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Walker, James; Lansing, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on both graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology to include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques will enhance the capability of the technique to identify failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. The combination of the two methods will allow for simple nondestructive tests to be capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to being placed in service and during service.

  9. Effect of twist on transverse impact response of ballistic fiber yarns

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-06-15

    A Hopkinson bar was employed to conduct transverse impact testing of twisted Kevlar KM2 fiber yarns at the same impact speed. The speed of Euler transverse wave generated by the impact was measured utilizing a high speed digital camera. The study included fiber yarns twisted by different amounts. The Euler transverse wave speed was observed to increase with increasing amount of twist of the fiber yarn, within the range of this investigation. As a result, the higher transverse wave speeds in the more twisted fiber yarns indicate better ballistic performance in soft body armors for personal protection.

  10. Energy absorption in composite materials for crashworthy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Crash energy-absorption processes in composite materials have been studied as part of a research program aimed at the development of energy absorbing subfloor beams for crashworthy military helicopters. Based on extensive tests on glass/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy composites, it is shown that the energy-absorption characteristics and crushing modes of composite beams are similar to those exhibited by tubular specimens of similar material and architecture. The crushing mechanisms have been determined and related to the mechanical properties of the constituent materials and specimen architecture. A simple and accurate method for predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite beams has been developed.

  11. Lightweight Towed Howitzer Demonstrator. Phase 1 and Partial Phase 2. Volume B. Technical Presentations - Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    tray hsg assy 1 85 5 62360 . ..Frame 1 TRAD Ti 70 0.16 281 45 6 G2370 . ..Wrap 1 Kevlar/epoxy 70 0.05 700 35 6 62380 . ..Coating 1 Urethane 70 0.05...CL -4L- I-J .4cm=CLC ~LU LAJL~ I.-- LL== L6 0 - -JA z ~ LA =c = La z 4c > =w ZwI . z C/)-- oc W LA. 0z C 0 CI. CC Z u z LJ -6 C-.- -4 mAC. L6 w z 4c0

  12. TSS-1R Failure Mode Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; McCollum, Matthew B.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.

    1997-01-01

    Soon after the break of the tether during the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R) mission in February, 1996, a Tiger Team was assembled at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center to determine the tether failure mode. One possible failure scenario was the Kevlar' strength member of the tether failed because of degradation due to electrical discharge or electrical arcing. During the next several weeks, extensive electrical discharge testing in low vacuum and plasma environments was conducted in an attempt to reproduce the electrical activity recorded by on-board science instruments during the mission. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  13. Environmental Effects on Long Term Displacement Data of Woven Fabric Webbings Under Constant Load for Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, WInfred S.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Duncan, Quinton; Plant, James

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of environmental temperature and humidity conditions on long-term creep displacement data of high strength Kevlar and VectranTM woven fabric webbings under constant load for inflatable structures is presented. The restraint layer of an inflatable structure for long-duration space exploration missions is designed to bear load and consists of an assembly of high strength webbings. Long-term creep displacement data of webbings can be utilized by designers to validate service life parameters of restraint layers of inflatable structures. Five groups of high-strength webbings were researched over a two year period. Each group had a unique webbing length, load rating, applied load, and test period. The five groups consisted of 1.) 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 49% ultimate tensile strength (UTS), 2.) 6K Vectran webbings loaded to 55% UTS, 3.) 12.5K Vectran webbings loaded to 22% UTS, 4.) 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 40% and 43% UTS, and 5.) 6K Kevlar webbings loaded to 48% UTS. Results show that all webbing groups exhibit the initial two stages of three of a typical creep curve of an elastic material. Results also show that webbings exhibit unique local wave patterns over the duration of the test period. Data indicate that the local pattern is primarily generated by daily variations in relative humidity values within the test facility. Data indicate that after a three to six month period, where webbings reach a steady-state creep condition, an annual sinusoidal displacement pattern is exhibited, primarily due to variations in annual mean temperature values. Data indicates that variations in daily temperature values and annual mean humidity values have limited secondary effects on creep displacement behavior. Results show that webbings in groups 2 and 5 do not exhibit well defined annual displacement patterns because the magnitude of the applied loads cause large deformations, and data indicate that material yielding within a webbing

  14. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Tether Fragments on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to simulate impacts of Kevlar and aluminum projectiles on a model of the LI-900 type insulating tiles used on Space Shuffle Orbiters The intent was to examine likely damage that such tiles might experience if impacted by orbital debris consisting of tether fragments. Projectile speeds ranged from 300 meters per second to 10 kilometers per second. Damage is characterized by penetration depth, tile surface-hole diameter, tile body-cavity diameter, coating fracture diameter, tether and cavity wall material phases, and deformation of the aluminum backwall.

  15. Physical Performance Decrements in Military Personnel Wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    remaining out of the testing position for more than 5 seconds. For the NeuroCom SOT, subjects were asked to stand on the force plate with the...PPE) P2 - 2 RTO-MP-HFM-181 and without a PPE system of Kevlar® front and back plates and an unlined combat helmet. The average mass of the PPE...in four different postural conditions immediately before and after the treadmill (exercise) test. All participants stood on a Bertec force platform

  16. Vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Otsu, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Motobayashi, T.; Sato, H.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    The first commissioning experiment of the SAMURAI spectrometer and its beam line was performed in March, 2012. The vacuum system for the SAMURAI spectrometer includes its beam line and the SAMURAI vacuum chamber with the windows for detecting neutrons and charged particles. The window for neutrons was made of stainless steel with a thickness of 3 mm and was designed with a shape of partial cylinder to support itself against the atmospheric pressure. The window for charged particles was of the combination of Kevlar and Mylar with the thickness of 280 and 75 μm, respectively. The pressure in the vacuum system was at a few Pa throughout the commissioning experiment.

  17. A safer method for body restoration following autopsy.

    PubMed

    Duflou, Johan; McNamara, Bradley; Cluney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of autopsy incisions can result in inadvertent needle stick injury to the prosector, which can be difficult to prevent even with the use of personal protective equipment such as Kevlar cut resistant gloves. We present a new technique for closure of autopsy incisions using a commonly available commercial hardware tool, a hole punch with a lever enhanced action, combined with blunt probe sewing, which results in an esthetic and leak-proof means of restoring cadavers. This technique is especially useful in cases which may pose blood-borne infection risks to the prosector. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Comparison of unusual carbon-based working electrodes for electrochemiluminescence sensors.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad; Sanginario, Alessandro; Jagadale, Pravin; Demarchi, Danilo; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    In this work, unconventional carbon-based materials were investigated for use in electrochemiluminescence (ECL) working electrodes. Precursors such as bamboo, pistachio shells, kevlar ® fibers and camphor were differently treated and used as working electrodes in ECL experiments. After a proper process they were assembled as electrodes and tested in an electrochemical cell. Comparison among them and with a commercial glassy carbon electrode (GCE) shows a very good response for all of them thus demonstrating their potential use as disposable low-cost electrodes for early detection electrochemical analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  20. Experimental Study of the Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Improvement on Stitched CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Yoichi; Ito, Akira

    Experimental investigations have been made on the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness (GIC) of stitched CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) laminates. The GIC of stitched CFRP laminates fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) and stitching with five kinds of stitch thread thicknesses, 400d (denier), 600d, 800d, 1000d, and 1200d were experimentally obtained by double cantilever beam (DCB) tests. Interlaminar tension tests for stitched CFRP laminates for a specimen containing only one stitch thread were also carried out. The consumption energy of the single stitched CFRP laminates (Wt) and stitch threads broken modes were obtained by such interlaminar tension tests. DCB test results show that the GIC of stitched CFRP laminates of several stitch thread thicknesses are governed by stitch density (SD). It is found that the relationship between ΔGIC/ΔSD and Wt are linear function. In other words, the GIC of Kevlar® stitched CFRP laminates is not only governed by SD but also Wt obtained from the interlaminar tension tests. It is also suggested that the interlaminar tension test results exhibit the potential for GIC estimation on the Kevlar® stitched CFRP laminates instead of conducting the DCB tests.

  1. Flywheel containment technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppa, A. P.; Zweben, C. H.; Mirandy, L.

    1980-07-01

    The important effect of containment weight on the density of a flywheel was examined for a selection of flywheel designs incorporating metallic and composite construction as contained by steel housings. Three different flywheel constructions are presented, namely laminated rotor, shaped disk, and multirim. Materials are steel for the first two types and E glass, S glass and Kevlar composites for the third type. All of the flywheels were comparable in that their stress levels were based on long term high cycle operation. All of the specific energy values were penalized heavily by the containment weight, the least being the laminated rotor (-29 percent) and the greatest being the shaped disk (-72 percent). The penalties for the multirim designs are -45 percent (E glass), -55 percent (S glass), and -60 percent (Kevlar). The low penalty of the laminated steel rotor was due to the fact that the containment weight was based on withstanding the rupture of only one of the constituent disks. The high penalty of the shaped steel disk, on the other hand, reflects the severe containment action that resulted from its bursting into large, hard, and axially narrow fragments. The intermediate but nevertheless substantial containment penalty of the multidrum composite rotors resulted from their relatively mild containment behavior.

  2. An experimental study on laser drilling and cutting of composite materials for the aerospace industry using excimer and CO2 sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Erba, M.; Galantucci, L. M.; Miglietta, S.

    This paper reports on the results of research which investigated the potential for the application of an excimer laser in the field of composite material drilling and cutting, by comparing this technology with that using CO2 sources. In particular, the scope of the work was to check whether the interaction between excimer lasers and composite materials, whose characteristic feature is the absence of thermal transfer, could yield better results than those obtainable with CO2 sources once heat transfer-induced difficulties had been eliminated. The materials selected for the experiments were multilayer composites having an epoxy resin matrix (65 percent in volume), with aramid fiber (Kevlar), carbon fiber and glass fiber as reinforcing materials, all of considerable interest for the aerospace industry. Optimal operational parameters were identified in relation to each source with a view to obtaining undersize holes or through cuts exhibiting severed areas of good quality. A comparison between the two types of processing carried out show that rims processed by excimer lasers are of better quality - particularly so with Kevlar - whereas the ablation rate is undoubtedly rather low compared with the CO2 technology.

  3. Hybrid passive/active damping for robust multivariable acoustic control in composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramani, Sudha; Wereley, Norman M.

    1996-05-01

    Noise transmission through a flexible kevlar-epoxy composite trim panel into an acoustic cavity or box is studied with the intent of controlling the interior sound fields. A hybrid noise attenuation technique is proposed which uses viscoelastic damping layers in the composite plate for passive attenuation of high frequency noise transmission, and uses piezo-electric patch actuators for active control in the low frequency range. An adaptive feedforward noise control strategy is applied. The passive structural damping augmentation incorporated in the composite plates is also intended to increase stability robustness of the active noise control strategy. A condenser microphone in the interior of the enclosure functions as the error sensor. Three composite plates were experimentally evaluated: one with no damping layer, the second with a 10 mil damping layer, and the third with a 15 mil damping layer. The damping layer was cocured in the kevlar-epoxy trim panels. Damping in the plates was increased from 1.6% for the plate with no damping layer, to 5.9% for the plate with a 15 mil damping layer. In experimental studies, the improved stability robustness of the controller was demonstrated by improved adaptive feedforward control algorithm convergence. A preliminary analytical model is presented that describes the dynamic behavior of a composite panel actuated by piezoelectric actuators bonded to its surface.

  4. FAA Development of Reliable Modeling Methodologies for Fan Blade Out Containment Analysis. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situations. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  5. Compression failure mechanisms of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M.; Moon, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was conducted to delineate the compression failure mechanisms of composite structures. The present report summarizes further results on kink band formation in unidirectional composites. In order to assess the compressive strengths and failure modes of fibers them selves, a fiber bundle was embedded in epoxy casting and tested in compression. A total of six different fibers were used together with two resins of different stiffnesses. The failure of highly anisotropic fibers such as Kevlar 49 and P-75 graphite was due to kinking of fibrils. However, the remaining fibers--T300 and T700 graphite, E-glass, and alumina--failed by localized microbuckling. Compressive strengths of the latter group of fibers were not fully utilized in their respective composite. In addition, acoustic emission monitoring revealed that fiber-matrix debonding did not occur gradually but suddenly at final failure. The kink band formation in unidirectional composites under compression was studied analytically and through microscopy. The material combinations selected include seven graphite/epoxy composites, two graphite/thermoplastic resin composites, one Kevlar 49/epoxy composite and one S-glass/epoxy composite.

  6. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program sponsored the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, which is designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar honeycomb structure to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed flat until needed for deployment. A variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid methods can be used. Experimental evaluation of the DEA utilized a building block approach that included material characterization testing of its constituent, Kevlar -129 fabric/epoxy, and flexural testing of single hexagonal cells. In addition, the energy attenuation capabilities of the DEA were demonstrated through multi-cell component dynamic crush tests, and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto concrete, water, and soft soil. During each stage of the DEA evaluation process, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. This report documents the results of the experimental evaluation that was conducted to assess the energy absorption capabilities of the DEA.

  7. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, D. M.; Pereira, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade-out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar(TradeName) 49 and Zylon(TradeName) AS (as spun) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation, and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases, the tests were designed so the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models to predict the response of fabrics under conditions that simulate those of a jet engine blade-release situation. In addition, some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different fabric materials.

  8. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior. PMID:29046838

  9. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Naum; Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called "stacked" graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  10. Plasma Surface Modification of Polyaramid Fibers for Protective Clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo, Mohamad

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a novel process that would achieve biocidal properties on Kevlar fabric via atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) induced-graft polymerization of monomers. In the course of the study, experiments were carried out to understand plasma-monomer-substrate interactions, particularly, how each of the main parameters in the plasma processing affects the formation of surface radicals and eventually the degree of graft polymerization of monomers. The study also served to explore the possibility of developing plasma-initiated and plasma-controlled graft polymerization for continuous operation. In this regards, three methods of processing were studied, which included two-step plasma graft-polymerization with immersion, two-step and one-step plasma graft-polymerization with pad-dry. In general, plasma treatment did not cause visible damage to the surface of Kevlar fibers, except for the appearance of tiny globules distributed almost uniformly indicating a minor effect of plasma treatment to the surface morphology of the polymer. From the examination of SEM images, however, it was found that a very localized surface etching seemed to have taken place, especially at high RF power (800 W) and long time of exposure (60 s), even in plasma downstream mode of operation. It was suggested that a small amount of charged particles might have escaped and reached the substrate surface. High density of surface radicals, which is the prerequisite for high graft density and high antimicrobial activity, was achieved by the combination of high RF power and short exposure time or low RF power and long time of exposure. This was a clear indication that the formation of surface radicals is a function of amount of the dissipated energy, which also explained the two-factor interaction between the two process parameters. XPS results showed that hydrolysis of the anilide bond of PPTA chains took place to some extent on the surface of Kevlar, leading to the

  11. Mechanical Design of a 4-Stage ADR for the PIPER mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Bryan L.; Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.; Jackson, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    The four 1,280 bolometer detector arrays that will fly on the balloon borne PIPER mission will be cooled by a 4-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). Two of the three mechanically independent ADR assemblies provide thermal isolation to their salt pills through Kevlar suspensions while the other provides thermal isolation to its salt pill through the use of bellows and Vespel material. The ADR integrates with the detector arrays and it sits in a large bucket Dewar containing superfluid liquid helium. This paper will describe the complex mechanical design of the PIPER ADR, and summarize the mechanical analysis done to validate the design.The four 1,280 bolometer detector arrays that will fly on the balloon borne PIPER mission will be cooled by a 4-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). Two of the three mechanically independent ADR assemblies provide thermal isolation to their salt pills through Kevlar suspensions while the other provides thermal isolation to its salt pill through the use of bellows and Vespel material. The ADR integrates with the detector arrays and it sits in a large bucket Dewar containing superfluid liquid helium. This paper will describe the complex mechanical design of the PIPER ADR, and summarize the mechanical analysis done to validate the design.

  12. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  13. Design of a unidirectional composite momentum wheel rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shogrin, Bradley; Jones, William R., Jr.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    1995-05-01

    A preliminary study comparing twelve unidirectional-fiber composite systems to five metal materials conventionally used in momentum wheels is presented. Six different fibers are considered in the study: E-Glass, S-Glass, Boron, AS, T300, and Kevlar. Because of the possibility of high momentum requirements, and thus high stresses, only two matrix materials are considered: a high-modulus (HM) and a intermediate-modulus-high-strength (IMHS) matrix. Each of the six fibers are coupled with each of the two matrix materials. In an effort to optimize the composite system, each composite is considered while varying the fiber volume ratio from 0.0 to 0.7 in increments of 0.1. For fiber volume ratios above 0.2, all twelve unidirectional-fiber composite systems meet the study's requirements with higher factors of safety and less mass than the five conventional isotropic (metal) materials. For example, at a fiber volume ratio of 0.6, the Kevlar/IMHS composite system has a safety factor 4.5 times greater than that of a steel (maraging) system and an approximately 10 percent reduction in weight.

  14. Effect of γ-irradiation on the optical and electrical properties of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Ahmad; Elfiky, Dalia; Ramadan, Ahmed M.; Hassan, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the optical and electrical properties of the reinforced fiber polymeric based materials became an important issue. Fiberglass/epoxy and Kevlar fiber/epoxy were selected as investigated samples manufactured with hand lay-up without autoclave curing technique. The selected technique is simple and low cost while being rarely used in space materials production. The electric conductivity and dielectric constant for those samples were measured with increasing the gamma radiation dose. Moreover, the absorptivity, band gap and color change were determined. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was performed to each of the material's constituent to evaluate the change in the investigated materials due to radiation exposure dose. In this study, the change of electrical properties for both investigated materials showed a slight variation of the test parameters with respect to the gamma dose increase; this variation is placed in the insulators rang. The tested samples showed an insulator stable behavior during the test period. The change of optical properties for both composite specimens showed the maximum absorptivity at the gamma dose 750 kGy. These materials are suitable for structure materials and thermal control for orbital life less than 7 years. In addition, the transparency of epoxy matrix was degraded. However, there is no color change for either Kevlar fiber or fiberglass.

  15. Lamination residual stresses in hybrid composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study lamination residual stresses for various material and loading parameters. The effects of hybridization on residual stresses and residual properties after thermal cycling under load were determined in angle-ply graphite/Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates. Residual strains in the graphite plies are not appreciably affected by the type and number of hybridizing plies. Computed residual stresses at room temperature in the S-glass plies reach values up to seventy-five percent of the transverse strength of the material. Computed residual stresses in the graphite plies exceed the static strength by approximately ten percent. In the case of Kevlar plies, computed residual stresses far exceed the static strength indicating possible early failure of these plies. Static testing of the hybrids above indicates that failure is governed by the ultimate strain of the graphite plies. In thermally cycled hybrids, in general, residual moduli were somewhat lower and residual strengths were higher than initial values.

  16. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  17. Protective gloves for use in high-risk patients: how much do they affect the dexterity of the surgeon?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A. M.; Birch, N. C.; Ribbans, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-five orthopaedic surgeons underwent eight motor and sensory tests while using four different glove combinations and without gloves. As well as single and double latex, surgeons wore a simple Kevlar glove with latex inside and outside and then wore a Kevlar and Medak glove with latex inside and outside, as recommended by the manufacturers. The effect of learning with each sequence was neutralised by randomising the glove order. The time taken to complete each test was recorded and, where appropriate, error rates were noted. Simple sensory tests took progressively longer to perform so that using the thickest glove combination led to the completion times being doubled. Error rates increased significantly. Tests of stereognosis also took longer and use of the thickest glove combination caused these tests to take three times as long on average. Error rates again increased significantly. However, prolongation of motor tasks was less marked. We conclude that, armed with this quantitative analysis of sensitivity and dexterity impairment, surgeons can judge the relative difficulties that may be incurred as a result of wearing the gloves against the benefits that they offer in protection. PMID:9135240

  18. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  19. Effect of particle hardness on the penetration behavior of fabrics intercalated with dry particles and concentrated particle-fluid suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Dennis P; Merrill, Richard L; Wagner, Norman J; Wetzel, Eric D

    2009-11-01

    The penetration behavior of Kevlar fabric intercalated with dry particles and shear thickening fluids (STF), highly concentrated fluid-particle suspensions, is presented. In particular, the role of particle hardness is explored by comparing fabric treatments containing SiO(2) particles, which are significantly harder than Kevlar, to treatments containing softer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles. The fabric testing includes yarn pull-out, quasi-static spike puncture, and ballistic penetration resistance, performed on single fabric layers. It was found that both dry particle and STF treatments resulted in improvements in fabric properties relative to neat or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) treated fabrics. On comparison of treatments with different particle hardness, the SiO(2) materials performed better in all tests than comparable PMMA materials, although the SiO(2) treatments caused yarn failure in pull-out testing, reducing the total pull-out energy. In addition, resistance to yarn pull-out was found to be substantially higher for STF-treated fabrics than for dry particle treated fabrics. However, both dry particle addition and STF treatments exhibited comparable enhancements in puncture and ballistic resistance. These observations suggest that viscous stress transfer, friction, and physical entrainment of hard particles into filaments contribute to the demonstrated improvements in the properties of protective fabrics treated with shear thickening fluids.

  20. High strength films from oriented, hydrogen-bonded "graphamid" 2D polymer molecular ensembles.

    PubMed

    Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Beaudet, Todd D; Andzelm, Jan W; Wetzel, Eric D

    2018-02-27

    The linear polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide), better known by its tradename Kevlar, is an icon of modern materials science due to its remarkable strength, stiffness, and environmental resistance. Here, we propose a new two-dimensional (2D) polymer, "graphamid", that closely resembles Kevlar in chemical structure, but is mechanically advantaged by virtue of its 2D structure. Using atomistic calculations, we show that graphamid comprises covalently-bonded sheets bridged by a high population of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular and micromechanical calculations predict that these strong intermolecular interactions allow stiff, high strength (6-8 GPa), and tough films from ensembles of finite graphamid molecules. In contrast, traditional 2D materials like graphene have weak intermolecular interactions, leading to ensembles of low strength (0.1-0.5 GPa) and brittle fracture behavior. These results suggest that hydrogen-bonded 2D polymers like graphamid would be transformative in enabling scalable, lightweight, high performance polymer films of unprecedented mechanical performance.

  1. Blast overpressure in rats: recreating a battlefield injury in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Long, Joseph B; Bentley, Timothy L; Wessner, Keith A; Cerone, Carolyn; Sweeney, Sheena; Bauman, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Blast injury to the brain is the predominant cause of neurotrauma in current military conflicts, and its etiology is largely undefined. Using a compression-driven shock tube to simulate blast effects, we assessed the physiological, neuropathological, and neurobehavioral consequences of airblast exposure, and also evaluated the effect of a Kevlar protective vest on acute mortality in rats and on the occurrence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in those that survived. This approach provides survivable blast conditions under which TBI can be studied. Striking neuropathological changes were caused by both 126- and 147-kPa airblast exposures. The Kevlar vest, which encased the thorax and part of the abdomen, greatly reduced airblast mortality, and also ameliorated the widespread fiber degeneration that was prominent in brains of rats not protected by a vest during exposure to a 126-kPa airblast. This finding points to a significant contribution of the systemic effects of airblast to its brain injury pathophysiology. Airblast of this intensity also disrupted neurologic and neurobehavioral performance (e.g., beam walking and spatial navigation acquisition in the Morris water maze). When immediately followed by hemorrhagic hypotension, with MAP maintained at 30 mm Hg, airblast disrupted cardiocompensatory resilience, as reflected by reduced peak shed blood volume, time to peak shed blood volume, and time to death. These findings demonstrate that shock tube-generated airblast can cause TBI in rats, in part through systemic mediation, and that the resulting brain injury significantly impacts acute cardiovascular homeostatic mechanisms as well as neurobehavioral function.

  2. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  3. Structure and Orientation Behavior of Highly Oriented Polymers Under Tensile and Compressive Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ramirez, Rafael

    The birefringence of Kevlar 49^ circler fibers has been shown to decrease with compressive strain, suggesting that structure changes under compression involve decreasing crystallite orientation. This mechanism appears to be the inverse of that occurring under tension, for which increasing crystallite orientation has been reported to occur, leading to non-linear elasticity. A contrast between the effects of both stress modes on structure (orientation) response is presented. While birefringence presents itself as a technically convenient and economically attractive technique for this type of study, caution must be exercised when interpreting results from measurements under stress. For highly crystalline fibers, experiments have led to the attribution of the observed changes in birefringence almost entirely to crystallite orientation. This study presents an analysis of the different contributions to birefringence under stress. X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed for Kevlar 49^ circler fibers under tensile stress. Results from crystal orientation cannot account for changes observed in birefringence. Moreover, they appear to account only for a small fraction of the total change. These observations suggest significant contributions from other sources. Theoretical calculations have been carried out under simulated stress conditions to quantify the effect of molecular deformation on the observed birefringence of Kevlar 49^circler fibers. The results have been obtained using semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations with the AM1 Hamiltonian in MOPAC. This analysis has been applied to poly(p^' -phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) and polyethylene (PE) chains. For PE, stress-free computations were performed on segments of up to 50 -(CH_2-CH _2)- units. Strains up to 1% were applied on segments of up to 40 units. For PPTA, segments of up to 5 PTA units were analyzed. Strain-free results indicate a linear dependence of molecular polarizability on chain length

  4. Analysis, design, fabrication, and performance of three-dimensional braided composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostar, Timothy D.

    1998-11-01

    Cartesian 3-D (track and column) braiding as a method of composite preforming has been investigated. A complete analysis of the process was conducted to understand the limitations and potentials of the process. Knowledge of the process was enhanced through development of a computer simulation, and it was discovered that individual control of each track and column and multiple-step braid cycles greatly increases possible braid architectures. Derived geometric constraints coupled with the fundamental principles of Cartesian braiding resulted in an algorithm to optimize preform geometry in relation to processing parameters. The design of complex and unusual 3-D braids was investigated in three parts: grouping of yarns to form hybrid composites via an iterative simulation; design of composite cross-sectional shape through implementation of the Universal Method; and a computer algorithm developed to determine the braid plan based on specified cross-sectional shape. Several 3-D braids, which are the result of variations or extensions to Cartesian braiding, are presented. An automated four-step braiding machine with axial yarn insertion has been constructed and used to fabricate two-step, double two-step, four-step, and four-step with axial and transverse yarn insertion braids. A working prototype of a multi-step braiding machine was used to fabricate four-step braids with surrogate material insertion, unique hybrid structures from multiple track and column displacement and multi-step cycles, and complex-shaped structures with constant or varying cross-sections. Braid materials include colored polyester yarn to study the yarn grouping phenomena, Kevlar, glass, and graphite for structural reinforcement, and polystyrene, silicone rubber, and fasteners for surrogate material insertion. A verification study for predicted yarn orientation and volume fraction was conducted, and a topological model of 3-D braids was developed. The solid model utilizes architectural parameters

  5. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV): Flight Rationale for the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kezirian, Michael T.; Johnson, Kevin L.; Phoenix, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Each Orbiter Vehicle (Space Shuttle Program) contains up to 24 Kevlar49/Epoxy Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) for storage of pressurized gases. In the wake of the Columbia accident and the ensuing Return To Flight (RTF) activities, Orbiter engineers reexamined COPV flight certification. The original COPV design calculations were updated to include recently declassified Kevlar COPV test data from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to incorporate changes in how the Space Shuttle was operated as opposed to orinigially envisioned. 2005 estimates for the probability of a catastrophic failure over the life of the program (from STS-1 through STS-107) were one-in-five. To address this unacceptable risk, the Orbiter Project Office (OPO) initiated a comprehensive investigation to understand and mitigate this risk. First, the team considered and eventually deemed unfeasible procuring and replacing all existing flight COPVs. OPO replaced the two vessels with the highest risk with existing flight spare units. Second, OPO instituted operational improvements in ground procedures to signficiantly reduce risk, without adversely affecting Shuttle capability. Third, OPO developed a comprehensive model to quantify the likelihood of occurrance. A fully-instrumented burst test (recording a lower burst pressure than expected) on a flight-certified vessel provided critical understanding of the behavior of Orbiter COPVs. A more accurate model was based on a newly-compiled comprehensive database of Kevlar data from LLNL and elsewhere. Considering hardware changes, operational improvements and reliability model refinements, the mean reliability was determined to be 0.998 for the remainder of the Shuttle Program (from 2007, for STS- 118 thru STS-135). Since limited hardware resources precluded full model validation through multiple tests, additional model confidence was sought through the first-ever Accelerated Stress Rupture Test (ASRT) of a flown flight article

  6. Investigation of the mechanical properties of organoplastic under shock wave loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragov, A. M.; Igumnov, L. A.; Konstantinov, A. Yu; Lomunov, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents results of dynamic tests of a typical representative of new composite and damping materials: organoplastics. Compression testing was performed using the traditional Kolsky method and its original modification. The strength and deformation properties of organoplastics under conditions of uniaxial stress and uniaxial deformation were studied. When the organoplastic is compressed transversely to the Kevlar fabric layers under conditions of a uniaxial stress state, the material begins to break down (to lose the layer cohesion) at a stress of about 200 MPa, while under the conditions of uniaxial strain, it retains its apparent integrity at stresses up to 500 MPa. The small value of the lateral thrust factor indicates a large internal strength of the material in tension in the radial direction.

  7. A stable numerical solution method in-plane loading of nonlinear viscoelastic laminated orthotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1989-01-01

    In response to the tremendous growth in the development of advanced materials, such as fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials, a new numerical method is developed to analyze and predict the time-dependent properties of these materials. Basic concepts in viscoelasticity, laminated composites, and previous viscoelastic numerical methods are presented. A stable numerical method, called the nonlinear differential equation method (NDEM), is developed to calculate the in-plane stresses and strains over any time period for a general laminate constructed from nonlinear viscoelastic orthotropic plies. The method is implemented in an in-plane stress analysis computer program, called VCAP, to demonstrate its usefulness and to verify its accuracy. A number of actual experimental test results performed on Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates are compared to predictions calculated from the numerical method.

  8. In situ simultaneous strain and temperature measurement of adaptive composite materials using a fiber Bragg grating based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyuk-Jin; Costantini, Daniele M.; Michaud, Veronique; Limberger, Hans G.; Manson, Jan-Anders; Salathe, Rene P.; Kim, Chun-Gon; Hong, Chang-Sun

    2005-05-01

    An optical fiber sensor to simultaneously measure strain and temperature was designed and embedded into an adaptive composite laminate which exhibits a shape change upon thermal activation. The sensor is formed by two fiber Bragg gratings, which are written in optical fibers with different core dopants. The two gratings were spliced close to each other and a sensing element resulted with Bragg gratings of similar strain sensitivity but different response to temperature. This is due to the dependence of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient on core dopants and relative concentrations. The sensor was tested on an adaptive composite laminate made of unidirectional Kevlar-epoxy pre-preg plies. Several 150μm diameter pre-strained NiTiCu shape memory alloy wires were embedded in the composite laminate together with one fiber sensor. Simultaneous monitoring of strain and temperature during the curing process and activation in an oven was demonstrated.

  9. Lamination residual strains and stresses in hybrid laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of hybridization on the magnitude of lamination residual stresses. Eight-ply graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates were studied. The same matrix resin was selected for all basic materials to ensure compatibility and uniform curing of the various plies. The specimens, with inserted strain gages and thermocouples, were subjected to curing and postcuring cycles in an autoclave. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to a thermal cycle from room temperature to 444 K and down to room temperature. It was found that hydridizing reduces apparently residual strains and stresses in the graphite plies. However, these strains were not affected much by the type and degree of hybridization.

  10. Fabrication and testing of non-graphitic superhybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and the mechanical properties of adhesively-bonded boron aluminum/titanium and non-graphitic fiber/epoxy resin superhybrid (NGSH) composite laminates for potential aerospace applications. The major driver for this study was the elimination of a potential graphite fiber release problem in the event of a fire. The results of the study show that non-graphitic fibers, such as S-glass and Kevlar 49, may be substituted for the graphite fibers used in superhybrid (SH) composites for some applications. As is to be expected, however, the non-graphitic superhybrids have lower stiffness properties than the graphitic superhybrids. In-plane and flexural moduli of the laminates studied in this program can be predicted reasonably well using linear laminate theory while nonlinear laminate theory is required for strength predictions.

  11. Dynamic response of composite beams with induced-strain actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents an analytical-experimental study on dynamic response of open-section composite beams with actuation by piezoelectric devices. The analysis includes the essential features of open-section composite beam modeling, such as constrained warping and transverse shear deformation. A general plate segment of the beam with and without piezoelectric ply is modeled using laminated plate theory and the forces and displacement relations of this plate segment are then reduced to the force and displacement of the one-dimensional beam. The dynamic response of bending-torsion coupled composite beams excited by piezoelectric devices is predicted. In order to validate the analysis, kevlar-epoxy and graphite-epoxy beams with surface mounted pieziceramic actuators are tested for their dynamic response. The response was measured using accelerometer. Good correlation between analysis and experiment is achieved.

  12. Mechanics of composite materials: Recent advances; Proceedings of the Symposium, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, August 16-19, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z. (Editor); Herakovich, C. T. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The present conference on the mechanics of composites discusses microstructure's influence on particulate and short fiber composites' thermoelastic and transport properties, the elastoplastic deformation of composites, constitutive equations for viscoplastic composites, the plasticity and fatigue of metal matrix composites, laminate damping mechanisms, the micromechanical modeling of Kevlar/epoxy composites' time-dependent failure, the variational characterization of waves in composites, and computational methods for eigenvalue problems in composite design. Also discussed are the elastic response of laminates, elastic coupling nonlinear effects in unsymmetrical laminates, elasticity solutions for laminate problems having stress singularities, the mechanics of bimodular composite structures, the optimization of laminated plates and shells, NDE for laminates, the role of matrix cracking in the continuum constitutive behavior of a damaged composite ply, and the energy release rates of various microcracks in short fiber composites.

  13. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  14. Mechanical property characterization of intraply hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the mechanical properties of intraply hybrids made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix hybridized with secondary S-glass or Kevlar 49 fiber composites is presented. The specimen stress-strain behavior was determined, showing that mechanical properties of intraply hybrid composites can be measured with available methods such as the ten-degree off-axis test for intralaminar shear, and conventional tests for tensile, flexure, and Izod impact properties. The results also showed that combinations of high modulus graphite/S-glass/epoxy matrix composites exist which yield intraply hybrid laminates with the best 'balanced' properties, and that the translation efficiency of mechanical properties from the constituent composites to intraply hybrids may be assessed with a simple equation.

  15. Spallation modeling in the Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation (CMA) computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. M.; Kobayashi, W. S.

    1987-06-01

    It has been observed during tests of certain laminated composite materials exposed to relatively high continuous wave laser irradiation, that the heated surface will spall. To model this phenomenon, the Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation code has been updated. In addition to temperature response, in-depth decomposition, and surface recession, thermal and mechanical stresses are calculated. Spall is modeled as a discrete mass removal event occurring when the stresses exceed the ultimate strength of the char through a critical depth. Comparisons are made with test data for a carbon phenolic cylinder exposed to a shock tube environment and for a flat plate Kevlar epoxy test specimen exposed to high intensity laser irradiation. Good agreement is shown; however, the results indicate a requirement for more comprehensive elevated-temperature material properties for further validation.

  16. Effect of phase lag on cyclic durability of laminated composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersons, Janis; Limonov, V.; Tamuzs, Vitants

    1992-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on fatigue of laminated fiber reinforced composites under out-of-phase, biaxial cyclic loading are presented. Experiments were carried out on tubular filament wound samples of epoxy matrix/organic (Kevlar type) fiber composites. Fatigue strength under two different loading modes, namely cyclic torsion combined with axial tension or compression, was investigated for phase lags psi = 0, pi/2, and pi. Durability was shown to decrease with increasing phase shift both for axial tension (R = 0.1) and compression (R = 10). A matrix failure criterion was proposed for a unidirectionally reinforced ply, and the ply discount method was modified to account for phase lag. Calculated S-N curves agree reasonably well with experimental data.

  17. Thermal deformations and stresses in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Residual stresses are induced during curing in angle-ply laminates as a result of anisotropic thermal deformations of the variously oriented plies. Residual strains are measured experimentally using embedded strain gage techniques, and residual stresses are computed using orthotropic stress-strain relations. The results show that, for graphite and Kevlar laminates, residual stresses at room temperature are high enough to cause damage in the plies in the transverse to the fiber direction. It is also shown that residual stresses do not relax appreciably. The ply stacking sequence is found to have no effect on the magnitude of average residual stresses. Residual stresses and susceptibility to cracking during curing depend to a marked extent on ply layup.

  18. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  19. Buckling of pressure-loaded, long, shear deformable, cylindrical laminated shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, John S.; Simitses, George J.

    A higher-order shell theory was developed (kinematic relations, constitutive relations, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions), which includes initial geometric imperfections and transverse shear effects for a laminated cylindrical shell under the action of pressure, axial compression and in-plane shear. Through the perturbation technique, buckling equations are derived for the corresponding 'perfect geometry' symmetric laminated configuration. Critical pressures are computed for very long cylinders for several stacking sequences, several radius-to-total-thickness ratios, three lamina materials (boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy), and three shell theories: classical, first-order shear deformable and higher- (third-)order shear deformable. The results provide valuable information concerning the applicability (accurate prediction of buckling pressures) of the various shell theories.

  20. Composite laminate free-edge reinforcement with U-shaped caps. I - Stress analysis. II - Theoretical-experimental correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, Terry, Jr.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The present generalized plane-strain FEM analysis for the prediction of interlaminar normal stress reduction when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a composite laminate gives attention to the highly variable transverse stresses near the free edge, cap length and thickness, and a gap under the cap due to the manufacturing process. The load-transfer mechanism between cap and laminate is found to be strain-compatibility, rather than shear lag. In the second part of this work, the three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge-cap designs; symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of kevlar-epoxy are shown to carry 130-140 percent greater loading than uncapped laminates, under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading.

  1. Passive-quadrature demodulated localized-Michelson fiber-optic strain sensor embedded in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valis, Tomas; Tapanes, Edward; Liu, Kexing; Measures, Raymond M.

    1991-04-01

    A strain sensor embedded in composite materials that is intrinsic, all fiber, local, and phase demodulated is described. It is the combination of these necessary elements that represents an advance in the state of the art. Sensor localization is achieved by using a pair of mirror-ended optical fibers of different lengths that are mechanically coupled up until the desired gauge length for common-mode suppression has been reached. This fiber-optic sensor has been embedded in both thermoset (Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/epoxy) and thermoplastic (graphite/PEEK) composite materials in order to make local strain measurements at the lamina level. The all-fiber system uses a 3 x 3 coupler for phase demodulation. Parameters such as strain sensitivity, transverse strain sensitivity, failure strain, and frequency response are discussed, along with applications.

  2. Practical application to composite materials of a portable digital ultrasound device controlled by a microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, J. G.; Husarek, V.

    1987-06-01

    The usefulness of a portable microprocessor-controlled ultrasound device for the periodic assessment of aircraft parts made of composite materials is shown. The performance of the device is demonstrated with the examples of a metallic honeycomb with a carbon-fiber skin, a phenolic honeycomb with a carbon skin, and a phenolic honeycomb with a Kevlar skin. Also considered are assessments of homogeneous carbon-fiber parts, including the study of artificial defects consisting of 1-2 mm diameter holes, and the assessment of the behavior of a carbon-titanium interface with separated zones. Advantages of the device include ease of adjustment, automated evaluation of the depth of defects, and the nearly-absolute reproducibility of adjustments.

  3. Study to investigate design, fabrication and test of low cost concepts for large hybrid composite helicopter fuselage, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, K. M.; Lucas, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a frame/stringer/skin fabrication technique for composite airframe construction was studied as a low cost approach to the manufacturer of larger helicopter airframe components. A center cabin aluminum airframe section of the Sikorsky CH-53D, was selected for evaluation as a composite structure. The design, as developed, is composed of a woven KEVLAR R-49/epoxy skin and graphite/epoxy frames and stringers. The single cure concept is made possible by the utilization of pre-molded foam cores, over which the graphite/epoxy pre-impregnated frame and stringer reinforcements are positioned. Bolted composite channel sections were selected as the optimum joint construction. The applicability of the single cure concept to larger realistic curved airframe sections, and the durability of the composite structure in a realistic spectrum fatigue environment, was described.

  4. Impact and Ballistic Response of Hybridized Thermoplastic Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    hybrid panels exhibit the lowest dynamic and residual deflection through all samples. Kevlar and [0/90] HB25 layup are similar in performance...HB25 + 2 Layer K705 Phenolic 1422.00 15.646 15.1638 Shot on Aramid Face 60/40 Mix HB25/LF1 1424.06 15.646 16.256 Shot on HB25 Face Dyneema HB80...Carbon 1420.46 16.764 16.3576 Shot on Carbon Face HB25 + 3-ply LF1 1427.38 16.866 18.4404 Shot on LF1 Face HB25 + 2 Layer K745 Phenolic 1418.00

  5. Time-Temperature Superposition to Determine the Stress-Rupture of Aramid Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwis, K. G. N. C.; Burgoyne, C. J.

    2006-07-01

    Conventional creep testing takes a long time to obtain stress-rupture data for aramid fibres at the low stress levels likely to be used in practical applications. However, the rate of creep of aramid can be accelerated by a thermally activated process to obtain the failure of fibres within a few hours. It is possible to obtain creep curves at different temperature levels which can be shifted along the time axis to generate a single curve know as a master curve, from which stress-rupture data can be obtained. This technique is known as the time-temperature superposition principle and will be applied to Kevlar 49 yarns. Important questions relating to the techniques needed to obtain smooth master curves will be discussed, as will the validity the resulting curves and the corresponding stress-rupture lifetime.

  6. Aerogel Hybrid Composite Materials: Designs and Testing for Multifunctional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This webinar will introduce the broad spectrum of aerogel composites and their diverse performance properties such as reduced heat transfer to energy storage, and expands specifically on the aerogel/fiber laminate systems and testing methodologies. The multi-functional laminate composite system, AeroFiber, and its construction is designed by varying the type of fiber (e.g. polyester, carbon, Kevlar®, Spectra® or Innegral(TradeMark) and combinations thereof), the aerogel panel type and thickness, and overall layup configuration. The combination and design of materials may be customized and tailored to achieve a range of desired properties in the resulting laminate system. Multi-functional properties include structural strength, impact resistance, reduction in heat transfer, increased fire resistance, mechanical energy absorption, and acoustic energy dampening. Applications include aerospace, aircraft, automotive, boating, building and construction, lightweight portable structures, liquefied natural gas, cryogenics, transportation and energy, sporting equipment, and military protective gear industries.

  7. Seawater infiltration effect on thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Haziq Izzuddin bin; Hassan, Mohamad Zaki bin; Ibrahim, Ikhwan; Rashidi, Ahmad Hadi Mohamed; Nor, Siti Fadzilah M.; Daud, Mohd Yusof Md

    2018-05-01

    Seawater salinity has been associated with the reduction of polymer structure durability. The aim of this study is to investigate the change in thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composite due to the presence of seawater. Carbon fiber, carbon/kevlar, fiberglass, and jute that reinforced with epoxy resin was laminated through hand-layup technique. Initially, these specimen was sectioned to 5×5 mm dimension, then immersed in seawater and distilled water at room temperature until it has thoroughly saturated. Following, the thermal degradation analysis using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), the thermic changes due to seawater infiltration was defined. The finding shows that moisture absorption reduces the glass transition temperature (Tg) of fiber reinforced epoxy composite. However, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of seawater infiltrated laminate composite is compareable with distilled water infiltrated laminate composite. The carbon fiber reinfored epoxy has the highest glass transition temperature out of all specimen.

  8. Effect of flow on the acoustic performance of extended reaction lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1983-01-01

    A model is developed for the effects of uniform and boundary-layer mean flow on the attenuation and propagation of harmonically excited sound waves in an extended reaction lined cylindrical duct. A duct geometry consisting of an annular outer region of bulk material surrounding an inner cylinder of air is utilized. A numerical solution is obtained for the coupled wave equations governing the motion of the sound in both the inner and annular regions. It is found that the numerically predicted attenuation and propagations constants are in excellent agreement with measured values using Kevlar as the liner material for plane-wave mode (O,O) excitation over a wide range of mean flows and sound frequency. The boundary-layer effects are determined to be unimportant, at least for plane-wave sound. In addition, numerical studies indicate small differences between the use of either the radial velocity or the radial displacement boundary conditions.

  9. Smart composites with embedded shape memory alloy actuators and fibre Bragg grating sensors: activation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. A.; Bosia, F.; Michaud, V.; Dunkel, G.; Botsis, J.; Månson, J.-A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the production of an adaptive composite by embedding thin pre-strained shape memory alloy actuators into a Kevlar-epoxy host material. In order to combine the activation and sensing capabilities, fibre Bragg grating sensors are also embedded into the specimens, and the strain measured in situ during activation. The effect of manufacturing conditions, and hence of the initial stress state in the composite before activation, on the magnitude of the measured strains is discussed. The results of stress and strain simulations are compared with experimental data, and guidelines are provided for the optimization of the composite. Finally, a pilot experiment is carried out to provide an example of how a strain-stabilizing feedback mechanism can be implemented in the smart structure.

  10. Method for Cleaning Laser-Drilled Holes on Printed Wiring Boards by Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirogaki, Toshiki; Aoyama, Eiichi; Minagi, Ryu; Ogawa, Keiji; Katayama, Tsutao; Matsuoka, Takashi; Inoue, Hisahiro

    We propose a new method for cleaning blind via holes after laser drilling of PWBs using oxygen plasma treatment. This report dealt with three kinds of PWB materials: epoxy resin and two kinds of aramid fiber reinforced plastics (AFRP: Technora or Kevlar fiber reinforcement). We observed the drilled holes after plasma treatment using both an optical and a scanning electric microscope (SEM). It was confirmed that adequate etching took place in the drilled holes by plasma treatment. We also compared the hole wall and hole bottom after plasma treatment with ones after chemical etching. It was clear that there was no damage to the aramid fiber tip on the hole wall, and that a smooth roughness of the hole wall was obtained by means of plasma treatment. As a result, we demonstrated that the plasma treatment is effective in cleaning the laser drilled holes of PWBs.

  11. Composite material bend-twist coupling for wind turbine blade applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Justin M.

    Current efforts in wind turbine blade design seek to employ bend-twist coupling of composite materials for passive power control by twisting blades to feather. Past efforts in this area of study have proved to be problematic, especially in formulation of the bend-twist coupling coefficient alpha. Kevlar/epoxy, carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy specimens were manufactured to study bend-twist coupling, from which numerical and analytical models could be verified. Finite element analysis was implemented to evaluate fiber orientation and material property effects on coupling magnitude. An analytical/empirical model was then derived to describe numerical results and serve as a replacement for the commonly used coupling coefficient alpha. Through the results from numerical and analytical models, a foundation for aeroelastic design of wind turbines blades utilizing biased composite materials is provided.

  12. NDE scanning and imaging of aircraft structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Donald; Kepler, Carl; Le, Cuong

    1995-07-01

    The Science and Engineering Lab at McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, Calif. has been involved in the development and use of computer-based scanning systems for NDE (nondestructive evaluation) since 1985. This paper describes the history leading up to our current applications which employ eddy current and ultrasonic scanning of aircraft structures that contain both metallics and advanced composites. The scanning is performed using industrialized computers interfaced to proprietary acquisition equipment and software. Examples are shown that image several types of damage such as exfoliation and fuselage lap joint corrosion in aluminum, impact damage, embedded foreign material, and porosity in Kevlar and graphite epoxy composites. Image analysis techniques are reported that are performed using consumer oriented computer hardware and software that are not NDE specific and not expensive

  13. Tapping mode imaging with an interfacial force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, O. L.; Graham, J. F.; Norton, P. R.

    1997-11-01

    In their present embodiment, sensors used in interfacial force microscopy do not have the necessary mechanical bandwidth to be employed as free-running tapping mode devices. We describe an extremely stable method of obtaining tapping mode images using feedback on the sensor. Our method is immune to small dc drifts in the force signal, and the prospect of diminishing the risk of damaging fragile samples is realized. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated by our imaging work on a Kevlar fiber-epoxy composite. We also present a model which accounts for the frequency dependence of the sensor in air when operating under closed loop control. A simplified force modulation model is investigated to explore the effect of contact on the closed loop response of the sensor.

  14. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in KEVLAR® 49 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, J. M.; Andrade, E.; Saulsberry, R. L.

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar® 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio <1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  15. Crushing characteristics of composite tubes with 'near-elliptical' cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine whether the energy-absorption capability of near-elliptical cross-section composite tubular specimens is a function of included angle. Each half of the near-elliptical cross-section tube is a segment of a circle. The included angle is the angle created by radial lines extending from the center of the circular segment to the ends of the circular segment. Graphite- and Kevlar-reinforced epoxy material was used to fabricate specimens. Tube internal diameters were 2.54, 3.81, and 7.62 cm, and included angles were 180, 160, 135, and 90 degrees. Based upon the test results from these tubes, energy-absorption capability increased between 10 and 30 percent as included angle decreased between 180 and 90 degrees for the materials evaluated. Energy-absorption capability was a decreasing nonlinear function of the ratio of tube internal diameter to wall thickness.

  16. Damping in aerospace composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agneni, A.; Balis Crema, L.; Castellani, A.

    Experimental results are presented on specimens of carbon and Kevlar fibers in epoxy resin, materials used in many aerospace structures (control surfaces and wings in aircraft, large antennas in spacecraft, etc.). Some experimental methods of estimating damping ratios are first reviewed, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain. Some damping factor estimates from experimental tests are then shown; in order to evaluate the effects of the aerospace environment, damping factors have been obtained in a typical range of temperature, namely between +120 C and -120 C, and in the pressure range from room pressure to 10 exp -6 torr. Finally, a theoretical approach for predicting the bounds of the damping coefficients is shown, and prediction data are compared with experimental results.

  17. Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results of the test for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  18. Structurally integrated fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials.

    PubMed

    Measures, R M; Glossop, N D; Lymer, J; Leblanc, M; West, J; Dubois, S; Tsaw, W; Tennyson, R C

    1989-07-01

    Progress toward the development of a fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials is reported. This system, based on the fracture of embedded optical fibers, has been characterized with respect to the orientation and location of the optical fibers in the composite. Together with a special treatment, these parameters have been tailored to yield a system capable of detecting the threshold of damage for various impacted Kevlar/epoxy panels. The technique has been extended to measure the growth of a damage region which could arise from either impact, manufacturing flaws, or static overloading. The mechanism of optical fiber fracture has also been investigated. In addition, the influence of embedded optical fibers on the tensile and compressive strength of the composite material has been studied. Image enhanced backlighting has been shown to be a powerful and convenient method of assessing internal damage to translucent composite materials.

  19. Free vibration analysis of composite railway wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, N.; Ramesh, T. C.

    1992-02-01

    Composite materials have been finding increasing applications in the field of transportation. A U.S.A. patent suggesting the use of composite materials for railway wheels is the basis for this paper. In thispaper, the natural vibrations of railway wheels made of composite materials have been theoretically estimated by the finite element method and compared with those in wheels made of steel. A thick conical shell element with displacements in the axial, radial and circumferential directions has been used in the analysis. This element brings out the coupling between the different modes of vibration, and this aspect is important in the dynamic analysis of composite wheels. Three geometries of wheels and two materials (Kevlar-epoxy and graphite-epoxy) have been used in the study. For each of these materials, two fiber orientations (radial and circumferential) have been taken up and their natural frequencies determined.

  20. Materials Refining for Structural Elements From Lunar Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    Use of in situ resources for construction on the Moon will require manufacturing structural materials out of lunar resources. Many materials that are currently used for aerospace and construction require materials that have low availability on the Moon. For example, graphite fiber, SiC fiber, and artificial fiber composites (such as Kevlar, Spectra, etc.) are used as advanced lightweight structural materials on Earth, but the low availability of C on the Moon makes these poor choices. Likewise the polymers used as the matrix for these composites, epoxy or polyester, also suffer from the low availability of C. Bulk paving and construction materials such as cement or concrete suffer from the low availability of water on the Moon, while asphalt, a common paving material on Earth, suffers from the low availability of C.

  1. Preliminary burn and impact tests of hybrid polymeric composites. [preventing graphite fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Brewer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Free graphite fibers released into the environment from resin matrix composite components, as a result of fire and/or explosion, pose a potential hazard to electrical equipment. An approach to prevent the fibers from becoming airborne is to use hybrid composite materials which retain the fibers at the burn site. Test results are presented for three hybrid composites that were exposed to a simulation of an aircraft fire and explosion. The hybrid systems consisted of 16 plies of graphite-epoxy with two plies of Kevlar-, S-glass-, or boron-epoxy on each face. Two different test environments were used. In one environment, specimens were heated by convection only, and then impacted by a falling mass. In the other environment, specimens were heated by convection and by radiation, but were not impacted. The convective heat flux was about 100-120 kW/m in both environments and the radiative flux was about 110 kW/sq m.

  2. Design, Fabrication and Test of Multi-Fiber Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. A.; Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Unidirectional and angleply multifiber laminates were tested for improved impact strength and other mechanical properties. The effects of several variables on the mechanical properties of epoxy matrix materials were described. These include fiber type (HMS and AS graphites, glass, and Kevlar 49), ratio of primary to hybridizing fiber and hybrid configuration. It is demonstrated that AS graphite/S glass in an intraply configuration results in the best combination of static and Charpy impact properties as well as superior ballistic impact resistance. Pendulum impact tests which were conducted on thin specimens are shown to produce different ranking of materials than tests conducted on standard thickness Charpy specimens. It is shown that the thin specimen results are in better agreement with the ballistic impact data. Additional static test data are reported as a function of temperature for the seven best hybrid configurations having epoxy, polyimide (PMR-15) and polyphenylquinoxaline resins as the matrix.

  3. Department of Physics' Involvement of the Impact Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonMeerwall, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    The project involved the impact testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the impacting projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.

  4. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOEpatents

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  5. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOEpatents

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2017-08-22

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  6. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOEpatents

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2015-08-11

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  7. Paint removal activities in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry

    1993-03-01

    Paint removal activities currently under way in Canada include: research and development of laser paint stripping; development and commercialization of a new blasting medium based on wheat starch; commercialization of a new blasting medium and process using crystalline ice blasting for paint removal and surface cleaning; and the development of automated and robotic systems for paint stripping applications. A specification for plastic media blasting (PMB) of aircraft and aircraft components is currently being drafted by NDHQ for use by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and contractors involved in coating removal for the CAF. Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) is studying the effects of various blast media on coating removal rates, and minimizing the possibility of damage to substrates other than aluminum such as graphite epoxy composite and Kevlar. The effects of plastic media blasting on liquid penetrant detection of fatigue cracks is also under investigation.

  8. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) tests have been conducted on small-diameter Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels subjected to long-term sustained load-to-failure tests. Single-cycle burst tests were used as a basis for determining the test pressure in the sustained-loading tests. AE data from two vessel locations were compared. The data suggest that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers is quite different for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. AE from boss-mounted transducers yielded relatively consistent values. These values were not a function of time for vessel failure. The development of an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels is discussed.

  9. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  10. Some observations relating to behind-body armour blunt trauma effects caused by ballistic impact.

    PubMed

    Lidén, E; Berlin, R; Janzon, B; Schantz, B; Seeman, T

    1988-01-01

    Live, anesthetised pigs were used to assess behind-armour blunt trauma effects. The thoraco-abdominal body region was covered with varying thicknesses of Kevlar fabric packets. This soft body armour was applied, either in direct contact with the thoracic wall of the animals, or with different plastic foam sheets, so-called trauma packs, between the armour and the skin. The live animals were surgically evaluated, and then sacrificed. Blocks of soft soap were subjected to equal tests and the behind-armour indentations were measured. The results indicate that serious injury to the body armour-protected chest may be caused by the impact of nonpenetrating bullets and shotgun pellets. Severe pulmonary contusions and lacerations were found when the energy transferred through the body armour was estimated to be high.

  11. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  12. Low-Thermal Conductivity Suspensions Used in the Isolation of the Salt Pills Aboard the Astro-H Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; Wegel, Donald C.; James, Bryan L.; Galassi, Nicholas M.; Faulkner, Richard L.; San Sebastian, Marcelino

    2011-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) utilizes the magnetocholoric effect in a paramagnetic salt to produce sub-Kelvin temperatures. It is a solid-state device that has no moving parts and does not rely upon a density gradient in a working fluid. This makes it ideal for cooling space-based instruments. ·Typically the salt is enclosed in a cylindrical pill that is suspended within the bore of a magnet. The suspension between the salt pill and magnet must be robust enough to survive a launch yet have a thermal conductance that minimizes heat from the magnet that is mechanically, and thermally, anchored to a stage at a higher temperature. Here we detail such a design that uses Kevlar(Trade Mark) as the supporting media in a system that limits motion of the salt pill axial as well as laterally with respect to the magnet bore.

  13. Space architecture monograph series. Volume 4: Genesis 2: Advanced lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieber, Joseph P.; Huebner-Moths, Janis; Paruleski, Kerry L.; Moore, Gary T. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This research and design study investigated advanced lunar habitats for astronauts and mission specialists on the Earth's moon. Design recommendations are based on environmental response to the lunar environment, human habitability (human factors and environmental behavior research), transportability (structural and materials system with least mass), constructability (minimizing extravehicular time), construction dependability and resilience, and suitability for NASA launch research missions in the 21st century. The recommended design uses lunar lava tubes, with construction being a combination of Space Station Freedom derived hard modules and light weight Kevlar laminate inflatable structures. The proposed habitat includes research labs and a biotron, crew quarters and crew support facility, mission control, health maintenance facility, maintenance work areas for psychological retreat, privacy, and comtemplation. Furniture, specialized equipment, and lighting are included in the analysis and design. Drawings include base master plans, construction sequencing, overall architectural configuration, detailed floor plans, sections and axonometrics, with interior perspectives.

  14. An automated technique for manufacturing thermoplastic stringers in continuous length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Baxevani, E.; Spelz, U.

    In the present work an automated Continuous Compression Moulding Technique for the manufacture of stringers in continuous length is presented. The method combines pultrusion and hot-pressing. The technique is utilized for the production of L-shape stringers which are widely applied in aerospace constructions. The investigation was carried out on carbon reinforced PEEK (C/PEEK), as well as, for comparison, on the thermoplastic composites carbon reinforced polyethersulfon (C/PES), glass and carbon reinforced polyphenylene-sulfide (G/PPS, C/PPS) and Kevlar reinforced Polyamide 6 (K/PA 6). For the materials investigated the optimized process parameters for manufacturing the L-shape stringers were derived experimentally. To achieve this goal, the quality of the produced parts was controlled by using non-destructive testing techniques. Parts providing satisfactory quality were also tested destructively to measure their mechanical properties. The investigation results have shown the suitability of the technique to produce continuous length stringers.

  15. Stochastic damage evolution in textile laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic model utilizing random material characteristics to predict damage evolution in textile laminates is presented. Model is based on a division of each ply into two sublaminas consisting of cells. The probability of cell failure is calculated using stochastic function theory and maximal strain failure criterion. Three modes of failure, i.e. fiber breakage, matrix failure in transverse direction, as well as matrix or interface shear cracking, are taken into account. Computed failure probabilities are utilized in reducing cell stiffness based on the mesovolume concept. A numerical algorithm is developed predicting the damage evolution and deformation history of textile laminates. Effect of scatter of fiber orientation on cell properties is discussed. Weave influence on damage accumulation is illustrated with the help of an example of a Kevlar/epoxy laminate.

  16. Environmental exposure effects on composite materials for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggeshall, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of environmental exposure on composite materials are determined. The environments considered are representative of those experienced by commercial jet aircraft. Initial results have been compiled for the following material systems: T300/5208, T300/5209, and T300/934. Future results will include AS-1/3501-6 and Kevlar 49/F161-188. Specimens are exposed on the exterior and interior of 737 airplanes of three airlines, and to continuous ground-level exposure at four locations. In addition, specimens are exposed in the laboratory to conditions such as: simulated ground-air-ground, weatherometer, and moisture. Residual strength results are presented for specimens exposed for up to five years at five ground-level exposure locations and on airplanes from one airline.

  17. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high-performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single-cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament-wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S-glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessel structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all-titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized including data from current NASA-Lewis Research Center contractual and in-house programs.

  18. Correlation of residual strength with acoustic emission from impact-damaged composite structures under constant biaxial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Whittaker, J. W.; Brosey, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    Small, filament-wound, Kevlar/epoxy, biaxial test specimens were subjected to various levels of impact damage. The specimens were pressurized in a proof test cycle to 58 percent of their nominal, undamaged strength and then pressurized to failure. Acoustic emission data were gathered by multiple sensors during a 10 minute hold at peak proof pressure. Post-test filtering of the data was performed to study composite behavior in the damaged region and other areas. The rate and total amount of AE produced depends on the duration of the static load and degree of damage. The concept of the event rate moment is introduced as a method of quantifying a structure's total AE behavior when under static load. Average event rate, total long duration events, and event rate moments provided various degrees of correlation between AE and residual strength.

  19. Flight service evaluation of PRD-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Fairing panels were fabricated to evaluate the fabrication characteristics and flight service performance of PRD-49 (Kevlar-49) a composite reinforcing material and to compare it with the fiberglass which is currently in use. Panel configurations were selected to evaluate the PRD-49 with two resin matrix materials in sandwich and solid laminate construction. Left and right hand versions of these configurations were installed on L-1011's which will accumulate approximately 3000 flight hours per year per aircraft. The direct substitution of PRD-49 for fiberglass produced a twenty-six percent weight reduction on the panel configurations. Examination of these panels revealed that there was no visible difference between the PRD-49 and adjacent fiberglass panels.

  20. Considerations for the head-injured air-evacuated patient: a case report of frontal sinus fracture and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Helling, Eric; McKinlay, Alex J

    2005-07-01

    Head and neck injuries are not uncommon in combat environments and may be increasing due to survivable injuries from the use of kevlar helmets and body armor. With the current capability of rapid evacuation from the battlefield, acutely injured patients with frontal sinus injuries may undergo further barometric challenges. Proper care during transport can prevent the occurrence of secondary injury (increased intracranial pressure, tension pneumocephalus) that would complicate the patient's management at the next level of care. Management principles (importance of low-level flight/pressurized cabin, preflight use of decongestants, avoidance of valsalva, and ability to manage complications either procedurally or by landing) are reviewed. In addition, we propose a simple mechanism for pressure equilibration of a compromised frontal sinus during air evacuation using an angiocatheter placed through the wound before closure.

  1. GENESIS 2: Advanced lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Gary T.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced, second-generation lunar habitats for astronauts and mission specialists working on the Moon are investigated. The work was based on design constraints set forth in previous publications. Design recommendations are based on environmental response to the lunar environment, habitability, safety, near-term technology, replaceability and modularity, and suitability for NASA lunar research missions in the early 21st century. Scientists, engineers, and architects from NASA/JSC, Wisconsin aeronautical industry, and area universities gave technical input and offered critiques at design reviews throughout the process. The recommended design uses a lunar lava tube, with construction using a combination of Space Station Freedom-derived modules and lightweight Kevlar-laminate inflatables. The outpost includes research laboratories and biotron, crew quarters and support facility, mission control, health maintenance facility, and related areas for functional and psychological requirements. Furniture, specialized equipment, and lighting are included in the design analysis.

  2. Technology of civil usage of composites. [in commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of advanced composites in structural components of commercial aircraft. The need for testing the response of a material system to service environment is discussed along with methods for evaluating design and manufacturing aspects of a built-up structure under environmental conditions and fail-safe (damage-tolerance) evaluation of structures. Crashworthiness aspects, the fire-hazard potential, and electrical damage of composite structures are considered. Practical operational experience with commercial aircraft is reviewed for boron/epoxy foreflaps, Kevlar/epoxy fillets and fairings, graphite/epoxy spoilers, graphite/polysulfone spoilers, graphite/epoxy floor posts, boron/aluminum aft pylon skin panels, graphite/epoxy engine nose cowl outer barrels, and graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder segments.

  3. Progress in developing ultrathin solar cell blanket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Mesch, H. G.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1984-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop technologies for welding interconnects to three types of 50-micron-thick, 2 by 2-cm solar cells. Parallel-gap resistance welding was used for interconnect attachment. Weld schedules were independently developed for each of the three cell types and were coincidentally identical. Six 48-cell modules were assembled with 50-micron (nominal) thick cells, frosted fused-silica covers, silver-plated Invar interconnectors, and four different substrate designs. Three modules (one for each cell type) have single-layer Kapton (50-micron-thick) substrates. The other three modules each have a different substrate (Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton, Kapton-graphite-Kapton, and Kapton-graphite-aluminum honeycomb-graphite). All six modules were subjected to 4112 thermal cycles from -175 to 65 C (corresponding to over 40 years of simulated geosynchronous orbit thermal cycling) and experienced only negligible electrical degradation (1.1 percent average of six 48-cell modules).

  4. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as

  5. Controlled tether extends satellite's orbital range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigotsky, V.

    1984-06-01

    A low orbit satellite tethered to the Space Shuttle Orbiter's cargo bay would be able to conduct upper atmosphere experiments without fear of orbit deterioration. NASA has in light of this initiated a Tethered Satellite System program aimed at the 1987 deployment of a 1,100-lb, 5 ft-diameter satellite to a distance of 6-12 miles from the Space Shuttle on a Kevlar tether. The distance of the fully developed system will be 62 miles, representing an altitude of 80 miles above the earth. Tether diameters under consideration are in the 0.065-0.1 inch range. The satellite control system will consist of a reel drive, a deployment boom, and a boom-mounted tether control, in order to vary tether tension during gravity gradient changes.

  6. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability of composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    The energy-absorption capability as a function of crushing speed was determined for Thornel 300/Fiberite 934 (Gr/E) and Kevlar-49/Fiberite 934 (K/E) composite material. Circular cross section tube specimens were crushed at quasi-static, 6 m/sec, and 12 m/sec speeds. Ply orientations of the tube specimens were (0/+ or - theta) sub 2 and (+ or - theta) sub 3 where theta=15, 45, and 75 degress. Based on the results of these tests the energy-absortion capability of Gr/E and K/E was determined to be a function of crushing speed. The crushing modes based on exterior appearance of the crushed tubes were unchanged for either material. However, the interlaminar crushing behavior changed with crushing speed.

  7. Paint removal using wheat starch blast media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Oestreich, John

    1993-03-01

    A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of cracks confirms better crack visibility with wheat starch media versus Type V or Type II plastic media. Testing of wheat starch media in several composite test programs, including fiberglass, Kevlar, and graphite-epoxy composites, showed no fiber damage. Process developments and production experience at the first U.S. aircraft stripping facility are also reviewed. Corporate and regional aircraft are being stripped in this three nozzle dry blast hanger.

  8. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) generated from Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels subjected to sustained load-to-failure tests were studied. Data from two different transducer locations on the vessels were compared. It was found that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers showed a wide variance from those for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. Emissions from boss-mounted transducers did, however, yield values that were relatively consistent. It appears that the signals from the boss-mounted transducers represent an integrated average of the emissions generated by fibers fracturing during the vessel tests. The AE from boss-mounted transducers were also independent of time for vessel failure. This suggests that a similar number of fiber fractures must occur prior to initiation of vessel failure. These studies indicate a potential for developing an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels.

  9. Design of a composite wing extension for a general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adney, P. S.; Horn, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    A composite wing extension was designed for a typical general aviation aircraft to improve lift curve slope, dihedral effect, and lift to drag ratio. Advanced composite materials were used in the design to evaluate their use as primary structural components in general aviation aircraft. Extensive wind tunnel tests were used to evaluate six extension shapes. The extension shape chosen as the best choice was 28 inches long with a total area of 17 square feet. Subsequent flight tests showed the wing extension's predicted aerodynamic improvements to be correct. The structural design of the wing extension consisted of a hybrid laminate carbon core with outer layers of Kevlar - layed up over a foam interior which acted as an internal support. The laminate skin of the wing extension was designed from strength requirements, and the foam core was included to prevent buckling. A joint lap was recommended to attach the wing extension to the main wing structure.

  10. Shearography NDE of NASA COPV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John W.; Santos, Fernando; Saulsbury, Regor; Koshti, Ajay; Russell, Rick; Regez, Brad

    2006-01-01

    1. 21 Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) consisting of Kevlar Space Shuttle Fleet Leaders and Graphite COPV were inspected at NASA WSTF, NM from Sept. 12 through Sept 16. 2. The inspection technique was Pressurization Shearography, tests designed to image composite material damage, degradation or design flaws leading to stress concentrations in the axial or hoop strain load path. 3. The defect types detected consisted of the following: a) Intentional impact damage with known energy. b) Un-intentional impact damage. c) Manufacturing defects. 4. COPV design features leading to strain concentrations detected include: a) Strain concentrations at bosses due to fiber closure pattern. b) Strain concentrations in body of COPV due to fiber wrap pattern. c) Strain concentrations at equator due to liner weld/fiber lay-up.

  11. Controllable rectification of the axial expansion in the thermally driven artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    At present, the concept of artificial muscle twisted by polymers or fibers has become a hot issue in the field of intelligent material research according to its distinguishing advantages, e.g., high energy density, large-stroke, non-hysteresis, and inexpensive. The axial thermal expansion coefficient is an important parameter which can affect its demanding applications. In this letter, a device with high accuracy capacitive sensor is constructed to measure the axial thermal expansion coefficient of the twisted carbon fibers and yarns of Kevlar, and a theoretical model based on the thermal elasticity and the geometrical features of the twisted structure are also presented to predict the axial expansion coefficient. It is found that the calculated results take good agreements with the experimental data. According to the present experiment and analyses, a method to control the axial thermal expansion coefficient of artificial muscle is proposed. Moreover, the mechanism of this kind of thermally driven artificial muscle is discussed.

  12. Flywheel rotor and containment technology development for FY 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.

    1982-12-01

    The status of technology development for an efficient, economical, and practical composite flywheel having an energy density of 88 Wh/kg (20 to 25 E Wh/lb) and an energy storge capacity of approximately 1 kWh is reported. Progress is also reported in the development of a fail-safe, lightweight, and low cost composite containment for the flywheel. One containment design was selected for prototype fabrication and testing. Flywheel rotor cyclic test capability was also demonstrated and evaluated. High strength Kevlar and graphite fibers are being studied. Tests of the elastomeric bond between the rotor and hub indicate that the bond strength exceeds the minimum torque requirements for automobile applications.

  13. Comparison of High-Performance Fiber Materials Properties in Simulated and Actual Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckernor, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of high-performance fibers, including Kevlar, Nomex, Vectran, and Spectra, have been tested for durability in the space environment, mostly the low Earth orbital environment. These materials have been tested in yarn, tether/cable, and fabric forms. Some material samples were tested in a simulated space environment, such as the Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility and solar simulators in the laboratory. Other samples were flown on the International Space Station as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment. Mass loss due to atomic oxygen erosion and optical property changes due to ultraviolet radiation degradation are given. Tensile test results are also presented, including where moisture loss in a vacuum had an impact on tensile strength.

  14. Analytical Prediction of Damage Growth in Notched Composite Panels Loaded in Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; McGowan, David M.; Davila, Carlos G.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method based on shell elements is developed for the computation of damage initiation and growth in stiffened thick-skin stitched graphite-epoxy panels loaded in axial compression. The analysis method involves a step-by-step simulation of material degradation based on ply-level failure mechanisms. High computational efficiency is derived from the use of superposed layers of shell elements to model each ply orientation in the laminate. Multiple integration points through the thickness are used to obtain the correct bending effects through the thickness without the need for ply-by-ply evaluations of the state of the material. The analysis results are compared with experimental results for three stiffened panels with notches oriented at 0, 15 and 30 degrees to the panel width dimension. A parametric study is performed to investigate the damage growth retardation characteristics of the Kevlar stitch lines in the pan

  15. Utilization of composite materials by the US Army: A look ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chait, Richard

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the use of composite materials in the Army is given. Important efforts to document design information, supporting research, and some national applications for composite materials are given. The use of Kevlar fiber in both vests and helmets for the soldier is outlined. The advantages of using fiberglass in the hull of the Bradley fighting ground vehicle is given. The full potential of composite materials is realized in the recently awarded LH Comanche RAH-66 program. The use of composites for application to rocket motor uses, wings, fins, and casings is under development. Because of the uncertain funding profile, it is more important than ever that technology planning provide the basis for effective prioritization and leveraging of the tech base efforts involving advanced materials.

  16. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  17. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  18. Evaluation of the Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Upbending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  19. Flight service evaluation of composite helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardoian, G. H.; Ezzo, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of composite helicopter tail rotor spars and horizontal stabilizers, exposed to the effects of the environment, after up to five and a half years of commercial service. This evaluation is supported by test results of helicopter components and panels which have been exposed to outdoor environmental effects since September 1979. Full scale static and fatigue tests have been conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy composite components obtained from Sikorsky Model S-76 helicopters in commercial operations in the Gulf Coast region of Louisiana. Small scale static and fatigue tests are being conducted on coupons obtained from panels under exposure to outdoor conditions in Stratford, Connecticut and West Palm, Florida. The panel layups are representative of the S-76 components. Additionally, this report discusses the results of moisture absorption evaluations and strength tests on the S-76 components and composite panels with up to five years of outdoor exposure.

  20. Durability of aircraft composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dextern, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Confidence in the long term durability of advanced composites is developed through a series of flight service programs. Service experience is obtained by installing secondary and primary composite components on commercial and military transport aircraft and helicopters. Included are spoilers, rudders, elevators, ailerons, fairings and wing boxes on transport aircraft and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on helicopters. Materials included in the evaluation are boron/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy, graphite/epoxy and boron/aluminum. Inspection, maintenance, and repair results for the components in service are reported. The effects of long term exposure to laboratory, flight, and outdoor environmental conditions are reported for various composite materials. Included are effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, and aircraft fuels and fluids.