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Sample records for key constituent groups

  1. A Comparison of Preferred Urban Administrative Dispositions between Constituency Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pregot, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This research study analyzes preferred leadership dispositions for teachers, parents, and school leaders. Respondents selected their most preferred dispositions from a list of 20 (Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium) leadership standards. Similarities and differences were discerned among the constituent groups. School leaders, teachers,…

  2. Tracking the Key Constituents of Concern of the WTP LAW Stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mabrouki, Ridha B.; Matlack, Keith S.; Abramowitz, Howard

    The testing results presented in the present report were also obtained on a DM10 melter system operated with the primary WTP LAW offgas system components with recycle, as specified in the statement of work (SOW) [6] and detailed in the Test Plan for this work [7]. The primary offgas system components include the SBS, the WESP, and a recycle system that allows recycle of liquid effluents back to the melter, as in the present baseline for the WTP LAW vitrification. The partitioning of technetium and other key constituents between the glass waste form, the offgas system liquid effluents, the offgasmore » stream that exits the WESP, and the liquid condensate from the vacuum evaporator were quantified in this work. The tests employed three different LAW streams spanning a range of waste compositions anticipated for WTP. Modifications to the offgas system and operational strategy were made to expedite the approach to steady state concentrations of key constituents in the glass and offgas effluent solutions during each test.« less

  3. Envisioning the Impact of Decisions Made about Early Childhood Professional Development Systems by Different Constituent Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Peggy; McMullen, Mary Benson

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors explore the need for early childhood practitioners and scholars to engage in joint problem solving to create and support early childhood education and care (ECEC) professional development systems in which all constituents benefit. Primary constituent groups and principal decision-making bodies are defined and analyzed,…

  4. Group Key Agreement Efficient in Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-14

    Selected Areas in Communications, 17(9), September 1999. [13] David Chaum . Zero-knowledge undeniable signatures . In I.B. Damgard, editor, Advances in...sender with some sufficiently strong public key signature method such as DSA or RSA (and using a long-term private key).1 All receivers are required...to verify signatures on all received messages and check the aforementioned fields. Consequently, our security model is different from some recent

  5. HSCCC separation and enantiomeric distribution of key volatile constituents of Piper claussenianum (Miq.) C. DC. (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Marques, André M; Fingolo, Catharina E; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C

    2017-11-01

    High Speed Countercurrent Chromatography (HSCCC) technique was used for the preparative isolation of the major leishmanicidal compounds from the essential oils of Piper claussenianum species in Brazil. The essential oils from inflorescences of P. claussenianum were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The enantiomeric ratio of the major constituents of the P. claussenianum essential oils were determined using a Rt-DEXsm chiral capillary column by GC-FID analysis. It was found an enantiomeric excess of (+)-(E)-nerolidol in the leaves, and (+)-linalool and (+)-(E)-nerolidol in the inflorescences essential oil. The major volatile terpenes alcohols were isolated in preparative scale from inflorescences: linalool (320.0 mg) and nerolidol (95.0 mg) in high purity level. The HSCCC, a support-free liquid-liquid partition chromatographic technique, proved to be an effective and useful method for fast isolation and purification of hydrophobic and similarly structured bioactive components from essential oils of Piper species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The University Charter School Partnership: A Case Study on the Perspectives of Key Constituencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMinico, Dana

    2011-01-01

    The following study sought to add to the body of literature on effective charter school models and the role universities play in urban school reform by closely examining one urban elementary university charter school partnership through the eyes of its key participants and in relation to the unique political and social contexts in which it was…

  7. Anaerobic biodegradability and methanogenic toxicity of key constituents in copper chemical mechanical planarization effluents of the semiconductor industry.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Jeremy; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Zhou, Michael; Ogden, Kimberly L; Field, Jim A

    2005-06-01

    Copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) effluents can account for 30-40% of the water discharge in semiconductor manufacturing. CMP effluents contain high concentrations of soluble copper and a complex mixture of organic constituents. The aim of this study is to perform a preliminary assessment of the treatability of CMP effluents in anaerobic sulfidogenic bioreactors inoculated with anaerobic granular sludge by testing individual compounds expected in the CMP effluents. Of all the compounds tested (copper (II), benzotriazoles, polyethylene glycol (M(n) 300), polyethylene glycol (M(n) 860) monooleate, perfluoro-1-octane sulfonate, citric acid, oxalic acid and isopropanol) only copper was found to be inhibitory to methanogenic activity at the concentrations tested. Most of the organic compounds tested were biodegradable with the exception of perfluoro-1-octane sulfonate and benzotriazoles under sulfate reducing conditions and with the exception of the same compounds as well as Triton X-100 under methanogenic conditions. The susceptibility of key components in CMP effluents to anaerobic biodegradation combined with their low microbial inhibition suggest that CMP effluents should be amenable to biological treatment in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

  8. Key participants in codeveloped technology pose for group picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Following the presentation of the Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), a new piece of technology developed through a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnership with industry, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Director Roy Bridges, Jr., key participants in the partnership pose for a group portrait. They are (from left) Bill Larson, NASA; Dr. Pedro Medelius, INET; Roy Bridges, Jr., KSC Director; Ed Gladney and William Saputo, L-3 Communications; Pam Gillespi, representing Congressman Dave Weldon; and Frank Kinney, Technological Research and Development Authority. The USCA is a key component of the codeveloped Automated Data Acquisition System (ADAS) that measures temperature, pressure and vibration at KSC's launch pads. The breakthrough technology is expected to reduce sensor setup and configuration times from hours to seconds. KSC teamed up with Florida's Technological Research and Development Authority and manufacturer L-3 Communications to produce a system that would benefit the aerospace industry and other commercial markets.

  9. Scalable Authenticated Tree Based Group Key Exchange for Ad-Hoc Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmedt, Yvo; Lange, Tanja; Burmester, Mike

    Task-specific groups are often formed in an ad-hoc manner within large corporate structures, such as companies. Take the following typical scenario: A director decides to set up a task force group for some specific project. An order is passed down the hierarchy where it finally reaches a manager who selects some employees to form the group. The members should communicate in a secure way and for efficiency, a symmetric encryption system is chosen. To establish a joint secret key for the group, a group key exchange (GKE) protocol is used. We show how to use an existing Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) to achieve authenticated GKE by modifying the protocol and particularly by including signatures.

  10. Key Components of Online Group Projects: Faculty Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Christine E.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Morgan, Kari; Williams, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand faculty perceptions of group work, a survey was deployed to online teaching instructors. Results suggest that most faculty find student socialization (e.g., being supportive, caring about each other), communication, reliability, and dependability important in the group process. However, very few faculty rated the…

  11. Key Stage 4 and GCSE: An Update from the Association's Key Stage 4 Working Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Examines plans and proposals for the "Key Stage 4" portion of the United Kingdom's General Certificate for Secondary Education (GCSE) program. Explains the development of a 10-point assessment scale and plans for combined subject courses. Argues that, although economics instruction should be encouraged, it should not be the sole emphasis…

  12. Key Determinants of Student Satisfaction When Undertaking Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Elvy; Tong, Canon; Wong, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The increasing popularity of team structures in business environment coupled with the common practice of including group projects/assignments in university curricula means that business schools should direct efforts towards maximizing team as well as personal results. Yet, most frameworks for studying teams center exclusively on team level…

  13. Mutual Assistance Associations: Refugee Self-Help Groups Play Key Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranard, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    The history and current status of Indochinese Mutual Assistance Programs (MAAs) is reviewed in the newsletter issue, and a description is provided of the six kinds of MAAs that are found in the United States. They include the following: (1) cultural preservation/social activities; (2) religious services; (3) special constituency groups; (4)…

  14. Simple group password-based authenticated key agreements for the integrated EPR information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Chang, I-Pin; Wang, Ching-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The security and privacy are important issues for electronic patient records (EPRs). The goal of EPRs is sharing the patients' medical histories such as the diagnosis records, reports and diagnosis image files among hospitals by the Internet. So the security issue for the integrated EPR information system is essential. That is, to ensure the information during transmission through by the Internet is secure and private. The group password-based authenticated key agreement (GPAKE) allows a group of users like doctors, nurses and patients to establish a common session key by using password authentication. Then the group of users can securely communicate by using this session key. Many approaches about GAPKE employ the public key infrastructure (PKI) in order to have higher security. However, it not only increases users' overheads and requires keeping an extra equipment for storing long-term secret keys, but also requires maintaining the public key system. This investigation presents a simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) protocol for the integrated EPR information system. The proposed SGPAKE protocol does not require using the server or users' public keys. Each user only remembers his weak password shared with a trusted server, and then can obtain a common session key. Then all users can securely communicate by using this session key. The proposed SGPAKE protocol not only provides users with convince, but also has higher security.

  15. Effective user management with high strength crypto -key in dynamic group environment in cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P. J.; Suganya, P.; Karthik, G.

    2017-11-01

    Cloud Clusters consists of various collections of files which are being accessed by multiple users of Cloud. The users are managed as a group and the association of the user to a particular group is dynamic in nature. Every group has a manager who handles the membership of a user to a particular group by issuing keys for encryption and decryption. Due to the dynamic nature of a user he/she may leave the group very frequently. But an attempt can be made by the user who has recently left the group to access a file maintained by that group. Key distribution becomes a critical issue while the behavior of the user is dynamic. Existing techniques to manage the users of group in terms of security and key distribution has been investigated so that to arrive at an objective to identify the scopes to increase security and key management scheme in cloud. The usage of various key combinations to measure the strength of security and efficiency of user management in dynamic cloud environment has been investigated.

  16. A Study on Group Key Agreement in Sensor Network Environments Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seung-Jae; Lee, Young-Gu; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Kim, Tai-Hoon; Jun, Moon-Seog

    2011-01-01

    These days, with the emergence of the concept of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks that collect, analyze and process all the information through the sensors have become of huge interest. However, sensor network technology fundamentally has wireless communication infrastructure as its foundation and thus has security weakness and limitations such as low computing capacity, power supply limitations and price. In this paper, and considering the characteristics of the sensor network environment, we propose a group key agreement method using a keyset pre-distribution of two-dimension arrays that should minimize the exposure of key and personal information. The key collision problems are resolved by utilizing a polygonal shape’s center of gravity. The method shows that calculating a polygonal shape’s center of gravity only requires a very small amount of calculations from the users. The simple calculation not only increases the group key generation efficiency, but also enhances the sense of security by protecting information between nodes. PMID:22164072

  17. Sarma-based key-group method for rock slope reliability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarahmadi Bafghi, A. R.; Verdel, T.

    2005-08-01

    The methods used in conducting static stability analyses have remained pertinent to this day for reasons of both simplicity and speed of execution. The most well-known of these methods for purposes of stability analysis of fractured rock masses is the key-block method (KBM).This paper proposes an extension to the KBM, called the key-group method (KGM), which combines not only individual key-blocks but also groups of collapsable blocks into an iterative and progressive analysis of the stability of discontinuous rock slopes. To take intra-group forces into account, the Sarma method has been implemented within the KGM in order to generate a Sarma-based KGM, abbreviated SKGM. We will discuss herein the hypothesis behind this new method, details regarding its implementation, and validation through comparison with results obtained from the distinct element method.Furthermore, as an alternative to deterministic methods, reliability analyses or probabilistic analyses have been proposed to take account of the uncertainty in analytical parameters and models. The FOSM and ASM probabilistic methods could be implemented within the KGM and SKGM framework in order to take account of the uncertainty due to physical and mechanical data (density, cohesion and angle of friction). We will then show how such reliability analyses can be introduced into SKGM to give rise to the probabilistic SKGM (PSKGM) and how it can be used for rock slope reliability analyses. Copyright

  18. Functional group diversity is key to Southern Ocean benthic carbon pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Chester J.

    2017-01-01

    High latitude benthos are globally important in terms of accumulation and storage of ocean carbon, and the feedback this is likely to have on regional warming. Understanding this ecosystem service is important but difficult because of complex taxonomic diversity, history and geography of benthic biomass. Using South Georgia as a model location (where the history and geography of benthic biology is relatively well studied) we investigated whether the composition of functional groups were critical to benthic accumulation, immobilization and burial pathway to sequestration–and also aid their study through simplification of identification. We reclassified [1], [2]) morphotype and carbon mass data to 13 functional groups, for each sample of 32 sites around the South Georgia continental shelf. We investigated the influence on carbon accumulation, immobilization and sequestration estimate by multiple factors including the compositions of functional groups. Functional groups showed high diversity within and between sites, and within and between habitat types. Carbon storage was not linked to a functional group in particular but accumulation and immobilization increased with the number of functional groups present and the presence of hard substrata. Functional groups were also important to carbon burial rate, which increased with the presence of mixed (hard and soft substrata). Functional groups showed high surrogacy for taxonomic composition and were useful for examining contrasting habitat categorization. Functional groups not only aid marine carbon storage investigation by reducing time and the need for team size and speciality, but also important to benthic carbon pathways per se. There is a distinct geography to seabed carbon storage; seabed boulder-fields are hotspots of carbon accumulation and immobilization, whilst the interface between such boulder-fields and sediments are key places for burial and sequestration. PMID:28654664

  19. Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Myrcia (Myrtaceae): A Review of an Aromatic and Medicinal Group of Plants.

    PubMed

    Cascaes, Márcia Moraes; Guilhon, Giselle Maria Skelding Pinheiro; de Aguiar Andrade, Eloisa Helena; das Graças Bichara Zoghbi, Maria; da Silva Santos, Lourivaldo

    2015-10-09

    Myrcia is one of the largest genera of the economically important family Myrtaceae. Some of the species are used in folk medicine, such as a group known as "pedra-hume-caá" or "pedra-ume-caá" or "insulina vegetal" (insulin plant) that it is used for the treatment of diabetes. The species are an important source of essential oils, and most of the chemical studies on Myrcia describe the chemical composition of the essential oils, in which mono- and sesquiterpenes are predominant. The non-volatile compounds isolated from Myrcia are usually flavonoids, tannins, acetophenone derivatives and triterpenes. Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antioxidant, antimicrobial activities have been described to Myrcia essential oils, while hypoglycemic, anti-hemorrhagic and antioxidant activities were attributed to the extracts. Flavonoid glucosides and acetophenone derivatives showed aldose reductase and α-glucosidase inhibition, and could explain the traditional use of Myrcia species to treat diabetes. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory are some of the activities observed for other isolated compounds from Myrcia.

  20. Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Myrcia (Myrtaceae): A Review of an Aromatic and Medicinal Group of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cascaes, Márcia Moraes; Guilhon, Giselle Maria Skelding Pinheiro; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Zoghbi, Maria das Graças Bichara; Santos, Lourivaldo da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Myrcia is one of the largest genera of the economically important family Myrtaceae. Some of the species are used in folk medicine, such as a group known as “pedra-hume-caá” or “pedra-ume-caá” or “insulina vegetal” (insulin plant) that it is used for the treatment of diabetes. The species are an important source of essential oils, and most of the chemical studies on Myrcia describe the chemical composition of the essential oils, in which mono- and sesquiterpenes are predominant. The non-volatile compounds isolated from Myrcia are usually flavonoids, tannins, acetophenone derivatives and triterpenes. Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antioxidant, antimicrobial activities have been described to Myrcia essential oils, while hypoglycemic, anti-hemorrhagic and antioxidant activities were attributed to the extracts. Flavonoid glucosides and acetophenone derivatives showed aldose reductase and α-glucosidase inhibition, and could explain the traditional use of Myrcia species to treat diabetes. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory are some of the activities observed for other isolated compounds from Myrcia. PMID:26473832

  1. Distribution of new HIV infections among key risk population groups in Togo.

    PubMed

    Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Maboudou, Angèle Akouavi; Deku, Kodzo; Pitche, Palokinam Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Good data on the epidemiology of modes of transmission of HIV among population at risk are important for development of prevention strategies, and resource allocation for the implementation of the interventions. We sought to estimate new HIV infections among key risk groups in Togo. We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological data on HIV and AIDS as part of the HIV control strategies in Togo from 2001 to 2012 following the PRISMA guidelines. We used the Mode of Transmission (MoT) modelling tool to estimate the incidence of new HIV infections in high risk groups. The MoT tool was developed and validated by UNAIDS and implemented by several countries using data on the HIV epidemic to estimate new HIV infections that will appear in the core groups. We used Epi-MoT tool to assess the availability and the quality of data. A score of availability of data over 50% and the quality over 1.5 were required to proceed to the MoT analysis. Uncertainty analysis to assess the reliability of the results was performed. Incidence of new HIV infections was estimated at 6,643 (95% CI = 5274, 9005) with an incidence rate of 203 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. The proportion of new HIV infections was 61.9% (95% CI = 46.2 to 71.7) in stable heterosexual couples compare to 14.01% (95% CI = 7.2 to 23.3) in people having casual sex. In high-risk groups new HIV infections accounted for 2.4% among sex workers (SWs) (95% CI = 1.2 - 4.1), 7.9% among clients of SWs (95% CI = 3.9-14.1) and 6.9% among men who have sex with men (MSM) (95% CI = 3.1 to 13.1). We describe the prediction of the HIV epidemic with a large contribution of stable heterosexual couples in the occurrence of new infections. But HIV incidence remains high in key risk populations. Innovative strategies for risk reduction should be strengthened to reduce the transmission especially in stable heterosexual couples.

  2. Distribution of new HIV infections among key risk population groups in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Maboudou, Angèle Akouavi; Deku, Kodzo; Pitche, Palokinam Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Good data on the epidemiology of modes of transmission of HIV among population at risk are important for development of prevention strategies, and resource allocation for the implementation of the interventions. We sought to estimate new HIV infections among key risk groups in Togo. Methods We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological data on HIV and AIDS as part of the HIV control strategies in Togo from 2001 to 2012 following the PRISMA guidelines. We used the Mode of Transmission (MoT) modelling tool to estimate the incidence of new HIV infections in high risk groups. The MoT tool was developed and validated by UNAIDS and implemented by several countries using data on the HIV epidemic to estimate new HIV infections that will appear in the core groups. We used Epi-MoT tool to assess the availability and the quality of data. A score of availability of data over 50% and the quality over 1.5 were required to proceed to the MoT analysis. Uncertainty analysis to assess the reliability of the results was performed. Results Incidence of new HIV infections was estimated at 6,643 (95% CI = 5274, 9005) with an incidence rate of 203 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. The proportion of new HIV infections was 61.9% (95% CI = 46.2 to 71.7) in stable heterosexual couples compare to 14.01% (95% CI = 7.2 to 23.3) in people having casual sex. In high-risk groups new HIV infections accounted for 2.4% among sex workers (SWs) (95% CI = 1.2 - 4.1), 7.9% among clients of SWs (95% CI = 3.9-14.1) and 6.9% among men who have sex with men (MSM) (95% CI = 3.1 to 13.1). Conclusion We describe the prediction of the HIV epidemic with a large contribution of stable heterosexual couples in the occurrence of new infections. But HIV incidence remains high in key risk populations. Innovative strategies for risk reduction should be strengthened to reduce the transmission especially in stable heterosexual couples. PMID:25922630

  3. Group assessment of key indicators of sustainable waste management in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tot, Bojana; Vujić, Goran; Srđević, Zorica; Ubavin, Dejan; Russo, Mário Augusto Tavares

    2017-09-01

    Decision makers in developing countries are struggling to solve the present problems of solid waste management. Prioritisation and ranking of the most important indicators that influence the waste management system is very useful for any decision maker for the future planning and implementation of a sustainable waste management system. The aim of this study is to evaluate key indicators and their related sub-indicators in a group decision-making environment. In order to gain insight into the subject it was necessary to obtain the qualified opinions of decision makers from different countries who understand the situation in the sector of waste management in developing countries. An assessment is performed by 43 decision makers from both developed and developing countries, and the applied methodology is based on a combined use of the analytic hierarchy process, from the multi-criteria decision-making set of tools, and the preferential voting method known as Borda Count, which belongs to social choice theory. Pairwise comparison of indicators is performed with the analytic hierarchy process, and the ranking of indicators once obtained is assessed with Borda Count. Detailed analysis of the final results showed that the Institutional-Administrative indicator was the most important one, with the maximum weight as derived by both groups of decision makers. The results also showed that the combined use of the analytic hierarchy process and Borda Count contributes to the credibility and objectivity of the decision-making process, allowing its use in more complex waste management group decision-making problems to be recommended.

  4. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: The example of Cabo Verde

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João Filipe G.; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R.; Marshall, Brandon DL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Methods Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Results Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95%CI:1.36–1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95%CI:7.8–8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios targeting FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence. PMID:25838121

  5. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: the example of Cabo Verde.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João Filipe G; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R; Marshall, Brandon D L

    2015-05-01

    We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95 % CI 1.36-1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95 % CI 7.8-8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios prioritizing FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence.

  6. Key Informant Models for Measuring Group-Level Variables in Small Groups: Application to Plural Subject Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algesheimer, René; Bagozzi, Richard P.; Dholakia, Utpal M.

    2018-01-01

    We offer a new conceptualization and measurement models for constructs at the group-level of analysis in small group research. The conceptualization starts with classical notions of group behavior proposed by Tönnies, Simmel, and Weber and then draws upon plural subject theory by philosophers Gilbert and Tuomela to frame a new perspective…

  7. Performance Analysis of Hierarchical Group Key Management Integrated with Adaptive Intrusion Detection in Mobile ad hoc Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-05

    applications in wireless networks such as military battlefields, emergency response, mobile commerce , online gaming, and collaborative work are based on the...www.elsevier.com/locate/peva Performance analysis of hierarchical group key management integrated with adaptive intrusion detection in mobile ad hoc...Accepted 19 September 2010 Available online 26 September 2010 Keywords: Mobile ad hoc networks Intrusion detection Group communication systems Group

  8. Paired carbon isotope from three key intervals of the Turee Creek Group, Pilbara Craton, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, M.; Thomazo, C.; Busigny, V.; Baton, F.; Muller, E.; Chaduteau, C.; Vennin, E.; Buoncristiani, J. F.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.; Philippot, P.

    2017-12-01

    Strong links between the global carbon cycle, surface oxygenation and climate are expected through Earth history, but remain elusive in the carbon isotope record up until the end of the Mesoproterozoic. This is well exemplified at the time of the Great Oxydation Event (GOE) and its succeding global glaciation when δ13Ccarbseems to remain close to 0‰. The Turee Creek Group (Pilbara Craton, Austalia) was identified as a good target for reevaluating the C-isotope record of this period as it is the only continuous stratigraphic sedimentary section worldwide hosting both events. Paired carbon isotope data (Δ13Ccarb-org = δ13Ccarb - δ13Corg) were measured on drill cores collected at three of its in key stratigraphic horizons: the transition between the Kungarra Fm. and underlying BIFs of the Boolgeeda Iron Fm. (TCDP1); the base of the Meteorite Bore Member glacial diamictites (TCDP2); the transition of the carbonate-bearing Kazput Fm. and underlying quartzites of the Koolbye Fm. (TCDP3). The carbonate interval of Kazput Fm. with δ13Ccarb 0‰ is probably the only one recording primary δ13Ccarb values. Its Δ13Ccarb-org value of 27.5‰ is tipical of Rubisco-based photosynthesis. All other formations are carbonate-poor. Their δ13Ccarb are lower than -3‰, reaching -15‰, with a broad tendancy of decreasing δ13Ccarb with decreasing carbonate content. Δ13Ccarb-org values are lower than 25‰ and define a negative correlation with δ13Ccarb within each formation, indicating that these carbonates are largely diagenetic. δ13Corg values in the Kazput Fm., Coolbye Fm. and BIFs range from 24 to -29‰, typical of rubisco-based photosynthesis assimilating carbon from a dissolved inorganic carbon reservoir close to 0‰. In the upper Kungarra Fm. δ13Corg values cluster around -32‰. In the diamictite and lower Kungarra Fm., they decrease from -28 to -36‰ with increasing TOC, pointing to variable contributions of an isotopically negative organic matter pool that

  9. Responses of Aquatic Bacteria to Terrestrial Runoff: Effects on Community Structure and Key Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huong T.; Ho, Cuong T.; Trinh, Quan H.; Trinh, Duc A.; Luu, Minh T. N.; Tran, Hai S.; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean L.; Merroune, Asmaa; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilizer application is often touted as an economical and effective method to increase soil fertility. However, this amendment may increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff into downstream aquatic ecosystems and may consequently alter aquatic microbial community. We focused on understanding the effects of DOC runoff from soils amended with compost, vermicompost, or biochar on the aquatic microbial community of a tropical reservoir. Runoff collected from a series of rainfall simulations on soils amended with different organic fertilizers was incubated for 16 days in a series of 200 L mesocosms filled with water from a downstream reservoir. We applied 454 high throughput pyrosequencing for bacterial 16S rRNA genes to analyze microbial communities. After 16 days of incubation, the richness and evenness of the microbial communities present decreased in the mesocosms amended with any organic fertilizers, except for the evenness in the mesocosms amended with compost runoff. In contrast, they increased in the reservoir water control and soil-only amended mesocosms. Community structure was mainly affected by pH and DOC concentration. Compared to the autochthonous organic carbon produced during primary production, the addition of allochthonous DOC from these organic amendments seemed to exert a stronger effect on the communities over the period of incubation. While the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria classes were positively associated with higher DOC concentration, the number of sequences representing key bacterial groups differed between mesocosms particularly between the biochar runoff addition and the compost or vermi-compost runoff additions. The genera of Propionibacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. were highly abundant in the compost runoff additions suggesting that they may represent sentinel species of complex organic carbon inputs. Overall, this work further underlines the importance of studying the off-site impacts of organic fertilizers as

  10. Responses of Aquatic Bacteria to Terrestrial Runoff: Effects on Community Structure and Key Taxonomic Groups.

    PubMed

    Le, Huong T; Ho, Cuong T; Trinh, Quan H; Trinh, Duc A; Luu, Minh T N; Tran, Hai S; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean L; Merroune, Asmaa; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilizer application is often touted as an economical and effective method to increase soil fertility. However, this amendment may increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff into downstream aquatic ecosystems and may consequently alter aquatic microbial community. We focused on understanding the effects of DOC runoff from soils amended with compost, vermicompost, or biochar on the aquatic microbial community of a tropical reservoir. Runoff collected from a series of rainfall simulations on soils amended with different organic fertilizers was incubated for 16 days in a series of 200 L mesocosms filled with water from a downstream reservoir. We applied 454 high throughput pyrosequencing for bacterial 16S rRNA genes to analyze microbial communities. After 16 days of incubation, the richness and evenness of the microbial communities present decreased in the mesocosms amended with any organic fertilizers, except for the evenness in the mesocosms amended with compost runoff. In contrast, they increased in the reservoir water control and soil-only amended mesocosms. Community structure was mainly affected by pH and DOC concentration. Compared to the autochthonous organic carbon produced during primary production, the addition of allochthonous DOC from these organic amendments seemed to exert a stronger effect on the communities over the period of incubation. While the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria classes were positively associated with higher DOC concentration, the number of sequences representing key bacterial groups differed between mesocosms particularly between the biochar runoff addition and the compost or vermi-compost runoff additions. The genera of Propionibacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. were highly abundant in the compost runoff additions suggesting that they may represent sentinel species of complex organic carbon inputs. Overall, this work further underlines the importance of studying the off-site impacts of organic fertilizers as

  11. Key neurological impairments influence function-related group outcomes after stroke.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Law-Gibson, Diane; Reding, Michael

    2002-07-01

    The function-related group (FRG) classification is based on functional assessment and has been assumed to encompass the effects of different patterns and severity of neurological impairments. This assumption may not be correct. It has been proposed as a means of comparing rehabilitation outcome across institutions. If neurological impairments significantly affect FRG outcome, then higher FRG outcome scores may reflect selection bias favoring patients with fewer neurological impairments rather than better quality of rehabilitation care. The goal of this study was to assess the influence of motor, somatosensory, and hemianopic visual impairments on FRG outcomes after stroke. All 288 consecutive stroke patients discharged in 1999 from an acute rehabilitation hospital were assigned to 1 of 5 FRGs on the basis of their Functional Independence Measure (FIM) mobility subscore and age. Each FRG was also stratified into 1 of 4 cohorts on the basis of the presence or absence of key neurological impairments: motor impairment only (M), motor plus either somatosensory or hemianopic visual impairment (MS/MV), motor plus somatosensory plus hemianopic visual impairment (MSV), and other combinations of impairments. FIM scores were available every 10 days for all patients from admission to discharge. The effect of impairment group on outcome was assessed within each FRG category through repeated-measures analysis of variance to assess differences in serial FIM scores across the 4 impairment groups. The distribution of each of the 4 impairment groups across the 5 FRGs was assessed with chi2 analysis. The numbers of patients in each of the 5 FRGs from the lowest level, FRG-11, to the highest, FRG-15, were as follows: 78 (27%), 47 (16%), 75 (26%), 55 (19%), and 33 (11%). Different neurological impairments were associated with significantly different mean+/-SD discharge FIM scores as follows: for FRG-11, MSV=63+/-16, MS/MV=68+/-19, and M=81+/-13 (P=0.04); for FRG-12, MSV=47+/-14, MS

  12. A Round-Efficient Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme Based on Extended Chaotic Maps for Group Cloud Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tian-Fu; Wang, Zeng-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The security is a critical issue for business purposes. For example, the cloud meeting must consider strong security to maintain the communication privacy. Considering the scenario with cloud meeting, we apply extended chaotic map to present passwordless group authentication key agreement, termed as Passwordless Group Authentication Key Agreement (PL-GAKA). PL-GAKA improves the computation efficiency for the simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) proposed by Lee et al. in terms of computing the session key. Since the extended chaotic map has equivalent security level to the Diffie–Hellman key exchange scheme applied by SGPAKE, the security of PL-GAKA is not sacrificed when improving the computation efficiency. Moreover, PL-GAKA is a passwordless scheme, so the password maintenance is not necessary. Short-term authentication is considered, hence the communication security is stronger than other protocols by dynamically generating session key in each cloud meeting. In our analysis, we first prove that each meeting member can get the correct information during the meeting. We analyze common security issues for the proposed PL-GAKA in terms of session key security, mutual authentication, perfect forward security, and data integrity. Moreover, we also demonstrate that communicating in PL-GAKA is secure when suffering replay attacks, impersonation attacks, privileged insider attacks, and stolen-verifier attacks. Eventually, an overall comparison is given to show the performance between PL-GAKA, SGPAKE and related solutions. PMID:29207509

  13. A Round-Efficient Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme Based on Extended Chaotic Maps for Group Cloud Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Hung; Tsung, Chen-Kun; Lee, Tian-Fu; Wang, Zeng-Bo

    2017-12-03

    The security is a critical issue for business purposes. For example, the cloud meeting must consider strong security to maintain the communication privacy. Considering the scenario with cloud meeting, we apply extended chaotic map to present passwordless group authentication key agreement, termed as Passwordless Group Authentication Key Agreement (PL-GAKA). PL-GAKA improves the computation efficiency for the simple group password-based authenticated key agreement (SGPAKE) proposed by Lee et al. in terms of computing the session key. Since the extended chaotic map has equivalent security level to the Diffie-Hellman key exchange scheme applied by SGPAKE, the security of PL-GAKA is not sacrificed when improving the computation efficiency. Moreover, PL-GAKA is a passwordless scheme, so the password maintenance is not necessary. Short-term authentication is considered, hence the communication security is stronger than other protocols by dynamically generating session key in each cloud meeting. In our analysis, we first prove that each meeting member can get the correct information during the meeting. We analyze common security issues for the proposed PL-GAKA in terms of session key security, mutual authentication, perfect forward security, and data integrity. Moreover, we also demonstrate that communicating in PL-GAKA is secure when suffering replay attacks, impersonation attacks, privileged insider attacks, and stolen-verifier attacks. Eventually, an overall comparison is given to show the performance between PL-GAKA, SGPAKE and related solutions.

  14. Group Leadership: Understanding, Guiding, & Sharing. Keys to Community Involvement Series: 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druian, Greg

    This booklet addresses persons who would like information about leadership of community groups. It is meant to be read both by current community group leaders and by persons who aspire to be leaders. Roles and functions of community group leadership are presented, along with suggestions about how to carry out the leadership role in ways that…

  15. From Loose Groups to Effective Teams: The Nine Key Factors of the Team Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheard, A. G.; Kakabadse, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    A loose group of individuals working on a task differs from an effective team on nine factors: clearly defined goals, priorities, roles and responsibilities, self-awareness, leadership, group dynamics, communications, content, and infrastructure. Ways to eliminate barriers and speed formation of effective teams could be based on those factors.…

  16. Acting Diverse: Target Group Orientation as Key Competence in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihsen, S.; Buschmeyer, A.

    2007-01-01

    International companies are recognised by equity between men and women as well as between other different groups (Diversity) as an economic factor and incorporate it into their company visions. Mixed teams are set up to design target group-oriented products, for example in automotive engineering. Therefore they need employees who represent the…

  17. Group A PP2Cs evolved in land plants as key regulators of intrinsic desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kuwamura, Mayuri; Nishikawa, Yuri; Nakatani, Mao; Ohtawa, Hitomi; Takezawa, Daisuke; Seki, Motoaki; Tanaka, Maho; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Sakata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative desiccation tolerance is common in bryophytes, although this character has been lost in most vascular plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens survives complete desiccation if treated with abscisic acid (ABA). Group A protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2C) are negative regulators of abscisic acid signalling. Here we show that the elimination of Group A PP2C is sufficient to ensure P. patens survival to full desiccation, without ABA treatment, although its growth is severely hindered. Microarray analysis shows that the Group A PP2C-regulated genes exclusively overlap with genes exhibiting a high level of ABA induction. Group A PP2C disruption weakly affects ABA-activated kinase activity, indicating Group A PP2C action downstream of these kinases in the moss. We propose that Group A PP2C emerged in land plants to repress desiccation tolerance mechanisms, possibly facilitating plants propagation on land, whereas ABA releases the intrinsic desiccation tolerance from Group A PP2C regulation. PMID:23900426

  18. Luminescence Dating Work From The Heidelberg Group: A Key Technology In Geoarchaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, G. A.; Kadereit, A.

    Geoarchaeology is a growing discipline in archaeological science. It aims at the natural environment as context of past human societies and at the interaction between both, the environment and man as part of a joint ecosystem. This topic is also of considerable concern of present societies. Like other historic sciences, geoarchaeology requires accurate chronologies. Since one deals in geoarchaeology predominantly with sediments and rocks, luminescence methods play a key role. This is demonstrated in two case studies from Phlious in southern Greece and Nasca in southern Peru. The results show clearly climatically triggered social developments and feedbacks to the environment.

  19. Dynamic Key Management Schemes for Secure Group Access Control Using Hierarchical Clustering in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Woei-Jiunn; Pai, Haw-Tyng

    2008-11-01

    The applications of group computing and communication motivate the requirement to provide group access control in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). The operation in MANETs' groups performs a decentralized manner and accommodated membership dynamically. Moreover, due to lack of centralized control, MANETs' groups are inherently insecure and vulnerable to attacks from both within and outside the groups. Such features make access control more challenging in MANETs. Recently, several researchers have proposed group access control mechanisms in MANETs based on a variety of threshold signatures. However, these mechanisms cannot actually satisfy MANETs' dynamic environments. This is because the threshold-based mechanisms cannot be achieved when the number of members is not up to the threshold value. Hence, by combining the efficient elliptic curve cryptosystem, self-certified public key cryptosystem and secure filter technique, we construct dynamic key management schemes based on hierarchical clustering for securing group access control in MANETs. Specifically, the proposed schemes can constantly accomplish secure group access control only by renewing the secure filters of few cluster heads, when a cluster head joins or leaves a cross-cluster. In such a new way, we can find that the proposed group access control scheme can be very effective for securing practical applications in MANETs.

  20. A Group Based Key Sharing and Management Algorithm for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moharram, Mohammed Morsi; Azam, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) are one special type of ad hoc networks that involves vehicles on roads. Typically like ad hoc networks, broadcast approach is used for data dissemination. Blind broadcast to each and every node results in exchange of useless and irrelevant messages and hence creates an overhead. Unicasting is not preferred in ad-hoc networks due to the dynamic topology and the resource requirements as compared to broadcasting. Simple broadcasting techniques create several problems on privacy, disturbance, and resource utilization. In this paper, we propose media mixing algorithm to decide what information should be provided to each user and how to provide such information. Results obtained through simulation show that fewer number of keys are needed to share compared to simple broadcasting. Privacy is also enhanced through this approach. PMID:24587749

  1. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    On the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  2. The antiporter-like subunit constituent of the universal adaptor of complex I, group 4 membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases and related complexes.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ana P; Marreiros, Bruno C; Pereira, Manuela M

    2013-05-01

    We have recently investigated the long-recognized relationship between complex I and group 4 [NiFe] hydrogenases and we have established the so-called Energy-converting hydrogenase related (Ehr) complex as a new member of the family. We have also observed that four subunits, homologues to NuoB, D, H and L, are common to the members of the family. We have designated this common group of subunits the universal adaptor. Taking into account the similarity of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter-like subunits of complex I (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN) and the unique structural characteristic of the long amphipathic α helix part of NuoL, the nature of the antiporter-like subunit of the universal adaptor was questioned. Thus, in this work we further explore the properties of the universal adaptor, investigating which antiporter-like subunit is part of the universal adaptor. We observe that the universal adaptor contains an antiporter-like subunit with a long amphipathic α helix, similar to NuoL. Consequently, the long helix is a common denominator that has been conserved in all members of the family. Such conservation surely reflects the key role of such helix in the energy transduction mechanism of this family of enzymes.

  3. Exponential Arithmetic Based Self-Healing Group Key Distribution Scheme with Backward Secrecy under the Resource-Constrained Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hua; Zheng, Yandong; Zhang, Xiyong; Li, Zhoujun

    2016-01-01

    In resource-constrained wireless networks, resources such as storage space and communication bandwidth are limited. To guarantee secure communication in resource-constrained wireless networks, group keys should be distributed to users. The self-healing group key distribution (SGKD) scheme is a promising cryptographic tool, which can be used to distribute and update the group key for the secure group communication over unreliable wireless networks. Among all known SGKD schemes, exponential arithmetic based SGKD (E-SGKD) schemes reduce the storage overhead to constant, thus is suitable for the the resource-constrained wireless networks. In this paper, we provide a new mechanism to achieve E-SGKD schemes with backward secrecy. We first propose a basic E-SGKD scheme based on a known polynomial-based SGKD, where it has optimal storage overhead while having no backward secrecy. To obtain the backward secrecy and reduce the communication overhead, we introduce a novel approach for message broadcasting and self-healing. Compared with other E-SGKD schemes, our new E-SGKD scheme has the optimal storage overhead, high communication efficiency and satisfactory security. The simulation results in Zigbee-based networks show that the proposed scheme is suitable for the resource-restrained wireless networks. Finally, we show the application of our proposed scheme. PMID:27136550

  4. Development of fluorescent probes based on protection-deprotection of the key functional groups for biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yonghe; Lee, Dayoung; Wang, Jiaoliang; Li, Guanhan; Yu, Jinghua; Lin, Weiying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-08-07

    Recently, the strategy of protection-deprotection of functional groups has been widely employed to design fluorescent probes, as the protection-deprotection of functional groups often induces a marked change in electronic properties. Significant advances have been made in the development of analyte-responsive fluorescent probes based on the protection-deprotection strategy. In this tutorial review, we highlight the representative examples of small-molecule based fluorescent probes for bioimaging, which are operated via the protection-deprotection of key functional groups such as aldehyde, hydroxyl, and amino functional groups reported from 2010 to 2014. The discussion includes the general protection-deprotection methods for aldehyde, hydroxyl, or amino groups, as well as the design strategies, sensing mechanisms, and deprotection modes of the representative fluorescent imaging probes applied to bio-imaging.

  5. Renormalization group invariance and optimal QCD renormalization scale-setting: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Fu, Hai-Bing; Ma, Hong-Hao; Brodsky, Stanley J; Mojaza, Matin

    2015-12-01

    A valid prediction for a physical observable from quantum field theory should be independent of the choice of renormalization scheme--this is the primary requirement of renormalization group invariance (RGI). Satisfying scheme invariance is a challenging problem for perturbative QCD (pQCD), since a truncated perturbation series does not automatically satisfy the requirements of the renormalization group. In a previous review, we provided a general introduction to the various scale setting approaches suggested in the literature. As a step forward, in the present review, we present a discussion in depth of two well-established scale-setting methods based on RGI. One is the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) in which the terms associated with the β-function are absorbed into the scale of the running coupling at each perturbative order; its predictions are scheme and scale independent at every finite order. The other approach is the 'principle of minimum sensitivity' (PMS), which is based on local RGI; the PMS approach determines the optimal renormalization scale by requiring the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish. In this paper, we present a detailed comparison of the PMC and PMS procedures by analyzing two physical observables R(e+e-) and [Formula: see text] up to four-loop order in pQCD. At the four-loop level, the PMC and PMS predictions for both observables agree within small errors with those of conventional scale setting assuming a physically-motivated scale, and each prediction shows small scale dependences. However, the convergence of the pQCD series at high orders, behaves quite differently: the PMC displays the best pQCD convergence since it eliminates divergent renormalon terms; in contrast, the convergence of the PMS prediction is questionable, often even worse than the conventional prediction based on an arbitrary guess for the renormalization scale. PMC predictions also have the property that any residual dependence on the choice

  6. Renormalization group invariance and optimal QCD renormalization scale-setting: a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Fu, Hai-Bing; Ma, Hong-Hao; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mojaza, Matin

    2015-12-01

    A valid prediction for a physical observable from quantum field theory should be independent of the choice of renormalization scheme—this is the primary requirement of renormalization group invariance (RGI). Satisfying scheme invariance is a challenging problem for perturbative QCD (pQCD), since a truncated perturbation series does not automatically satisfy the requirements of the renormalization group. In a previous review, we provided a general introduction to the various scale setting approaches suggested in the literature. As a step forward, in the present review, we present a discussion in depth of two well-established scale-setting methods based on RGI. One is the ‘principle of maximum conformality’ (PMC) in which the terms associated with the β-function are absorbed into the scale of the running coupling at each perturbative order; its predictions are scheme and scale independent at every finite order. The other approach is the ‘principle of minimum sensitivity’ (PMS), which is based on local RGI; the PMS approach determines the optimal renormalization scale by requiring the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish. In this paper, we present a detailed comparison of the PMC and PMS procedures by analyzing two physical observables R e+e- and Γ(H\\to b\\bar{b}) up to four-loop order in pQCD. At the four-loop level, the PMC and PMS predictions for both observables agree within small errors with those of conventional scale setting assuming a physically-motivated scale, and each prediction shows small scale dependences. However, the convergence of the pQCD series at high orders, behaves quite differently: the PMC displays the best pQCD convergence since it eliminates divergent renormalon terms; in contrast, the convergence of the PMS prediction is questionable, often even worse than the conventional prediction based on an arbitrary guess for the renormalization scale. PMC predictions also have the property that any residual dependence on

  7. What are the key food groups to target for preventing obesity and improving nutrition in schools?

    PubMed

    Bell, A C; Swinburn, B A

    2004-02-01

    To determine differences in the contribution of foods and beverages to energy consumed in and out of school, and to compare consumption patterns between school canteen users and noncanteen users. Cross-sectional National Nutrition Survey, 1995. Australia. SUBJECTS ON SCHOOL DAYS: A total of 1656 children aged 5-15 y who had weekday 24-h dietary recall data. An average of 37% of total energy intake was consumed at school. Energy-dense foods and beverages such as fat spreads, packaged snacks, biscuits and fruit/cordial drinks made a greater contribution to energy intake at school compared to out of school (P< or =0.01). Fast foods and soft drinks contributed 11 and 3% of total energy intake; however, these food groups were mostly consumed out of school. Fruit intake was low and consumption was greater in school. In all, 14% of children purchased food from the canteen and they obtained more energy from fast food, packaged snacks, desserts, milk and confectionary (P< or =0.05) than noncanteen users. : Energy-dense foods and beverages are over-represented in the Australian school environment. To help prevent obesity and improve nutrition in schools, biscuits, snack bars and fruit/cordial drinks brought from home and fast food, packaged snacks, and confectionary sold at canteens should be replaced with fruit and water.

  8. The clinical significance of betaine, an osmolyte with a key role in methyl group metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lever, Michael; Slow, Sandy

    2010-06-01

    Betaine is an essential osmolyte and source of methyl groups and comes from either the diet or by the oxidation of choline. Its metabolism methylates homocysteine to methionine, also producing N,N-dimethylglycine. Betaine insufficiency is associated with the metabolic syndrome, lipid disorders and diabetes, and may have a role in vascular and other diseases. Betaine is important in development, from the pre-implantation embryo to infancy. Betaine supplementation improves animal and poultry health, but the effect of long-term supplementation on humans is not known, though reports that it improves athletic performance will stimulate further studies. Subsets of the population that may benefit from betaine supplementation could be identified by the laboratory, in particular those who excessively lose betaine through the urine. Plasma betaine is highly individual, in women typically 20-60 micromol/L and in men 25-75 micromol/L. Plasma dimethylglycine is typically <10 micromol/L. Urine betaine excretion is minimal, even following a large betaine dose. It is constant, highly individual and normally <35 mmol/mole creatinine. The preferred method of betaine measurement is by LC-MS/MS, which is rapid and capable of automation. Slower HPLC methods give comparable results. Proton NMR spectrometry is another option but caution is needed to avoid confusion with trimethylamine-N-oxide. 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hamming's "open doors" and group creativity as keys to scientific excellence: the example of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Charlton used diverse approaches to identify research institutions which provided home to outstanding scientists and work. One intriguing example of long-lasting scientific excellence is Cambridge with 19 Nobel laureates who worked at the University or at the MRC Molecular Biology Unit when they received the prize between 1947 and 2006. With specific reference to Cambridge, I would like to complement the primarily quantitative assessment and offer considerations as to why and how research achievements may have clustered in space and time. Indeed, observations voiced by the mathematician Richard Hamming as to how great research can be pursued offer explanations for the series of great science in the UK. In my view, the most important determinant of the clustering may be illustrated by Hamming's fitting picture of "open doors": working in environments with the doors open allows constant interactions with peers with various disciplinary backgrounds, and thus fast avoidance of detours or dead ends in science and, ultimately, a focus on and the solution of problems of paramount, rather than of tangential, importance. Narrative insights into a strong argumentative tradition at Cambridge provided by Drs. Watson and Magueijo between 1968 and 2003 are in line with Hamming's suggestion and the value of group creativity. In the internet age with abundant interactions beyond home institutions we should not be surprised if clusters of great science were no longer confined to the usual suspect institutions which were awarded disproportionally with Nobel prizes in the past.

  10. Key for European species of the Cheilosia proxima group (Diptera, Syrphidae) with a description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Vujić, Ante; Radenković, Snežana; Trifunov, Sonja; Nikolić, Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new hoverfly species, Cheilosia barbafacies Vujić & Radenković sp. n. (Diptera, Syrphidae), is described and distinguished from the closely related species Cheilosia pascuorum Becker, 1894, based on material collected from the mountains of the Balkan Peninsula. Diagnostic characteristics and an identification key for the members of the proxima group of Cheilosia s. str., including the new taxon, are provided. PMID:23653524

  11. Patch testing with fragrances: results of a multicenter study of the European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group with 48 frequently used constituents of perfumes.

    PubMed

    Frosch, P J; Pilz, B; Andersen, K E; Burrows, D; Camarasa, J G; Dooms-Goossens, A; Ducombs, G; Fuchs, T; Hannuksela, M; Lachapelle, J M

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of reactivity to a series of commonly used fragrances in dermatological patients. A total of 48 fragrances (FF) were chosen, based on the publication of Fenn in 1989 in which the top 25 constituents of 3 types (1. perfumes, 2. household products, 3. soaps) of 400 commercial products on the US market had been determined. In a pilot study on a total of 1069 patients in 11 centres, the appropriate test concentration and vehicle were examined. For most fragrances, 1% and 5% were chosen, and petrolatum proved to be the best vehicle in comparison to isopropyl myristate and diethyl phthalate. In the main study, a set of 5 to 10 fragrances at 2 concentrations was patch tested in each centre on a minimum of 100 consecutive patients seen in the patch test clinic. These patients were also patch tested to a standard series with the 8% fragrance mix (FM) and its 8 constituents. In patients with a positive reaction to any of the 48 FF, a careful history with regard to past or present reactions to perfumed products was taken. A total of 1323 patients were tested in 11 centres. The 8% FM was positive in 89 patients (8.3% of 1072 patients). Allergic reactions to the constituents were most frequent to oak moss (24), isoeugenol (20), eugenol (13), cinnamic aldehyde (10) and geraniol (8). Reactions read as allergic on day 3/4 were observed only 10X to 7 materials of the new series (Iso E Super (2), Lyral (3), Cyclacet (1), DMBCA (1), Vertofix (1), citronellol (1) and amyl salicylate (1)). The remaining 41 fragrances were negative. 28 irritant or doubtful reactions on day 3/4 were observed to a total of 19 FF materials (more than 1 reaction: 5% citronellol (2), 1% amyl salicylate (2), 1% isononyl acetate (3), 0.1% musk xylol (2), 1% citral (2), and 1% ionone beta (2)). Clinical relevance of positive reactions to any of the FF series was not proved in a single case. This included the 4 reactions in patients who were negative to

  12. A multicenter prospective cohort study on camera navigation training for key user groups in minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Graafland, Maurits; Bok, Kiki; Schreuder, Henk W R; Schijven, Marlies P

    2014-06-01

    Untrained laparoscopic camera assistants in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) may cause suboptimal view of the operating field, thereby increasing risk for errors. Camera navigation is often performed by the least experienced member of the operating team, such as inexperienced surgical residents, operating room nurses, and medical students. The operating room nurses and medical students are currently not included as key user groups in structured laparoscopic training programs. A new virtual reality laparoscopic camera navigation (LCN) module was specifically developed for these key user groups. This multicenter prospective cohort study assesses face validity and construct validity of the LCN module on the Simendo virtual reality simulator. Face validity was assessed through a questionnaire on resemblance to reality and perceived usability of the instrument among experts and trainees. Construct validity was assessed by comparing scores of groups with different levels of experience on outcome parameters of speed and movement proficiency. The results obtained show uniform and positive evaluation of the LCN module among expert users and trainees, signifying face validity. Experts and intermediate experience groups performed significantly better in task time and camera stability during three repetitions, compared to the less experienced user groups (P < .007). Comparison of learning curves showed significant improvement of proficiency in time and camera stability for all groups during three repetitions (P < .007). The results of this study show face validity and construct validity of the LCN module. The module is suitable for use in training curricula for operating room nurses and novice surgical trainees, aimed at improving team performance in minimally invasive surgery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. The clinical role of lecturers in nursing in Ireland: perceptions from key stakeholder groups in nurse education on the role.

    PubMed

    Meskell, Pauline; Murphy, Kathleen; Shaw, David

    2009-10-01

    The clinical role of lecturers in nursing has been a focus of debate since the integration of nurse education into higher education institutions. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from the preliminary phase of a study, undertaken to investigate the perceptions of key stakeholder groups in nurse education, regarding the current clinical role of nurse lecturers in Ireland. A descriptive exploratory design was used involving focus group and individual interviews, soliciting views of purposefully selected educationalists, clinicians, policy formulators and students. The issue was examined from a policy perspective, aiming to collectively represent views of all participant groups. This approach facilitated a more complete picture of perceptions of the role to emerge, to better inform future decision making. Twenty two focus group interviews and twenty one individual interviews were conducted. Content analysis was used to identify themes. All groups were in agreement that role definition was urgently required to dispel ambiguities surrounding what the clinical role should involve. Conflicting views were evident among groups regarding lecturers' clinical credibility, visibility and teaching effectiveness. Findings highlight the essential nature of nurse lecturers engaging with clinical areas to maintain their skills, demonstrate a value for the practice component of the role and provide a link between education and practice.

  14. Effects of a group-based reproductive management extension programme on key management outcomes affecting reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Brownlie, Tom S; Morton, John M; Heuer, Cord; McDougall, Scott

    2015-02-01

    A group-based reproductive management extension programme has been designed to help managers of dairy herds improve herd reproductive performance. The aims of this study were, firstly, to assess effects of participation by key decision makers (KDMs) in a farmer action group programme in 2009 and 2010 on six key management outcomes (KMOs) that affect reproductive performance over 2 years (2009-2010 and 2010-2011), and secondly, to describe KDM intentions to change management behaviour(s) affecting each management outcome after participation in the programme. Seasonal calving dairy herds from four regions of New Zealand were enrolled in the study. Intentions to modify management behaviour were recorded using the formal written action plans developed during the extension programme. KMOs assessed were calving pattern of the herd, pre-calving heifer liveweight, pre-calving and premating body condition score (BCS), oestrus detection, anoestrus cow management and bull management. Participation was associated with improvements in heifer liveweight, more heifers calving in the first 6 weeks of the seasonal calving period, premating BCS and oestrus detection. No significant effects were observed on anoestrus cow management or bull management. KDMs with greater numbers of proposed actions had lower 6 week in-calf rates in the second study year than KDMs who proposed fewer actions. A more effective strategy to ensure more appropriate objectives is proposed. Strategies to help KDMs to implement proposed actions more successfully should be investigated to improve the programme further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Consumption of key food groups during the postpartum period in low-income, non-Hispanic black mothers.

    PubMed

    Kay, Melissa C; Wasser, Heather; Adair, Linda S; Thompson, Amanda L; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Suchindran, Chirayath M; Bentley, Margaret E

    2017-10-01

    The postpartum period can impact diet quality and subsequently place women at greater risk for overweight or obesity. This study examined consumption of key food groups during the first 2 years postpartum among low income, non-Hispanic black, first-time mothers. Data were from the Infant Care, Feeding and Risk of Obesity Study, a cohort of 217 mother-infant dyads, followed from 3 to 18 months postpartum, collected from 2003 to 2007. At each study visit (3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months) 24-h dietary recalls were collected. Consumption levels were compared to those recommended from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) for each of the following food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, whole grains, protein foods and dairy, as well as an estimated upper limit for sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption. At each time point, mothers met recommended intake levels for grains and protein foods only. In random-intercept logistic regression models, no demographic or household characteristics were associated with a likelihood of consuming recommended levels for any of the food groups according to the DGAs. Given the low intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein foods and high intake of SSBs and refined grains, interventions targeting women's diet during the postpartum period are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n., a new species of the Aenictus ceylonicus group (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) from China, with a key to the Chinese members of the group

    PubMed Central

    Staab, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aenictus is the most species-rich genus of army ants in the subfamily Dorylinae and one of the most species rich ant genera in China and the world. In this paper, a new species of the Aenictus ceylonicus group, Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n., is described and illustrated based on the worker caste. The new species occurs in the subtropical forests of south-east China and is morphologically most similar to Aenictus henanensis Li & Wang, 2005 and Aenictus wudangshanensis Wang, 2006. Aenictus hoelldobleri sp. n. can be distinguished from both species by the shape of the subpetiolar process. The new species also resembles Aenictus lifuiae Terayama 1984 and Aenictus thailandianus Terayama & Kubota, 1993 but clearly differs in various features of the cuticular sculpture. A key to the Chinese species of the Aenictus ceylonicus group based on the worker caste is provided, which may help to reassess and clarify the taxonomic status of the abundant Chinese records of the true Aenictus ceylonicus (Mayr, 1866), a species which almost certainly does not occur in China. Several new locality records are given, among them the first record of Aenictus watanasiti Jaitrong & Yamane, 2013 from China. PMID:26310780

  17. Description of 23 new species of the Exocelina ekari-group from New Guinea, with a key to all representatives of the species group (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdo, Helena; Sagata, Katayo; Panjaitan, Rawati; Menufandu, Herlina; Balke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Twenty three new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described herein: Exocelina bewaniensis sp. n., Exocelina bismarckensis sp. n., Exocelina craterensis sp. n., Exocelina gorokaensis sp. n., Exocelina herowana sp. n., Exocelina jimiensis sp. n., Exocelina kisli sp. n., Exocelina ksionseki sp. n., Exocelina lembena sp. n., Exocelina mantembu sp. n., Exocelina michaelensis sp. n., Exocelina pinocchio sp. n., Exocelina pseudoastrophallus sp. n., Exocelina pseudobifida sp. n., Exocelina pseudoedeltraudae sp. n., Exocelina pseudoeme sp. n., Exocelina sandaunensis sp. n., Exocelina simbaiarea sp. n., Exocelina skalei sp. n., Exocelina tabubilensis sp. n., Exocelina tariensis sp. n., Exocelina vovai sp. n., and Exocelina wannangensis sp. n. All of them have been found to belong to the Exocelina ekari-group. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters (habitus, color, male antennae, protarsomeres 4–5, median lobes, and parameres) are illustrated. Data on the distribution of the new species and some already described species are given. PMID:25610341

  18. Florida Keys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West. This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03890

  19. Waking the health plan giant: Group Health Cooperative stops counting sheep and starts counting key tobacco indicators.

    PubMed

    McAfee, T

    1998-01-01

    Implementing a comprehensive approach to decreasing tobacco use in a large health plan requires hard work and commitment on the part of many individuals. We found that major organisational change can be accomplished and sustained. Keys to our success included our decision to remove access barriers to our cessation programmes (including cost); obtaining top leadership buy-in; identifying accountable individuals who owned responsibility for change; measuring key processes and outcomes; and finally keeping at it tenaciously through multiple cycles of improvement.

  20. A new species of Oozetetes De Santis (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Eupelmidae) from Colombia with an updated key for the bucheri species-group.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Benavides, A Lucia; Serna, Francisco; Gibson, Gary A P

    2016-02-26

    Oozetetes lucidus sp. nov. (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) is described from Colombia, South America, and through macrophotography compared with all described species in the bucheri species-group of Oozetetes De Santis. An illustrated key modified from Gibson (2004) is provided to distinguish females of the six described species of this group.

  1. Building a Constituency for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Margie

    One of the goals of the West Virginia Task Force on Children, Youth and Families is to build a constituency for children. Two critical factors in building a constituency for children are a shared vision and influential leaders. The four principles used by the Task Force for building a constituency are: (1) defining a regional target for organizing…

  2. Small Group Discussion as a Key Component in Online Assessment Training for Enhanced Student Learning in Web-Based Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan; Zhang, Zhihong

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of online assessment training, with synchronous group discussion as a key component, on subsequent web-based peer assessment results. Participants included 81 college students, mostly women, taking a business writing class. After initial submission of a draft counter-offer letter, they completed…

  3. Therapeutics incorporating blood constituents.

    PubMed

    Charoenphol, Phapanin; Oswalt, Katie; Bishop, Corey J

    2018-04-05

    Blood deficiency and dysfunctionality can result in adverse events, which can primarily be treated by transfusion of blood or the re-introduction of properly functioning sub-components. Blood constituents can be engineered on the sub-cellular (i.e., DNA recombinant technology) and cellular level (i.e., cellular hitchhiking for drug delivery) for supplementing and enhancing therapeutic efficacy, in addition to rectifying dysfunctioning mechanisms (i.e., clotting). Herein, we report the progress of blood-based therapeutics, with an emphasis on recent applications of blood transfusion, blood cell-based therapies and biomimetic carriers. Clinically translated technologies and commercial products of blood-based therapeutics are subsequently highlighted and perspectives on challenges and future prospects are discussed. Blood-based therapeutics is a burgeoning field and has advanced considerably in recent years. Blood and its constituents, with and without modification (i.e., combinatorial), have been utilized in a broad spectrum of pre-clinical and clinically-translated treatments. This review article summarizes the most up-to-date progress of blood-based therapeutics in the following contexts: synthetic blood substitutes, acellular/non-recombinant therapies, cell-based therapies, and therapeutic sub-components. The article subsequently discusses clinically-translated technologies and future prospects thereof. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Narrowing the Gap in Outcomes for Vulnerable Groups. A Review of the Research Evidence: Summary of Key Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Sally; Straw, Suzanne; Jones, Megan; Springate, Iain; Lord, Pippa; Stoney, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the Local Government Association (LGA) commissioned the NFER to review the best evidence on what works in narrowing the gap in outcomes for vulnerable groups across the five Every Child Matters areas. The review aimed to underpin the Narrowing the Gap Programme, a major development programme being implemented by the LGA and the DCSF. …

  5. Enacting Key Skills-Based Curricula in Secondary Education: Lessons from a Technology-Mediated, Group-Based Learning Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Keith; Conneely, Claire; Murchan, Damian; Tangney, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Bridge21 is an innovative approach to learning for secondary education that was originally conceptualised as part of a social outreach intervention in the authors' third-level institution whereby participants attended workshops at a dedicated learning space on campus focusing on a particular model of technology-mediated group-based learning. This…

  6. Disinvestment policy and the public funding of assisted reproductive technologies: outcomes of deliberative engagements with three key stakeholder groups.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Katherine; Hiller, Janet E; Street, Jackie M; Carter, Drew; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Watt, Amber M; Moss, John R; Elshaug, Adam G

    2014-05-05

    Measures to improve the quality and sustainability of healthcare practice and provision have become a policy concern. In addition, the involvement of stakeholders in health policy decision-making has been advocated, as complex questions arise around the structure of funding arrangements in a context of limited resources. Using a case study of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), deliberative engagements with a range of stakeholder groups were held on the topic of how best to structure the distribution of Australian public funding in this domain. Deliberative engagements were carried out with groups of ART consumers, clinicians and community members. The forums were informed by a systematic review of ART treatment safety and effectiveness (focusing, in particular, on maternal age and number of treatment cycles), as well as by international policy comparisons, and ethical and cost analyses. Forum discussions were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Each forum demonstrated stakeholders' capacity to understand concepts of choice under resource scarcity and disinvestment, and to countenance options for ART funding not always aligned with their interests. Deliberations in each engagement identified concerns around 'equity' and 'patient responsibility', culminating in a broad preference for (potential) ART subsidy restrictions to be based upon individual factors rather than maternal age or number of treatment cycles. Community participants were open to restrictions based upon measures of body mass index (BMI) and smoking status, while consumers and clinicians saw support to improve these factors as part of an ART treatment program, as distinct from a funding criterion. All groups advocated continued patient co-payments, with measures in place to provide treatment access to those unable to pay (namely, equity of access). Deliberations yielded qualitative, socially-negotiated evidence required to inform ethical, accountable policy decisions in the specific

  7. Disinvestment policy and the public funding of assisted reproductive technologies: outcomes of deliberative engagements with three key stakeholder groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures to improve the quality and sustainability of healthcare practice and provision have become a policy concern. In addition, the involvement of stakeholders in health policy decision-making has been advocated, as complex questions arise around the structure of funding arrangements in a context of limited resources. Using a case study of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), deliberative engagements with a range of stakeholder groups were held on the topic of how best to structure the distribution of Australian public funding in this domain. Methods Deliberative engagements were carried out with groups of ART consumers, clinicians and community members. The forums were informed by a systematic review of ART treatment safety and effectiveness (focusing, in particular, on maternal age and number of treatment cycles), as well as by international policy comparisons, and ethical and cost analyses. Forum discussions were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Results Each forum demonstrated stakeholders’ capacity to understand concepts of choice under resource scarcity and disinvestment, and to countenance options for ART funding not always aligned with their interests. Deliberations in each engagement identified concerns around ‘equity’ and ‘patient responsibility’, culminating in a broad preference for (potential) ART subsidy restrictions to be based upon individual factors rather than maternal age or number of treatment cycles. Community participants were open to restrictions based upon measures of body mass index (BMI) and smoking status, while consumers and clinicians saw support to improve these factors as part of an ART treatment program, as distinct from a funding criterion. All groups advocated continued patient co-payments, with measures in place to provide treatment access to those unable to pay (namely, equity of access). Conclusions Deliberations yielded qualitative, socially-negotiated evidence required to inform ethical

  8. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  9. Investigating Constituent Values and School Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ann; Glassman, Michael; Riegel, Lisa; Dawson, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Using a sociopolitical perspective to understand the alignment of community values and school policies, we conducted focus groups in three geographically close but economically varied neighborhood in one Midwest urban area. The article presents findings related to constituent values, social capital, and school policies, including charter school…

  10. Barriers to Eating Traditional Foods Vary by Age Group in Ecuador With Biodiversity Loss as a Key Issue.

    PubMed

    Penafiel, Daniela; Termote, Celine; Lachat, Carl; Espinel, Ramon; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Damme, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    To document the perceptions of indigenous peoples for the sustainable management of natural resources against malnutrition. Initially 4 and then 12 interviews were conducted with 4 different age groups. Eight rural villages in Guasaganda, central Ecuador, were studied in 2011-2012. A total of 75 people (22 children, 18 adolescents, 20 adults, and 15 elders). Benefits, severity, susceptibility, barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy of eating traditional foods. Qualitative content analysis was completed using NVivo software. Initial analysis was inductive, followed by a content analysis directed by the Health Belief Model. Coding was completed independently by 2 researchers and kappa statistics (κ ≥ 0.65) were used to evaluate agreement. Healthy perceptions toward traditional foods existed and differed by age. Local young people ate traditional foods for their health benefits and good taste; adults cultivated traditional foods that had an economic benefit. Traditional knowledge used for consumption and cultivation of traditional foods was present but needs to be disseminated. Nutrition education in schools is needed that supports traditional knowledge in younger groups and prevents dietary changes toward unhealthy eating. Increased production of traditional food is needed to address current economic realities. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenolic group on A-ring is key for dracoflavan B as a selective noncompetitive inhibitor of α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Toh, Zhi Siang; Wang, Hongyu; Yip, Yew Mun; Lu, Yuyun; Lim, Benedict Jeffrey Ang; Zhang, Daiwei; Huang, Dejian

    2015-12-15

    A high throughput assay was applied to guide the isolation of a new pancreatic α-amylase inhibitor, dracoflavan B, from the dragon's blood resin from Daemonorops draco. Applying C18 column, we successfully isolated both diastereomers and their structures verified by (1)H NMR spectra in comparison with the literature values. Their activity in inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase with comparable IC50 values of 23μM (A type) and 27μM (B type) that are similar to that of acarbose. Dracoflavan B shows much weaker activity in inhibiting bacterial α-amylase and no activity towards fungal α-amylase. Moreover, both isomers show no inhibitory activity towards mammalian α-glucosidase. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, dracoflavan B was a non-competitive α-amylase inhibitor with a Ki value of 11.7μM. Lack of α-amylase inhibition for proanthocyanidin A2 dimer demonstrated that dracoflavan B hydrophobic nature of the B, A', C' and B' rings are important for its α-amylase inhibition. In addition, selective chemical modification studies revealed that the phenolic group is also vital to dracoflavan B for its pancreatic α-amylase inhibition activity. Without the A ring phenolic hydrogen bond donor, the derivatives of dracoflavan B showed detrimental α-amylase inhibition. On the contrary, galloylation on the A ring phenolic OH group enhanced the activity as shown by the low IC50 (12μM) against α-amylase which is 56% more potent as compared to dracoflavan B. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved One-Way Hash Chain and Revocation Polynomial-Based Self-Healing Group Key Distribution Schemes in Resource-Constrained Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huifang; Xie, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Self-healing group key distribution (SGKD) aims to deal with the key distribution problem over an unreliable wireless network. In this paper, we investigate the SGKD issue in resource-constrained wireless networks. We propose two improved SGKD schemes using the one-way hash chain (OHC) and the revocation polynomial (RP), the OHC&RP-SGKD schemes. In the proposed OHC&RP-SGKD schemes, by introducing the unique session identifier and binding the joining time with the capability of recovering previous session keys, the problem of the collusion attack between revoked users and new joined users in existing hash chain-based SGKD schemes is resolved. Moreover, novel methods for utilizing the one-way hash chain and constructing the personal secret, the revocation polynomial and the key updating broadcast packet are presented. Hence, the proposed OHC&RP-SGKD schemes eliminate the limitation of the maximum allowed number of revoked users on the maximum allowed number of sessions, increase the maximum allowed number of revoked/colluding users, and reduce the redundancy in the key updating broadcast packet. Performance analysis and simulation results show that the proposed OHC&RP-SGKD schemes are practical for resource-constrained wireless networks in bad environments, where a strong collusion attack resistance is required and many users could be revoked. PMID:25529204

  13. How will ocean acidification affect Baltic sea ecosystems? an assessment of plausible impacts on key functional groups.

    PubMed

    Havenhand, Jonathan N

    2012-09-01

    Increasing partial pressure of atmospheric CO₂ is causing ocean pH to fall-a process known as 'ocean acidification'. Scenario modeling suggests that ocean acidification in the Baltic Sea may cause a ≤ 3 times increase in acidity (reduction of 0.2-0.4 pH units) by the year 2100. The responses of most Baltic Sea organisms to ocean acidification are poorly understood. Available data suggest that most species and ecologically important groups in the Baltic Sea food web (phytoplankton, zooplankton, macrozoobenthos, cod and sprat) will be robust to the expected changes in pH. These conclusions come from (mostly) single-species and single-factor studies. Determining the emergent effects of ocean acidification on the ecosystem from such studies is problematic, yet very few studies have used multiple stressors and/or multiple trophic levels. There is an urgent need for more data from Baltic Sea populations, particularly from environmentally diverse regions and from controlled mesocosm experiments. In the absence of such information it is difficult to envision the likely effects of future ocean acidification on Baltic Sea species and ecosystems.

  14. Sex Differences in Asthma: A Key Role of Androgen-Signaling in Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Sophie; Blanquart, Eve; Guéry, Jean-Charles

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, and also allergy differentially affect women and men. In general, women develop strongest immune responses and thus the proportion of infected individuals and the severity of many viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections are increased in men. However, heightened immunity in women makes them more susceptible than men to autoimmunity and allergy. While sex differences in immunity are well documented, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these immunological differences, particularly in allergic asthma. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways mediated by exacerbated type 2 immune responses. Sex differences have been reported in the incidence, prevalence, and severity of asthma. While during childhood, males are more susceptible to asthma than females, there is a switch at the onset of puberty as for many other allergic diseases. This decrease of asthma incidence around puberty in males suggests that hormonal mediators could play a protective role in the susceptibility to allergic responses in male. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have recently emerged as critical players in the initiation of allergic responses, but also in the resolution of parasitic infection, through their capacity to rapidly and potently produce type 2 cytokines. This review will cover the current understanding of the impact of sex-linked factors in allergic inflammation, with a particular focus on the role of sex hormones on the development and function of tissue-resident ILC2s.

  15. SET DOMAIN GROUP701 encodes a H3K4-methytransferase and regulates multiple key processes of rice plant development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kunpeng; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2017-07-01

    Chromatin-based epigenetic information plays an important role in developmental gene regulation, in response to environment, and in natural variation of gene expression levels. Histone H3 lysine 4 di/trimethylation (H3K4me2/3) is abundant in euchromatin and is generally associated with transcriptional activation. Strikingly, however, enzymes catalyzing H3K4me2/3 remain poorly characterized in crops so far. Here, we investigated the function of the rice SET DOMAIN GROUP 701 (SDG701) gene by molecular and biochemical characterization of the gene product, and by studying effects of its loss or gain of function on plant growth and development. We demonstrated that SDG701 encodes a methytransferase specifically catalyzing H3K4 methylation. Overexpression and knockdown experiments showed that SDG701 is crucial for proper sporophytic plant development as well as for gametophytic transmission that directly impacts rice grain production. In-depth analysis of plant flowering time revealed that SDG701 promotes rice flowering under either long-day or short-day photoperiods. Consistently, the SDG701 protein was found to bind chromatin to promote H3K4me3 and to enhance expression of the rice Hd3a and RFT1 florigens. Collectively, our results establish SDG701 as a major rice H3K4-specific methyltransferase and provide important insights into function of H3K4me3 deposition in transcription activation of florigens in promoting plant flowering. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Masses of constituent quarks confined in open bottom hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Jovanović, P.; Milošević, J.; Ignjatović, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We apply color-spin and flavor-spin quark-quark interactions to the meson and baryon constituent quarks, and calculate constituent quark masses, as well as the coupling constants of these interactions. The main goal of this paper was to determine constituent quark masses from light and open bottom hadron masses, using the fitting method we have developed and clustering of hadron groups. We use color-spin Fermi-Breit (FB) and flavor-spin Glozman-Riska (GR) hyperfine interaction (HFI) to determine constituent quark masses (especially b quark mass). Another aim was to discern between the FB and GR HFI because our previous findings had indicated that both interactions were satisfactory. Our improved fitting procedure of constituent quark masses showed that on average color-spin (FB) HFI yields better fits. The method also shows the way how the constituent quark masses and the strength of the interaction constants appear in different hadron environments.

  17. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews.

    PubMed

    Lo, Brian K; Morgan, Emily H; Folta, Sara C; Graham, Meredith L; Paul, Lynn C; Nelson, Miriam E; Jew, Nicolette V; Moffat, Laurel F; Seguin, Rebecca A

    2017-10-04

    Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  18. Unified Compact ECC-AES Co-Processor with Group-Key Support for IoT Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Luis; Castillo, Encarnación; López-Ramos, Juan A; Álvarez-Bermejo, José A; García, Antonio; Morales, Diego P

    2018-01-16

    Security is a critical challenge for the effective expansion of all new emerging applications in the Internet of Things paradigm. Therefore, it is necessary to define and implement different mechanisms for guaranteeing security and privacy of data interchanged within the multiple wireless sensor networks being part of the Internet of Things. However, in this context, low power and low area are required, limiting the resources available for security and thus hindering the implementation of adequate security protocols. Group keys can save resources and communications bandwidth, but should be combined with public key cryptography to be really secure. In this paper, a compact and unified co-processor for enabling Elliptic Curve Cryptography along to Advanced Encryption Standard with low area requirements and Group-Key support is presented. The designed co-processor allows securing wireless sensor networks with independence of the communications protocols used. With an area occupancy of only 2101 LUTs over Spartan 6 devices from Xilinx, it requires 15% less area while achieving near 490% better performance when compared to cryptoprocessors with similar features in the literature.

  19. Unified Compact ECC-AES Co-Processor with Group-Key Support for IoT Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Encarnación; López-Ramos, Juan A.; Morales, Diego P.

    2018-01-01

    Security is a critical challenge for the effective expansion of all new emerging applications in the Internet of Things paradigm. Therefore, it is necessary to define and implement different mechanisms for guaranteeing security and privacy of data interchanged within the multiple wireless sensor networks being part of the Internet of Things. However, in this context, low power and low area are required, limiting the resources available for security and thus hindering the implementation of adequate security protocols. Group keys can save resources and communications bandwidth, but should be combined with public key cryptography to be really secure. In this paper, a compact and unified co-processor for enabling Elliptic Curve Cryptography along to Advanced Encryption Standard with low area requirements and Group-Key support is presented. The designed co-processor allows securing wireless sensor networks with independence of the communications protocols used. With an area occupancy of only 2101 LUTs over Spartan 6 devices from Xilinx, it requires 15% less area while achieving near 490% better performance when compared to cryptoprocessors with similar features in the literature. PMID:29337921

  20. Constituency Input into Budget Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents techniques for ensuring constituency involvement in district- and site-level budget management. Outlines four models for securing constituent input and focuses on strategies to orchestrate the more complex model for staff and community participation. Two figures are included. (LMI)

  1. Adsorption of Wine Constituents on Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A

    2016-10-18

    The adsorption of macromolecules on solid surfaces is of great importance in the field of nanotechnology, biomaterials, biotechnological, and food processes. In the field of oenology adsorption of wine macromolecules such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, and proteins is much less desirable on membrane materials because of fouling and reduced filtering performance. On the other hand, adsorption of these molecules on processing aids is very beneficial for achieving wine clarity and stability. In this article, the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of white, rosé, and red wine constituents was evaluated. Allylamine, acrylic acid, and ethanol were selected as precursors for plasma polymerization in order to generate coatings rich in amine, carboxyl, and hydroxyl chemical groups, respectively. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ability of different surface chemical functionalities to adsorb wine constituents were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results demonstrated that the amine and carboxyl modified surfaces encourage adsorption of constituents from white wine. The hydroxyl modified surfaces have the ability to preferentially adsorb rosé wine constituents, whereas red wine adsorbed to the highest extent on acrylic acid surface.

  2. Description of two new species of the Exocelina broschii-group from Papua New Guinea, with revision and key to all representatives of this species group (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdo, Helena; Sagata, Katayo; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from Papua New Guinea are described herein: Exocelina mondmillensis sp. n. and Exocelina pseudomarinae sp. n. They are placed into the Exocelina broschii-group based on the shovel/fork-like ventral sclerites of their median lobe. While the former has rather distinct combination of the morphological characters (inconspicuous dorsal punctation, thin apex of the median lobe and ventral sclerite of the median lobe with two tips of different length), the latter is very similar to already described species Exocelina marinae (Shaverdo, Sagata & Balke, 2005). All described species of the group are revised and a key to their identification is provided. Important diagnostic characters (habitus, color, protarsomeres 4–5, median lobes, and parameres) are illustrated. Data on the distribution of all species of the group are given showing that its representatives occur only in Papua New Guinea and most of them are widely distributed in it central part. PMID:27110191

  3. [Chemical constituents from Ajuga nipponensis].

    PubMed

    He, Gui-xia; Liang, Xiao-lan; Ouyang, Wen; Yi, Gang-qiang; Li, Yun-yao; Zhao, Jian-ping; Ikhlas, Khan

    2013-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Ajuga nipponensis. The chemical constituents were isolated by repeated silica gel column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by phyisochemical properties and spectral analysis. Ten compounds were isolated and identified as:hexadecanoic acid(1), ajuforrestin A(2), beta-sitosterol(3), acacetin(4), apigenin(5), ajugamacrin B(6), ursolic acid(7), beta-ecdysone(8), 8-acetylharpagide(9) and daucosterol(10). Compounds 1-7 and 10 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  4. Public understanding of cigarette smoke constituents: three US surveys.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Noel T; Morgan, Jennifer C; Baig, Sabeeh A; Mendel, Jennifer R; Boynton, Marcella H; Pepper, Jessica K; Byron, M Justin; Noar, Seth M; Agans, Robert P; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2016-09-01

    The Tobacco Control Act requires public disclosure of information about toxic constituents in cigarette smoke. To inform these efforts, we studied public understanding of cigarette smoke constituents. We conducted phone surveys with national probability samples of adolescents (n=1125) and adults (n=5014) and an internet survey with a convenience sample of adults (n=4137), all in the USA. We assessed understanding of cigarette smoke constituents in general and of 24 specific constituents. Respondents commonly and incorrectly believed that harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke mostly originate in additives introduced by cigarette manufacturers (43-72%). Almost all participants had heard that nicotine is in cigarette smoke, and many had also heard about carbon monoxide, ammonia, arsenic and formaldehyde. Less than one-quarter had heard of most other listed constituents being in cigarette smoke. Constituents most likely to discourage respondents from wanting to smoke were ammonia, arsenic, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, lead and uranium. Respondents more often reported being discouraged by constituents that they had heard are in cigarette smoke (all p<0.05). Constituents with names that started with a number or ended in 'ene' or 'ine' were less likely to discourage people from wanting to smoke (all p<0.05). Many people were unaware that burning the cigarette is the primary source of toxic constituents in cigarette smoke. Constituents that may most discourage cigarette smoking have familiar names, like arsenic and formaldehyde and do not start with a number or end in ene/ine. Our findings may help campaign designers develop constituent messages that discourage smoking. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. The case for expanding the definition of 'key populations' to include high-risk groups in the general population to improve targeted HIV prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Shisana, Olive; Zungu, N; Evans, M; Risher, K; Rehle, T; Clementano, D

    2015-09-22

    Two additional key populations within the general population in South Africa (SA) that are at risk of HIV infection are black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. To investigate the social determinants of HIV serostatus for these two high-risk populations. Data from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, and Behaviour Survey were analysed for black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. Of the 6.4 million people living with HIV in SA in 2012, 1.8 million (28%) were black women aged 20 - 34 years and 1.9 million (30%) black men aged 25 - 49 years. In 2012, they constituted 58% of the total HIV-positive population and 48% of the newly infected population. Low socioeconomic status (SES) was strongly associated (p<0.001) with being HIV-positive among black women aged 20 - 34 years, and was marginally significant among black men aged 25 - 49 years (p<0.1). Low SES is a critical social determinant for HIV infection among the high-risk groups of black African women aged 20 - 34 years and black African men aged 25 - 49 years. Targeted interventions for these key populations should prioritise socioeconomic empowerment, access to formal housing and services, access to higher education, and broad economic transformation.

  6. [Advance in chemical constituents of genus Clematis].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Yang, Depo

    2009-10-01

    Progresses in the studies on chemical constituents of Clematis L. (belonging to the family Ranunculaceae) were systematiically reviewed in this article. The plants in this genus have a wide spectrum of constituents as follows: triterpenes, flavonoids, lignans, coumarins, alkaloids, volatile oils, steroids, organic acids, macrocyclic compounds and phenols, etc., among which triterpenoid saponins, flavonoids and lignans are the main components. The triterpenoid saponins are mainly oleanolic type and hederagenin type, most of which are bidesmosidic saponins, substituted with oligosaccharide chains at both C-3 and C-28, and some are substituted with acetyl, caffeoyl, isoferuloyl, p-methoxy cinnamyl and 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamyl groups in the oligosaccharide chains. The flavonoids from Clematis species are mainly flavones, flavonols, flavanones, isoflavones, xanthones and their glucosides (sugar moieties are connected to the aglycone through either the oxygen or the carbon atoms), the aglycones of which are mainly apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin and quercetin. The lignans from Clematis are mainly eupomatene lignans, cyclolignans, monoepoxylignans, bisepoxylignans and lignanolides. Clematis spp. are rich in resources, however, studies on their chemical constituents have only been carried out on twenty or so spp. As a result, it is necessary to expand our study on other spp. from this genus for better utilization of medicinal resources.

  7. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... consignments of cherries and does not direct where the consigned cherries are sold is not a sales constituency...

  8. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... consignments of cherries and does not direct where the consigned cherries are sold is not a sales constituency...

  9. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... consignments of cherries and does not direct where the consigned cherries are sold is not a sales constituency...

  10. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... consignments of cherries and does not direct where the consigned cherries are sold is not a sales constituency...

  11. Children and adolescents' choices of foods and beverages high in added sugars are associated with intakes of key nutrients and food groups.

    PubMed

    Frary, Carol D; Johnson, Rachel K; Wang, Min Qi

    2004-01-01

    To determine associations between intakes of the primary food and beverage sources of added sugars and intakes of key nutrients and food pyramid groups among U.S. children aged 6-17 years. The 1994-96 and 1998 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) were used to examine the diets of U.S. children aged 6-17 years, who provided 2 full days of dietary data. The nationally representative sample (n = 3038) included children age 6-11 (n = 1913) and adolescents age 12-17 (n = 1125). Food codes for sweetened foods and beverages were selected from the USDA Food Coding Scheme and categorized into five food and beverage categories. The Statistical Analysis System software program was used to recode and format the data for statistical analysis and the Survey Data Analysis System was used to apply sample weights and generate statistical procedures. The consumption of sweetened dairy products was positively associated with calcium intakes for children and adolescents. Consumption of presweetened cereals increased the likelihood of the children and adolescents meeting recommendations for the essential shortfall micronutrients calcium, folate, and iron, whereas the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, sugars and sweets, and sweetened grains decreased the likelihood of meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for these nutrients. Only children who were nonconsumers of sugar-sweetened beverages had a mean calcium intake that met the adequate intakes (AI). Consumption of sweetened dairy products and presweetened cereals was positively associated with the number of dairy servings consumed per day for both age groups. On average, consumption of sweetened dairy foods and beverages and presweetened cereals had a positive impact on children and adolescents' diet quality, whereas sugar-sweetened beverages, sugars and sweets, and sweetened grains had a negative impact on their diet quality.

  12. Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients: a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levy Hara, Gabriel; Kanj, Souha S; Pagani, Leonardo; Abbo, Lilian; Endimiani, Andrea; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos; Tattevin, Pierre; Mehtar, Shaheen; Lopes Cardoso, Fernando; Unal, Serhat; Gould, Ian

    2016-09-01

    The Antibiotic Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society for Chemotherapy propose ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospital settings. (i) Get appropriate microbiological samples before antibiotic administration and carefully interpret the results: in the absence of clinical signs of infection, colonisation rarely requires antimicrobial treatment. (ii) Avoid the use of antibiotics to 'treat' fever: use them to treat infections, and investigate the root cause of fever prior to starting treatment. (iii) Start empirical antibiotic treatment after taking cultures, tailoring it to the site of infection, risk factors for multidrug-resistant bacteria, and the local microbiology and susceptibility patterns. (iv) Prescribe drugs at their optimal dosing and for an appropriate duration, adapted to each clinical situation and patient characteristics. (v) Use antibiotic combinations only where the current evidence suggests some benefit. (vi) When possible, avoid antibiotics with a higher likelihood of promoting drug resistance or hospital-acquired infections, or use them only as a last resort. (vii) Drain the infected foci quickly and remove all potentially or proven infected devices: control the infection source. (viii) Always try to de-escalate/streamline antibiotic treatment according to the clinical situation and the microbiological results. (ix) Stop unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics once the absence of infection is likely. And (x) Do not work alone: set up local teams with an infectious diseases specialist, clinical microbiologist, hospital pharmacist, infection control practitioner or hospital epidemiologist, and comply with hospital antibiotic policies and guidelines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Phillip M.; Wiedemann, Rachel; Matty, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic change-out, including the ORU 02 analyzer and the ORU 08 Verification Gas Assembly. The most recent ORU 02 and ORU 08 assemblies are operating nominally. For ORU 02, the ion source filaments and ion pump lifetime continue to be key determinants of MCA performance. Additionally, testing is underway to evaluate the capacity of the MCA to analyze ammonia. Finally, plans are being made to bring the second MCA on ISS to an operational configuration.

  14. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Phillip M.; Cougar, Tamara; Ulrich, BettyLynn

    2017-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic change-out, including the ORU 02 analyzer and the ORU 08 Verification Gas Assembly. The most recent ORU 02 and ORU 08 assemblies in the LAB MCA are operating nominally. For ORU 02, the ion source filaments and ion pump lifetime continue to be key determinants of MCA performance. Finally, the Node 3 MCA is being brought to an operational configuration.

  15. End-of-life care in advanced kidney disease: ethical and legal issues and key challenges for black and minority ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Antonia J

    2014-09-01

    Advances in modern medical technology have gone so far that it is now possible for machinery to keep people alive. To some extent this has led to a misperception in society that death can almost always be postponed because life-sustaining extracorporeal machinery of some sort or another, for example a dialysis machine, can prevent it. However, for some, being kept alive connected to a dialysis machine for four hours three times a week does not represent or even come close to an existence or quality of life they consider valuable. It may even cause unnecessary distress. This may be because they have reached a point at the end of their lives where they would like the focus of their treatment or care to become that which enables them to live as well as possible until they die. In these circumstances treatment and care should properly be that which enables the supportive and palliative care needs of both patient and family to be identified and met throughout the last phase of life and into bereavement. Identifying and acknowledging the importance of such a paradigm shift in the delivery of healthcare, and above all facilitating it, includes taking on the responsibility, incumbent upon us all, to address the ethical issues that are brought into focus. In this paper, I examine some of these issues. I consider the ways in which underlying theoretical ethical principles have informed the development of professional guidance and highlight the dynamic relationship this guidance has with the law. Finally, I demonstrate the ways in which it can be usefully applied to inform and assist clinical decision-making. Key challenges for BAME groups are addressed. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  16. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  17. [Chemical constituents of Changium smyrnioides].

    PubMed

    Ren, Dong-chun; Qian, Shi-hui; Yang, Nian-yun; Xie, Ning; Duan, Jin-ao

    2008-01-01

    To study chemical constituents of Changium smyrnioides Wolff. The chemical components were isolated and purified by silica gel column and recrystallization. The chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of physico-chemical properties and spectral data. Ten compounds were isolated and identified as lignoceric acid (1), beta-sitosterol (2), stigmasterol (3), 5-hydroxy-8-methoxypsoralen (4), glycerylmonopalmitate (5), L-pyroglutamic acid (6), succinic acid (7), vanillic acid-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (8 ), vanillic acid (9), daucosterol (10). Compounds 1, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9 are obtained from the plant for the first time.

  18. The inorganic constituents of echinoderms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, F.W.; Wheeler, W.C.

    1915-01-01

    In a recent paper on the composition of crinoid skeletons we showed that crinoids contain large quantities of magnesia, and that its proportion varies with the temperature of the water in which the creatures live. This result was so novel and surprising that it seemed desirable to examine other echinoderms and to ascertain whether they showed the same characteristics and regularity. A number of sea urchins and starfishes were therefore studied, their inorganic constituents being analyzed in the same manner as those of the crinoids

  19. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Phillip M.; Thoresen, Souzan; Granahan, John; Matty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic changeout, including the ORU 02 analyzer and the ORU 08 Verification Gas Assembly. Over the past two years, two ORU 02 analyzer assemblies have operated nominally while two others have experienced premature on-orbit failures. These failures as well as nominal performances demonstrate that ORU 02 performance remains a key determinant of MCA performance and logistical support. It can be shown that monitoring several key parameters can maximize the capacity to monitor ORU health and properly anticipate end of life. Improvements to ion pump operation and ion source tuning are expected to improve lifetime performance of the current ORU 02 design.

  20. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Phillip M.; Thoresen, Souzan; Wiedemann, Rachel; Matty, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic change-out, including the ORU 02 analyzer and the ORU 08 Verification Gas Assembly. Improvements to ion pump operation and ion source tuning have improved lifetime performance of the current ORU 02 design. The most recent ORU 02 analyzer assemblies, as well as ORU 08, have operated nominally. For ORU 02, the ion source filaments and ion pump lifetime continue to be key determinants of MCA performance and logistical support. Monitoring several key parameters provides the capacity to monitor ORU health and properly anticipate end of life.

  1. [Chemical constituents from Vaccinium bracteatum].

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Chen, Xia; Niu, Chang-Shan; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2014-02-01

    The chemical constituents of Vaccinium bracteatum were studied by means of macroporous resin, ODS column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Eleven compounds were isolated from this plant. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the eleven compounds were determined as 10-O-trans-p-coumaroyl-6alpha-hydroxyl-dihydromonotropein (1), 10-O-cis-p-coumaroyl -6alpha-hydroxyl-dihydromonotropein (2), vaccinoside (3), 10-O-cis-p-coumaroyl monotropein (4), isolariciresinol-9-O-beta-D-xyloside (5), tectoridin (6), vicenin-3 (7), quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside (8), quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside (9), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside (10), and quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucuronide (11), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 are new, and compounds 4, 6 and 7 are isolated from the genus Vaccinium for the first time.

  2. [Chemical constituents of Swertia macrosperma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongling; Geng, Changan; Zhang, Xuemei; Ma, Yunbao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jijun

    2010-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Swertia macrosperma. The air-dried whole plants of Swertia macrosperma were extracted with boiling water. The extract was concentrated to a small amount of volume and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and n-BuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). Thirteen compounds were isolated from S. macrosperma, and were characterized as norbellidifolin (1), 1-hydroxy-3,7, 8-trimethoxy-xanthone (2), norswertianolin (3), swertianolin (4), 1,3,7,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone-8-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), swertiamatin (6), decentapicrin (7), coniferl aldehyde (8), sinapaldehyde (9), balanophonin (10), together with beta-sitosterol, daucosterol, and oleanolic acid . Compounds 2, 4-10 were obtained from Swertia macrosperma for the first time.

  3. [Chemical constituents from Exochorda racemosa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajia; Li, Xiangmei; Ren, Lihua; Fang, Chengwu; Wang, Fei

    2011-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Exochorda racemosa. Compounds were isolated and purified by silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, MCI gel and RP-18 column chromatography, and their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. Twenty compounds were isolated and identified as N-p-coumaroyl-N'-caffeoylputrescine (1), sutherlandin trans-p-coumarate (2), apigenin 7-O-methylglucuronide (3), astragalin (4), nicotiflorin (5), kaempferol 3-neohesperidoside (6), rutin (7), apigenin (8), luteolin (9), linalool-1-oic acid (10), betulalbuside A (11), ursolic acid (12) , corosolic acid (13), gynuramide II (14), beta-sitosterol (15), daucosterol (16), uridine (17), adenosine (18), syringin (19), and trans4-hydroxycinnamic acid (20), respectively. All compounds were obtained from this plant for the first time, moreover, 1 was reported as a new natural product, and 2 is a naturally rare cyanogenic glycoside.

  4. [Chemical constituents of Rauvolfia verticillata].

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Chun-Jie

    2012-06-01

    The study on the Rauvolfia verticillata (Lour.) Baill., which belongs to Apocynaceae, was carried out to look for its chemical constituents and pharmacological activity. The isolation and purification were performed by chromatography on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and ODS (octadecyl silane) open column. The structures of obtained compounds were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Three indole alkaloids and one acridone alkaloid were isolated from chloroform layer extract and identified as ajmalicine B (1), sandwicine (2), raunescine (3) and 7-hydroxynoracronycine (4) separately. Ajmalicine B (1) is a new compound belonging to indole alkaloid. Compound 4 as an acridone alkaloid was a new type compound isolated from Rauvolfia genus for the first time. We also did some biological activity research on the new type compound (4) to explore other pharmacological activities in addition to antihypertensive activity.

  5. Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure

    SciTech Connect

    LaKind, J.S.; Jenkins, R.A.; Naiman, D.Q.

    1999-06-01

    The 16-City Study analyzed for gas-phase environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents (nicotine, 3-ethenyl pyridine [3-EP], and myosmine) and for particulate-phase constituents (respirable particulate matter [RSP], ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter [UVPM], fluorescing particulate matter [FPM], scopoletin, and solanesol). In this second of three articles, the authors discuss the merits of each constituent as a marker for ETS and report pair-wise comparisons of the markers. Neither nicotine nor UVPM were good predictors for RSP. However, nicotine and UVPM were good qualitative predictors of each other. Nicotine was correlated with other gas-phase constituents. Comparisons between UVPM and other particulate-phase constituents were performed. Its relationmore » with FPM was excellent, with UVPM approximately 1 1/2 times FPM. The correlation between UVPM and solanesol was good, but the relationship between the two was not linear. The relation between UVPM and scopoletin was not good, largely because of noise in the scopoletin measures around its limit of detection. The authors considered the relation between nicotine and saliva cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine. The two were highly correlated on the group level.« less

  6. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID; Herbst, R Scott [Idaho Falls, ID; Mann, Nicholas R [Blackfoot, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  7. Socio-economic dietary inequalities in UK adults: an updated picture of key food groups and nutrients from national surveillance data.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Eva R; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-01-14

    Socio-economic differences in diet are a potential contributor to health inequalities. The present study provides an up-to-date picture of socio-economic differences in diet in the UK, focusing on the consumption of three food groups and two nutrients of public health concern: fruit and vegetables; red and processed meat; oily fish; saturated fats; non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES). We analysed data for 1491 adults (age ≥ 19 years) from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008-2011. Socio-economic indicators were household income, occupational social class and highest educational qualification. Covariate-adjusted estimates for intakes of fruit and vegetables, red and processed meat, and both nutrients were estimated using general linear models. Covariate-adjusted OR for oily fish consumption were derived with logistic regression models. We observed consistent socio-economic gradients in the consumption of the three food groups as estimated by all the three indicators. Contrasting highest and lowest levels of each socio-economic indicator, we observed significant differences in intakes for the three food groups and NMES. Depending on the socio-economic indicator, highest socio-economic groups consumed up to 128 g/d more fruit and vegetables, 26 g/d less red and processed meat, and 2·6% points less NMES (P< 0·05 for all). Relative to lowest socio-economic groups, highest socio-economic groups were 2·4 to 4·0 times more likely to eat oily fish. No significant patterns in saturated fat consumption were apparent. In conclusion, socio-economic differences were identified in the consumption of food groups and one nutrient of public health importance. Aligning dietary intakes with public health guidance may require interventions specifically designed to reduce health inequalities.

  8. [Chemical constituents of Swertia angustifolia].

    PubMed

    He, Kang; Cao, Tuan-wu; Wang, Hong-ling; Geng, Chang-an; Zhang, Xue-mei; Chen, Ji-jun

    2015-09-01

    This present work is to study the chemical constituents of Swertia angustifolia. The whole plants of air-dried Swertia angustifolia was extracted with 90% EtOH. The water extract was suspended in H2O and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and nBuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). Fourteen compounds were isolated and characterized as 1, 8-dihydroxy-3, 7-dimethoxyxanthone (1), 1, 8-dihydroxy-3, 5, 7-trimethoxyxanthone (2), 7-hydroxy-3, 8-dimethoxyxanthone-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 8-0-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-6) -β-D-glucopyranosyl] -1, 7-dihydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone (4), (+) -syringaresinol (5), ferulic acid (6), trans-coniferyl aldehyde (7), sinapaldehyde (8), trans-coniferyl alcohol (9), 3, 4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (10), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (11), isophthalic acid (12), 2-furoic acid (13), and 2-methyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone(14). Compounds 2-14 were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  9. [Chemical constituents of Halenia elliptica].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongling; Chen, Hao; Geng, Chang'an; Zhang, Xuemei; Ma, Yunbao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jijun

    2011-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Halenia elliptica. The air-dried whole plants of Halenia elliptica were extracted with 90% EtOH. The EtOH extract was condensed to a small amount of volume and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and n-BuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). 12 compounds were isolated from H. elliptica, and characterized as 8-hydroxy-2-methylchromone (1), 5-methoxy-2-methylchromone (2), 7-epi-vogeloside (3), coniferl aldehyde (4), sinapaldehyde (5), norbellidifolin (6), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,4,6-tetramethoxyxanthone (7), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,4,7-tetramethoxyxanthone (8), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,5-trimethoxyxanthone (9), together with azelaic acid, beta-sitosterol, and oleanolic acid. Compounds 1, 2 were new natural compounds and compounds 3-6, 10 were obtained from H. elliptica for the first time and compound 6 showed inhibitory activities against HBsAg and HBeAg secretion with IC50 value of 0.77 and < 0.62 mmol x L(-1), respectively.

  10. [Chemical constituents of Lepidium meyenii].

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen-juan; Xu, Hong-bo; Yang, Cai-yan; Geng, Chang-an; Zhang Xue-mei; Chen, Ji-jun

    2015-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Lepidium meyenii, the air-dried rhizome of L. meyenii was extracted with 70% EtOH. The extract was condensed to a small amount of volume and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and n-BuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography, and identified based on spectral analyses (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HRESIMS). Eighteen compounds were isolated from L. meyenii, including 7 alkaloids and 4 fatty acids and 7 other compounds. They were characterized as (3-hydroxybenzyl) carbamic acid(1), phenylmethanamine(2), N-benzylformamide (3), N-benzylacetamide (4), pyridin-4-ylmethanamine(5), n-(4-methoxybenzyl) aniline(6), uracil(7), succininc acid(8), decanedioic acid(9), n-hexa- decanoic acid methyl ester(10), heptanoic acid(11), solerole(12), pyromucic acid methyl ester(13), 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furancar- boxadehyde(14), 5-(methoxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde(15), 1,7-dihydroxy-2,3, 4-trimethoxyxanthone (16), 1,7-di- hydroxy-3,4- dimethoxy-xanthone(17), (+)-pinoresinol(18). Meanwhile, compounds 1-18 were obtained from L. neyenii for the first time.

  11. Scheil-Gulliver Constituent Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Bale, Christopher W.

    2017-06-01

    During solidification of alloys, conditions often approach those of Scheil-Gulliver cooling in which it is assumed that solid phases, once precipitated, remain unchanged. That is, they no longer react with the liquid or with each other. In the case of equilibrium solidification, equilibrium phase diagrams provide a valuable means of visualizing the effects of composition changes upon the final microstructure. In the present study, we propose for the first time the concept of Scheil-Gulliver constituent diagrams which play the same role as that in the case of Scheil-Gulliver cooling. It is shown how these diagrams can be calculated and plotted by the currently available thermodynamic database computing systems that combine Gibbs energy minimization software with large databases of optimized thermodynamic properties of solutions and compounds. Examples calculated using the FactSage system are presented for the Al-Li and Al-Mg-Zn systems, and for the Au-Bi-Sb-Pb system and its binary and ternary subsystems.

  12. Key cytokines of adaptive immunity are differentially induced in rainbow trout kidney by a group of structurally related geranyl aromatic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Beatriz; Obreque, Javiera; Soto-Aguilera, Sarita; Maisey, Kevin; Imarai, Mónica; Modak, Brenda

    2016-02-01

    Filifolinone is a semi-synthetic terpenoid derivative obtained from Heliotropium filifolium that increases the expression level of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in kidney cells of salmon. Because cytokines are produced in response to a foreign organism and by distinct other signals modulating immune responses, we further studied the potential immunomodulatory effects of a group of structural related terpenoid derivatives from H. filifolium on salmonids to determine the relationship between the chemical structure of the derivatives and their ability to modify cytokine expression and the lymphoid content. The resin and four 3H-spiro 1-benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexane derivatives were tested in vivo in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by quantifying the transcript levels of antiviral and T helper-type cytokines and T and B cells in the kidney. Three of the four terpenoids differ only in the C-7'substituent of the cyclohexane and the presence of the ketone group at this position in Filifolinone appeared responsible of an important up-regulation of IFN-α1, IFN-γ, IL-4/13A and IL-17D in the kidney of the treated trout. In addition, the absence of a methoxy group in carbon 7 of the benzene ring, found in all compounds but not in Folifolinoic acid, produced a significant reduction of IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4/13A transcripts. B cells were not affected by the compound treatment but Filifolinoic acid and the resin induced a significant reduction of T cells. Altogether, results showed that immunomodulating responses observed in the trout by effect of 3H-spiro 1-benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexane derivatives is related to the presence of the ketone group in the carbon 7' and the methoxy group in carbon 7 of the benzene ring, being Filifolinone the most active immunostimulatory compound identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  14. “My First Thought was Croutons”: Perceptions of Cigarettes and Cigarette Smoke Constituents Among Adult Smokers and Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer C.; Mendel, Jennifer; Teal, Randall; Noar, Seth M.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Hall, Marissa G.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Understanding what people think about harmful and potentially harmful constituents in cigarettes and cigarette smoke has new urgency given legislation requiring US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to disclose constituent information. Our study sought to obtain qualitative information on what people think about these constituents and the language they use to talk about them. Methods: We conducted six focus groups in 2014 with 40 adults in North Carolina. Open-ended questions focused on cigarette and cigarette smoke constituents in general and on the 18 constituents on the FDA’s abbreviated list. We coded the transcripts for emergent themes, and all four coders discussed themes until we reached consensus. Results: Participants knew that cigarette smoke contains chemicals but did not know how many chemicals nor what those chemicals are, beyond tar and nicotine. Dangers of constituents mentioned included “chemicals,” physical disease, and addiction. Participants incorrectly believed harmful constituents came primarily from tobacco companies’ additives. For unfamiliar constituents, people tried to make associations based on similar-sounding words. Recognizable constituents that participants associated with health harms most discouraged them from wanting to smoke. Most participants wanted to know health harms associated with constituents and what else the chemicals were in. Conclusions: Participants showed enthusiasm for learning more information about constituents, and also showed substantial misunderstandings about the source of harmful constituents. Our findings contribute to the limited body of research on adults’ knowledge and perceptions of cigarette smoke constituents and can aid the FDA as it plans to disclose constituent information to the public. Implications: Our study provides information about adults’ understanding of cigarette smoke constituents and what adults would like to know about these constituents. This information can

  15. "My First Thought was Croutons": Perceptions of Cigarettes and Cigarette Smoke Constituents Among Adult Smokers and Nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Moracco, Kathryn E; Morgan, Jennifer C; Mendel, Jennifer; Teal, Randall; Noar, Seth M; Ribisl, Kurt M; Hall, Marissa G; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-07-01

    Understanding what people think about harmful and potentially harmful constituents in cigarettes and cigarette smoke has new urgency given legislation requiring US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to disclose constituent information. Our study sought to obtain qualitative information on what people think about these constituents and the language they use to talk about them. We conducted six focus groups in 2014 with 40 adults in North Carolina. Open-ended questions focused on cigarette and cigarette smoke constituents in general and on the 18 constituents on the FDA's abbreviated list. We coded the transcripts for emergent themes, and all four coders discussed themes until we reached consensus. Participants knew that cigarette smoke contains chemicals but did not know how many chemicals nor what those chemicals are, beyond tar and nicotine. Dangers of constituents mentioned included "chemicals," physical disease, and addiction. Participants incorrectly believed harmful constituents came primarily from tobacco companies' additives. For unfamiliar constituents, people tried to make associations based on similar-sounding words. Recognizable constituents that participants associated with health harms most discouraged them from wanting to smoke. Most participants wanted to know health harms associated with constituents and what else the chemicals were in. Participants showed enthusiasm for learning more information about constituents, and also showed substantial misunderstandings about the source of harmful constituents. Our findings contribute to the limited body of research on adults' knowledge and perceptions of cigarette smoke constituents and can aid the FDA as it plans to disclose constituent information to the public. Our study provides information about adults' understanding of cigarette smoke constituents and what adults would like to know about these constituents. This information can help communication campaigns describe cigarette smoke constituents in a

  16. Key Ingredients-Target Groups, Methods and Messages, and Evaluation-of Local-Level, Public Interventions to Counter Stigma and Discrimination: A Lived Experience Informed Selective Narrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Laura J; Gordon, Sarah E; Reeves, Racheal A

    2018-04-01

    A proliferation of recent literature provides substantial direction as to the key ingredients-target groups, messages and methods, and evaluation-of local-level, public interventions to counter stigma and discrimination. This paper provides a selective narrative review of that literature from the perspective or standpoint of anti-stigma experts with lived experience of mental distress, the key findings of which have been synthesised and presented in diagrammatic overviews (infographics). These are intended to guide providers in planning, delivering and evaluating lived experience-directed local-level, public interventions to counter stigma and discrimination in accord with current best practice.

  17. Large Constituent Families Help Children Parse Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krott, Andrea; Nicoladis, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The family size of the constituents of compound words, or the number of compounds sharing the constituents, has been shown to affect adults' access to compound words in the mental lexicon. The present study was designed to see if family size would affect children's segmentation of compounds. Twenty-five English-speaking children between 3;7 and…

  18. Carbon fluxes within the epipelagic zone of the Humboldt Current System off Chile: The significance of euphausiids and diatoms as key functional groups for the biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Humberto E.; Daneri, Giovanni; Iriarte, José L.; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Menschel, Eduardo; Barría, Claudio; Pantoja, Silvio; Lizárraga, Lorena

    2009-12-01

    The information from 54 drifting sediment traps deployed between 1997 and 2006 along the Humboldt Current System off Chile (from 19.9°S to 42.2°S) was analyzed to contribute to unveiling the recurrent global-ocean issue of the lack of relationship between gross primary production (GPP) and particulate organic carbon (POC) export below 50 m depth. When the proportion of carbon that effectively sinks is relatively low compared to the carbon being fixed through GPP, a significant amount (average of 32%) of the sinking organic matter is composed of diatoms, regardless of GPP rates. Such a fraction seems to be affected by the physiological state of phytoplankton. In contrast, when the fraction of carbon sinking is high relative to GPP, most of sinking organic matter is composed of euphausid faecal strings. Such a situation occurs at relatively low values of GPP and chlorophyll-a. Most of these high sinking rates of pellets and low phytoplankton biomass occur during summer, when physical conditions favour the presence of phytoplankton blooms, and when the GPP/Biomass ratio indicates healthy phytoplankton physiological conditions. All this evidence supports the assessment of the relevance of euphausiids as key species in the Humboldt Current System pointing to (i) the top-down control that euphausiids are capable of exerting over primary producer biomass, and (ii) euphausiids‘ paramount role on total organic carbon flux over the Concepción continental shelf, regarding both POC export to the sediments and possibly the channelling of GPP directly to higher trophic levels.

  19. Key Role of Group V Secreted Phospholipase A2 in Th2 Cytokine and Dendritic Cell-Driven Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Henderson Jr, William R.; Ye, Xin; Lai, Ying; Ni, Zhanglin; Bollinger, James G.; Tien, Ying-Tzang; Chi, Emil Y.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown that disruption of the gene for group X secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-X) markedly diminishes airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in a mouse asthma model. With the large number of additional sPLA2s in the mammalian genome, the involvement of other sPLA2s in the asthma model is possible – in particular, the group V sPLA2 (sPLA2-V) that like sPLA2-X is highly active at hydrolyzing membranes of mammalian cells. Methodology and Principal Findings The allergen-driven asthma phenotype was significantly reduced in sPLA2-V-deficient mice but to a lesser extent than observed previously in sPLA2-X-deficient mice. The most striking difference observed between the sPLA2-V and sPLA2-X knockouts was the significant impairment of the primary immune response to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) in the sPLA2-V−/− mice. The impairment in eicosanoid generation and dendritic cell activation in sPLA2-V−/− mice diminishes Th2 cytokine responses in the airways. Conclusions This paper illustrates the diverse roles of sPLA2s in the immunopathogenesis of the asthma phenotype and directs attention to developing specific inhibitors of sPLA2-V as a potential new therapy to treat asthma and other allergic disorders. PMID:23451035

  20. Assessing Regional and Community Needs through the Use of Focus Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark; Brenton, Angela

    The University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) and Little Rock's Pulaski Technical College (PTC) have both used the focus group process with key constituents to understand institutional needs and priorities and public expectations of their institutions. The model followed by both institutions consists of the following three phases: forming the…

  1. Intake of key micronutrients and food groups in patients with late-stage age-related macular degeneration compared with age-sex-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Liew, Gerald; Russell, Joanna; Cosatto, Victoria; Burlutsky, George; Mitchell, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge of the risk factor profile of patients presenting with late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could help identify the most frequent modifiable AMD precursors among people who are referred for treatment. We aimed to assess dietary behaviours by comparing adjusted mean intakes of micronutrients and major food groups (fruits, vegetables, fish) among patients with AMD and a sample of age-sex-matched controls. Cross-sectional analysis of 480 late AMD cases and 518 population-based age-sex-matched controls with no AMD signs. AMD cases (aged 60+ years) were those presenting for treatment to a hospital eye clinic in Sydney, Australia, during 2012-2015. The comparator group were obtained from a cohort study (Blue Mountains Eye Study; Sydney, Australia) during 2002-2009. Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. AMD lesions were assessed from retinal photographs. After multivariable adjustment, patients with late-stage AMD compared with controls had significantly lower intakes of vitamin E (7.4 vs 9.8 mg/day; p<0.0001), beta-carotene (6232 vs 7738 μg/day; p<0.0001), vitamin C (161 vs 184 mg/day; p=0.0002) and folate (498.3 vs 602 μg/day; p<0.0001); but had higher intakes of zinc (13.0 vs 11.9 mg/day; p<0.0001). A significantly lower proportion of patients with late AMD met the recommended intake of vegetables than controls: 52.9% versus 64.5%; p=0.0002. This study showed significant differences in intakes of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, folate and vegetables between patients with late-stage AMD and healthy controls, and thus has provided a better understanding of the nutritional intake of patients presenting with advanced AMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics identify key interactions in the HER2-HER3 receptor tyrosine kinase interface.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy S; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Sept, David; Bose, Ron

    2013-08-30

    The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase is a driver oncogene in many human cancers, including breast and gastric cancer. Under physiologic levels of expression, HER2 heterodimerizes with other members of the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB family, and the HER2-HER3 dimer forms one of the most potent oncogenic receptor pairs. Previous structural biology studies have individually crystallized the kinase domains of HER2 and HER3, but the HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimer structure has yet to be solved. Using a reconstituted membrane system to form HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimers and carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry, we observed that HER2 and HER3 kinase domains preferentially form asymmetric heterodimers with HER3 and HER2 monomers occupying the donor and acceptor kinase positions, respectively. Conformational changes in the HER2 activation loop, as measured by changes in carboxyl group labeling, required both dimerization and nucleotide binding but did not require activation loop phosphorylation at Tyr-877. Molecular dynamics simulations on HER2-HER3 kinase dimers identify specific inter- and intramolecular interactions and were in good agreement with MS measurements. Specifically, several intermolecular ionic interactions between HER2 Lys-716-HER3 Glu-909, HER2 Glu-717-HER3 Lys-907, and HER2 Asp-871-HER3 Arg-948 were identified by molecular dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of the cancer-associated mutations HER2 D769H/D769Y, HER3 E909G, and HER3 R948K (also numbered HER3 E928G and R967K) on kinase activity in the context of this new structural model. This study provides valuable insights into the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB kinase structure and interactions, which can guide the design of future therapies.

  3. Database of natural matrix reference materials (NMRM) for organic constituents.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G V; Bleise, A R

    2001-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency maintains a database of internationally available certified reference materials (CRM) of natural matrices. This database is periodically updated, and presently documents nearly 25,000 measurands in 1,700 materials. The organic constituents are classified in five major groups of analytes aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (A), chlorinated hydrocarbons (B), pesticides (C), organometallic compounds (D) and other organic constituents (nutrients, etc.) (E). The matrices include natural materials such as body fluids, food products, soils, and sediments, terrestrial (e.g. plants), and anthropogenic products (e.g. dust, fly ash). These five organic groups of analytes encompass more than 2000 measurands for 420 different analytes in 230 materials. Of these measurands, 1,682 (68%) are certified, and 768 (32%) are provided as informational values. Within each major group of analytes, measurands reported as informational values accounted for: A (35%); B (35%); C (26%); D (10%), and E (22%). The high proportion of informational values (i.e. non-certified values) for A, B, and C, compares well with a similar but undesirable situation faced in the nineteen-seventies in the inorganic area when simultaneous multielement techniques became available. In the case of D and E, it appears that mostly targeted analytes are measured, leading to a cohesive certification profile. Although the IAEA database is not equally comprehensive for all groups of analytes cited above, it can still serve as an useful indicator of the status of organic constituents in RMs.

  4. Notes on the ant genus Cataglyphis Foerster, 1850 (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) in the Arabian Peninsula with description of a new species and a key to species of the C. pallida-group

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Mostafa R.; Collingwood, Cedric A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cataglyphis fisheri sp. n. is described and illustrated from the United Arab Emirates, Oman and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia based on the worker caste. It belongs to the Cataglyphis pallida-group which is recorded for the first time from the Arabian Peninsula. Cataglyphis fisheri sp. n. is similar to Cataglyphis pallida Mayr, 1877 from Kazakhstan. Differential diagnosis between these two species is given and a key to the species of the Cataglyphis pallida-group is presented. Cataglyphis laylae Collingwood, 2011 is treated as a junior synonym of Cataglyphis saharae Santschi, 1929. Cataglyphis flavobrunnea Collingwood & Agosti, 1996 is redescribed and a lectotype for this species is designated. PMID:26798297

  5. Membrane composition and dynamics: a target of bioactive virgin olive oil constituents.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Sergio; Bermudez, Beatriz; Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Jaramillo, Sara; Varela, Lourdes M; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2014-06-01

    The endogenous synthesis of lipids, which requires suitable dietary raw materials, is critical for the formation of membrane bilayers. In eukaryotic cells, phospholipids are the predominant membrane lipids and consist of hydrophobic acyl chains attached to a hydrophilic head group. The relative balance between saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated acyl chains is required for the organization and normal function of membranes. Virgin olive oil is the richest natural dietary source of the monounsaturated lipid oleic acid and is one of the key components of the healthy Mediterranean diet. Virgin olive oil also contains a unique constellation of many other lipophilic and amphipathic constituents whose health benefits are still being discovered. The focus of this review is the latest evidence regarding the impact of oleic acid and the minor constituents of virgin olive oil on the arrangement and behavior of lipid bilayers. We highlight the relevance of these interactions to the potential use of virgin olive oil in preserving the functional properties of membranes to maintain health and in modulating membrane functions that can be altered in several pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cigarette constituent health communications for smokers: impact of chemical, imagery, and source.

    PubMed

    Kowitt, Sarah; Sheeran, Paschal; Jarman, Kristen L; Ranney, Leah M; Schmidt, Allison M; Noar, Seth M; Huang, Li-Ling; Goldstein, Adam O

    2017-10-03

    Communication campaigns are incorporating tobacco constituent messaging to reach smokers, yet there is a dearth of research on how such messages should be constructed or will be received by smokers. In a 2x2x2 experiment, we manipulated three cigarette constituent message components: (1) the toxic constituent of tobacco (arsenic vs. lead) with a corresponding health effect, (2) the presence or absence of an evocative image, and (3) the source of the message (FDA vs. no source). We recruited smokers (N = 1,669, 55.4% women) via an online platform and randomized them to 1 of the 8 message conditions. Participants viewed the message and rated its believability and perceived effectiveness, the credibility of the message source, and action expectancies (i.e., likelihood of seeking additional information and help with quitting as a result of seeing the message). We found significant main effects of image, constituent, and source on outcomes. The use of arsenic as the constituent, the presence of an evocative image, and the FDA as the source increased the believability, source credibility, and perceived effectiveness of the tobacco constituent health message. Multiple elements of a constituent message, including type of constituent, imagery, and message source, impact their reception among smokers. Specifically, communication campaigns targeting smokers that utilize arsenic as the tobacco constituent, visual imagery, and the FDA logo may be particularly effective in changing key outcomes that are associated with subsequent attitude and behavioral changes. This paper describes how components of communication campaigns about cigarette constituents are perceived. Multiple elements of a tobacco constituent message, including type of constituent, image, and message source may influence the reception of messages among current smokers. Communication campaigns targeting smokers that utilize arsenic as the tobacco constituent, visual imagery, and the FDA logo may be particularly

  7. The Presidential Image: Key to Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, W. Terry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of the community college president's image (e.g., behavior, dress, and mannerisms) to enhance leadership in times of limited resources and declining enrollments. Describes the qualities of trust, good judgement, and expertise as keys to an image that effectively involves followers and constituents in implementing presidential…

  8. GCLAS: a graphical constituent loading analysis system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKallip, T.E.; Koltun, G.F.; Gray, J.R.; Glysson, G.D.

    2001-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has developed a program called GCLAS (Graphical Constituent Loading Analysis System) to aid in the computation of daily constituent loads transported in stream flow. Due to the relative paucity with which most water-quality data are collected, computation of daily constituent loads is moderately to highly dependent on human interpretation of the relation between stream hydraulics and constituent transport. GCLAS provides a visual environment for evaluating the relation between hydraulic and other covariate time series and the constituent chemograph. GCLAS replaces the computer program Sedcalc, which is the most recent USGS sanctioned tool for constructing sediment chemographs and computing suspended-sediment loads. Written in a portable language, GCLAS has an interactive graphical interface that permits easy entry of estimated values and provides new tools to aid in making those estimates. The use of a portable language for program development imparts a degree of computer platform independence that was difficult to obtain in the past, making implementation more straightforward within the USGS' s diverse computing environment. Some of the improvements introduced in GCLAS include (1) the ability to directly handle periods of zero or reverse flow, (2) the ability to analyze and apply coefficient adjustments to concentrations as a function of time, streamflow, or both, (3) the ability to compute discharges of constituents other than suspended sediment, (4) the ability to easily view data related to the chemograph at different levels of detail, and (5) the ability to readily display covariate time series data to provide enhanced visual cues for drawing the constituent chemograph.

  9. Prioritization of constituents for national- and regional-scale ambient monitoring of water and sediment in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Valder, Joshua F.; Carter, Janet M.; Zogorski, John S.

    2013-01-01

    A total of 2,541 constituents were evaluated and prioritized for national- and regional-scale ambient monitoring of water and sediment in the United States. This prioritization was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in preparation for the upcoming third decade (Cycle 3; 2013–23) of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. This report provides the methods used to prioritize the constituents and the results of that prioritization. Constituents were prioritized by the NAWQA National Target Analyte Strategy (NTAS) work group on the basis of available information on physical and chemical properties, observed or predicted environmental occurrence and fate, and observed or anticipated adverse effects on human health or aquatic life. Constituents were evaluated within constituent groups that were determined on the basis of physical or chemical properties or on uses or sources. Some constituents were evaluated within more than one constituent group. Although comparable objectives were used in the prioritization of constituents within the different constituent groups, differences in the availability of information accessed for each constituent group led to the development of separate prioritization approaches adapted to each constituent group to make best use of available resources. Constituents were assigned to one of three prioritization tiers: Tier 1, those having the highest priority for inclusion in ambient monitoring of water or sediment on a national or regional scale (including NAWQA Cycle 3 monitoring) on the basis of their likelihood of environmental occurrence in ambient water or sediment, or likelihood of effects on human health or aquatic life; Tier 2, those having intermediate priority for monitoring on the basis of their lower likelihood of environmental occurrence or lower likelihood of effects on human health or aquatic life; and Tier 3, those having low or no priority for monitoring on the basis of evidence of nonoccurrence or lack of

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of non-peptide PAR1 thrombin receptor antagonists based on small bifunctional templates: arginine and phenylalanine side chain groups are keys for receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Androutsou, Maria-Eleni; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hollenberg, Morley D; Matsoukas, John; Agelis, George

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of new non-peptide PAR(1) mimetic receptor antagonists, based on conformational analysis of the S(42)FLLR(46) tethered ligand (TL) sequence of PAR(1). These compounds incorporate the key pharmacophore groups in the TL sequence, guanidyl, amino and phenyl, which are essential for triggering receptor activity. Compounds 5 and 15 (50-100 microM) inhibited both TFLLR-amide (10 microM) and thrombin-mediated (0.5 and 1 U/ml; 5 and 10 microM) calcium signaling in a cultured human HEK cell assay.

  11. Differences in chemical constituents of Artemisia annua L from different geographical regions in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Yuping; Guo, Lanping; Qiu, Zhidong; Huang, Luqi; Qu, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Daodi-herb is a part of Chinese culture, which has been naturally selected by traditional Chinese medicine clinical practice for many years. Sweet wormwood herb is a kind of Daodi-herb, and comes from Artemisia annua L. Artemisinin is a kind of effective antimalarial drug being extracted from A. annua. Because of artemisinin, Sweet wormwood herb earns a reputation. Based on the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (PPRC), Sweet wormwood herb can be used to resolve summerheat-heat, and prevent malaria. Besides, it also has other medical efficacies. A. annua, a medicinal plant that is widely distributed in the world contains many kinds of chemical composition. Research has shown that compatibility of artemisinin, scopoletin, arteannuin B and arteannuic acid has antimalarial effect. Compatibility of scopoletin, arteannuin B and arteannuic acid is conducive to resolving summerheat-heat. Chemical constituents in A. annua vary significantly according to geographical locations. So, distribution of A. annua may play a key role in the characteristics of efficacy and chemical constituents of Sweet wormwood herb. It is of great significance to study this relationship. We mainly analyzed the relationship between the chemical constituents (arteannuin B, artemisinin, artemisinic acid, and scopoletin) with special efficacy in A. annua that come from different provinces in china, and analyzed the relationship between chemical constituents and spatial distribution, in order to find out the relationship between efficacy, chemical constituents and distribution. A field survey was carried out to collect A. annua plant samples. A global positioning system (GPS) was used for obtaining geographical coordinates of sampling sites. Chemical constituents in A. annua were determined by liquid chromatography tandem an atmospheric pressure ionization-electrospray mass spectrometry. Relationship between chemical constituents including proportions, correlation analysis (CoA), principal

  12. [Chemical constituents from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum].

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Jun; Liu, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Yun; Tian, Jing-Kui

    2006-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum. Column chromatography (silica gel, macroporous resin, sephadex LH - 20 and the preparative RP - HPLC were used to isolate the constituents. Their structures were elucidated by physical and spectral data. Eight compounds were isolated and identified as tangeritin (1), 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylplatycodigenin methyl ester (2), 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylplaticogenic acid A lactone (3), 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylplatycodigenin (4), deapio-platyconic acid A lactone (5), deapio-platycodin-D (6), platycoside-G1 (7) and platycoside-E (8). Compounds 1,3 and 5 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  13. [Studies on chemical constituents of Taxillus sutchuenenisis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-tao; Feng, Feng

    2007-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Taxillus sutchuenenisis (Lecomte) Danser. Chromatography and spectrum analysis were employed to isolated and elucidate the chemical constituents in the plant. 9 compounds were isolated and identified as quercetin (I), quervetin 3-O-beta-D-galactoside (II), isoquercitrin (III), quercitrin (IV), rutin (V), gallic acid (VI), ferulic acid (VII), beta-sitosterol (VIII), daucosterol (IX), respectively. Compounds III-IX are isolated from this plant for the first time. The work provide evidence for the exploitation and utilization of this plant resouce.

  14. [Chemical constituents from leaves of Paulownia fortunei].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Qiang; Wu, Jing-Lian; Cao, Fei-Hua; Li, Chong

    2008-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of leaves of Paulownia fortunei (Seem.) Hemsl. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated through spectroscopic analysis. The compounds were identified as mimulone (I), apigenin (II), luteolin (III), 2alpha, 3beta, 19beta-trihydroxyurs-28-O-beta-D-galactonopyranos ylester (anserinoside, IV), 3alpha-hydroxyl-ursolicacid (V), ursolicacid (VI), daucosterol (VII), beta-sitosterol (VIII). The compounds I - V are obtained from leaves of Paulownia fortunei (Seem.) Hemsl for the first time.

  15. [Chemical constituents from Neo-Taraxacum siphonathum].

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuyun; Zhou, Honghao; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Kelong; Liu, Suqin

    2009-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the antioxidant fraction of Neo-Taraxacum siphonathum. Various chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and purify the constituents. The structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical evidence and spectral analysis. Ten compounds were isolated and identified from Neo-T. siphonathum, caffeic acid (1), chlorogenic acid (2), quercetin (3), luteolin (4), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), quercetin-3-O-alpha-D-arabinofuranoside (6), quercetin-3-O-alpha-D-arabinopyranoside (7), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (8), beta-sitosterol (9) and daucosterol (10). Compounds 1-10 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  16. [Phenanthrene constituents from rhizome of Arundina graminifolia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-feng; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Dong-ming

    2005-03-01

    To isolate and elucidate the constituents from rhizome of Arundina graminifolia. Theconstituents were extracted with 95% alcohol and isolated by chromatography on silica gel, Sephedax LH-20. The structures were determined by UV, IR, NMR and MS spectral analysis. Five phenanthrene constituents were identified as 7-hydroxy-2, 4-dimethoxy-9, 10-dihydrophenanthrene( I ), 4, 7-dihydroxy-2-methoxy-9, 10-dihydrophenanthrene ( II ), 2, 7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-9, 10-dihydrophenanthrene ( III ), 7-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenanthrene-1,4-dione ( IV ), 7-hydroxy-2-methoxy-9, 10-dihydrophenanthrene-1,4-dione (V), respectively. All compounds were isolated from rhizome of A. graminifolia for the first time.

  17. [Studies on chemical constituents of Pinus armandii].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Ding, Yi; Sun, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Dong-ming

    2005-05-01

    To study chemical constituents from pine cone of Pinus armandii Franch. The constituents were isolated by chromatographic method and the structures were identified on the basis of spectral analysis. Four compounds were identified as 7-oxo-12alpha, 13beta-dihydroxyabiet-8(14)-en18-oic acid (I), 7-oxo-13beta-hydroxyabiet-8 (14)-en-18-oic acid (II), 8 (14)-podocarpen-13-on-18-oic acid (III) and lambertianic acid (IV). Compound I is a new diterpenoid and compounds II, III were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  18. LACIE analyst interpretation keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, J. G.; Payne, R. W.; Palmer, W. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Two interpretation aids, 'The Image Analysis Guide for Wheat/Small Grains Inventories' and 'The United States and Canadian Great Plains Regional Keys', were developed during LACIE phase 2 and implemented during phase 3 in order to provide analysts with a better understanding of the expected ranges in color variation of signatures for individual biostages and of the temporal sequences of LANDSAT signatures. The keys were tested using operational LACIE data, and the results demonstrate that their use provides improved labeling accuracy in all analyst experience groupings, in all geographic areas within the U.S. Great Plains, and during all periods of crop development.

  19. 40 CFR 264.93 - Hazardous constituents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the ground-water quality; (vii) The potential for health risks caused by human exposure to waste... quality; (viii) The potential for health risks caused by human exposure to waste constituents; (ix) The... 264.93 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED...

  20. [Chemical constituents of Pileostegia viburnoides var. glabrescens].

    PubMed

    Zou, Ju-ying; Chen, Sheng-huang; Li, Qin-wen; Ou, Yang-wen; Chen, Han-jun; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Pileostegia viburnoides var. glabrescens. The compounds were isolated and purified by various techniques. Their structures were determined by physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Five compounds were isolated and identified as friedelin (1), beta-sitosterol (2), umbelliferone (3), daucosterol (4) and skimmin (5). All the compounds were isolated from this genus for the first time.

  1. 40 CFR 264.93 - Hazardous constituents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administrator will consider the following: (1) Potential adverse effects on ground-water quality, considering... (2) Potential adverse effects on hydraulically-connected surface water quality, considering: (i) The... specify in the facility permit the hazardous constituents to which the ground-water protection standard of...

  2. 40 CFR 264.93 - Hazardous constituents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administrator will consider the following: (1) Potential adverse effects on ground-water quality, considering... (2) Potential adverse effects on hydraulically-connected surface water quality, considering: (i) The... specify in the facility permit the hazardous constituents to which the ground-water protection standard of...

  3. Gulose as a constituent of a glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mengele, R; Sumper, M

    1992-02-17

    The aldohexose gulose was identified as a constituent of a hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide derived from the glycoprotein SSG 185. This glycoprotein is part of the extracellular matrix of the green alga Volvox carteri. The gulose residue occupies a terminal position in the corresponding saccharide.

  4. Earth GRAM-99 and Trace Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is an engineering-level model of Earth's atmosphere. It provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0-27 km, GRAM thermodynamics and winds are based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. Above 120 km, GRAM is based on the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. In the intervening altitude region, GRAM is based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) climatology that also forms the basis of the 1986 COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). Atmospheric composition is represented in GRAM by concentrations of both major and minor species. Above 120 km, MET provides concentration values for N2, O2, Ar, O, He, and H. Below 120 km, species represented also include H2O, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, and CO2. At COSPAR 2002 a comparison was made between GRAM constituents below 120 km and those provided by Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) climatology. No current need to update GRAM constituent climatology in that height range was identified. This report examines GRAM (MET) constituents between 100 and 1000 km altitudes. Discrepancies are noted between GRAM (MET) constituent number densities and mass density or molecular weight. Near 110 km altitude, there is up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mass density (with mass density being valid and number densities requiring adjustment). Near 700 km altitude there is also up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mean molecular weight (with molecular weight requiring adjustment). In neither case are MET mass density estimates invalidated. These discrepancies have been traced to MET subroutines SLV (which affects 90-170 km height range) and SLVH (which affects helium above 440 km altitude). With these discrepancies corrected, results are presented to

  5. Adolescents' and Young Adults' Knowledge and Beliefs About Constituents in Novel Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Kimberly D; Cornacchione, Jennifer; Wagoner, Kimberly G; Noar, Seth M; Moracco, Kathryn E; Teal, Randall; Wolfson, Mark; Sutfin, Erin L

    2016-07-01

    Novel tobacco products, such as little cigars, cigarillos, hookah, and e-cigarettes, and their smoke or aerosol contain chemicals which the FDA has determined to be Harmful or Potentially Harmful Constituents. We explored adolescents' and young adults' knowledge and beliefs about constituents in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol, in order to inform risk communication messages. Seventy-seven adolescents and young adults (ages 13-25) participated in 10 focus groups, including 47 novel tobacco product users and 30 susceptible nonusers. Participants were asked to discuss 10 pre-selected constituents found in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol. The first author analyzed the discussion for emergent themes. Participants were generally familiar with arsenic, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and nicotine, but unfamiliar with acetaldehyde, acrolein, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanon (NNK), and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). All participants had negative beliefs about most constituents, although users had positive beliefs about nicotine. "Unfamiliar" constituents were associated with similarly-sounding words (eg, acetaldehyde sounds like acetaminophen), and some participants recognized words in the chemical names of NNK/NNN (eg, "nitro"). "Familiar" constituents were associated with negative health effects and other common products the constituents are found in. All participants wanted more information about the constituents' health effects, toxicity, and other common products. Most participants were unaware the constituents discussed are in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol. Risk communication messages could capitalize on negative associations with familiar constituents, or attempt to educate about unfamiliar constituents, to discourage novel tobacco product use among adolescents and young adults. The results of this study have implications for how the FDA and other agencies can communicate about the risks of novel

  6. Revision of the western Palaearctic species of Aleiodes Wesmael (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Rogadinae). Part 1: Introduction, key to species groups, outlying distinctive species, and revisionary notes on some further species

    PubMed Central

    van Achterberg, Cornelis; Shaw, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Seven new species of the genus Aleiodes Wesmael, 1838 (Braconidae: Rogadinae) are described and illustrated: Aleiodes abraxanae sp. n., Aleiodes angustipterus sp. n., Aleiodes artesiariae sp. n., Aleiodes carminatus sp. n., Aleiodes diarsianae sp. n., Aleiodes leptofemur sp. n., and Aleiodes ryrholmi sp. n. A neotype is designated for each of Aleiodes circumscriptus (Nees, 1834) and Aleiodes pictus (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838), and both species are redescribed and illustrated. Aleiodes ochraceus Hellén, 1927 (not Aleiodes ochraceus (Curtis, 1834)) is renamed as Aleiodes curticornis nom. n. & stat. rev., and redescribed and illustrated. Aleiodes bistrigatus Roman, 1917, Aleiodes nigriceps Wesmael, 1838, and Aleiodes reticulatus (Noskiewicz, 1956), are re-instated as valid species. A lectotype is designated for Aleiodes bistrigatus Roman. An illustrated key is given to some distinctive species and the residual species groups along which further parts of an entire revision of western Palaearctic species of Aleiodes and Heterogamus will be organised. Biology, host associations and phenology are discussed for the keyed species (in addition to the above, Aleiodes albitibia (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838), Aleiodes apiculatus (Fahringer, 1932), Aleiodes arcticus (Thomson, 1892), Aleiodes cantherius (Lyle, 1919), Aleiodes esenbeckii (Hartig, 1834), Aleiodes jakowlewi (Kokujev, 1898), Aleiodes modestus (Reinhard, 1863), Aleiodes nigricornis Wesmael, 1838, Aleiodes pallidator (Thunberg, 1822), Aleiodes praetor (Reinhard, 1863), Aleiodes seriatus (Herrich- Schäffer, 1838) sensu lato, Aleiodes testaceus (Telenga, 1941), Aleiodes ungularis (Thomson, 1892), and Aleiodes varius (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838)) which are dealt with in full here (with the exception of Aleiodes seriatus s.l. which is, however, included in the key). The experimental methodology covering the revision as a whole, which involves some behavioural investigation, is outlined. PMID:28138281

  7. Analysis of chemical constituents in Cistanche species.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2009-03-13

    Species of the genus of Cistanche (Rou Cong Rong in Chinese) are perennial parasite herbs, and are mainly distributed in arid lands and warm deserts. As a superior tonic for the treatment of kidney deficiency, impotence, female infertility, morbid leucorrhea, profuse metrorrhagia and senile constipation, Cistanche herbs earned the honor of "Ginseng of the desert". Recently, there has been increasing scientific attention on Herba Cistanche for its remarkable bioactivities including antioxidation, neuroprotection, and anti-aging. The chemical constituents of Cistanche plants mainly include volatile oils and non-volatile phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs), iridoids, lignans, alditols, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Pharmacological studies show that PhGs are the main active components for curing kidney deficiency, antioxidation and neuroprotection; galactitol and oligosaccharides are the representatives for the treatment of senile constipation, while polysaccharides are responsible for improving body immunity. In this paper, the advances on the chemical constituents of Cistanche plants and their corresponding analyses are reviewed.

  8. [Chemical constituents from rhizomes of Illicium henryi].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jifeng; Zhang, Xuemei; Shi, Yao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yunbao; Chen, Jijun

    2010-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Illicium henryi. Column chromatographic techniques using silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, Rp-8 and Rp-18 as packing materials were applied to isolate constituents. The structures of isolates were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data analyses. Twelve compounds were isolated from the rhizomes of I. henryi, which were characterized as balanophonin (1), aviculin (2), rubriflosides A (3), 1,2-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediol (4), jasopyran (5), kaempferol (6), quercetin (7), (2R, 3R)-3, 5, 7, 3', 5'- pentahydroxyflavan (8), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (9), 3, 4-dimethoxyphenyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (10), coniferyl aldehyde (11), sinapaldehyde (12), respectively. All the isolates were obtained for the first time from this plant.

  9. [Chemical constituents from stems of Ilex pubescens].

    PubMed

    Xing, Xian-dong; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Feng; Liu, Wen-yuan

    2012-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the stems of Ilex pubescens Hook. et Am. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by various column chromatographic methods with diatomite, silica gel, ODS and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were identified on physical properties and spectroscopic methods. Nine compounds were isolated and determined as luteolin(1), quercetin(2), hyperoside(3), rutin(4), 1, 5-dihydroxy-3-methyl-anthraquinone(5),3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid-1-O-beta-D-glucoside(6), hexadecanoic acid(7), stearic acid(8), n-tetratriacontanol(9), respectively. All the compounds are isolated from this plant for the first time, and compounds 5 and 6 are isolated from this genus for the first time.

  10. [Chemical Constituents from Melissa officinalis Leaves].

    PubMed

    Ji, Zi-yang; Yang, Yan-xia; Zhuang, Fang-fang; Yan, Fu-lin; Wang, Chang-hong

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of Melissa officinalis leaves. The chemical constituents were separated by silica gel column chromatography and their structures were determined by spectroscopic experiments. 13 compounds were isolated and identified as protocatechuyl aldehyde(1), serratagenic acid(2), vanillin(3), 2α,3β-dihydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid(4), ursolic acid(5), oleanolic acid(6), daucosterol(7),2α,3β,23,29-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid-29-O-β-D-gluco- pyranoside(8), luteolin(9) rosmarinic acid(10), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside (11), β-stitosterol(12) and palmitic acid(13). Compounds 1 ~ 8 are separated from this plant for the first time and compounds 1-4 and 8 are isolated from this genus for the first time.

  11. [Chemical constituents from flowers of Chrysanthemum indicum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyue; Chen, Dong; Liang, Lijuan; Xue, Peifeng; Tu, Pengfei

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of the flowers of Chrysanthemum indicum. The chemical constituents were isolated by various column chromatographic methods. The structures were identified by spectral data. Twelve compounds were isolated and identified as acacetin (1), tricin (2), 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone(3), 5-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavon(4),7hydroxyflavonone (5), isorhamnetin (6),5,6,7-trihydroxy- 3',4', 5'-trimethoxyflanon (7 ), quercetin (8) , (3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta, 7 beta, 14 beta)-eudesmen-3,5,6,11-tetrol (9), syringaresinol (10), liriodendrin (11), and genkwanin (12). Compounds 3-7, 10-12 were isolated from this species for the first time, and compounds 3, 5, 7, 10, 11 were obtained from genus Chrysanthemum for the first time.

  12. Antigenotoxic potential of certain dietary constituents.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Yogeshwer; Arora, Annu; Taneja, Pankaj

    2003-01-01

    The human diet contains a variety of compounds that exhibit chemopreventive effects towards an array of xenobiotics. In the present study, the antigenotoxic potential of selected dietary constituents including Diallyl sulfide (DAS), Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), Curcumin (CUR), and Black tea polyphenols (BTP) has been evaluated in the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation and mammalian in vivo cytogenetic assays. In addition, the anticlastogenic effect of the above dietary constituents was identified towards Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and cyclophosphamide- (CP) induced cytogenetic damage in mouse bone marrow cells. The induction of BaP and CP induced chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei formation, and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were found to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by DAS, I3C, CUR, and BTP. Thus the study reveals the antimutagenic potential of these dietary compounds towards BaP- and CP-induced genotoxicity in microbial and mammalian test systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  14. Adolescents’ and Young Adults’ Knowledge and Beliefs About Constituents in Novel Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Cornacchione, Jennifer; Wagoner, Kimberly G.; Noar, Seth M.; Moracco, Kathryn E.; Teal, Randall; Wolfson, Mark; Sutfin, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Novel tobacco products, such as little cigars, cigarillos, hookah, and e-cigarettes, and their smoke or aerosol contain chemicals which the FDA has determined to be Harmful or Potentially Harmful Constituents. We explored adolescents’ and young adults’ knowledge and beliefs about constituents in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol, in order to inform risk communication messages. Methods: Seventy-seven adolescents and young adults (ages 13–25) participated in 10 focus groups, including 47 novel tobacco product users and 30 susceptible nonusers. Participants were asked to discuss 10 pre-selected constituents found in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol. The first author analyzed the discussion for emergent themes. Results: Participants were generally familiar with arsenic, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and nicotine, but unfamiliar with acetaldehyde, acrolein, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanon (NNK), and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). All participants had negative beliefs about most constituents, although users had positive beliefs about nicotine. “Unfamiliar” constituents were associated with similarly-sounding words (eg, acetaldehyde sounds like acetaminophen), and some participants recognized words in the chemical names of NNK/NNN (eg, “nitro”). “Familiar” constituents were associated with negative health effects and other common products the constituents are found in. All participants wanted more information about the constituents’ health effects, toxicity, and other common products. Most participants were unaware the constituents discussed are in novel tobacco products and their smoke or aerosol. Conclusions: Risk communication messages could capitalize on negative associations with familiar constituents, or attempt to educate about unfamiliar constituents, to discourage novel tobacco product use among adolescents and young adults. Implications: The results of this study have implications for

  15. Analytical evaluation of the combined influence of polarization mode dispersion and group velocity dispersion on the bit error rate performance of optical homodyne quadrature phase-shift keying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Kazi Abu; Majumder, Satya Prasad

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical approach is presented to evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance of an optical fiber transmission system with quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation under the combined influence of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and group velocity dispersion (GVD) in a single-mode fiber (SMF). The analysis is carried out without and with polarization division multiplexed (PDM) transmission considering a coherent homodyne receiver. The probability density function (pdf) of the random phase fluctuations due to PMD and GVD at the output of the receiver is determined analytically, considering the pdf of differential group delay (DGD) to be Maxwellian distribution and that of GVD to be Gaussian approximation. The exact pdf of the phase fluctuation due to PMD and GVD is also evaluated from its moments using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Average BER is evaluated by averaging the conditional BER over the pdf of the random phase fluctuation. The BER performance results are evaluated for different system parameters. It is found that PDM-QPSK coherent homodyne system suffers more power penalty than the homodyne QPSK system without PDM. A PDM-QPSK system suffers a penalty of 4.3 dB whereas power penalty of QPSK system is 3.0 dB at a BER of 10-9 for DGD of 0.8 Tb and GVD of 1700 ps/nm. Analytical results are compared with the experimental results reported earlier and found to have good conformity.

  16. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, R; Sabna, B

    2008-04-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discussed with respect to the role of these plants in ethnomedicine in India.

  17. Phytochemical constituents of some Indian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, R.; Sabna, B.

    2008-01-01

    Alkaloids, tannins, saponins, steroid, terpenoid, flavonoids, phlobatannin and cardie glycoside distribution in seven medicinal plants belonging to different families were assessed and compared. The medicinal plants investigated were Aegle marmelos, Cynodon dactylon, Eclipta prostrata, Moringa pterygosperma, Pongamia pinnata, Sida acuta and Tridax procumbens. The significance of the plants in traditional medicine and the importance of the distribution of these chemical constituents were discussed with respect to the role of these plants in ethnomedicine in India. PMID:22557280

  18. [Chemical constituents from herbs of Swertia delavayi].

    PubMed

    Xia, Cong-long; Liu, Guang-ming; Zhang, Hao

    2008-08-01

    To isolate and identify the chemical constituents of 95% alcohol extract from Swertia delavayi. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatogrphy and their structures were identified by the physicochemical properties and spectral analyses. Seven compounds were isolated and identified as oleanolic acid (1), gentiopcroside (2), swertiamarin (3), daucosterol (4), swertiadecoraxanthone-II (5), isovitexin (6), isoorientin (7). Compounds 2-7 were isolated from S. delavayi for the first time. While the compound 6 was firstly reported from the genus Swertia.

  19. [Chemical Constituents from Mallotus paniculatus (II)].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun-ling

    2015-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Mallotus paniculaus radix. The compounds were isolated with column chromatography. The chemical structures were identified by spectral and spectroscopic technology. Seven compounds were isolated from the n-BuOH extract and identified as scopoletin(1), isoscopletin(2), erythordiol(3), apigenin(4), 4-methoxybenzoic acid(5), acetylaleuritolic acid(6) and β-daucosterol (7). compounds 2 - 6 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  20. [Studies on chemical constituents from Elaeocarpus sylvestris].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Chao; Shi, Hai-Ming

    2008-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Elaeocarpus sylvestris. The compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods and their structures were elucidated by physico-chemical properties and spectral analysis. Six compounds were isolated and identified as: 2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (1), coniferyl alcohol (2), umbelliferone (3), scopoletin (4), beta-sitosterol (5), daucosterol (6). All above compounds are isolated from Elaeocarpus Genus for the first time.

  1. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-07-26

    We explore further the idea that the lattice QCD data for hadron properties in the region m[^2][_pi] > 0.2GeV^2 can be described by the constituent quark model. This leads to a natural explanation of the fact that nucleon excited states are generally stable for pion masses greater than their physical excitation energies. Finally, we apply these same ideas to the problem of how pentaquarks might behave in lattice QCD, with interesting conclusions.

  2. Key Objectives Bank: Year 9. Key Stage 3: National Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    In each sub-section of the "Framework for Teaching English: Years 7, 8 and 9," certain key objectives are identified in boldface print. These objectives are key because they signify skills or understanding which are crucial to pupils' language development. They are challenging for the age group and are important markers of progress. This…

  3. Statistical Analysis of CMC Constituent and Processing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornuff, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are the next "big thing" in high-temperature structural materials. In the case of jet engines, it is widely believed that the metallic superalloys currently being utilized for hot structures (combustors, shrouds, turbine vanes and blades) are nearing their potential limits of improvement. In order to allow for increased turbine temperatures to increase engine efficiency, material scientists have begun looking toward advanced CMCs and SiC/SiC composites in particular. Ceramic composites provide greater strength-to-weight ratios at higher temperatures than metallic alloys, but at the same time require greater challenges in micro-structural optimization that in turn increases the cost of the material as well as increases the risk of variability in the material s thermo-structural behavior. to model various potential CMC engine materials and examines the current variability in these properties due to variability in component processing conditions and constituent materials; then, to see how processing and constituent variations effect key strength, stiffness, and thermal properties of the finished components. Basically, this means trying to model variations in the component s behavior by knowing what went into creating it. inter-phase and manufactured by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and melt infiltration (MI) were considered. Examinations of: (1) the percent constituents by volume, (2) the inter-phase thickness, (3) variations in the total porosity, and (4) variations in the chemical composition of the Sic fiber are carried out and modeled using various codes used here at NASA-Glenn (PCGina, NASALife, CEMCAN, etc...). The effects of these variations and the ranking of their respective influences on the various thermo-mechanical material properties are studied and compared to available test data. The properties of the materials as well as minor changes to geometry are then made to the computer model and the detrimental effects

  4. A standardised approach towards PROving the efficacy of foods and food constituents for health CLAIMs (PROCLAIM): providing guidance.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Alison M; Meijer, Gert W; Richardson, David P; Rondeau, Virginie; Skarp, Maria; Stasse-Wolthuis, Marianne; Tweedie, Guy C; Witkamp, Renger

    2011-11-01

    Diet is well known to have beneficial health properties that extend beyond traditionally accepted nutritional effects. The approach involved in elucidating these beneficial physiological effects is becoming more important, as reflected by increasing research being undertaken. With growing consumer awareness of foods and food constituents and their relationship to health, the key questions for regulators, scientists and the food industry continue to relate to: (1) how consumers could be protected and have confidence that the health claims on foods are well supported by the evidence; (2) how research on physiological effects of food (constituents) and their health benefits could be stimulated and supported; (3) how research findings could be used in the development of innovative new food products. The objectives of this paper are to provide a set of recommendations on the substantiation of health claims for foods, to develop further guidance on the choice of validated markers (or marker patterns) and what effects are considered to be beneficial to the health of the general public (or specific target groups). Finally, the case for developing a standardised approach for assessing the totality of the available scientific data and weighing the evidence is proposed.

  5. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  6. Hyperforin--a key constituent of St. John's wort specifically activates TRPC6 channels.

    PubMed

    Leuner, Kristina; Kazanski, Victor; Müller, Margarethe; Essin, Kirill; Henke, Bettina; Gollasch, Maik; Harteneck, Christian; Müller, Walter E

    2007-12-01

    Hyperforin, a bicyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol derivative, is the main active principle of St. John's wort extract responsible for its antidepressive profile. Hyperforin inhibits the neuronal serotonin and norepinephrine uptake comparable to synthetic antidepressants. In contrast to synthetic antidepressants directly blocking neuronal amine uptake, hyperforin increases synaptic serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations by an indirect and yet unknown mechanism. Our attempts to identify the molecular target of hyperforin resulted in the identification of TRPC6. Hyperforin induced sodium and calcium entry as well as currents in TRPC6-expressing cells. Sodium currents and the subsequent breakdown of the membrane sodium gradients may be the rationale for the inhibition of neuronal amine uptake. The hyperforin-induced cation entry was highly specific and related to TRPC6 and was suppressed in cells expressing a dominant negative mutant of TRPC6, whereas phylogenetically related channels, i.e., TRPC3 remained unaffected. Furthermore, hyperforin induces neuronal axonal sprouting like nerve growth factor in a TRPC6-dependent manner. These findings support the role of TRPC channels in neurite extension and identify hyperforin as the first selective pharmacological tool to study TRPC6 function. Hyperforin integrates inhibition of neurotransmitter uptake and neurotrophic property by specific activation of TRPC6 and represents an interesting lead-structure for a new class of antidepressants.

  7. Key Constituency: How a Medium-Sized Public University Started Its Parents Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, Polly

    2011-01-01

    Parents present something of a conundrum to higher education administrators. They know that parents play a very important role in student success, especially during the first year, but institutions are also committed to ensuring that students successfully transition from childhood to adulthood. While they want to encourage parent involvement in…

  8. Global Reference Atmospheric Model and Trace Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is an engineering-level model of the Earth's atmosphere. It provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0-27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. Above 120 km, GRAM is based on the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. In the intervening altitude region, GRAM is based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) climatology that also forms the basis of the 1986 COSPAR Intemationa1 Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). MAP data in GRAM are augmented by a specially-derived longitude variation climatology. Atmospheric composition is represented in GRAM by concentrations of both major and minor species. Above 120 km, MET provides concentration values for N2, O2, Ar, O, He, and H. Below 120 km, species represented also include H2O, O3, N2O, CO, CH, and CO2. Water vapor in GRAM is based on a combination of GUACA, Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL), and NASA Langley Research Center climatologies. Other constituents below 120 km are based on a combination of AFGL and h4AP/CIRA climatologies. This report presents results of comparisons between GRAM Constituent concentrations and those provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) climatology of Summers (NRL,/MR/7641-93-7416, 1993). GRAM and NRL concentrations were compared for seven species (CH4, CO, CO2, H2O, N2O, O2, and O3) for months January, April, July, and October, over height range 0-115 km, and latitudes -90deg to + 90deg at 10deg increments. Average GRAM-NRL correlations range from 0.878 (for CO) to 0.975 (for O3), with an average over all seven species of 0.936 (standard deviation 0.049).

  9. Lunar soil: Size distribution and mineralogical constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duke, M.B.; Woo, C.C.; Bird, M.L.; Sellers, G.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    The lunar soil collected by Apollo 11 consists primarily of submillimeter material and is finer in grain size than soil previously recorded photographically by Surveyor experiments. The main constituents are fine-grained to glassy rocks of basaltic affinity and coherent breccia of undetermined origin. Dark glass, containing abundant nickel-iron spheres, coats many rocks, mineral, and breccia fragments. Several types of homogeneous glass occur as fragments and spheres. Colorless spheres, probably an exotic component, are abundant in the fraction finer than 20 microns.

  10. [Studies on chemical constituents of Dendrobium crystallinum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Chao-feng; Wang, Zheng-tao; Zhang, Mian; Shao, Li; Xu, Luo-shan

    2008-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Dendobium crystallinum. Compounds were isolated and purified by silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Their structures were identified by physicochemical properties and spectral analyses. Nine compounds were obtained and identified as: 4, 4'-dihydroxy-3, 5-dimethoxybi-benzyl (1), gigantol (2), naringenin (3) , p-hydroxybenzoic acid (4), n-tetracosyl trans-p-cou-marate (5), n-octacosy trans-p-coumarate (6), n-hexacosyl trans-ferulate (7), stigmasterol (8), daucosterol (9). All these compounds were obtained from this plant for the first time, compounds 1 and 4 were isolated firstly from the genus.

  11. [Studies on chemical constituents of Heterosmilax yunnanensis].

    PubMed

    Qin, Wen-jie; Wang, Gang-li; Lin, Rui-chao

    2007-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Heterosmilax yunianensis. The compounds were isolated and repeatedly purified with chromatograph and the structures were elucidated by physico-chemical properties and spectral analysis. Eight compounds were obtained and elucidated as beta-sitosterol (I), glycerol monopalmitate (II), daucosterol (IIl), hexacosanoic acid (IV), 5-hydroxymethyl furaldehyde (V), hergapen (VI), ursolic acid (VII), liquiritigenin (VIII). They have been isolated from this plant for the first time, and IV - VIII are obtained from the plants of Heterosmilax for the first time.

  12. Immunomodulatory constituents from an ascomycete, Microascus tardifaciens.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, H; Fujimaki, T; Okuyama, E; Yamazaki, M

    1999-10-01

    Fractionation guided by the immunosuppressive activity of the defatted AcOEt extract of an Ascomycete, Microascus tardifaciens, afforded eight constituents, questin (emodin 8-O-methylether) (1), rubrocristin (2), 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylphthalide (3), cladosporin (asperentin) (4), cladosporin 8-O-methylether (5), tradioxopiperazine A [cyclo-L-alanyl-5-isopentenyl-2-(1',1'-dimethylallyl)-L-tryptophan] (6), tradioxopiperazine B [cyclo-L-alanyl-7-isopentenyl-2-(1',1'-dimethylallyl)-L-tryptophan] (7), and asperflavin (8), among which 6 and 7 were new compounds. Compounds 1 and 2 showed considerably high immunosuppressive activity, 6 was moderate and, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8 showed low activity.

  13. Two new constituents from Erigeron breviscapus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, De-Quan

    2013-09-01

    Two novel constituents, named erigeronones A (1) and B (2), together with apigenin-7-O-β-galacturonide (3), quercetin-7-O-β-glucuronide (4), quercetin-3-O-β-galacturonide (5), and eriodictyol-7-O-β-glucuronide (6), were isolated from the whole grass of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand.-Mazz (Compositae). Their structures were established on the basis of spectral analyses and comparison with the literature data. Both new compounds 1 and 2 possess a γ-pyrone moiety that is rare in nature. Compound 1 showed significant protective effect on H2O2-injured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

  14. Mutations of Electrons as Constituents of Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, R. B.

    1997-04-01

    Conjecture (C) 1: Coulomb-charged constituents of electron (e) are attracted to its barycentre by lepto-strong force F=K/r^2+f; f is stably perturbative for r < the "radius" of e. An exterior magnetic field (MF) with gradient (G) secularly perturbs the eccentricities but not the energies of the constituents' orbits, changing the spin (s) and magnetic moment (μ) of e. (C) 2: F coheres two or more e's dynamically with r approximately equal to the "radius" of e. The resulting MF and G at each e oscillate. Stable values of s and μ result for each e which differs from the atomic values. Binding energies change the masses of the e's. A hadron results. (C) 3: An e similarly may bind to a proton to form a Rutherford- Santilli neutron. The proton is negligibly mutated.(References: H. Dehmelt, Science 247, 539 (1990); T.E. Phipps, Jr., Heretical Verities (Classic Non-fiction Library, Urbana, 1986); R.M. Santilli, Hadronic Mechanics (Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev, 1995 and 1996), 3 volumes.)

  15. Advanced Constituents and Processes for Ceramic Composite Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Bhatt, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    The successful replacement of metal alloys by ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in hot-section engine components will depend strongly on optimizing the processes and properties of the CMC microstructural constituents so that they can synergistically provide the total CMC system with improved temperature capability and with the key properties required by the components for long-term structural service. This presentation provides the results of recent activities at NASA aimed at developing advanced silicon carbide (Sic) fiber-reinforced hybrid Sic matrix composite systems that can operate under mechanical loading and oxidizing conditions for hundreds of hours at 2400 and 2600 F, temperatures well above current metal capability. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (-30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive engine environments. It is shown that the improved temperature capability of the SiC/SiC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays high thermal stability, creep resistance, rupture resistance, and thermal conductivity, and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for added environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics. Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to form the initial portion of the hybrid Sic matrix. Because of its high creep resistance and thermal conductivity, the CVI Sic matrix is a required base constituent for all the high temperature SiC/SiC systems. By subsequently thermo- mechanical-treating the CMC preform, which consists of the S ylramic-iBN fibers and CVI Sic matrix, process-related defects in the matrix are removed, further improving matrix and CMC creep resistance and conductivity.

  16. Coalition, partnership, and constituency building by a state public health agency: a retrospective.

    PubMed

    Kimbrell, J D

    2000-03-01

    This article is a retrospective that traces the development of an evolutionary process for a state health agency in addressing the challenge of implementing core public health functions and the provision of essential services. Coalition, partnership, and constituency building were critical elements in the process. Various initiatives are described and their importance as building blocks to a larger process of organizational change is explained. Key lessons from the process are outlined.

  17. Antimelanoma and Antityrosinase from Alpinia galangal Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Po-Len; Lin, Li-Ching; Chen, Yen-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Two compounds, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,4,6-heptatrien-3-one (BHPHTO) and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) they have been isolated from the rhizomes of Alpinia galangal, and the structures of both pure constituents were determined using spectroscopic analyses. The study examined the bioeffectivenesses of the two compounds on the human melanoma A2058 and showed that significantly inhibited the proliferation of melanoma cells in the cell viability assay. This research was also taken on the tests to B16-F10 cell line and showed minor inhibitory consequences of cellular tyrosinase activities and melanin contents. Our results revealed the anticancer effects of A. galangal compounds, and therefore, the target compounds could be potentially applied in the therapeutic application and the food industry. PMID:24027439

  18. Interrelation of exhaust-gas constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1938-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the interrelation of the constituents of the exhaust gases of internal-combustion engines and the effect of engine performance on these relations. Six single-cylinder, liquid-cooled tests engines and one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled engine were tested. Various types of combustion chambers were used and the engines were operated at compression ratios from 5.1 to 7.0 using spark ignition and from 13.5 to 15.6 using compression ignition. The investigation covered a range of engine speeds from 1,500 to 2,100 r.p.m. The fuels used were two grades of aviation gasoline, auto diesel fuel, and laboratory diesel fuel. Power, friction, and fuel-consumption data were obtained from the single-cylinder engines at the same time that the exhaust-gas samples were collected.

  19. Stable heavy pentaquarks in constituent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.-M.; Valcarce, A.; Vijande, J.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that standard constituent quark models produce (c bar cqqq) hidden-charm pentaquarks, where c denotes the charmed quark and q a light quark, which lie below the lowest threshold for spontaneous dissociation and thus are stable in the limit where the internal c bar c annihilation is neglected. The binding is a cooperative effect of the chromoelectric and chromomagnetic components of the interaction, and it disappears in the static limit with a pure chromoelectric potential. Their wave function contains color sextet and color octet configurations for the subsystems and can hardly be reduced to a molecular state made of two interacting hadrons. These pentaquark states could be searched for in the experiments having discovered or confirmed the hidden-charm meson and baryon resonances.

  20. Regional differences in constituents of gall stones.

    PubMed

    Ashok, M; Nageshwar Reddy, D; Jayanthi, V; Kalkura, S N; Vijayan, V; Gokulakrishnan, S; Nair, K G M

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pigment and mixed gall stone formation remains elusive. The elemental constituents of gall stones from southern states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Karnataka have been characterized. Our aim was to determine the elemental concentration of representative samples of pigment, mixed and cholesterol gall stones from Andhra Pradesh using proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) using a 3 MV horizontal pelletron accelerator. Pigment gall stones had significantly high concentrations of copper, iron and lead; chromium was absent. Except for iron all these elements were significantly low in cholesterol gall stones and intermediate levels were seen in mixed gall stones. Highest concentrations of chromium was seen in cholesterol and titanium in mixed gall stones respectively; latter similar to other southern states. Arsenic was distinctly absent in cholesterol and mixed gall stones. The study has identified differences in elemental components of the gall stones from Andhra Pradesh.

  1. [Study on Chemical Constituents of Peanut Hull].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ai-xue; Sun, Yun; Qian, Shao-xiang; Rao, Gao-xiong

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of peanut hull. Several chromatography methods such as silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 combined with recrystallization were applied to isolate the compounds. Based on spectrum technologies (MS,1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and physico-chemical methods, structures of isolated compounds were identified. Twelve compounds were isolated and elucidated as luteolin (1), diosmetin (2), 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-8-prenyflavone (3),5,7,3'-trihydroxy-4'- methoxy-8-prenylflavone(4), eriodicrtyol (5), racemoflavone (6), hydnocarpin (7), 5,7-dihydroxy chromone (8), 5-hydroxy-chromone- 7-O-β-D-glucoside (9), ferulic acid (10), β-sitosterol (11) and daucosterol(12). Except compounds 1, 5 and 8, all compounds are obtained from peanut hull for the first time.

  2. [Studies on chemical constituents of Illicium simonsii].

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiao-Ya; Guo, Miao-Ru; Zhao, Cong-Wei; Li, Shuai

    2008-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the active fractions against HIV in vitro, a crude ethanolic extract of Illicium simonsii. The compounds were isolated with column chromatography methods. MS and NMR spectroscopic methods were used to determine the structures of the compounds. Seven compounds were isolated from the active fractions against HIV in vitro of the 90% ethanol extract and their structures were elucidated as (+)-catechin (1), (-)-epicatechin (2), (+)-catechin 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (3), kaempferol 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (4), quercetin 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (5), erigeside C (6) and daucosterol (7). Seven compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time, but none of them exhibited active against HIV in vitro. Compounds 3 and 6 were isolated from this genus for the first time.

  3. Phenolic constituents of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels.

    PubMed

    Maranz, Steven; Wiesman, Zeev; Garti, Nissim

    2003-10-08

    Analysis of the phenolic constituents of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels by LC-MS revealed eight catechin compounds-gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate-as well as quercetin and trans-cinnamic acid. The mean kernel content of the eight catechin compounds was 4000 ppm (0.4% of kernel dry weight), with a 2100-9500 ppm range. Comparison of the profiles of the six major catechins from 40 Vitellaria provenances from 10 African countries showed that the relative proportions of these compounds varied from region to region. Gallic acid was the major phenolic compound, comprising an average of 27% of the measured total phenols and exceeding 70% in some populations. Colorimetric analysis (101 samples) of total polyphenols extracted from shea butter into hexane gave an average of 97 ppm, with the values for different provenances varying between 62 and 135 ppm of total polyphenols.

  4. Deicing chemicals as source of constituents of highway runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolved major and trace constituents of deicing chemicals as a source of constituents in highway runoff must be quantified for interpretive studies of highway runoff and its effects on surface water and groundwater. Dissolved constituents of the deicing chemicals-sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and premix (a mixture of sodium and calcium chloride)-were determined by analysis of salt solutions created in the laboratory and are presented as mass ratios to chloride. Deicing chemical samples studied are about 98 and 97 percent pure sodium chloride and calcium chloride, respectively: however, each has a distinct major and trace ion constituent signature. The greatest impurity in sodium chloride road sail samples was sulfate, followed by calcium, potassium, bromide, vanadium, magnesium, fluoride, and other constituents with a ratio to chloride of less than 0.0001 by mass. The greatest impurity in the calcium chloride road salt samples was sodium, followed by potassium, sulfate, bromide, silica, fluoride. strontium, magnesium, and other constituents with a ratio to chloride of less than 0.0001 by mass. Major constituents of deicing chemicals in highway runoff may account for a substantial source of annual chemical loads. Comparison of estimated annual loads and first flush concentrations of deicing chemical constituents in highway runoff with those reported in the literature indicate that although deicing chemicals are not a primary source of trace constituents, they are not a trivial source, either. Therefore, deicing chemicals should be considered as a source of many major and trace constituents in highway and urban runoff.

  5. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    forms for the total constituent molar density rate evolution; indeed, examination of these gain/loss rates shows that they also have a good quasi-steady behavior with a functional form resembling that of the constituent rate. This finding highlights the fact that the fitting technique provides a methodology that can be repeatedly used to obtain an accurate representation of full or skeletal kinetic models. Assuming success with the modified reduced model, the advantage of the modeling approach is clear. Because this model is based on the Nc rate rather than on that of individual heavy species, even if the number of species increases with increased carbon number in the alkane group, providing that the quasi-steady rate aspect persists, then extension of this model to higher alkanes should be conceptually straightforward, although it remains to be seen if the functional fits would remain valid or would require reconstruction.

  6. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  7. Online Information About Harmful Tobacco Constituents: A Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Katherine A; Bernat, Jennifer K; Keely O'Brien, Erin; Delahanty, Janine C

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco products and smoke contain more than 7000 chemicals (ie, constituents). Research shows that consumers have poor understanding of tobacco constituents and find communication about them to be confusing. The current content analysis describes how information is communicated about tobacco constituents online in terms of source, target audience, and message. A search was conducted in September 2015 using tobacco constituent and tobacco terms and identified 226 relevant Web sites for coding. Web sites were coded for type, target audience, reading level, constituent information, type of tobacco product, health effects, and emotional valence by two coders who independently coded half of the sample. There was a 20% overlap to assess interrater reliability, which was high (κ = .83, p < .001). The mean reading grade level of information online was 8.2 (SD = 2.8) with 81.7% of Web sites above the sixth grade reading level. Nearly all Web sites presented information in a qualitative narrative format (93%) and almost half (48.2%) presented information in a quantitative format. Nicotine (59.3%) and nitrosamines (28.8%) were the mostly frequently mentioned tobacco constituents. Cancer was the most frequently mentioned health effect (51.3%). Nearly a quarter (23%) of the Web sites did not explicitly state that tobacco constituents or tobacco products are associated with health effects. Large gaps exist in online information about tobacco constituents including incomplete information about tobacco constituent-related health effects and limited information about tobacco products other than cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. This study highlights opportunities to improve the content and presentation of information related to tobacco constituents. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is required to publicly display a list of tobacco constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke by brand. However, little is known about tobacco constituent information available to the

  8. Quantum key management

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  9. [Chemical constituents of leaves of Psidium guajava].

    PubMed

    Shao, Meng; Wang, Ying; Jian, Yu-Qing; Sun, Xue-Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-03-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the 95% ethanol extract of Psidium guajava. Compounds were separated by using a combination of various chromatographic methods including silica gel, D101 macroporous resin, ODS, Sephadex LH-20 and preparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by physicochemical properties and spectral data Eighteen compounds were isolated and identified as (+) -globulol (1), clovane-2beta, 9alpha-diol (2), 2beta-acetoxyclovan-9alpha-ol (3), (+) -caryolane-1 ,9beta-diol (4), ent-T-muurolol (5), clov-2-ene-9alpha-ol (6), isophytol (7), tamarixetin (8), gossypetin (9), quercetin (10), kaempferol (11), guajaverin (12), avicularin (13), chrysin 6-C-glucoside (14), 3'-O-methyl-3, 4-methylenedioxyellagic acid 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (15), p-hydroxy-benzoic acid (16), guavinoside A (17) and guavinoside B (18). Compounds 2-9 and 14-16 were isolated from this plant for the first time. The ethanol extract showed 61.3% inhibition against the proliferation of colon cancer cell line SW480.

  10. Rice bran constituents: immunomodulatory and therapeutic activities.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Young; Lee, Kwang-Won; Choi, Hee-Don

    2017-03-22

    Rice bran, one of the most abundant and valuable byproducts produced during the rice milling process, is of steadily growing interest in recent years due to its potential health benefits. Evidence is rapidly accumulating for the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals. However, the potential benefits of rice bran are found in several of its bioactive ingredients including oils, polysaccharides, proteins, and micronutrients. In addition, a significant advantage of rice bran is that it contains more than 100 antioxidants and several categories of bioactive phytonutrients, such as polyphenols, phytosterols, tocotrienols, γ-oryzanol, B vitamins, minerals, and trace minerals. As an immunomodulator, rice bran has beneficial constituents such as polysaccharides, proteins, and oils. Numerous studies also reported that potent antioxidants in rice bran included immune system enhancing compounds, such as phytosterols, polysaccharides, minerals and trace minerals including magnesium, selenium, zinc, vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids and several other phytonutrients. We believe that this review will be a valuable resource for more studies on rice barn as a dietary source.

  11. [Chemical constituents from roots of Datura metel].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-You; Yang, Chun-Li; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2018-04-01

    The chemical constituents from the n-butanol fraction of the 70% ethanol extract of Datura metel roots were separated by silica gel and ODS chromatogram columns as well as preparative HPLC. On the basis of spectral data analysis, their structures were elucidated. Twenty-one compounds were obtained and their structures were identified as citroside A (1), coniferin (2), paeoniflorin (3), (6R,7E,9R)-9-hydroxy-4,7-megastigmadien-3-one 9-O-[α-L-arabin-opyranosyl-(l→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside] (4), (1R,7R,10R,11R)-12-hydroxyl anhuienosol (5), kaurane acid glycoside A (6), ent-2-oxo-15,16-dihydroxypimar-8(14)-en-16-O-β-glucopyranoside (7), ginsenoside Rg₁(8), ginsenoside Re (9), notoginsenosides R₁(10), N-butyl-O-β-D-fructofuranoside (11), salidroside (12), hexyl β-sophoroside (13), 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenol 1-glucoside (14), benzyl-O-β-D-xylopyranoxyl(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (15), (Z)-3-hexenyl-O-α-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (16), N-[2-(3,4-dihydro-xyphenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-3-(4-methoxyphenyl) prop-2-enamide (17), cannabisin D (18), cannabisin E (19), melongenamide B (20), paprazine (21). Compounds 2-17 and 20-21 were isolated from the Solanaceae family for the first time. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A.; Wagner, William R.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices. PMID:28218279

  13. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A; Wagner, William R; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices.

  14. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A.; Wagner, William R.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices.

  15. Nucleon Spin Structure and Constituent Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Qing, Di; Chen, Xiang-Song; Goldman, T.

    1998-10-01

    The success of the constituent quark model has been challenged by the nucleon spin structure discovered in polarized deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We find that this puzzle is due to misidentifying the axial charge Δ q and the nonrelativistic quark spin. The space component of the quark axial vector current operator, int d^3x\\overlineψ γγ_5ψ =2s_q, defines the quark spin operator s_q, including not only the Pauli spin operator, which corresponds to the nonrelativistic quark spin s_q^NR, but also relativistic and quark-antiquark pair creation (annihilation) correction terms. Both of these suppress the quark spin contribution for a nucleon at rest due to transverse motion of the quark. The relativistic quark orbital angular momentum operator L_q=int d^3x\\overlineψ x× fracpartial iψ includes L^NRq and two correction terms which are exactly the same as those of sq but of opposite sign. They provide compensation which keeps the total nucleon spin frac 12 untouched no matter what kind of quark model is used. Nucleon spin can be decomposed either as s_q+Lq or as s_q^NR+L_q^NR. (The gluon degree of freedom is assumed to be frozen in the nucleon ground state at low energy scales.) The tensor charge δ q=int d^3x\\overlineψ Σ ψ of the nucleon is predicted to have similar but smaller corrections.

  16. Assembly constraints drive co-evolution among ribosomal constituents.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Akashi, Hiroshi; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-06-23

    Ribosome biogenesis, a central and essential cellular process, occurs through sequential association and mutual co-folding of protein-RNA constituents in a well-defined assembly pathway. Here, we construct a network of co-evolving nucleotide/amino acid residues within the ribosome and demonstrate that assembly constraints are strong predictors of co-evolutionary patterns. Predictors of co-evolution include a wide spectrum of structural reconstitution events, such as cooperativity phenomenon, protein-induced rRNA reconstitutions, molecular packing of different rRNA domains, protein-rRNA recognition, etc. A correlation between folding rate of small globular proteins and their topological features is known. We have introduced an analogous topological characteristic for co-evolutionary network of ribosome, which allows us to differentiate between rRNA regions subjected to rapid reconstitutions from those hindered by kinetic traps. Furthermore, co-evolutionary patterns provide a biological basis for deleterious mutation sites and further allow prediction of potential antibiotic targeting sites. Understanding assembly pathways of multicomponent macromolecules remains a key challenge in biophysics. Our study provides a 'proof of concept' that directly relates co-evolution to biophysical interactions during multicomponent assembly and suggests predictive power to identify candidates for critical functional interactions as well as for assembly-blocking antibiotic target sites. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Public understanding of cigarette smoke constituents: three US surveys

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Noel T; Morgan, Jennifer C; Baig, Sabeeh A; Mendel, Jennifer R; Boynton, Marcella H; Pepper, Jessica K; Byron, M Justin; Noar, Seth M; Agans, Robert P; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Tobacco Control Act requires public disclosure of information about toxic constituents in cigarette smoke. To inform these efforts, we studied public understanding of cigarette smoke constituents. Methods We conducted phone surveys with national probability samples of adolescents (n=1125) and adults (n=5014) and an internet survey with a convenience sample of adults (n=4137), all in the USA. We assessed understanding of cigarette smoke constituents in general and of 24 specific constituents. Results Respondents commonly and incorrectly believed that harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke mostly originate in additives introduced by cigarette manufacturers (43–72%). Almost all participants had heard that nicotine is in cigarette smoke, and many had also heard about carbon monoxide, ammonia, arsenic and formaldehyde. Less than one-quarter had heard of most other listed constituents being in cigarette smoke. Constituents most likely to discourage respondents from wanting to smoke were ammonia, arsenic, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, lead and uranium. Respondents more often reported being discouraged by constituents that they had heard are in cigarette smoke (all p<0.05). Constituents with names that started with a number or ended in ‘ene’ or ‘ine’ were less likely to discourage people from wanting to smoke (all p<0.05). Discussion Many people were unaware that burning the cigarette is the primary source of toxic constituents in cigarette smoke. Constituents that may most discourage cigarette smoking have familiar names, like arsenic and formaldehyde and do not start with a number or end in ene/ine. Our findings may help campaign designers develop constituent messages that discourage smoking. PMID:27924009

  18. Results of the U.S. Geological Survey's Analytical Evaluation Program for standard reference samples: T-155 (trace constituents), M-148 (major constituents), N-59 (nutrient constituents), N-60 (nutrient constituents), P-31 (low ionic strength constituents), GWT-4 (ground-water trace constituents) and Hg-27 (Mercury) distributed in September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Jerry W.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for seven standard reference samples -- T-155 (trace constituents), M-148 (major constituents), N-59 (nutrient constituents), N-60 (nutrient constituents), P-31 (low ionic strength constituents), GWT-4 (ground-water trace constituents), and Hg- 27 (mercury) -- which were distributed in September 1998 to 162 laboratories enrolled in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 136 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the seven reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the seven standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  19. Public Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  20. CONSTITUENCY IN A SYSTEMIC DESCRIPTION OF THE ENGLISH CLAUSE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUDSON, R.A.

    TWO WAYS OF DESCRIBING CLAUSES IN ENGLISH ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS PAPER. THE FIRST, TERMED THE "FEW-IC'S" APPROACH, IS A SEGMENTATION OF THE CLAUSE INTO A SMALL NUMBER OF IMMEDIATE CONSTITUENTS WHICH REQUIRE A LARGE NUMBER OF FURTHER SEGMENTATIONS BEFORE THE ULTIMATE CONSTITUENTS ARE REACHED. THE SECOND, "MANY-IC'S" APPROACH, IS A SEGMENTATION INTO…

  1. Constituent quark masses in Poincaré-invariant quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Viktor; Haurysh, Vadzim

    2017-12-01

    The masses of the quarks in the Poincaré-invariant quantum mechanics are the constituent masses. Even in this framework it is possible to obtain an estimate of the constituent quark masses from the Ward identity for the axial current ant the current quark masses.

  2. Keys to Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Up ahead, a foreboding wooden door showing wear from passage of earlier travelers is spotted. As the old porch light emits a pale yellow glow, a key ring emerges from deep inside the coat pocket. Searching for just the right key, the voyager settles on one that also shows age. As the key enters its receptacle and begins to turn, a clicking noise…

  3. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force.…

  4. Antioxidant activity of food constituents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gülçin, İlhami

    2012-03-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in research into the role of plant-derived antioxidants in food and human health. The beneficial influence of many foodstuffs and beverages including fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, and cacao on human health has been recently recognized to originate from their antioxidant activity. For this purpose, the most commonly methods used in vitro determination of antioxidant capacity of food constituents are reviewed and presented. Also, the general chemistry underlying the assays in the present paper was clarified. Hence, this overview provides a basis and rationale for developing standardized antioxidant capacity methods for the food, nutraceutical, and dietary supplement industries. In addition, the most important advantages and shortcomings of each method were detected and highlighted. The chemical principles of these methods are outlined and critically discussed. The chemical principles of methods of 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) radical (ABTS(·+)) scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(·)) radical scavenging, Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) transformation assay, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, cupric ions (Cu(2+)) reducing power assay (Cuprac), Folin-Ciocalteu reducing capacity (FCR assay), peroxyl radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical (O (2) (·-)) scavenging, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging, hydroxyl radical (OH(·)) scavenging, singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quenching assay and nitric oxide radical (NO(·)) scavenging assay are outlined and critically discussed. Also, the general antioxidant aspects of main food components were discussed by a number of methods which are currently used for detection of antioxidant properties food components. This review consists of two main sections. The first section is devoted to main components in the foodstuffs and beverages. The second general section is some definitions of the main antioxidant methods commonly used for determination of

  5. Polarized structure functions in a constituent quark scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopetta, Sergio; Vento, Vicente; Traini, Marco

    1998-12-01

    Using a simple picture of the constituent quark as a composite system of point-like partons, we construct the polarized parton distributions by a convolution between constituent quark momentum distributions and constituent quark structure functions. Using unpolarized data to fix the parameters we achieve good agreement with the polarization experiments for the proton, while not so for the neutron. By relaxing our assumptions for the sea distributions, we define new quark functions for the polarized case, which reproduce well the proton data and are in better agreement with the neutron data. When our results are compared with similar calculations using non-composite constituent quarks the accord with the experiments of the present scheme is impressive. We conclude that, also in the polarized case, DIS data are consistent with a low energy scenario dominated by composite constituents of the nucleon.

  6. Indicator bacteria and associated water quality constituents in stormwater and snowmelt from four urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galfi, H.; Österlund, H.; Marsalek, J.; Viklander, M.

    2016-08-01

    Four indicator bacteria were measured in association with physico-chemical constituents and selected inorganics during rainfall, baseflow and snowmelt periods in storm sewers of four urban catchments in a northern Swedish city. The variation patterns of coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Clostridium perfringens concentrations were assessed in manually collected grab samples together with those of phosphorus, nitrogen, solids, and readings of pH, turbidity, water conductivity, temperature and flow rates to examine whether these constituents could serve as potential indicators of bacteria sources. A similar analysis was applied to variation patterns of eight selected inorganics typical for baseflow and stormwater runoff to test the feasibility of using these inorganics to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources of inflow into storm sewers. The monitored catchments varied in size, the degree of development, and land use. Catchment and season (i.e., rainy or snowmelt periods) specific variations were investigated for sets of individual stormwater samples by the principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the constituents with variation patterns similar to those of indicator bacteria, and to exclude the constituents with less similarity. In the reduced data set, the similarities were quantified by the clustering correlation analysis. Finally, the positive/negative relationships found between indicator bacteria and the identified associated constituent groups were described by multilinear regressions. In the order of decreasing concentrations, coliforms, E. coli and enterococci were found in the highest mean concentrations during both rainfall and snowmelt generated runoff. Compared to dry weather baseflow, concentrations of these three indicators in stormwater were 10 (snowmelt runoff) to 102 (rain runoff) times higher. C. perfringens mean concentrations were practically constant regardless of the season and catchment. The type and number of

  7. Simple Web-based interactive key development software (WEBiKEY) and an example key for Kuruna (Poaceae: Bambusoideae).

    PubMed

    Attigala, Lakshmi; De Silva, Nuwan I; Clark, Lynn G

    2016-04-01

    Programs that are user-friendly and freely available for developing Web-based interactive keys are scarce and most of the well-structured applications are relatively expensive. WEBiKEY was developed to enable researchers to easily develop their own Web-based interactive keys with fewer resources. A Web-based multiaccess identification tool (WEBiKEY) was developed that uses freely available Microsoft ASP.NET technologies and an SQL Server database for Windows-based hosting environments. WEBiKEY was tested for its usability with a sample data set, the temperate woody bamboo genus Kuruna (Poaceae). WEBiKEY is freely available to the public and can be used to develop Web-based interactive keys for any group of species. The interactive key we developed for Kuruna using WEBiKEY enables users to visually inspect characteristics of Kuruna and identify an unknown specimen as one of seven possible species in the genus.

  8. Observation of Atmospheric Constituents From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, J. P.

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere from space is a growing research field. Surprisingly but for good physical reasons, the mesosphere and stratosphere are easier to probe from space than the troposphere. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) and SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) are related European instruments, which were proposed and been designed to measure atmospheric constituents (gases, aerosols and clouds) by passive remote sensing of the up-welling solar radiation leaving atmosphere. GOME is a smaller version of SCIAMACHY and was launched as part of the core payload of the second European research satellite (ERS-2) on the 20th April 1995. GOME comprises four spectral channels and measures simultaneously the earthshine radiance or solar extra terrestrial irradiance between 240 and 790 nm. Inversion of GOME measurements using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) yields the total column of trace gases (e.g. O3, NO2, HCHO, BrO and OClO). Application of the FURM (Full Retrieval Method) enables the profiles of O3 to be retrieved. One of the important achievements of GOME has been the separation of tropopsheirc columns of trace gases using TEM (Tropospheric Excess Method). SCIAMACHY has been developed as Germa n, Dutch and Belgian contribution to ENVISAT. It has significantly enhanced capability compared to GOME, measuring a larger spectral range, 220-2380 nm, and observing in alternate nadir and limb modes as well as solar and lunar occultation. ENVISAT is to be launched into a sun synchronous polar orbit, having an equator crossing time of 10.00 a.m. at the beginning of March 2002. SCIAMACHY is thereby able to measure many more species and vertical profiles than GOME. This facilitates improved tropospheric retrievals. Finally GeoTROPE (Geostationary TROPospheric Explorer) is a new mission, which is proposed for launch within the ESA Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission. It comprises two national

  9. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  10. [Studies on chemical constituents from seeds of Euryale ferox].

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-lin; Zhang, Ya-qiong; Xie, Xiao-yan; Che, Yan-yun

    2014-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the seeds of Euryale ferox. The chemical constituents were isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex LH-20 and their structures were identified by physico-chemical and spectral analysis. Seven compounds were purified from the 95% ethanol extract. These constituents were elucidated as protocatechuic acid (1), gallic acid (2), gallic acid ethyl ester(3),5 ,7-dihydroxychromone(4), β-sitosterol(5), daucosterol(6), and 5,7-dihydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone(7), respectively. All compounds are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  11. Odor-active constituents of Cedrus atlantica wood essential oil.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Ayaka; Tommis, Basma; Belhassen, Emilie; Satrani, Badr; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    The main odorant constituents of Cedrus atlantica essential oil were characterized by GC-Olfactometry (GC-O), using the Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis (AEDA) methodology with 12 panelists. The two most potent odor-active constituents were vestitenone and 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene. The identification of the odorants was realized by a detailed fractionation of the essential oil by liquid-liquid basic extraction, distillation and column chromatography, followed by the GC-MS and GC-O analyses of some fractions, and the synthesis of some non-commercial reference constituents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Constituents and functional implications of the rat default mode network.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Ming; Liang, Xia; Gu, Hong; Brynildsen, Julia K; Stark, Jennifer A; Ash, Jessica A; Lin, Ching-Po; Lu, Hanbing; Rapp, Peter R; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2016-08-02

    The default mode network (DMN) has been suggested to support a variety of self-referential functions in humans and has been fractionated into subsystems based on distinct responses to cognitive tasks and functional connectivity architecture. Such subsystems are thought to reflect functional hierarchy and segregation within the network. Because preclinical models can inform translational studies of neuropsychiatric disorders, partitioning of the DMN in nonhuman species, which has previously not been reported, may inform both physiology and pathophysiology of the human DMN. In this study, we sought to identify constituents of the rat DMN using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging. After identifying DMN using a group-level independent-component analysis on the rs-fMRI data, modularity analyses fractionated the DMN into an anterior and a posterior subsystem, which were further segregated into five modules. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography demonstrates a close relationship between fiber density and the functional connectivity between DMN regions, and provides anatomical evidence to support the detected DMN subsystems. Finally, distinct modulation was seen within and between these DMN subcomponents using a neurocognitive aging model. Taken together, these results suggest that, like the human DMN, the rat DMN can be partitioned into several subcomponents that may support distinct functions. These data encourage further investigation into the neurobiological mechanisms of DMN processing in preclinical models of both normal and disease states.

  13. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  14. Fatty Acid Composition and Volatile Constituents of Protaetia brevitarsis Larvae.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyelim; Youn, Kumju; Kim, Minji; Yun, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2013-06-01

    A total of 48 different volatile oils were identified form P. brevitarsis larvae by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Acids (48.67%) were detected as the major group in P. brevitarsis larvae comprising the largest proportion of the volatile compounds, followed by esters (19.84%), hydrocarbons (18.90%), alcohols (8.37%), miscellaneous (1.71%), aldehydes (1.35%) and terpenes (1.16%). The major volatile constituents were 9-hexadecenoic acid (16.75%), 6-octadecenoic acid (14.88%) and n-hexadecanoic acid (11.06%). The composition of fatty acid was also determined by GC analysis and 16 fatty acids were identified. The predominant fatty acids were oleic acid (C18:1, 64.24%) followed by palmitic acid (C16:0, 15.89%), palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 10.43%) and linoleic acid (C18:2, 4.69%) constituting more than 95% of total fatty acids. The distinguished characteristic of the fatty acid profile of P. brevitarsis larvae was the high proportion of unsaturated fatty acid (80.54% of total fatty acids) versus saturated fatty acids (19.46% of total fatty acids). Furthermore, small but significant amounts of linoleic, linolenic and γ-linolenic acids bestow P. brevitarsis larvae with considerable nutritional value. The novel findings of the present study provide a scientific basis for the comprehensive utilization of the insect as a nutritionally promising food source and a possibility for more effective utilization.

  15. Antioxidant activities of ginger extract and its constituents toward lipids.

    PubMed

    Si, Wenhui; Chen, Yan Ping; Zhang, Jianhao; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Chung, Hau Yin

    2018-01-15

    Lipid oxidation-a major cause of food product deterioration-necessitates the use of food additives to inhibit food oxidation. Ginger extract (GE) has been reported to possess antioxidant properties. However, components isolated from ginger have been rarely reported to inhibit fat oxidation. Herein, antioxidant properties of GE and four pure components derived from it (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogaol) were examined and their properties were compared to those of butylated hydroxytoluene. GE and the constituent components exhibited antioxidant properties that might be attributed to their hydroxyl groups and suitable solubilizing side chains. 6-Shogaol and 10-gingerol exhibited higher activity at 60°C than 6-gingerol and 8-gingerol. Low antioxidant activity was detected at high temperatures (120/180°C). Overall, GE displayed the strongest dose-dependent antioxidant properties, especially at high temperatures, thereby demonstrating that GE can be employed as a natural antioxidant in lipid-containing processed foods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tabanone a new phytotoxic constituent of cogongrass (Imperta culindrica)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.] is a troublesome invasive weedy species with reported allelopathic properties. The phytotoxicity of different constituents isolated from roots and aerial parts of this species was evaluated on Lactuca sativa and Agrostis stolonifera. No significant phytot...

  17. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Testing for Toxic Constituents of Comfrey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the possibilities of toxins present in medicinal herbs. Describes an experiment in which toxic constituents can be selectively detected by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. (TW)

  18. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora (II)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Tao, Liang

    2010-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. seven compounds were isolated and identified as aucubin (1), catalpol (2), acteoside (3), martynoside (4), ursolicacid (5), daucosterol (6), beta-sitosterol-3-0-beta-D-(6'-0-palmitate) glucopyranosisde (7). All these compounds are obtained from Buddleja albiflora for the first time.

  19. [Study on the chemical constituents of Rhizoma Cyperi].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Xia, Hou-Lin; Huang, Li-Hua; Chen, Dan-Dan; Chen, Jin-Yu; Weng, Hai-Ting

    2008-07-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Rhizoma Cyperi. The constituents were separated and purified by silica gel column chromatography, their structures were identified on the basis of physico-chemical properties and spectral data. Six compounds were isolated and identified as physicion (1), hexadecanoic acid (2), beta-sitosterol (3), stigmasterol (4), catenarin (5), daucosterol (6). Compounds 1, 4, 5 were isolated from this plant for the first fime.

  20. [Studies on chemical constituents of aerial parts of Ammopiptanthus mongolicus].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Shi-Zhong; Tu, Peng-Fei; Lei, Lian-Di

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of the aerial parts of Ammopiptanthus mongolicus. The chemical constituents were isolated by various column chromatographic methods. The structures were identified by spectral data. Ten compounds were isolated and identified as m-hydroxybenzoic acid (1), 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethanone (2), beta-sitosterol (3), (-)-syringaresinol (4), (+)-lariciresinol (5), blumenol A (6), blumenol B (7), beta-daucosterol (8), coniferin (9), syringin (10). The ten compounds were obtained from the genus Ammopiptanthus for the first time.

  1. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Gueldenstaedtia stenophylla].

    PubMed

    Wei, You-xia; Chen, Li; Wang, Jun-xian

    2007-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Gueldenstaeditia stenophylla. The constituents were isolated by alcohol extraction, column chromatography on silica gel. Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Six compounds were obtained, and five of them were identified as n-hexadecanioc acid (I), beta-sitosterol (II), daucosterol (III), apigenin (IV), D-fructose (VI). Compound V was being determined. Five compounds are isolated from Gueldenstaedtia stenophylla and compounds I, III are extracted from Gueldenstaedtia Fisch for the first time.

  2. How close are countries of the WHO European Region to achieving the goal of vaccinating 75% of key risk groups against influenza? Results from national surveys on seasonal influenza vaccination programmes, 2008/2009 to 2014/2015.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Pernille; Mereckiene, Jolita; Cotter, Suzanne; Johansen, Kari; Tsolova, Svetla; Brown, Caroline

    2018-01-25

    Influenza vaccination is recommended especially for persons at risk of complications. In 2003, the World Health Assembly urged Member States (MS) to increase vaccination coverage to 75% among older persons by 2010. To assess progress towards the 2010 vaccination goal and describe seasonal influenza vaccination recommendations in the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region. Data on seasonal influenza vaccine recommendations, dose distribution, and target group coverage were obtained from two sources: European Union and European Economic Area MS data were extracted from influenza vaccination surveys covering seven seasons (2008/2009-2014/2015) published by the Vaccine European New Integrated Collaboration Effort and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. For the remaining WHO European MS, a separate survey on policies and uptake for all seasons (2008/2009-2014/2015) was distributed to national immunization programmes in 2015. Data was available from 49 of 53 MS. All but two had a national influenza vaccination policy. High-income countries distributed considerably higher number of vaccines per capita (median; 139.2 per 1000 population) compared to lower-middle-income countries (median; 6.1 per 1000 population). Most countries recommended vaccination for older persons, individuals with chronic disease, healthcare workers, and pregnant women. Children were included in < 50% of national policies. Only one country reached 75% coverage in older persons (2014/2015), while a number of countries reported declining vaccination uptake. Coverage of target groups was overall low, but with large variations between countries. Vaccination coverage was not monitored for several groups. Despite policy recommendations, influenza vaccination uptake remains suboptimal. Low levels of vaccination is not only a missed opportunity for preventing influenza in vulnerable groups, but could negatively affect pandemic preparedness. Improved understanding of barriers to

  3. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  4. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

    2000-04-25

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam ofmore » light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.« less

  5. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  6. The centipede genus Eupolybothrus Verhoeff, 1907 (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae) in North Africa, a cybertaxonomic revision, with a key to all species in the genus and the first use of DNA barcoding for the group

    PubMed Central

    Stoev, Pavel; Akkari, Nesrine; Zapparoli, Marzio; Porco, David; Enghoff, Henrik; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Georgiev, Teodor; Penev, Lyubomir

    2010-01-01

    interactive key to all valid species of Eupolybothrus is made with DELTA software. PMID:21594115

  7. Neurotoxic effects of gasoline and gasoline constituents.

    PubMed Central

    Burbacher, T M

    1993-01-01

    This overview was developed as part of a symposium on noncancer end points of gasoline and key gasoline components. The specific components included are methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl tertiary butyl ether, tertiary amyl methyl ether, butadiene, benzene, xylene, toluene, methyl alcohol, and ethyl alcohol. The overview focuses on neurotoxic effects related to chronic low-level exposures. A few general conclusions and recommendations can be made based on the results of the studies to date. a) All the compounds reviewed are neuroactive and, as such, should be examined for their neurotoxicity. b) For most of the compounds, there is a substantial margin of safety between the current permissible exposure levels and levels that would be expected to cause overt signs of neurotoxicity in humans. This is not the case for xylene, toluene, and methanol, however, where neurologic effects are observed at or below the current Threshold Limit Value. c) For most of the compounds, the relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle neurotoxic effects has not been studied. Studies therefore should focus on examining the dose-response relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle changes in central nervous system function. PMID:8020437

  8. Replacing American Breakfast Foods with Ready-To-Eat (RTE) Cereals Increases Consumption of Key Food Groups and Nutrients among US Children and Adults: Results of an NHANES Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Colin D; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-09-13

    Replacing the typical American breakfast with ready-to-eat cereals (RTECs) may improve diet quality. Our goal was to assess the impact of RTECs on diet quality measures for different age groups, using substitution modeling. Dietary intakes came from the 2007-2010 National Health and Examination Surveys (NHANES; n = 18,112). All breakfast foods, excluding beverages, were replaced on a per calorie basis, with frequency-weighted and age/race specific RTECs. Model 1 replaced foods with RTECs alone; Model 2 replaced foods with RTECs and milk. Diet quality measures were based on desirable food groups and nutrients, Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 scores, and estimated diet costs. Model 1 diets were significantly higher in whole grains (+84.6%), fiber (+14.3%), vitamin D (+14.0%), iron (+54.5%) and folic acid (+104.6%), as compared to observed diets. Model 2 diets were additionally higher in dairy (+15.8%), calcium (+11.3%) and potassium (+3.95%). In Model 1, added sugar increased (+5.0%), but solid fats declined (-10.9%). Energy from solid fats and added sugars declined (-3.2%) in both models. Model 2 offered higher diet quality (57.1 vs. 54.6, p -value < 0.01) at a lower cost ($6.70 vs. $6.92; p < 0.01), compared to observed diets. Substitution modeling of NHANES data can assess the nutritional and economic impact of dietary guidance.

  9. Replacing American Breakfast Foods with Ready-To-Eat (RTE) Cereals Increases Consumption of Key Food Groups and Nutrients among US Children and Adults: Results of an NHANES Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Colin D.; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Replacing the typical American breakfast with ready-to-eat cereals (RTECs) may improve diet quality. Our goal was to assess the impact of RTECs on diet quality measures for different age groups, using substitution modeling. Dietary intakes came from the 2007–2010 National Health and Examination Surveys (NHANES; n = 18,112). All breakfast foods, excluding beverages, were replaced on a per calorie basis, with frequency-weighted and age/race specific RTECs. Model 1 replaced foods with RTECs alone; Model 2 replaced foods with RTECs and milk. Diet quality measures were based on desirable food groups and nutrients, Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 scores, and estimated diet costs. Model 1 diets were significantly higher in whole grains (+84.6%), fiber (+14.3%), vitamin D (+14.0%), iron (+54.5%) and folic acid (+104.6%), as compared to observed diets. Model 2 diets were additionally higher in dairy (+15.8%), calcium (+11.3%) and potassium (+3.95%). In Model 1, added sugar increased (+5.0%), but solid fats declined (−10.9%). Energy from solid fats and added sugars declined (−3.2%) in both models. Model 2 offered higher diet quality (57.1 vs. 54.6, p-value < 0.01) at a lower cost ($6.70 vs. $6.92; p < 0.01), compared to observed diets. Substitution modeling of NHANES data can assess the nutritional and economic impact of dietary guidance. PMID:28902145

  10. Employee Spotlight: Baris Key

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Baris

    2014-05-29

    Baris Key, an employee at Argonne National Laboratory, discusses the importance of national lab researchers and how they merge basic science, analyze and process in a way that the industry can benefit from.

  11. Employee Spotlight: Baris Key

    ScienceCinema

    Key, Baris

    2018-04-16

    Baris Key, an employee at Argonne National Laboratory, discusses the importance of national lab researchers and how they merge basic science, analyze and process in a way that the industry can benefit from.

  12. Secret Key Crypto Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Guido Marco; Melzani, Filippo

    This chapter presents the algorithm selected in 2001 as the Advanced Encryption Standard. This algorithm is the base for implementing security and privacy based on symmetric key solutions in almost all new applications. Secret key algorithms are used in combination with modes of operation to provide different security properties. The most used modes of operation are presented in this chapter. Finally an overview of the different techniques of software and hardware implementations is given.

  13. Chemical constituents and bioactivities of the plants of genus Flemingia Roxb. et Ait. (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhai, Fengyan; Liu, Zhongdong

    2012-09-01

    The genus Flemingia Roxb. et Ait. (Leguminosae) has been used for disease prevention and therapy in China since ancient times. So the material basis of the pharmacological activity in the genus Flemingia should be clear for how to use this kind of traditional Chinese medicines more reasonably in pharmacology. Therefore, this review gives an account of the current knowledge on the chemical constituents, biological activities and pharmacological properties of the plants of the genus. Several different classes of compounds were previously isolated, which the main groups are flavones, particularly prenylated flavones, and triterpenes accompanied with sterols, anthraquinones, and others. The names and structures of the chemical constituents are given in this review. In addition, the pharmacological effects of the extracts and individual compounds (mainly for flavones) derived from the genus plants have been found, including neuroprotection, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, cytotoxicity, hormone-like effects, antimicrobial activities, and so on.

  14. Criticality in Bulk Metallic Glass Constituent Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Rodrigo Miguel Ojeda; Graedel, T. E.; Pekarskaya, Evgenia; Schroers, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), which readily form amorphous phases during solidification, are increasingly being used in first applications of watch components, electronic casings, and sporting goods. The compositions of BMGs typically include four to six elements. Various political and geological factors have recently led to supply disruptions for several metals, including some present in BMG compositions. In this work, we assess the "criticality" of 22 technologically interesting BMG compositions, compare the results with those for three common engineering alloy groups, and derive recommendations for BMG composition choices from a criticality perspective. The criticality of BMGs is found to be generally much higher compared with those for the established engineering alloys. Therefore, criticality concerns should also be considered in the choice between existing and developing novel BMGs.

  15. Function key and shortcut key use in airway facilities.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-02-01

    This document provides information on the function keys and shortcut keys used by systems in the Federal Aviation Administration : Airway Facilities (AF) work environment. It includes a catalog of the function keys and shortcut keys used by each syst...

  16. Identification of Diet-Derived Constituents as Potent Inhibitors of Intestinal Glucuronidation

    PubMed Central

    Gufford, Brandon T.; Chen, Gang; Lazarus, Philip; Graf, Tyler N.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes within enterocytes constitute a key barrier to xenobiotic entry into the systemic circulation. Furanocoumarins in grapefruit juice are cornerstone examples of diet-derived xenobiotics that perpetrate interactions with drugs via mechanism-based inhibition of intestinal CYP3A4. Relative to intestinal CYP3A4-mediated inhibition, alternate mechanisms underlying dietary substance–drug interactions remain understudied. A working systematic framework was applied to a panel of structurally diverse diet-derived constituents/extracts (n = 15) as inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs) to identify and characterize additional perpetrators of dietary substance–drug interactions. Using a screening assay involving the nonspecific UGT probe substrate 4-methylumbelliferone, human intestinal microsomes, and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing gut-relevant UGT1A isoforms, 14 diet-derived constituents/extracts inhibited UGT activity by >50% in at least one enzyme source, prompting IC50 determination. The IC50 values of 13 constituents/extracts (≤10 μM with at least one enzyme source) were well below intestinal tissue concentrations or concentrations in relevant juices, suggesting that these diet-derived substances can inhibit intestinal UGTs at clinically achievable concentrations. Evaluation of the effect of inhibitor depletion on IC50 determination demonstrated substantial impact (up to 2.8-fold shift) using silybin A and silybin B, two key flavonolignans from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) as exemplar inhibitors, highlighting an important consideration for interpretation of UGT inhibition in vitro. Results from this work will help refine a working systematic framework to identify dietary substance–drug interactions that warrant advanced modeling and simulation to inform clinical assessment. PMID:25008344

  17. On the constituent counting rule for hard exclusive processes involving multi-quark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    At high energy, the cross section at finite scattering angle of a hard exclusive process falls off as a power of the Manderstam variable s. If all involved quark-gluon compositions undergo hard momentum transfers, the fall-off scaling is determined by the underlying valence structures of the initial and final hadrons, known as the constituent counting rule. In spite of the complication due to helicity conservation, it has been argued that when applied to exclusive process with exotic multiquark states, the counting rule is a powerful way to determine the valence degrees of freedom inside hadron exotics. In this work, we demonstrate that for hadrons with hidden flavors, the naive application of the constituent counting rule to exclusive process with hadron exotic multiquark states is problematic, since it is not mandatory for all components to participate in hard scattering at the scale . We illustrate the problems in the viewpoint based on effective field theory. We clarify the misleading results that may be obtained from the constituent counting rule in exclusive processes with exotic candidates such as , , X(3872), etc. Supported in part by DFG and NSFC through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311), Thousand Talents Plan for Young Professionals, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) President’s International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) (2015VMA076), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575110, 11655002), Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai (15DZ2272100, 15ZR1423100), Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF111CJ1), and by Key Laboratory for Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Ministry of Education.

  18. [Key informers. When and How?].

    PubMed

    Martín González, R

    2009-03-01

    When information obtained through duly designed and developed studies is not available, the solution to certain problems that affect the population or that respond to certain questions may be approached by using the information and experience provided by the so-called key informer. The key informer is defined as a person who is in contact with the community or with the problem to be studied, who is considered to have good knowledge of the situation and therefore who is considered an expert. The search for consensus is the basis to obtain information through the key informers. The techniques used have different characteristics based on whether the experts chosen meet together or not, whether they are guided or not, whether they interact with each other or not. These techniques include the survey, the Delphi technique, the nominal group technique, brainwriting, brainstorming, the Phillips 66 technique, the 6-3-5 technique, the community forum and the community impressions technique. Information provided by key informers through the search for consensus is relevant when this is not available or cannot be obtained by other methods. It has permitted the analysis of the existing neurological care model, elaboration of recommendations on visit times for the out-patient neurological care, and the elaboration of guidelines and recommendations for the management of prevalent neurological problems.

  19. Brain correlates of constituent structure in sign language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Antonio; Limousin, Fanny; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pallier, Christophe

    2018-02-15

    During sentence processing, areas of the left superior temporal sulcus, inferior frontal gyrus and left basal ganglia exhibit a systematic increase in brain activity as a function of constituent size, suggesting their involvement in the computation of syntactic and semantic structures. Here, we asked whether these areas play a universal role in language and therefore contribute to the processing of non-spoken sign language. Congenitally deaf adults who acquired French sign language as a first language and written French as a second language were scanned while watching sequences of signs in which the size of syntactic constituents was manipulated. An effect of constituent size was found in the basal ganglia, including the head of the caudate and the putamen. A smaller effect was also detected in temporal and frontal regions previously shown to be sensitive to constituent size in written language in hearing French subjects (Pallier et al., 2011). When the deaf participants read sentences versus word lists, the same network of language areas was observed. While reading and sign language processing yielded identical effects of linguistic structure in the basal ganglia, the effect of structure was stronger in all cortical language areas for written language relative to sign language. Furthermore, cortical activity was partially modulated by age of acquisition and reading proficiency. Our results stress the important role of the basal ganglia, within the language network, in the representation of the constituent structure of language, regardless of the input modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatty Acid Composition and Volatile Constituents of Protaetia brevitarsis Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyelim; Youn, Kumju; Kim, Minji; Yun, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2013-01-01

    A total of 48 different volatile oils were identified form P. brevitarsis larvae by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Acids (48.67%) were detected as the major group in P. brevitarsis larvae comprising the largest proportion of the volatile compounds, followed by esters (19.84%), hydrocarbons (18.90%), alcohols (8.37%), miscellaneous (1.71%), aldehydes (1.35%) and terpenes (1.16%). The major volatile constituents were 9-hexadecenoic acid (16.75%), 6-octadecenoic acid (14.88%) and n-hexadecanoic acid (11.06%). The composition of fatty acid was also determined by GC analysis and 16 fatty acids were identified. The predominant fatty acids were oleic acid (C18:1, 64.24%) followed by palmitic acid (C16:0, 15.89%), palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 10.43%) and linoleic acid (C18:2, 4.69%) constituting more than 95% of total fatty acids. The distinguished characteristic of the fatty acid profile of P. brevitarsis larvae was the high proportion of unsaturated fatty acid (80.54% of total fatty acids) versus saturated fatty acids (19.46% of total fatty acids). Furthermore, small but significant amounts of linoleic, linolenic and γ-linolenic acids bestow P. brevitarsis larvae with considerable nutritional value. The novel findings of the present study provide a scientific basis for the comprehensive utilization of the insect as a nutritionally promising food source and a possibility for more effective utilization. PMID:24471125

  1. Comparison is key.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mark H; Stenner, A Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Several concepts from Georg Rasch's last papers are discussed. The key one is comparison because Rasch considered the method of comparison fundamental to science. From the role of comparison stems scientific inference made operational by a properly developed frame of reference producing specific objectivity. The exact specifications Rasch outlined for making comparisons are explicated from quotes, and the role of causality derived from making comparisons is also examined. Understanding causality has implications for what can and cannot be produced via Rasch measurement. His simple examples were instructive, but the implications are far reaching upon first establishing the key role of comparison.

  2. The fragrance mix and its constituents: a 14-year material.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    1995-01-01

    Results from 14 years of patch testing with the fragrance mix and its constituents are reviewed. From 1979-1992, 8215 consecutive patients were patch tested with the fragrance mix and 449 (5.5%) had a positive reaction. An increase in the frequency of reactions to fragrance mix was seen from the first 5-year period to the last. Only 54.4% of the patients tested in the last 5-year period with the individual constituents of the mix had at least 1 positive reaction. The results of testing with the constituents are the basis for a discussion of methodological problems. A significant decrease in the frequency of reaction to cinnamic aldehyde was registered, at the same time as the test concentration was reduced from 2% to 1% pet. However, no significant variations in the frequency of reactions to oak moss were seen, notwithstanding a similar reduction in test concentration.

  3. NREL Makes Key Appointments

    Science.gov Websites

    Makes Key Appointments Staffing for Distributed Energy and Tech Management Announced For more information contact: Gary Schmitz, 303-275-4050 email: Gary Schmitz Golden, Colo., Feb. 28, 2001 - Two reorganized Planning and Technology Management Division. Anthony Schaffhauser has been selected to become

  4. Key Competencies. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, David; Browne, Geoff

    Key competencies (or generic skills) have been specified in four sources: Further Education Unit (FEU), United Kingdom (1987); Finn Report (1991) and Mayer Committee (1992), Australia; U.S. Labor Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) (June 1991); and Butterworth and Lovell (1983), New South Wales. A comparison of the four…

  5. Public Key Infrastructure Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    commerce. This Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) study focuses on the United States Federal Government operations, but also addresses national and global ... issues in order to facilitate the interoperation of protected electronic commerce among the various levels of government in the U.S., private citizens

  6. [Chemical constituents of the roots of Vaccinium bracteatum].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-Lan; Mai, Xi; Guo, Hui; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2012-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the roots of Vaccinium bracteatum. The constituents were separated and purified with chromatographic methods (including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and RP-18 column chromatography), and their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods (including MS, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR). 10 compounds were isolated from the roots of Vaccinium bracteatu and were elucidated as chlorogenic acid (1), pinoresinol (2), ferulic acid (3), kaempferol (4), trans-caffeic acid (5), beta-sitosterol (6), quercetin (7), oleanolic acid (8), apigenin (9) and luteolin (10). Compounds 1 -3 are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  7. Nigella sativa and its active constituent thymoquinone in oral health

    PubMed Central

    AlAttas, Safia A.; Zahran, Fat’heya M.; Turkistany, Shereen A.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we summarized published reports that investigated the role of Nigella sativa (NS) and its active constituent, thymoquinone (TQ) in oral health and disease management. The literature studies were preliminary and scanty, but the results revealed that black seed plants have a potential therapeutic effect for oral and dental diseases. Such results are encouraging for the incorporation of these plants in dental therapeutics and hygiene products. However, further detailed preclinical and clinical studies at the cellular and molecular levels are required to investigate the mechanisms of action of NS and its constituents, particularly TQ. PMID:26905343

  8. Rationale and constituencies for the Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kristine A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to maximize the benefits from prospective space-exploration endeavors, and to enlist the support of as many constituencies as possible, NASA is either conducting or developing programs which emphasize different aspects of the Space Exploration Initiative. Attention is presently given to the cases of education using space exploration themes as teaching tools and technology transfer from government to private industry. Only on the basis of the establishment of such constituencies, will it be possible to sustain funding over the three decades foreseen as required for a Mars exploration effort.

  9. [Bioactive constituents from whole herbs of Vernonia cinerea (II)].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaxu; Tang, Yuping; Min, Zhida; Gong, Zhunan

    2009-11-01

    To study the constituents of the whole herbs of Vernonia cinerea by bio-activity guided isolation with PC-12 model. The constituents were separated by column chromatography and the structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Ten compounds were identified to be (-)-clovane-2,9-diol (1), caryolane-1,9beta-diol (2), apigenin (3), chrysoeriol (4), luteolin (5), thermopsoside (6), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucoside (7), quercetin(8), apigenin-4'-O-beta-D-glucoside (9), hyperin (10), beta-amyrin aceate (11), lupeol acetate (12). Compounds 1, 2, 6 and 10 were isolated from this genus for the first time.

  10. The Chemical Constituents and Pharmacological Actions of Cordyceps sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jihui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hanyue; Zhang, Xuelan; Han, Chunchao

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, also called DongChongXiaCao (winter worm, summer grass) in Chinese, is becoming increasingly popular and important in the public and scientific communities. This study summarizes the chemical constituents and their corresponding pharmacological actions of Cordyceps sinensis. Many bioactive components of Cordyceps sinensis have been extracted including nucleoside, polysaccharide, sterol, protein, amino acid, and polypeptide. In addition, these constituents' corresponding pharmacological actions were also shown in the study such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumour, antiapoptosis, and immunomodulatory actions. Therefore can use different effects of C. sinensis against different diseases and provide reference for the study of Cordyceps sinensis in the future. PMID:25960753

  11. Care management program evaluation: constituents, conflicts, and moves toward standardization.

    PubMed

    Long, D Adam; Perry, Theodore L; Pelletier, Kenneth R; Lehman, Gregg O

    2006-06-01

    Care management program evaluations bring together constituents from finance, medicine, and social sciences. The differing assumptions and scientific philosophies that these constituents bring to the task often lead to frustrations and even contentions. Given the forms and variations of care management programs, the difficulty associated with program outcomes measurement should not be surprising. It is no wonder then that methods for clinical and economic evaluations of program efficacy continue to be debated and have yet to be standardized. We describe these somewhat hidden processes, examine where the industry stands, and provide recommendations for steps to standardize evaluation methodology.

  12. Stark cell optoacoustic detection of constituent gases in sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector for gas analysis is implemented with Stark effect cell modulation for switching a beam in and out of coincidence with a spectral line of a constituent gas in order to eliminate the heating effect of laser energy in the cell as a source of background noise. By using a multiline laser, and linearly sweeping the DC bias voltage while exciting the cell with a multiline laser, it is possible to obtain a spectrum from which to determine the combinations of excited constituents and determine their concentrations in parts per million.

  13. [Studies on chemical constituents of cultivated Cistanche salsa].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hu; Hu, Jun-Ping; Rena, Kasimu; Du, Nian-Sheng

    2008-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of cultivated Cistanche salsa. Compounds were isolated and purified on several chromatography, and then were identified by physico-chemical properties and structurally elucidated by spectral analysis. Seven compounds were isolated and identified as beta-sitosterol (I), daucosterol (II), beta-sitosteryl glucoside 3'-O-heptadecoicate (III), 8-hydroxygeraniol 1-beta-D-glucopyranoside (IV), 2-methanol-5-hydroxy-pyridine (V), betaine (VI), galactitol (VII). The chemical constituents of artificial cultivated Cistanche salsa are studied for the first time. Among them, compound III and IV are isolated from the plant for the first time, compound V is isolated from this genus for the first time.

  14. [Chemical Constituents from Processed Products of Aconitum Vilmoriniani Radix].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-jun; Yang, Zhu-ya; Tan, Wen-hong; Zhou, Zhi-hong; Ma, Xiao-xia

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of the processed products of Aconitum Vilmorinian Radix. The constituents were isolated by repeated column chromatography over silica gel, alumina and RP-C18 as well as recrystallization. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis and physicochemical properties. Ten compounds were obtained from the methanol extract, and they were identified as yunaconitine (1), 8-deacetyl-yunaconitine (2), geniculatine C (3), vilmorrianine B (4), vilmorrianine C(5), vilmorrianine D (6), talatisamine (7), β-sitosterol (8), β-daucosterol (9) and β-sitosterol acetate (10). All compounds are obtained from the processed products of Aconitum Vilmoriniani Radix for the first time.

  15. [Study on Chemical Constituents from Roots of Lonicera macranthoides].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-juan; Chen, Yu; Ma, Xin; Zhao, You-yi; Feng, Xu

    2014-12-01

    To study chemical constituents of the roots of Lonicera macranthoides. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by means of several chromatographic techniques and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Seven compounds were isolated and identified as ribenol (1), excoecarin C (2), 18-hydroxy-13-epi-manoyloxide (3), asiatic acid (4), oleanolic acid (5), β-sitosterol (6) and β-daucosterol (7). Compounds 1-4 are obtained from this genus for the first time. Compound 5 is obtained from this plant for the first time. All the compounds are found from the roots of Lonicera mac- ranthoides for the first time.

  16. [Chemical Constituents of Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Suaeda glauca].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ping; Wang, Qi-zhi; Yin, Min; Wang, Ming; Zhao, You-yi; Shan, Yu; Feng, Xu

    2015-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Suaeda glauca. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified with several separation and purification techniques. Their structures were identified by physicochemical properties and various spectroscopic methods. Ten compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction as lignoceric acid (1), β-amyrin-n-nonyl ether(2), β-sitosterol(3), β-daucosterol(4), quercetin(5), luteolin(6), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside(7), isorhamnetin(8), scopoletin (9) and stigmasterol(10). Compounds 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 are isolated from Suaeda genus for the first time and compounds 3 - 5 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  17. [Study on chemical constituents from Schisandra chinensis stem].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-shi; Du, Shu-shan; Cai, Qian

    2014-10-01

    To separate and identify the chemical constituents from the stem of Schisandra chinensis. Various chromatographic techniques were used to separate and purify the chemical constituents from 95% ethanol extraction of the stem of Schisandra chinensis. Their structures were elucidated based on the physico-chemical properties and spectral data. Ten compounds were obtained and elucidated as (+)-deoxyschizandrin (1), γ-schizandrin (2), wuweizisu C (3), gomisin N (4), schizandrin (5), anwuweizic acid (6), (-)-dihydroguaiaretic acid (7), tetradecanoic acid (8), β-sitosterol (9) and daucosterol (10). Compounds 6-8 are obtained from the stem of Schisandra chinensis for the first time.

  18. [Chemical constituents from aerial part of Aconitum brachypodum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yun; Zuo, Ai-Xue; Sun, Yun; Rao, Gao-Xiong

    2014-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the aerial part of Aconitum brachypodum. The constituents were isolated and purified by silica gel, activated alumina and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data and physiochemical evidence. Eleven compounds were isolated from 80% ethanol extract and identified as secokaraconitine (1), brachyaconitines A (2), C (3), talatisamine (4), hypaconitine (5), songrine (6), bullatine A (7), 7-carbony sitosterone (8), lupeol (9), β-sitosterol (10) and daucosterol (11). All compounds are isolated from the aerial part of Aconitum brachypodum for the first time.

  19. [Study on water-soluble chemical constituents of Taraxacum mongolicum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-qing; Wang, Tian-lin

    2014-06-01

    To study the water-soluble chemical constituents of Taraxacum mongolicum. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by means of several chromatographic techniques and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Nine compounds were isolated and identified as trans-p-coumaryl alcohol(1), trans-p-coumaryl aldehyde(2),p- hydroxybenzoate (3) , p-hydroxyphenyl-propionic acid (4) , 4-hydroxy-2, 6-dimethoxyphenol-1 -O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5) , protocate- chuic aldehyde(6) ,rutin(7) ,quercetin(8) ,kaempferal-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-( 1-6) -β-D-glucopyranoside(9). Com pounds 1-6 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  20. Analgesic-Like Activity of Essential Oil Constituents: An Update

    PubMed Central

    de Cássia da Silveira e Sá, Rita; Lima, Tamires Cardoso; da Nóbrega, Flávio Rogério; de Brito, Anna Emmanuela Medeiros

    2017-01-01

    The constituents of essential oils are widely found in foods and aromatic plants giving characteristic odor and flavor. However, pharmacological studies evidence its therapeutic potential for the treatment of several diseases and promising use as compounds with analgesic-like action. Considering that pain affects a significant part of the world population and the need for the development of new analgesics, this review reports on the current studies of essential oils’ chemical constituents with analgesic-like activity, including a description of their mechanisms of action and chemical aspects. PMID:29232831

  1. Relationship between mozzarella yield and milk composition, processing factors, and recovery of whey constituents.

    PubMed

    Sales, D C; Rangel, A H N; Urbano, S A; Freitas, Alfredo R; Tonhati, Humberto; Novaes, L P; Pereira, M I B; Borba, L H F

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to identify the relationship between mozzarella cheese yield and buffalo milk composition, processing factors, and recovery of whey constituents. A production of 30 batches of mozzarella cheese at a dairy industry in northeast Brazil (Rio Grande do Norte) was monitored between March and November 2015. Mozzarella yield and 32 other variables were observed for each batch, and divided into 3 groups: milk composition variables (12); variables involved in the cheesemaking process (14); and variables for recovery of whey constituents (6). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and principal component analysis. Most of the correlations between milk composition variables and between the variables of the manufacturing processes were not significant. Significant correlations were mostly observed between variables for recovery of whey constituents. Yield only showed significant correlation with time elapsed between curd cuttings and age of the starter culture, and it showed greater association with age of the starter culture, time elapsed between curd cuttings, and during stretching, as well as with milk pH and density. Thus, processing factors and milk characteristics are closely related to dairy efficiency in mozzarella manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Disclosure of incidental constituents of psychotherapy as a moral obligation for psychiatrists and psychotherapists.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Manuel; Gaab, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Informed consent to medical intervention reflects the moral principle of respect for autonomy and the patient's right to self-determination. In psychotherapy, this includes a requirement to inform the patient about those components of treatment purported to cause the therapeutic effect. This information must encompass positive expectancies of change and placebo-related or incidental constituent therapy effects, which are as important as specific intervention techniques for the efficacy of psychotherapy. There is a risk that informing the patient about possible incidental constituents of therapy may reduce or even completely impede these effects, with negative consequences for overall outcome. However, withholding information about incidental constituents of psychotherapy would effectively represent a paternalistic action at the expense of patient autonomy; whether such paternalism might in certain circumstances be justified forms part of the present discussion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Organic Nitrates: A Complex Family of Atmospheric Trace Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballschmiter, K.; Fischer, R. G.; Grünert, A.; Kastler, J.; Schneider, M.; Woidich, S.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic and geogenic hydrocarbons are the precursors of organic nitrates that are formed as tropospheric photo-oxidation products in the presence of NOx. Air chemistry leads to a very complex pattern of nitric acid esters: alkyl nitrates, aryl-alkyl nitrates, and bifunctional nitrates like alkyl dinitrates, hydroxy alkyl nitrates and carbonyl alkyl nitrates. We have analyzed the pattern of organic nitrates in air samples after adsorption/thermal desorption (low volume sampling-LVS) or adsorption/solvent desorption (high volume sampling-HVS) by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) using air aliquotes of 100 up to 3000 liters on column. The complexity of the organic nitrates found in air requires a group pre-separation by normal phase liquid chromatography. A detection limit per compound of 0.005 ppt(v) is achieved by our approach. We have synthesized a broad spectrum of organic nitrates as reference compounds. Air samples were taken from central Europe, the US West (Utah, Nevada, California), and the North- and South Atlantic including Antarctica. Levels and patterns of the regional and global occurrence of the various groups of C1-C12 organic nitrates including dinitrates and hydroxy nitrates and nitrates of isoprene (2-methylbutadiene) are presented. Werner G., J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds" Angewandte Chemie - International Edition (1999) 38: 1634-1637. Woidich S., O. Froescheis, O. Luxenhofer, K. Ballschmiter: "EI- and NCI-mass spectrometry of arylalkyl nitrates and their occurrence in urban air" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (1999) 364 : 91-99. Kastler, J; Jarman, W; Ballschmiter, K.: "Multifunctional organic nitrates as constituents in European and US urban photo-smog" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (2000) 368:244-249. Schneider M., K. Ballschmiter: "C3-C14 alkyl nitrates in remote South Atlantic air" Chemosphere (1999) 38: 233-244. Fischer

  4. Key paediatric messages from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Barben, Jürg; Bohlin, Kajsa; Everard, Mark L.; Hall, Graham; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle; Priftis, Kostas N.; Rusconi, Franca; Midulla, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) maintained its high profile at the 2015 ERS International Congress in Amsterdam. There were symposia on preschool wheeze, respiratory sounds and cystic fibrosis; an educational skills workshop on paediatric respiratory resuscitation; a hot topic session on risk factors and early origins of respiratory diseases; a meet the expert session on paediatric lung function test reference values; and the annual paediatric grand round. In this report the Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly's Groups highlight the key messages from the abstracts presented at the Congress. PMID:27730186

  5. Temporal trends in water-quality constituent concentrations and annual loads of chemical constituents in Michigan watersheds, 1998–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoard, Christopher J.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2018-02-21

    In 1998, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Geological Survey began the Water Chemistry Monitoring Program for select streams in the State of Michigan. Objectives of this program were to provide assistance with (1) statewide water-quality assessments, (2) the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permitting process, and (3) water-resource management decisions. As part of this program, water-quality data collected from 1998 to 2013 were analyzed to identify potential trends for select constituents that were sampled. Sixteen water-quality constituents were analyzed at 32 stations throughout Michigan. Trend analysis on the various water-quality data was done using either the uncensored Seasonal Kendall test or through Tobit regression. In total, 79 trends were detected in the constituents analyzed for 32 river stations sampled for the study period—53 downward trends and 26 upward trends were detected. The most prevalent trend detected throughout the State was for ammonia, with 11 downward trends and 1 upward trend estimated.In addition to trends, constituent loads were estimated for 31 stations from 2002 to 2013 for stations that were sampled 12 times per year. Loads were computed using the Autobeale load computation program, which used the Beale ratio estimator approach to estimate an annual load. Constituent loads were the largest in large watershed streams with the highest annual flows such as the Saginaw and Grand Rivers. Likewise, constituent loads were the smallest in smaller tributaries that were sampled as part of this program such as the Boardman and Thunder Bay Rivers.

  6. Chapter 06: Identification key

    Treesearch

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    The key is written to guide you through the identification process in the most efficient and accurate way possible. It presents you with a numbered series of questions and asks you to answer them. The answers you provide will be based on your interpretations of the anatomical characters in your unknown specimen and will lead you to a new set of questions. Each time you...

  7. Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2004-05-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) uses single-photon communications to generate the shared, secret random number sequences that are used to encrypt and decrypt secret communications. The unconditional security of QKD is based on the interplay between fundamental principles of quantum physics and information theory. An adversary can neither successfully tap the transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). QKD could be particularly attractive for free-space optical communications, both ground-based and for satellites. I will describe a QKD experiment performed over multi-kilometer line-of-sight paths, which serves as a model for a satellite-to-ground key distribution system. The system uses single-photon polarization states, without active polarization switching, and for the first time implements the complete BB84 QKD protocol including, reconciliation, privacy amplification and the all-important authentication stage. It is capable of continuous operation throughout the day and night, achieving the self-sustaining production of error-free, shared, secret bits. I will also report on the results of satellite-to-ground QKD modeling.

  8. Integrated and Independent Learning of Hand-Related Constituent Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berner, Michael P.; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In almost all daily activities fingers of both hands are used in coordinated succession. The present experiments explored whether learning in such tasks pertains not only to the overall sequence spanning both hands but also to the constituent sequences of each hand. In a serial reaction time task, 2 repeating hand-related sequences were…

  9. Constituent Perceptions of a Community College: An "Image" Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    Every 5 years, Johnson County Community College (JCCC), in Overland Park, Kansas, conducts a study of community perceptions to measure the level of community satisfaction with the overall mission of the college. Specifically, the studies seek to measure constituents' awareness of JCCC's role, their support of the college's activities to fulfill…

  10. LC-MS characterization of constituents of mesquite flour

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using an LC-MS method in conjunction with two complementary types of chromatographic retention modes—namely reversed phase and aqueous normal phase (ANP)—various compounds present in mesquite flour extracts were identified. Because of the diverse types of chemical constituents found in such natural ...

  11. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  12. Preparation of thin film silver fluoride electrodes from constituent elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of preparing thin-film metal fluoride electrodes from the elemental constituents has been demonstrated. Silver fluoride cathodes were prepared by deposition of silver on a conducting graphite substrate followed by fluorination under controlled conditions using elemental fluorine. The resulting electrodes were of high purity, and the variables such as size, shape, and thickness were easily controlled.

  13. Constituent Aspects of Workplace Guidance in Secondary VET

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swager, Robert; Klarus, Ruud; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present an integrated model of workplace guidance to enhance awareness of what constitutes good guidance, to improve workplace guidance practices in vocational education and training. Design/methodology/approach: To identify constituent aspects of workplace guidance, a systematic search of Web of Science was conducted,…

  14. [Reviews on antiviral activity of chemical constituents from plants].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xian-Feng; Wang, Yu-Li; Xu, Wei-Ren

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the progress in researches on antiviral activity of chemical constituents from plants in recent years, the antiviral activity and mechanism of action of flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, coumarins and polysaccharoses were sammarszed, provided new leading compound for antivirus new drugs from the plares in prospect.

  15. Meteorological and constituent data for January and February 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Balloon data consisting of a plot showing the mixing ratio of ozone partial pressure in micromillibors and temperature in degrees centigrade versus pressure altitude in millibars is presented. An accompanying tabulation of meteorological and constituent data is also presented. The total overburden was aquired by Dobson Spectrophotometer 72.

  16. Sociophonetic Variations in Korean Constituent Final "-Ko" and "-To"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi, So Young L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine (i) linguistic and extralinguistic factors that influence vowel raising of /o/ in constituent-final "-ko" and "-to" in Seoul Korean and (ii) listeners' perceptions of this vowel raising and social meanings of the raised variant. The analyses are based on production data collected…

  17. 75 FR 15639 - Revision of the Requirements for Constituent Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... and Research (HFM-17), Food and Drug Administration, 1401 Rockville Pike, suite 200N, Rockville, MD... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 610 [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0099] RIN 0910-AG15 Revision of the Requirements for Constituent Materials AGENCY: Food and...

  18. Antiparasitic, Nematicidal and Antifouling Constituents from Juniperus Berries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Juniperus procera berries yielded antiparasitic, nematicidal and antifouling constituents, including a wide range of known abietane, pimarane and labdane diterpenes. Among these, abieta-7,13-diene (1) demonstrated in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium f...

  19. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  20. QCD constituent counting rules for neutral vector mesons

    DOE PAGES

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Lebed, Richard F.; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2018-02-08

    QCD constituent counting rules define the scaling behavior of exclusive hadronic scattering and electromagnetic scattering amplitudes at high momentum transfer in terms of the total number of fundamental constituents in the initial and final states participating in the hard subprocess. The scaling laws reflect the twist of the leading Fock state for each hadron and hence the leading operator that creates the composite state from the vacuum. Thus, the constituent counting scaling laws can be used to identify the twist of exotic hadronic candidates such as tetraquarks and pentaquarks. Effective field theories must consistently implement the scaling rules in ordermore » to be consistent with the fundamental theory. Here in this paper, we examine how one can apply constituent counting rules for the exclusive production of one or two neutral vector mesons V 0 in e + e - annihilation, processes in which the V 0 can couple via intermediate photons. In the case of a (narrow) real V 0, the photon virtuality is fixed to a precise value s 1 = m2V 0, thus treating the V 0 as a single fundamental particle. Each real V 0 thus contributes to the constituent counting rules with NV0 = 1 . In effect, the leading operator underlying the V 0 has twist 1. Thus, in the specific physical case of single or double on-shell V 0 production via intermediate photons, the predicted scaling from counting rules coincides with vector-meson dominance (VMD), an effective theory that treats V 0 as an elementary field. However, the VMD prediction fails in the general case where the V 0 is not coupled through an elementary photon field, and then the leading-twist interpolating operator has twist NV 0 = 2 . Analogous effects appear in pp scattering processes.« less

  1. QCD constituent counting rules for neutral vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Lebed, Richard F.; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2018-02-01

    QCD constituent counting rules define the scaling behavior of exclusive hadronic scattering and electromagnetic scattering amplitudes at high momentum transfer in terms of the total number of fundamental constituents in the initial and final states participating in the hard subprocess. The scaling laws reflect the twist of the leading Fock state for each hadron and hence the leading operator that creates the composite state from the vacuum. Thus, the constituent counting scaling laws can be used to identify the twist of exotic hadronic candidates such as tetraquarks and pentaquarks. Effective field theories must consistently implement the scaling rules in order to be consistent with the fundamental theory. Here, we examine how one can apply constituent counting rules for the exclusive production of one or two neutral vector mesons V0 in e+e- annihilation, processes in which the V0 can couple via intermediate photons. In the case of a (narrow) real V0, the photon virtuality is fixed to a precise value s1=mV02, thus treating the V0 as a single fundamental particle. Each real V0 thus contributes to the constituent counting rules with NV0=1. In effect, the leading operator underlying the V0 has twist 1. Thus, in the specific physical case of single or double on-shell V0 production via intermediate photons, the predicted scaling from counting rules coincides with vector-meson dominance (VMD), an effective theory that treats V0 as an elementary field. However, the VMD prediction fails in the general case where the V0 is not coupled through an elementary photon field, and then the leading-twist interpolating operator has twist NV 0=2 . Analogous effects appear in p p scattering processes.

  2. QCD constituent counting rules for neutral vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Lebed, Richard F.; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    QCD constituent counting rules define the scaling behavior of exclusive hadronic scattering and electromagnetic scattering amplitudes at high momentum transfer in terms of the total number of fundamental constituents in the initial and final states participating in the hard subprocess. The scaling laws reflect the twist of the leading Fock state for each hadron and hence the leading operator that creates the composite state from the vacuum. Thus, the constituent counting scaling laws can be used to identify the twist of exotic hadronic candidates such as tetraquarks and pentaquarks. Effective field theories must consistently implement the scaling rules in ordermore » to be consistent with the fundamental theory. Here in this paper, we examine how one can apply constituent counting rules for the exclusive production of one or two neutral vector mesons V 0 in e + e - annihilation, processes in which the V 0 can couple via intermediate photons. In the case of a (narrow) real V 0, the photon virtuality is fixed to a precise value s 1 = m2V 0, thus treating the V 0 as a single fundamental particle. Each real V 0 thus contributes to the constituent counting rules with NV0 = 1 . In effect, the leading operator underlying the V 0 has twist 1. Thus, in the specific physical case of single or double on-shell V 0 production via intermediate photons, the predicted scaling from counting rules coincides with vector-meson dominance (VMD), an effective theory that treats V 0 as an elementary field. However, the VMD prediction fails in the general case where the V 0 is not coupled through an elementary photon field, and then the leading-twist interpolating operator has twist NV 0 = 2 . Analogous effects appear in pp scattering processes.« less

  3. Computer-Guided Approach to Access the Anti-influenza Activity of Licorice Constituents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA), a key enzyme in viral replication, is the first-line drug target to combat influenza. On the basis of a shape-focused virtual screening, the roots of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) were identified as plant species with an accumulation of constituents that show 3D similarities to known influenza NA inhibitors (NAIs). Phytochemical investigation revealed 12 constituents identified as (E)-1-[2,4-dihydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)phenyl]-3-(8-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-6-yl)-2-propen-1-one (1), 3,4-dihydro-8,8-dimethyl-2H,8H-benzo[1,2-b:3,4-b′]dipyran-3-ol (2), biochanin B (3), glabrol (4), glabrone (5), hispaglabridin B (6), licoflavone B (7), licorice glycoside B (8), licorice glycoside E (9), liquiritigenin (10), liquiritin (11), and prunin (12). Eleven of these constituents showed significant influenza virus NA inhibition in a chemiluminescence (CL)-based assay. Additional tests, including (i) a cell-based cytopathic effect inhibition assay (general antiviral activity), (ii) the evaluation of cytotoxicity, (iii) the inhibition of the NA of Clostridium perfringens (CL- and fluorescence (FL)-based assay), and (iv) the determination of self-fluorescence and quenching, provided further perspective on their anti-influenza virus potential, revealing possible assay interference problems and false-positive results. Compounds 1, 3, 5, and 6 showed antiviral activity, most likely caused by the inhibition of NA. Of these, compounds 1, 3, and 6 were highly ranked in shape-focused virtual screening. PMID:24313801

  4. Extracts and constituents of Leontopodium alpinum enhance cholinergic transmission: Brain ACh increasing and memory improving properties

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Ariane; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Vo, Nguyen Phung; Prast, Helmut; Stuppner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Leontopodium alpinum (‘Edelweiss’) was phytochemically investigated for constituents that might enhance cholinergic neurotransmission. The potency to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine (ACh) in rat brain served as key property for the bioguided isolation of cholinergically active compounds using different chromatographic techniques. The dichlormethane (DCM) extract of the root, fractions and isolated constituents were injected i.c.v. and the effect on brain ACh was detected via the push–pull technique. The DCM extract enhanced extracellular ACh concentration in rat brain and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The extracellular level of brain ACh was significantly increased by the isolated sesquiterpenes, isocomene and 14-acetoxyisocomene, while silphiperfolene acetate and silphinene caused a small increasing tendency. Only silphiperfolene acetate showed in vitro AChE inhibitory activity, thus suggesting the other sesquiterpenes to stimulate cholinergic transmission by an alternative mechanism of action. Isocomene was further investigated with behavioural tasks in mice. It restored object recognition in scopolamine-impaired mice and showed nootropic effects in the T-maze alternation task in normal and scopolamine-treated mice. Additionally, this sesquiterpene reduced locomotor activity of untreated mice in the open field task, while the activity induced by scopolamine was abolished. The enhancement of synaptic availability of ACh, the promotion of alternation, and the amelioration of scopolamine-induced deficit are in accordance with a substance that amplifies cholinergic transmission. Whether the mechanism of action is inhibition of AChE or another pro-cholinergic property remains to be elucidated. Taken together, isocomene and related constituents of L. alpinum deserve further interest as potential antidementia agents in brain diseases associated with cholinergic deficits. PMID:18541221

  5. Hepatotoxic constituents and toxicological mechanism of Xanthium strumarium L. fruits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li-Ming; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Han, Ping; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Yan, Rong-Di; Wang, Yang; Rahman, Khalid; Jia, Min; Han, Ting; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2014-03-14

    In the recent years, the international community has attached increasing importance to possible toxicity associated with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). And hepatotoxicity is one of the major concerns, a fundamental pathological process induced by toxicant. This paper is in an attempt to identify the hepatotoxic components in Xanthium strumarium L. fruits (XSF) and interpret the toxicological mechanism induced by XSF. XSF extract was prepared and seven characteristic components were isolated and identified in XSF water extracts. We evaluated their hepatotoxicity effect on cell proliferation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in L-02 and BRL liver cell line. An integrated metabonomics study using high-resolution (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis was undertake to elucidate the hepatotoxicity mechanism induced in rats by XSF. The urine and serum metabolites were measured after treatment of rats with XSF (7.5, 15.0 and 30.0 g/kg/day) for 5 days. The results showed that atractyloside, carboxyatractyloside, 4'-desulphate-atractyloside and XSF induced significant cytotoxic effects in both L-02 and BRL liver cell lines, indicating that atractyloside, carboxyatractyloside, and 4'-desulphate-atractyloside were the toxic components of XSF. When rats were treated with XSF at 30.0 g/kg the hepatotoxicity was reflected in the changes observed in serum biochemical profiles and by the histopathological examination of the liver. The levels of VLDL/LDL, 3-HB, lactate, acetate, acetone and glutamate in serum were increased in this group, while d-glucose, choline and valine were decreased. The elevation in the levels of succinate, citrate, 2-oxo-glutamate, glycine, 3-HB, acetate, lactate, hippurate, dimethylglycine, methylamine, dimethylamine, phenylalanine and tryptophan was observed in urine, in contrast a reduction in the intensities of taurine, d-glucose, N-acetyl-glucoprotein and trimethylamine

  6. Chemical structures of constituents from the whole plant of Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Tomoe; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Oda, Yoshimi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Fukaya, Masashi; Yano, Mamiko; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Two new dammarane-type triterpene oligoglycosides, bacomosaponins A and B, and three new phenylethanoid glycosides, bacomosides A, B1, and B2, were isolated from the whole plant of Bacopa monniera Wettst. The chemical structures of the new constituents were characterized on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. In the present study, bacomosaponins A and B with acyl groups were obtained from the whole plant of B. monniera. This is the first report of acylated dammarane-type triterpene oligoglycosides isolated from B. monniera. In addition, dammarane-type triterpene saponins significantly inhibited the aggregation of 42-mer amyloid β-protein.

  7. Simple Web-based interactive key development software (WEBiKEY) and an example key for Kuruna (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)1

    PubMed Central

    Attigala, Lakshmi; De Silva, Nuwan I.; Clark, Lynn G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Programs that are user-friendly and freely available for developing Web-based interactive keys are scarce and most of the well-structured applications are relatively expensive. WEBiKEY was developed to enable researchers to easily develop their own Web-based interactive keys with fewer resources. Methods and Results: A Web-based multiaccess identification tool (WEBiKEY) was developed that uses freely available Microsoft ASP.NET technologies and an SQL Server database for Windows-based hosting environments. WEBiKEY was tested for its usability with a sample data set, the temperate woody bamboo genus Kuruna (Poaceae). Conclusions: WEBiKEY is freely available to the public and can be used to develop Web-based interactive keys for any group of species. The interactive key we developed for Kuruna using WEBiKEY enables users to visually inspect characteristics of Kuruna and identify an unknown specimen as one of seven possible species in the genus. PMID:27144109

  8. Socio-demographic diversity and unexplained variation in death rates among the most deprived parliamentary constituencies in Britain.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, H; Mitchell, R; Gibbs, J; Platt, S; Dorling, D

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable unexplained variation in death rates between deprived areas of Britain. This analysis assesses the degree of variation in socio-demographic factors among deprivation deciles and how variables associated with deaths differ among the most deprived areas. Death rates 1996-2001, Carstairs' 2001 deprivation score and indicators, population density, black and minority ethnic group (BME) and population change 1971-2001 were calculated for 641 parliamentary constituencies in Britain. Constituencies were grouped into Carstairs' deciles. We assessed standard errors of all variables by decile and the relationship between death rates and socio-demographic variables with Pearson's correlations and linear regression by decile and for all constituencies combined. Standard errors in death rates and most socio-demographic variables were greatest for the most deprived decile. Death rates among all constituencies were positively correlated with Carstairs' score and indicators, density and BME, but for the most deprived decile, there was no association with Carstairs and a negative correlation with overcrowding, density and BME. For the most deprived decile multivariate models containing population density, BME and change had substantially higher R(2). Understanding variations in death rates between deprived areas requires greater consideration of their socio-demographic diversity including their population density, ethnicity and migration.

  9. THE KEY VIRAL PLAYERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Members of the enterovirus group cause numerous diseases, including gastroenteritis, encephalitis, meningitis, myocard...

  10. Changes in key constituents of clonally propagated Artemisia annua L. during preparation of compressed leaf tablets for possible therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, Pamela J.; Towler, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia annua L., long used as a tea infusion in traditional Chinese medicine, produces artemisinin. Although artemisinin is currently used as artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) against malaria, oral consumption of dried leaves from the plant showed efficacy and will be less costly than ACT. Many compounds in the plant have some antimalarial activity. Unknown, however, is how these plant components change as leaves are processed into tablets for oral consumption. Here we compared extracts from fresh and dried leaf biomass with compressed leaf tablets of A. annua. Using GC-MS, nineteen endogenous compounds, including artemisinin and several of its pathway metabolites, nine flavonoids, three monoterpenes, a coumarin, and two phenolic acids, were identified and quantified from solvent extracts to determine how levels of these compounds changed during processing. Results showed that compared to dried leaves, artemisinin, arteannuin B, artemisinic acid, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, chrysoplenetin, and quercetin increased or remained stable with powdering and compression into tablets. Dihydroartemisinic acid, monoterpenes, and chrysoplenol-D decreased with tablet formation. Five target compounds were not detectable in any of the extracts of this cultivar. In contrast to the individually measured aglycone flavonoids, using the AlCl3 method, total flavonoids increased nearly fivefold during the tablet formation. To our knowledge this is the first study documenting changes that occurred in processing dried leaves of A. annua into tablets. These results will improve our understanding of the potential use of not only this medicinal herb, but also others to afford better quality control of intact plant material for therapeutic use. PMID:25228784

  11. Inflammatory and fibrotic proteins proteomically identified as key protein constituents in urine and stone matrix of patients with kidney calculi.

    PubMed

    Boonla, Chanchai; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Spittau, Björn; Schlosser, Andreas; Pimratana, Chaowat; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2014-02-15

    To uncover whether urinary proteins are incorporated into stones, the proteomic profiles of kidney stones and urine collected from the same patients have to be explored. We employed 1D-PAGE and nanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS to analyze the proteomes of kidney stone matrix (n=16), nephrolithiatic urine (n=14) and healthy urine (n=3). We identified 62, 66 and 22 proteins in stone matrix, nephrolithiatic urine and healthy urine, respectively. Inflammation- and fibrosis-associated proteins were frequently detected in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine. Eighteen proteins were exclusively found in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine, considered as candidate biomarkers for kidney stone formation. S100A8 and fibronectin, representatives of inflammation and fibrosis, respectively, were up-regulated in nephrolithiasis renal tissues. S100A8 was strongly expressed in infiltrated leukocytes. Fibronectin was over-expressed in renal tubular cells. S100A8 and fibronectin were immunologically confirmed to exist in nephrolithiatic urine and stone matrix, but in healthy urine they were undetectable. Conclusion, both kidney stones and urine obtained from the same patients greatly contained inflammatory and fibrotic proteins. S100A8 and fibronectin were up-regulated in stone-baring kidneys and nephrolithiatic urine. Therefore, inflammation and fibrosis are suggested to be involved in the formation of kidney calculi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ANALYZE EXISTING DATA ON PM COMPOSITION TO IDENTIFY KEY FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE HUMAN EXPOSURES TO PM CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An association has been demonstrated between ambient particulate matter (PM 2.5 and PM 10) concentrations and human morbidity/mortality. However, little is known regarding the most important sources of PM exposure, interpersonal and intrapersonal variability in exposure, and the...

  13. User's manual for the Graphical Constituent Loading Analysis System (GCLAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Eberle, Michael; Gray, J.R.; Glysson, G.D.

    2006-01-01

    This manual describes the Graphical Constituent Loading Analysis System (GCLAS), an interactive cross-platform program for computing the mass (load) and average concentration of a constituent that is transported in stream water over a period of time. GCLAS computes loads as a function of an equal-interval streamflow time series and an equal- or unequal-interval time series of constituent concentrations. The constituent-concentration time series may be composed of measured concentrations or a combination of measured and estimated concentrations. GCLAS is not intended for use in situations where concentration data (or an appropriate surrogate) are collected infrequently or where an appreciable amount of the concentration values are censored. It is assumed that the constituent-concentration time series used by GCLAS adequately represents the true time-varying concentration. Commonly, measured constituent concentrations are collected at a frequency that is less than ideal (from a load-computation standpoint), so estimated concentrations must be inserted in the time series to better approximate the expected chemograph. GCLAS provides tools to facilitate estimation and entry of instantaneous concentrations for that purpose. Water-quality samples collected for load computation frequently are collected in a single vertical or at single point in a stream cross section. Several factors, some of which may vary as a function of time and (or) streamflow, can affect whether the sample concentrations are representative of the mean concentration in the cross section. GCLAS provides tools to aid the analyst in assessing whether concentrations in samples collected in a single vertical or at single point in a stream cross section exhibit systematic bias with respect to the mean concentrations. In cases where bias is evident, the analyst can construct coefficient relations in GCLAS to reduce or eliminate the observed bias. GCLAS can export load and concentration data in formats

  14. Percentage entrainment of constituent loads in urban runoff, south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Runoff quantity and quality data from four urban basins in south Florida were analyzed to determine the entrainment of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total carbon, chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, and total lead within the stormwater runoff. Land use of the homogeneously developed basins are residential (single family), highway, commercial, and apartment (multifamily). A computational procedure was used to calculate, for all storms that had water-quality data, the percentage of constituent load entrainment in specified depths of runoff. The plot of percentage of constituent load entrained as a function of runoff is termed the percentage-entrainment curve. Percentage-entrainment curves were developed for three different source areas of basin runoff: (1) the hydraulically effective impervious area, (2) the contributing area, and (3) the drainage area. With basin runoff expressed in inches over the contributing area, the depth of runoff required to remove 90 percent of the constituent load ranged from about 0.4 inch to about 1.4 inches; and to remove 80 percent, from about 0.3 to 0.9 inch. Analysis of variance, using depth of runoff from the contributing area as the response variable, showed that the factor 'basin' is statistically significant, but that the factor 'constituent' is not statistically significant in the forming of the percentage-entrainment curve. Evidently the sewerage design, whether elongated or concise in plan dictates the shape of the percentage-entrainment curve. The percentage-entrainment curves for all constituents were averaged for each basin and plotted against basin runoff for three source areas of runoff-the hydraulically effective impervious area, the contributing area, and the drainage area. The relative positions of the three curves are directly related to the relative sizes of the three source areas considered. One general percentage-entrainment curve based on runoff from the contributing area was formed by averaging across

  15. Group Threat and Policy Change: The Spatial Dynamics of Prohibition Politics, 1890-1919.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Kenneth T; Seguin, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The authors argue that group threat is a key driver of the adoption of new and controversial policies. Conceptualizing threat in spatial terms, they argue that group threat is activated through the joint occurrence of (1) proximity to threatening groups and (2) the population density of threatened groups. By analyzing the adoption of county and state "dry laws" banning alcohol from 1890 to 1919, they first show that prohibition victories were driven by the relative strength of supportive constituencies such as native whites and rural residents, vis-à-vis opponents such as Irish, Italian, or German immigrants or Catholics. Second, they show that threat contributed to prohibition victories: counties bordering large immigrant or urban populations, which did not themselves contain similar populations, were more likely to adopt dry laws. Threat arises primarily from interactions between spatially proximate units at the local level, and therefore higher-level policy change is not reducible to the variables driving local policy.

  16. Report on the U.S. Geological Survey's Evaluation Program Standard Reference Samples Distributed in October 1995: T-137 (Trace Constituents), M-136 (Major Constituents), N-47 (Nutrient Constituents), N-48 (Nutrient Constituents), P-25 (Low Ionic Strength Constituents), and Hg-21 (Mercury)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Jerry W.; Long, H. Keith

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's analytical evaluation program for 6 standard reference samples--T-137 (trace constituents), M-136 (major constituents), N-47 (nutrient constituents), N-48 (nutrient constituents), P-25 (low ionic strength constituents), and Hg-21 (mercury)--that were distributed in October 1995 to 149 laboratories registered in the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored interlaboratory testing program. Analytical data that were received from 136 of the laboratories were evaluated with respect to: overall laboratory performance and relative laboratory performance for each analyte in the six reference samples. Results of these evaluations are presented in tabular form. Also presented are tables and graphs summarizing the analytical data provided by each laboratory for each analyte in the six standard reference samples. The most probable value for each analyte was determined using nonparametric statistics.

  17. [Studies on chemical constituents from leaves of Vaccinium bracteatum].

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng-Liang; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jing-Kui; Zhou, Wen-Ming

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents from the leaves of Vaccinium bracteatum. Many column chromatographic techniques were used for the isolation and separation of chemical constituents. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical evidences. Twelve compounds were isolated from the plant, and they were identified as chrysoeriol (1), scopoletin (2), trans-p-hydroxycinnamic acid (3), trans-p-hydroxycinnamic acid ethyl ester (4), cafeic acid ethyl ester (5), beta-sitosterol (6), iuteolin (7), quercetin (8), esculetin (9), cafeic acid (10), isolariciresinol-9-O-beta-D-xyloside (11), 10-O-trans-p-coumaroylsandoside (12). Compounds 4, 5, 11, 12 were isolated from the genus Vaccinium for the first time, and compounds 1, 2, 9, 10 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  18. [Studies on chemical constituents of leaves of Psidium guajava].

    PubMed

    Fu, Huizheng; Luo, Yongming; Zhang, Dongming

    2009-03-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the leaves of Psidium guajava. The chemical constituents were isolated by column chromatography on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and MPLC. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis. Nine compounds were isolated from this plant, and the structure of them were identified as ursolic acid (1), 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid (2), 2alpha-hydroxyoleanolic acid (3), morin-3-O-alpha-L-arabopyranoside (4), quercetin (5), hyperin (6), myricetin-3-O-beta-D-glucoside (7), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside (8), 1-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (9). Compounds 3, 7-9 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  19. Silymarin Constituents Enhance ABCA1 Expression in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limei; Rotter, Susanne; Ladurner, Angela; Heiss, Elke H.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin is a hepatoprotective mixture of flavonolignans and flavonoids extracted from the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn). This study investigates the effect of major bioactive constituents from silymarin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silydianin, silychristin, isosilychristin, and taxifolin, on the expression of ABCA1, an important cholesterol efflux transporter, in THP-1-derived macrophages. Four of the studied compounds, isosilybin A, silybin B, silychristin and isosilychristin, were found to significantly induce ABCA1 protein expression without affecting cell viability. Moreover, isosilybin A, a partial PPARγ agonist, was found to promote cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings first show ABCA1 protein up-regulating activity of active constituents of silymarin and provide new avenues for their further study in the context of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26729088

  20. Silymarin Constituents Enhance ABCA1 Expression in THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limei; Rotter, Susanne; Ladurner, Angela; Heiss, Elke H; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2015-12-31

    Silymarin is a hepatoprotective mixture of flavonolignans and flavonoids extracted from the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn). This study investigates the effect of major bioactive constituents from silymarin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silydianin, silychristin, isosilychristin, and taxifolin, on the expression of ABCA1, an important cholesterol efflux transporter, in THP-1-derived macrophages. Four of the studied compounds, isosilybin A, silybin B, silychristin and isosilychristin, were found to significantly induce ABCA1 protein expression without affecting cell viability. Moreover, isosilybin A, a partial PPARγ agonist, was found to promote cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings first show ABCA1 protein up-regulating activity of active constituents of silymarin and provide new avenues for their further study in the context of cardiovascular disease.

  1. [Studies on bioactive constituents of whole herbs of Vernonia cinerea].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua-xu; Tang, Yu-ping; Pan, Lin-mei; Min, Zhi-da

    2008-08-01

    To study the constituents of the whole herbs of Vernonia cinerea. by bio-activity guided isolation with PC-12 model. The constituents were separated by column chromatography and the structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Four compounds were identified to be (+)-lirioresinol B (1), stigmasterol (2), stigmasterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside (3), 4-sulfo-benzocyclobutene (4), and their NGF inducing activity were also investigated. Compounds 1, 3, 4 were isolated from this genus for the first time, and compound 4 was identified as a new natural product. Compounds 1, 3, 4 showed cytotoxicity on PC-12, and compounds 2, 3, 4 showed inhibition activity. Compound 4 showed a specific effect on the survival of TrkA fibroblasts, and resulted in the inducing NGF activity.

  2. Effects of Some Common Food Constituents on Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaling; Chan, Sze Wa; Hu, Miao; Walden, Richard; Tomlinson, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and there is considerable interest in the role of dietary constituents and supplements in the prevention and treatment of these disorders. We reviewed the major publications related to potential effects on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes of some common dietary constituents: carotenoids, flavonoid-rich cocoa, tea, red wine and grapes, coffee, omega-3 fatty acids, and garlic. Increased intake of some of these has been associated with reduced all-cause mortality or reduced incidence of myocardial infraction, stroke, and hypertension. However, although the evidence from observational studies is supportive of beneficial effects for most of these foodstuffs taken as part of the diet, potential benefits from the use of supplements derived from these natural products remain largely inconclusive. PMID:22347642

  3. The evolution of AAOE observed constituents with the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Lait, Leslie R.; Newman, P. A.; Martin, R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Anderson, J.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    One of the difficulties in determining constituent trends from the ER-2 flight data is the large amount of day to day variability generated by the motion of the polar vortex. To reduce this variability, the observations have been transformed into the conservative (Lagrangian) reference frames consisting of the coordinate pairs, potential temperature (PT) and potential vorticity (PV), or PT and N2O. The requirement of only two independent coordinates rests on the assumption that constituent distributions and their chemical processes are nearly zonal in that coordinate system. Flight data is used everywhere for these transformation except for potential vorticity. Potential vorticity is determined from level flight segments, and NMC PV values during flight dives and takeoffs are combined with flight data in a smooth fashion.

  4. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Philip M.; Thoresen, Souzan; Granahan, John; Matty, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer is a mass spectrometer based system that measures the major atmospheric constituents on the International Space Station. A number of limited-life components require periodic changeout, including the analyzer (ORU 02) and the verification gas assembly (ORU 08). The longest lasting ORU 02 was recently replaced after a record service length of 1033 days. The comparatively high performance duration may be attributable to a reduced inlet flow rate into the analyzer, resulting in increased ion pump lifetime; however, there may be other factors as well. A recent schedule slip for delivery of replacement verification gas led to a demonstration that the calibration interval could be extended on a short-term basis. An analysis of ORU 08 performance characteristics indicates that it is possible to temporarily extend the calibration interval from 6 weeks to 12 weeks if necessary.

  5. [Studies on chemical constituents from herbs of Botrychium lanuginosum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Xiao-qiu; Yao, Chun-suo; Fang, Wei-shuo

    2008-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Botrychium lanuginosum. Various chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and purify the constituents. The structures were elucidated by chemical evidence and spectroscopic methods. Ten compounds were isolated from the 95% ethanol extract of the herb of B. lanuginosum and their structures were elucidated as 30-nor-21beta-hopan-22-one (1), beta-sitosterol (2), luteolin (3), thunberginol A (4), apigenin (5), (6'-O-palmitoyl)-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside (6), daucosterol (7), 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S, 3R, 4E, 8Z)-2-[(2R-hydroxy hexadecanoyl) amino]-4, 8-octadecadiene-1, 3-diol (8), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (9), sucrose (10). Compounds 1-10 were isolated from this genus for the first time.

  6. [Studies on chemical constituents of the seeds of Allium cepa].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ling; Ji, Teng-Fei; Wang, Ai-Guo; Yang, Jian-Bo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2008-02-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the seeds of Allium cepa L., the constituents of the seeds of Allium cepa L. To isolate and purify by silica gel, macroporous resin HP-20, Sephadex LH-20, RP-18 column. Seven compounds were isolated from the EtOH extract of the seeds of Allium cepa., their structures were elucidated by physico-chemical properties and spectroscopic analysis as tianshic acid (I), N-trans-feruloyl tyramine (II), beta-sitosterol-3 beta-glucopyranoside-6'-palmitate (III), sitosterol (IV), daucosterol (V), tryptophane (VI), adenine riboside (VI). Compounds V-VIII are obtained from this plant for the first time, compounds I-IV are isolated from the genus Allium for the first time.

  7. [Study on chemical constituents from roots of Saussurea lappa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Hongqing; Du, Guanhua; Chen, Ruoyun

    2009-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents in roots of Saussurea lappa. Isolation and purification were carried out by silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and RP-18 column chromatography. The chemical structures of constituents were elucidated on the basis of spectral data. Eleven compounds were isolated and identified as: 5,7-dihydroxy-2-methylchromone (1), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (3), 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-acetophenone (4), ethyl 2-pyrrolidinone-5(s)-carboxylate (5), 5-hydroxymethyl-furaldehyde (6), palmitic acid (7), succinic acid (8), glucose (9), daucosterol (10), beta-sitosterol (11). Compounds 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9 were isolated from the genus Saussurea for the first time.

  8. [Studies on chemical constituents from roots of Craibiodendron henryi].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Yue; Yu, Shi-Shan; Hu, You-Cai; Qu, Jing

    2007-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the roots of Craibiodendron henryi. Various chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and purify the constituents. The structures were elucidated by chemical evidence and spectral methods. Twelve compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the 95% ethanolic extract and their struc- tures were elucidated as quercetin (1), quercetin-3-O-rhamnicoside (2), quercetin-3-O-arabinofuranoside (3), (-)-epicatechin (4), proanthocyanidin A-2 (5), procyanidin B-2 (6), (-)-isolariciresinol-2a-O-beta-D-xylopyranoside (7), lyoniside (8), sitoster-yl-3beta-glucoside-6'-O-palmitate (9), beta-sitosterol (10), daucosterol (11) and octacosanoic acid (12). Compounds 1-12 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  9. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Pharbitis purpurea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lan; Hua, Zhun; Zhao, Bao-Ying; Tang, Wan-Xia; Zhang, Shu-Jun

    2010-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Pharbitis purpurea. The constituents were isolated by silica gel column chromatography, HPLC and recrystallization and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis. Fourteen compounds were isolated and identified as daucosterol (1), umbelliferone (2), ursolic acid (3), N-p-hydroxy-cis-coumaroyltyramine (4), N-p-hydroxy-trans-coumaroyltyramine (5), N-cis-feruloyltyramine (6), N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7), (3R, 5R, 6S, 7E, 9S)-megastigman-5,6-epoxy-7-ene-3,9-diol (8), (6S,9R)-vomifoliol (9), (+)-syringaresinol (10), isovitexin (11), syringopicroside( 12), uricil (13), (6S,9R)-roseoside (14). Compounds 3, 8-2,14 are isolated from the genus for the first time.

  10. [Studies on chemical constituents from stem barks of Fraxinus paxiana].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-jing; Zhao, Zhi-juan

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of Fraxinus paxiana. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by chromatographic techniques and the structures of the compounds were identified with or by spectroscopic methods. Fifteen compounds were obtained from the methanol extract of F. paxiana and their structures were elucidated as esculin (1), esculetin (2), fraxin (3), fraxetin (4), salidroside (5), osmanthuside H (6), liriodendrin (7), 3-(4-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-3-methoxy)-phenyl-2E-propenol (8), threo-syringylglycerol (9), euscaphic acid (10), 3-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3, 5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-propanone (11), omega-hydroxypropioguaiacone (12), sinapyladehyde (13), betulinic acid (14) and mannitol (15). All compounds were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  11. [Research on chemical constituents from stem of Gymnema sylvestre].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Han-shen; Zhu, Xue-yan; Lu, Ru-mei; Liang, Jie; Qiu, Qin; Meng, Qi-miao

    2008-08-01

    To study on the chemical constituents from the stem of Gymnema sylvestre. The constituents were extracted by percolation with ethanol. Then the extract was separated by systemic solvent separation methods. The part of n-butanol extract was isolated and purified by macroporous adsorptive resins, silica gel column chromatography, sephadex gel column chromatography and recrystallization. The isolated compounds were identified by spectrum methods. Eight compounds were isolated and identified as fallows: Conduritol A(I), 1-Heptadecanol(II), Stigmasterol glucoside(III), 1-Quercitol(IV), 1-Octadecanol(V), Potassium nitrate(VI), Lupeol cinnamate(VII), Stigmasterol(VIII). Chemical compounds II, III, V, VII are firstly obtained from this plant.

  12. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and its bioactive constituents.

    PubMed

    Laribi, Bochra; Kouki, Karima; M'Hamdi, Mahmoud; Bettaieb, Taoufik

    2015-06-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), a member of the Apiaceae family, is among most widely used medicinal plant, possessing nutritional as well as medicinal properties. Thus, the aim of this updated review is to highlight the importance of coriander as a potential source of bioactive constituents and to summarize their biological activities as well as their different applications from data obtained in recent literature, with critical analysis on the gaps and potential for future investigations. A literature review was carried out by searching on the electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar for studies focusing on the biological and pharmacological activities of coriander seed and herb bioactive constituents. All recent English-language articles published between 2000 and 2014 were searched using the terms 'C. sativum', 'medicinal plant', 'bioactive constituents', and 'biological activities'. Subsequently, coriander seed and herb essential oils have been actively investigated for their chemical composition and biological activities including antimicrobial, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, anxiolytic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer activities, among others. Although coriander has been reported to possess a wide range of traditional medicinal uses, no report is available in its effectiveness use in reactive airway diseases such as asthma and bronchiolitis. In brief, the information presented herein will be helpful to create more interest towards this medicinal species by defining novel pharmacological and clinical applications and hence, may be useful in developing new drug formulations in the future or by employing coriander bioactive constituents in combination with conventional drugs to enhance the treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer and cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. AFGL Atmospheric Constituent Profiles (0.120km)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-15

    compilations and (d) individual constituents. Each species is followed by the set of journal refer- ences which contributed either directly or indirectly to... enced materials; those publications that can be associated with particular molecules are so identified. 3. ERROR ESTIMATES/VARIABILITY The practical...budgets, J. Geophys. Res; 88, 10785-10807. (NO, NO 2 , HNO 3 , NO 3] Louisnard, N., Fergant, G., Girard, A., Gramont, L., Lado -Bordowsky, 0., Laurent, J

  14. Antiviral and antituberculous activity of Helichrysum melanacme constituents.

    PubMed

    Lall, N; Hussein, A A; Meyer, J J M

    2006-04-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation of the acetonic extract of Helichrysum melanacme using human Influenza virus type A and a drug-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro resulted in the isolation of 2 4',6'-trihydroxy-3'-prenylchalcone (1) and 4',6',5''-trihydroxy-6'',6''-dimethyldihydropyrano[2'',3''-2',3'] chalcone (2) as active constituents. 3-O-methylquercetin and quercetin were also isolated but were inactive against the microorganisms tested in this study.

  15. [Study on the chemical constituents in roots of Gentiana dahurica].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian-Liang; Shi, Zhang-Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zheng, Jiang-Bin

    2011-08-01

    To systematically study the chemical constituents in the roots of Gentiana dahurica. Various column chromatographic techniques were used for isolation and purification. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data (UV, IR, MS, NMR) and identified by comparing with the authentic substance. Seven compounds were isolated and identified as: roburic acid (1), oleanolic acid (2), beta-sitosterol (3), daucosterol (4), gentiopicroside(5), swertiamarine (6), sweroside (7). Compounds 1, 2 and 4 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  16. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Ficus microcarpa].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wen; Sun, Zhi-Rong; Li, Zhi-Yong; Jin, Jia-Xing; Wang, Wen-Quan; Yan, Yu-Ning

    2010-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the Ficus microcarpa. Isolation and identification were carried out by using various chromatography techniques and spectral methods. Eight compounds were isolated. Their structures were identified as beta-amyrone (I), lupeol (II), lupeol acetate (III), maslinic acid (IV), epifriedelinol (V), stearic acid (VI), beta-sitosterol (VI), daucosterol (VI). Compounds I, II, VI are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  17. Chemical constituents from aerial part of Curcuma wenyujin.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zheng-Ming; Li, Ying-Yu; Ji, Ping; Wang, Yu-Bo; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents from aerial part of Curcuma wenyujin. Compounds were isolated by repeated column chromatography on silica gel. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis and comparison with literature data. Six compounds were isolated and identified as codonolactone (1), voleneol (2), octacosanoic acid (3), beta-sitosterol (4), mangdesisterol (5), and daucosterol (6). Compounds 1, 2, and 5 were isolated from the plant for the first time.

  18. Assimilation of Stratospheric Meteorological and Constituent Observations: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This talk reviews the assimilation of meteorological and constituent observations of the stratosphere. The first efforts to assimilate observations into stratospheric models were during the early 1980s, and a number of research studies followed during the next decade. Since the launch of the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) in 1991, model-assimilated data sets of the stratospheric meteorological state have been routinely available. These assimilated data sets were critical in bringing together observations from the different instruments on UARS as well as linking UARS observations to measurements from other platforms. Using trajectory-mapping techniques, meteorological assimilation analyses are, now, widely used in the analysis of constituent observations and have increased the level of quantitative study of stratospheric chemistry and transport. During the 1990s the use of winds and temperatures from assimilated data sets became standard for offline chemistry and transport modeling. variability in middle latitudes. The transport experiments, however, reveal a set of shortcomings that become obvious as systematic errors are integrated over time. Generally, the tropics are not well represented, mixing between the tropics and middle latitudes is overestimated, and the residual circulation is not accurate. These shortcomings reveal underlying fundamental challenges related to bias and noise. Current studies using model simulation and data assimilation in controlled experimentation are highlighting the issues that must be addressed if assimilated data sets are to be convincingly used to study interannual variability and decadal change. observations. The primary focus has been on stratospheric ozone, but there are efforts that investigate a suite of reactive chemical constituents. Recent progress in ozone assimilation shows the potential of assimilation to contribute to the validation of ozone observations and, ultimately, the retrieval of ozone profiles from

  19. Analysis of stratospheric ozone, temperature, and minor constituent data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.; Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to use available satellite measurements of temperature and constituent concentrations to test the conceptual picture of stratospheric chemistry and transport. This was originally broken down into two sub-goals: first, to use the constituent data to search for critical tests of our understanding of stratospheric chemistry and second, to examine constituent transport processes emphasizing interactions with chemistry on various time scales. A third important goal which has evolved is to use the available solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data from Nimbus 7 to describe the morphology of recent changes in Antarctic and global ozone with emphasis on searching for constraints to theories. The major effort now being pursued relative to the two original goals is our effort as a theoretical team for the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE). Our effort for the AASE is based on the 3D transport and chemistry model at Goddard. Our goal is to use this model to place the results from the mission data in a regional and global context. Specifically, we set out to make model runs starting in late December and running through March of 1989, both with and without heterogeneous chemistry. The transport is to be carried out using dynamical fields from a 4D data assimilation model being developed under separate funding from this task. We have successfully carried out a series of single constituent transport experiments. One of the things demonstrated by these runs was the difficulty in obtaining observed low N2O abundances in the vortex without simultaneously obtaining very high ozone values. Because the runs start in late December, this difficulty arises in the attempt to define consistent initial conditions for the 3D model. To accomplish a consistent set of initial conditions, we are using the 2D photochemistry-transport model of Jackman and Douglass and mapping in potential temperature

  20. Identifying intrinsic constituents of focus through ``imitation via restoration.''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Xu, Ching X.; Sun, Xuejing

    2003-04-01

    In this study we test the hypothesis that although certain parts of an observed intonation may seem dispensable in perception tests, they nevertheless are consistently produced by speakers. We refer to all consistently produced parts of an intonation as its ``intrinsic constituents.'' To identify the intrinsic constituents, we developed an experimental paradigm called ``imitation via restoration.'' In this paradigm, the intonation under scrutiny is first recorded by a native speaker. Then words carrying a potential constituent of the intonation are replaced by a loud noise. During the experiment, the sentence containing the replacement noise is presented to the subjects together with the text. The subjects' task is to repeat the sentence in exactly the same way as they hear it. The consistency with which subjects restore the missing parts of the target intonation would therefore provide a reasonable indication as to which of them are truly intrinsic to the intonation. Our first such experiment was conducted on determining whether focus consists of only on-focus pitch range expansion or it also involves obligatory post-focus pitch range suppression. Eight native speakers of Beijing Mandarin participated as subjects. Preliminary results have provided supporting evidence for the dual-component hypothesis.

  1. [Studies on ethyl acetate soluble constituents of Huanglian Jiedutang].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao-Tang; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2008-09-01

    To study the ethyl acetate soluble constituents from the water extractive of Huanglian Jiedutang decoction, which are composed of Rhizoma Coptidis, Radix Scutellariae, Cortex Phellodendri and Fructus Gardeniae, and provide substances foundation for its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic investigation. The chemical constituents were isolated by various column chromatographic methods and structurally elucidated by NMR and MS techniques. Thirty-five compounds were isolated, among which twenty compounds have been identified as beta-sitosterol (1), oroxylin A (2), wogonin (3), ursolic acid (4), skullcapflavone I (5), tenaxin I (6), skullcapflavone II (7), limonin (8), 5, 2'-dihydroxy-6, 7, 8, 3'-tetramethoxyflavone (9), chrysin (12), baicalein (17), tenaxin II (19), 5, 7, 2'-trihydroxy-6, 8-dimethoxyflavone (21), shihulimonin A (22), 6, 2'-dihydroxy-5, 7, 8, 6'-tetramethoxyflavone (26), viscidulin II (28), 5, 7, 4'-trihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone (29), 5, 7, 2', 6'-tetrahydroxyflavone (30), wogonin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronide methyl ester (31) and daucosterol (34). On the basis of reported results of the chemical constituents of Rhizoma Coptidis, Radix Scutellariae, Cortex Phellodendri and Fructus Gardeniae, it was estimated that all flavonoid compounds rised from the Radix Scutellariae, and compounds 8 and 22 rised from Cortex Phellodendri. Compound 22 was identified in the Cortex Phellodendri for the first time.

  2. International Space Station Major Constituent Analyzer On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Ben D.; Erwin, Philip M.; Thoresen, Souzan; Granahan, John; Matty, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is an integral part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The MCA is a mass spectrometer-based instrument designed to provide critical monitoring of six major atmospheric constituents; nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor. These gases are sampled continuously and automatically in all United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) modules via the Sample Distribution System (SDS). The MCA is the primary tool for management of atmosphere constituents and is therefore critical for ensuring a habitable ISS environment during both nominal ISS operations and campout EVA preparation in the Airlock. The MCA has been in operation in the US Destiny Laboratory Module for over 10 years, and a second MCA has been delivered to the ISS for Node 3 operation. This paper discusses the performance of the MCA over the two past year, with particular attention to lessons learned regarding the operational life of critical components. Recent data have helped drive design upgrades for a new set of orbit-replaceable units (ORUs) currently in production. Several ORU upgrades are expected to increase expected lifetimes and reliability.

  3. Volatile Constituents of Three Piper Species from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hieua, Le D; Hoic, Tran M; Thangda, Tran D; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2015-11-01

    The chemical compositions of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of three Piper plants grown in Vietnam are reported. The analysis was achieved by means of gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituents of the leaf oil of Piper majusculum Blume were β-caryophyllene (20.7%), germacrene D (18.6%) and β-elemene (11.3%). The quantitatively significant compounds of the volatile oils of P. harmandii C. DC were sabinene (leaves, 14.5%; stems, 16.2%), benzyl benzoate (leaves, 20.0%; stems, 29.40%) and benzyl salicylate (leaves, 14.1%; stems, 24.3%). Also, α-cadinol (17.0%) was identified in large proportion in the leaf oil. However, sabinene (leaves, 17.9%; stems, 13.5%), benzyl benzoate (leaves, 20.5%; stems, 32.5%) and β-eudesmol (leaves, 13.8%; stems, 8.4%) were the main constituents of P. brevicaule C. DC. This is the first report on the volatile constituents of both P. harmandii and P. brevicaule.

  4. Ethnopharmacological Investigations of Phytochemical Constituents Isolated from the Genus Cuscuta.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Muhammad; Rehman, Kanwal; Hussain, Iqbal; Farooq, Tahir; Ali, Bisharat; Majeed, Irum; Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The genus Cuscuta, of the family Cuscutaceae, is present in plants and has been traditionally used medicinally against many diseases and conditions, notably depression, mental illness, headache, spleen disease, jaundice, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Large numbers of phytochemical constituents such as alkaloids, flavonoids, lignins, oxygen heterocyclic compounds, steroids, fatty acids, phenolic acids, resin glycosides, and polysaccharides have been isolated from different species of Cuscuta. Ethnopharmacological studies conducted on such constituents have also been shown Cuscuta to possess anticancer, antiviral, antispasmodic, antihypertensive, anticonvulsant, antibacterial, antioxidant, diuretic, and hair-growth activity. Many tribes and traditional communities have long used the different forms of Cuscuta for treatment and prevention of many diseases. In this article, we comprehensively summarize relevant data regarding the phytochemical, ethnopharmacological, and traditional therapeutic uses of Cuscuta. In addition, we review the parts of the plants that are used as traditional therapeutic agents, their regions of existence, and their possible modes of action. To conclude, we provide evidence and new insights for further discovery and development of natural drugs from Cuscuta. We show that further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism of action and safety profile of phytochemical constituents isolated from Cuscuta.

  5. Preventive and Prophylactic Mechanisms of Action of Pomegranate Bioactive Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Lu, Pinyi; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit presents strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiobesity, and antitumoral properties, thus leading to an increased popularity as a functional food and nutraceutical source since ancient times. It can be divided into three parts: seeds, peel, and juice, all of which seem to have medicinal benefits. Several studies investigate its bioactive components as a means to associate them with a specific beneficial effect and develop future products and therapeutic applications. Many beneficial effects are related to the presence of ellagic acid, ellagitannins (including punicalagins), punicic acid and other fatty acids, flavonoids, anthocyanidins, anthocyanins, estrogenic flavonols, and flavones, which seem to be its most therapeutically beneficial components. However, the synergistic action of the pomegranate constituents appears to be superior when compared to individual constituents. Promising results have been obtained for the treatment of certain diseases including obesity, insulin resistance, intestinal inflammation, and cancer. Although moderate consumption of pomegranate does not result in adverse effects, future studies are needed to assess safety and potential interactions with drugs that may alter the bioavailability of bioactive constituents of pomegranate as well as drugs. The aim of this review is to summarize the health effects and mechanisms of action of pomegranate extracts in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23737845

  6. SSME Key Operations Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian; Bradley, Michael; Ives, Janet

    1997-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test program was conducted between August 1995 and May 1996 using the Technology Test Bed (TTB) Engine. SSTO vehicle studies have indicated that increases in the propulsion system operating range can save significant weight and cost at the vehicle level. This test program demonstrated the ability of the SSME to accommodate a wide variation in safe operating ranges and therefore its applicability to the SSTO mission. A total of eight tests were completed with four at Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Engine Test Facility and four at the Stennis Space Center (SSC) A-2 attitude test stand. Key demonstration objectives were: 1) Mainstage operation at 5.4 to 6.9 mixture ratio; 2) Nominal engine start with significantly reduced engine inlet pressures of 50 psia LOX and 38 psia fuel; and 3) Low power level operation at 17%, 22%, 27%, 40%, 45%, and 50% of Rated Power Level. Use of the highly instrumented TTB engine for this test series has afforded the opportunity to study in great detail engine system operation not possible with a standard SSME and has significantly contributed to a greater understanding of the capabilities of the SSME and liquid rocket engines in general.

  7. [Analysis of the chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave].

    PubMed

    Shong, E; Lui, R

    1997-10-01

    The chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave were analyzed by GC-MS-DS. 27 constituents were identified, alpha-pinene (70.65%) and caryophyllene (10.38%) of them are main components.

  8. Setting objectives for managing Key deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Wagner, Tyler; Stauffer, Glenn E.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is responsible for the protection and management of Key deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium) because the species is listed as Endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. There are a host of actions that could possibly be undertaken to recover the Key deer population, but without a clearly defined problem and stated objectives it can be difficult to compare and evaluate alternative actions. In addition, management goals and the acceptability of alternative management actions are inherently linked to stakeholders, who should be engaged throughout the process of developing a decision framework. The purpose of this project was to engage a representative group of stakeholders to develop a problem statement that captured the management problem the FWS must address with Key deer and identify objectives that, if met, would help solve the problem. In addition, the objectives were organized in a hierarchical manner (i.e., an objectives network) to show how they are linked, and measurable attributes were identified for each objective. We organized a group of people who represented stakeholders interested in and potentially affected by the management of Key deer. These stakeholders included individuals who represented local, state, and federal governments, non-governmental organizations, the general public, and local businesses. This stakeholder group met five full days over the course of an eight-week period to identify objectives that would address the following problem:“As recovery and removal from the Endangered Species list is the purpose of the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service needs a management approach that will ensure a sustainable, viable, and healthy Key deer population. Urbanization has affected the behavior and population dynamics of the Key deer and the amount and characteristics

  9. Nitrogen-Containing Constituents of Black Cohosh: Chemistry, Structure Elucidation, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lankin, David C.; Cisowska, Tamara; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    The roots/rhizomes of black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L. syn. Cimicifuga racemosa [L]. Nutt., Ranunculaceae) have been used traditionally by Native Americans to treat colds, rheumatism, and a variety of conditions related to women’s health. In recent years black cohosh preparations have become popular dietary supplements among women seeking alternative treatments for menopausal complaints. The popularity of the plant has led to extensive phytochemical and biological investigations, including several clinical trials. Most of the phytochemical and biological research has focused on two abundant classes of compounds: the triterpene glycosides and phenolic acids. A third group of phytoconstituents that has received far less attention consists of the alkaloids and related compounds that contain nitrogen. This chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge of the chemistry and biological activities associated with this group of constituents and provides some perspective on their significance for future research on this interesting plant. PMID:27795590

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 192 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 192 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 192 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 192 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium...

  14. Testing Theories of Linguistic Constituency with Configural Learning: The Case of the English Syllable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapatsinski, Vsevolod

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes and tests an experimental method to assess the psychological reality of hierarchical theories of constituent structure in particular domains. I show that a hierarchical theory of constituent structure necessarily makes the prediction that an association between constituents should be easier to learn than an association…

  15. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  16. Spatial distribution of dissolved constituents in Icelandic river waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskarsdottir, Sigrídur Magnea; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Snorrason, Arni; Halldorsdottir, Stefanía Gudrún; Gisladottir, Gudrún

    2011-02-01

    SummaryIn this study we map the spatial distribution of selected dissolved constituents in Icelandic river waters using GIS methods to study and interpret the connection between river chemistry, bedrock, hydrology, vegetation and aquatic ecology. Five parameters were selected: alkalinity, SiO 2, Mo, F and the dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved inorganic phosphorus mole ratio (DIN/DIP). The highest concentrations were found in rivers draining young rocks within the volcanic rift zone and especially those draining active central volcanoes. However, several catchments on the margins of the rift zone also had high values for these parameters, due to geothermal influence or wetlands within their catchment area. The DIN/DIP mole ratio was higher than 16 in rivers draining old rocks, but lowest in rivers within the volcanic rift zone. Thus primary production in the rivers is limited by fixed dissolved nitrogen within the rift zone, but dissolved phosphorus in the old Tertiary catchments. Nitrogen fixation within the rift zone can be enhanced by high dissolved molybdenum concentrations in the vicinity of volcanoes. The river catchments in this study were subdivided into several hydrological categories. Importantly, the variation in the hydrology of the catchments cannot alone explain the variation in dissolved constituents. The presence or absence of central volcanoes, young reactive rocks, geothermal systems and wetlands is important for the chemistry of the river waters. We used too many categories within several of the river catchments to be able to determine a statistically significant connection between the chemistry of the river waters and the hydrological categories. More data are needed from rivers draining one single hydrological category. The spatial dissolved constituent distribution clearly revealed the difference between the two extremes, the young rocks of the volcanic rift zone and the old Tertiary terrain.

  17. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    PubMed

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sampling and analysis of natural gas trace constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Attari, A.; Chao, S.

    1993-09-01

    Major and minor components of natural gas are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), using a thermal conductivity (TC). The best results obtained by these methods can report no better than 0.01 mole percent of each measured component. Even the extended method of analysis by flame ionization detector (FID) can only improve on the detection limit of hydrocarbons. The gas industry needs better information on all trace constituents of natural gas, whether native or inadvertently added during gas processing that may adversely influence the operation of equipment or the safety of the consumer. The presence of arsenic and mercury inmore » some gas deposits have now been documented in international literature as causing not only human toxicity but also damaging to the field equipment. Yet, no standard methods of sampling and analysis exist to provide this much needed information. In this paper the authors report the results of a three-year program to develop an extensive array of sampling and analysis methods for speciation and measurement of trace constituents of natural gas. A cryogenic sampler operating at near 200 K ({minus}99 F) and at pipeline pressures up to 12.4 {times} 10{sup 6}Pa (1800 psig) has been developed to preconcentrate and recover all trace constituents with boiling points above butanes. Specific analytical methods have been developed for speciating and measurement of many trace components (corresponding to US EPA air toxics) by GC-AED and GC-MS, and for determining various target compounds by other techniques. Moisture, oxygen and sulfur contents are measured on site using dedicated field instruments. Arsenic, mercury and radon are sampled by specific solid sorbents for subsequent laboratory analysis.« less

  19. Comparative Antitussive Effects of Medicinal Plants and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Saeideh; Shakeri, Farzaneh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2018-01-15

    Context • The cough is a protective reflex, with 2 types, one being more sensitive to mechanical stimulation and the other to chemical stimulation, such as sulfur dioxide, ammonia, citric acid, and capsaicin. Some evidence is available that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Today, use of herbal drugs is increasing all over the world for various ailments, including to provide antitussive activity. Objective • The study intended to review the antitussive effects of various extracts, some fractions, and some constituents of the studied medicinal plants. Design • Various databases, including the Medline, Science Direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar, were searched for studies published between 1978 and 2015, using the keywords antitussive and cough and the names of various medicinal plants and their constituents. Setting • The study took place in the districts related to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Mashhad, Iran). Outcome Measures • The antitussive effects of medicinal plants and their constituents were normalized to 50 mg/kg and 1 mg/mL against various cough stimulants and compared. Results • The most potent antitussive effect was observed for Nigella sativa and Linum usitatissimum on coughs induced by sulfur dioxide. Artemisia absinthium showed a higher antitussive effect on cough induced by ammonia compared with the other studied medicinal plants. The antitussive effects of Cuminum cyminum and Glycyrrhiza glabra were more potent on cough induced by citric acid than other medicinal plants. Conclusions • These results suggest the therapeutic potential of the studied medicinal plants as antitussive therapies. However, only a few clinical studies have examined the antitussive effects of medicinal plants, and more clinical studies are needed. The underlying mechanisms of the antitussive effects of medicinal plants should be also examined in further studies.

  20. Perspective on Biotransformation and De Novo Biosynthesis of Licorice Constituents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yujia; Lv, Bo; Feng, Xudong; Li, Chun

    2017-12-27

    Licorice, an important herbal medicine, is derived from the dried roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza genus plants. It has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical, tobacco, and cosmetics industries with high economic value. However, overexploitation of licorice resources has severely destroyed the local ecology. Therefore, producing bioactive compounds of licorice through the biotransformation and bioengineering methods is a hot spot in recent years. In this perspective, we comprehensively summarize the biotransformation of licorice constituents into high-value-added derivatives by biocatalysts. Furthermore, successful cases and the strategies for de novo biosynthesizing compounds of licorice in microbes have been summarized. This paper will provide new insights for the further research of licorice.

  1. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  2. Investigation of acoustic metasurfaces with constituent material properties considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Nikhil JRK; Li, Yong; Jing, Yun

    2018-03-01

    This paper examines the transmission behavior of two acoustic metasurfaces and their constituent structural units while including the various material properties that could affect their functionality. The unit cells and the metasurfaces are modeled numerically, and the impact of the structural interaction and thermoviscosity on sound transmission and phase modulation is studied. Each of these effects is viewed individually in order to better understand their influence. Various cases are presented, and the change in the behavior of the metasurfaces is investigated. The deviations from the ideal desired results are examined and highlighted to show that it is important to incorporate these effects to better predict the behavior of acoustic metasurfaces.

  3. [Study on the chemical constituents in Pouzolzia zeylanica].

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming; Niu, You-Ya; Yu, Juan; Kong, Qing-Tong

    2012-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Pouzolzia zeylanica. Many chromatography means were used in separation and purification, and the structures of all compounds were identified by the means of spectroscopic analysis and physicochemical properties. 14 compounds were elucidated as: beta-sitosterol (1), daucosterol (2), oleanolic acid (3), epicatechin (4), alpha-amyrin (5), eugenyl-beta-rutinoside (6), 2alpha, 3alpha, 19alpha-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic (7), scopolin (8), scutellarein-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside (9), scopoletin (10), quercetin (11), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucoside (12), apigenin (13), 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid (14). All compounds are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  4. [Chemical constituents of Cocculus orbiculatus var. mollis root].

    PubMed

    Liao, Jing; Lei, Yu; Wang, Jian-Zhong

    2014-02-01

    To study the chemical constituents in the root of Cocculus orbiculatus var. mollis. The compounds were isolated by silica gel chromatography, their structures were established by spectroscopic methods. Eleven compounds were isolated and identified as wattisine A (I), O-methylcocsoline (II), (+) cocsoline (III), (+) cocsuline (IV), magnoflorine (V), sino-coculine (VI), isosinococuline (VII), (-) coclaurine (VIII), daucosterol (IX), beta-sitosterol (X) and 1-oleioyl-3-(9Z, 12Z-arachoyl) glycerol (XI). Compound I is isolated from this genus for the first time,and compound II - XI are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  5. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Lonicera macranthoides].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Xing-Zeng; Wang, Ming; Dong, Yun-Fa; Feng, Xu

    2008-07-01

    To study the chemical constituents of flower buds of Lonicera macranthoides. The 90% EtOH extract of Lonicera macranthoides. was successively partitioned with petroleum ether and ethyl acetete. Repeated column chromatography of the ethyl acetete fraction afforded the following compounds (1-9): ginnol (1), triacontanol (2), ursolic acid (3), beta-sitosterol (4), triacontane (5), palmitic acid (6), beta-daucosterol (7), 3-decyl-3-octyldocosan-1-ol (8), 3-dodecyl-3-nonyldocosan-1-ol (9). All compounds except 4 are isolated from this plant for the first time while compounds 2, 3, 5, 8 and 9 are their first time been isolated from genus Lonicera.

  6. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Phlomis younghusbandii].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-li; Lin, Rui-chao; Wang, Gang-li; Zhao, Han-ru; Gao, Yuan; Ciren, Bianha

    2007-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Phlomis younghusbandii. Compounds were isolated from the ethanolic extract by silica gel column chromatography, and their structures were identified by physical and chemical evidences and spectral methods. Eight compounds were isolated and identified respectively as 8-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester (1), shanzhiside methyl ester (2), phlomiol (3), 2-butoxy-2-(hydroxymthyl) tetrahydro-2H-3,4,5-pyrantriol (4), sesamoside (5), pulchelloside-I (6), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (7) and daucosterol (8). All the compounds were isolated from the plant for the first time.

  7. [Study on the chemical constituents from Melicope ptelefolia].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-Feng; Liang, Yue; Du, Qing-Tao; Guo, Li-Bing

    2011-03-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Melicope ptelefolia. Several chromatographic methods were applied to isolate and purify compounds. Their structures were identified on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectroscopic data. Seven compounds were isolated and elucidated as n-octadecanyl palmitate (I), beta-sitosterol (II), palmitic acid (III), 3, 5,3'-trihydroxy-8,4'-dimethoxy-7-(3-methylbut-2-enyloxy) flavone (IV), daucosterol (V), salylic acid (VI), kaempferol-3-O-alpha-D-arabinpyranoside (VII). Compound VII is isolated from the genus for the first time, Compounds V and VI are isolated from Melicope ptelefolia for the first time.

  8. [Chemical constituents from involatile moiety of Pogostemon cablin].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liejun; Mu, Shuzhen; Zhang, Jianxin; Deng, Bin; Song, Zhiqin; Hao, Xiaojiang

    2009-02-01

    To study the chemical constituents of involatile moiety of Pogostemon cablin. Compounds were isolated and purified by repeated column chromatography, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Nine compounds have been isolated and identified: epifriedelinol (1), 5-hydroxymethol-2-furfural (2), succinic acid (3), beta-sitosterol (4), daucosterol (5), crenatoside (6), 3'''-O-methylcrenatoside (7), isocrenatoside (8), and apigenin-7-O-beta-D-(6"-p-coumaryl)-glucoside (9). Compounds 2, 3, 6-8 were isolated from Pogostemon genus for the first time.

  9. [Studies on the chemical constituents from Cissus pteroclada].

    PubMed

    Chi, Cui-Yun; Wang, Feng; Lei, Ting; Xu, Shao-Yu; Hong, Ai-Hua; Cen, Ying-Zhou

    2010-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Yao Medicine Cissus pteroclada. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography with silica gel, TLC and recrystallization. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectra analysis. Six compounds were isolated and identified as beta-sitosterol (I), bergenin (II), 11-O-galloylbergenin (III), 11-O-(4-hydroxy benzoyl) bergenin (IV), gallic acid (V), daucosterol (VI). Compounds III and NIV are obtained from the genus for the first time. All the compounds are isolated from this plant for the first time except the compound II.

  10. [Chemical constituents from supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-yan; Lin, Hai-cheng; Wang, Guo-li; Zhang, Lian-xue

    2014-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis. The compounds were separated and purified by conventional column chromatography and their structures were identified by spectroscopic methods. Nine compounds were isolated from the supercritical CO2 extraction of Schisandra chinensis, and their structures were identified as chrysophanol(1),schisandrin B(2), β-sitosterol(3), schisandrin C(4),schisandrol A(5), angeloylgomisin H(6), daucosterol(7) 1, 5-dimethyl citrate (8), and shikimic acid (9). Compounds 1, 8 and 9 are isolated from Schisandra chinensis for the first time,and compound 1 as an anthraquinone is isolated from this genus for the first time.

  11. [Study on the chemical constituents from Clematis brevicaudata].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Mei; Du, Jing; Miao, Zhong-Huan; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Clematis brevicaudata. The compounds were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated through spectroscopic analysis (NMR). Eight compounds were isolated and identified as: palmitic acid (1), 1-docosanol (2), pentacosanoic acid-2', 3'-dihydroxypropyl ester (3), beta-sitosterol (4), daucosterol (5), a mixture of the trans-p-coumarate of the n-alkanols (6), 3,4-dihydroxy-trans coumatate ethyl ester (7), syringaresinol-O-D-glucopyranoside (8). All these compounds are obtained from Clematis brevicaudata for the first time.

  12. [Chemical constituents from the rhizoma of Arundina graminifolia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-feng; Han, Yun; Xing, Dong-ming; Wang, Wei; Xu, Li-zhen; Du, Li-jun; Ding, Yi

    2004-02-01

    To isolate and elucidate the chemical constituents from the tuber of Arundina graminifolia. The compounds were extracted by 95% alcohol and isolated by column chromatography on silica gel, SephedaxLH-20 and ODS. The structures were determined by UV, IR, NMR and MS spectral analysis. Five compounds were isolated, and their structures were identified as (2E)-, 2-propenoic acid, 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-decosyl ester (I), p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (II), triacontanol (III) and p-hydroxybenzylethyl ether (IV), 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybibenzyl (V), respectively. All compounds were isolated from the genus of Arundina for the first time.

  13. [Chemical constituents of Carya cathayensis and their antitumor bioactivity].

    PubMed

    Wu, De-lin; Chen, Shi-yun; Liu, Jing-song; Jin, Chuan-shan; Xu, Feng-qing

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of Carya cathayensis and their antitumor bioactivity. The compounds were isolated by Sephadex LH-20 and silica gel column chromatography. Their structures were identified by physicochemical properties and spectroscopic analysis. Then their cytotoxic activity was studied. Five compounds were elucidated as chrysophanol (1), physcion (2), beta-sitosterol (3), pinostrobin(4), 4,8-dihydroxy-1-tetralone (5). Compounds 2 and 5 are isolated from Carya cathayensis for the first time. In the MTT antitumor experiments, the compounds 1,4 and 5 have the cytotoxic activity to KB cell.

  14. Cytotoxic constituents of ethyl acetate fraction from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengli; Zhang, Wu; Li, Jie; Lei, Jiachuan; Yu, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate fraction (EE-DS) from Dianthus superbus was found to possess the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in previous study. To investigate cytotoxic constituents, the bioassay-guided isolation of compounds from EE-DS was performed. Two dianthramides (1 and 2), three flavonoids (3-5), two coumarins (6 and 7) and three other compounds (8-10) were obtained. Structures of isolated compounds were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Cytotoxicity of the compounds against HepG2 cells was evaluated. Compound 1 showed the strongest cytotoxicity, compounds 10, 4, 3 and 5 had moderate cytotoxicity.

  15. Standardization of Cassia spectabilis with respect to authenticity, assay and chemical constituent analysis.

    PubMed

    Torey, Angeline; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Yeng, Chen; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2010-05-10

    Quality control standardizations of the various medicinal plants used in traditional medicine is becoming more important today in view of the commercialization of formulations based on these plants. An attempt at standardization of Cassia spectabilis leaf has been carried out with respect to authenticity, assay and chemical constituent analysis. The authentication involved many parameters, including gross morphology, microscopy of the leaves and functional group analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The assay part of standardization involved determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract which could help assess the chemical effects and establish curative values. The MIC of the C. spectabilis leaf extracts was investigated using the Broth Dilution Method. The extracts showed a MIC value of 6.25 mg/mL, independent of the extraction time. The chemical constituent aspect of standardization involves quantification of the main chemical components in C. spectabilis. The GCMS method used for quantification of 2,4-(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione in the extract was rapid, accurate, precise, linear (R(2) = 0.8685), rugged and robust. Hence this method was suitable for quantification of this component in C. spectabilis. The standardization of C. spectabilis is needed to facilitate marketing of medicinal plants, with a view to promoting the export of valuable Malaysian Traditional Medicinal plants such as C. spectabilis.

  16. Rapid Characterization of Constituents in Tribulus terrestris from Different Habitats by UHPLC/Q-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Fangxu; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Xinguang; Kang, Liping; Fan, Ziquan; Qiao, Lirui; Yan, Renyi; Liu, Shuchen; Ma, Baiping

    2017-11-01

    A strategy for rapid identification of the chemical constituents from crude extracts of Tribulus terrestris was proposed using an informatics platform for the UHPLC/Q-TOF MS E data analyses. This strategy mainly utilizes neutral losses, characteristic fragments, and in-house library to rapidly identify the structure of the compounds. With this strategy, rapid characterization of the chemical components of T. terrestris from Beijing, China was successfully achieved. A total of 82 steroidal saponins and nine flavonoids were identified or tentatively identified from T. terrestris. Among them, 15 new components were deduced based on retention times and characteristic MS fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, the chemical components of T. terrestris, including the other two samples from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region, China, and Rome, Italy, were also identified with this strategy. Altogether, 141 chemical components were identified from these three samples, of which 39 components were identified or tentatively identified as new compounds, including 35 groups of isomers. It demonstrated that this strategy provided an efficient protocol for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in complex samples such as traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) by UHPLC/Q-TOF MS E with informatics platform. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Extraction behavior of metallic contaminants and soil constituents from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, S; Park, S W; Ulmanu, M

    2005-06-01

    With an aim of developing an effective remediation technology for soils contaminated by heavy metals and metalloids, the extraction behavior of metallic contaminants as well as those of soil constituents was studied on a laboratory scale. Three contaminated soils collected from a former metal recycling plant were examined. These three soils were found to be contaminated by As, Cu, Pb, Sb, Se and Zn as compared to the non-contaminated soil. The pH-dependent extraction behavior of various elements from the soils was measured in a wide pH range and categorized into three groups. Hydrochloric acid (HCl), H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3, sodium citrate, sodium tartrate, disodium dihydrogen ethylenediaminetetraacetate and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid were evaluated as extractants for removing contaminants from the soils. Extraction behavior of the soil constituents was also studied. The efficiency of the extraction was evaluated by the Japanese content and leaching tests. The stabilization of Pb remaining in the soil after the extraction process was conducted by the addition of iron(III) and calcium chloride.

  18. Rapid Characterization of Constituents in Tribulus terrestris from Different Habitats by UHPLC/Q-TOF MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Fangxu; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Xinguang; Kang, Liping; Fan, Ziquan; Qiao, Lirui; Yan, Renyi; Liu, Shuchen; Ma, Baiping

    2017-08-01

    A strategy for rapid identification of the chemical constituents from crude extracts of Tribulus terrestris was proposed using an informatics platform for the UHPLC/Q-TOF MSE data analyses. This strategy mainly utilizes neutral losses, characteristic fragments, and in-house library to rapidly identify the structure of the compounds. With this strategy, rapid characterization of the chemical components of T. terrestris from Beijing, China was successfully achieved. A total of 82 steroidal saponins and nine flavonoids were identified or tentatively identified from T. terrestris. Among them, 15 new components were deduced based on retention times and characteristic MS fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, the chemical components of T. terrestris, including the other two samples from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region, China, and Rome, Italy, were also identified with this strategy. Altogether, 141 chemical components were identified from these three samples, of which 39 components were identified or tentatively identified as new compounds, including 35 groups of isomers. It demonstrated that this strategy provided an efficient protocol for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in complex samples such as traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) by UHPLC/Q-TOF MSE with informatics platform. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Constituents of Okra

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fangbo; Zhong, Yu; Li, Mengqiu; Chang, Qi; Liao, Yonghong; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile

    2015-01-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench), a healthy vegetable, is widely spread in tropical and subtropical areas. Previous studies have proven that okra pods possess anti-fatigue activity, and the aim of this research is to clarify the anti-fatigue constituents. To achieve this, we divided okra pods (OPD) into seeds (OSD) and skins (OSK), and compared the contents of total polysaccharides, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, isoquercitrin, and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose and the antioxidant activity in vitro and anti-fatigue activity in vivo between OSD and OSK. The contents of total polyphenols and total polysaccharides were 29.5% and 14.8% in OSD and 1.25% and 43.1% in OSK, respectively. Total flavonoids, isoquercitrin and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose (5.35%, 2.067% and 2.741%, respectively) were only detected in OSD. Antioxidant assays, including 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and reducing power test, and weight-loaded swimming test showed OSD possessed significant antioxidant and anti-fatigue effects. Moreover, biochemical determination revealed that that anti-fatigue activity of OSD is caused by reducing the levels of blood lactic acid (BLA) and urea nitrogen (BUN), enhancing hepatic glycogen storage and promoting antioxidant ability by lowering malondialdehyde (MDA) level and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels. These results proved okra seeds were the anti-fatigue part of okra pods and polyphenols and flavonoids were active constituents. PMID:26516905

  20. Hardware Design Improvements to the Major Constituent Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, Scott; Schwietert, Daniel; Anaya, Marcial; DeWolf, Shannon; Merrill, Dave; Gardner, Ben D.; Thoresen, Souzan; Granahan, John; Belcher, Paul; Matty, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is designed to monitor the major constituents of the ISS's internal atmosphere. This mass spectrometer based system is an integral part of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and is a primary tool for the management of ISS atmosphere composition. As a part of NASA Change Request CR10773A, several alterations to the hardware have been made to accommodate improved MCA logistics. First, the ORU 08 verification gas assembly has been modified to allow the verification gas cylinder to be installed on orbit. The verification gas is an essential MCA consumable that requires periodic replenishment. Designing the cylinder for subassembly transport reduces the size and weight of the maintained item for launch. The redesign of the ORU 08 assembly includes a redesigned housing, cylinder mounting apparatus, and pneumatic connection. The second hardware change is a redesigned wiring harness for the ORU 02 analyzer. The ORU 02 electrical connector interface was damaged in a previous on-orbit installation, and this necessitated the development of a temporary fix while a more permanent solution was developed. The new wiring harness design includes flexible cable as well as indexing fasteners and guide-pins, and provides better accessibility during the on-orbit maintenance operation. This presentation will describe the hardware improvements being implemented for MCA as well as the expected improvement to logistics and maintenance.

  1. [New pharmacological activities of garlic and its constituents].

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, H

    1997-10-01

    According to the recent pharmacological findings, garlic is a preventive rather than therapeutic. Epidemiological studies in China, Italy and USA showed the inverse relationship between stomach and colon cancer incidences and dietary garlic intake. Anti-carcinogenic activities of garlic and its constituents including sulfides and S-allyl cysteine, have been demonstrated using several animal models. Garlic preparations has been also shown to lower serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which are major risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, through inhibition of their bio-synthesis in the liver, and to inhibit oxidation of low density lipoprotein. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed that aged garlic extract stimulated immune functions, such as proliferation of lymphocyte, cytokine release, NK activity and phagocytosis. More recently, aged garlic extract has been demonstrated to prolong life span of senescence accelerated mice and prevent brain atrophy. Manufacturing processes significantly affect chemical constituents in garlic preparations. Different forms contain different phytochemicals and may have different effects and toxicities. For example, aged garlic extract inhibited t-BuOOH-induced oxidation, whereas raw garlic stimulated the oxidation. Although garlic has been used as a condiment and folklore for a long time, it has been noted to cause adverse reactions, such as stomach ulcer and anemia. Among the garlic preparations, only aged garlic extract has been proven to be safe through toxicological studies. Thus, aged garlic extract could be the most promising garlic preparation for disease prevention.

  2. On Latent Growth Models for Composites and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Gregory R; Mao, Xiulin; Kher, Hemant

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decade and a half, latent growth modeling has become an extremely popular and versatile technique for evaluating longitudinal change and its determinants. Most common among the models applied are those for a single measured variable over time. This model has been extended in a variety of ways, most relevant for the current work being the multidomain and the second-order latent growth models. Whereas the former allows for growth function characteristics to be modeled for multiple outcomes simultaneously, with the degree of growth characteristics' relations assessed within the model (e.g., cross-domain slope factor correlations), the latter models growth in latent outcomes, each of which has effect indicators repeated over time. But what if one has an outcome that is believed to be formative relative to its indicator variables rather than latent? In this case, where the outcome is a composite of multiple constituents, modeling change over time is less straightforward. This article provides analytical and applied details for simultaneously modeling growth in composites and their constituent elements, including a real data example using a general computer self-efficacy questionnaire.

  3. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rehab M; Elfeky, Souad A; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite-ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λmax=254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm(-2) to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal degradation of cloudy apple juice phenolic constituents.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, D; Valkenborg, D; Coudijzer, K; Noten, B; Servaes, K; De Loose, M; Voorspoels, S; Diels, L; Van Droogenbroeck, B

    2014-11-01

    Although conventional thermal processing is still the most commonly used preservation technique in cloudy apple juice production, detailed knowledge on phenolic compound degradation during thermal treatment is still limited. To evaluate the extent of thermal degradation as a function of time and temperature, apple juice samples were isothermally treated during 7,200s over a temperature range of 80-145 °C. An untargeted metabolomics approach based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry was developed and applied with the aim to find out the most heat labile phenolic constituents in cloudy apple juice. By the use of a high resolution mass spectrometer, the high degree of in-source fragmentation, the quality of deconvolution and the employed custom-made database, it was possible to achieve a high degree of structural elucidation for the thermolabile phenolic constituents. Procyanidin subclass representatives were discovered as the most heat labile phenolic compounds of cloudy apple juice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Crataegus pinnatifida: chemical constituents, pharmacology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaqi; Peng, Wei; Qin, Rongxin; Zhou, Hong

    2014-01-30

    Crataegus pinnatifida (Hawthorn) is widely distributed in China and has a long history of use as a traditional medicine. The fruit of C. pinnatifida has been used for the treatment of cardiodynia, hernia, dyspepsia, postpartum blood stasis, and hemafecia and thus increasing interest in this plant has emerged in recent years. Between 1966 and 2013, numerous articles have been published on the chemical constituents, pharmacology or pharmacologic effects and toxicology of C. pinnatifida. To review the pharmacologic advances and to discuss the potential perspective for future investigation, we have summarized the main literature findings of these publications. So far, over 150 compounds including flavonoids, triterpenoids, steroids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, lignans, hydroxycinnamic acids, organic acids and nitrogen-containing compounds have been isolated and identified from C. pinnatifida. It has been found that these constituents and extracts of C. pinnatifida have broad pharmacological effects with low toxicity on, for example, the cardiovascular, digestive, and endocrine systems, and pathogenic microorganisms, supporting the view that C. pinnatifida has favorable therapeutic effects. Thus, although C. pinnatifida has already been widely used as pharmacological therapy, due to its various active compounds, further research is warranted to develop new drugs.

  6. The cytotoxic constituents from marine-derived streptomyces 3320#

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hong; Gu, Qianqun; Cui, Chengbin; Zhu, Weiming

    2006-01-01

    The present work studies the chemical constituents from marine-derived streptomyces 3320# and their antitumor activities. The n-BuOH extract of the ferment broth of 3320# was chromatographed on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, ODS columns and HPLC to separate the compounds with antitoumor activities. Their structures were identified using IR, UV, NMR, MS spectroscopic techniques and compared with published data. The antitumor activities of the isolates were assayed using SRB method and flow cytometry assay, accompanied with the morphological observation of the cells under light microscope against mammalian tsFT210 cells. Ten compounds, cyclo-(Ala-Leu) 1, cyclo-(Ala-Ile) 2, cyclo-(Ala-Val) 3, cyclo-(Phe- Pro) 4, cyclo-(Phe-Gly) 5, cyclo-(Leu-Pro) 6, 1-methyl-1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid 7, N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl) acetamide 8, 4-methyoxy-1-(2-hydroxy) ethylbenzene 9 and uridine 10, were isolated from the ferment broth of streptomyces 3320#. Among them, compounds 6, 7, 8 and 10 showed potent cytotoxicity against the tsFT210 cell with the IC50 values of 3.6, 7.2, 5.2 and 1.6 mmol L-1, respectively. Compounds 8, 10 also exhibited apoptosis inducing activity under 2.0 mmol L-1. Compounds 6, 7, 8 and 10 are the principle bioactive constituents responsible for the antitumor activities of marine streptomyces 3320#. Compound 7 was isolated from this species for the first time.

  7. Chemical constituents of Cordia latifolia and their nematicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Begum, Sabira; Perwaiz, Sobiya; Siddiqui, Bina S; Khan, Shazia; Fayyaz, Shahina; Ramzan, Musarrat

    2011-05-01

    Following nematicidal activity-guided isolation studies on the fruits, bark, and leaves of Cordia latifolia, two new constituents, cordinoic acid (=11-oxours-12-ene-23,28-dioic acid; 1) and cordicilin (=2-{[(E)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoyl]oxy}-3-[4-hydroxy-3-(stearoyloxy)phenyl]propanoic acid; 2) were isolated from the stem and leaves, respectively, together with nine known compounds, namely cordioic and cordifolic acid from the stem bark, latifolicin A-D and rosmarinic acid from the fruits, and cordinol and cordicinol from the leaves. Their structures were determined by means of spectroscopic analyses including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. The nematicidal activities of these constituents were determined against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Hundred percent mortality was caused by all of these after 72 h at a 0.125% concentration. Compound 1 and cordioic acid were most active and caused 100% mortality after 24 h at a 0.50% concentration. Furthermore, compound 2, the ester of rosemarinic acid, was found to be more active than the free acid. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  8. Maintain levels of nicotine but reduce other smoke constituents: a formula for ''less-hazardous'' cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.C.; Young, J.C.; Rickert, W.S.

    Twenty-two volunteers who smoked more than 20 cigarettes with ''high'' nicotine yields (0.8 to 1.2 mg) per day participated in an 8-week study designed to test the hypothesis that smoking cigarettes with a constant level of nicotine but reduced deliveries of tar, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide leads to a decrease in smoke absorption. All subjects smoked their usual high-nicotine brand for the first 3 weeks (P1), and the absorption of smoke constituents was determined from levels of thiocyanate and cotinine in saliva and serum, levels of carbon monoxide in expired air, and levels of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood. Duringmore » the final 5 weeks (P2), the treatment group (16 subjects) switched to the ''light'' version of their usual brands (similar yields of nicotine but with reduced yields of tar, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide); the control group (6 subjects) smoked their usual brands for the duration of the study. Average levels of cotinine for the subjects who switched during P2 were not significantly different from those of the control group as was expected. Slight reductions were noted in average expired-air carbon monoxide levels, blood carboxyhemoglobin, and saliva thiocyanate, but these reductions were smaller than anticipated based on brand characteristics. The results suggest that the ratio of smoke constituents is different when individuals, rather than machines, smoke cigarettes. Yields determined under subject-defined conditions are necessary in order to properly evaluate the role of nicotine in the design of ''less-hazardous'' cigarettes.« less

  9. The grammar of visual narrative: Neural evidence for constituent structure in sequential image comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Neil; Jackendoff, Ray; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Kuperberg, Gina R.

    2014-01-01

    Constituent structure has long been established as a central feature of human language. Analogous to how syntax organizes words in sentences, a narrative grammar organizes sequential images into hierarchic constituents. Here we show that the brain draws upon this constituent structure to comprehend wordless visual narratives. We recorded neural responses as participants viewed sequences of visual images (comics strips) in which blank images either disrupted individual narrative constituents or fell at natural constituent boundaries. A disruption of either the first or the second narrative constituent produced a left-lateralized anterior negativity effect between 500-700ms. Disruption of the second constituent also elicited a posteriorly-distributed positivity (P600) effect. These neural responses are similar to those associated with structural violations in language and music. These findings provide evidence that comprehenders use a narrative structure to comprehend visual sequences and that the brain engages similar neurocognitive mechanisms to build structure across multiple domains. PMID:25241329

  10. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  11. Secure key storage and distribution

    DOEpatents

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  12. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gufford, Brandon T.; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G.; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4′- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27–66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2–8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19–73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65–120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20–310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product–drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. PMID:26070840

  13. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  14. Principles of visual key construction-with a visual identification key to the Fagaceae of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Kirchoff, Bruce K; Leggett, Roxanne; Her, Va; Moua, Chue; Morrison, Jessica; Poole, Chamika

    2011-01-01

    Advances in digital imaging have made possible the creation of completely visual keys. By a visual key we mean a key based primarily on images, and that contains a minimal amount of text. Characters in visual keys are visually, not verbally defined. In this paper we create the first primarily visual key to a group of taxa, in this case the Fagaceae of the southeastern USA. We also modify our recently published set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys to make them applicable to visual keys. Photographs of the Fagaceae were obtained from internet and herbarium databases or were taken specifically for this project. The images were printed and then sorted into hierarchical groups. These hierarchical groups of images were used to create the 'couplets' in the key. A reciprocal process of key creation and testing was used to produce the final keys. Four keys were created, one for each of the parts-leaves, buds, fruits and bark. Species description pages consisting of multiple images were also created for each of the species in the key. Creation and testing of the key resulted in a modified list of best practices for image use visual keys. The inclusion of images into paper and electronic keys has greatly increased their ease of use. However, virtually all of these keys are still based upon verbally defined, atomistic characters. The creation of primarily visual keys allows us to overcome the well-known limitations of linguistic-based characters and create keys that are much easier to use, especially for botanical novices.

  15. Key handling in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Newe, T.

    2007-07-01

    With the rapid growth of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), many advanced application areas have received significant attention. However, security will be an important factor for their full adoption. Wireless sensor nodes pose unique challenges and as such traditional security protocols, used in traditional networks cannot be applied directly. Some new protocols have been published recently with the goal of providing both privacy of data and authentication of sensor nodes for WSNs. Such protocols can employ private-key and/or public key cryptographic algorithms. Public key algorithms hold the promise of simplifying the network infrastructure required to provide security services such as: privacy, authentication and non-repudiation, while symmetric algorithms require less processing power on the lower power wireless node. In this paper a selection of key establishment/agreement protocols are reviewed and they are broadly divided into two categories: group key agreement protocols and pair-wise key establishment protocols. A summary of the capabilities and security related services provided by each protocol is provided.

  16. Association between particulate matter and its chemical constituents of urban air pollution and daily mortality or morbidity in Beijing City.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Xin, Jinyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan; Wang, Shigong; Cheng, Mengtian; Wen, Tianxue; Wang, Guangcheng; Liu, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Recent time series studies have indicated that daily mortality and morbidity are associated with particulate matters. However, about the relative effects and its seasonal patterns of fine particulate matter constituents is particularly limited in developing Asian countries. In this study, we examined the role of particulate matters and its key chemical components of fine particles on both mortality and morbidity in Beijing. We applied several overdispersed Poisson generalized nonlinear models, adjusting for time, day of week, holiday, temperature, and relative humidity, to investigate the association between risk of mortality or morbidity and particulate matters and its constituents in Beijing, China, for January 2005 through December 2009. Particles and several constituents were associated with multiple mortality or morbidity categories, especially on respiratory health. For a 3-day lag, the nonaccident mortality increased by 1.52, 0.19, 1.03, 0.56, 0.42, and 0.32% for particulate matter (PM)2.5, PM10, K(+), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), and NO3(-) based on interquartile ranges of 36.00, 64.00, 0.41, 8.75, 1.43, and 2.24 μg/m(3), respectively. The estimates of short-term effects for PM2.5 and its components in the cold season were 1 ~ 6 times higher than that in the full year on these health outcomes. Most of components had stronger adverse effects on human health in the heavy PM2.5 mass concentrations, especially for K(+), NO3(-), and SO4(2-). This analysis added to the growing body of evidence linking PM2.5 with mortality or morbidity and indicated that excess risks may vary among specific PM2.5 components. Combustion-related products, traffic sources, vegetative burning, and crustal component and resuspended road dust may play a key role in the associations between air pollution and public health in Beijing.

  17. Proactive Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galassi, John P., Ed.

    Several authors describe group counseling programs provided by a university counseling center to meet student needs for developing interpersonal communication skills and self-assertion behavior. In response to these needs, the counseling center provided personal growth groups, a proactive black group, a women's group, a marriage growth group, and…

  18. Pretreatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics alters the pharmacokinetics of major constituents of Shaoyao-Gancao decoction in rats after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Yuan, Jie; Hu, Wen-Juan; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ye, Yang; Zhong, Da-Fang; Zhao, Guang-Rong; Yao, Sheng; Liu, Jia

    2018-05-17

    The influence of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of major constituents of Shaoyao-Gancao decoction (SGD) in rats was investigated. The pharmacokinetic behaviors of paeoniflorin (PF), albiflorin (AF), liquiritin (LT), isoliquiritin (ILT), liquiritin apioside (LA), isoliquiritin apioside (ILA), and glycyrrhizic acid (GL), seven major constituents of SGD, as well as glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a major metabolite of GL, were analyzed. A 1-week pretreatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics (ampicillin, metronidazole, neomycin, 1 g L -1 ; and vancomycin, 0.5 g L -1 ) via drinking water reduced plasma exposure of the major constituents. The AUC 0-24 h of PF and LT was significantly decreased by 28.7% and 33.8% (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, the AUC 0-24 h of AF, ILT, LA, ILA, and GL was decreased by 31.4%, 50.9%, 16.9%, 44.1%, and 37.0%, respectively, compared with the control group. In addition, the plasma GA exposure in the antibiotic-pretreated group was significantly lower (P < 0.005) than the control group. The in vitro stability of the major constituents of SGD in the rat intestinal contents with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics was also investigated. The major constituents were comparatively stable in the rat duodenum contents, and the biotransformation of GL mainly occurred in the rat colon contents. In summary, broad-spectrum antibiotics suppressed the absorption of the major constituents of SGD and significantly inhibited the biotransformation of GL to GA by suppressing the colon microbiota. The results indicated a potential clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) when SGD was administered with broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  19. Analysis of Food Contaminants, Residues, and Chemical Constituents of Concern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Baraem; Reuhs, Bradley L.; Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The food chain that starts with farmers and ends with consumers can be complex, involving multiple stages of production and distribution (planting, harvesting, breeding, transporting, storing, importing, processing, packaging, distributing to retail markets, and shelf storing) (Fig. 18.1). Various practices can be employed at each stage in the food chain, which may include pesticide treatment, agricultural bioengineering, veterinary drug administration, environmental and storage conditions, processing applications, economic gain practices, use of food additives, choice of packaging material, etc. Each of these practices can play a major role in food quality and safety, due to the possibility of contamination with or introduction (intentionally and nonintentionally) of hazardous substances or constituents. Legislation and regulation to ensure food quality and safety are in place and continue to develop to protect the stakeholders, namely farmers, consumers, and industry. [Refer to reference (1) for information on regulations of food contaminants and residues.

  20. Mammalian autophagy degrades nuclear constituents in response to tumorigenic stress.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhixun; Ivanov, Andrejs; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-08-02

    During autophagy, double-membrane autophagosomes are observed in the cytoplasm. Thus, extensive studies have focused on autophagic turnover of cytoplasmic material. Whether autophagy has a role in degrading nuclear constituents is poorly understood. We reveal that the autophagy protein LC3/Atg8 directly interacts with the nuclear lamina protein LMNB1 (lamin B1), and binds to LMN/lamin-associated chromatin domains (LADs). Through these interactions, autophagy specifically mediates destruction of nuclear lamina during tumorigenic stress, such as by activated oncogenes and DNA damage. This nuclear lamina degradation upon aberrant cellular stress impairs cell proliferation by inducing cellular senescence, a stable form of cell-cycle arrest and a tumor-suppressive mechanism. Our findings thus suggest that, in response to cancer-promoting stress, autophagy degrades nuclear material to drive cellular senescence, as a means to restrain tumorigenesis. Our work provokes a new direction in studying the role of autophagy in the nucleus and in tumor suppression.

  1. Kaon quark distribution functions in the chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Sawada, Takahiro; Kao, Chung Wen

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the valence u and s ¯ quark distribution functions of the K+ meson, vK (u )(x ,Q2) and vK (s ¯)(x ,Q2), in the framework of the chiral constituent quark model. We judiciously choose the bare distributions at the initial scale to generate the dressed distributions at the higher scale, considering the meson cloud effects and the QCD evolution, which agree with the phenomenologically satisfactory valence quark distribution of the pion and the experimental data of the ratio vK (u )(x ,Q2)/vπ (u )(x ,Q2) . We show how the meson cloud effects affect the bare distribution functions in detail. We find that a smaller S U (3 ) flavor symmetry breaking effect is observed, compared with results of the preceding studies based on other approaches.

  2. Kinetic calculations of explosives with slow-burning constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Souers, P. Clark; Fried, Laurence E.

    1998-07-01

    The equilibrium thermochemical code CHEETAH V1.40 has been modified to detonate part of the explosive and binder. An Einstein thermal description of the unreacted constituents is used, and the Einstein temperature may be increased to reduce heat absorption. We study the effect of the reactivity and thermal transport on the detonation velocity. Hydroxy-terminated-polybutadiene binders have low energy and density and would degrade the detonation velocity if they burned. Runs with unburned binder are closer to the measured values. Aluminum and ammonium perchlorate are also largely unburned within the sonic reaction zone that determines the detonation velocity. All three materials appear not to fully absorb heat as well. The normal assumption of total reaction in a thermochemical code is clearly not true for these special cases, where the detonation velocities have widely different values for different combinations of processes.

  3. Detonation Velocity Calculations of Explosives with Slowly-Burning Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Souers, P. Clark; Fried, Laurence E.

    1997-07-01

    The thermochemical code Equilbrium CHEETAH has been modified to allow partial reaction of constituents and partial flow of heat. Solid or liquid reactants are described by Einstein oscillators, whose temperatures can be changed to allow heat transfer. Hydroxy-terminated-poly-budadiene, mixed with RDX or HMX, does not react, as shown by the effect on the calculated detonation velocity. Aluminum and ammonium perchlorate in composites also do not react. Only partial heat flow also takes place in the unreacted materials. These results show that the usual assumption of total burn in a thermochemical code is probably incorrect, at least in the sonic reaction zone that drives the detonation velocity. A kinetic code would be the logical extension of this work.

  4. Ionospheric chemistry. [minor neutrals and ionized constituents of thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    This report deals primarily with progress in the chemistry of minor neutrals and ionized constituents of the thermosphere. Significant progress was made over the last few years in quantitative studies of many chemical processes. This success was primarily due to the advent of multiparameter multisatellite programs which permitted accurate simultaneous measurements to be made of many important parameters. In many cases studies of chemical reactions were made with laboratory-like precision. Rate coefficients have been derived as functions of temperature for a number of important reactions. New information has been acquired on nearly every major process which occurs in the thermosphere, including the recombination rates of all major molecular ions, charge transfer reactions, ion atom interchange reactions, and reactions of neutral and ionized metastable atoms and molecules.

  5. A new sesquiterpene and other constituents from Saussurea lappa root.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin-Ao; Hou, Pengfei; Tang, Yuping; Liu, Pei; Su, Shulan; Liu, Hanqing

    2010-10-01

    Five sesquiterpenes, dehydrocostus lactone (1), santamarine (5), beta-cyclocostunolide (6), 4alpha-hydroxy-4beta-methyldihydrocostol (7) and 10alpha-hydroxyl-artemisinic acid (9), along with four other compounds, beta-sitosterol (2), daucosterol (3), 5-hydroxymethyl-furaldehyde (4), and trans-syingin (8), were isolated and identified from the roots of Saussurea lappa (Compositae). Based on previous reports and our study, sesquiterpene derivatives are common and characteristic constituents of the genus Saussurea. Among the nine compounds obtained, 9 is a new sesquiterpene. It is an artemisinic acid derivative, whose structural skeleton has not been reported for Saussurea species before, but artemisinic acid is a common compound in another Compositae species, Artemisia annua. Dehydrocostus lactone (1) is present in high-content and is a possible bioprecursor of 10alpha-hydroxyartemisinic acid (9).

  6. [Study on chemical constituents from rhizome of Rabdosia flavida].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Zao; Li, Jin-Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xue-Jiao; Jiang, Bei

    2014-07-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the rhizome of Rabdosia flavida. The compounds were isolated and purified by various chromatographic methods, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data and physicochemical properties. Ten compounds were obtained from ethyl acetate fraction of the 70% acetone extract of Rabdosia flavida rhizome and identified as ferruginol (1), dehydrocostuslactone (2), taraxasterol (3), oleic acid (4), ursolic cid (5), coniferyl aldehyde (6), oleanolic acid (7), 6,12, 15-trihydroxy-5, 8,11, 13-abietetra-7-one (8), 5α, 8α-epidioxyergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol (9), and daucosterol (10). All the compounds are isolated from Rabdosia flavida for the first time.

  7. [Study on chemical constituents from leaves of Tripterygium wilfordii].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Li, Chuangjun; Yang, Jingzhi; Wei, Baixing; Luo, Yongming; Zhang, Dongming

    2011-04-01

    In order to study the chemical constituents of the leaves of Tripterygium wilfordii and provide references for the bio-active study, we isolated nine compounds from the dried leaves of Tripterygium wilfordii. Their structures were determined by application of spectroscopic (NMR, MS) and chemical methods. These compounds were isolated and identified as (+)-lyoniresinol (1), (+)-isolariciresinol (2), burselignan (3), dibutyl phthalate (4), cyclo-(S-Pro-R-Phe) (5), cyclo-(S-Pro-R-Leu) (6), cyclo-(S-Pro-S-Ile) (7), 3-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-propanone (8) and daucosterol (9). Compounds 1-3, 5-8 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  8. [Study on the chemical constituents from Cyathea spinulosa].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Shuang; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Feng, Zi-Ming; Yang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Pei-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Cyathea spinulosa. Compounds were isolated by chromatographic techniques. Their structures were elucidated by spectral methods. Eight compounds were isolated from the ethanol extract of Cyathea spinulosa and identified as stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (1), stigmast-3,6-dione (2), ergosterol (3), protocatechuic aldehyde (4), 1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3R,4E,8Z)-2-[(2-hydroxyoctadecanoyl) amido]-4,8- octadecadiene-1,3-diol (5), (2S,3S, 4R)-2-[(2'R) -2'-hydroxytetracosanoylamino]-1,3,4-octadecanetriol (6), beta-sitosterol (7), daucosterol (8). Compounds 1-6 are isolated from this plant for the first time.

  9. [Chemical constituents in aerial part of Reineckea carnea].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Fu, Hong-Zheng

    2008-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents in the aerial part of Reineckea carnea. The compounds were isolated by extraction, silica gel, gel, and reversed-phase silica gel coloum chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures were identified by various spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR spectrum, MS, IR, etc. Six compounds were isolated and identified as 1alpha, 3beta-dihydroxy-5beta-pregn-16-en-20-one-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), syringaresinol-beta-D-glucoside (2), sophoraflavone B (3), stigmast-5, 22-dien-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), daucosterol (5), a-D-glucose (6). Compound 1 was a new compound, coumpounds 2-6 were obtained from the plant for the first time.

  10. [Study on Chemical Constituents of Fermented Antrodia camphorata Powder].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-su; Chen, Fei; Liu, Xun-hong; Yang, Nian-yun; Ma, Yang; Hou, Ya; Luo, Yi-yuan

    2015-02-01

    To study the chemical constituents of fermented Antrodia camphorata powder. 15 compounds were isolated from Antrodia camphorata by Silica gel column chromatography, ODS column chromatography, gel column chromatography, preparative liquid phase chromatography separation technique, as well as recrystallization. On the basis of their physical and chemical properties and spectral data,their structures were identified as Ferulic acid (1), Inositol (2), β-Sitosterol (3),Vanillin (4),Vanillic acid (5), Butyric acid (6), Daucosterol (7), p-Hydroxycinnamic acid (8), Lauric acid (9), Inosine (10), Uridine (11), Adenine (12), D(+)-Sucrose (13), Arachidic acid (14) and Guanosine (15). Compounds 1, 5, 6 and 8-15 are isolated from fermented powder for the first time.

  11. [Studies on chemical constituents from roots of Mirabilis jalapa].

    PubMed

    Lai, Guo-Fang; Luo, Shi-De; Cao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yi-Fen

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the anti-HIV constituents from the root of Mirabilis jalapa. The compounds were isolated by column chromatography on silica gel, Sephadex LH - 20, MCI-gel CHP-20P and RP-18. The structure were identified by means of NMR and MS analyses (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, MS). Eleven compounds were isolated and identified as astragaloside II (1), astragaloside II (2), astragaloside IV (3), astragaloside VI (4), flazin (5), 4'-hydroxy-2, 3-dihydroflavone 7-beta-D-glucopyranoside (6), gingerglycolipid A (7), 3, 4-dihydroxybenzaldehyd (8), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (9), beta-sitosterol (10) and daucosterol (11). Compounds 1-9 were obtained from this genus for the first time.

  12. [Chemical Constituents of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis Aerial Parts].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Song, Zu-rong; Liu, Jin-qi; Zhang, Guo-sheng

    2015-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents of aerial parts of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis . Aerial parts of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis was extracted with 95% EtOH, and separated and purified by silica gel, RP 18 and Sephadex LH-20 col- umn chromatography. The structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. A total of ten compounds were isolated and iden- tified as β-sitosterol (1) ergosta-7, 22-dien-3-one (2), β-ecdysone (3), kaempferol (4), daucosterol (5) luteolin (6) calonysterone (7), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (8), quercetin (9), and 3β, 5α, 9α-trihydroxyergosta-7, 22-dien-6-one (10). Compounds 2,6 and 10 are isolated from Paris polyphylla var. chinensis for the first time.

  13. Atmospheric constituent density profiles from full disk solar occultation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpe, J. D.; Chang, C. S.; Strickland, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical methods are described which permit the derivation of the number of density profiles of atmospheric constituents from solar occultation measurements. The algorithm is first applied to measurements corresponding to an arbitrary solar-intensity distribution to calculate the normalized absorption profile. The application of Fourier transform to the integral equation yields a precise expression for the corresponding number density, and the solution is employed with the data given in the form of Laguerre polynomials. The algorithm is employed to calculate the results for the case of uniform distribution of solar intensity, and the results demonstrate the convergence properties of the method. The algorithm can be used to effectively model representative model-density profiles with constant and altitude-dependent scale heights.

  14. Is nucleon spin structure inconsistent with the constituent quark model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Di; Chen, Xiang-Song; Wang, Fan

    1998-12-01

    Proton spin structure discovered in polarized deep inelastic scattering is shown to be consistent with the valence-sea quark mixing constituent quark model. The relativistic correction and quark-antiquark pair creation (annihilation) terms inherently involved in the quark axial vector current suppress the quark spin contribution to the proton spin. The relativistic quark orbital angular momentum provides compensative terms to keep the proton spin 12 untouched. The tensor charge of the proton is predicted to have a similar but smaller suppression. An explanation on why baryon magnetic moments can be parametrized by the naive quark model spin content as well as the spin structure discovered in polarized deep inelastic scattering is given.

  15. New upper limits for atmospheric constituents on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, U.; Larson, H. P.; Gautier, T. N., III

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of Io from 0.86 to 2.7 microns with a resolution of 3.36 per cm and a signal to rms noise ratio of 120 is presented. No absorptions due to any atmospheric constituents on Io could be found in the spectrum. Upper limits of 0.12 cm-atm for NH3, 0.12 cm-atm for CH4, 0.4 cm-atm for N2O, and 24 cm-atm for H2S were determined. Laboratory spectra of ammonia frosts as a function of temperature were compared with the spectrum of Io and showed this frost not to be present at the surface of Io. A search for possible resonance lines of carbon, silicon, and sulfur, as well as the 1.08-micron line of helium, proved negative. Upper emission limits of 60, 18, 27, and 60 kilorayleighs, respectively, were established for these lines.

  16. Chemical constituents of Panax ginseng exposed to. gamma. irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Joongho; Belanger, J.M.R.; Sigouin, M.

    1990-03-01

    Chemical constituents were monitored to assess the biochemical and nutritional safety of Panax ginseng powders that were irradiated at doses of 1-10 kGy. Quantitative analysis has shown that the main effective components - saponins - are not altered by {sup 60}Co {gamma} irradiation. Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} was not affected by the treatment. Negligible changes were observed in the free carbohydrate contents. Doses of more than 5 kGy caused significant decreases in sulfur-containing amino acids and in tyrosine. At doses of 10 kGy, free amino acids, such as proline and lysine, showed an appreciable increase. The composition in minerals was not alteredmore » irrespective of the applied doses.« less

  17. Exogenously treated mammalian sex hormones affect inorganic constituents of plants.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Serkan; Dumlupinar, Rahmi

    2011-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to reveal the changes in inorganic constituents of plants exposed to mammalian sex hormones (MSH). Chickpea leaves were sprayed with 10(-4), 10(-6), 10(-9), 10(-12), and 10(-15) M concentrations of progesterone, β-estradiol, and androsterone at 7th day after sowing. The plants were harvested at the end of 18 days after treatment of MSH solutions and the inorganic components determined using a wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. At all of the concentrations tested, MSH significantly increased the contents of K, S, Na, Ca, Mg, Zn, Fe, P, Cu, and Ni. Interestingly, only Mn and Cl contents decreased. The maximum changes in the inorganic composition were recorded at 10(-6) M for plants treated with progesterone and 10(-9) M for plants treated with β-estradiol and androsterone.

  18. Inhibition of MAO by fractions and constituents of hypericum extract.

    PubMed

    Bladt, S; Wagner, H

    1994-10-01

    The inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by six fractions from hypericum extract and three characteristic constituents (as pure substances) were analyzed in vitro and ex vivo to study the antidepressive mechanism of action. Rat brain homogenates were used as the in vitro model, while the ex vivo analysis was performed after intraperitoneal application of the test substances to albino rats. Massive inhibition of MAO-A could be shown with the total extract and all fractions only at the concentration of 10(-3) mol/L. At 10(-4) mol/L, one fraction rich in flavonoides showed an inhibition of 39%, and all other fractions demonstrated less than 25% inhibition. Using pure hypericin as well as in all ex vivo experiments, no relevant inhibiting effects could be shown. From the results it can be concluded that the clinically proven antidepressive effect of hypericum extract cannot be explained in terms of MAO inhibition.

  19. Strong, tough and stiff bioinspired ceramics from brittle constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouville, Florian; Maire, Eric; Meille, Sylvain; van de Moortèle, Bertrand; Stevenson, Adam J.; Deville, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    High strength and high toughness are usually mutually exclusive in engineering materials. In ceramics, improving toughness usually relies on the introduction of a metallic or polymeric ductile phase, but this decreases the material’s strength and stiffness as well as its high-temperature stability. Although natural materials that are both strong and tough rely on a combination of mechanisms operating at different length scales, the relevant structures have been extremely difficult to replicate. Here, we report a bioinspired approach based on widespread ceramic processing techniques for the fabrication of bulk ceramics without a ductile phase and with a unique combination of high strength (470 MPa), high toughness (22 MPa m1/2), and high stiffness (290 GPa). Because only mineral constituents are needed, these ceramics retain their mechanical properties at high temperatures (600 °C). Our bioinspired, material-independent approach should find uses in the design and processing of materials for structural, transportation and energy-related applications.

  20. Mind your salts: when the inactive constituent isn't.

    PubMed

    Neubig, Richard R

    2010-10-01

    Many pharmacological agents include "inactive" constituents that are used to alter the solubility, stability, or pharmaceutical properties of a drug. These "salts" are often ignored, and the "active ingredient" gets all of the attention. Pamoic acid (4-[(3-carboxy-2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methyl]-3-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid) has been used in formulations of several drugs as pamoate salts. This Perspective highlights an Accelerated Communication in this issue (p. 560) that identifies pamoic acid as a potent activator of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR35. This effect may contribute to the pharmacological actions of some agents that are prepared as pamoate salts. Thus, pharmacologists, regulators, and clinicians should "mind their salts" in considering differences among supposedly equivalent agents.

  1. Possible effects of volcanic eruptions on stratospheric minor constituent chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Although stratosphere penetrating volcanic eruptions have been infrequent during the last half century, periods have existed in the last several hundred years when such eruptions were significantly more frequent. Several mechanisms exist for these injections to affect stratospheric minor constituent chemistry, both on the long-term average and for short-term perturbations. These mechanisms are reviewed and, because of the sensitivity of current models of stratospheric ozone to chlorine perturbations, quantitative estimates are made of chlorine injection rates. It is found that, if chlorine makes up as much as 0.5 to 1% of the gases released and if the total gases released are about the same magnitude as the fine ash, then a major stratosphere penetrating eruption could deplete the ozone column by several percent. The estimate for the Agung eruption of 1963 is just under 1% an amount not excluded by the ozone record but complicated by the peak in atmospheric nuclear explosions at about the same time.

  2. Chemical constituents of the leaf of Alpinia mutica Roxb.

    PubMed

    Sirat, Hasnah Mohd; Jani, Nor Akmalazura

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodistillation of the fresh leaves of Alpinia mutica afforded 0.005% colourless essential oil. GC and GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 33 components accounting for 92.9% of the total oil, dominated by 20 sesquiterpenes (76.7%) and 10 monoterpenes (8.3%). The major constituent was found to be β-sesquiphellandrene which was 29.2% of the total oil. Soxhlet extraction, followed by repeated column chromatography of the dried leaves yielded two phenolic compounds, identified as 5,6-dehydrokawain and aniba dimer A, together with one amide assigned as auranamide. The structures of these compounds were determined by using spectroscopic analysis. Antibacterial screening of the essential oil, the crude and isolated compounds showed weak to moderate inhibitory activity.

  3. Constituents of Senecio chionophilus with potential antitubercular activity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian-Qiao; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G; Montenegro, Gloria; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2004-09-01

    Two new sesquiterpenoids, (1S,4S,5R,10R)-1-hydroxy-6-isobutyryloxy-10H-9-oxofuranoeremophilane (1) and 1alpha-hydroxy-6beta-(2xi-methylbutyryloxy)-10alphaH-9-oxofuranoeremophilane (2), along with 21 known constituents, were isolated from the n-hexane and dichloromethane extracts of the above-ground biomass and roots of Senecio chionophilus. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and chemical transformation methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by Mosher ester methodology. All of the isolates were evaluated for their antitubercular potential against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a microplate Alamar Blue assay. Compound 2, 6beta-angeloyloxy-1alpha-hydroxy-10alphaH-9-oxofuranoeremophilane (3), and 4'-hydroxyacetophenone (6) exhibited mild antitubercular activity at minimum inhibitory concentrations of 119, 114, and 121 microg/mL, respectively.

  4. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    PubMed Central

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  5. Emerging therapeutic potential of graviola and its constituents in cancers.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Jahan, Rahat; Chaudhary, Sanjib; Walker, Larry A; Sayed, Zafar; Jones, Dwight T; Batra, Surinder K; Macha, Muzafar A

    2018-04-05

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the USA and around the world. Although the current synthetic inhibitors used in targeted therapies have improved patient prognosis, toxicity and development of resistance to these agents remain a challenge. Plant-derived natural products and their derivatives have historically been used to treat various diseases, including cancer. Several leading chemotherapeutic agents are directly or indirectly based on botanical natural products. Beyond these important drugs, however, a number of crude herbal or botanical preparations have also shown promising utility for cancer and other disorders. One such natural resource is derived from certain plants of the family Annonaceae, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Among the best known of these is Annona muricata, also known as soursop, graviola or guanabana. Extracts from the fruit, bark, seeds, roots and leaves of graviola, along with several other Annonaceous species, have been extensively investigated for anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Phytochemical studies have identified the acetogenins, a class of bioactive polyketide-derived constituents, from the extracts of Annonaceous species, and dozens of these compounds are present in different parts of graviola. This review summarizes current literature on the therapeutic potential and molecular mechanism of these constituents from A.muricata against cancer and many non-malignant diseases. Based on available data, there is good evidence that these long-used plants could have both chemopreventive and therapeutic potential. Appropriate attention to safety studies will be important to assess their effectiveness on various diseases caused or promoted by inflammation.

  6. [Studies on chemical constituents from rhizome of Anemone flaccida].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-tian; Takaishi, Yoshihisa; Zhang, Yan-wen; Duan, Hong-quan

    2008-07-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Anemone flaccida. Chemical constituents were isolated by repeated column chromatography (silica gel, Toyopearl HW-40C and preparative HPLC). The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data analysis. Twelve triterpenes were isolated and their structures were identified as follow: oleanolic acid (1), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-xylopyranoside (2), eleutheroside K (3), oleanolic acid 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-xylopyranoside (4), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinofurnoside (5), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccuronopyranose (6), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccuronopyranose methyl ester (7), oleanolic acid 28-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (8), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccuronopyranose 28-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->4)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glccopyranoside (9), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccopyranosyl methyl ester 28-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->4)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glccopyranoside (10), oleanolic acid 3-O-beta-D-glccopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-28-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->4)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glccopyranoside (11), oleanolic acid 3-O-alpha-L-rh-amnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyrnosyl-28-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->4)-beta-D-glccopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glccopyranoside (12). compounds 5-8, 10, 12 were isolated from this plant for the first time. Compounds 2, 5 and 11 showed positive anti-tumor activities.

  7. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    DOE PAGES

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-05-09

    In this paper, we show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, r max,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of r max,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of r max,i can be used to predict themore » rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. Finally, this approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps.« less

  8. Jupiter's Mid-Infrared Aurora: Solar Connection and Minor Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore; Livengood, T.A.; Fast, K.E.; Hewagama, T.; Schmilling, F.; Sonnabend, G.; Delgado, J.

    2009-01-01

    High spectral resolution in the 12 pin region of the polar regions of Jupiter reveal unique information on auroral phenomena and upper stratospheric composition. Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate; throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X-ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based. spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane, emission brightness and solar 10.7-cm radar flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high scalar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. The spectra measured contain features that cannot be attributed to ethane and are most likely spectra of minor constituents whose molecular bands overlap the v9 band of ethane. Possible candidates are allene, propane, and other higher order hydrocarbons. These features appear to be enhanced in the active polar regions. Laboratory measurements at comparable spectral resolution of spectra of candidate molecules will be used to identify the constituents. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the NASA/ESA Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  9. Euclidean bridge to the relativistic constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, T. J.; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald A.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Knowledge of nucleon structure is today ever more of a precision science, with heightened theoretical and experimental activity expected in coming years. At the same time, a persistent gap lingers between theoretical approaches grounded in Euclidean methods (e.g., lattice QCD, Dyson-Schwinger equations [DSEs]) as opposed to traditional Minkowski field theories (such as light-front constituent quark models). Purpose: Seeking to bridge these complementary world views, we explore the potential of a Euclidean constituent quark model (ECQM). This formalism enables us to study the gluonic dressing of the quark-level axial-vector vertex, which we undertake as a test of the framework. Method: To access its indispensable elements with a minimum of inessential detail, we develop our ECQM using the simplified quark + scalar diquark picture of the nucleon. We construct a hyperspherical formalism involving polynomial expansions of diquark propagators to marry our ECQM with the results of Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) analyses, and constrain model parameters by fitting electromagnetic form factor data. Results: From this formalism, we define and compute a new quantity—the Euclidean density function (EDF)—an object that characterizes the nucleon's various charge distributions as functions of the quark's Euclidean momentum. Applying this technology and incorporating information from BSE analyses, we find the quenched dressing effect on the proton's axial-singlet charge to be small in magnitude and consistent with zero, while use of recent determinations of unquenched BSEs results in a large suppression. Conclusions: The quark + scalar diquark ECQM is a step toward a realistic quark model in Euclidean space, and needs additional refinements. The substantial effect we obtain for the impact on the axial-singlet charge of the unquenched dressed vertex compared to the quenched demands further investigation.

  10. A Typology for Finite Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tou, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    This project classifies groups of small order using a group's center as the key feature. Groups of a given order "n" are typed based on the order of each group's center. Students are led through a sequence of exercises that combine proof-writing, independent research, and an analysis of specific classes of finite groups…

  11. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and inorganic constituents in ambient surface soils, Chicago, Illinois: 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, R.T.; Arnold, T.L.; Cannon, W.F.; Graham, D.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of ambient surface soils were collected from 56 locations in Chicago, Illinois, using stratified random sampling techniques and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds and inorganic constituents. PAHs appear to be derived primarily from combustion of fossil fuels and may be affected by proximity to industrial operations, but do not appear to be substantially affected by the organic carbon content of the soil, proximity to nonindustrial land uses, or proximity to a roadway. Atmospheric settling of particulate matter appears to be an important mechanism for the placement of PAH compounds into soils. Concentrations of most inorganic constituents are affected primarily by soil-forming processes. Concentrations of lead, arsenic, mercury, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, molybdenum, zinc, and selenium are elevated in ambient surface soils in Chicago in comparison to the surrounding area, indicating anthropogenic sources for these elements in Chicago soils. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium in Chicago soils appear to reflect the influence of the carbonate bedrock parent material on the chemical composition of the soil, although the effects of concrete and road fill cannot be discounted. Concentrations of inorganic constituents appear to be largely unaffected by the type of nearby land use. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Memory for melody and key in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Jaimie; Weiss, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults) heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age. PMID:29077726

  13. Memory for melody and key in childhood.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Poon, Jaimie; Weiss, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults) heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age.

  14. Reduced Exposure to Harmful and Potentially Harmful Smoke Constituents With the Tobacco Heating System 2.1

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gizelle; Magnette, John; Picavet, Patrick; Weitkunat, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Heating rather than burning tobacco reduces levels of harmful and potentially harmful constituents, and consumer products using this approach aim to reduce exposure to tobacco toxicants. The Tobacco Heating System (THS) version 2.1 has been enhanced from earlier prototypes with an improved heat control and sensorial experience and thereby user acceptance. Exposure measurements are required to determine whether it may be possible to reduce the individual health risk compared to smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). Methods: This controlled clinical study randomly assigned 40 smokers to either a group continuing to use of their own CC brand (n = 20) or a group switching to THS 2.1 (n = 20) for 5 days. Biomarkers of exposure were measured at baseline and on day 1 through day 5. Product consumption, Human Puffing Topography, the occurrence of adverse events, and an assessment of subjective effects, such as smoking satisfaction and enjoyment of respiratory tract sensations, were also determined. Results: The group of smokers who switched to THS 2.1 adapted their puffing behavior initially through longer puff duration and more puffs. During the duration of the study, total puff volume returned to baseline levels and the mean daily product consumption increased but with similar nicotine exposure compared to baseline CC use. Biomarkers of exposure to tobacco smoke toxicants which inform product risk assessment were significantly reduced with THS use compared to the CC group. THS 2.1 users experienced less reinforcing effects with THS 2.1 than with their own cigarette brand. Conclusions: THS 2.1 is a promising alternative to smoking CCs. Notwithstanding possible use adaption through consumption or puffing behavior, the exposure to harmful smoke constituents was markedly reduced with the new heated tobacco platform. Implications: Exposure markers to harmful and potentially harmful smoke constituents were lowered with the THS 2.1. Heating tobacco instead of

  15. Finite key analysis for symmetric attacks in quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tim; Kampermann, Hermann; Kleinmann, Matthias

    2006-10-15

    We introduce a constructive method to calculate the achievable secret key rate for a generic class of quantum key distribution protocols, when only a finite number n of signals is given. Our approach is applicable to all scenarios in which the quantum state shared by Alice and Bob is known. In particular, we consider the six state protocol with symmetric eavesdropping attacks, and show that for a small number of signals, i.e., below n{approx}10{sup 4}, the finite key rate differs significantly from the asymptotic value for n{yields}{infinity}. However, for larger n, a good approximation of the asymptotic value is found.more » We also study secret key rates for protocols using higher-dimensional quantum systems.« less

  16. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for themore » purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.« less

  17. Key to trematodes reported in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Malcolm Edwin

    1981-01-01

    The trematodes show the greatest variety of forms among the helminth parasites of waterfowl, including over half of all species reported; sometimes this group also includes the greatest part of the worms in a single bird. Over 500 species of trematodes have been reported in waterfowl. Almost all of these have been included in the present set of keys; it was not possible, however, to obtain the descriptions of a few forms (7 of 525).

  18. [Studies on chemical constituents from herbs of Taraxacum mongolicum].

    PubMed

    Shi, Shu-Yun; Zhou, Chang-Xin; Xu, Yan; Tao, Qiao-Feng; Bai, Hua; Lu, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Wen-Yan; Chen, Hai-Yong; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Li-Wei; Wu, Yi-Hang; Zeng, Su; Huang, Ke-Xin; Zhao, Yu; Li, Xiao-Kun; Qu, Jia

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of the herbs of Taraxacum mongolicum. The chemical constituents were isolated by various column chromatographic methods and their structures elucidated mainly by NMR and MS evidences. Forty-four components were obtained and identified were as artemetin (1), quercetin (2), quercetin-3', 4', 7-trime-thyl ether (3), luteolin (4), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), luteolin-7-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside (6), genkwanin (7), isoetin (8), hesperetin (9), genkwanin-4'-O-beta-D-lutinoside (10), hesperidin (11), quercetin-7-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6) -beta-D-glucopyranoside (12), quercetin-3, 7-O-beta-D-diglucopyranoside (13), isoetin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl- 2'-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside (14), isoetin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (15), isoetin-7- O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-beta-D-xyloypyranoside (16), caffeic acid (17), furulic acid (18), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (19), 3, 5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (20), 3, 4-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (21), 4, 5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (22), 1-hydroxymethyl-5-hydroxy-phenyl-2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (23), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (24), p-coumaric acid (25), 3, 5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid (26), gallic acid (27), gallicin (28), syringic acid (29), 3, 4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (30), caffeic acid ethyl ester (31), esculetin (32), rufescidride (33), mongolicumin A [6, 9, 10-trihydroxy-benzoxanthene-1, 2-dicarboxylic acid] (34), mongolicumin B [1 l-hydroxy-2-oxo-guaia-1 (10), 3, 5-trien-8, 12-lactone] (35), isodonsesquitin A (36), taraxacin (37), sesquiterpene ketolactone (38), taraxasteryl acetate (39), phi-taraxasteryl acetate (40) and lupenol acetate (41), palmitic acid (42), beta-sitosterol (43), and stigmasterol (44). Four compounds (14, 15, 34 and 35) were new compounds, compounds 1, 3, 6-13, 20-22, 30 and 31 were isolated from this genus for the first time, while compounds 18, 23-29, 32 and 37-42 were obtained from this species for the first time.

  19. Investigation into mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdokimenko, Ekaterina

    Bone is a hierarchically structured natural composite material, consisting of organic phase (type-I collagen), inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite), and water. Studies of the two main bone constituents, utilizing controlled demineralization and deproteinization, can shed light on mineral-collagen interaction which makes bone such a unique biological material. This knowledge is necessary for computational analysis of bone structure to identify preferential sites in the collagen matrix and mineral network that degrade more easily. The main goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive picture of mechanical properties of bone and its main constituents. Following the Introduction, Chapter 2 presents an investigation of microstructure and compressive mechanical properties of bovine femur cortical bone carried out on completely demineralized, completely deproteinized, and untreated bone samples in three anatomical directions. Anisotropic nature of bone was clearly identified in all cases. Extra levels of porosity along with microstructural differences for the three directions were found to be the main sources of the anisotropy. In Chapter 3, a new theoretical model of cortical and trabecular bone as composite materials with hierarchical structure spanning from nanometer (collagen-mineral) level to millimeter (bone) level was developed. Compression testing was performed on untreated, demineralized, and deproteinized cortical and trabecular bovine femur bone samples to verify the model. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions; excellent agreement was found between the theory and experiments for all bone phases. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and micro-computed tomography techniques were applied to characterize the structure of the samples at multiple length scales and provide further inputs for the modeling. Chapter 4 presents a comparative study of mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of mature and young bovine

  20. The diversity of family health: constituent systems and resources.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in family health associated with child's chronic illness and hospitalization. The aim was to answer the following questions: (i) What kind of changes do families experience when a child in the family is afflicted by a chronic illness; and (ii) What kind of changes do families experience when their child is admitted to hospital? The data were collected in 2002 in interviews with 29 such families whose children were receiving treatment or who had previously received treatment on the paediatric wards of two hospitals in Finland. Data were collected until reaching theoretical saturation, in which no additional data are found. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory method, proceeding to the stage of axial coding. Family health was formed out of two different dimensions: the constituent systems and the resources of family health. The constituent systems describe the impact of the child's chronic illness and period of hospitalization at the level of both individual family members and the family as a whole. These systems were described by five categories: (i) ill child at the centre of family attention, (ii) siblings in a minor role, (iii) the child's illness governs parental well-being, (iv) the roller coaster of the couple relationship and (v) the whole family is ill. The resources promoting and maintaining family health were divided into six different categories: (i) creative and maintaining mental images, (ii) active involvement, (iii) internal coping means, (iv) reinforcement of coping means, (v) awareness and change of values and (vi) social network shares emotional burden and responsibility for care. The results of the study show that family health is highly vulnerable when a child has to be admitted to hospital because of a chronic condition. They should help nursing staff gain a clearer picture of the depth and diversity of family health and support the resources that promote family health. Future research

  1. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  2. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  3. Chemical constituents in groundwater from multiple zones in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2009-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hopkins, Candice B.; Maimer, Neil V.

    2015-01-01

    Tritium concentrations in relation to basaltic flow units indicate the presence of wastewater influence in multiple basalt flow groups; however, tritium is most abundant in the South Late Matuyama flow group in the southern boundary wells. The concentrations of wastewater constituents in deep zones in wells Middle 2051, USGS 132, USGS 105, and USGS 103 support the concept of groundwater flow deepening in the southwestern corner of the INL, as indicated by the INL groundwater-flow model.

  4. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived,…

  5. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address amore » majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.« less

  6. Secure key from bound entanglement.

    PubMed

    Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2005-04-29

    We characterize the set of shared quantum states which contain a cryptographically private key. This allows us to recast the theory of privacy as a paradigm closely related to that used in entanglement manipulation. It is shown that one can distill an arbitrarily secure key from bound entangled states. There are also states that have less distillable private keys than the entanglement cost of the state. In general, the amount of distillable key is bounded from above by the relative entropy of entanglement. Relationships between distillability and distinguishability are found for a class of states which have Bell states correlated to separable hiding states. We also describe a technique for finding states exhibiting irreversibility in entanglement distillation.

  7. Slips of the Typewriter Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Presents an analysis of 500 submorphemic slips of the typewriter key that escaped the notice of authors and other proofreaders and thereby made their way into the published records of scientific research. (Author/VWL)

  8. Algorithms for Lightweight Key Exchange.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Rafael; Caballero-Gil, Cándido; Santonja, Juan; Zamora, Antonio

    2017-06-27

    Public-key cryptography is too slow for general purpose encryption, with most applications limiting its use as much as possible. Some secure protocols, especially those that enable forward secrecy, make a much heavier use of public-key cryptography, increasing the demand for lightweight cryptosystems that can be implemented in low powered or mobile devices. This performance requirements are even more significant in critical infrastructure and emergency scenarios where peer-to-peer networks are deployed for increased availability and resiliency. We benchmark several public-key key-exchange algorithms, determining those that are better for the requirements of critical infrastructure and emergency applications and propose a security framework based on these algorithms and study its application to decentralized node or sensor networks.

  9. Electronic Strategies To Manage Key Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Nora

    2003-01-01

    Describes how Charlotte-Mecklenburg (North Carolina) district used a relational database, e-mail, electronic newsletters, cable television, telecommunications, and the Internet to enhance communications with their constituencies. (PKP)

  10. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon themore » size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.« less

  11. Safety and side effects of cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Mateus Machado; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S

    2011-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic constituent of Cannabis, has multiple pharmacological actions, including anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about its safety and side effect profile in animals and humans. This review describes in vivo and in vitro reports of CBD administration across a wide range of concentrations, based on reports retrieved from Web of Science, Scielo and Medline. The keywords searched were "cannabinoids", "cannabidiol" and "side effects". Several studies suggest that CBD is non-toxic in non-transformed cells and does not induce changes on food intake, does not induce catalepsy, does not affect physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature), does not affect gastrointestinal transit and does not alter psychomotor or psychological functions. Also, chronic use and high doses up to 1,500 mg/day of CBD are reportedly well tolerated in humans. Conversely, some studies reported that this cannabinoid can induce some side effects, including inhibition of hepatic drug metabolism, alterations of in vitro cell viability, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased activities of p-glycoprotein and other drug transporters. Based on recent advances in cannabinoid administration in humans, controlled CBD may be safe in humans and animals. However, further studies are needed to clarify these reported in vitro and in vivo side effects.

  12. Bitterness and antibacterial activities of constituents from Evodia rutaecarpa.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Li, Bo; Wu, Fei; Li, Tingzhao; Wang, Youjie; Ma, Qiang; Liang, Shuang

    2017-03-29

    Bitter herbs are important in Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Electronic Tongue (e-Tongue) is an instrument that can be trained to evaluate bitterness of bitter herbs and their constituents. The aim of this research was to evaluate bitterness of limonoids and alkaloids from Evodia rutaecarpa to demonstrate that they are main bitter material basic of E. rutaecarpa. Nine compounds, including limonoids, indoloquinazoline alkaloids and quinolone alkaloids, were isolated, identified and analyzed by the e-Tongue. Additionally, the antibacterial activities of the nine compounds were evaluated against E. coli and S. aureus. All the nine compounds had bitter taste and antibacterial activities to some extent. Among them, limonoids, which were the bitterest compounds, had greater antibacterial activities than alkaloids. And there is a positive correlation between bitter taste and antibacterial activities. It was confirmed in our study that limonoids, indoloquinazoline alkaloids and quinolone alkaloids are main bitter material basic of E. rutaecarpa based on two evaluation methods of e-Tongue and antibacterial experiment. In addition, the e-Tongue technique is a suitable new method to measure bitter degree in herbs.

  13. Cognitive constraints on constituent order: Evidence from elicited pantomime

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew L.; Mayberry, Rachel I.; Ferreira, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does human cognition influence the structure of human language? Recent experiments using elicited pantomime suggest that the prevalence of Subject-Object-Verb (SOV) order across the world's languages may arise in part because SOV order is most compatible with how we conceptually represent transitive events (Goldin-Meadow, So, Özyürek, & Mylander, 2008). However, this raises the question as to why non-SOV orders exist. Two recent studies (Meir, Lifshitz, Ilkbasaran, & Padden, 2010; Gibson et al., 2013) suggest that SOV might be suboptimal for describing events in which both the agent and patient are plausible agents (e.g. a woman pushing a boy); we call these “reversible” events. We replicate these findings using elicited pantomime and offer a new interpretation. Meir et al.'s (2010) account is framed largely in terms of constraints on comprehension, while Gibson et al.'s (2013) account involves minimizing the risk of information loss or memory degradation. We offer an alternative hypothesis that is grounded in constraints on production. We consider the implications of these findings for the distribution of constituent order in the world's spoken languages and for the structure of emerging sign languages. PMID:23792806

  14. New chemical constituents from the Piper betle Linn. (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Atiya, Akhtar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Ranjan Lal, Uma

    2018-05-01

    The phytochemical investigation of chloroform extract from Piper betle var. haldia, Piperaceae, leaves has resulted in the isolation of two new chemical constituents which were identified as 1-n-dodecanyloxy resorcinol (H1) and desmethylenesqualenyl deoxy-cepharadione-A (H4), on the basis of spectroscopic data 1D NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) and 2D NMR ( 1 H- 1 H COSY and HMBC) as well as ESI-MS, FT-IR and HR-ESI-MS analyses. Compounds H1 and H4 showed excellent antioxidant DPPH free radical scavenging activity with IC 50 values of 7.14 μg/mL and 8.08 μg/mL compared to ascorbic acid as a standard antioxidant drug with IC 50 value of 2.52 μg/mL, respectively. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity against human hepatoma cell line (PLC-PRF-5) showed moderate effect with the GI 50 values of 35.12 μg/mL for H1, 31.01 μg/mL for H4, compared to Doxorubicin ® as a standard cytotoxic drug with GI 50 value of 18.80 μg/mL.

  15. Cytotoxic constituents of Pachyrhizus tuberosus from Peruvian amazon.

    PubMed

    Leuner, Olga; Havlik, Jaroslav; Budesinsky, Milos; Vrkoslav, Vladimir; Chu, Jessica; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Hummelova, Jana; Miksatkova, Petra; Lapcik, Oldrich; Valterova, Irena; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2013-10-01

    Investigations into the chemical constituents of the seeds of the neglected tuber crop Pachyrhizus tuberosus (Leguminosae) resulted in the isolation of seven components: five rotenoids [12a-hydroxyerosone (1), 12a-hydroxydolineone (2), erosone (3), 12a-hydroxyrotenone (4) and rotenone (6)], a phenylfuranocoumarin [pachyrrhizine (5)] and an isoflavanone [neotenone (7)]. The compounds were isolated using several chromatography techniques and characterized and verified by NMR and HPLC/MS. The MTT assay was used to examine the selective cytotoxic effects of the methanolic P. tuberosus extract and isolated compounds in two human cancer cell lines [breast (MCF-7) and colorectal (HCT-116)] and in non-transformed human fibroblasts (MRC-5); IC50 values were calculated. The methanolic P. tuberosus extract displayed respectable cytotoxic effects against HCT-116 and MCF-7 cells with IC50 values of 7.3 and 6.3 microg/mL, respectively. Of the compounds, 6 exacted greatest cytotoxicity and selectivity towards the cancer cell lines tested, yielding IC50 values of 0.3 microg/mL against both MCF-7 and HCT-116 cells, and a 6-fold reduced activity against MRC-5 fibroblasts. Compound 4 also demonstrated cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and HCT-116 (1.1 and 1.8 microg/mL, respectively), and reduced cytotoxicity towards MRC-5 cells (7.5 mirog/mL). The results revealed from the in vitro cytotoxic MTT assay are worthy of further antitumor investigation.

  16. In vitro toxicity of welding fumes and their constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.M.; Hansen, K.; Madsen, A.F.

    1988-08-01

    Welding fumes from a wide variety of processes and applications were assayed for toxicity with BHK21 cell line and SHE primary cells in culture. The most toxic fumes are those from the manual metal arc welding of stainless steel (MMA/SS) (LD50 = 7-14 microgram/ml), although all other welding fumes tested are toxic, with potencies lower by a factor of 10-200. The activity of MMA/SS is presumably due to the presence of high concentrations of Cr(VI) in the soluble fraction: For all other fumes the lowered activity (LD50 = 80-800 microgram/ml) is limited mostly to the insoluble fraction, and in partmore » can be related to the presence of MnO/sub 2/ and Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ which are toxic at such levels in these cell culture assays. Slight discrepancies between survival tests for the two cell lines, and between survival and lactate dehydrogenate release for BHK, indicate a differential response to certain constituents of these complex materials. These results suggest the need for a battery of different types of assays for use in an eventual ranking of exposures for the purpose of relative risk assessment.« less

  17. [Chemical constituents contained in seeds of Notopterygium franchetii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxia; Jiang, Shunyuan; Xu, Kaijie; Shi, Haili; Zhou, Yi; Deng, Wenlong; Ding, Lisheng; Peng, Shulin

    2012-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the seeds of Notopterygium franchetii. Ethanol extracts of seeds N. franchetii were separated and purified by such methods as normal and reversed phase column chromatographies and thin-layer chromatography and structurally elucidated by MS and NMR evidences. Twenty nine compounds were separated, they were isoimperatorin (1), [3-sitosterol (2), phellopterin (3), bergapten (4), N-tetra, hexa, octacosanoylanthranilic acid (5-7), daucosterol (8), oxypeucedanin hydrate (9), umbelliferone (10), demethylfuropinnarin (11), (2S, 3S, 4R, 8E)-2-[(2'R)- 2'-hydroxydoco, trico, tetraco, entaco, hexaco sanosylamino] -octadecene-1, 3, 4-triol (12-16), (-)-oxypeucedanin (17), diosmetin (18), bergaptol-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (19), nodakenin (20), 1'-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(2R, 3S)-3-hydroxynodakenetin (21), uracil (22), decuroside V (23), 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-5-hydroxypsoralen (24), 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-5-methoxylpsoralen (25), diosmin (26), alaschanioside C (27), kynurenic acid (28) and mannitol (29). All of these compounds were separated from the seeds of N. franchetii for the first time. Of them, 18, 22, 26 and 29 were firstly obtained from genus Notopterygium.

  18. Chemical constituents from the stems of Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Xu, Tun-Hai; Zhang, Man-Qi; Li, Xue; Xu, Ya-Juan; Jiang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Tong-Hua; Xu, Dong-Ming

    2014-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents of stems of Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult. Chromatographic techniques using silica gel, C18 reversed phase silica gel, and prep-HPLC were used. The structures were elucidated on the basis of MS and spectroscopic analysis (1D and 2D NMR), as well as chemical methods. Seven compounds were isolated and their structures were elucidated as conduritol A (1), stigmasterol (2), lupeol (3), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (4), the sodium salt of 22α-hydroxy-longispinogenin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-D-glu-curono-pyranosyl-28-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (5), oleanolic acid-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), and the sodium salt of 22α-hydroxy-longispinogenin 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-28-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (7). The inhibition activities of compounds 1, 5-7 on non-enzymatic glycation of protein in vitro were evaluated. Compound 7 is a new triterpenoid saponin. It was shown that compounds 1, 5-7 have weak inhibition activities for non-enzymatic glycation of protein in vitro. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Legitimation dynamics: How SROI could mobilize resources for new constituencies.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Kate

    2017-10-01

    The following critical essay on the social return on investment (SROI) methodology is broken into two parts. In the first section, focusing on the categorization dynamics of the SROI, I review a set of methodological and ethical tensions surrounding the SROI, using examples from my own work and other published works using SROI. These tensions include the fact that the project requires standardization to achieve comparability while concurrently offering a flexibility in constructing a narrative of impact that is attractive to users. In the second section, focusing on the legitimation dynamics, I define a narrow scope for where, despite the aforementioned pitfalls, that the SROI can be quite effective in building a rhetorical argument for directing material resources. The essay argues that despite ongoing methodological challenges, the investor lens and market logic undergirding the metric provide a powerful frame for persuasion that can be used to construct worthiness and value creation for constituents not already constructed as such. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New constituents from noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit juice.

    PubMed

    Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Zhao, Jianping; Dunbar, D Chuck; Khan, Ikhlas A; Rushing, James W; Muhammad, Ilias

    2006-08-23

    Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae), known as noni, has a long history of traditional use in the Hawaiian and Tahitian islands. More recently, an array of commercial noni fruit juice products are gaining popularity as dietary supplements, with claims of anticancer and immunostimulant activities. The biologically active principles of noni are not fully known. In continuation of work on the isolation of markers from dietary supplements, this paper reports the isolation of three new markers, namely, 1-O-(3'-methylbut-3'-enyl)-beta-D-glucopyranose (1), 1-n-butyl-4-(5'-formyl-2'-furanyl)methyl succinate (2), and 4-epi-borreriagenin (3), together with the known iridoid glycosides asperulosidic acid (4) and deacetylasperulosidic acid (5) and a mixture of 1-n-butyl-4-methyl-2-hydroxysuccinate (6a) and 1-n-butyl-4-methyl-3-hydroxysuccinate (6b), as well as a mixture of alpha- and beta-glucopyranose from noni fruit juice obtained from Puerto Rico. The structures of compounds were based on 1H and 13C NMR, mainly 2D NMR COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY experiments, and HRMS. Furthermore, samples from fresh-squeezed noni fruit juice from Japan revealed the presence of scopoletin (7), in addition to compounds 1-6, indicating no significant differences in the marker constituents of noni collected from Atlantic and Pacific regions.

  1. Bioactive Constituents of Juniperus turbinata Gussone from La Maddalena Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Venditti, A; Maggi, F; Quassinti, L; Bramucci, M; Lupidi, G; Ornano, L; Ballero, M; Sanna, C; Bruno, M; Rosselli, S; Bianco, A

    2018-05-22

    In this paper is reported a comprehensive phytochemical study of Juniperus turbinata (Cupressaceae) collected from La Maddalena Archipelago (Sardinia, Italy). Both the essential oil and the ethanolic extract were analyzed. The essential oil appears to belong to a new chemotype compared to other Mediterranean juniper accessions, as it was favored by geographic isolation of the isles. It showed a low content of monoterpene hydrocarbons and α-terpineol, ent-manoyl oxide 1,10-di-epi-cubenol as the major constituents. The ethanolic fraction resulted mainly composed by diterpenoids. Among these 15-formyloxyimbricatolic acid (11) is a new natural product since it has hitherto been obtained only by synthetic route. The phenolic fraction was constituted by biflavonoids: cupressuflavone (3), followed by minor amounts of amentoflavone (4) and hinokiflavone (5). The essential oil and six purified compounds (1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 9) were assessed for biological activities, namely antioxidant (assessed by DPPH · , ABTS ·+ and FRAP methods) and cytotoxic effects towards selected human tumor cell lines (MDA-MB 231, A375 and HCT116 cells). Compound 3 exhibited radical scavenging activity against ABTS ·+ radical which was higher than that of the reference Trolox. Noteworthy, compound 9 showed powerful effects on tumor cell lines, with IC 50 values in the range of 0.060-0.201 μM, which make it a promising anticancer drug candidate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. [Chemical constituents from endophyte Chaetomium globosum in Imperata cylindrical].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Zhu, Li; Wei, Zhong-qi; Li, Xiao-wen; Li, Ming; Song, Yong-chun

    2015-12-01

    Isolation and purification of chemical constituents from solid culture of endophyte Chaetomium globosum in Imperata cylindrical was performed through silica gel column chromatography, gel filtration over Sephadex LH-20 and preparative HPLC. Nine compounds were obtained and their structures were determined as chaetoglobosin F(1), chaetoglobosin Fex(2), chaetoglobosin E(3) cytoglobosin A(4), penochalasin C(S), isochaetoglobosin D (6), N-benzoylphenylalaninyl-N-benzoyphenylalaninate(7), uracil(8) and 5-methyluracil(9), respectively, based on HR-MS and NMR data and comparison with literatures. Compound 7 was isolated from Chaeeomium sp. for the first time. In vitro cytotoxicity of compounds was evaluated using MTT mothed and 1,3,4 and 5 showed inhibition activity to the human cervical carcinoma cell HeLa with IC50 values of 99.43, 23.77, 97.92, 86.25 micromol x L(-1), while positive cotolocisnin Ad apno1ch alse IC50 24.33 micromol x L(-1).

  3. How likely are constituent quanta to initiate inflation?

    DOE PAGES

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Trodden, Mark

    2015-08-06

    In this study, we propose an intuitive framework for studying the problem of initial conditions in slow-roll inflation. In particular, we consider a universe at high, but sub-Planckian energy density and analyze the circumstances under which it is plausible for it to become dominated by inflated patches at late times, without appealing to the idea of self-reproduction. Our approach is based on defining a prior probability distribution for the constituent quanta of the pre-inflationary universe. To test the idea that inflation can begin under very generic circumstances, we make specific – yet quite general and well grounded – assumptions onmore » the prior distribution. As a result, we are led to the conclusion that the probability for a given region to ignite inflation at sub-Planckian densities is extremely small. Furthermore, if one chooses to use the enormous volume factor that inflation yields as an appropriate measure, we find that the regions of the universe which started inflating at densities below the self-reproductive threshold nevertheless occupy a negligible physical volume in the present universe as compared to those domains that have never inflated.« less

  4. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug.

    PubMed

    Zuardi, A W; Crippa, J A S; Hallak, J E C; Moreira, F A; Guimarães, F S

    2006-04-01

    A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis) component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  5. Nonsterol Triterpenoids as Major Constituents of Olea europaea

    PubMed Central

    Stiti, Naïm; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée

    2012-01-01

    Plant triterpenoids represent a large and structurally diverse class of natural products. A growing interest has been focused on triterpenoids over the past decade due to their beneficial effects on human health. We show here that these bioactive compounds are major constituents of several aerial parts (floral bud, leaf bud, stem, and leaf) of olive tree, a crop exploited so far almost exclusively for its fruit and oil. O. europaea callus cultures were analyzed as well. Twenty sterols and twenty-nine nonsteroidal tetra- and pentacyclic triterpenoids belonging to seven types of carbon skeletons (oleanane, ursane, lupane, taraxerane, taraxastane, euphane, and lanostane) were identified and quantified by GC and GC-MS as free and esterified compounds. The oleanane-type compounds, oleanolic acid and maslinic acid, were largely predominant in all the organs tested, whereas they are practically absent in olive oil. In floral buds, they represented as much as 2.7% of dry matter. In callus cultures, lanostane-type compounds were the most abundant triterpenoids. In all the tissues analyzed, free and esterified triterpene alcohols exhibited different distribution patterns of their carbon skeletons. Taken together, these data provide new insights into largely unknown triterpene secondary metabolism of Olea europaea. PMID:22523691

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity of nonpolar constituents from different parts of kava plant (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Jhoo, Jin-Woo; Freeman, James P; Heinze, Thomas M; Moody, Joanna D; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D; Dragull, Klaus; Tang, Chung-Shih; Ang, Catharina Y W

    2006-04-19

    Kava (Piper methysticum), a perennial shrub native to the South Pacific islands, has been used to relieve anxiety. Recently, several cases of severe hepatotoxicity have been reported from the consumption of dietary supplements containing kava. It is unclear whether the kava constituents, kavalactones, are responsible for the associated hepatotoxicity. To investigate the key components responsible for the liver toxicity, bioassay-guided fractionation was carried out in this study. Kava roots, leaves, and stem peelings were extracted with methanol, and the resulting residues were subjected to partition with a different polarity of solvents (hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water) for evaluation of their cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells based on the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase enzyme leakage assays. Organic solvent fractions displayed a much stronger cytotoxicity than water fractions for all parts of kava. The hexane fraction of the root exhibited stronger cytotoxic effects than fractions of root extracted with other solvents or extracts from the other parts of kava. Further investigations using bioassay-directed isolation and analysis of the hexane fraction indicated that the compound responsible for the cytotoxicity was flavokavain B. The identity of the compound was confirmed by (1)H and (13) C NMR and MS techniques.

  7. Compositions and constituents of freshwater dissolved organic matter isolated by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Huang, Wen; Ran, Yong; Mao, Jingdong

    2014-08-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from riverine and lacustrine water was isolated using a reverse osmosis (RO) system. Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) was used to quantitatively evaluate the compositions and constituents of DOM, which are compared with previous investigations on marine DOM. Results indicated that concentration factor (CF) was a key metric controlling yield and sorption of DOM on the RO system. The sorption was likely non-selective, based on the (13)C NMR and δ(13)C analyses. Carbohydrates and lipids accounted for 25.0-41.5% and 30.2-46.3% of the identifiable DOM, followed by proteins (18.2-19.8%) and lignin (7.17-12.8%). The freshwater DOM contained much higher alkyl and aromatic C but lower alkoxyl and carboxyl C than marine DOM. The structural difference was not completely accounted for by using structure of high molecular weight (HMW) DOM, suggesting a size change involved in transformations of DOM during the transport from rivers to oceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative analysis of major constituents in green tea with different plucking periods and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lan-Sook; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Young-Chan

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the plucking periods and the major constituents and the antioxidant activity in green tea. Green tea was prepared from leaves plucked from the end of April 2013 to the end of May 2013 at intervals of one week or longer. The contents of theanine, theobromine, caffeine, catechin (C), and gallocatechin gallate (GCg) were significantly decreased, whereas those of epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) and epigallocatechin (EGC) were significantly increased along with the period of tea leaf plucking. In addition, antioxidant activity of green tea and standard catechins was investigated using ABTS, FRAP and DPPH assays. The highest antioxidant activity was observed in relatively the oldest leaf, regardless of the assay methods used. Additionally, the order of antioxidant activity of standard catechins was as follows: EGCg≥GCg≥ECg>EGC≥GC≥EC≥C. Moreover, the cis-catechins contents were the key factor affecting the antioxidant activity of green tea in all assays employed (ABTS, r=0.731, p<0.01; FRAP, r=0.886, p<0.01; DPPH, r=0.778, p<0.01).

  9. Optimizing Requirements Decisions with KEYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalali, Omid; Menzies, Tim; Feather, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Recent work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has allowed for external access to five of JPL's real-world requirements models, anonymized to conceal proprietary information, but retaining their computational nature. Experimentation with these models, reported herein, demonstrates a dramatic speedup in the computations performed on them. These models have a well defined goal: select mitigations that retire risks which, in turn, increases the number of attainable requirements. Such a non-linear optimization is a well-studied problem. However identification of not only (a) the optimal solution(s) but also (b) the key factors leading to them is less well studied. Our technique, called KEYS, shows a rapid way of simultaneously identifying the solutions and their key factors. KEYS improves on prior work by several orders of magnitude. Prior experiments with simulated annealing or treatment learning took tens of minutes to hours to terminate. KEYS runs much faster than that; e.g for one model, KEYS ran 13,000 times faster than treatment learning (40 minutes versus 0.18 seconds). Processing these JPL models is a non-linear optimization problem: the fewest mitigations must be selected while achieving the most requirements. Non-linear optimization is a well studied problem. With this paper, we challenge other members of the PROMISE community to improve on our results with other techniques.

  10. Sulforaphane, a natural constituent of broccoli, prevents cell death and inflammation in nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horváth, Béla; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Tapia, Edilia; García-Torres, Itzhel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Pacher, Pál

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II, CIS) is a potent and widely used chemotherapeutic agent to treat various malignancies, but its therapeutic use is limited because of dose-dependent nephrotoxicity. Cell death and inflammation play a key role in the development and progression of CIS-induced nephropathy. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural constituent of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, etc., has been shown to exert various protective effects in models of tissue injury and cancer. In this study, we have investigated the role of prosurvival, cell death and inflammatory signaling pathways using a rodent model of CIS-induced nephropathy, and explored the effects of SFN on these processes. Cisplatin triggered marked activation of stress signaling pathways [p53, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38-α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)] and promoted cell death in the kidneys (increased DNA fragmentation, caspases-3/7 activity, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling), associated with attenuation of various prosurvival signaling pathways [e.g., extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38-β MAPK]. Cisplatin also markedly enhanced inflammation in the kidneys [promoted NF-κB activation, increased expression of adhesion molecules ICAM and VCAM, enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels and inflammatory cell infiltration]. These effects were significantly attenuated by pretreatment of rodents with SFN. Thus, the cisplatin-induced nephropathy is associated with activation of various cell death and proinflammatory pathways (p53, JNK, p38-α, TNF-α and NF-κB) and impairments of key prosurvival signaling mechanisms (ERK and p38-β). SFN is able to prevent the CIS-induced renal injury by modulating these pathways, providing a novel approach for preventing this devastating complication of chemotherapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Sulforaphane, a natural constituent of broccoli, prevents cell death and inflammation in nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horváth, Béla; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Tapia, Edilia; García-Torres, Itzhel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Pacher, Pál

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II, CIS) is a potent and widely used chemotherapeutic agent to treat various malignancies, but its therapeutic use is limited because of the dose-dependent nephrotoxicity. Cell death and inflammation play key role in the development and progression of CIS-induced nephropathy. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural constituent of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, etc., has been shown to exert various protective effects in models of tissue injury and cancer. In this study, we have investigated the role of pro-survival, cell death and inflammatory signaling pathways using a rodent model of CIS-induced nephropathy, and explored the effects of SFN on these processes. Cisplatin triggered marked activation of stress signaling pathways (p53, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38-α MAPK) and promoted cell death in the kidneys (increased DNA fragmentation, caspases-3/7 activity, TUNEL), associated with attenuation of various pro-survival signaling pathways (e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38-β MAPK). Cisplatin also markedly enhanced inflammation in the kidneys (promoted NF-κB activation, increased expression of adhesion molecules ICAM and VCAM, enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, and inflammatory cell infiltration). These effects were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment of rodents with SFN. Cisplatin-induced nephropathy is associated with activation of various cell death and pro-inflammatory pathways (p53, JNK, p38-α, TNF-α, and NF-κB) and impairments of key pro-survival signaling mechanisms (ERK and p38-β). SFN is able to prevent the CIS-induced renal injury by modulating these pathways, providing a novel approach for preventing this devastating complication of the chemotherapy. PMID:21684138

  12. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{supmore » 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.« less

  13. Association between airborne PM2.5 chemical constituents and birth weight—implication of buffer exposure assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisu, Keita; Belanger, Kathleen; Bell, Michelle L.

    2014-08-01

    Several papers reported associations between airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and birth weight, though findings are inconsistent across studies. Conflicting results might be due to (1) different PM2.5 chemical structure across locations, and (2) various exposure assignment methods across studies even among the studies that use ambient monitors to assess exposure. We investigated associations between birth weight and PM2.5 chemical constituents, considering issues arising from choice of buffer size (i.e. distance between residence and pollution monitor). We estimated the association between each pollutant and term birth weight applying buffers of 5 to 30 km in Connecticut (2000-2006), in the New England region of the USA. We also investigated the implication of the choice of buffer size in relation to population characteristics, such as socioeconomic status. Results indicate that some PM2.5 chemical constituents, such as nitrate, are associated with lower birth weight and appear more harmful than other constituents. However, associations vary with buffer size and the implications of different buffer sizes may differ by pollutant. A homogeneous pollutant level within a certain distance is a common assumption in many environmental epidemiology studies, but the validity of this assumption may vary by pollutant. Furthermore, we found that areas close to monitors reflect more minority and lower socio-economic populations, which implies that different exposure approaches may result in different types of study populations. Our findings demonstrate that choosing an exposure method involves key tradeoffs of the impacts of exposure misclassification, sample size, and population characteristics.

  14. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  15. GROUP INEQUALITY.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications.

  16. In Silico Investigations of Chemical Constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum in the Anti-Hypertensive Drug Targets: ROCK, ACE, and PDE5.

    PubMed

    Arya, Hemant; Syed, Safiulla Basha; Singh, Sorokhaibam Sureshkumar; Ampasala, Dinakar R; Coumar, Mohane Selvaraj

    2017-06-16

    Understanding the molecular mode of action of natural product is a key step for developing drugs from them. In this regard, this study is aimed to understand the molecular-level interactions of chemical constituents of Clerodendrum colebrookianum Walp., with anti-hypertensive drug targets using computational approaches. The plant has ethno-medicinal importance for the treatment of hypertension and reported to show activity against anti-hypertensive drug targets-Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK), angiotensin-converting enzyme, and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Docking studies showed that three chemical constituents (acteoside, martinoside, and osmanthuside β6) out of 21 reported from the plant to interact with the anti-hypertensive drug targets with good glide score. In addition, they formed H-bond interactions with the key residues Met156/Met157 of ROCK I/ROCK II and Gln817 of PDE5. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of protein-ligand complexes suggest that H-bond interactions between acteoside/osmanthuside β6 and Met156/Met157 (ROCK I/ROCK II), acteoside and Gln817 (PDE5) were stable. The present investigation suggests that the anti-hypertensive activity of the plant is due to the interaction of acteoside and osmanthuside β6 with ROCK and PDE5 drug targets. The identified molecular mode of binding of the plant constituents could help to design new drugs to treat hypertension.

  17. About the group - ATLAS group

    Science.gov Websites

    ATLAS group Studies of particle collisions at highest energy frontiers Home • About the group About the group Welcom to the home page of the ATLAS group of High-Energy Physics division of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS is one of the two general purpose detectors for the Large Hadron

  18. Constituent loads in small streams: the process and problems of estimating sediment flux

    Treesearch

    R. B. Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Constituent loads in small streams are often estimated poorly. This is especially true for discharge-related constituents like sediment, since their flux is highly variable and mainly occurs during infrequent high-flow events. One reason for low-quality estimates is that most prevailing data collection methods ignore sampling probabilities and only partly account for...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 258 - Constituents for Detection Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Constituents for Detection Monitoring I Appendix I to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Pt. 258, App. I Appendix I to Part 258—Constituents...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 258 - Constituents for Detection Monitoring

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Constituents for Detection Monitoring I Appendix I to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Pt. 258, App. I Appendix I to Part 258—Constituents...

  1. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater constituents in selected streams in northern Arkansas, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Haggard, Brian E.; Meyers, Michael T.; Green, W. Reed

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the University of Arkansas and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, collected data in 2004 to determine the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater constituents, including many constituents of emerging environmental concern, in selected streams in northern Arkansas. Samples were collected in March and April 2004 from 17 sites located upstream and downstream from wastewater- treatment plant effluent discharges on 7 streams in northwestern Arkansas and at 1 stream site in a relatively undeveloped basin in north-central Arkansas. Additional samples were collected at three of the sites in August 2004. The targeted organic wastewater constituents and sample sites were selected because wastewater-treatment plant effluent discharge provides a potential point source of these constituents and analytical techniques have improved to accurately measure small amounts of these constituents in environmental samples. At least 1 of the 108 pharmaceutical or other organic wastewater constituents was detected at all sites in 2004, except at Spavinaw Creek near Maysville, Arkansas. The number of detections generally was greater at sites downstream from municipal wastewater-treatment plant effluent discharges (mean = 14) compared to sites not influenced by wastewatertreatment plants (mean = 3). Overall, 42 of the 108 constituents targeted in the collected water-quality samples were detected. The most frequently detected constituents included caffeine, phenol, para-cresol, and acetyl hexamethyl tetrahydro naphthalene.

  2. The genus Hippocampus--a review on traditional medicinal uses, chemical constituents and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Huang, Baokang

    2015-03-13

    Several species from the genus Hippocampus have been widely used as a traditional medicine or invigorant with long history in China. Five species of them have been recorded in Chinese pharmacopoeia with name Hippocampus (Chinese name Haima [symbol: see text]). The ethnopharmacologial history of this genus indicated that they possess anti-tumor, anti-aging, anti-fatigue, anti-prostatic hyperplasia activities and can be used for the treatment of tumor, aging, fatigue, thrombus, inflammatory, hypertension and impotence. This review focuses on the traditional medicinal uses of Hippocampus species, as well as the phytochemical, pharmacological and toxicological studies on this genus. To provide an overview of the ethnopharmacology, chemical constituents, pharmacology and clinical applications of the genus Hippocampus, and to reveal their therapeutic potentials and being an evidence base for further research works of the Hippocampus. Information on the Hippocampus species was collected from scientific journals, books, thesis and reports based on the Chinese herbal classic literature and worldwide accepted scientific databases via a library and electronic search (PubMed, Elsevier, Scopus, Google Scholar, Springer, Web of Science and CNKI). A survey of literature revealed that the major chemical constituents of Hippocampus are sterides, essential amino acids, fatty acids and microelements. Experimental evidences confirmed that the Hippocampus could be used in treating tumor, aging, fatigue, thrombus, inflammatory, hypertension, prostatic hyperplasia and impotence. The most important function of Hippocampus in TCM is invigorating kidney-yang. The key traditional uses of Hippocampus have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but their mechanism and clinical trial data are needed, and the sustainable exploitation of the endangered Hippocampus species should be considered. This literature analysis of traditional medicinal uses and experimental chemical and pharmacological

  3. Inhibitory activities of major anthraquinones and other constituents from Cassia obtusifolia against β-secretase and cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Ali, Md Yousof; Jung, Hee Jin; Jeong, Hyong Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-09-15

    Semen Cassiae has been traditionally used as an herbal remedy for liver, eye, and acute inflammatory diseases. Recent pharmacological reports have indicated that Cassiae semen has neuroprotective effects, attributable to its anti-inflammatory actions, in ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease (AD) models. The basic goal of this study was to evaluate the anti-AD activities of C. obtusifolia and its major constituents. Previously, the extract of C. obtusifolia seeds, was reported to have memory enhancing properties and anti-AD activity to ameliorate amyloid β-induced synaptic dysfunction. However, the responsible components of C. obtusifolia seeds in an AD are currently still unknown. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of C. obtusifolia and its constituents against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) enzyme activity. In vitro cholinesterase enzyme assays by using AChE, BChE, and BACE1 were performed. We also scrutinized the potentials of Cassiae semen active component as BACE1 inhibitors via enzyme kinetics and molecular docking simulation. In vitro enzyme assays demonstrated that C. obtusifolia and its major constituents have promising inhibitory potential against AChE, BChE, and BACE1. All Cassiae semen constituents exhibited potent inhibitory activities against AChE and BACE1 with IC50 values of 6.29-109µg/mL and 0.94-190µg/mL, whereas alaternin, questin, and toralactone gentiobioside exhibited significant inhibitory activities against BChE with IC50 values of 113.10-137.74µg/mL. Kinetic study revealed that alaternin noncompetitively inhibited, whereas cassiaside and emodin showed mixed-type inhibition against BACE1. Furthermore, molecular docking simulation results demonstrated that hydroxyl group of alaternin and emodin tightly interacted with the active site residues of BACE1 and their relevant binding energies (-6.62 and -6.89kcal

  4. Variability in chemical constituents in Petasites hybridus from Austria.

    PubMed

    Chizzola; Ozelsberger; Langer

    2000-06-01

    Petasites hybridus (Asteraceae), butter bur, is an ancient medicinal plant with spasmolytic sesquiterpene esters. Two chemotypes, the petasine and the furanopetasine chemotype, occur in Austria. The first one is considered as pharmaceutically useful due to its spasmolytic constituents, but it is restricted to the northern parts of the Alps. This use, however, is impaired by the presence of low amounts of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), mainly senecionine and intergerrimine. PA are usually concentrated in the metabolically active parts of the complex rhizome which are the thickenings just below the leaves. They are also present in flower stalks but are almost absent in leaf buds, the petioles and the leaf blades. The alkaloids showed a great variability within and between populations; the values recorded ranged from less than 2 to 500mgkg(-1) PA, median PA of 77 populations varied from 2 to 191mgkg(-1) in the rhizomes. In nearly 25% of the samples analysed the PA content was below 10mgkg(-1), another 25% had between 10 and 20mgkg(-1) PA. Histograms of PA concentrations in a population often showed a distinct skewness toward lower alkaloid contents. Alkaloid content was independent of sesquiterpene chemotype. The seasonal influence on PA content of rhizomes was little in comparison to the variability within the population or within the rhizome itself. Nevertheless, when comparable rhizome parts within a population were considered, the PA content may remain stable over several years. Although plants totally free of PA could not yet be found, it is possible to select populations low in alkaloids. Several populations of the petasine chemotype containing less than 10mgkg(-1) in the rhizomes could be found in the area investigated.

  5. Methylxanthines are the psycho-pharmacologically active constituents of chocolate.

    PubMed

    Smit, Hendrik J; Gaffan, Elizabeth A; Rogers, Peter J

    2004-11-01

    Liking, cravings and addiction for chocolate ("chocoholism") are often explained through the presence of pharmacologically active compounds. However, mere "presence" does not guarantee psycho-activity. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies measured the effects on cognitive performance and mood of the amounts of cocoa powder and methylxanthines found in a 50 g bar of dark chocolate. In study 1, participants ( n=20) completed a test battery once before and twice after treatment administration. Treatments included 11.6 g cocoa powder and a caffeine and theobromine combination (19 and 250 mg, respectively). Study 2 ( n=22) comprised three post-treatment test batteries and investigated the effects of "milk" and "dark" chocolate levels of these methylxanthines. The test battery consisted of a long duration simple reaction time task, a rapid visual information processing task, and a mood questionnaire. Identical improvements on the mood construct "energetic arousal" and cognitive function were found for cocoa powder and the caffeine+theobromine combination versus placebo. In chocolate, both "milk chocolate" and "dark chocolate" methylxanthine doses improved cognitive function compared with "white chocolate". The effects of white chocolate did not differ significantly from those of water. A normal portion of chocolate exhibits psychopharmacological activity. The identical profile of effects exerted by cocoa powder and its methylxanthine constituents shows this activity to be confined to the combination of caffeine and theobromine. Methylxanthines may contribute to the popularity of chocolate; however, other attributes are probably much more important in determining chocolate's special appeal and in explaining related self-reports of chocolate cravings and "chocoholism".

  6. Pulmonary responses to welding fumes: role of metal constituents.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Taylor, Michael D; Zimmer, Anthony T; Roberts, Jenny R

    2004-02-13

    It is estimated that more than 1 million workers worldwide perform some type of welding as part of their work duties. Epidemiology studies have shown that a large number of welders experience some type of respiratory illness. Respiratory effects seen in full-time welders have included bronchitis, siderosis, asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders. Inhalation exposure to welding fumes may vary due to differences in the materials used and methods employed. The chemical properties of welding fumes can be quite complex. Most welding materials are alloy mixtures of metals characterized by different steels that may contain iron, manganese, chromium, and nickel. Animal studies have indicated that the presence and combination of different metal constituents is an important determinant in the potential pneumotoxic responses associated with welding fumes. Animal models have demonstrated that stainless steel (SS) welding fumes, which contain significant levels of nickel and chromium, induce more lung injury and inflammation, and are retained in the lungs longer than mild steel (MS) welding fumes, which contain mostly iron. In addition, SS fumes generated from welding processes using fluxes to protect the resulting weld contain elevated levels of soluble metals, which may affect respiratory health. Recent animal studies have indicated that the lung injury and inflammation induced by SS welding fumes that contain water-soluble metals are dependent on both the soluble and insoluble fractions of the fume. This article reviews the role that metals play in the pulmonary effects associated with welding fume exposure in workers and laboratory animals.

  7. Management of diabetic complications: a chemical constituents based approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randhir; Kaur, Navpreet; Kishore, Lalit; Gupta, Girish Kumar

    2013-10-28

    Long term hyperglycemia leads to development of complications associated with diabetes. Diabetic complications are now a global health problem without effective therapeutic approach. Hyperglycemia and oxidative stress are important components for the development of diabetic complications. Over the past few decades, herbal medicines have attracted much attention as potential therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications due to their multiple targets and less toxic side effects. This review aims to assess the current available knowledge of medicinal herbs for attenuation and management of diabetic complications and their underlying mechanisms. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by scrutinizing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases (SCOPUS, PUBMED, SCIELO, NISCAIR, Google Scholar) to retrieve available published literature. The inclusion criteria for the selection of plants were based upon all medicinal herbs and their active compounds with attributed potentials in relieving diabetic complications. Moreover, plants which have potential effect in ameliorating oxidative stress in diabetic animals have been included. Overall, 238 articles were reviewed for plant literature and out of the reviewed literature, 127 articles were selected for the study. Various medicinal plants/plant extracts containing flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolic compounds, terpenoids, saponins and phytosterol type chemical constituents were found to be effective in the management of diabetic complications. This effect might be attributed to amelioration of persistent hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and modulation of various metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Screening chemical candidate from herbal medicine might be a promising approach for new drug discovery to treat the diabetic complications. There is still a dire need to explore the mechanism of action of

  8. [Study on molecular recognition technology in active constituents extracted and isolated from Aconitum pendulum].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Qin; Li, Guo-Shan; Fu, Xue-Yan; Ma, Jing-Zu

    2011-03-01

    To investigate CD molecular recognition technology applied in active constituents extracted and isolated from traditional Chinese medicine--Aconitum pendulum. The inclusion constant and form probability of the inclusion complex of Aconitum pendulum with p-CD was calculated by UV spectra method. The active constituents of Aconitum pendulum were extracted and isolated by molecular recognition technology. The inclusion complex was identified by UV. The chemical constituents of Aconitum pendulum and inclusion complex was determined by HPLC. The analgesic effects of inclusion complex was investigated by experiment of intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid in rats. The inclusion complex was identified and confirmed by UV spectra method, the chemical components of inclusion complex were simple, and the content of active constituents increased significantly, the analgesic effects of inclusion complex was well. The molecular recognition technology can be used for extracting and isolating active constituents of Aconitum pendulum, and the effects are obvious.

  9. Characterization of the lateral distribution of fluorescent lipid in binary-constituent lipid monolayers by principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugár, István P; Zhai, Xiuhong; Boldyrev, Ivan A; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Brockman, Howard L; Brown, Rhoderick E

    2010-01-01

    Lipid lateral organization in binary-constituent monolayers consisting of fluorescent and nonfluorescent lipids has been investigated by acquiring multiple emission spectra during measurement of each force-area isotherm. The emission spectra reflect BODIPY-labeled lipid surface concentration and lateral mixing with different nonfluorescent lipid species. Using principal component analysis (PCA) each spectrum could be approximated as the linear combination of only two principal vectors. One point on a plane could be associated with each spectrum, where the coordinates of the point are the coefficients of the linear combination. Points belonging to the same lipid constituents and experimental conditions form a curve on the plane, where each point belongs to a different mole fraction. The location and shape of the curve reflects the lateral organization of the fluorescent lipid mixed with a specific nonfluorescent lipid. The method provides massive data compression that preserves and emphasizes key information pertaining to lipid distribution in different lipid monolayer phases. Collectively, the capacity of PCA for handling large spectral data sets, the nanoscale resolution afforded by the fluorescence signal, and the inherent versatility of monolayers for characterization of lipid lateral interactions enable significantly enhanced resolution of lipid lateral organizational changes induced by different lipid compositions.

  10. Investigation on the phenolic constituents in Hamamelis virginiana leaves by HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Duckstein, Sarina M; Stintzing, Florian C

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous and acetone/water extracts from Hamamelis virginiana leaves were investigated to obtain a thorough insight into their phenolic composition. To secure compound integrity, a gentle extraction method including the exclusion of light was used. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses yielded a fingerprint including 27 phenolic constituents. Quantification of the key compounds on an equivalent basis by high-performance liquid chromatography diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) showed that gallotannins consisting of six to 11 galloyl units constitute the main fraction, whereas procyanidins and catechin represented only a minor part. Closer inspection revealed that both extracts possess virtually the same galloyl hexose distribution, and the octagalloyl hexose represents the major tannin constituent. Additionally, eight flavonol glycosides and their corresponding aglycones quercetin and kaempferol, as well as three chlorogenic acid isomers and other hydroxycinnamic acids, were identified. Moreover, stability studies on the aqueous extract (5 °C, dark; room temperature, dark; room temperature, light) revealed that the phenolic profile underwent changes when exposed to light. Especially the gallotannins proved to be considerably unstable which may result in phytochemically altered Hamamelis leaf extracts upon transport and storage.

  11. Social Position Influencing the Water Perception Gap Between Local Leaders and Constituents in a Socio-Hydrological System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeffner, Melissa; Jackson-Smith, Douglas; Flint, Courtney G.

    2018-02-01

    How well city leaders represent their constituents and meet their needs are key concerns in transitioning to local sustainable water governance. To date, however, there is little research documenting the influence of social position between elected leaders who make policy, career staff water managers who design and operate systems and implement policies, and the members of the public whose individual water use behaviors are important drivers of water sustainability outcomes. In this study, we ask: "How does social position explain variation in water perceptions and concerns between different actors in a socio-hydrological system?" Using a mixed method approach with survey and interview data, we explore the ways that positioning within the governance system, geographic context, and citizen engagement in local government mediate perceptions of the urban water system. Regardless of local biophysical water supply conditions, residents showed most concern about future water shortages and high water costs, while their leaders were consistently most concerned about deteriorating local water infrastructure. Further, constituents who received water-related information directly from public utility mailings or served on community committees and boards had perceptions that were more aligned with leaders' concerns. The importance of social structure over natural and built environments in shaping water issue perceptions underscores the value of social analysis in socio-hydrology studies. Further, practitioners looking to increase consensus for a transition to sustainable water governance might work to develop institutional mechanisms to increase opportunities for water user involvement in local water system governance.

  12. Rapid characterization of the chemical constituents of Sijunzi decoction by UHPLC coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhibo; Wang, Miao; Cai, Yi; Yang, Hongmei; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Chunjie

    2018-06-01

    Sijunzi decoction, a renowned Chinese prescription has long been utilized to treat gastrointestinal problems. In the context of this research work, the use of Ultra high performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was made to separate and characterize the components of Sijunzi decoction. The performance of Liquid chromatography was carried out on a C8 column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm); moreover, the mobile phase were consisted of 0.2% formic acid (A) and acetonitrile (B). In accordance with the findings, characterization of 120 chemical compounds was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The key constituents among them included ginsenosides (in Radix Ginseng), 16 triterpene carboxylic acids (in Poria), sesquiterpenes (in Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae), triterpenesaponins (in Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle) as well as flavonoids (in Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle) in Sijunzi decoction. This research developed the bases for prospective research associated with Sijunzi decoction, together with being expected to be useful to rapidly extract and characterize the constituents in other Traditional Chinese herbal formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Group Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  14. Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  15. Florida Everglades and Keys, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Though much of southern Florida is covered by clouds, the Florida Everglades and Keys (25.0N, 82.0W) remain relatively clear in this nearly vertical view. The view covers the Gulf of Mexico port city of Ft. Myers, and Lake Okeechobee, at the top of the scene, in the north, The Everglades, in the center and the entire Florida Key Chain at the bottom. Even with the many popcorn clouds, ground detail and the city of Miami is easily discerned.

  16. Counterfactual Quantum Deterministic Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Jian; Tang, Chao-Jing

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new counterfactual quantum cryptography protocol concerning about distributing a deterministic key. By adding a controlled blocking operation module to the original protocol [T.G. Noh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 (2009) 230501], the correlation between the polarizations of the two parties, Alice and Bob, is extended, therefore, one can distribute both deterministic keys and random ones using our protocol. We have also given a simple proof of the security of our protocol using the technique we ever applied to the original protocol. Most importantly, our analysis produces a bound tighter than the existing ones.

  17. Stratospheric constituent measurements using UV solar occultation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Gillis, J.; Goldman, A.; Kosters, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemistry of the stratospheric ozone layer was studied as the result of predictions that trace amounts of pollutants can significantly affect the layer. One of the key species in the determination of the effects of these pollutants is the OH radical. A balloon flight was made to determine whether data on atmospheric OH could be obtained from lower resolution solar spectra obtained from high altitude during sunset.

  18. Part 1. Statistical Learning Methods for the Effects of Multiple Air Pollution Constituents.

    PubMed

    Coull, Brent A; Bobb, Jennifer F; Wellenius, Gregory A; Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Mittleman, Murray A; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2015-06-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA*) currently regulates individual air pollutants on a pollutant-by-pollutant basis, adjusted for other pollutants and potential confounders. However, the National Academies of Science concluded that a multipollutant regulatory approach that takes into account the joint effects of multiple constituents is likely to be more protective of human health. Unfortunately, the large majority of existing research had focused on health effects of air pollution for one pollutant or for one pollutant with control for the independent effects of a small number of copollutants. Limitations in existing statistical methods are at least partially responsible for this lack of information on joint effects. The goal of this project was to fill this gap by developing flexible statistical methods to estimate the joint effects of multiple pollutants, while allowing for potential nonlinear or nonadditive associations between a given pollutant and the health outcome of interest. We proposed Bayesian kernel machine regression (BKMR) methods as a way to simultaneously achieve the multifaceted goals of variable selection, flexible estimation of the exposure-response relationship, and inference on the strength of the association between individual pollutants and health outcomes in a health effects analysis of mixtures. We first developed a BKMR variable-selection approach, which we call component-wise variable selection, to make estimating such a potentially complex exposure-response function possible by effectively using two types of penalization (or regularization) of the multivariate exposure-response surface. Next we developed an extension of this first variable-selection approach that incorporates knowledge about how pollutants might group together, such as multiple constituents of particulate matter that might represent a common pollution source category. This second grouped, or hierarchical, variable-selection procedure is

  19. Dissolved metals and associated constituents in abandoned coal-mine discharges, Pennsylvania, USA. Part 2: Geochemical controls on constituent concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Water-quality data for discharges from 140 abandoned mines in the Anthracite and Bituminous Coalfields of Pennsylvania reveal complex relations among the pH and dissolved solute concentrations that can be explained with geochemical equilibrium models. Observed values of pH ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 in the coal-mine discharges (CMD). Generally, flow rates were smaller and solute concentrations were greater for low-pH CMD samples; pH typically increased with flow rate. Although the frequency distribution of pH was similar for the anthracite and bituminous discharges, the bituminous discharges had smaller median flow rates; greater concentrations of SO4, Fe, Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni and Sr; comparable concentrations of Mn, Cd, Zn and Se; and smaller concentrations of Ba and Pb than anthracite discharges with the same pH values. The observed relations between the pH and constituent concentrations can be attributed to (1) dilution of acidic water by near-neutral or alkaline ground water; (2) solubility control of Al, Fe, Mn, Ba and Sr by hydroxide, sulfate, and/or carbonate minerals; and (3) aqueous SO4-complexation and surface-complexation (adsorption) reactions. The formation of AlSO4+ and AlHSO42 + complexes adds to the total dissolved Al concentration at equilibrium with Al(OH)3 and/or Al hydroxysulfate phases and can account for 10-20 times greater concentrations of dissolved Al in SO4-laden bituminous discharges compared to anthracite discharges at pH of 5. Sulfate complexation can also account for 10-30 times greater concentrations of dissolved FeIII concentrations at equilibrium with Fe(OH)3 and/or schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)4.5(SO4)1.75) at pH of 3-5. In contrast, lower Ba concentrations in bituminous discharges indicate that elevated SO4 concentrations in these CMD sources could limit Ba concentrations by the precipitation of barite (BaSO4). Coprecipitation of Sr with barite could limit concentrations of this element. However, concentrations of dissolved Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn

  20. Teaming with Opportunity: Media Programs, Community Constituencies, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    This book is intended to help library media teachers understand the nature of partnerships at both individual and group levels. It details the steps for developing and maintaining partnerships, particularly with groups and demonstrates how technology can affect these educational collaborative efforts. The chapters cover the following topics: (1)…

  1. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  2. Key for Trees of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coder, Kim D.; Wray, Paul H.

    This key is designed to help identify the most common trees found in Iowa. It is based on vegetative characteristics such as leaves, fruits, and bark and is illustrated with black and white line drawings. Since vegetative characteristics vary due to climate, age, soil fertility, and other conditions, the numerical sizes listed, such as length and…

  3. Work Keys: Developing the Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarty, Joyce R.

    The American College Testing Program is developing a new program, Work Keys, a system to develop and assess employability skills. It consists of four components: (1) a systematic process for profiling job skill requirements; (2) assessments that measure learners' job skill levels; (3) procedures and formats for conveying assessment results so they…

  4. Seven Keys to Successful Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Peter

    Written for secondary, technical, and technical and further education (TAFE) students, this book aims to make learning easier and more enjoyable by showing students how to use a series of basic study skills called "keys." The book offers an explanation, examples, graphic illustrations, and activities for each skill. Chapters include: (1)…

  5. Key Skills and Competencies. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on key skills and competencies and human resource development (HRD). "Career Related Competencies" (Marinka A.C.T. Kuijpers) reports findings from surveys completed by Dutch employees who identified these issues: self-reflection is more important than career control; age and gender influence attitude…

  6. Key Skills Influencing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Tonya; Gruenert, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A predictive, non-experimental, cross-sectional design (Johnson, 2001) was used to conduct a study to determine if elementary administrators' key counseling skills and select demographics predicted state-level student performance indicators in their respective schools. A secondary purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable on-line…

  7. Advisory Groups to Encourage Collaboration: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lisa A.; Glynn, Graham; Lavallee, David; Moreau, Joseph; Orzech, Mary Jo; Pence, Harry E.

    2011-01-01

    This article is a case study of how the provost and senior executive leadership of one large university system capitalized on a long-standing advisory group as a tool to support communication and collaboration across a broad constituency. These advisory efforts help guide both future directions and investment. It is the story of how this group has…

  8. Key Reconciliation for High Performance Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Mateo, Jesus; Elkouss, David; Martin, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution is carving its place among the tools used to secure communications. While a difficult technology, it enjoys benefits that set it apart from the rest, the most prominent is its provable security based on the laws of physics. QKD requires not only the mastering of signals at the quantum level, but also a classical processing to extract a secret-key from them. This postprocessing has been customarily studied in terms of the efficiency, a figure of merit that offers a biased view of the performance of real devices. Here we argue that it is the throughput the significant magnitude in practical QKD, specially in the case of high speed devices, where the differences are more marked, and give some examples contrasting the usual postprocessing schemes with new ones from modern coding theory. A good understanding of its implications is very important for the design of modern QKD devices. PMID:23546440

  9. On Robust Key Agreement Based on Public Key Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Feng

    We describe two new attacks on the HMQV protocol. The first attack raises a serious question on the basic definition of "authentication" in HMQV, while the second attack is generally applicable to many other protocols. In addition, we present a new authenticated key agreement protocol called YAK. Our approach is to depend on well-established techniques such as Schnorr's signature. Among all the related protocols, YAK appears to be the simplest so far. We believe simplicity is an important engineering principle.

  10. Electronic Cigarettes: Their Constituents and Potential Links to Asthma.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Phillip W; Jaspers, Ilona

    2017-10-05

    Vaping is gaining popularity in the USA, particularly among teens and young adults. While e-cigs are commonly represented as safer alternatives to tobacco cigarettes, little is known regarding the health effects of their short- or long-term use, especially in individuals with pre-existing respiratory diseases such as asthma. Flavored e-cig liquids (e-liquids) and e-cig aerosols contain airway irritants and toxicants that have been implicated in the pathogenesis and worsening of lung diseases. In this review, we will summarize existing data on potential health effects of components present in e-cig aerosols, such as propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, nicotine, and flavorings, and discuss their relevance in the context of asthma. Recent survey data indicate that adolescents with asthma had a higher prevalence of current e-cig use (12.4%) compared to their non-asthmatics peers (10.2%) and conveyed positive beliefs about tobacco products, especially e-cigs. Similarly, a study conducted among high school students from Ontario, Canada, indicated a greater likelihood of e-cig use in asthmatics as compared to their non-asthmatic peers. Availability of different flavorings is often cited as the main reason among youth/adolescents for trying e-cigs or switching from cigarettes to e-cigs. Occupational inhalation of some common food-safe flavoring agents is reported to cause occupational asthma and worsen asthmatic symptoms. Moreover, workplace inhalation exposures to the flavoring agent diacetyl have caused irreversible obstructive airway disease in healthy workers. Additionally, recent studies report that thermal decomposition of propylene glycol (PG) and vegetable glycerin (VG), the base constituents of e-liquids, produces reactive carbonyls, including acrolein, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, which have known respiratory toxicities. Furthermore, recent nicotine studies in rodents reveal that prenatal nicotine exposures lead to epigenetic reprogramming in the offspring

  11. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  12. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  13. The grammar of visual narrative: Neural evidence for constituent structure in sequential image comprehension.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Neil; Jackendoff, Ray; Holcomb, Phillip J; Kuperberg, Gina R

    2014-11-01

    Constituent structure has long been established as a central feature of human language. Analogous to how syntax organizes words in sentences, a narrative grammar organizes sequential images into hierarchic constituents. Here we show that the brain draws upon this constituent structure to comprehend wordless visual narratives. We recorded neural responses as participants viewed sequences of visual images (comics strips) in which blank images either disrupted individual narrative constituents or fell at natural constituent boundaries. A disruption of either the first or the second narrative constituent produced a left-lateralized anterior negativity effect between 500 and 700ms. Disruption of the second constituent also elicited a posteriorly-distributed positivity (P600) effect. These neural responses are similar to those associated with structural violations in language and music. These findings provide evidence that comprehenders use a narrative structure to comprehend visual sequences and that the brain engages similar neurocognitive mechanisms to build structure across multiple domains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Citrus Essential Oils and Their Constituents on Growth of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei-Najafgholi, Hossein; Tarighi, Saeed; Golmohammadi, Morteza; Taheri, Parissa

    2017-04-14

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri ( Xcc ), is the most devastating of the citrus diseases worldwide. During our study, we found that Essential oils (EOs) of some citrus cultivars are effective on Xcc . Therefore, it prompted us to determine the plant metabolites responsible for the antibacterial properties. We obtained EOs from some locally cultivated citrus by using a Clevenger apparatus and their major constituents were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effect of Citrus aurantium , C. aurantifolia , Fortunella sp. EOs and their major constituents were evaluated against Xcc -KVXCC1 using a disk diffusion assay. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration of the EOs and their constituents were determined using the broth microdilution method. C. aurantium , C. aurantifolia Eos, and their major constituents including citral, linalool, citronellal, geraniol, α-terpineol, and linalyl acetate indicated antibacterial effects against Xcc . The C. aurantifolia EO and citral showed the highest antibacterial activity among the tested EOs and constituents with inhibition zones of 15 ± 0.33 mm and 16.67 ± 0.88 mm, respectively. Synergistic effects of the constituents were observed between α-terpineol-citral, citral-citronellal, citral-geraniol, and citronellal-geraniol by using a microdilution checkerboard assay. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that exposure of Xcc cells to citral caused cell wall damage and altered cytoplasmic density. We introduced C. aurantifolia and C. aurantium EOs, and their constituents citral, α-terpineol, citronellal, geraniol, and linalool as possible control agents for CBC.

  15. [Studies on the chemical constituents of the volatiles of Clerodendron bungei].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-nong

    2004-02-01

    To analyse chemical constituents of the volatiles of Clerodendron bungei. The volatiles of C. bungei were extracted through steam distillation, and then the constituents were separated by GC and identified by MS. 33 Compounds were identified. The principal chemical constituents of the volatiles of C. bungei are ethanol, acetone, 1-penten-3-ol,2-pentanol, (Z)-2-penten-1-ol, 3-furaldehyde, 3-hexen-1-ol, 4-hexen-1-ol, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, benzenemethanol, linal-ool oxide, trans-Linalool oxide, linalool,2,5-dimethylcyclohexanol, phenylethyl alcohol, etc.

  16. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  17. Key papers in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodney, Simon; Shah, Taimur Tariq; Patel, Hitendra R H; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of death in men. The evidence base for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is continually changing. We aim to review and discuss past and contemporary papers on these topics to provoke debate and highlight key dilemmas faced by the urological community. We review key papers on prostate-specific antigen screening, radical prostatectomy versus surveillance strategies, targeted therapies, timing of radiotherapy and alternative anti-androgen therapeutics. Previously, the majority of patients, irrespective of risk, underwent radical open surgical procedures associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging that not all prostate cancers are alike and that low-grade disease can be safely managed by surveillance strategies and localized treatment to the prostate. The question remains as to how to accurately stage the disease and ultimately choose which treatment pathway to follow.

  18. Key drivers of airline loyalty.

    PubMed

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty.

  19. Key drivers of airline loyalty

    PubMed Central

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty. PMID:27064618

  20. Does Switching to Reduced Ignition Propensity Cigarettes Alter Smoking Behavior or Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Constituents?

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Vaughan W.; Norton, Kaila J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Connolly, Gregory N.; Alpert, Hillel R.; Sjödin, Andreas; Romanoff, Lovisa; Li, Zheng; June, Kristie M.; Giovino, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2004, several jurisdictions have mandated that cigarettes show reduced ignition propensity (RIP) in laboratory testing. RIP cigarettes may limit fires caused by smoldering cigarettes, reducing fire-related deaths and injury. However, some evidence suggests that RIP cigarettes emit more carbon monoxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and smokers may alter their smoking patterns in response to RIP cigarettes. Both of these could increase smokers’ exposures to harmful constituents in cigarettes. Methods: An 18-day switching study with a comparison group was conducted in Boston, MA (N = 77), and Buffalo, NY (N = 83), in 2006–2007. Current daily smokers completed 4 laboratory visits and two 48-hr field data collections. After a 4-day baseline, Boston participants switched to RIP cigarettes for 14 days, whereas Buffalo participants smoked RIP cigarettes throughout. Outcome measures included cigarettes smoked per day; smoking topography; salivary cotinine; breath CO; and hydroxylated metabolites of pyrene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluorene. Because the groups differed demographically, analyses adjusted for race, age, and sex. Results: We observed no significant changes in smoking topography or CO exposure among participants who switched to RIP cigarettes. Cigarette use decreased significantly in the switched group (37.7 cigarettes/48 hr vs. 32.6 cigarettes/48 hr, p = .031), while hydroxyphenanthrenes increased significantly (555 ng/g creatinine vs. 669 ng/g creatinine, p = .007). No other biomarkers were significantly affected. Discussion: Small increases in exposure to phenanthrene among smokers who switched to RIP versions were observed, while other exposures and smoking topography were not significantly affected. Toxicological implications of these findings are unclear. These findings should be weighed against the potential public health benefits of adopting RIP design standards for cigarette products. PMID:20805292