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Sample records for key factors controlling

  1. Review of key factors controlling engineered nanoparticle transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Gao, Bin; Tang, Deshan

    2016-11-15

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, has witnessed rapid development in production and application. Engineered nanomaterials revolutionize the industry due to their unique structure and superior performance. The release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into the environment, however, may pose risks to the environment and public health. To advance current understanding of environmental behaviors of ENPs, this work provides an introductory overview of ENP fate and transport in porous media. It systematically reviews the key factors controlling their fate and transport in porous media. It first provides a brief overview of common ENPs in the environment and their sources. The key factors that govern ENP transport in porous media are then categorized into three groups: (1) nature of ENPs affecting their transport in porous media, (2) nature of porous media affecting ENP transport, and (3) nature of flow affecting ENP transport in porous media. In each group, findings in recent literature on the specific governing factors of ENP transport in porous media are discussed in details. Finally, this work concludes with remarks on the importance of ENP transport in porous media and directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Insights into key factors controlling GO stability in natural surface waters.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Ren, Xuemei; Tan, Xiaoli; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Chen, Changlun

    2017-08-05

    The effects of pH, cations (Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Al 3+ ), and anions (Cl - , HCO 3 - , HPO 4 2- and SO 4 2- ) on graphene oxide (GO) stability were investigated to address the current limitations in the knowledge regarding the stability of GO in natural surface water and its underlying mechanism. The threshold values of cations that destabilize GO were obtained and affected by both pH and anions. By employing elemental mapping and studying the effects of polyacrylic acid (PAA) on GO sedimentation and the re-dispersion of GO aggregates, we find that the GO aggregates induced by Na + and K + via electric double layer suppression and by Ca 2+ and Al 3+ via strong complxing are difficult to re-disperse completely. Specifically, more PAA is needed to re-disperse GO aggregates than to stabilize GO, which suggests that after GO binds with heavy metal ions. It is less likely to be transported over a long distance even in natural water that are rich in natural organic matter. Finally, we find that the key factor controlling GO sedimentation in natural surface waters is its binding with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ . This study is expected to provide critical knowledge to more accurately predict the fate of GO in natural surface aquatic environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quartz dustiness: A key factor in controlling exposure to crystalline silica in the workplace.

    PubMed

    López-Lilao, A; Escrig, A; Orts, M J; Mallol, Gustavo; Monfort, E

    2016-11-01

    The classification of Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) as carcinogenic for humans has drawn greater attention to crystalline silica exposure in the workplace in recent years, leading to recommendations by safety and health bodies in Europe and the U.S. for lower occupational exposure limits. In view of this new scenario, the present study examined quartz dustiness, as quartz handling is a major source of crystalline silica in the workplace. The study was conducted on test samples with different mean particle sizes, prepared from several commercial quartzes. The quartz particle samples were characterised and the influence of certain quartz particle parameters on quartz dustiness was determined. The results indicate that quartz dustiness may be significantly affected by mean particle size, specific surface area, the Hausner ratio, and fine particle content. The study shows that, in order to minimise the adverse health effects associated with the inhalation of crystalline silica, quartz dustiness may be deemed a key factor in controlling the generation of fugitive quartz emissions during quartz processing, both into the outside atmosphere (air pollution) and inside the facilities (occupational health).

  4. Distributions of key exposure factors controlling the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in an estuarine food web

    SciTech Connect

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Harrington, N.W.; Shear, N.M.; Curry, C.L.; Carlson-Lynch, H.; Henning, M.H.; Su, S.H.; Rabbe, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    A critical evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of common estuarine organisms was conducted in an attempt to develop probabilistic distributions for those variables that influence the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water, and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values were identified for dominant organisms from various trophic levels, including the polychaete Nereis virens, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The exposure factors of interest included ingestion rate for various food sources, growth rate, respiration rate, excretion rate, body weight, wet/dry weight ratio, lipid content, chemical assimilation efficiency, and food assimilation efficiency. These exposure factors are critical to the execution of mechanistic food web models, which, when properly calibrated, can be used to estimate tissue concentrations of nonionic chemicals in aquatic organisms based on knowledge of the bioenergetics and feeding interactions within a food web and the sediment and water concentrations of chemicals. In this article the authors describe the use of distributions for various exposure factors in the context of a mechanistic bioaccumulation model that is amenable to probabilistic analyses for multiple organisms within a food web. A case study is provided which compares the estimated versus measured concentrations of five polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in a representative food web from the tidal portion of the Passaic River, New Jersey, USA. The results suggest that the model is accurate within an order of magnitude or less in estimating the bioaccumulation of PCBs in this food web without calibration. The results of a model sensitivity analysis suggest that the input parameters which most influence the output of the model are both chemical and organism specific.

  5. Key factors controlling the transport of silver nanoparticles in porous media.

    PubMed

    El Badawy, Amro M; Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Scheckel, Kirk G; Suidan, Makram T; Tolaymat, Thabet M

    2013-05-07

    The current study investigated the mobility of four silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized using different capping agents and represent the common stabilization mechanisms as well as surface charging scenarios in reactive and nonreactive porous media. The AgNPs were (1) uncoated H2-AgNPs (electrostatically stabilized) and (2) citrate coated AgNPs (Citrate-AgNPs) (electrostatically stabilized), (3) polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) (sterically stabilized), and (4) branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs) (electrosterically stabilized). The porous media were (1) quartz sand (QS), (2) ferrihydrite-coated sand (FcS), and (3) kaolin-coated sand (KcS). The H2-AgNPs and Citrate-AgNPs were readily mobile in QS but significantly retained in FcS and KcS with more deposition achieved in the KcS media. The deposition of the H2-AgNPs and Citrate-AgNPs followed the order of KcS > FcS > QS. The PVP-AgNPs breakthrough occurred more rapid as compared to the H2-AgNPs and Citrate-AgNPs but the deposition of PVP-AgNPs followed the same order of the electrostatically stabilized AgNPs (KcS > FcS > QS). The BPEI-AgNPs were readily mobile regardless of the porous media reactivity. Physicochemical interactions were the dominant filtration mechanism in the majority of the investigated cases but straining played the major role in the deposition of the electrostatically stabilized H2-AgNPs and Citrate-AgNPs in the KcS media. The results highlight the importance of both the stabilization mechanism and capping agent chemistry as key factors governing the transport of AgNPs in the environment.

  6. Key factors controlling microbial community response after a fire: importance of severity and recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombao, Alba; Barreiro, Ana; Martín, Ángela; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in forest ecosystems, especially after fire when vegetation is destroyed and soil is bared. Fire severity and recurrence might be one of main factors controlling the microbial response after a wildfire but information about this topic is scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of fire regimen (recurrence and severity) on soil microbial community structure by means of the analysis of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA). The study was performed with unburned and burned samples collected from the top layer of a soil affected by a high severity fire (Laza, NW Spain) heated under laboratory conditions at different temperatures (50°C, 75°C, 100°C, 125°C, 150°C, 175°C, 200°C, 300°C) to simulate different fire intensities; the process was repeated after further soil recovery (1 month incubation) to simulate fire recurrence. The soil temperature was measured with thermocouples and used to calculate the degree-hours as estimation of the amount of heat supplied to the samples (fire severity). The PLFA analysis was used to estimate total biomass and the biomass of specific groups (bacteria, fungi, gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria) as well as microbial community structure (PLFA pattern) and PLFA data were analyzed by means of principal component analysis (PCA) in order to identify main factors determining microbial community structure. The results of PCA, performed with the whole PLFA data set, showed that first component explained 35% of variation and clearly allow us to differentiate unburned samples from the corresponding burned samples, while the second component, explaining 16% of variation, separated samples according the heating temperature. A marked impact of fire regimen on soil microorganisms was detected; the microbial community response varied depending on previous history of soil heating and the magnitude of changes in the PLFA pattern was related to the amount of heat supplied to the

  7. [Key factors in the control of electroosmosis with external radial electric field in CE].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Chen, Y

    1999-11-01

    Direct control of electroosmosis flow (EOF) by external radial electric field was performed at room temperature using a home-made field-modulated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. The EOF was monitored at 206 nm by using DMSO as a probe. To apply a radial electric field across the CE capillary wall, the capillary was cased with a wide column. Both of the concentric space and the capillary bore were then filled with an identical running buffer and applied with an axial electric field of 150 V/cm but starting from different levels. All of the tubes used were made of fused silica with polyimide over-coating (from the Yongnian Optical Fiber Work, Hebei, P. R. China). The size of the CE capillaries adopted was 25-100 microns i.d. (375 microns o.d.) x 28.5/45 cm (effective/total length), and that of the casing column 400 microns i.d. x 32 cm. To investigate the fundamentals of the external EOF control when using the flexible fused silica capillaries, various parameters have been inspected such as pH, buffer composition, additives and capillary wall feature etc.. As expected, to well control both of the magnitude and direction of the electroosmosis, the buffer pH should be kept below 4 and the buffer concentration below 50 mmol/L. However, buffers below 1 mmol/L should be avoided because such a diluted running buffer may result in poor CE separation. Weak electrolytes like citric acid, tartaric acid and acetic acid were found to be capable of generating better EOF control than the strong electrolytes such as phosphate and chlorides. This is possibly due to the formation of looser electric double layer with the weak rather than the strong electrolytes. Some wall coatings like calix arene and its derivatives can evidently improve the EOF control even at pH 5. This reveals an exciting way to expend the controllable pH range. In addition, narrow-bore capillaries were demonstrated to be better than wide-bore tubes. Other conditions such as buffer additives and capillary

  8. Understanding the key factors that control the rate of β-hairpin folding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Deguo; Zhu, Yongjin; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Gai, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Both turn sequence and interstrand hydrophobic side-chain–side-chain interaction have been suggested to be important determinants of β-hairpin stability. However, their roles in controlling the folding dynamics of β-hairpins have not been clearly determined. Herein, we investigated the structural stability and folding kinetics of a series of tryptophan zippers by static IR and CD spectroscopies and the IR temperature jump method. Our results support a β-hairpin folding mechanism wherein the rate-limiting event corresponds to the formation of the turn. We find that the logarithm of the folding rate depends linearly on the entropic change associated with the turn formation, where faster folding correlates with lower entropic cost. Moreover, a stronger turn-promoting sequence increases the stability of a β-hairpin primarily by increasing its folding rate, whereas a stronger hydrophobic cluster increases the stability of a β-hairpin primarily by decreasing its unfolding rate. PMID:15520391

  9. Mechanisms of surgical control of type 2 diabetes: GLP-1 is the key factor-Maybe.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; D'Alessio, David A

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity and diabetes. The 2 most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy, improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss. One of the early hypotheses raised to explain the immediate antidiabetic effect of RYGB was that rapid delivery of nutrients from the stomach pouch into the distal small intestine enhances enteroinsular signaling to promote insulin signaling. Given the tenfold increase in postmeal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response compared to unchanged integrated levels of postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide after RYGB, enhanced meal-induced insulin secretion after this procedure was thought to be the result of elevated glucose and GLP-1 levels. In this contribution to the larger point-counterpoint debate about the role of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery, most of the focus will be on RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Independent Control of Organogenesis and Shoot Tip Abortion are Key Factors to Developmental Plasticity in Kiwifruit (Actinidia)

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Toshi M.; Seleznyova, Alla N.; Barnett, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims In kiwifruit (Actinidia), the number of nodes per shoot is highly variable and is influenced by genotype and environmental conditions. To understand this developmental plasticity, three key processes were studied: organogenesis by the shoot apical meristem during shoot growth; expansion of phytomers; and shoot tip abortion. Methods Studies were made of organogenesis and shoot tip abortion using light and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on shoot growth cessation was investigated using temperature indices over the budbreak period, and patterns of shoot tip abortion were quantified using stochastic modelling. Key Results All growing buds began organogenesis before budbreak. During shoot development, the number of phytomers initiated by the shoot apical meristem is correlated with the number of expanding phytomers and the mean internode length. Shoot tip abortion is preceded by growth cessation and is not brought about by the death of the shoot apical meristem, but occurs by tissue necrosis in the sub-apical zone. For most genotypes studied, the probability of shoot tip abortion is higher during expansion of the preformed part of the shoot. Lower temperatures during early growth result in a higher probability of shoot tip abortion. Conclusions Organogenesis and shoot tip abortion are controlled independently. All buds have the potential to become long shoots. Conditions that increase early growth rate postpone shoot tip abortion. PMID:17650513

  11. Key Factors Controlling the Growth of Biological Soil Crusts: Towards a Protocol to Produce Biocrusts in Greenhouse Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Ayuso, Sergio; María Giraldo Silva, Ana; Nelson, Corey; Barger, Nichole; Antoninka, Anita; Bowker, Matthew; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (= biocrusts) are topsoil communities comprise of, but not limited to, cyanobacteria, algae, lichens, and mosses that grow intimately associated with soil particles in drylands. Biocrusts have central ecological roles in these areas as sources of carbon and nutrients, and efficiently retain water and prevent soil erosion, which improves soil structure and promotes soil fertility. However, human activities, such as cattle grazing, hiking or military training, are rapidly striking biocrusts. Although it is well known that the inoculation with cyanobacteria or lichens can enhance the recovery of biocrusts in degraded soils, little is known about the factors that control their growth rates. Using soil and inocula from four different sites located in one cold desert (Utah) and in one hot desert (New Mexico), we performed a fractional factorial experiment involving seven factors (water, light, P, N, calcium carbonate, trace metals and type of inoculum) to screen their effects on the growth of biocrusts. After four months, we measured the concentration of chlorophyll a, and we discovered that water, light and P, N or P+N were the most important factors controlling the growth of biocrusts. In the experimental treatments involving these three factors we measured a similar concentration of chlorophyll a (or even higher) to this found in the field locations. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene segment using universal bacteria primers revealed a microbial community composition in the biocrusts grown that closely corresponds to initial measurements made on inocula. In summary, based on our success in obtaining biocrust biomass from natural communities in greenhouse facilities, without significantly changing its community composition at the phylum and cyanobacterial level, we are paving the road to propose a protocol to produce a high quality-nursed inoculum aiming to assist restoration of arid and semi-arid ecosystems affected by large-scale disturbances.

  12. The Key Sigma Factor of Transition Phase, SigH, Controls Sporulation, Metabolism, and Virulence Factor Expression in Clostridium difficile▿†

    PubMed Central

    Saujet, Laure; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Soutourina, Olga; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Toxin synthesis in Clostridium difficile increases as cells enter into stationary phase. We first compared the expression profiles of strain 630E during exponential growth and at the onset of stationary phase and showed that genes involved in sporulation, cellular division, and motility, as well as carbon and amino acid metabolism, were differentially expressed under these conditions. We inactivated the sigH gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in the transition to post-exponential phase in Bacillus subtilis. Then, we compared the expression profiles of strain 630E and the sigH mutant after 10 h of growth. About 60% of the genes that were differentially expressed between exponential and stationary phases, including genes involved in motility, sporulation, and metabolism, were regulated by SigH, which thus appears to be a key regulator of the transition phase in C. difficile. SigH positively controls several genes required for sporulation. Accordingly, sigH inactivation results in an asporogeneous phenotype. The spo0A and CD2492 genes, encoding the master regulator of sporulation and one of its associated kinases, and the spoIIA operon were transcribed from a SigH-dependent promoter. The expression of tcdA and tcdB, encoding the toxins, and of tcdR, encoding the sigma factor required for toxin production, increased in a sigH mutant. Finally, SigH regulates the expression of genes encoding surface-associated proteins, such as the Cwp66 adhesin, the S-layer precursor, and the flagellum components. Among the 286 genes positively regulated by SigH, about 40 transcriptional units presenting a SigH consensus in their promoter regions are good candidates for direct SigH targets. PMID:21572003

  13. Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy in the Acute Stage: What Is the Key Factor for Efficacy? A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Woldag, Hartwig; Voigt, Nancy; Bley, Maria; Hummelsheim, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT) has proven effective in patients with subacute and chronic forms of aphasia. It has remained unclear, however, whether intensity of therapy or constraint is the relevant factor. Data about intensive speech and language therapy (SLT) are conflicting. To identify the effective component of CIAT and assess the feasibility of SLT in the acute stage after stroke. A total of 60 patients with aphasia (68.2 ± 11.7 years) were enrolled 18.9 days after first-ever stroke. They were randomly distributed into 3 groups: (1) CIAT group receiving therapy for 3 hours per day (10 workdays, total 30 hours); (2) conventional communication treatment group, with same intensity without constraints; and (3) control group receiving individual therapy twice a day as well as group therapy (total 14 hours). Patients were assessed pretreatment and posttreatment using the Aachener Aphasia Test (primary end point: token test) and the Communicative Activity Log (CAL). Pretreatment, there were no between-group differences. Posttreatment, all groups showed significant improvements without between-group differences. It was found that 14 hours of aphasia therapy administered within 2 weeks as individual therapy, focusing on individual deficits, combined with group sessions has proven to be most efficient. This approach yielded the same outcome as 30 hours of group therapy, either in the form of CIAT or group therapy without constraints. SLT in an intensive treatment schedule is feasible and was well tolerated in the acute stage after stroke. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  15. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-04

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Key Impact Factors on Dam Break Fatalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Yu, Z.; Song, Y.; Han, D.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Dam failures can lead to catastrophes on human society. However, there is a lack of research about dam break fatalities, especially on the key factors that affect fatalities. Based on the analysis of historical dam break cases, most studies have used the regression analysis to explore the correlation between those factors and fatalities, but without implementing optimization to find the dominating factors. In order to understand and reduce the risk of fatalities, this study has proposed a new method to select the impact factors on the fatality. It employs an improved ANN (Artificial Neural Network) combined with LOOCV (Leave-one-out cross-validation) and SFS (Stepwise Forward Selection) approach to explore the nonlinear relationship between impact factors and life losses. It not only considers the factors that have been widely used in the literature but also introduces new factors closely involved with fatalities. Dam break cases occurred in China from 1954 to 2013 are summarized, within which twenty-five cases are selected with a comprehensive coverage of geographic position and temporal variation. Twelve impact factors are taken into account as the inputs, i.e., severity of dam break flood (SF), population at risk (PR), public understanding of dam break (UB), warning time (TW), evacuation condition (EC), weather condition during dam break (WB), dam break mode (MB), water storage (SW), building vulnerability (VB), dam break time (TB), average distance from the affected area to the dam (DD) and preventive measures by government (PG).From those, three key factors of SF, MB and TB are chosen. The proposed method is able to extract the key factors, and the derived fatality model performs well in various types of dam break conditions.

  17. Towards an effective control programme of soil-transmitted helminth infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Part 1: Prevalence and associated key factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the continuous efforts to improve the quality of life of Orang Asli (Aborigines) communities, these communities are still plagued with a wide range of health problems including parasitic infections. The first part of this study aimed at determining the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections and identifying their associated factors among rural Orang Asli children. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 484 Orang Asli children aged ≤ 15 years (235 females and 249 males) belonging to 215 households from 13 villages in Lipis district, Pahang, Malaysia. Faecal samples were collected and examined by using formalin-ether sedimentation, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results Overall, 78.1% of the children were found to be infected with one or more STH species. The prevalence of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections were 71.7%, 37.4% and 17.6%, respectively. Almost all, three quarters and one fifth of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections, respectively, were of moderate-to-heavy intensities. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that age of ≥ 6 years (school-age), using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, absence of a toilet in the house, large family size (≥ 7 members), not washing hands before eating, and not washing hands after defecation were the key factors significantly associated with STH among these children. Conclusion This study reveals an alarmingly high prevalence of STH among Orang Asli children and clearly brings out an urgent need to implement school-based de-worming programmes and other control measures like providing a proper sanitation, as well as a treated drinking water supply and proper health education regarding good personal hygiene practices. Such an integrated control program will help significantly in

  18. Towards an effective control programme of soil-transmitted helminth infections among Orang Asli in rural Malaysia. Part 1: prevalence and associated key factors.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Nabil A; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Roslan, Muhammad Aidil; Bulgiba, Awang

    2013-01-28

    Despite the continuous efforts to improve the quality of life of Orang Asli (Aborigines) communities, these communities are still plagued with a wide range of health problems including parasitic infections. The first part of this study aimed at determining the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections and identifying their associated factors among rural Orang Asli children. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 484 Orang Asli children aged ≤ 15 years (235 females and 249 males) belonging to 215 households from 13 villages in Lipis district, Pahang, Malaysia. Faecal samples were collected and examined by using formalin-ether sedimentation, Kato Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and behavioural information were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, 78.1% of the children were found to be infected with one or more STH species. The prevalence of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections were 71.7%, 37.4% and 17.6%, respectively. Almost all, three quarters and one fifth of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections, respectively, were of moderate-to-heavy intensities. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that age of ≥ 6 years (school-age), using unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water, absence of a toilet in the house, large family size (≥ 7 members), not washing hands before eating, and not washing hands after defecation were the key factors significantly associated with STH among these children. This study reveals an alarmingly high prevalence of STH among Orang Asli children and clearly brings out an urgent need to implement school-based de-worming programmes and other control measures like providing a proper sanitation, as well as a treated drinking water supply and proper health education regarding good personal hygiene practices. Such an integrated control program will help significantly in reducing the prevalence and intensity of STH in

  19. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  20. Student Success Factors: Identifying Key Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulaiman, Ainin; Mohezar, Suhana

    2006-01-01

    The authors' main aim in this study was to identify key predictors of Master of Business Administration (MBA) students' academic performance. The authors measured performance by the students' cumulative grade point average achieved, using data from the Students Information Systems and Application database. The authors found that a student's…

  1. Switchgrass stand establishment: key factors for success

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is not difficult to establish if precipitation is timely and four key management practices are followed. First, purchase certified seed with excellent seed lot quality. Second, develop a good firm seedbed. Third, plant the seed at the proper time, depth, and rate. F...

  2. Helicopter training simulators: Key market factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, John

    1992-01-01

    Simulators will gain an increasingly important role in training helicopter pilots only if the simulators are of sufficient fidelity to provide positive transfer of skills to the aircraft. This must be done within an economic model of return on investment. Although rotor pilot demand is still only a small percentage of overall pilot requirements, it will grow in significance. This presentation described the salient factors influencing the use of helicopter training simulators.

  3. Fibroblast growth factors: key players in regeneration and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Maddaluno, Luigi; Urwyler, Corinne; Werner, Sabine

    2017-11-15

    Tissue injury initiates a complex repair process, which in some organisms can lead to the complete regeneration of a tissue. In mammals, however, the repair of most organs is imperfect and results in scar formation. Both regeneration and repair are orchestrated by a highly coordinated interplay of different growth factors and cytokines. Among the key players are the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which control the migration, proliferation, differentiation and survival of different cell types. In addition, FGFs influence the expression of other factors involved in the regenerative response. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the roles of endogenous FGFs in regeneration and repair in different organisms and in different tissues and organs. Gaining a better understanding of these FGF activities is important for appropriate modulation of FGF signaling after injury to prevent impaired healing and to promote organ regeneration in humans. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Proteome Stability as a Key Factor of Genome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Gumeni, Sentiljana; Evangelakou, Zoi; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage is constantly produced by both endogenous and exogenous factors; DNA lesions then trigger the so-called DNA damaged response (DDR). This is a highly synchronized pathway that involves recognition, signaling and repair of the damage. Failure to eliminate DNA lesions is associated with genome instability, a driving force in tumorigenesis. Proteins carry out the vast majority of cellular functions and thus proteome quality control (PQC) is critical for the maintenance of cellular functionality. PQC is assured by the proteostasis network (PN), which under conditions of proteome instability address the triage decision of protein fold, hold, or degrade. Key components of the PN are the protein synthesis modules, the molecular chaperones and the two main degradation machineries, namely the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathways; also, part of the PN are a number of stress-responsive cellular sensors including (among others) heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Nevertheless, the lifestyle- and/or ageing-associated gradual accumulation of stressors results in increasingly damaged and unstable proteome due to accumulation of misfolded proteins and/or protein aggregates. This outcome may then increase genomic instability due to reduced fidelity in processes like DNA replication or repair leading to various age-related diseases including cancer. Herein, we review the role of proteostatic machineries in nuclear genome integrity and stability, as well as on DDR responses. PMID:28937603

  5. Zur (FurB) is a key factor in the control of the oxidative stress response in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C; González, Andrés; Napolitano, Mauro; Luque, Ignacio; Barja, Francisco; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2015-06-01

    Iron and zinc are necessary nutrients whose homeostasis is tightly controlled by members of the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) superfamily in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Although the link between iron metabolism and oxidative stress management is well documented, little is known about the connection between zinc homeostasis and the oxidative stress response in cyanobacteria. Zinc homeostasis in Anabaena is controlled by Zur, also named FurB. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, Zur (FurB) improved cell survival during oxidative stress. In order to investigate the possible correlation between Zur and the oxidative stress response in Anabaena, zur deletion and zur-overexpressing strains have been constructed, and the consequences of Zur imbalance evaluated. The lack of Zur increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), whereas an excess of Zur enhanced oxidative stress resistance. Both mutants displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including alterations on the filament surfaces observable by scanning electron microscopy, reduced content of endogenous H2 O2 and altered expression of sodA, catalases and several peroxiredoxins. Transcriptional and biochemical analyses unveiled that the appropriate level of Zur is required for proper control of the oxidative stress response and allowed us to identify major antioxidant enzymes as novel members of the Zur regulon. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Cancerous toxin is the key pathogenic factor of malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ling, Chang-Quan

    2008-02-01

    The definition of cancerous toxin and the relationships between cancerous toxin and other factors including the etiopathogenesis, pathogenesis and treatment of malignant tumor were discussed in this paper. The author suggests that the cancerous toxin is engendered by the disequilibrium of human body, which is the foundation of tumorigenesis. Cancerous toxin is the main pathogenic factor or one of the main pathogenic factors during the development of malignant tumor, hence it is also the key point for understanding and treating malignant tumor.

  7. Key performance measures to control maintenance-associated HAIs.

    PubMed

    Njuangang, Stanley; Liyanage, Champika; Akintoye, Akintola

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve overall healthcare maintenance (HM) service performance in NHS infection control (IC). Hence, the authors identify critical success factors (CSFs) and key performance measures in maintenance-associated infections. These infections occur because of the poor performance of HM service in IC. In the first Delphi exercise, complete CSFs and performance measures were presented to the Delphi participants for refinement and modification. Delphi round 1 data were analysed manually and used to refine the rounds 2 and 3 Delphi instruments. In subsequent Delphi rounds, the results were analysed through descriptive statistics. In total, eight CSFs and 53 key performance measures were identified for reducing maintenance-associated infections in hospitals. For example, establishing clear communication between the infection control team (ICT) and HM unit is important for preventing maintenance-associated HAIs. Dust prevention is also identified by the healthcare experts as an important measure to prevent maintenance-associated HAIs in high-risk patient areas. The findings provide CSFs and key performance measures for measuring performance in HM in IC. Reducing the rate of maintenance-associated infections will have important socio-economic and health ramifications for hospitals. It will reduce cost and free up additional resources for alternative projects. It will also raise confidence among healthcare users about the quality of services provided by hospitals.

  8. Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubation Environments: A Framework of Key Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajani, Haya; Dedoussis, Evangelos; Watson, Erika; Tzokas, Nikalaos

    2014-01-01

    The benchmarking framework developed in this study is specifically designed for higher education institutions to consider when developing environments to encourage entrepreneurship among their students, graduates and staff. The objective of the study was to identify key success factors of Graduate Entrepreneurship Incubator Environments (GEIEs)…

  9. From shared care to disease management: key-influencing factors

    PubMed Central

    Eijkelberg, Irmgard M.J.G.; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to improve the quality of care of chronically ill patients the traditional boundaries between primary and secondary care are questioned. To demolish these boundaries so-called ‘shared care’ projects have been initiated in which different ways of substitution of care are applied. When these projects end, disease management may offer a solution to expand the achieved co-operation between primary and secondary care. Objective Answering the question: What key factors influence the development and implementation of shared care projects from a management perspective and how are they linked? Theory The theoretical framework is based on the concept of the learning organisation. Design Reference point is a multiple case study that finally becomes a single case study. Data are collected by means of triangulation. The studied cases concern two interrelated Dutch shared care projects for type 2 diabetic patients, that in the end proceed as one disease management project. Results In these cases the predominant key-influencing factors appear to be the project management, commitment and local context, respectively. The factor project management directly links the latter two, albeit managing both appear prerequisites to its success. In practice this implies managing the factors' interdependency by the application of change strategies and tactics in a committed and skilful way. Conclusion Project management, as the most important and active key factor, is advised to cope with the interrelationships of the influencing factors in a gradually more fundamental way by using strategies and tactics that enable learning processes. Then small-scale shared care projects may change into a disease management network at a large scale, which may yield the future blueprint to proceed. PMID:16896415

  10. Key Planning Factors for Recovery from a Radiological Terrorism Incident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Goiania, Brazil (Figure 3-1). It took over a week to discover the release, and in that time extensive community contamination and exposures occurred...report describing the Cs-137 accident in Goiania, Brazil . Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory September 2012Key Planning Factors for Radiological...from plant operators on the disposal of sludge from plant operations are added to the general discussion of what do we do about the wastes being

  11. Exploring key factors in online shopping with a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Wu, Chia-Huei; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Yu, Jian; Wang, Jiangtao; Zheng, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the web increasingly influences retail sales. An in-depth analysis of consumer decision-making in the context of e-business has become an important issue for internet vendors. However, factors affecting e-business are complicated and intertwined. To stimulate online sales, understanding key influential factors and causal relationships among the factors is important. To gain more insights into this issue, this paper introduces a hybrid method, which combines the Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) with the analytic network process, called DANP method, to find out the driving factors that influence the online business mostly. By DEMATEL approach the causal graph showed that "online service" dimension has the highest degree of direct impact on other dimensions; thus, the internet vendor is suggested to made strong efforts on service quality throughout the online shopping process. In addition, the study adopted DANP to measure the importance of key factors, among which "transaction security" proves to be the most important criterion. Hence, transaction security should be treated with top priority to boost the online businesses. From our study with DANP approach, the comprehensive information can be visually detected so that the decision makers can spotlight on the root causes to develop effectual actions.

  12. Obesity prevention: the key to non-communicable disease control.

    PubMed

    Henry, F J

    2011-07-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the main public health problem in the Caribbean and they place a severe economic burden on the health systems in the region. This paper contends that preventing obesity is a critical factor in controlling NCDs. The paper further argues that obesity prevention is more likely to come from structural and policy-related changes to the environment than from medical interventions targeted at the individual. Rolling back the rapid increase in obesity in the Caribbean requires much more than the traditional passive approach that relied almost entirely on education for individual behavioural change. The traditional models of obesity control have generally failed globally and a new public policy approach needs to be instituted to attack this epidemic in a multisectoral way. Effective control of obesity will require a shift away from the traditional focus on clinical management and individual behaviour change towards strategies which deal with the environment in which such behaviours occur Outlined in this paper are key policy changes required by the various sectors whose inputs are vital to the success of prevention efforts.

  13. Identifying Key Hospital Service Quality Factors in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain

    2015-01-01

    Background The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. Objective As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. Methods We defined social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea’s two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. Results To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is

  14. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  15. Tag Content Access Control with Identity-based Key Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Rong, Chunming

    2010-09-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology that used to identify objects and users has been applied to many applications such retail and supply chain recently. How to prevent tag content from unauthorized readout is a core problem of RFID privacy issues. Hash-lock access control protocol can make tag to release its content only to reader who knows the secret key shared between them. However, in order to get this shared secret key required by this protocol, reader needs to communicate with a back end database. In this paper, we propose to use identity-based secret key exchange approach to generate the secret key required for hash-lock access control protocol. With this approach, not only back end database connection is not needed anymore, but also tag cloning problem can be eliminated at the same time.

  16. Power Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frank Nola invented the Power Factor Controller (PFC) at Marshall Space Flight Center more than a decade ago. Nola came up with a way to curb power wastage in AC induction motors. The PFC matches voltage with the motor's actual need by continuously sensing shifts between voltage and current. When it senses a light load it cuts the voltage to the minimum needed. Potential energy savings range from 8 to 65 percent.

  17. Myopic Loss Aversion: Demystifying the Key Factors Influencing Decision Problem Framing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Andrew M.; Looney, Clayton Arlen

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of myopic loss aversion theory has been hamstrung by conflicting results, methodological inconsistencies, and a piecemeal approach toward understanding the key factors influencing decision problem framing. A series of controlled experiments provides a more holistic view of the variables promoting myopia. Extending the information…

  18. Key factors affecting mechanical behavior of metallic glass nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Qi-Kai; Li, Mo

    2017-01-01

    Both strengthening and weakening trends with decreasing diameter have been observed for metallic glass nanowires, sometimes even in the samples with the same chemical composition. How to reconcile the results has reminded a puzzle. Since the detailed stress state and microstructure of metallic glass nanowires may differ from each other significantly depending on preparation, to discover the intrinsic size effect it is necessary to study metallic glass nanowires fabricated differently. Here we show the complex size effects from one such class of metallic glass nanowires prepared by casting using molecular dynamics simulations. As compared with the nanowires of the same composition prepared by other methods, the cast nanowires deform nearly homogeneously with much lower strength but better ductility; and also show strengthening in tension but weakening in compression with decreasing wire diameter. The subtle size dependence is shown to be related to the key factors including internal and surface stress state, atomic structure variation, and presence of various gradients. The complex interplay of these factors at decreasing size leads to the different deformation behaviors. PMID:28134292

  19. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  20. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictionsmore » from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations

  1. Key factors affecting urban runoff pollution under cold climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtanen, Marjo; Sillanpää, Nora; Setälä, Heikki

    2015-10-01

    Urban runoff contains various pollutants and has the potential of deteriorating the quality of aquatic ecosystems. In this study our objective is to shed light on the factors that control the runoff water quality in urbanized catchments. The effects of runoff event characteristics, land use type and catchment imperviousness on event mass loads (EML) and event mean concentrations (EMC) were studied during warm and cold periods in three study catchments (6.1, 6.5 and 12.6 ha in size) in the city of Lahti, Finland. Runoff and rainfall were measured continuously for two years at each catchment. Runoff samples were taken for total nutrients (tot-P and tot-N), total suspended solids (TSS), heavy metals (Zn, Cr, Al, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, Mn) and total organic carbon (TOC). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis (SMLR) was used to identify general relationships between the following variables: event water quality, runoff event characteristics and catchment characteristics. In general, the studied variables explained 50-90% of the EMLs but only 30-60% of the EMCs, with runoff duration having an important role in most of the SMLR models. Mean runoff intensity or peak flow was also often included in the runoff quality models. Yet, the importance (being the first, second or third best) and role (negative or positive impact) of the explanatory variables varied between the cold and warm period. Land use type often explained cold period concentrations, but imperviousness alone explained EMCs weakly. As for EMLs, the influence of imperviousness and/or land use was season and pollutant dependent. The study suggests that pollutant loads can be - throughout the year - adequately predicted by runoff characteristics given that seasonal differences are taken into account. Although pollutant concentrations were sensitive to variation in seasonal and catchment conditions as well, the accurate estimation of EMCs would require a more complete set of explanatory factors than used in this

  2. Simplified Key Management for Digital Access Control of Information Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-02

    and compute whether or not the criteria are met for allowing access . An information object can be an e- mail, a Word document, a spreadsheet, or a...whether or not the criteria are met for allowing access . An information object can be an e-mail, a Word document, a spreadsheet, or a series of sensor...I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S Simplified Key Management for Digital Access Control of Information

  3. E-Learning and Retention Key Factors Influencing Student Withdrawal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packham, Gary; Jones, Paul; Miller, Christopher; Thomas, Brychan

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the causes for student withdrawals experienced in the E-College Wales BA Enterprise programme. These key causes, identified by interview with former students are contrasted against the existing literature. The study found that successful e-learners were typically female, non-HE qualified, self employed and aged between 31 and…

  4. Key Design Factors in Durable Instructional Technology Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, John

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of any professional development effort to achieve durable change in teacher practice is affected by a host of design factors and their precise alignment with multiple delivery strategies. However, how successful professional development (PD) programs achieve an effective mix of these factors and strategies is not well understood. The…

  5. Tendencies and Key Factors in the Health of School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimashevskaia, N. M.; Shabunova, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    According to research data, in today's Russia 70 percent of children are born with various health risk factors, and this leads to a rapid deterioration of their health during their school years. The health of school students is getting worse as a consequence of the effect of a whole set of social and economic and psychological factors, and the…

  6. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-28

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  7. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors.

    PubMed

    Esplandiu, Maria J; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-28

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  8. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David, E-mail: dreguera@ub.edu

    2016-03-28

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential andmore » the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.« less

  9. Succesful Lean Manufacturing Implementation: Internal Key Influencing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virginia, Iuga; Claudiu, Kifor

    2015-09-01

    Manufacturing sectors and companies all over the world are successfully implementing lean principles within their processes. Nowadays, lean has become an indispensable part of global players. Companies worldwide need to be aware of multiple factors which weigh heavily on the success or failure of lean implementation. This paper focuses on giving a brief and structured overview over the fundamental organizational factors which play a substantial role for the lean manufacturing (LM) implementation process. The study below focuses on internal factors which are indispensable for a successful LM implementation within organizations. It is imperative that these internal factors are known, recognized and taken into consideration during the whole LM implementation process. Ignoring their influence on the process's implementation may lead to endangering the expected results or to making the process more difficult which could result in much higher human resource consumption.

  10. Controllability, not chaos, key criterion for ocean state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey; Hsieh, Tsung-Lin

    2017-07-01

    The Lagrange multiplier method for combining observations and models (i.e., the adjoint method or 4D-VAR) has been avoided or approximated when the numerical model is highly nonlinear or chaotic. This approach has been adopted primarily due to difficulties in the initialization of low-dimensional chaotic models, where the search for optimal initial conditions by gradient-descent algorithms is hampered by multiple local minima. Although initialization is an important task for numerical weather prediction, ocean state estimation usually demands an additional task - a solution of the time-dependent surface boundary conditions that result from atmosphere-ocean interaction. Here, we apply the Lagrange multiplier method to an analogous boundary control problem, tracking the trajectory of the forced chaotic pendulum. Contrary to previous assertions, it is demonstrated that the Lagrange multiplier method can track multiple chaotic transitions through time, so long as the boundary conditions render the system controllable. Thus, the nonlinear timescale poses no limit to the time interval for successful Lagrange multiplier-based estimation. That the key criterion is controllability, not a pure measure of dynamical stability or chaos, illustrates the similarities between the Lagrange multiplier method and other state estimation methods. The results with the chaotic pendulum suggest that nonlinearity should not be a fundamental obstacle to ocean state estimation with eddy-resolving models, especially when using an improved first-guess trajectory.

  11. Three phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power control circuit for a three phase induction motor is described. Power factors for the three phases are summed to provide a control signal, and this control signal is particularly filtered and then employed to control the duty cycle of each phase of input power to the motor.

  12. Three phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A power control circuit for a three phase induction motor is described. The power factors for the three phases are summed to provide a control signal. This control signal is particularly filtered and then employed to control the duty cycle of each phase of input power to the motor.

  13. Ethylene, a key factor in the regulation of seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Corbineau, Françoise; Xia, Qiong; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene is an important component of the gaseous environment, and regulates numerous plant developmental processes including seed germination and seedling establishment. Dormancy, the inability to germinate in apparently favorable conditions, has been demonstrated to be regulated by the hormonal balance between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs). Ethylene plays a key role in dormancy release in numerous species, the effective concentrations allowing the germination of dormant seeds ranging between 0.1 and 200 μL L-1. Studies using inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or of ethylene action and analysis of mutant lines altered in genes involved in the ethylene signaling pathway (etr1, ein2, ain1, etr1, and erf1) demonstrate the involvement of ethylene in the regulation of germination and dormancy. Ethylene counteracts ABA effects through a regulation of ABA metabolism and signaling pathways. Moreover, ethylene insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis are more sensitive to ABA and the seeds are more dormant. Numerous data also show an interaction between ABA, GAs and ethylene metabolism and signaling pathways. It has been increasingly demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a significant role in the regulation of seed germination interacting with hormonal signaling pathways. In the present review the responsiveness of seeds to ethylene will be described, and the key role of ethylene in the regulation of seed dormancy via a crosstalk between hormones and other signals will be discussed. PMID:25346747

  14. Improved power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Power dissipation is ac induction motor is reduced by circuit that lowers applied voltage when motor is idling or only lightly loaded. Timing voltages in phase with motor current are sensed a cross gate-controlled semiconductor whitch with motor, rather than across high-power resistor, as in earlier version.

  15. Psychological factors mediate key symptoms of fibromyalgia through their influence on stress.

    PubMed

    Malin, Katrina; Littlejohn, Geoffrey Owen

    2016-09-01

    The clinical features of fibromyalgia are associated with various psychological factors, including stress. We examined the hypothesis that the path that psychological factors follow in influencing fibromyalgia symptoms is through their direct effect on stress. Ninety-eight females with ACR 1990 classified fibromyalgia completed the following questionnaires: The Big 5 Personality Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, Mastery Scale, and Perceived Control of Internal States Scale. SPSS (PASW version 22) was used to perform basic t tests, means, and standard deviations to show difference between symptom characteristics. Pathway analysis using structural equation modelling (Laavan) examined the effect of stress on the relationships between psychological factors and the elements that define the fibromyalgia phenotype. The preferred model showed that the identified path clearly linked the psychological variables of anxiety, neuroticism and mastery, but not internal control, to the three key elements of fibromyalgia, namely pain, fatigue and sleep (p < 0.001), via the person's perceived stress. Confusion, however, did not fit the preferred model. This study confirms that stress is a necessary link in the pathway between certain identified, established and significant psychological factors and key fibromyalgia symptoms. This has implications for the understanding of contributing mechanisms and the clinical care of patients with fibromyalgia.

  16. Key Success Factors for Statistical Literacy Poster Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFeely, Steve; Campos, Pedro; Helenius, Reija

    2017-01-01

    Statistical literacy is complex and multifaceted. In every country, education and numeracy are a function of a multitude of factors including culture, history, and societal norms. Nevertheless, since the launch of the International Statistical Poster Competition (ISLP) in 1994, a number of patterns have emerged to suggest there are some common or…

  17. Leadership and management quality: key factors in effective health systems.

    PubMed

    Pfeffermann, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of health care systems in the developing world is related to the quality of their leadership and management, yet that factor has been neglected by academics and funders. Based on replicable existing models, the article proposes an approach to strengthening local management training institutions.

  18. The Human Factor: A Key to Excellence in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzies, Paula; Hare, Isadora

    This document contends that efforts designed to determine how schools can educate children for the nation of tomorrow, by focusing primarily on curriculum issues, instruction, and teachers, may have overlooked the interpersonal factors which contribute to excellence and those human and social forces which may interfere with the attainment of…

  19. Particle size distribution: A key factor in estimating powder dustiness.

    PubMed

    López Lilao, Ana; Sanfélix Forner, Vicenta; Mallol Gasch, Gustavo; Monfort Gimeno, Eliseo

    2017-12-01

    A wide variety of raw materials, involving more than 20 samples of quartzes, feldspars, nephelines, carbonates, dolomites, sands, zircons, and alumina, were selected and characterised. Dustiness, i.e., a materials' tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. These raw materials were selected to encompass a wide range of particle sizes (1.6-294 µm) and true densities (2650-4680 kg/m 3 ). The dustiness of the raw materials, i.e., their tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. The influence of some key material parameters (particle size distribution, flowability, and specific surface area) on dustiness was assessed. In this regard, dustiness was found to be significantly affected by particle size distribution. Data analysis enabled development of a model for predicting the dustiness of the studied materials, assuming that dustiness depended on the particle fraction susceptible to emission and on the bulk material's susceptibility to release these particles. On the one hand, the developed model allows the dustiness mechanisms to be better understood. In this regard, it may be noted that relative emission increased with mean particle size. However, this did not necessarily imply that dustiness did, because dustiness also depended on the fraction of particles susceptible to be emitted. On the other hand, the developed model enables dustiness to be estimated using just the particle size distribution data. The quality of the fits was quite good and the fact that only particle size distribution data are needed facilitates industrial application, since these data are usually known by raw materials managers, thus making additional tests unnecessary. This model may therefore be deemed a key tool in drawing up efficient preventive and/or corrective measures to reduce dust emissions during bulk powder processing, both inside and outside industrial facilities. It is recommended, however

  20. Reliable LED Lighting Technologies: Key Factors and Procurement Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Lynn; Arquit Niederberger, Anne

    2015-10-08

    Abstract— Lighting systems have the ability to transform the economic and educational infrastructure of disadvantaged communities, and eradicating “light poverty” has become one of the primary goals of the International Year of Light 2015. Solid-state lighting (SSL) technology, based on light-emitting diode (LED) light sources, has emerged as the next generation of lighting technology, with a current global market penetration of roughly 5%. This paper will report on recent research on understanding SSL lighting system reliability (failure modes, environmental stressors, electrical power quality); discuss the implications of SSL technology reliability for providing lighting services; and suggest practical approaches to ensuremore » SSL reliability to benefit humanity. Among the key findings from this work is that LED sources can be extremely reliable, withstanding a broad range of environmental stresses without failure. Nonetheless, SSL lighting systems can have a negative impact on electrical power reliability, as well as on the affordability of lighting services, without attention to the quality of the accompanying power infrastructure. It is therefore critical to ensure that the performance of the power supply electronics used in lighting systems is matched to the quality of the power source, when evaluating energy efficient lighting choices.« less

  1. Key factors for a high-quality VR experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champel, Mary-Luc; Doré, Renaud; Mollet, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    For many years, Virtual Reality has been presented as a promising technology that could deliver a truly new experience to users. The media and entertainment industry is now investigating the possibility to offer a video-based VR 360 experience. Nevertheless, there is a substantial risk that VR 360 could have the same fate as 3DTV if it cannot offer more than just being the next fad. The present paper aims at presenting the various quality factors required for a high-quality VR experience. More specifically, this paper will focus on the main three VR quality pillars: visual, audio and immersion.

  2. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ricart, A. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Mateo, M. A.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Masque, P.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3 to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3 to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stores were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). Also, sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3 to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8 and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypotheses that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g. meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g. recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g. hydrodynamic energy and sediment accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  3. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  4. Master Transcription Factors and Mediator Establish Super-Enhancers at Key Cell Identity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Warren A.; Orlando, David A.; Hnisz, Denes; Abraham, Brian J.; Lin, Charles Y.; Kagey, Michael H.; Rahl, Peter B.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Master transcription factors Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog bind enhancer elements and recruit Mediator to activate much of the gene expression program of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We report here that the ESC master transcription factors form unusual enhancer domains at most genes that control the pluripotent state. These domains, which we call super-enhancers, consist of clusters of enhancers that are densely occupied by the master regulators and Mediator. Super-enhancers differ from typical enhancers in size, transcription factor density and content, ability to activate transcription, and sensitivity to perturbation. Reduced levels of Oct4 or Mediator cause preferential loss of expression of super-enhancer-associated genes relative to other genes, suggesting how changes in gene expression programs might be accomplished during development. In other more differentiated cells, super-enhancers containing cell type-specific master transcription factors are also found at genes that define cell identity. Super-enhancers thus play key roles in the control of mammalian cell identity. PMID:23582322

  5. Key Factors Influencing Rapid Development of Potentially Dune-Stabilizing Moss-Dominated Crusts

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Chongfeng; Zhang, Kankan; Zhang, Chunyun; Wu, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a widespread photosynthetic ground cover in arid and semiarid areas. They have many positive ecological functions, such as increasing soil stability, and reducing water and wind erosion. Using artificial technology to achieve the rapid development of BSCs is expected to become a low-cost and highly beneficial ecological restoration measure. In the present study, typical moss-dominated crusts in a region characterized by mobile dunes (Mu Us Sandland, China) were collected, and a 40-day cultivation experiment was performed to investigate key factors, including watering frequency, light intensity and a nutrient addition, which affect the rapid development of moss crusts and their optimal combination. The results demonstrated that watering frequency and illumination had a significant positive effect (P=0.049, three-factor ANOVA) and a highly significant, complicated effect (P=0.000, three-factor ANOVA), respectively, on the plant density of bryophytes, and a highly significant positive effect on the chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharide contents (P=0.000, P=0.000; P=0.000, P=0.000; one-way ANOVA). Knop nutrient solution did not have a significant positive but rather negative effect on the promotion of moss-dominated crust development (P=0.270, three-factor ANOVA). Moss-dominated crusts treated with the combination of moderate-intensity light (6,000 lx) + high watering frequency (1 watering/2 days) - Knop had the highest moss plant densities, while the treatment with high-intensity light (12,000 lx) + high watering frequency (1 watering/2 days) + Knop nutrient solution had higher chlorophyll a contents than that under other treatments. It is entirely feasible to achieve the rapid development of moss crusts under laboratory conditions by regulating key factors and creating the right environment. Future applications may seek to use cultured bryophytes to control erosion in vulnerable areas with urgent needs. PMID:26230324

  6. Key Factors Influencing Rapid Development of Potentially Dune-Stabilizing Moss-Dominated Crusts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Chongfeng; Zhang, Kankan; Zhang, Chunyun; Wu, Shufang

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a widespread photosynthetic ground cover in arid and semiarid areas. They have many positive ecological functions, such as increasing soil stability, and reducing water and wind erosion. Using artificial technology to achieve the rapid development of BSCs is expected to become a low-cost and highly beneficial ecological restoration measure. In the present study, typical moss-dominated crusts in a region characterized by mobile dunes (Mu Us Sandland, China) were collected, and a 40-day cultivation experiment was performed to investigate key factors, including watering frequency, light intensity and a nutrient addition, which affect the rapid development of moss crusts and their optimal combination. The results demonstrated that watering frequency and illumination had a significant positive effect (P=0.049, three-factor ANOVA) and a highly significant, complicated effect (P=0.000, three-factor ANOVA), respectively, on the plant density of bryophytes, and a highly significant positive effect on the chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharide contents (P=0.000, P=0.000; P=0.000, P=0.000; one-way ANOVA). Knop nutrient solution did not have a significant positive but rather negative effect on the promotion of moss-dominated crust development (P=0.270, three-factor ANOVA). Moss-dominated crusts treated with the combination of moderate-intensity light (6,000 lx) + high watering frequency (1 watering/2 days) - Knop had the highest moss plant densities, while the treatment with high-intensity light (12,000 lx) + high watering frequency (1 watering/2 days) + Knop nutrient solution had higher chlorophyll a contents than that under other treatments. It is entirely feasible to achieve the rapid development of moss crusts under laboratory conditions by regulating key factors and creating the right environment. Future applications may seek to use cultured bryophytes to control erosion in vulnerable areas with urgent needs.

  7. SCOR based key success factors in cooking oil supply chain buyers perspective in Padang City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahara, Fatimah; Hadiguna, Rika Ampuh

    2017-11-01

    Supply chain of cooking oil is a network of companies from palm oil as raw material to retailers which work to create the value and deliver products into the end consumers. This paper is aimed to study key success factors based on consumer's perspective as the last stage in the supply chain. Consumers who are examined in this study are restaurants management or owners. Restaurant is the biggest consumption of cooking oil. The factors is studied based on Supply Chain Operation Reference (SCOR) version 10.0. Factors used are formulated based on the third-level metrics of SCOR Model. Factors are analyzed using factors analysis. This study found factors which become key success factors in managing supply chain of cooking oil encompass reliability, responsiveness and agility. Key success factors can be applied by governments as policy making and cooking oil companies as formulation of the distribution strategies.

  8. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Recent Slowdown in Institutionalizing Key Management Controls Needs to Be Addressed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Recent Slowdown in Institutionalizing Key Management Controls Needs to Be Addressed May 2009 GAO-09-586 Report Documentation Page...2009 DOD BUSINESS SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION Recent Slowdown in Institutionalizing Key Management Controls Needs to Be Addressed Highlights of GAO-09...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Business Systems Modernization. Recent Slowdown in Institutionalizing Key

  9. Enhanced Two-Factor Authentication and Key Agreement Using Dynamic Identities in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Chang, I-Pin; Lee, Tian-Fu; Lin, Tsung-Hung; Liu, Chuan-Ming

    2015-11-30

    Key agreements that use only password authentication are convenient in communication networks, but these key agreement schemes often fail to resist possible attacks, and therefore provide poor security compared with some other authentication schemes. To increase security, many authentication and key agreement schemes use smartcard authentication in addition to passwords. Thus, two-factor authentication and key agreement schemes using smartcards and passwords are widely adopted in many applications. Vaidya et al. recently presented a two-factor authentication and key agreement scheme for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Kim et al. observed that the Vaidya et al. scheme fails to resist gateway node bypassing and user impersonation attacks, and then proposed an improved scheme for WSNs. This study analyzes the weaknesses of the two-factor authentication and key agreement scheme of Kim et al., which include vulnerability to impersonation attacks, lost smartcard attacks and man-in-the-middle attacks, violation of session key security, and failure to protect user privacy. An efficient and secure authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs based on the scheme of Kim et al. is then proposed. The proposed scheme not only solves the weaknesses of previous approaches, but also increases security requirements while maintaining low computational cost.

  10. Enhanced Two-Factor Authentication and Key Agreement Using Dynamic Identities in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chang, I-Pin; Lee, Tian-Fu; Lin, Tsung-Hung; Liu, Chuan-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Key agreements that use only password authentication are convenient in communication networks, but these key agreement schemes often fail to resist possible attacks, and therefore provide poor security compared with some other authentication schemes. To increase security, many authentication and key agreement schemes use smartcard authentication in addition to passwords. Thus, two-factor authentication and key agreement schemes using smartcards and passwords are widely adopted in many applications. Vaidya et al. recently presented a two-factor authentication and key agreement scheme for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Kim et al. observed that the Vaidya et al. scheme fails to resist gateway node bypassing and user impersonation attacks, and then proposed an improved scheme for WSNs. This study analyzes the weaknesses of the two-factor authentication and key agreement scheme of Kim et al., which include vulnerability to impersonation attacks, lost smartcard attacks and man-in-the-middle attacks, violation of session key security, and failure to protect user privacy. An efficient and secure authentication and key agreement scheme for WSNs based on the scheme of Kim et al. is then proposed. The proposed scheme not only solves the weaknesses of previous approaches, but also increases security requirements while maintaining low computational cost. PMID:26633396

  11. Role of Education in Rural Development: A Key Factor for Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navaratnam, Kathiravelu K.

    Relevent, locally-controlled educational programs play key roles in rural development in developing nations. Education has a desirable controlling influence over development of the rural individual, family, community, and society, leading to reduced poverty, income equity, and controlled unemployment. The failure of trickle-down development and…

  12. Proline dehydrogenase: a key enzyme in controlling cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Servet, Caroline; Ghelis, Thanos; Richard, Luc; Zilberstein, Aviah; Savoure, Arnould

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), also called proline oxidase (POX), is a universal enzyme in living organisms. It catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate leading to the release of electrons, which can be transferred to either electron transfer systems or to molecular oxygen. ProDH is not only essential for proline catabolism but also plays key roles in providing energy, shuttling redox potential between cellular compartments and reactive oxygen species production. Structural analysis of prokaryotic ProDHs already gives some insights into the biochemical activity and biological functions of this enzyme, which can be extended to eukaryotic ProDHs based on sequence similarities. Here we report the most recent investigations on the biochemical and regulation of ProDH at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational levels. The biological roles of ProDH in cell homeostasis and adaptation through energetic, developmental, adaptive, physiological and pathological processes in eukaryotes are presented and discussed to create a framework for future research direction.

  13. Controlling Water Intercalation Is Key to a Direct Graphene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Verguts, Ken; Schouteden, Koen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Peters, Lisanne; Vrancken, Nandi; Wu, Xiangyu; Li, Zhe; Erkens, Maksiem; Porret, Clement; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Van Haesendonck, Chris; De Gendt, Stefan; Brems, Steven

    2017-10-25

    The key steps of a transfer of two-dimensional (2D) materials are the delamination of the as-grown material from a growth substrate and the lamination of the 2D material on a target substrate. In state-of-the-art transfer experiments, these steps remain very challenging, and transfer variations often result in unreliable 2D material properties. Here, it is demonstrated that interfacial water can insert between graphene and its growth substrate despite the hydrophobic behavior of graphene. It is understood that interfacial water is essential for an electrochemistry-based graphene delamination from a Pt surface. Additionally, the lamination of graphene to a target wafer is hindered by intercalation effects, which can even result in graphene delamination from the target wafer. For circumvention of these issues, a direct, support-free graphene transfer process is demonstrated, which relies on the formation of interfacial water between graphene and its growth surface, while avoiding water intercalation between graphene and the target wafer by using hydrophobic silane layers on the target wafer. The proposed direct graphene transfer also avoids polymer contamination (no temporary support layer) and eliminates the need for etching of the catalyst metal. Therefore, recycling of the growth template becomes feasible. The proposed transfer process might even open the door for the suggested atomic-scale interlocking-toy-brick-based stacking of different 2D materials, which will enable a more reliable fabrication of van der Waals heterostructure-based devices and applications.

  14. Teachers' Professional Development: What Are the Key Change Factors for Mathematics Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehkonen, Erkki; Torner, Gunter

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed and interviewed 13 experienced German middle school mathematics teachers to examine key factors causing discontinuity in their professional development. Results included 49 statements about change that fell into four categories. Researchers extracted three change factors not reported in earlier literature: experiences and observations…

  15. Key factors, Soil N Processes, and nitrite accumulation affecting nitrous oxide emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A better understanding of the key factors affecting nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and potential mitigation strategies is essential for sustainable agriculture. The objective of this study was to examine the important factors affecting N2O emissions, soil processes involved, and potential mitigation s...

  16. Historical water control maps - key to understand current challenges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, János

    2014-05-01

    The 19th century and post-World War II decades were the main eras of water controlling in former Hungarian Kingdom and Hungary. Due to those large projects, the number and frequency of big floods were minimized but changes caused several other problems what we have to face off in the present. The main help to understand or highlight the fundamentals of those problems can be the flood control maps which, in some cases, show the original, natural riverbed and neighbouring areas of the river. There is other advantage of these maps compared to other surveys: while the main focus of the water control surveys was the river, there was sufficient time to measure the fine differences of land-use and relief in detail. Our sample area is the middle part of Tisza river and three different maps were chosen to show the changes before and after the regulations: Map of the Middle-Tisza, mapping until 1790 by János Lietzner This map is the earliest, known, topographic scale map about the river. Due to its age, the sheets are in bad state, especially their parts close to the edges and corners. A photographed, greyscale copy exists about the sheets, that was used in our research. Despite such bad conditions, it contains lots of information about the river and settlements, as well as detailed land-use before any flood regulation. New survey of Tisza river, mapping until 1932 by the Directorate of Water and Construction Because of the changes, due to time and regulation, several new surveys were ordered at the end of 19th century and between the world wars. During those new surveys, the river was re-triangulated and mapped, although cross and longitudinal section measurements also were carried out. This map clearly shows the results and changes of regulations, especially on populated areas, newly built dykes etc. but before the changes happened between 1950 and 1980. Topographic maps of the Hungarian Defence Forces - Geoinformation Services As a current, base-dataset, topographic maps

  17. How the Adoption of the Big-Data Paradigm Affects the Key Factors That Influence the Effectiveness of an Information Assurance (IA) Framework: A Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Benjamin G.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study identified those factors that influence the perceived effectiveness of traditional IA control frameworks. The key factors examined in this study are risk management, governance, access control, privacy protection, integrity, availability, reliability, and usability. The researcher endeavored to determine how the…

  18. Key factors of eddy current separation for recovering aluminum from crushed e-waste.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jujun; Dong, Lipeng; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Tao; Huang, Mingzhi; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-02-01

    Recovery of e-waste in China had caused serious pollutions. Eddy current separation is an environment-friendly technology of separating nonferrous metallic particles from crushed e-waste. However, due to complex particle characters, separation efficiency of traditional eddy current separator was low. In production, controllable operation factors of eddy current separation are feeding speed, (ωR-v), and S p . There is little special information about influencing mechanism and critical parameters of these factors in eddy current separation. This paper provided the special information of these key factors in eddy current separation of recovering aluminum particles from crushed waste refrigerator cabinets. Detachment angles increased as the increase of (ωR-v). Separation efficiency increased with the growing of detachment angles. Aluminum particles were completely separated from plastic particles in critical parameters of feeding speed 0.5m/s and detachment angles greater than 6.61deg. S p /S m of aluminum particles in crushed waste refrigerators ranged from 0.08 to 0.51. Separation efficiency increased as the increase of S p /S m . This enlightened us to develop new separator to separate smaller nonferrous metallic particles in e-waste recovery. High feeding speed destroyed separation efficiency. However, greater S p of aluminum particles brought positive impact on separation efficiency. Greater S p could increase critical feeding speed to offer greater throughput of eddy current separation. This paper will guide eddy current separation in production of recovering nonferrous metals from crushed e-waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Key Planning Factors for Recovery from a Chemical Warfare Agent Incident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    36 Hydrogen Cyanide** 120 Some toxic industrial chemicals Chlorine** 293 Hydrogen chloride 3,000 Carbon monoxide 4,000 Ammonia 16,000...Planning Factors For Recovery from a Chemical Warfare Agent Incident Summer 2012 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Key Planning Factors for Recovery from a Chemical Warfare Agent Incident 5a

  20. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  1. Key Motivational Factors in the Retention of Three Generations of Public High School Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pospichal, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the similarities and differences between five key motivational factors: (a) new teacher induction, (b) noninduction mentor support in the early years of teaching, (c) salary and benefits, (d) working conditions, and (e) administrative support influential in retention of employment in…

  2. Willingness to Pay for Mosquito Control in Key West, Florida, and Tucson, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Katherine L.; Hayden, Mary H.; Haenchen, Steven; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Walker, Kathleen R.; Ernst, Kacey C.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne illnesses like West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue are growing threats to the United States. Proactive mosquito control is one strategy to reduce the risk of disease transmission. In 2012, we measured the public's willingness to pay (WTP) for increased mosquito control in two cities: Key West, FL, where there have been recent dengue outbreaks, and Tucson, AZ, where dengue vectors are established and WNV has been circulating for over a decade. Nearly three quarters of respondents in both cities (74% in Tucson and 73% in Key West) would be willing to pay $25 or more annually toward an increase in publicly funded mosquito control efforts. WTP was positively associated with income (both cities), education (Key West), and perceived mosquito abundance (Tucson). Concerns about environmental impacts of mosquito control were associated with lower WTP in Key West. Expanded mosquito control efforts should incorporate public opinion as they respond to evolving disease risks. PMID:26903603

  3. Key success factors of health research centers: A mixed method study.

    PubMed

    Tofighi, Shahram; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Heydari, Majid

    2017-08-01

    In order to achieve success in future goals and activities, health research centers are required to identify their key success factors. This study aimed to extract and rank the factors affecting the success of research centers at one of the medical universities in Iran. This study is a mixed method (qualitative-quantitative) study, which was conducted between May to October in 2016. The study setting was 22 health research centers. In qualitative phase, we extracted the factors affecting the success in research centers through purposeful interviews with 10 experts of centers, and classified them into themes and sub-themes. In the quantitative phase, we prepared a questionnaire and scored and ranked the factors recognized by 54 of the study samples by Friedman test. Nine themes and 42 sub-themes were identified. Themes included: strategic orientation, management, human capital, support, projects, infrastructure, communications and collaboration, paradigm and innovation and they were rated respectively as components of success in research centers. Among the 42 identified factors, 10 factors were ranked respectively as the key factors of success, and included: science and technology road map, strategic plan, evaluation indexes, committed human resources, scientific evaluation of members and centers, innovation in research and implementation, financial support, capable researchers, equipment infrastructure and teamwork. According to the results, the strategic orientation was the most important component in the success of research centers. Therefore, managers and authorities of research centers should pay more attention to strategic areas in future planning, including the science and technology road map and strategic plan.

  4. Key factors influencing allied health research capacity in a large Australian metropolitan health district

    PubMed Central

    Alison, Jennifer A; Zafiropoulos, Bill; Heard, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify key factors affecting research capacity and engagement of allied health professionals working in a large metropolitan health service. Identifying such factors will assist in determining strategies for building research capacity in allied health. Materials and methods A total of 276 allied health professionals working within the Sydney Local Health District (SLHD) completed the Research Capacity in Context Tool (RCCT) that measures research capacity and culture across three domains: organization, team, and individual. An exploratory factor analysis was undertaken to identify common themes within each of these domains. Correlations were performed between demographic variables and the identified factors to determine possible relationships. Results Research capacity and culture success/skill levels were reported to be higher within the organization and team domains compared to the individual domain (median [interquartile range, IQR] 6 [5–8], 6 [5–8], 5 [3–7], respectively; Friedman χ2(2)=42.04, p<0.001). Exploratory factor analyses were performed to identify factors that were perceived by allied health respondents to affect research capacity. Factors identified within the organization domain were infrastructure for research (eg, funds and equipment) and research culture (eg, senior manager’s support for research); within the team domain the factors were research orientation (eg, dissemination of results at research seminars) and research support (eg, providing staff research training). Within the individual domain, only one factor was identified which was the research skill of the individual (eg, literature evaluation, submitting ethics applications and data analysis, and writing for publication). Conclusion The reported skill/success levels in research were lower for the individual domain compared to the organization or team domains. Key factors were identified in each domain that impacted on allied health

  5. The Polyadenylation Factor Subunit CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30: A Key Factor of Programmed Cell Death and a Regulator of Immunity in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Garmier, Marie; de Bont, Linda; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile; Bergounioux, Catherine; Delarue, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. Indeed, incompatible plant-pathogen interactions are well known to induce the hypersensitive response, a localized cell death. Mutational analyses have identified several key PCD components, and we recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for the key enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myoinositol synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD, revealing roles for myoinositol or inositol derivatives in the regulation of PCD. Here, we identified a regulator of plant PCD by screening for mutants that display transcriptomic profiles opposing that of the mips1 mutant. Our screen identified the oxt6 mutant, which has been described previously as being tolerant to oxidative stress. In the oxt6 mutant, a transfer DNA is inserted in the CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR30 (CPSF30) gene, which encodes a polyadenylation factor subunit homolog. We show that CPSF30 is required for lesion formation in mips1 via SA-dependent signaling, that the prodeath function of CPSF30 is not mediated by changes in the glutathione status, and that CPSF30 activity is required for Pseudomonas syringae resistance. We also show that the oxt6 mutation suppresses cell death in other lesion-mimic mutants, including lesion-simulating disease1, mitogen-activated protein kinase4, constitutive expressor of pathogenesis-related genes5, and catalase2, suggesting that CPSF30 and, thus, the control of messenger RNA 3′ end processing, through the regulation of SA production, is a key component of plant immune responses. PMID:24706550

  6. Evolving Systems: Nonlinear Adaptive Key Component Control with Persistent Disturbance Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to Evolving Systems, which are autonomously controlled subsystems that self-assemble into a new Evolved System with a higher purpose. Evolving Systems of aerospace structures often require additional control when assembling to maintain stability during the entire evolution process. This is the concept of Adaptive Key Component Control which operates through one specific component to maintain stability during the evolution. In addition this control must overcome persistent disturbances that occur while the evolution is in progress. We present theoretical results for the successful operation of Nonlinear Adaptive Key Component control in the presence of such disturbances and an illustrative example.

  7. ROLE OF DOM PHOTOREACTIONS IN CONTROLLING UV EXPOSURE OF CORAL ASSEMBLAGES IN THE FLORIDA KEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have indicated that solar LTV radiation is a significant stressor of coral assemblages in tropical and subtropical marine environments. Here evidence is presented that UV exposure of coral reefs in the Florida Keys near Key West is controlled by the colored compone...

  8. Identifying Key Drivers of Return Reversal with Dynamical Bayesian Factor Graph.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuai; Tong, Yunhai; Wang, Zitian; Tan, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    In the stock market, return reversal occurs when investors sell overbought stocks and buy oversold stocks, reversing the stocks' price trends. In this paper, we develop a new method to identify key drivers of return reversal by incorporating a comprehensive set of factors derived from different economic theories into one unified dynamical Bayesian factor graph. We then use the model to depict factor relationships and their dynamics, from which we make some interesting discoveries about the mechanism behind return reversals. Through extensive experiments on the US stock market, we conclude that among the various factors, the liquidity factors consistently emerge as key drivers of return reversal, which is in support of the theory of liquidity effect. Specifically, we find that stocks with high turnover rates or high Amihud illiquidity measures have a greater probability of experiencing return reversals. Apart from the consistent drivers, we find other drivers of return reversal that generally change from year to year, and they serve as important characteristics for evaluating the trends of stock returns. Besides, we also identify some seldom discussed yet enlightening inter-factor relationships, one of which shows that stocks in Finance and Insurance industry are more likely to have high Amihud illiquidity measures in comparison with those in other industries. These conclusions are robust for return reversals under different thresholds.

  9. Factors Influencing Oral Bioavailability of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract and Its Key Phenolic Principles.

    PubMed

    Jiamboonsri, Pimsumon; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Bavovada, Rapepol; Leanpolchareanchai, Jiraporn; Yin, Taijun; Gao, Song; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-30

    Mango seed kernel extract (MSKE) and its key components (gallic acid, GA; methyl gallate, MG; and pentagalloyl glucopyranose, PGG) have generated interest because of their pharmacological activities. To develop the potential use of the key components in MSKE as natural therapeutic agents, their pharmacokinetic data are necessary. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the factors affecting their oral bioavailability as pure compounds and as components in MSKE. The in vitro chemical stability, biological stability, and absorption were evaluated in Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution, Caco-2 cell and rat fecal lysates, and the Caco-2 cell model, respectively. The in vivo oral pharmacokinetic behavior was elucidated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The key components were unstable under alkaline conditions and in Caco-2 cell lysates or rat fecal lysates. The absorptive permeability coefficient followed the order MG > GA > PGG. The in vivo results exhibited similar pharmacokinetic trends to the in vitro studies. Additionally, the co-components in MSKE may affect the pharmacokinetic behaviors of the key components in MSKE. In conclusion, chemical degradation under alkaline conditions, biological degradation by intestinal cell and colonic microflora enzymes, and low absorptive permeability could be important factors underlying the oral bioavailability of these polyphenols.

  10. Heteronemin, a marine sponge terpenoid, targets TDP-43, a key factor in several neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassiano, Chiara; Esposito, Roberta; Tosco, Alessandra; Zampella, Angela; D'Auria, Maria Valeria; Riccio, Raffaele; Casapullo, Agostino; Monti, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-14

    Trans-activation response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), a key factor in several neurodegenerative conditions, was discovered as a novel target of heteronemin by chemical proteomics. Combining bio-physical orthogonal approaches with biological analysis, heteronemin was found to influence the binding of TDP-43-cognate nucleic acids and to modulate the TDP-43 aggregation state and its cellular localization.

  11. Key success factors for clinical knowledge management systems: Comparing physician and hospital manager viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sho-Fang; Hsieh, Ping-Jung; Chen, Hui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The study explores the perceptions of physicians and hospital managers regarding the key success factors (KSFs) of a clinical knowledge management system (CKMS). It aims to eliminate the perception gap and gain more insights for a successful CKMS.A survey was conducted in four medical centers in Taiwan. A total of 340 questionnaires, including 15 for hospital managers and 70 for physicians in each hospital, were administered. The effective response rates are 78.3% and 56.1% respectively. Partial least square (PLS) were used to analyze the data.The results identified six KSFs of CKMS including system software and hardware, knowledge quality, system quality, organizational factors, user satisfaction, and policy factors. User satisfaction and policy factors have direct effects on perceived CKMS performance. Knowledge quality is regarded as an antecedent to user satisfaction, while system quality is the antecedent to both user satisfaction and policy factors. System software and hardware was supported only by managers, and organizational factors were supported only by physicians.Among the factors, this study highlighted the policy factor. Besides, the study provides hospital managers additional insights into physician requirements for organizational support. Third, more physician participation and involvement are recommended when introducing and developing a CKMS.

  12. Identification of two key genes controlling chill haze stability of beer in barley (Hordeum vulgare L).

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Ning, Huajiang; Li, Chengdao; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-06-11

    In bright beer, haze formation is a serious quality problem, degrading beer quality and reducing its shelf life. The quality of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) malt, as the main raw material for beer brewing, largely affects the colloidal stability of beer. In this study, the genetic mechanism of the factors affecting beer haze stability in barley was studied. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of alcohol chill haze (ACH) in beer was carried out using a Franklin/Yerong double haploid (DH) population. One QTL, named as qACH, was detected for ACH, and it was located on the position of about 108 cM in chromosome 4H and can explain about 20 % of the phenotypic variation. Two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd were identified by proteomics analysis. Bioinformatics analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd had the same position as qACH in the chromosome. It may be deduced that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd are candidate genes for qACH, controlling colloidal stability of beer. Polymorphism comparison between Yerong and Franklin in the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd detected the corresponding gene specific markers, which could be used in marker-assisted selection for malt barley breeding. We identified a novel QTL, qACH controlling chill haze of beer, and two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd. And further analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd might be the candidate genes associated with beer chill haze.

  13. Key success factors of health research centers: A mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Shahram; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Heydari, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to achieve success in future goals and activities, health research centers are required to identify their key success factors. Objective This study aimed to extract and rank the factors affecting the success of research centers at one of the medical universities in Iran. Methods This study is a mixed method (qualitative-quantitative) study, which was conducted between May to October in 2016. The study setting was 22 health research centers. In qualitative phase, we extracted the factors affecting the success in research centers through purposeful interviews with 10 experts of centers, and classified them into themes and sub-themes. In the quantitative phase, we prepared a questionnaire and scored and ranked the factors recognized by 54 of the study samples by Friedman test. Results Nine themes and 42 sub-themes were identified. Themes included: strategic orientation, management, human capital, support, projects, infrastructure, communications and collaboration, paradigm and innovation and they were rated respectively as components of success in research centers. Among the 42 identified factors, 10 factors were ranked respectively as the key factors of success, and included: science and technology road map, strategic plan, evaluation indexes, committed human resources, scientific evaluation of members and centers, innovation in research and implementation, financial support, capable researchers, equipment infrastructure and teamwork. Conclusion According to the results, the strategic orientation was the most important component in the success of research centers. Therefore, managers and authorities of research centers should pay more attention to strategic areas in future planning, including the science and technology road map and strategic plan. PMID:28979733

  14. Identifying the Key Factors Affecting Warning Message Dissemination in VANET Real Urban Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Fogue, Manuel; Garrido, Piedad; Martinez, Francisco J.; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Calafate, Carlos T.; Manzoni, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, new architectures and technologies have been proposed for Vehicular Ad Hoc networks (VANETs). Due to the cost and complexity of deploying such networks, most of these proposals rely on simulation. However, we find that most of the experiments made to validate these proposals tend to overlook the most important and representative factors. Moreover, the scenarios simulated tend to be very simplistic (highways or Manhattan-based layouts), which could seriously affect the validity of the obtained results. In this paper, we present a statistical analysis based on the 2k factorial methodology to determine the most representative factors affecting traffic safety applications under real roadmaps. Our purpose is to determine which are the key factors affecting Warning Message Dissemination in order to concentrate research tests on such parameters, thus avoiding unnecessary simulations and reducing the amount of simulation time required. Simulation results show that the key factors affecting warning messages delivery are the density of vehicles and the roadmap used. Based on this statistical analysis, we consider that VANET researchers must evaluate the benefits of their proposals using different vehicle densities and city scenarios, to obtain a broad perspective on the effectiveness of their solution. Finally, since city maps can be quite heterogeneous, we propose a roadmap profile classification to further reduce the number of cities evaluated. PMID:23604026

  15. Three-Phase Power Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Three-Phase Power-Factor Controller develops a control signal for each motor winding. As motor loading decreases, rms value of applied voltage is decreased by feedback-control circuit. Power consumption is therefore lower than in unregulated operation. Controller employs phase detector for each of three phases of delta-connected induction motor. Phase-difference sum is basis for control.

  16. Secreted transcription factor controls Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Sridharan; Manzanillo, Paolo; Chan, Kaman; Dovey, Cole; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens trigger specialized virulence factor secretion systems on encountering host cells. The ESX-1 protein secretion system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis—the causative agent of the human disease tuberculosis—delivers bacterial proteins into host cells during infection and is critical for virulence, but how it is regulated is unknown. Here we show that EspR (also known as Rv3849) is a key regulator of ESX-1 that is required for secretion and virulence in mice. EspR activates transcription of an operon that includes three ESX-1 components, Rv3616c–Rv3614c, whose expression in turn promotes secretion of ESX-1 substrates. EspR directly binds to and activates the Rv3616c–Rv3614c promoter and, unexpectedly, is itself secreted from the bacterial cell by the ESX-1 system that it regulates. Efflux of the DNA-binding regulator results in reduced Rv3616c–Rv3614c transcription, and thus reduced ESX-1 secretion. Our results reveal a direct negative feedback loop that regulates the activity of a secretion system essential for virulence. As the virulence factors secreted by the ESX-1 system are highly antigenic, fine control of secretion may be critical to successful infection. PMID:18685700

  17. The Key Factors Analysis of Palisades Temperature in Deep Open-pit Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Du, Cuifeng; Jin, Wenbo; Wang, Puyu

    2018-01-01

    In order to study the key factors of palisades temperature field in a deep open-pit mine in the natural environment, the influence of natural factors on the palisades temperature in a deep open-pit mine were analysed based on the principle of heat transfer. Four typical places with different ways of solar radiation were selected to carry out the field test. The results show that solar radiation, atmospheric temperature, and wind speed are three main factors affecting the temperature of palisades and that the direct sunlight plays a leading role. The time period of the sun shining directly on the shady slope of the palisades is short because of blocking effect, whose temperature changes in a smaller scale. At the same time, the sun slope of the palisades suffers from the solar radiation for a long time, whose temperature changes in a larger scale, and the variation is similar to the air temperature.

  18. Reconstruction of gene regulatory networks reveals chromatin remodelers and key transcription factors in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, Valeriya; Mendoza-Parra, Marco Antonio; Saleem, Mohamed-Ashick M; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in genetic and epigenetic landscapes are known to contribute to the development of different types of cancer. However, the mechanistic links between transcription factors and the epigenome which coordinate the deregulation of gene networks during cell transformation are largely unknown. We used an isogenic model of stepwise tumorigenic transformation of human primary cells to monitor the progressive deregulation of gene networks upon immortalization and oncogene-induced transformation. We applied a systems biology approach by combining transcriptome and epigenome data for each step during transformation and integrated transcription factor-target gene associations in order to reconstruct the gene regulatory networks that are at the basis of the transformation process. We identified 142 transcription factors and 24 chromatin remodelers/modifiers (CRMs) which are preferentially associated with specific co-expression pathways that originate from deregulated gene programming during tumorigenesis. These transcription factors are involved in the regulation of divers processes, including cell differentiation, the immune response, and the establishment/modification of the epigenome. Unexpectedly, the analysis of chromatin state dynamics revealed patterns that distinguish groups of genes which are not only co-regulated but also functionally related. Decortication of transcription factor targets enabled us to define potential key regulators of cell transformation which are engaged in RNA metabolism and chromatin remodeling. We reconstructed gene regulatory networks that reveal the alterations occurring during human cellular tumorigenesis. Using these networks we predicted and validated several transcription factors as key players for the establishment of tumorigenic traits of transformed cells. Our study suggests a direct implication of CRMs in oncogene-induced tumorigenesis and identifies new CRMs involved in this process. This is the first comprehensive view of

  19. A key role for corticotropin-releasing factor in alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Markus; Koob, George F

    2007-08-01

    Recent data indicate that alcohol dependence induces long-term neuroadaptations that recruit a negative emotional state. This leads to excessive alcohol ingestion motivated by relief of negative emotionality. A key mechanism in this transition to negative reinforcement is a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling within the amygdala. Long term upregulation of CRF(1) receptors is observed in the amygdala following a history of dependence, and CRF antagonists selectively block emotionality, excessive alcohol drinking and stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking in post-dependent animals. Innate upregulation of CRF(1) receptor expression mimics the post-dependent phenotype, both with regard to emotional responses and ethanol self-administration. Therefore, the CRF system is emerging as a key element of the neuroadaptive changes driving alcoholism and as a major target for its treatment.

  20. Bacteriological Aspects of Hand Washing: A Key for Health Promotion and Infections Control

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Ataee, Mohammad Hosein; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali; Salesi, Mahmud

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to show the historical aspects of hands washing for healthy life and explains how can reduce the transmission of community-acquired infectious agents by healthcare workers and patients. This review article is prepared based on available database. The key words used were hands washing, risk assessment, hands hygiene, bacterial flora, contamination, infection, nosocomial, tap water, sanitizer, bacterial resistance, hands bacterial flora, washing methods, antiseptics, healthcare workers, healthcare personnel, from PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, Scopus, Web of Sciences, and Google Scholar. Data were descriptively analyzed. The insistence on hand washing has a history of 1400 years. The research results indicate that the bacteria released from the female washed hands in wet and dry condition was lower than from the male's hands with a significance level (3 CFU vs. 8 CFU; confidence interval 95%, P ≤ 0.001). The valuable results of the study indicated that released amount of bacterial flora from wet hands is more than 10 times in compared to dry hands. In addition, established monitoring systems for washing hands before and after patient's manipulation as well as after toilet were dominant indices to prevent the transfer of infectious agents to the patients. Increasing awareness and belief of the healthcare workers have shown an important role by about 30% reduction in the transfection. Hand washing could reduce the episodes of transmission of infectious agents in both community and healthcare settings. However, hand washing is an important key factor to prevent transmission of infectious agents to patients. There is no standard method for measuring compliance. Thus, permanent monitoring of hand washing to reduce the transmission of infections is crucial. Finally, the personnel must believe that hand washing is an inevitable approach to infection control. PMID:28382192

  1. Bacteriological Aspects of Hand Washing: A Key for Health Promotion and Infections Control.

    PubMed

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Ataee, Mohammad Hosein; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali; Salesi, Mahmud

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to show the historical aspects of hands washing for healthy life and explains how can reduce the transmission of community-acquired infectious agents by healthcare workers and patients. This review article is prepared based on available database. The key words used were hands washing, risk assessment, hands hygiene, bacterial flora, contamination, infection, nosocomial, tap water, sanitizer, bacterial resistance, hands bacterial flora, washing methods, antiseptics, healthcare workers, healthcare personnel, from PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, Scopus, Web of Sciences, and Google Scholar. Data were descriptively analyzed. The insistence on hand washing has a history of 1400 years. The research results indicate that the bacteria released from the female washed hands in wet and dry condition was lower than from the male's hands with a significance level (3 CFU vs. 8 CFU; confidence interval 95%, P ≤ 0.001). The valuable results of the study indicated that released amount of bacterial flora from wet hands is more than 10 times in compared to dry hands. In addition, established monitoring systems for washing hands before and after patient's manipulation as well as after toilet were dominant indices to prevent the transfer of infectious agents to the patients. Increasing awareness and belief of the healthcare workers have shown an important role by about 30% reduction in the transfection. Hand washing could reduce the episodes of transmission of infectious agents in both community and healthcare settings. However, hand washing is an important key factor to prevent transmission of infectious agents to patients. There is no standard method for measuring compliance. Thus, permanent monitoring of hand washing to reduce the transmission of infections is crucial. Finally, the personnel must believe that hand washing is an inevitable approach to infection control.

  2. Power-Factor Controller With Regenerative Braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modified power-factor motor-control circuit operates motor as a phase-controlled generator when load attempts to turn at higher than synchronous speed. An induction motor is required to act at times as a brake. Circuit modification allows power-factor controller to save energy in motoring mode and convert automatically to an induction-generator controller in generating, or braking, mode.

  3. Failure Detector for Power-Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    New protective circuits have been developed for power-factor ac motor controllers. Circuits prevent direct current and consequent motor heating that would normally result from failure of solid-state switch in controller. Single-phase power-factor controller with short detector compensates for short-circuit failure in either direction by applying full power to motor. Controller with open detector compensates for open-circuit failure in either direction by turning off power to motor.

  4. Identifying sensitive sources and key control handles for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Sweetapple, Christine; Fu, Guangtao; Butler, David

    2014-10-01

    This research investigates the effects of adjusting control handle values on greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment, and reveals critical control handles and sensitive emission sources for control through the combined use of local and global sensitivity analysis methods. The direction of change in emissions, effluent quality and operational cost resulting from variation of control handles individually is determined using one-factor-at-a-time sensitivity analysis, and corresponding trade-offs are identified. The contribution of each control handle to variance in model outputs, taking into account the effects of interactions, is then explored using a variance-based sensitivity analysis method, i.e., Sobol's method, and significant second order interactions are discovered. This knowledge will assist future control strategy development and aid an efficient design and optimisation process, as it provides a better understanding of the effects of control handles on key performance indicators and identifies those for which dynamic control has the greatest potential benefits. Sources with the greatest variance in emissions, and therefore the greatest need to monitor, are also identified. It is found that variance in total emissions is predominantly due to changes in direct N2O emissions and selection of suitable values for wastage flow rate and aeration intensity in the final activated sludge reactor is of key importance. To improve effluent quality, costs and/or emissions, it is necessary to consider the effects of adjusting multiple control handles simultaneously and determine the optimum trade-off. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of VEGF: a novel mechanism to control angiogenesis by Withania somnifera's key metabolite Withaferin A.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sanjib; Islam, Md Khirul; Shilpi, Jamil A; Hasan, Shihab

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, or new blood vessel formation from existing one, plays both beneficial and detrimental roles in living organisms in different aspects. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a signal protein, well established as key regulator of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. VEGF ensures oxygen supply to the tissues when blood supply is not adequate, or tissue environment is in hypoxic condition. Limited expression of VEGF is necessary, but if it is over expressed, then it can lead to serious disease like cancer. Cancers that have ability to express VEGF are more efficient to grow and metastasize because solid cancers cannot grow larger than a limited size without adequate blood and oxygen supply. Anti-VEGF drugs are already available in the market to control angiogenesis, but they are often associated with severe side-effects like fetal bleeding and proteinuria in the large number of patients. To avoid such side-effects, new insight is required to find potential compounds as anti-VEGF from natural sources. In the present investigation, molecular docking studies were carried out to find the potentiality of Withaferin A, a key metabolite of Withania somnifera, as an inhibitor of VEGF. Molecular Docking studies were performed in DockingServer and SwissDock. Bevacizumab, a commercial anti-VEGF drug, was used as reference to compare the activity of Withaferin A. X-ray crystallographic structure of VEGF, was retrieved from Protein Data Bank (PDB), and used as drug target protein. Structure of Withaferin A and Bevacizumab was obtained from PubChem and ZINC databases. Molecular visualization was performed using UCSF Chimera. Withaferin A showed favorable binding with VEGF with low binding energy in comparison to Bevacizumab. Molecular Docking studies also revealed potential protein-ligand interactions for both Withaferin A and Bevacizumab. Conclusively our results strongly suggest that Withaferin A is a potent anti-VEGF agent as ascertained by its potential

  6. Three-Factor User Authentication and Key Agreement Using Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Park, YoHan; Park, YoungHo

    2016-12-14

    Secure communication is a significant issue in wireless sensor networks. User authentication and key agreement are essential for providing a secure system, especially in user-oriented mobile services. It is also necessary to protect the identity of each individual in wireless environments to avoid personal privacy concerns. Many authentication and key agreement schemes utilize a smart card in addition to a password to support security functionalities. However, these schemes often fail to provide security along with privacy. In 2015, Chang et al. analyzed the security vulnerabilities of previous schemes and presented the two-factor authentication scheme that provided user privacy by using dynamic identities. However, when we cryptanalyzed Chang et al.'s scheme, we found that it does not provide sufficient security for wireless sensor networks and fails to provide accurate password updates. This paper proposes a security-enhanced authentication and key agreement scheme to overcome these security weaknesses using biometric information and an elliptic curve cryptosystem. We analyze the security of the proposed scheme against various attacks and check its viability in the mobile environment.

  7. Three-Factor User Authentication and Key Agreement Using Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, YoHan; Park, YoungHo

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication is a significant issue in wireless sensor networks. User authentication and key agreement are essential for providing a secure system, especially in user-oriented mobile services. It is also necessary to protect the identity of each individual in wireless environments to avoid personal privacy concerns. Many authentication and key agreement schemes utilize a smart card in addition to a password to support security functionalities. However, these schemes often fail to provide security along with privacy. In 2015, Chang et al. analyzed the security vulnerabilities of previous schemes and presented the two-factor authentication scheme that provided user privacy by using dynamic identities. However, when we cryptanalyzed Chang et al.’s scheme, we found that it does not provide sufficient security for wireless sensor networks and fails to provide accurate password updates. This paper proposes a security-enhanced authentication and key agreement scheme to overcome these security weaknesses using biometric information and an elliptic curve cryptosystem. We analyze the security of the proposed scheme against various attacks and check its viability in the mobile environment. PMID:27983616

  8. Identification of the key ecological factors influencing vegetation degradation in semi-arid agro-pastoral ecotone considering spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu; Wang, Qinghui; Fan, Min

    2017-11-01

    When assessing re-vegetation project performance and optimizing land management, identification of the key ecological factors inducing vegetation degradation has crucial implications. Rainfall, temperature, elevation, slope, aspect, land use type, and human disturbance are ecological factors affecting the status of vegetation index. However, at different spatial scales, the key factors may vary. Using Helin County, Inner-Mongolia, China as the study site and combining remote sensing image interpretation, field surveying, and mathematical methods, this study assesses key ecological factors affecting vegetation degradation under different spatial scales in a semi-arid agro-pastoral ecotone. It indicates that the key factors are different at various spatial scales. Elevation, rainfall, and temperature are identified as crucial for all spatial extents. Elevation, rainfall and human disturbance are key factors for small-scale quadrats of 300 m × 300 m and 600 m × 600 m, temperature and land use type are key factors for a medium-scale quadrat of 1 km × 1 km, and rainfall, temperature, and land use are key factors for large-scale quadrats of 2 km × 2 km and 5 km × 5 km. For this region, human disturbance is not the key factor for vegetation degradation across spatial scales. It is necessary to consider spatial scale for the identification of key factors determining vegetation characteristics. The eco-restoration programs at various spatial scales should identify key influencing factors according their scales so as to take effective measurements. The new understanding obtained in this study may help to explore the forces which driving vegetation degradation in the degraded regions in the world.

  9. [Discussion on developing a data management plan and its key factors in clinical study based on electronic data capture system].

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-na; Huang, Xiu-ling; Gao, Rui; Lu, Fang

    2012-08-01

    Data management has significant impact on the quality control of clinical studies. Every clinical study should have a data management plan to provide overall work instructions and ensure that all of these tasks are completed according to the Good Clinical Data Management Practice (GCDMP). Meanwhile, the data management plan (DMP) is an auditable document requested by regulatory inspectors and must be written in a manner that is realistic and of high quality. The significance of DMP, the minimum standards and the best practices provided by GCDMP, the main contents of DMP based on electronic data capture (EDC) and some key factors of DMP influencing the quality of clinical study were elaborated in this paper. Specifically, DMP generally consists of 15 parts, namely, the approval page, the protocol summary, role and training, timelines, database design, creation, maintenance and security, data entry, data validation, quality control and quality assurance, the management of external data, serious adverse event data reconciliation, coding, database lock, data management reports, the communication plan and the abbreviated terms. Among them, the following three parts are regarded as the key factors: designing a standardized database of the clinical study, entering data in time and cleansing data efficiently. In the last part of this article, the authors also analyzed the problems in clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine using the EDC system and put forward some suggestions for improvement.

  10. The transcription factor Pokemon: a new key player in cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-10-01

    Learning how critical cell regulatory pathways are controlled may lead to new opportunities for cancer treatment. We recently identified the transcription factor Pokemon as a central regulator of the important tumor suppressor ARF. Pokemon is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and cells lacking Pokemon are refractory to oncogenic transformation. These findings suggest that Pokemon may offer an effective new target for cancer therapeutics.

  11. Key factors influencing the intention of telecare adoption: an institutional perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chung-Feng

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore key factors of influence on the adoption of telecare by care institutions. This investigation was based on an extensive Technology-Organization-Environment framework comprising the four constructs of technology, organization, environment, and the project planning as well as corresponding variables. This study utilized a self-administered questionnaire for data collection, focusing on the managers of all 339 nursing homes in Taiwan for the census survey. A total of 70 valid questionnaires yielded a response rate of 20.65%. After analyzing the responses through the Partial Least Squares approach, government support, technological knowledge, supplier support, team skills, and compatibility were found to be the five key factors that positively impact intention to adopt telecare from an institutional perspective. The results of this study indicated that care institutions, for the most part, are willing to develop telecare and are already incorporating preliminary applications of telecare, such as distance learning and resident positioning. Solutions to potential issues related to implementing telecare in practice are also proposed in this study.

  12. Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Xu, Han; Li, Yide; Deng, Ye; Li, Diqiang; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-08-20

    Tropical rainforests cover over 50% of all known plant and animal species and provide a variety of key resources and ecosystem services to humans, largely mediated by metabolic activities of soil microbial communities. A deep analysis of soil microbial communities and their roles in ecological processes would improve our understanding on biogeochemical elemental cycles. However, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforests and causative factors remain unclear. GeoChip, contained almost all of the key functional genes related to biogeochemical cycles, could be used as a specific and sensitive tool for studying microbial gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest was analyzed by using GeoChip technology. Gene categories detected in the tropical rainforest soils were related to different biogeochemical processes, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling. The relative abundance of genes related to C and P cycling detected mostly derived from the cultured bacteria. C degradation gene categories for substrates ranging from labile C to recalcitrant C were all detected, and gene abundances involved in many recalcitrant C degradation gene categories were significantly (P < 0.05) different among three sampling sites. The relative abundance of genes related to N cycling detected was significantly (P < 0.05) different, mostly derived from the uncultured bacteria. The gene categories related to ammonification had a high relative abundance. Both canonical correspondence analysis and multivariate regression tree analysis showed that soil available N was the most correlated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Overall high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for different biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available N could be the key factor in shaping the

  13. Drought Response in Wheat: Key Genes and Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Root System Architecture and Transpiration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manoj; Soolanayakanahally, Raju; Ogawa, Satoshi; Uga, Yusaku; Selvaraj, Michael G.; Kagale, Sateesh

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as, drought, heat, salinity, and flooding threaten global food security. Crop genetic improvement with increased resilience to abiotic stresses is a critical component of crop breeding strategies. Wheat is an important cereal crop and a staple food source globally. Enhanced drought tolerance in wheat is critical for sustainable food production and global food security. Recent advances in drought tolerance research have uncovered many key genes and transcription regulators governing morpho-physiological traits. Genes controlling root architecture and stomatal development play an important role in soil moisture extraction and its retention, and therefore have been targets of molecular breeding strategies for improving drought tolerance. In this systematic review, we have summarized evidence of beneficial contributions of root and stomatal traits to plant adaptation to drought stress. Specifically, we discuss a few key genes such as, DRO1 in rice and ERECTA in Arabidopsis and rice that were identified to be the enhancers of drought tolerance via regulation of root traits and transpiration efficiency. Additionally, we highlight several transcription factor families, such as, ERF (ethylene response factors), DREB (dehydration responsive element binding), ZFP (zinc finger proteins), WRKY, and MYB that were identified to be both positive and negative regulators of drought responses in wheat, rice, maize, and/or Arabidopsis. The overall aim of this review is to provide an overview of candidate genes that have been identified as regulators of drought response in plants. The lack of a reference genome sequence for wheat and non-transgenic approaches for manipulation of gene functions in wheat in the past had impeded high-resolution interrogation of functional elements, including genes and QTLs, and their application in cultivar improvement. The recent developments in wheat genomics and reverse genetics, including the availability of a gold

  14. Drought Response in Wheat: Key Genes and Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Root System Architecture and Transpiration Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manoj; Soolanayakanahally, Raju; Ogawa, Satoshi; Uga, Yusaku; Selvaraj, Michael G; Kagale, Sateesh

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as, drought, heat, salinity, and flooding threaten global food security. Crop genetic improvement with increased resilience to abiotic stresses is a critical component of crop breeding strategies. Wheat is an important cereal crop and a staple food source globally. Enhanced drought tolerance in wheat is critical for sustainable food production and global food security. Recent advances in drought tolerance research have uncovered many key genes and transcription regulators governing morpho-physiological traits. Genes controlling root architecture and stomatal development play an important role in soil moisture extraction and its retention, and therefore have been targets of molecular breeding strategies for improving drought tolerance. In this systematic review, we have summarized evidence of beneficial contributions of root and stomatal traits to plant adaptation to drought stress. Specifically, we discuss a few key genes such as, DRO1 in rice and ERECTA in Arabidopsis and rice that were identified to be the enhancers of drought tolerance via regulation of root traits and transpiration efficiency. Additionally, we highlight several transcription factor families, such as, ERF (ethylene response factors), DREB (dehydration responsive element binding), ZFP (zinc finger proteins), WRKY, and MYB that were identified to be both positive and negative regulators of drought responses in wheat, rice, maize, and/or Arabidopsis. The overall aim of this review is to provide an overview of candidate genes that have been identified as regulators of drought response in plants. The lack of a reference genome sequence for wheat and non-transgenic approaches for manipulation of gene functions in wheat in the past had impeded high-resolution interrogation of functional elements, including genes and QTLs, and their application in cultivar improvement. The recent developments in wheat genomics and reverse genetics, including the availability of a gold

  15. Effect of Demographics on Excretion of Key Urinary Factors Related to Kidney Stone Risk.

    PubMed

    Perinpam, Majuran; Ware, Erin B; Smith, Jennifer A; Turner, Stephen T; Kardia, Sharon L R; Lieske, John C

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of demographics including age and sex on excretion of 4 key urinary factors (calcium [Ca], magnesium [Mg], oxalate and uric acid [UA]) related to kidney stone risk. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected from non-Hispanic white sibships in Rochester, MN. Height, weight, blood pressure, serum creatinine, and cystatin C were measured. Diet was assessed using the Viocare food frequency questionnaire. Effects of demographics and dietary elements on urinary excretions were evaluated in univariate, multivariate, and interaction models that included age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Samples were available from 709 individuals. In multivariate models, sex was a significant predictor of all 4 urinary factors, age was significant for all but UA excretion, and serum creatinine was significant only for Ca and Mg excretion (P <.05). BMI or weight positively correlated with Mg, oxalate, and UA excretion (P <.05). Use of a thiazide diuretic (lower) and dietary protein (higher) were associated with Ca excretion, whereas dietary Ca was associated with higher Mg excretion. Urinary UA excretion increased with animal protein intake and cystatin C estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and was lower with concurrent loop diuretic use. Significant interaction effects on urinary UA excretion were observed for loop diuretic use and sex, eGFR and sex, age and animal protein intake, and BMI and eGFR (P <.05). Age and sex influence excretion of key urinary factors related to kidney stone risk and should be taken into account when evaluating kidney stone patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [A model for evaluation of key measures for control of chikungunya fever outbreak in China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin; Liu, Ruchun; Chen, Shuilian; Chen, Tianmu

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the transmission pattern of Chikungunya (CHIK) fever in community and evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito control, case isolation and other key control measures by using ordinary differential equation (ODE) model. According to natural history of CHIK, an ODE model for the epidemiological analysis of CHIK outbreak was established. The key parameters of the model were obtained by fitting the model with reported outbreak data of the first CHIK outbreak in China. Then the outbreak characteristics without intervention, the effectiveness of mosquito control and case isolation were simulated. Without intervention, an imported case would cause an outbreak in a community with population of 11 000, and cumulative case number would exceed 941 when the total attack rate was 8.55%. The results of our simulation revealed that the effectiveness of case isolation was not perfect enough when it was implemented alone. Although the number of cases could be decreased by case isolation, the duration of outbreak would not be shortened. Differently, the effectiveness of mosquito control was remarkable. In addition, the earlier the measure was implemented, the better the effectiveness would be. The effectiveness of mosquito control plus case isolation was same with mosquito control. To control a CHIK outbreak, mosquito control is the most recommended measures. However, case isolation is also necessary as the supplementation of mosquito control.

  17. Surgical Ventricular Entry is a Key Risk Factor for Leptomeningeal Metastasis of High Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Roelz, Roland; Reinacher, Peter; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Hippchen, Beate; Egger, Karl; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Machein, Marcia

    2015-12-04

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) of high grade gliomas (HGG) can lead to devastating disease courses. Understanding of risk factors for LM is important to identify patients at risk. We reviewed patient records and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of all patients with a first diagnosis of HGG who underwent surgery in our institution between 2008 and 2012. To assess the influence of potential risk factors for LM and the impact of LM on survival multivariate statistics were performed. 239 patients with a diagnosis of HGG and at least 6 months of MRI and clinical follow-up were included. LM occurred in 27 (11%) patients and was symptomatic in 17 (65%). A strong correlation of surgical entry to the ventricle and LM was found (HR: 8.1). Ventricular entry was documented in 137 patients (57%) and LM ensued in 25 (18%) of these. Only two (2%) of 102 patients without ventricular entry developed LM. Median overall survival of patients after diagnosis of LM (239 days) was significantly shorter compared to patients without LM (626 days). LM is a frequent complication in the course of disease of HGG and is associated with poor survival. Surgical entry to the ventricle is a key risk factor for LM.

  18. [Health care networks in Germany: status quo and key success factors].

    PubMed

    Wambach, Veit; Lindenthal, J

    2015-04-01

    One third of all practicing physicians are currently working in one of the 400 German health care networks. These physicians' networks bring together GPs and specialists and cooperate with different partners, for example, nursing homes, hospitals, and self-help groups. To increase the quality and the efficiency of care and patient satisfaction by improving the collaboration and communication between physicians and other health care providers.The example of the accountable care organization "Gesundheitsnetz Qualität und Effizienz" (QuE; Health Quality and Efficiency Network) in Nuremberg is used to show that it is possible to achieve an increase in efficiency while providing above-average quality of care and achieving high patient satisfaction. Additionally, the article deals with the status quo, the core objectives, and the key activities of previous generations of health care networks. Quality indicators, satisfaction surveys, and economic parameters are the basis for measuring and representing the above-average performance of physicians' networks. Regional health care networks offer an entire range of patient care, from outpatients and inpatients to the complementary sector, and thereby have excellent prospects for playing an even more important role in the German health care system. The key success factors are: the consideration of specific regional characteristics, their proximity to the patient, and consistent patient orientation.

  19. A Secure Three-Factor User Authentication and Key Agreement Protocol for TMIS With User Anonymity.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Biswas, G P

    2015-08-01

    Telecare medical information system (TMIS) makes an efficient and convenient connection between patient(s)/user(s) and doctor(s) over the insecure internet. Therefore, data security, privacy and user authentication are enormously important for accessing important medical data over insecure communication. Recently, many user authentication protocols for TMIS have been proposed in the literature and it has been observed that most of the protocols cannot achieve complete security requirements. In this paper, we have scrutinized two (Mishra et al., Xu et al.) remote user authentication protocols using smart card and explained that both the protocols are suffering against several security weaknesses. We have then presented three-factor user authentication and key agreement protocol usable for TMIS, which fix the security pitfalls of the above mentioned schemes. The informal cryptanalysis makes certain that the proposed protocol provides well security protection on the relevant security attacks. Furthermore, the simulator AVISPA tool confirms that the protocol is secure against active and passive attacks including replay and man-in-the-middle attacks. The security functionalities and performance comparison analysis confirm that our protocol not only provide strong protection on security attacks, but it also achieves better complexities along with efficient login and password change phase as well as session key verification property.

  20. What are the key endodontic factors associated with oral health-related quality of life?

    PubMed

    Liu, P; McGrath, C; Cheung, G

    2014-03-01

    To determine the associations between endodontic factors and oral health-related quality of life (OHQoL), controlling for socio-demographics, pain and other oral health clinical factors. OHQoL assessments were conducted amongst a consecutive sample of 412 Chinese patients requiring endodontic treatment employing the short-form Oral Heath Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Information on (i) number of teeth requiring endodontic treatment, (ii) tooth type, (iii) retreatment requirements, (iv) periapical radiolucency assessment and (v) diagnostic classification was obtained. In addition, socio-demographic information (age, gender, educational attainment and family income), pain ratings on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and other clinical oral health status information were collected. Bivariate analyses identified association between number of teeth requiring endodontic treatment and summary OHIP-14 score (P < 0.01) and four of its seven domain scores (P < 0.05). Need for endodontic retreatment was associated with summary OHIP-14 score (P < 0.05) and two of its seven domain scores (P < 0.05). In regression analyses having controlled for socio-demographics, other clinical factors and pain rating amongst 15 confounding variables, patients requiring endodontic treatment for multiple teeth were more than twice as likely to have poor OHQoL (upper quintile OHIP-14 scores) compared with those requiring endodontic treatment for a single tooth (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.17, 3.98, P < 0.05). Pain VAS rating and age also emerged as significant factors associated with poor OHQoL in the regression analysis. OHQoL is compromised amongst patients requiring endodontic treatment. Number of teeth requiring endodontic treatment is associated with poor OHQoL, controlling for socio-demographic and other oral health clinical and pain factors. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use the predictive models to explore the key factors affecting phytoplankton succession in Lake Erhai, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Wang, Huan; Chen, Jun; Shen, Hong; Deng, Xuwei

    2018-01-01

    Increasing algae in Lake Erhai has resulted in frequent blooms that have not only led to water ecosystem degeneration but also seriously influenced the quality of the water supply and caused extensive damage to the local people, as the lake is a water resource for Dali City. Exploring the key factors affecting phytoplankton succession and developing predictive models with easily detectable parameters for phytoplankton have been proven to be practical ways to improve water quality. To this end, a systematic survey focused on phytoplankton succession was conducted over 2 years in Lake Erhai. The data from the first study year were used to develop predictive models, and the data from the second year were used for model verification. The seasonal succession of phytoplankton in Lake Erhai was obvious. The dominant groups were Cyanobacteria in the summer, Chlorophyta in the autumn and Bacillariophyta in the winter. The developments and verification of predictive models indicated that compared to phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton density is more effective for estimating phytoplankton variation in Lake Erhai. CCA (canonical correlation analysis) indicated that TN (total nitrogen), TP (total phosphorus), DO (dissolved oxygen), SD (Secchi depth), Cond (conductivity), T (water temperature), and ORP (oxidation reduction potential) had significant influences (p < 0.05) on the phytoplankton community. The CCA of the dominant species found that Microcystis was significantly influenced by T. The dominant Chlorophyta, Psephonema aenigmaticum and Mougeotia, were significantly influenced by TN. All results indicated that TN and T were the two key factors driving phytoplankton succession in Lake Erhai.

  2. Transcription Factor and lncRNA Regulatory Networks Identify Key Elements in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yang, William; Zhang, Jialing; Yang, Jack Y; Guan, Renchu; Yang, Mary Qu

    2018-01-05

    Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed carcinoma and is the leading cause of cancer death. Although significant progress has been made towards its understanding and treatment, unraveling the complexities of lung cancer is still hampered by a lack of comprehensive knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the disease. High-throughput and multidimensional genomic data have shed new light on cancer biology. In this study, we developed a network-based approach integrating somatic mutations, the transcriptome, DNA methylation, and protein-DNA interactions to reveal the key regulators in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD). By combining Bayesian network analysis with tissue-specific transcription factor (TF) and targeted gene interactions, we inferred 15 disease-related core regulatory networks in co-expression gene modules associated with LUAD. Through target gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of key TFs, including known cancer genes that potentially regulate the disease networks. These TFs were significantly enriched in multiple cancer-related pathways. Specifically, our results suggest that hepatitis viruses may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, highlighting the need for further investigations into the roles that viruses play in treating lung cancer. Additionally, 13 putative regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including three that are known to be associated with lung cancer, and nine novel lncRNAs were revealed by our study. These lncRNAs and their target genes exhibited high interaction potentials and demonstrated significant expression correlations between normal lung and LUAD tissues. We further extended our study to include 16 solid-tissue tumor types and determined that the majority of these lncRNAs have putative regulatory roles in multiple cancers, with a few showing lung-cancer specific regulations. Our study provides a comprehensive investigation of transcription factor and lncRNA regulation in the context of LUAD regulatory networks

  3. Phase Detector for Power-Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    Positive feedback assures reliable switching. Three Phase Power Factor Controller includes three phase detectors, each produces rectangular waves of duration approximately equal to lag time between line voltage and motor current.

  4. Uncertainty about effects is a key factor influencing institutional review boards' approval of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wao, Hesborn; Mhaskar, Rahul; Kumar, Ambuj; Miladinovic, Branko; Guterbock, Thomas; Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    To investigate factors, which influence institutional review boards' (IRBs') decision to approve or not approve clinical studies, a nationwide vignette-based online survey of IRB members was conducted. A factorial design was used, whereby seven aspects of each hypothetical study were randomly varied in 15 phrases in each vignette to produce unique vignettes. Participants indicated the degree of study approval and described factors influencing approval decision. Qualitative responses were thematically content analyzed. Sixteen themes were obtained from 208 participants from 42 institutions. Uncertainty, adherence, study design, and harms were frequently and intensely cited to influence study approval. Analysis of two extreme subgroups (approvers vs. nonapprovers) showed that uncertainty influenced approval decisions, odds ratios (OR) = 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-9.8) and OR = 3.2 (95% CI, 1.1-8.9), respectively, based on theme frequency and theme intensity, ignoring multiple observations per person. Taking into consideration multiple observations per person, similar results were obtained for uncertainty: OR = 8.9 (95% CI, 0.93-85.4). Perceived uncertainty about benefits and harms of a proposed intervention is a key driver in IRB members' approval of clinical trials. This, in turn, calls for improved standardization in the communications of information on benefits and harms in the research protocols considered by the IRBs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Successful collaboration between occupational health service providers and client companies: Key factors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lisa; Sjöström, John; Antonsson, Ann-Beth

    2015-06-05

    Occupational health services (OHS) are often described as an important resource to reduce work-related diseases and improve the workplace. This paper identifies key factors for successful collaboration between Swedish OHS providers and their client companies. Interviews were carried out with representatives of 15 companies and their OHS providers. The interviews were transcribed and their content analyzed. The results revealed that successful collaboration was highly correlated with six factors. First, the collaboration depends on both parties; ``it takes two to tango''. Second, the company and the OHS provider have a joint commitment to a long-term collaboration. Third, the collaboration is built on frequent contact at different organizational levels. Fourth, the company has a well-structured work environment for occupational health and safety management. Fifth, the OHS provider uses a consultative approach in its prevention and promotion activities. Finally, OHS providers seek to treat the company, not the individual. Our research indicates that a successful collaboration requires both occupational health and safety management (OHSM) within the company and the assistance of a competent OHS provider. A change toward more promotion and prevention services benefits the company, since the occupational health services are better tailored to the company's needs.

  6. Lack of physician-patient communication as a key factor associated with malpractice litigation in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Domino, Joseph; McGovern, Connie; Chang, Kate W C; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-02-01

    Perinatal disorders are prone to malpractice litigation. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) results from stretching the nerves in the perinatal period and may lead to paresis or paralysis and sensory loss in the affected arm. Little is known about the key factors associated with malpractice litigation by families of patients with NBPP and whether these factors reflect the practice environment or are inherent to the condition. In this study, the authors documented the percentage of families of NBPP patients at a specialty center that had filed a malpractice suit and described the key factors associated with that pursuit of legal action. The families/caregivers of 51 patients with NBPP who had presented to the University of Michigan Interdisciplinary Brachial Plexus Program participated in this study. A qualitative research design was applied using both a questionnaire to examine psychosocial factors and a dynamic tool to measure health outcomes from the patient perspective via parent proxy (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS] assessment instruments). Statistical analysis included the Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and Student t-test. The study protocol was approved by the University of Michigan institutional review board. Forty-seven percent of the families pursued malpractice litigation. In comparing patient families that had pursued legal action with those that had not, significant differences were revealed in the perception that the sustained birth injury was unnecessary (p = 0.002), the information received in the perinatal period was inadequate (p = 0.003), family concerns were ignored in the perinatal period (p = 0.005), and family concerns were not adequately addressed (p < 0.001). Sixty-six percent of the families received external advice to pursue legal action. The PROMIS survey revealed significant group differences in depressive symptoms (p = 0.008), fatigue (p = 0.02), pain (p = 0.01), and anger (p = 0.004). In

  7. An improved arbitrated quantum signature protocol based on the key-controlled chained CNOT encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Sun, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Ke-Jia; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new quantum encryption based on the key-controlled chained CNOT operations, which is named KCCC encryption, is proposed. With the KCCC encryption, an improved arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) protocol is presented. Compared with the existing protocols, our protocol can effectively prevent forgery attacks and disavowal attacks. Moreover, only single state is required in the protocol. We hope it is helpful to further research in the design of AQS protocols in future.

  8. Delphi-based study and analysis of key risk factors for invasive fungal infection in haematological patients.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, L; Salavert, M; Gayoso, J; Lizasoaín, M; Ruiz Camps, I; Di Benedetto, N

    2017-04-01

    Mortality caused by invasive fungal infections due to filamentous fungi (IFI-FF) is high. Predisposing factors to IFI-FF are multiple and should be stratified. The objective of this study was to identify key risk factors for IFI-FF in onco-haematological patients in different clinical settings. Prospective national Delphi study. Risk factors for IFI-FF in patients with onco-haematological diseases were identified by a systematic review of the literature. An anonymous survey was sent by e-mail to a panel of experts. A key risk factor was defined when at least 70% of the surveyed participants assigned a "maximal" or "high" risk. In allogenic stem cell transplantation, 18 of the 42 risk factors analyzed were classified as key risk factors, including neutropenia, previous IFI-FF, grade III/IV acute or extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), umbilical cord blood transplantation, HLA mismatching transplantation, graft failure, absence of HEPA filters, absence of laminar air flow, diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia, haploidentical transplantation, anti-TNF-α drugs, alemtuzumab, anti-thymocyte globulin, immunosuppressive prophylaxis for GVHD, lymphocytopenia, cytomegalovirus infection, and proximity to construction areas. In acute leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AL/MDS), 7 of 25 risk factors were defined as key risk factors, including neutropenia, consolidation therapy without response, induction therapy, antifungal prophylaxis with azoles, proximity to construction areas, and absence of HEPA filters. In lymphoma/multiple myeloma (MM), the five key risk factors among 21 analyzed were use of steroids, neutropenia, progressive disease, anti-CD52 therapies, and proximity to construction areas. The Delphi method was useful for the classification and stratification of risk factors for IFI-FF in patients with onco-haematological diseases. Identifying key risk factors will contribute to a better management of IFI-FF in this group of patients at high or changing

  9. Aircraft Loss of Control Causal Factors and Mitigation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control is the leading cause of jet fatalities worldwide. Aside from their frequency of occurrence, accidents resulting from loss of aircraft control seize the public s attention by yielding a large number of fatalities in a single event. In response to the rising threat to aviation safety, the NASA Aviation Safety Program has conducted a study of the loss of control problem. This study gathered four types of information pertaining to loss of control accidents: (1) statistical data; (2) individual accident reports that cite loss of control as a contributing factor; (3) previous meta-analyses of loss of control accidents; and (4) inputs solicited from aircraft manufacturers, air carriers, researchers, and other industry stakeholders. Using these information resources, the study team identified the causal factors that were cited in the greatest number of loss of control accidents, and which were emphasized most by industry stakeholders. This report describes the study approach, the key causal factors for aircraft loss of control, and recommended mitigation strategies to make near-term impacts, mid-term impacts, and Next Generation Air Transportation System impacts on the loss of control accident statistics

  10. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    SciTech Connect

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J..M.

    1996-08-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls.

  11. Key factors limiting the open circuit voltage of n(+)pp(+) indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, Chandra; Thesling, William; Weinberg, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Solar cells made from gallium arsenide (Gaas), with a room temperature bandgap of E(sub g) = 1.43 eV have exhibited the best measured open circuit voltage (V sub oc) of 1.05 V at 1 AM0, 25 C. The material InP is in many ways similar to GaAs. A simple calculation comparing InP to GaAs then shows that solar cells made from InP, with E(sub g) = 1.35 at 300 K, should exhibit the best measured V sub oc of approximately 950 mV at 1 AM0, 300 K. However, to date, the best measured V sub oc for InP solar cells made by any fabrication method is 899 mV at AM1.5, 25 C which would translate to 912 mV at 1 AM0, 25 C. The V sub oc of an n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell is governed by several factors. Of these, some factors, such as the thickness and doping of the emitter and base regions, are easily controlled and can be adjusted to desired values dictated by a good performance optimizing model. Such factors were not considered. There are other factors which also govern V sub oc, and their values are not so easily controlled. The primary ones among these are (1) the indirect or Hall-Shockley-Read lifetimes in the various regions of the cell, (2) the low-doping intrinsic carrier concentration n(sub i) of the InP material, (3) the heavy doping factors in the emitter and BSF regions, and (4) the front surface recombination velocity S(sub F). The influence of these latter factors on the V sub oc of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell and the results were used to produce a near-optimum design of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell.

  12. Key factors limiting the open circuit voltage of n(+)pp(+) indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, Chandra; Thesling, William; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    Solar cells made from gallium arsenide (GaAs), with a room temperature bandgap of E(sub g) = 1.43 eV have exhibited the best measured open circuit voltage (V sub OC) of 1.05 V at 1 AMO, 25 C. The material InP is in many ways similar to GaAs. A simple calculation comparing InP to GaAs then shows that solar cells made from InP, with E(sub g) = 1.35 at 300 K, should exhibit the best measured (V sub OC) of approximately 950 mV at 1 AMO, 300 K. However, to date, the best measured V(sub OC) for InP solar cells made by any fabrication method is 899 mV at AM1.5, 25 C which would translate to 912 mV at 1 AMO, 25 C. The V(sub OC) of an n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell is governed by several factors. Of these, some factors, such as the thickness and doping of the emitter and base regions, are easily controlled and can be adjusted to desired values dictated by a good performance optimizing model. Such factors were not considered. There are other factors which also govern V(sub OC), and their values are not so easily controlled. The primary ones among these are (1) the indirect or Hall-Shockley-Read lifetimes in the various regions of the cell, (2) the low-doping intrinsic carrier concentration n(sub i) of the InP material, (3) the heavy doping factors in the emitter and BSF regions, and (4) the front surface recombination velocity S(sub F). The influence of these latter factors on the V(sub OC) of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell and the results were used to produce a near-optimum design of the n(+)pp(+) InP solar cell.

  13. Commercialization of the power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Motor Power Controller, also known as the Power Factor Controller, is to improve power factor and reduce power dissipation in induction motors operating below full load. These purposes were studied and tested in detail. The Motor Power Controller is capable of raising power factors from 0.2 to 0.8 and results in energy savings. It was found that many motors, in their present operating applications, are classified as unstable. The electronic nature of the controller vs. the electrical nature of the motor, compound this problem due to the differences in response time of the two devices. Many tests were successfully completed, the most indicating greater savings than anticipated. Also, there was an effect on efficiency which was not included in the calculations.

  14. Implementing a larviciding efficacy or effectiveness control intervention against malaria vectors: key parameters for success.

    PubMed

    Antonio-Nkondjio, Christophe; Sandjo, Nino Ndjondo; Awono-Ambene, Parfait; Wondji, Charles S

    2018-01-24

    During the last decade, scale-up of vector control tools such as long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) contributed to the reduction of malaria morbidity and mortality across the continent. Because these first line interventions are now affected by many challenges such as insecticide resistance, change in vector feeding and biting behaviour, outdoor malaria transmission and adaptation of mosquito to polluted environments, the World Health Organization recommends the use of integrated control approaches to improve, control and elimination of malaria. Larviciding is one of these approaches which, if well implemented, could help control malaria in areas where this intervention is suitable. Unfortunately, important knowledge gaps remain in its successful application. The present review summarises key parameters that should be considered when implementing larviciding efficacy or effectiveness trials.

  15. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA): a key factor in DNA replication and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2011-05-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) has been found in the nuclei of yeast, plant and animal cells that undergo cell division, suggesting a function in cell cycle regulation and/or DNA replication. It subsequently became clear that PCNA also played a role in other processes involving the cell genome. This review discusses eukaryotic PCNA, with an emphasis on plant PCNA, in terms of the protein structure and its biochemical properties as well as gene structure, organization, expression and function. PCNA exerts a tripartite function by operating as (1) a sliding clamp during DNA synthesis, (2) a polymerase switch factor and (3) a recruitment factor. Most of its functions are mediated by its interactions with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination as well as in regulation of the cell cycle and chromatid cohesion. Moreover, post-translational modifications of PCNA play a key role in regulation of its functions. Finally, a phylogenetic comparison of PCNA genes suggests that the multi-functionality observed in most species is a product of evolution. Most plant PCNAs exhibit features similar to those found for PCNAs of other eukaryotes. Similarities include: (1) a trimeric ring structure of the PCNA sliding clamp, (2) the involvement of PCNA in DNA replication and repair, (3) the ability to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase δ and (4) the ability to interact with p21, a regulator of the cell cycle. However, many plant genomes seem to contain the second, probably functional, copy of the PCNA gene, in contrast to PCNA pseudogenes that are found in mammalian genomes.

  16. Directed evolution study unveiling key sequence factors that affect translation efficiency in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsukuda, Miyuki; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    Synonymous mutations in protein coding genes significantly impact translation efficiency. We synthesized a pair of genes encoding green fluorescent protein that were separated by 160 synonymous mutations to investigate key factors that affect translation efficiency. One sequence was optimized for Escherichia coli (GFP(Eco)) and the other for Bacillus subtilis (GFP(Bsu)). When the genes were expressed in E. coli, GFP(Eco) fluoresced 12-fold stronger than GFP(Bsu), confirming the suboptimal nature of the GFP(Bsu) gene. We then employed directed evolution to improve the expression of GFP(Bsu). Random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling was used to generate mutant libraries, which were screened for fluorescence. A variant showing 6-fold fluorescence enhancement was identified, which contained a single mutation (G10A) in a rare codon for Gly-4. However, the substitution generated another type of rare codon, AGA, for Arg, suggesting that the improvement was caused by a factor other than the rare codon. We next applied saturation mutagenesis to Gly-4. The darkest variant contained a GGG codon (GFP(Bsu)-G) for Gly-4. Taking the location of the mutation into account, we hypothesized that destabilization of the mRNA secondary structure around the initiation codon improved the expression. We then randomized the nucleotide triplet in 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of GFP(Bsu), which is complementary to the Gly-4 codon. A variant showing 6-fold fluorescence enhancement was identified, which exhibited a destabilized secondary structure. When this 5'UTR sequence was combined with GFP(Bsu)-G, 22-fold fluorescent improvement was achieved. Collectively, the stability of the mRNA secondary structure around the initiation codon predominantly affected the translation efficiency. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Components of breeding productivity in a marine bird community: key factors and concordance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Hatch, Martha A.

    1990-01-01

    We estimated components of annual breeding productivity for eight species of marine birds on the Semidi Islands in the western Gulf of Alaska. Mortality of eggs and young, caused primarily by avian predators, accounted for most of the annual variation in productivity. Failure to produce eggs, clutch size variation, and the hatchability of eggs were generally less important. The stage of breeding at which annual productivity was most strongly regulated differed among species. In murres, chick-rearing success accounted for the largest share of annual variation in overall productivity, whereas incubation success was the key factor in fulmars, kittiwakes, and puffins. Although avian predators were the dominant proximate cause of egg and chick losses in some species, food supply seemed ultimately responsible for variation in all the major components of productivity. Concordance of productivity among species was low for the marine bird community as a whole, but selected pairs of species exhibited a greater tendency for high and low productivities to occur in the same years. Compared with the same or similar species outside Alaska, Semidi Islands birds were in one of three categories: (i) species whose productivity was about the same as reported from other areas (fulmars and gulls), (ii) species with comparatively low productivity (murres, puffins, kittiwakes), and (iii) species with similar mean productivity but greater annual variation (cormorants). These patterns suggest that specialized consumers of forage fish experienced food shortages at the Semidi Islands and that surface feeders were more severely affected than divers.

  18. The gut microbiota: A key factor in the therapeutic effects of (poly)phenols.

    PubMed

    Espín, Juan Carlos; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2017-09-01

    (Poly)phenols (PPs) constitute a large family of phytochemicals with high chemical diversity that are known to be active principles of plant-derived nutraceuticals and herbal medicinal products. Their pharmacological activity, however, is difficult to demonstrate due to their mild physiological effects, and to the large inter-individual variability observed. Many PPs have little bioavailability and reach the colon almost unaltered. There they encounter the gut microbes resulting in a two-way interaction in which PPs modulate the gut microbiota composition, and the intestinal microbes catabolize the ingested PPs to release metabolites that are often more active and better absorbed than the native phenolic compounds. The type and quantity of the PP metabolites produced in humans depend on the gut microbiota composition and function, and different metabotypes have been identified. However, not all the metabolites have the same biological activity, and therefore the final health effects of dietary PPs depend on the gut microbiota composition. Stratification in clinical trials according to individuals' metabotypes is necessary to fully understand the health effects of PPs. In this review, we present and discuss the most significant and updated knowledge regarding the reciprocal interrelation of the gut microbiota with dietary PPs as a key factor that modulates the health effects of these compounds. The review will focus in those PPs that are known to be metabolized by gut microbiota resulting in bioactive metabolites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using sensitivity analysis to identify key factors for the propagation of a plant epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Bruchou, Claude; Dallot, Sylvie; Pleydell, David R. J.; Jacquot, Emmanuel; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Thébaud, Gaël

    2018-01-01

    Identifying the key factors underlying the spread of a disease is an essential but challenging prerequisite to design management strategies. To tackle this issue, we propose an approach based on sensitivity analyses of a spatiotemporal stochastic model simulating the spread of a plant epidemic. This work is motivated by the spread of sharka, caused by plum pox virus, in a real landscape. We first carried out a broad-range sensitivity analysis, ignoring any prior information on six epidemiological parameters, to assess their intrinsic influence on model behaviour. A second analysis benefited from the available knowledge on sharka epidemiology and was thus restricted to more realistic values. The broad-range analysis revealed that the mean duration of the latent period is the most influential parameter of the model, whereas the sharka-specific analysis uncovered the strong impact of the connectivity of the first infected orchard. In addition to demonstrating the interest of sensitivity analyses for a stochastic model, this study highlights the impact of variation ranges of target parameters on the outcome of a sensitivity analysis. With regard to sharka management, our results suggest that sharka surveillance may benefit from paying closer attention to highly connected patches whose infection could trigger serious epidemics. PMID:29410846

  20. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  1. Environmental impact and risk assessments and key factors contributing to the overall uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Salbu, Brit

    2016-01-01

    , ignoring sensitive history life stages of organisms and transgenerational effects. To link sources, ecosystem transfer and biological effects to future impact and risks, a series of models are usually interfaced, while uncertainty estimates are seldom given. The model predictions are, however, only valid within the boundaries of the overall uncertainties. Furthermore, the model predictions are only useful and relevant when uncertainties are estimated, communicated and understood. Among key factors contributing most to uncertainties, the present paper focuses especially on structure uncertainties (model bias or discrepancies) as aspects such as particle releases, ecosystem dynamics, mixed exposure, sensitive life history stages and transgenerational effects, are usually ignored in assessment models. Research focus on these aspects should significantly reduce the overall uncertainties in the impact and risk assessment of radioactive contaminated ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Key Factors in the Success of an Organization's Information Security Culture: A Quantitative Study and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    This research study reviewed relative literature on information security and information security culture within organizations to determine what factors potentially assist an organization in implementing, integrating, and maintaining a successful organizational information security culture. Based on this review of literature, five key factors were…

  3. Long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution by controlling excess noise

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography founded on the laws of physics could revolutionize the way in which communication information is protected. Significant progresses in long-distance quantum key distribution based on discrete variables have led to the secure quantum communication in real-world conditions being available. However, the alternative approach implemented with continuous variables has not yet reached the secure distance beyond 100 km. Here, we overcome the previous range limitation by controlling system excess noise and report such a long distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution experiment. Our result paves the road to the large-scale secure quantum communication with continuous variables and serves as a stepping stone in the quest for quantum network. PMID:26758727

  4. Evolving Systems: Adaptive Key Component Control and Inheritance of Passivity and Dissipativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. Autonomous assembly of large, complex flexible structures in space is a target application for Evolving Systems. A critical requirement for autonomous assembling structures is that they remain stable during and after assembly. The fundamental topic of inheritance of stability, dissipativity, and passivity in Evolving Systems is the primary focus of this research. In this paper, we develop an adaptive key component controller to restore stability in Nonlinear Evolving Systems that would otherwise fail to inherit the stability traits of their components. We provide sufficient conditions for the use of this novel control method and demonstrate its use on an illustrative example.

  5. DNA complexed structure of the key transcription factor initiating development in sporulating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Msadek, Tarek; Zapf, James; Madhusudan; Hoch, James A; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2002-08-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus species, the ultimate bacterial adaptive response, requires the precisely coordinated expression of a complex genetic pathway, and is initiated through the accumulation of the phosphorylated form of Spo0A, a pleiotropic response regulator transcription factor. Spo0A controls the transcription of several hundred genes in all spore-forming Bacilli including genes for sporulation and toxin regulation in pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis. The crystal structure of the effector domain of Spo0A from Bacillus subtilis in complex with its DNA target was determined. In the crystal lattice, two molecules form a tandem dimer upon binding to adjacent sites on DNA. The protein:protein and protein:DNA interfaces revealed in the crystal provide a basis for interpreting the transcription activation process and for the design of drugs to counter infections by these bacteria.

  6. Key factors for providing appropriate medical care in secondary school athletics: athletic training services and budget.

    PubMed

    Wham, George S; Saunders, Ruth; Mensch, James

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that appropriate medical care for interscholastic athletes is frequently lacking. However, few investigators have examined factors related to care. To examine medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs and to identify factors associated with variations in provision of care. Cross-sectional study. Mailed and e-mailed survey. One hundred sixty-six South Carolina high schools. The 132-item Appropriate Medical Care Assessment Tool (AMCAT) was developed and pilot tested. It included 119 items assessing medical care based on the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Age Athletes (AMCSSAA) Consensus Statement and Monograph (test-retest reliability: r = 0.89). Also included were items assessing potential influences on medical care. Presence, source, and number of athletic trainers; school size; distance to nearest medical center; public or private status; sports medicine supply budget; and varsity football regional championships served as explanatory variables, whereas the school setting, region of state, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers served as control variables. The Appropriate Care Index (ACI) score from the AMCAT provided a quantitative measure of medical care and served as the response variable. The ACI score was determined based on a school's response to items relating to AMCSSAA guidelines. Regression analysis revealed associations with ACI score for athletic training services and sports medicine supply budget (both P < .001) when controlling for the setting, region, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers. These 2 variables accounted for 30% of the variance in ACI score (R(2) = 0.302). Post hoc analysis showed differences between ACI score based on the source of the athletic trainer and the size of the sports medicine supply budget. The AMCAT offers an evaluation of medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs. In South Carolina schools, athletic training services and the sports medicine

  7. PGC-1α in Melanoma: A Key Factor for Antioxidant Response and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Mas, Margalida; González-Hedström, Daniel; Abrisqueta, Marta; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi; Sastre-Serra, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and BRAF are common mutations in melanoma. Through different pathways, they each regulate the expression of PGC-1α, which is a key factor in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the antioxidant response. Our aim was to study the importance of the different regulatory characteristics of MC1R and BRAF on the pathways they regulate in melanoma. For this purpose, ROS production, levels of gene expression and enzymatic activities were analyzed in HBL and MeWo, with wild-type MC1R and BRAF, and A375 cells with mutant MC1R and BRAF. HBL cells showed a functional MC1R-PGC-1α pathway and exhibited the lowest ROS production, probably because of a better mitochondrial pool and the presence of UCP2. On the other hand, MeWo cells showed elevated levels of PGC-1α but also high ROS production, similar to the A375 cells, along with an activated antioxidant response and significantly low levels of UCP2. Finally, A375 cells are mutant for BRAF, and thus showed low levels of PGC-1α. Consequently, A375 cells exhibited poor mitochondrial biogenesis and function, and no antioxidant response. These results show the importance of the activation of the MC1R-PGC-1α pathway for mitochondrial biogenesis and function in melanoma development, as well as BRAF for the antioxidant response regulated by PGC-1α. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4404-4413, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the results of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.

  9. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; ...

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore » of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  10. Soil physical properties: Key factors for successful reclamation of disturbed landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The practice of open cast mining, e.g. for lignite, results in major landscape disturbances and especially affects soils because relocation and subsequent mixing of naturally developed soil horizons leads to areas with extremely altered soil properties compared to the undisturbed conditions. Various reclamation measures are applied to recover the reconstructed landscape for different land use options. Major parts of the post mining landscapes are used for agriculture, agroforestry or silviculture, the remaining voids of the coal mines fill successively with groundwater after mine closure and are or will be used mainly for touristic and leisure purposes. Small proportions of the post mining areas are left for natural succession, or habitats for endangered flora and fauna are initiated. In reclamation research, many studies have focused on soil chemical and biological constraints of post mining substrates and investigated factors such as unsuitable pH, in many cases very low pH, (poor) nutrient contents and (poor) biological activity. But the initial and developing soil physical parameters and functions are also key factors for the success of reclamation practices. The soil water and gas balance influence strongly the suitability of a site for the intended future land use. The mechanical stability of the soil determines the rigidity of the pore system against deforming forces and thereby the persistence of soil functions, such as water and air permeability over time. The amendment of unfavourable (initial) soil physical properties is in most cases more complex and time-consuming than e.g. optimization of pH or fertilization with nutrients. Moreover, regarding the suitability of a site e.g. as a habitat for plants or microorganisms, poor physical pre-conditions can turn substrates with perfect nutrient contents and composition and pH into infertile locations of very low productivity. We show results of an on-going field study where the effects of different

  11. Hydrology and human behavior: two key factors of diarrhea incidence in montane tropical humid areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boithias, Laurie; Choisy, Marc; Souliyaseng, Noy; Jourdren, Marine; Quet, Fabrice; Buisson, Yves; Thammahacksa, Chanthamousone; Silvera, Norbert; Latsachack, Keooudone; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Pierret, Alain; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Becerra, Sylvia; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The global burden of diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In montane areas of South-East Asia such as northern Laos, recent changes in land use have induced increased runoff, soil erosion and in-stream suspended sediment loads, and potential pathogen dissemination. In this study we hypothesized that climate factors combined with human behavior control diarrhea incidence, either because higher rainfall, leading to higher stream discharges, suspended sediment loads and Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) counts, are associated with higher numbers of reported diarrhea cases during the rainy season, or because water shortage leads to the use of less safe water sources during the dry season. For this mixed methods approach, we conducted a retrospective time series analysis of meteorological variables (rainfall, air temperature), hydrological variables (discharge, suspended sediments, FIB counts, water temperature) at the outlet of 2 catchments in Northern Lao PDR, and the number of diarrheal disease cases reported in 6 health centers located in the Luang Prabang Province. We also examined the socio-behavioral factors potentially affecting vulnerability to the effect of the climate factors, such as drinking water sources and hygiene habits. We found the FIB Escherichia coli to be present all year long (100-1,000 MPN 100 mL-1) indicating that fecal contamination is ubiquitous and constant. We found that populations switch their water supply from wells to surface water during drought periods, the latter of which appear to be at higher risk of bacterial contamination than municipal water fountains. We thus found that water shortage in the Luang Prabang area triggers diarrhea peaks during the dry and hot season and that rainfall and aquifer refill ends the epidemic during the wet season. We thus found that anthropogenic drivers, such as hygiene practices, were at least as important as environmental drivers in determining the seasonal pattern of a

  12. The key quality control technology of main cable erection in long-span suspension bridge construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongrui; Wei, Wei; Dai, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Main cable is one of the most important structure of suspension Bridges, which bear all the dead and live load from upper structure. Cable erection is one of the most critical process in suspension bridge construction. Key points about strand erection are studied in this paper, including strand traction, lateral movement, section adjustment, placing into saddle, anchoring, line shape adjustment and keeping, and tension control. The technology has helped a long-span suspension bridge in Yunnan Province, China get a ideal finished state.

  13. Type A dissection and chronic dilatation: tenascin-C as a key factor in destabilization of the aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Trescher, Karola; Thometich, Barbara; Demyanets, Svitlana; Kassal, Hermann; Sedivy, Roland; Bittner, Reginald; Holzinger, Christoph; Podesser, Bruno K

    2013-08-01

    Tenascin-C plays an important role in myocardial and vascular remodelling. We hypothesized that tenascin-C is a key factor in the development of degenerative disease of the ascending aorta, leading to chronic dilatation and acute aortic dissection. Ascending aortic wall specimens were obtained during surgery for chronic dilatation (n=52) and acute Type A dissection (n=30). Patients (n=12) undergoing aortic valve replacement served as controls. Tenascin-C expression was evaluated by immunostaining and semi-quantitatively assessed using the ImageJ software. TN-C levels in peripheral blood were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histological examination showed a clear difference between chronic dilatation and acute dissection. In chronic dilatation, tenascin-C staining was homogenously distributed throughout the media parallel to vascular smooth muscle cells. In acute dissection, a strong staining with a heterogenous and spotty distribution was detected. Control aortas showed no tenascin-C staining. Tenascin-C expression was significantly higher in Type-A dissection compared with chronic dilatation. This was accompanied by a significant elevation of tenascin-C levels in peripheral blood in acute dissection. There was no statistical correlation between the tenascin-C level in peripheral blood and the aortic diameter either in dissection or in dilatation. Tenascin-C is a marker of progressive destabilization of the aortic wall independent of size in chronic dilatation and acute dissection. Therefore, it might be a valuable tool in guiding intervention strategies in patients with disease of the ascending aorta.

  14. Power-Factor Controllers: How Safe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K.; Christian, W.; Kovacik, J.; Grazyk, T.

    1985-01-01

    Potential safety problems with power-factor controllers (PFC's) evaluated. Based on study of PFCs in use with appliances, report recommends measures to prevent consumers from misapplying these energy saving devices. Device used on such appliances as refrigerators, sewing machines, pumps, hair dryers, and food processors. When misused, they fail to save energy and may cause damage.

  15. Power Factor Controller Avoids False Turnoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    Single-phase power-factor controller includes special inhibiting circuit to avoid false turnoff. If thyristor trigger signal occurs during flow of current from preceding half cycle, inhibiting signal delays application of trigger pulse until beginning of next current half cycle.

  16. Factors controlling hole angle and direction

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.H.

    1986-11-01

    An understanding of the factors controlling hole angle and direction will contribute to hitting the drilling target more frequently. As the bottomhole assembly (BHA) behavior and the bit/formation interactions become better understood, less expensive and safer holes can be drilled.

  17. Human factors aspects of air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Older, H. J.; Cameron, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of human factors problems associated with the operation of present and future air traffic control systems is presented. A description is included of those activities and tasks performed by air traffic controllers at each operational position within the present system. Judgemental data obtained from controllers concerning psychological dimensions related to these tasks and activities are also presented. The analysis includes consideration of psychophysiological dimensions of human performance. The role of the human controller in present air traffic control systems and his predicted role in future systems is described, particularly as that role changes as the result of the system's evolution towards a more automated configuration. Special attention is directed towards problems of staffing, training, and system operation. A series of ten specific research and development projects are recommended and suggested work plans for their implementation are included.

  18. Distributed Factorization Computation on Multiple Volunteered Mobile Resource to Break RSA Key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, I.; Hardi, S. M.; Tarigan, J. T.; Zamzami, E. M.; Sihombing, P.

    2017-01-01

    Similar to common asymmeric encryption, RSA can be cracked by usmg a series mathematical calculation. The private key used to decrypt the massage can be computed using the public key. However, finding the private key may require a massive amount of calculation. In this paper, we propose a method to perform a distributed computing to calculate RSA’s private key. The proposed method uses multiple volunteered mobile devices to contribute during the calculation process. Our objective is to demonstrate how the use of volunteered computing on mobile devices may be a feasible option to reduce the time required to break a weak RSA encryption and observe the behavior and running time of the application on mobile devices.

  19. Semi-quantum communication: protocols for key agreement, controlled secure direct communication and dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban

    2017-12-01

    Semi-quantum protocols that allow some of the users to remain classical are proposed for a large class of problems associated with secure communication and secure multiparty computation. Specifically, first-time semi-quantum protocols are proposed for key agreement, controlled deterministic secure communication and dialogue, and it is shown that the semi-quantum protocols for controlled deterministic secure communication and dialogue can be reduced to semi-quantum protocols for e-commerce and private comparison (socialist millionaire problem), respectively. Complementing with the earlier proposed semi-quantum schemes for key distribution, secret sharing and deterministic secure communication, set of schemes proposed here and subsequent discussions have established that almost every secure communication and computation tasks that can be performed using fully quantum protocols can also be performed in semi-quantum manner. Some of the proposed schemes are completely orthogonal-state-based, and thus, fundamentally different from the existing semi-quantum schemes that are conjugate coding-based. Security, efficiency and applicability of the proposed schemes have been discussed with appropriate importance.

  20. Periods of child growth up to age 8 years in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam: key distal household and community factors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Whitney B; Crookston, Benjamin T; Lundeen, Elizabeth A; Stein, Aryeh D; Behrman, Jere R

    2013-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated some growth recovery among children stunted in infancy. Less is known about key age ranges for such growth recovery, and what factors are correlates with this growth. This study characterized child growth up to age 1 year, and from ages 1 to 5 and 5 to 8 years controlling for initial height-for-age z-score (HAZ), and identified key distal household and community factors associated with these growth measures using longitudinal data on 7266 children in the Young Lives (YL) study in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. HAZ at about age 1 year and age in months predicted much of the variation in HAZ at age 5 years, but 40-71% was not predicted. Similarly, HAZ at age 5 years and age in months did not predict 26-47% of variation in HAZ at 8 years. Multiple regression analysis suggests that parental schooling, consumption, and mothers' height are key correlates of HAZ at about age 1 and also are associated with unpredicted change in HAZ from ages 1 to 5 and 5 to 8 years, given initial HAZ. These results underline the importance of a child's starting point in infancy in determining his or her growth, point to key distal household and community factors that may determine early growth in early life and subsequent growth recovery and growth failure, and indicate that these factors vary some by country, urban/rural designation, and child sex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Periods of Child Growth up to age 8 Years in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam: Key Distal Household and Community Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Whitney B.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; Lundeen, Elizabeth A.; Stein, Aryeh D.; Behrman, Jere R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated some growth recovery among children stunted in infancy. Less is known about key age ranges for such growth recovery, and what factors are correlates with this growth. This study characterized child growth up to age 1 year, and from ages 1 to 5 and 5 to 8 years controlling for initial height-for-age z-score (HAZ), and identified key distal household and community factors associated with these growth measures using longitudinal data on 7,266 children in the Young Lives (YL) study in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. HAZ at about age 1 year and age in months predicted much of the variation in HAZ at age 5 years, but 40 to 71% was not predicted. Similarly, HAZ at age 5 years and age in months did not predict 26 to 47% of variation in HAZ at 8 years. Multiple regression analysis suggests that parental schooling, consumption, and mothers’ height are key correlates of HAZ at about age 1 and also are associated with unpredicted change in HAZ from ages 1 to 5 and 5 to 8 years, given initial HAZ. These results underline the importance of a child’s starting point in infancy in determining his or her growth, point to key distal household and community factors that may determine early growth in early life and subsequent growth recovery and growth failure, and indicate that these factors vary some by country, urban/rural designation, and child sex. PMID:23769211

  2. Advanced Key Technologies for Hot Control Surfaces in Space Re- Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogigli, Michael; Pradier, Alain; Tumino, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    (1)MAN Technologie AG, D- 86153 Augsburg, Germany (2,3) ESA, 2200 Noordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Current space re-entry vehicles (e.g. X-38 vehicle 201, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)) require advanced control surfaces (so called body flaps). Such control surfaces allow the design of smaller and lighter vehicles as well as faster re-entries (compared to the US Shuttle). They are designed as light-weight structures that need no metallic parts, need no mass or volume consuming heat sinks to protect critical components (e.g. bearings) and that can be operated at temperatures of more than 1600 "C in air transferring high mechanical loads (dynamic 40 kN, static 70 kN) at the same time. Because there is a need for CRV and also for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) in future, the European Space Agency (ESA) felt compelled to establish a "Future European Space Transportation and Investigation Program,, (FESTIP) and a "General Support for Technology Program,, (GSTP). One of the main goals of these programs was to develop and qualify key-technologies that are able to master the above mentioned challenging requirements for advanced hot control surfaces and that can be applied for different vehicles. In 1996 MAN Technologie has started the development of hot control surfaces for small lifting bodies in the national program "Heiü Strukturen,,. One of the main results of this program was that especially the following CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) key technologies need to be brought up to space flight standard: Complex CMC Structures, CMC Bearings, Metal-to-CMC Joining Technologies, CMC Fasteners, Oxidation Protection Systems and Static and Dynamic Seals. MAN Technologie was contracted by ESA to continue the development and qualification of these key technologies in the frame of the FESTIP and the GSTP program. Development and qualification have successfully been carried out. The key technologies have been applied for the X-38 vehicle

  3. Screening for key genes and transcription factors in ankylosing spondylitis by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongyang; Wang, Xiuyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2018-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis and autoimmune disease, the etiology and pathogenesis of which remain largely unknown. In the present study, blood samples were harvested from patients with AS and from healthy volunteers as a normal control (NC) for RNA-sequencing. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the AS group compared with the NC group were identified, and gene ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were subsequently performed. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and AS-specific transcriptional regulatory network construction was performed for the DEGs. A total of 503 DEGs, including 338 upregulated and 165 downregulated DEGs, were identified in patients with AS compared with the NC group. Three upregulated DEGs identified, interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT)1, IFIT3 and radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing (RSAD)2, are interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes that serve a role in the IFN signaling pathway. The most significantly enriched GO term was response to other organisms. Osteoclast differentiation was a significantly enriched pathway for eight DEGs [High affinity immunoglobulin gamma Fc receptor (FCGR)1A, FCGR2B, four and a half LIM domains 2, integrin β3, signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), leukocyte immunoglobulin like receptor (LILR)A4 and LILRA6]. The six hub genes in the PPI network constructed were interferon-stimulated gene 15, heat shock protein β1, microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3A, IFIT1, IFIT3 and SOCS3. POU domain class 2 transcription factor 1 (1-Oct) and ecotropic virus integration site-1 (Evi-1) were identified as two important transcription factors (TFs) in AS according to the AS-specific transcriptional regulatory network constructed. In addition, IFIT1 and IFIT3 were identified as targets of 1-Oct. The results of the

  4. Aerial and tidal transport of mosquito control pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

    PubMed

    Pierce, R H; Henry, M S; Blum, T C; Mueller, E M

    2005-05-01

    This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The study monitored the distribution and persistence of two mosquito adulticides, permethrin and dibrom (naled), during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport. The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads, set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS. Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications, ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 microg/m(2) throughout the study. Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site. Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product) was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS. These compounds were detected in subsurface, offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 microg/1, 14 hr after application. Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 microg/l were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route. Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50, 96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia = 0.02 microg/l) indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas.

  5. On the Security of a Two-Factor Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for Telecare Medicine Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hamed; Teymoori, Vahid; Nikooghadam, Morteza; Abbassi, Hassan

    2015-08-01

    Telecare medicine information systems (TMISs) aim to deliver appropriate healthcare services in an efficient and secure manner to patients. A secure mechanism for authentication and key agreement is required to provide proper security in these systems. Recently, Bin Muhaya demonstrated some security weaknesses of Zhu's authentication and key agreement scheme and proposed a security enhanced authentication and key agreement scheme for TMISs. However, we show that Bin Muhaya's scheme is vulnerable to off-line password guessing attacks and does not provide perfect forward secrecy. Furthermore, in order to overcome the mentioned weaknesses, we propose a new two-factor anonymous authentication and key agreement scheme using the elliptic curve cryptosystem. Security and performance analyses demonstrate that the proposed scheme not only overcomes the weaknesses of Bin Muhaya's scheme, but also is about 2.73 times faster than Bin Muhaya's scheme.

  6. The physical and mental health of lesbian, gay male, and bisexual (LGB) older adults: the role of key health indicators and risk and protective factors.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I; Emlet, Charles A; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Muraco, Anna; Erosheva, Elena A; Goldsen, Jayn; Hoy-Ellis, Charles P

    2013-08-01

    Based on resilience theory, this paper investigates the influence of key health indicators and risk and protective factors on health outcomes (including general health, disability, and depression) among lesbian, gay male, and bisexual (LGB) older adults. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with LGB older adults, aged 50 and older (N = 2,439). Logistic regressions were conducted to examine the contributions of key health indicators (access to health care and health behaviors), risk factors (lifetime victimization, internalized stigma, and sexual identity concealment), and protective factors (social support and social network size) to health outcomes, when controlling for background characteristics. The findings revealed that lifetime victimization, financial barriers to health care, obesity, and limited physical activity independently and significantly accounted for poor general health, disability, and depression among LGB older adults. Internalized stigma was also a significant predictor of disability and depression. Social support and social network size served as protective factors, decreasing the odds of poor general health, disability, and depression. Some distinct differences by gender and sexual orientation were also observed. High levels of poor general health, disability, and depression among LGB older adults are of major concern. These findings highlight the important role of key risk and protective factors, which significantly influences health outcomes among LGB older adults. Tailored interventions must be developed to address the distinct health issues facing this historically disadvantaged population.

  7. Factor Analysis of Key Success Indicators in Curriculum Quality Assurance Operation for Bachelor's Degree in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukdee, Thitipong; Tornee, Songpol; Kraipetch, Chanita

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors of key success indicators in curriculum quality assurance operation for bachelor's degree in Physical Education. The 576 subjects were selected using cluster sampling from curriculum lecturers, staffs, and lecturers at the Academy of Physical Education Curriculum. The instrument was a related…

  8. A Comprehensive Test of General Strain Theory: Key Strains, Situational- and Trait-Based Negative Emotions, Conditioning Factors, and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry; McCluskey, Cynthia Perez; Hwang, Hye-Won

    2009-01-01

    Using longitudinal data on South Korean youth, the authors addressed limitations of previous tests of general strain theory (GST), focusing on the relationships among key strains, situational- and trait-based negative emotions, conditioning factors, and delinquency. Eight types of strain previously shown most likely to result in delinquency,…

  9. Problem-Based Learning Environment in Basic Computer Course: Pre-Service Teachers' Achievement and Key Factors for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendioglu, Akin

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study aims to determine pre-service teachers' achievements and key factors that affect the learning process with regard to problem-based learning (PBL) and lecture-based computer course (LBCC) conditions. The research results showed that the pre-service teachers in the PBL group had significantly higher achievement scores than…

  10. Polyacrylamide grafted cellulose as an eco-friendly flocculant: Key factors optimization of flocculation to surfactant effluent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hangcheng; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Xiaogang; Shao, Lan; Zhang, Xiumei; Yao, Juming

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of effluents from surfactant manufacturers is giving rise to increasingly serious environmental problems. In order to develop the eco-friendly flocculation materials to achieve effective removal of pollutants from the surfactant effluents, the bamboo pulp cellulose from Phyllostachys heterocycla is employed as the skeleton material to synthesize an eco-friendly bamboo pulp cellulose-g-polyacrylamide (BPC-g-PAM) for flocculation. The BPC-g-PAM is used with the metal ions as the coagulant to treat the effluent from a surfactant manufacturer. The response surface methodology coupled with Box-behnken design is employed to optimize the key factors of coagulation-flocculation. The results show that the combination of Fe(3+) with BPC-g-PAM achieves the best coagulation-flocculation performance like, the fast treatment time, minimum coagulant and BPC-g-PAM dosages compared with the other two combinations of Al(3+) with BPC-g-PAM and Ca(2+) with BPC-g-PAM. Therefore, the combination of Fe(3+) with BPC-g-PAM is expected to promote its application for the pollution control in the surfactant manufacturers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dominant factors in controlling marine gas pools in South China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, S.; Watney, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    In marine strata from Sinian to Middle Triassic in South China, there develop four sets of regional and six sets of local source rocks, and ten sets of reservoir rocks. The occurrence of four main formation periods in association with five main reconstruction periods, results in a secondary origin for the most marine gas pools in South China. To improve the understanding of marine gas pools in South China with severely deformed geological background, the dominant control factors are discussed in this paper. The fluid sources, including the gas cracked from crude oil, the gas dissolved in water, the gas of inorganic origin, hydrocarbons generated during the second phase, and the mixed pool fluid source, were the most significant control factors of the types and the development stage of pools. The period of the pool formation and the reconstruction controlled the pool evolution and the distribution on a regional scale. Owing to the multiple periods of the pool formation and the reconstruction, the distribution of marine gas pools was complex both in space and in time, and the gas in the pools is heterogeneous. Pool elements, such as preservation conditions, traps and migration paths, and reservoir rocks and facies, also served as important control factors to marine gas pools in South China. Especially, the preservation conditions played a key role in maintaining marine oil and gas accumulations on a regional or local scale. According to several dominant control factors of a pool, the pool-controlling model can be constructed. As an example, the pool-controlling model of Sinian gas pool in Weiyuan gas field in Sichuan basin was summed up. ?? Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag 2007.

  12. Career Development Factors for Minority Disability and Health Research Leaders: A Key Informant Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyibe, Edward O.; Moore, Corey L.; Wang, Ningning; Davis, Dytisha; Aref, Fariborz; Washington, Andre L.; Johnson, Jean; Eugene-Cross, Kenyotta; Muhammad, Atashia; Lewis, Allen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined and documented minority disability and health research leaders' experiences and perspectives on career development challenges and success strategies. Methods: A sample of 15 African American, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Latino, and Asian research leaders as key informants participated in the inquiry. Research…

  13. Key Factors to Instructors' Satisfaction of Learning Management Systems in Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Busaidi, Kamla Ali; Al-Shihi, Hafedh

    2012-01-01

    Learning Management System (LMS) enables institutions to administer their educational resources, and support their traditional classroom education and distance education. LMS survives through instructors' continuous use, which may be to a great extent associated with their satisfaction of the LMS. Consequently, this study examined the key factors…

  14. A comparison study on detection of key geochemical variables and factors through three different types of factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseinzade, Zohre; Mokhtari, Ahmad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Large numbers of variables have been measured to explain different phenomena. Factor analysis has widely been used in order to reduce the dimension of datasets. Additionally, the technique has been employed to highlight underlying factors hidden in a complex system. As geochemical studies benefit from multivariate assays, application of this method is widespread in geochemistry. However, the conventional protocols in implementing factor analysis have some drawbacks in spite of their advantages. In the present study, a geochemical dataset including 804 soil samples collected from a mining area in central Iran in order to search for MVT type Pb-Zn deposits was considered to outline geochemical analysis through various fractal methods. Routine factor analysis, sequential factor analysis, and staged factor analysis were applied to the dataset after opening the data with (additive logratio) alr-transformation to extract mineralization factor in the dataset. A comparison between these methods indicated that sequential factor analysis has more clearly revealed MVT paragenesis elements in surface samples with nearly 50% variation in F1. In addition, staged factor analysis has given acceptable results while it is easy to practice. It could detect mineralization related elements while larger factor loadings are given to these elements resulting in better pronunciation of mineralization.

  15. Plant NF-Y transcription factors: Key players in plant-microbe interactions, root development and adaptation to stress.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, María Eugenia; Rípodas, Carolina; Niebel, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    NF-Ys are heterotrimeric transcription factors composed by the NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC subunits. In plants, NF-Y subunits are encoded by multigene families whose members show structural and functional diversifications. An increasing number of NF-Y genes has been shown to play key roles during different stages of root nodule and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, as well as during the interaction of plants with pathogenic microorganisms. Individual members of the NF-YA and NF-YB families have also been implicated in the development of primary and lateral roots. In addition, different members of the NF-YA and NF-YB gene families from mono- and di-cotyledonous plants have been involved in plant responses to water and nutrient scarcity. This review presents the most relevant and striking results concerning these NF-Y subunits. A phylogenetic analysis of the functionally characterized NF-Y genes revealed that, across plant species, NF-Y proteins functioning in the same biological process tend to belong to common phylogenetic groups. Finally, we discuss the forthcoming challenges of plant NF-Y research, including the detailed dissection of expression patterns, the elucidation of functional specificities as well as the characterization of the potential NF-Y-mediated epigenetic mechanisms by which they control the expression of their target genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Factor Y in Development and Disease, edited by Prof. Roberto Mantovani. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Key factors influencing ADME properties of therapeutic proteins: A need for ADME characterization in drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitts, Jay; Canter, David; Graff, Ryan; Smith, Alison; Khawli, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Protein therapeutics represent a diverse array of biologics including antibodies, fusion proteins, and therapeutic replacement enzymes. Since their inception, they have revolutionized the treatment of a wide range of diseases including respiratory, vascular, autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as cancer. While in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and efficacy studies are routinely carried out for protein therapeutics, studies that identify key factors governing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties have not been fully investigated. Thorough characterization and in-depth study of their ADME properties are critical in order to support drug discovery and development processes for the production of safer and more effective biotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss the main factors affecting the ADME characteristics of these large macromolecular therapies. We also give an overview of the current tools, technologies, and approaches available to investigate key factors that influence the ADME of recombinant biotherapeutic drugs, and demonstrate how ADME studies will facilitate their future development. PMID:26636901

  17. Mitochondrial Impairment as a Key Factor for the Lack of Attachment after Cold Storage of Hepatocyte Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Pless-Petig, Gesine; Walter, Björn; Bienholz, Anja

    2018-01-01

    with subsequent energy deficiency is a key factor for the lack of attachment of cold-stored hepatocyte suspensions. PMID:29390882

  18. Exercise-induced neuroprotective effects on neurodegenerative diseases: the key role of trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Nardi, António E; Machado, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, are becoming a major issue to public health care. Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment to address cognitive impairment in these patients. Here, we aim to explore the role of exercise-induced trophic factor enhancement in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. There is a significant amount of evidence from animal and human studies that links neurodegenerative related cognitive deficits with changes on brain and peripheral trophic factor levels. Several trials with elderly individuals and patients with neurodegenerative diseases report exercise induced cognitive improvements and changes on trophic factor levels including BDNF, IGF-I, among others. Further studies with healthy aging and clinical populations are needed to understand how diverse exercise interventions produce different variations in trophic factor signaling. Genetic profiles and potential confounders regarding trophic factors should also be addressed in future trials.

  19. Transition of basaltic lava from pahoehoe to aa, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Field observations and key factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Donald W.; Tilling, Robert I.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly all Hawaiian basaltic lava erupts as pahoehoe, and some changes to aa during flowage and cooling; factors governing the transition involve certain critical relations between viscosity and rate of shear strain. If the lava slows, cools, and stops in direct response to concomitant increase in viscosity before these critical relations are reached, it remains pahoehoe. But, if flow mechanics (flow rate, flow dimensions, slope, momentum, etc.) impel the lava to continue to move and deform even after it has become highly viscous, the critical relations may be reached and the lava changes to aa.Typical modes of transition from pahoehoe to aa include: (1) spontaneous formation of relatively stiff clots in parts of the flowing lava where shear rate is highest; these clots grow into discrete, rough, sticky masses to which the remaining fluid lava incrementally adheres; (2) fragmentation and immersion of solid or semi-solid surface crusts of pahoehoe by roiling movements of the flow, forming cores of discrete, tacky masses; (3) sudden renewed movement of lava stored and cooled within surface reservoirs to form clots. The masses, fragments, and clots in these transition modes are characterized by spinose, granulated surfaces; as flow movement continues, the masses and fragments aggregate, fracture, and grind together, completing the transition to aa.Observations show that the critical relation between viscosity and rate of shear strain is inverse: if viscosity is low, a high rate of shear is required to begin the transition to aa; conversely, if viscosity is high, a much lower rate of shear will induce the transition. These relations can be demonstrated qualitatively with simple graphs, which can be used to examine the flow history of any selected finite lava element by tracing the path represented by its changing viscosity and shear rate. A broad, diffuse “transition threshold zone” in these graphs portrays the inverse critical relation between viscosity and shear

  20. Perceived key injury risk factors in World Cup alpine ski racing—an explorative qualitative study with expert stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Amesberger, Günter; Blake, Ollie M; Müller, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about key injury risk factors in alpine ski racing, particularly for World Cup (WC) athletes. Objective This study was undertaken to compile and explore perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. Methods Qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with 61 expert stakeholders of the WC ski racing community. Experts’ statements were collected, paraphrased and loaded into a database with inductively derived risk factor categories (Risk Factor Analysis). At the end of the interviews, experts were asked to name those risk factors they believed to have a high potential impact on injury risk and to rank them according to their priority of impact (Risk Factor Rating). Results In total, 32 perceived risk factors categories were derived from the interviews within the basic categories Athlete, Course, Equipment and Snow. Regarding their perceived impact on injury risk, the experts’ top five categories were: system ski, binding, plate and boot; changing snow conditions; physical aspects of the athletes; speed and course setting aspects and speed in general. Conclusions Severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing can have various causes. This study compiled a list of perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors and explored those factors with the highest believed impact on injury risk. Hence, by using more detailed hypotheses derived from this explorative study, further studies should verify the plausibility of these factors as true risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. PMID:22872684

  1. Perceived key injury risk factors in World Cup alpine ski racing--an explorative qualitative study with expert stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Amesberger, Günter; Blake, Ollie M; Müller, Erich

    2012-12-01

    There is limited knowledge about key injury risk factors in alpine ski racing, particularly for World Cup (WC) athletes. This study was undertaken to compile and explore perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing. Qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with 61 expert stakeholders of the WC ski racing community. Experts' statements were collected, paraphrased and loaded into a database with inductively derived risk factor categories (Risk Factor Analysis). At the end of the interviews, experts were asked to name those risk factors they believed to have a high potential impact on injury risk and to rank them according to their priority of impact (Risk Factor Rating). In total, 32 perceived risk factors categories were derived from the interviews within the basic categories Athlete, Course, Equipment and Snow. Regarding their perceived impact on injury risk, the experts' top five categories were: system ski, binding, plate and boot; changing snow conditions; physical aspects of the athletes; speed and course setting aspects and speed in general. Severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing can have various causes. This study compiled a list of perceived intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors and explored those factors with the highest believed impact on injury risk. Hence, by using more detailed hypotheses derived from this explorative study, further studies should verify the plausibility of these factors as true risk factors for severe injuries in WC alpine ski racing.

  2. Exploring Measures to Control Road Traffic Injuries in Iran: Key Informants Points of View

    PubMed Central

    SALARI, Hedayat; MOTEVALIAN, Seyed Abbas; ARAB, Mohammad; ESFANDIARI, Atefeh; AKBARI SARI, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Injuries and fatalities from road traffic Injuries are global public health concerns, and a major problem in the Iran. This study aimed to explore strategies to control road traffic Injuries (RTI) in Iran. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study to explore possible ways to reduce the occurrence of road traffic Injuries in Iran in 2016. Interviewees were purposively sampled from various sectors due to multidisciplinary nature of RTIs. Participants were mainly representatives from the police, Ministry of Road, Municipal, emergency services and Ministry of Health. Besides, public health authorities, researchers, and university professors were interviewed. We conducted in-depth interviews using generic guides. Data was analyzed using MAXQDA 10 software. Through content analysis, we interpreted core themes relevant to the accomplishment of our study objectives. Results: Themes that emerged from our study include; road traffic management, governance, education, improving accident database, enforcement, driving license restrictions, and construction of pedestrian overpass. Conclusion: This study revealed key informants’ views regarding available and affordable solutions to reduce RTIs in Iran. Many applicable strategies are identified in the control of RTIs in Iran. Although some solutions such as highway construction and/or expanding rail transportation have been suggested as effective measures for reducing accident, but they are costly and may not be fully applied in developing countries like Iran. PMID:28560198

  3. Exploring Measures to Control Road Traffic Injuries in Iran: Key Informants Points of View.

    PubMed

    Salari, Hedayat; Motevalian, Seyed Abbas; Arab, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Atefeh; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Injuries and fatalities from road traffic Injuries are global public health concerns, and a major problem in the Iran. This study aimed to explore strategies to control road traffic Injuries (RTI) in Iran. We conducted a qualitative study to explore possible ways to reduce the occurrence of road traffic Injuries in Iran in 2016. Interviewees were purposively sampled from various sectors due to multidisciplinary nature of RTIs. Participants were mainly representatives from the police, Ministry of Road, Municipal, emergency services and Ministry of Health. Besides, public health authorities, researchers, and university professors were interviewed. We conducted in-depth interviews using generic guides. Data was analyzed using MAXQDA 10 software. Through content analysis, we interpreted core themes relevant to the accomplishment of our study objectives. Themes that emerged from our study include; road traffic management, governance, education, improving accident database, enforcement, driving license restrictions, and construction of pedestrian overpass. This study revealed key informants' views regarding available and affordable solutions to reduce RTIs in Iran. Many applicable strategies are identified in the control of RTIs in Iran. Although some solutions such as highway construction and/or expanding rail transportation have been suggested as effective measures for reducing accident, but they are costly and may not be fully applied in developing countries like Iran.

  4. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  5. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. PMID:25873679

  6. Social Cognition and Executive Functions As Key Factors for Effective Pedagogy in Higher Education.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rut; Navarrete, Gorka

    2017-01-01

    Higher education (HE) faces the challenge of responding to an increasing diversity. In this context, more attention is being paid to teachers and teaching skills positively related to students learning. Beyond the knowledges identified as key components of an effective teacher, teachers also need to be capable of unraveling what their students think and believe, and how they accommodate the new information. More importantly, teachers need to be able to adapt their own teaching to their audience's needs. In learners, social cognition (SC) has been related to a better receptivity to the different teacher-student interactions. Since these interactions are bidirectional, SC could also help to explain teachers' receptiveness to the information available in feedback situations. However, little is known about how SC is related to teacher development, and therefore teaching effectiveness, in HE. In addition, executive functions (EFs), closely related to SC, could play a key role in the ability to self-regulate their own teaching to better answering their students emerging needs. Although there is wide evidence regarding the association of EFs to performance in high demanding settings, as far as we know, there are no studies exploring the relationship between teachers' EFs and teaching effectiveness in HE. Establishing a positive association between teaching effectiveness and these socio-cognitive functions could be a promising first step in designing professional development programs that promote HE academics' ability to understand and care about students thoughts and emotions, to eventually adapt their teaching to their students needs for a better learning.

  7. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school’s tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students’ belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change. PMID:26372554

  8. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school's tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students' belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change.

  9. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  10. Is Personality a Key Predictor of Missing Study Data? An Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jerant, Anthony; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Duberstein, Paul; Franks, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known regarding the effects of psychological factors on data collection in research studies. We examined whether Five Factor Model (FFM) personality factors—Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness—predicted missing data in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). METHODS Individuals (N = 415) aged 40 years and older with various chronic conditions, plus basic activity impairment, depressive symptoms, or both, were recruited from a primary care network and enrolled in a 6-week RCT of an illness self-management intervention, delivered by means of home visits or telephone calls or usual care. Random effects logistic regression modeling was used to examine whether FFM factors predicted missing illness management self-efficacy data at any scheduled follow-up (2, 4, and 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months), controlling for disease burden, study arm, and sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS Across all follow-up points, the missing data rate was 4.5%. Higher levels of Openness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for 1-SD increase = 0.24; 95% CI, 0.12–0.46; P <.001), Agreeableness (AOR = 0.29; CI 0.14–0.60; P=.001), and Conscientiousness (AOR = 0.24; CI 0.15–0.50; P <.001) were independently associated with fewer missing data. Accuracy of the missing data prediction model increased when personality variables were added (change in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.71 to 0.77; χ21=6.6; P=.01). CONCLUSIONS Personality was a powerful predictor of missing study data in this RCT. Assessing personality could inform efforts to enhance data completion and adjust analyses for bias caused by missing data. PMID:19273870

  11. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli. PMID:24396271

  12. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  13. Key recovery factors for the August 24, 2014, South Napa Earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Brocher, Thomas M.; Prentice, Carol S.; Boatwright, John; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Aagaard, Brad T.; Blair, James Luke; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Erdem, Jemile; Wicks, Chuck; Murray, Jessica R.; Pollitz, Fred F.; Langbein, John O.; Svarc, Jerry L.; Schwartz, David P.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Hecker, Suzanne; DeLong, Stephen B.; Rosa, Carla M.; Jones, Brenda; Lamb, Rynn M.; Rosinski, Anne M.; McCrink, Timothy P.; Dawson, Timothy E.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Glennie, Craig; Hauser, Darren; Ericksen, Todd; Mardock, Dan; Hoirup, Don F.; Bray, Jonathan D.; Rubin, Ron S.

    2014-01-01

    Through discussions between the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) following the South Napa earthquake, it was determined that several key decision points would be faced by FEMA for which additional information should be sought and provided by USGS and its partners. This report addresses the four tasks that were agreed to. These tasks are (1) assessment of ongoing fault movement (called afterslip) especially in the Browns Valley residential neighborhood, (2) assessment of the shaking pattern in the downtown area of the City of Napa, (3) improvement of information on the fault hazards posed by the West Napa Fault System (record of past earthquakes and slip rate, for example), and (4) imagery acquisition and data processing to provide overall geospatial information support to FEMA.

  14. Students' Understanding of Large Numbers as a Key Factor in Their Understanding of Geologic Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of geologic time is comprised of 2 facets. Events in Earth's history can be placed in relative and absolute temporal succession on a vast timescale. Rates of geologic processes vary widely, and some occur over time periods well outside human experience. Several factors likely contribute to an understanding of geologic time, one of…

  15. Key Factors in Smoking Cessation Intervention among 15-16-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Broms, Ulla; Pitkaniemi, Janne; Koskenvuo, Markku; Meurman, Jukka

    2009-01-01

    The authors aimed to investigate factors associated with smoking cessation among adolescents after tobacco intervention. They examined smokers (n = 127) from one birth cohort (n = 545) in the city of Kotka in Finland. These smokers were randomized in 3 intervention groups the dentist (n = 44) and the school nurse (n = 42 groups), and a control…

  16. The Key Factors Affecting Students' Individual Interest in School Science Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Derek

    2018-01-01

    Individual interest in school science lessons can be defined as a relatively stable and enduring personal emotion comprising affective and behavioural reactions to events in the regular science lessons at school. Little research has compared the importance of different factors affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons. The…

  17. Social Cognition and Executive Functions As Key Factors for Effective Pedagogy in Higher Education

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Rut; Navarrete, Gorka

    2017-01-01

    Higher education (HE) faces the challenge of responding to an increasing diversity. In this context, more attention is being paid to teachers and teaching skills positively related to students learning. Beyond the knowledges identified as key components of an effective teacher, teachers also need to be capable of unraveling what their students think and believe, and how they accommodate the new information. More importantly, teachers need to be able to adapt their own teaching to their audience’s needs. In learners, social cognition (SC) has been related to a better receptivity to the different teacher-student interactions. Since these interactions are bidirectional, SC could also help to explain teachers’ receptiveness to the information available in feedback situations. However, little is known about how SC is related to teacher development, and therefore teaching effectiveness, in HE. In addition, executive functions (EFs), closely related to SC, could play a key role in the ability to self-regulate their own teaching to better answering their students emerging needs. Although there is wide evidence regarding the association of EFs to performance in high demanding settings, as far as we know, there are no studies exploring the relationship between teachers’ EFs and teaching effectiveness in HE. Establishing a positive association between teaching effectiveness and these socio-cognitive functions could be a promising first step in designing professional development programs that promote HE academics’ ability to understand and care about students thoughts and emotions, to eventually adapt their teaching to their students needs for a better learning. PMID:29209251

  18. Remotely controlled fusion of selected vesicles and living cells: a key issue review.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Azra; Moreno-Pescador, Guillermo; Oddershede, Lene B; Bendix, Poul M

    2018-03-01

    Remote control over fusion of single cells and vesicles has a great potential in biological and chemical research allowing both transfer of genetic material between cells and transfer of molecular content between vesicles. Membrane fusion is a critical process in biology that facilitates molecular transport and mixing of cellular cytoplasms with potential formation of hybrid cells. Cells precisely regulate internal membrane fusions with the aid of specialized fusion complexes that physically provide the energy necessary for mediating fusion. Physical factors like membrane curvature, tension and temperature, affect biological membrane fusion by lowering the associated energy barrier. This has inspired the development of physical approaches to harness the fusion process at a single cell level by using remotely controlled electromagnetic fields to trigger membrane fusion. Here, we critically review various approaches, based on lasers or electric pulses, to control fusion between individual cells or between individual lipid vesicles and discuss their potential and limitations for present and future applications within biochemistry, biology and soft matter.

  19. Remotely controlled fusion of selected vesicles and living cells: a key issue review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Azra; Moreno-Pescador, Guillermo; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2018-03-01

    Remote control over fusion of single cells and vesicles has a great potential in biological and chemical research allowing both transfer of genetic material between cells and transfer of molecular content between vesicles. Membrane fusion is a critical process in biology that facilitates molecular transport and mixing of cellular cytoplasms with potential formation of hybrid cells. Cells precisely regulate internal membrane fusions with the aid of specialized fusion complexes that physically provide the energy necessary for mediating fusion. Physical factors like membrane curvature, tension and temperature, affect biological membrane fusion by lowering the associated energy barrier. This has inspired the development of physical approaches to harness the fusion process at a single cell level by using remotely controlled electromagnetic fields to trigger membrane fusion. Here, we critically review various approaches, based on lasers or electric pulses, to control fusion between individual cells or between individual lipid vesicles and discuss their potential and limitations for present and future applications within biochemistry, biology and soft matter.

  20. Evidence for key enzymatic controls on metabolism of Arctic river organic matter.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul J; Sobczak, William V; Larue, Madeleine M; Bulygina, Ekaterina; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E; Schade, John; Davydov, Sergei; Zimov, Nikita; Holmes, Robert M; Spencer, Robert G M

    2014-04-01

    Permafrost thaw in the Arctic driven by climate change is mobilizing ancient terrigenous organic carbon (OC) into fluvial networks. Understanding the controls on metabolism of this OC is imperative for assessing its role with respect to climate feedbacks. In this study, we examined the effect of inorganic nutrient supply and dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition on aquatic extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) in waters draining the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), including permafrost-derived OC. Reducing the phenolic content of the DOM pool resulted in dramatic increases in hydrolase EEAs (e.g., phosphatase activity increased >28-fold) supporting the idea that high concentrations of polyphenolic compounds in DOM (e.g., plant structural tissues) inhibit enzyme synthesis or activity, limiting OC degradation. EEAs were significantly more responsive to inorganic nutrient additions only after phenolic inhibition was experimentally removed. In controlled mixtures of modern OC and thawed permafrost endmember OC sources, respiration rates per unit dissolved OC were 1.3-1.6 times higher in waters containing ancient carbon, suggesting that permafrost-derived OC was more available for microbial mineralization. In addition, waters containing ancient permafrost-derived OC supported elevated phosphatase and glucosidase activities. Based on these combined results, we propose that both composition and nutrient availability regulate DOM metabolism in Arctic aquatic ecosystems. Our empirical findings are incorporated into a mechanistic conceptual model highlighting two key enzymatic processes in the mineralization of riverine OM: (i) the role of phenol oxidase activity in reducing inhibitory phenolic compounds and (ii) the role of phosphatase in mobilizing organic P. Permafrost-derived DOM degradation was less constrained by this initial 'phenolic-OM' inhibition; thus, informing reports of high biological availability of ancient, permafrost-derived DOM with clear ramifications

  1. Increasing operational command and control security by the implementation of device independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, Fabio Antonio; Messina, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    In a very simplistic way, the Command and Control functions can be summarized as the need to provide the decision makers with an exhaustive, real-time, situation picture and the capability to convey their decisions down to the operational forces. This two-ways data and information flow is vital to the execution of current operations and goes far beyond the border of military operations stretching to Police and disaster recovery as well. The availability of off-the shelf technology has enabled hostile elements to endanger the security of the communication networks by violating the traditional security protocols and devices and hacking sensitive databases. In this paper an innovative approach based to implementing Device Independent Quantum Key Distribution system is presented. The use of this technology would prevent security breaches due to a stolen crypto device placed in an end-to-end communication chain. The system, operating with attenuated laser, is practical and provides the increasing of the distance between the legitimate users.

  2. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A; van der Linden, Giel T J; Schaminée, Joop H J; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-12-09

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species.

  3. Museum specimens reveal loss of pollen host plants as key factor driving wild bee decline in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Jeroen; Reemer, Menno; van Kats, Ruud; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Linden, Giel T. J.; Schaminée, Joop H. J.; Siepel, Henk; Kleijn, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for declining populations of both wild and managed bees has raised concern about a potential global pollination crisis. Strategies to mitigate bee loss generally aim to enhance floral resources. However, we do not really know whether loss of preferred floral resources is the key driver of bee decline because accurate assessment of host plant preferences is difficult, particularly for species that have become rare. Here we examine whether population trends of wild bees in The Netherlands can be explained by trends in host plants, and how this relates to other factors such as climate change. We determined host plant preference of bee species using pollen loads on specimens in entomological collections that were collected before the onset of their decline, and used atlas data to quantify population trends of bee species and their host plants. We show that decline of preferred host plant species was one of two main factors associated with bee decline. Bee body size, the other main factor, was negatively related to population trend, which, because larger bee species have larger pollen requirements than smaller species, may also point toward food limitation as a key factor driving wild bee loss. Diet breadth and other potential factors such as length of flight period or climate change sensitivity were not important in explaining twentieth century bee population trends. These results highlight the species-specific nature of wild bee decline and indicate that mitigation strategies will only be effective if they target the specific host plants of declining species. PMID:25422416

  4. Vitamin D Receptor Deficiency and Low Vitamin D Diet Stimulate Aortic Calcification and Osteogenic Key Factor Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nadine; Brandsch, Corinna; Kühne, Hagen; Thiele, Alexandra; Hirche, Frank; Stangl, Gabriele I.

    2012-01-01

    Low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) are associated with cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency could be a causal factor in atherosclerotic vascular changes and vascular calcification. Aortic root sections of vitamin D receptor knockout (VDR−/−) mice that were stained for vascular calcification and immunostained for osteoblastic differentiation factors showed more calcified areas and a higher expression of the osteogenic key factors Msx2, Bmp2, and Runx2 than the wild-type mice (P<0.01). Data from LDL receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice that were fed western diet with either low (50 IU/kg), recommended (1,000 IU/kg), or high (10,000 IU/kg) amounts of vitamin D3 over 16 weeks revealed increasing plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D (P<0.001) with increasing intake of vitamin D, whereas levels of calcium and phosphorus in plasma and femur were not influenced by the dietary treatment. Mice treated with the low vitamin D diet had more calcified lesions and a higher expression of Msx2, Bmp2, and Runx2 in aortic roots than mice fed recommended or high amounts of vitamin D (P<0.001). Taken together, these findings indicate vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for aortic valve and aortic vessel calcification and a stimulator of osteogenic key factor expression in these vascular areas. PMID:22536373

  5. Key factors contributing to accident severity rate in construction industry in Iran: a regression modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Ghiasvand, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Construction industry involves the highest risk of occupational accidents and bodily injuries, which range from mild to very severe. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with accident severity rate (ASR) in the largest Iranian construction companies based on data about 500 occupational accidents recorded from 2009 to 2013. We also gathered data on safety and health risk management and training systems. Data were analysed using Pearson's chi-squared coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Median ASR (and the interquartile range) was 107.50 (57.24- 381.25). Fourteen of the 24 studied factors stood out as most affecting construction accident severity (p<0.05). These findings can be applied in the design and implementation of a comprehensive safety and health risk management system to reduce ASR.

  6. Control of canine rabies in developing countries: key features and animal welfare implications.

    PubMed

    Aréchiga Ceballos, N; Karunaratna, D; Aguilar Setién, A

    2014-04-01

    Over 90% of human deaths from rabies worldwide are caused by dog bites. Mass vaccination, along with the effective control of dog populations, has been used successfully in industrialised countries to control this disease. A lower success rate in developing countries is due to a number of factors, including vaccination campaigns that do not cover a sufficient number of animals or reach all communities, and a wide biodiversity that increases the number of reservoirs of the rabies virus. Educational programmes are needed, which focus on the commitment involved when acquiring a domestic animal, stating clearly what is required to provide it with a good quality of life. New technologies developed in the industrialised world will not always be successful in less developed countries. Approaches must be adapted to the particular conditions in each country, taking cultural and socio-economic issues into account. Authorities must promote research on dog population dynamics, the development of non-invasive methods to control dog populations and the most efficient, stable and low-cost options for vaccination. Under the One Health model, it is hoped that dog-transmitted human rabies will be accorded high priority as a zoonosis by human health authorities, international authorities and donor agencies to support ambitious eradication goals, particularly those being set in South-East Asia. Well-designed and adequately resourced vaccination programmes, based on the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) guidelines, will have significant animal welfare benefits, due to the availability of improved vaccines (in terms of efficacy, duration of immunity, ease of administration and lower cost), advances in dog population management and the more widespread implementation of the OIE Guidelines on Stray Dog Control. Animal welfare benefits include not only the elimination of pain and suffering caused by the clinical disease itself, but also the avoidance of the indirect impact of

  7. Key factors influencing the incidence of hemolysis: A critical appraisal of current evidence.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Euan James; Vecellio, Elia; Lake, Rebecca; Li, Ling; Burnett, Leslie; Chesher, Douglas; Braye, Stephen; Mackay, Mark; Gay, Stephanie; Badrick, Tony; Westbrook, Johanna; Georgiou, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Hemolysis is a leading cause of pre-analytical laboratory errors. The identification of contributing factors is an important step towards the development of effective practices to reduce and prevent hemolysis. We performed a review of PUBMED, Embase, Medline and CINAHL to identify articles published between January 2000 and August 2016 that identified factors influencing in vitro hemolysis rates. The 40 studies included in this review provide excellent evidence that hemolysis rates are higher in Emergency Departments (EDs), for non-antecubital draws, for specimens drawn using an intravenous catheter compared to venipuncture and for samples transported by pneumatic tube compared to by hand. There is also good evidence that hemolysis rates are higher when specimens are not collected by professional phlebotomists, larger volume specimen tubes are used, specimen tubes are filled less than halfway and tourniquet time is greater than one minute. The results of this review suggest that hospitals and clinical laboratories should consider deploying phlebotomists in EDs, drawing all blood through a venipuncture, using the antecubital region as the optimum blood collection site and transporting specimens by laboratory assistant/other personnel, or if this in not practical, ensuring that pneumatic transport systems are validated, maintained and monitored. Studies also recommend making hemolysis a hospital-wide issue and ensuring high-quality staff training and adherence to standard operating procedures to reduce hemolysis rates. Awareness of the factors that influence hemolysis rates, and adoption of strategies to mitigate these risk factors, is an important step towards creating quality practices to reduce hemolysis rates and improve the quality of patient care.

  8. Academic mobility as a key factor of quality assurance in tertiary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Academic mobility of both faculty and students forms a critical element of the international dimension of higher education and is one of the most important factors of quality assurance of higher education institutions worldwide. Internationalization and globalization of Russian higher education system is having one of the major impacts on the quality management and assurance. Faculty and student mobility figures are now one of the core factors for obtaining state accreditation for Russian universities as well as an important indicator showing the university success and prestige. The aim of the paper is a closer look at the perspectives and results of the academic mobility, the factors stimulating and discouraging mobility, and the outcomes of the mobility influencing the education in Russian universities. Siberian State Aerospace University has had more than 10 years experience in organizing student mobility. Most of the problems in carrying out international activities are common for the whole Russia but still there are some peculiarities featuring technical universities situated in the centre of Russia.

  9. Key factors for a successful implementation of personalized e-health services.

    PubMed

    Griebel, Lena; Sedlmayr, Brita; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Criegee-Rieck, Manfred; Sedlmayr, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Personalized e-health services hold many promises, e.g. the improvement of health care quality or the reduction of costs. However, such services can't tap their full potential if they will not be used. That's why it is essential to understand what brings potential users to accept them. In the literature many acceptance models exist that predict the usage of innovations, but none of them specifically refers to the adoption of e-health services. Therefore we combined the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and the e-health literacy concept and enhanced the resulting model with additional factors. MEDLINE® was searched; 75 studies were included for final analysis. Apart from the UTAUT variables and e-health literacy, 10 additional factors were identified: anxiety, trust, attitude toward using, computer self-efficacy, perceived system quality, search strategy, user's condition, health specific knowledge, Internet dependency and satisfaction with medical care. Future research will include the devolvement of an instrument for assessing these factors and testing the initial research model in an international context.

  10. Comparative “-omics” in Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clinical Isolates Reveals Key Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lluch-Senar, Maria; Cozzuto, Luca; Cano, Jaime; Delgado, Javier; Llórens-Rico, Verónica; Pereyre, Sabine; Bebear, Cécile; Serrano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The human respiratory tract pathogen M. pneumoniae is one of the best characterized minimal bacterium. Until now, two main groups of clinical isolates of this bacterium have been described (types 1 and 2), differing in the sequence of the P1 adhesin gene. Here, we have sequenced the genomes of 23 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. Studying SNPs, non-synonymous mutations, indels and genome rearrangements of these 23 strains and 4 previously sequenced ones, has revealed new subclasses in the two main groups, some of them being associated with the country of isolation. Integrative analysis of in vitro gene essentiality and mutation rates enabled the identification of several putative virulence factors and antigenic proteins; revealing recombination machinery, glycerol metabolism and peroxide production as possible factors in the genetics and physiology of these pathogenic strains. Additionally, the transcriptomes and proteomes of two representative strains, one from each of the two main groups, have been characterized to evaluate the impact of mutations on RNA and proteins levels. This study has revealed that type 2 strains show higher expression levels of CARDS toxin, a protein recently shown to be one of the major factors of inflammation. Thus, we propose that type 2 strains could be more toxigenic than type 1 strains of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26335586

  11. Personal Learning Environments in the Workplace: An Exploratory Study into the Key Business Decision Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Arunangsu; Law, Effie Lai-Chong; Mikroyannidis, Alexander; Owen, Glyn; Velasco, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) have emerged as a solution to the need of learners for open and easily customisable learning environments. PLEs essentially hand complete control over the learning process to the learner. However, this learning model is not fully compatible with learning in the workplace, which is influenced by certain…

  12. Key factors in imprecision in radiological emergency response assessments using the NAME model.

    PubMed

    Haywood, S M; Bedwell, P; Hort, M C

    2010-03-01

    In the very early stages of response to an accidental release of radioactivity leading to environmental contamination, it is likely that only limited measurements of radioactivity in the local environment will be available on which to base decisions concerning protection measures and radiation monitoring activities. Model predictions will be used to aid understanding of the radiological situation and to form a basis for emergency health protection decisions. This paper presents an analysis of the relative importance of contributors to the imprecision associated with emergency response calculations based on a few off-site measurements, using predictions from the UK Met Office's NAME III (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment version 5.2) dispersion model. The results presented extend those from a previous study in which a simple Gaussian plume model was used and confirm the key parameters contributing to imprecision. The potential extent of the sheltering countermeasure resulting from a hypothetical release in real weather conditions occurring in 2007 and 2008 is also presented.

  13. Oxidative stress--a key emerging impact factor in health, ageing, lifestyle and aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kandola, K; Bowman, A; Birch-Machin, M A

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress is the resultant damage that arises due to redox imbalances, more specifically an increase in destructive free radicals and reduction in protection from antioxidants and the antioxidant defence pathways. Oxidation of lipids by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage cellular structures and result in premature cell death. At low levels, ROS-induced oxidative stress can be prevented through the action of antioxidants, however, when ROS are present in excess, inflammation and cytotoxicity eventually results leading to cellular oxidative stress damage. Increasing evidence for the role of oxidative stress in various diseases including neurological, dermatological, and cardiovascular diseases is now emerging. Mitochondria are the principal source (90%) of ROS in the cell, with superoxide radicals being generated when molecular oxygen is combined with free electrons. Given the key role of mitochondria in the generation of cellular oxidative stress it is worth considering this organelle and the process in more detail and to provide methods of intervention. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Applying a Health Promoting Schools approach to nutrition interventions in schools: key factors for success.

    PubMed

    Rana, Leanne; Alvaro, Rita

    2010-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of using a Health Promoting Schools (HPS) framework to deliver a nutrition intervention in schools. 'CREATE healthy eating in schools' used a HPS framework to assist key school health stakeholders to increase healthier food and drink choices across 68 schools in South Australia. Data were collected on a range of measures including workshop feedback, resource evaluation, canteen menu assessments and case studies. Twenty-nine workshops were provided across 10 metropolitan and rural locations. Overall, 254 participants from 60 schools attended workshops, with an average of three people from each school. An average of 90% of all respondents found workshops useful/very useful, with most participants reporting they had increased knowledge and skills of healthy eating, healthy eating guidelines and menu planning at the end of workshops. At the completion of the program, many participants reported increasing healthy food choices across the school. Menu assessments of a small selection of participating school menus (n=10) supported these findings, with the majority of menus (n=9) showing increases in healthy food choices from 2005 to 2006. Implementation of the 'CREATE healthy eating in schools' program resulted in self-reported improvements in healthy eating activities and increases in healthy food choices in a number of schools.

  15. Crystallographic orientation and electrode nature are key factors for electric current generation by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Beatriz; Ortiz, Juan M; Schrott, Germán; Busalmen, Juan P; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the influence of electrode material and crystallographic structure on electron transfer and biofilm formation of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Single-crystal gold-Au(110), Au(111), Au(210)-and platinum-Pt(100), Pt(110), Pt(111), Pt(210)-electrodes were tested and compared to graphite rods. G. sulfurreducens electrochemically interacts with all these materials with different attachment kinetics and final current production, although redox species involved in the electron transfer to the anode are virtually the same in all cases. Initial bacterial colonization was fastest on graphite up to the monolayer level, whereas gold electrodes led to higher final current densities. Crystal geometry was shown to have an important influence, with Au(210) sustaining a current density of up to 1442±101μAcm(-2) at the steady state, over Au(111) with 961±94μAcm(-2) and Au(110) with 944±89μAcm(-2). On the other hand, the platinum electrodes displayed the lowest performances, including Pt(210). Our results indicate that both crystal geometry and electrode material are key parameters for the efficient interaction of bacteria with the substrate and should be considered for the design of novel materials and microbial devices to optimize energy production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Onar, Omer C; DeVault, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems

  17. The growth factor myostatin, a key regulator in skeletal muscle growth and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, A; Diel, P

    2005-03-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses the ability to both respond and adapt to changing environmental stimuli, leading to a set of metabolic and morphological adaptations, which allow it to better meet the energy demands of sustained physical activity. Great progress has been achieved over the past years by means of innovative molecular techniques, which has led to the discovery of new growth factors and the identification of molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of muscle development. These findings provide new starting points to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training. One of these new identified growth factors is myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family of proteins that has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth during embryogenesis. Blocking of the myostatin signalling transduction pathway by specific inhibitors and genetic manipulations has been shown to result in a dramatic increase of skeletal muscle mass. This review focuses on the importance of myostatin in mediating skeletal muscle homeostasis in response to training as well as during the progress of myogenic disease, like atrophy or dystrophy. Manipulations of myostatin signalling may be useful for agriculture applications, treatment of muscle diseases, inhibition of muscle atrophy and last but not least as life style drugs in antiaging therapies or manipulations of the muscle to fat ratio. Drugs with the ability to modulate myostatin signalling may have the potential to enhance physical performance in athletes and therefore they probably represent a new class of doping substances.

  18. Investigation of key factors in preparation of alpha sources by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Krmpotić, Matea; Rožmarić, Martina; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2018-02-09

    The electrodeposition for alpha source preparation, using several electrolyte solution-cathode material combinations, is investigated and evaluated. The investigated factors focused on the electrodeposition time, the applied current, electrolyte volume and anode-cathode distances for the conventional electrodeposition cell (with no external stirring or cooling system). The conditions (temperature and the solution pH) during the electrodeposition process were also studied and discussed. The optimized parameters for each system are provided, and evaluated for the usage in determination of actinides (uranium, plutonium, americium and curium radioisotopes) in various samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The key roles of complement and tissue factor in Escherichia coli-induced coagulation in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Landsem, A; Fure, H; Christiansen, D; Nielsen, E W; Østerud, B; Mollnes, T E; Brekke, O L

    2015-10-01

    The complement system and the Toll-like (TLR) co-receptor CD14 play important roles in innate immunity and sepsis. Tissue factor (TF) is a key initiating component in intravascular coagulation in sepsis, and long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) enhances the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription of TF. The aim of this study was to study the mechanism by which complement and CD14 affects LPS- and Escherichia coli (E. coli)-induced coagulation in human blood. Fresh whole blood was anti-coagulated with lepirudin, and incubated with ultra-purified LPS (100 ng/ml) or with E. coli (1 × 10(7) /ml). Inhibitors and controls included the C3 blocking peptide compstatin, an anti-CD14 F(ab')2 antibody and a control F(ab')2 . TF mRNA was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and monocyte TF surface expression by flow cytometry. TF functional activity in plasma microparticles was measured using an amidolytic assay. Prothrombin fragment F 1+2 (PTF1.2) and PTX3 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effect of TF was examined using an anti-TF blocking antibody. E. coli increased plasma PTF1.2 and PTX3 levels markedly. This increase was reduced by 84->99% with compstatin, 55-97% with anti-CD14 and > 99% with combined inhibition (P < 0·05 for all). The combined inhibition was significantly (P < 0·05) more efficient than compstatin and anti-CD14 alone. The LPS- and E. coli-induced TF mRNA levels, monocyte TF surface expression and TF functional activity were reduced by > 99% (P < 0·05) with combined C3 and CD14 inhibition. LPS- and E. coli-induced PTF1.2 was reduced by 76-81% (P < 0·05) with anti-TF antibody. LPS and E. coli activated the coagulation system by a complement- and CD14-dependent up-regulation of TF, leading subsequently to prothrombin activation. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Adolescent girls and young women: key populations for HIV epidemic control

    PubMed Central

    Dellar, Rachael C; Dlamini, Sarah; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool

    2015-01-01

    Introduction At the epicentre of the HIV epidemic in southern Africa, adolescent girls and young women aged 15–24 contribute a disproportionate ~30% of all new infections and seroconvert 5–7 years earlier than their male peers. This age–sex disparity in HIV acquisition continues to sustain unprecedentedly high incidence rates, and preventing HIV infection in this age group is a pre-requisite for achieving an AIDS-free generation and attaining epidemic control. Discussion Adolescent girls and young women in southern Africa are uniquely vulnerable to HIV and have up to eight times more infection than their male peers. While the cause of this vulnerability has not been fully elucidated, it is compounded by structural, social and biological factors. These factors include but are not limited to: engagement in age-disparate and/or transactional relationships, few years of schooling, experience of food insecurity, experience of gender-based violence, increased genital inflammation, and amplification of effects of transmission co-factors. Despite the large and immediate HIV prevention need of adolescent girls and young women, there is a dearth of evidence-based interventions to reduce their risk. The exclusion of adolescents in biomedical research is a huge barrier. School and community-based education programmes are commonplace in many settings, yet few have been evaluated and none have demonstrated efficacy in preventing HIV infection. Promising data are emerging on prophylactic use of anti-retrovirals and conditional cash transfers for HIV prevention in these populations. Conclusions There is an urgent need to meet the HIV prevention needs of adolescent girls and young women, particularly those who are unable to negotiate monogamy, condom use and/or male circumcision. Concerted efforts to expand the prevention options available to these young women in terms of the development of novel HIV-specific biomedical, structural and behavioural interventions are urgently

  1. Adolescent girls and young women: key populations for HIV epidemic control.

    PubMed

    Dellar, Rachael C; Dlamini, Sarah; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool

    2015-01-01

    At the epicentre of the HIV epidemic in southern Africa, adolescent girls and young women aged 15-24 contribute a disproportionate ~30% of all new infections and seroconvert 5-7 years earlier than their male peers. This age-sex disparity in HIV acquisition continues to sustain unprecedentedly high incidence rates, and preventing HIV infection in this age group is a pre-requisite for achieving an AIDS-free generation and attaining epidemic control. Adolescent girls and young women in southern Africa are uniquely vulnerable to HIV and have up to eight times more infection than their male peers. While the cause of this vulnerability has not been fully elucidated, it is compounded by structural, social and biological factors. These factors include but are not limited to: engagement in age-disparate and/or transactional relationships, few years of schooling, experience of food insecurity, experience of gender-based violence, increased genital inflammation, and amplification of effects of transmission co-factors. Despite the large and immediate HIV prevention need of adolescent girls and young women, there is a dearth of evidence-based interventions to reduce their risk. The exclusion of adolescents in biomedical research is a huge barrier. School and community-based education programmes are commonplace in many settings, yet few have been evaluated and none have demonstrated efficacy in preventing HIV infection. Promising data are emerging on prophylactic use of anti-retrovirals and conditional cash transfers for HIV prevention in these populations. There is an urgent need to meet the HIV prevention needs of adolescent girls and young women, particularly those who are unable to negotiate monogamy, condom use and/or male circumcision. Concerted efforts to expand the prevention options available to these young women in terms of the development of novel HIV-specific biomedical, structural and behavioural interventions are urgently needed for epidemic control. In the interim

  2. Identifying Key Factors in Homeowner's Adoption of Water Quality Best Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Joan M.; Pasko, Danielle K.; Eisenhauer, Brian W.

    2013-07-01

    The recognition of the significance of the residential environment in contributing to non-point source (NPS) pollution and the inherently dispersed nature of NPS pollution itself that presents significant challenges to effective regulation has led to the creation and dissemination of best management practices (BMPs) that can reduce the impacts of NPS pollution (Environmental Protection Agency US, Protecting water quality from urban runoff, http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/nps_urban-facts_final.pdf, 2003). However, very few studies have examined the factors that influence the adoption of BMPs by residential homeowners, despite the fact that residential environments have been identified as one of the most significant contributors to NPS pollution. Given this need, the purpose of this project was to explore how demographic and knowledge-based factors predict adoption of residential BMPs in an urbanizing watershed in Northern Illinois using statistical analyses of survey data collected as part of a watershed planning process. The findings indicate that broad knowledge of BMPs is the strongest predictor of use for a specific BMP. Knowledge of BMPs is strongly correlated with their use, which reinforces the need for educational programs, even among those assumed to be knowledgeable about BMPs.

  3. The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the Dominican Republic: Key Contributing Factors.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Patria; Malow, Robert; Ruffin, Beverly; Rothe, Eugenio M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews HIV/AIDS epidemiological data and recent research conducted in the Dominican Republic, with a focus on explaining the variability in estimated seroincidence and prevalence within the country. HIV seroprevalence estimates range from 1.0% (in the general population) to 11.0% among men who have sex with men (MSM). Some have indicated that the highest HIV seroprevalence occurs in Haitian enclaves called bateyes (US Agency for International Development [USAID], 2008), which are migrant worker shantytowns primarily serving the sugar industry in the Dominican Republic. Others report higher or comparable rates to the bateyes in areas related to the tourism and sex industries. As in other Caribbean and Latin American countries, reported HIV transmission in the Dominican Republic is predominantly due to unprotected heterosexual sex and the infection rate has been increasing disproportionally among women. The Dominican Republic represents two thirds of the Hispaniola island; the western one third is occupied by Haiti, the nation with the highest HIV prevalence in the western hemisphere. Although data is limited, it shows important differences in seroprevalence and incidence between these two countries, but commonalities such as poverty, gender inequalities, and stigma appear to be pivotal factors driving the epidemic. This article will discuss these and other factors that may contribute to the HIV epidemic in the Dominican Republic, as well as highlight the gaps in the literature and provide recommendations to guide further work in this area, particularly in the role of governance in sustainable HIV prevention.

  4. The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the Dominican Republic: Key Contributing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patria; Malow, Robert; Ruffin, Beverly; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews HIV/AIDS epidemiological data and recent research conducted in the Dominican Republic, with a focus on explaining the variability in estimated seroincidence and prevalence within the country. HIV seroprevalence estimates range from 1.0% (in the general population) to 11.0% among men who have sex with men (MSM). Some have indicated that the highest HIV seroprevalence occurs in Haitian enclaves called bateyes (US Agency for International Development [USAID], 2008), which are migrant worker shantytowns primarily serving the sugar industry in the Dominican Republic. Others report higher or comparable rates to the bateyes in areas related to the tourism and sex industries. As in other Caribbean and Latin American countries, reported HIV transmission in the Dominican Republic is predominantly due to unprotected heterosexual sex and the infection rate has been increasing disproportionally among women. The Dominican Republic represents two thirds of the Hispaniola island; the western one third is occupied by Haiti, the nation with the highest HIV prevalence in the western hemisphere. Although data is limited, it shows important differences in seroprevalence and incidence between these two countries, but commonalities such as poverty, gender inequalities, and stigma appear to be pivotal factors driving the epidemic. This article will discuss these and other factors that may contribute to the HIV epidemic in the Dominican Republic, as well as highlight the gaps in the literature and provide recommendations to guide further work in this area, particularly in the role of governance in sustainable HIV prevention. PMID:21368008

  5. Investigation of Key Factors for Accident Severity at Railroad Grade Crossings by Using a Logit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shou-Ren; Li, Chin-Shang; Lee, Chi-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Although several studies have used logit or probit models and their variants to fit data of accident severity on roadway segments, few have investigated accident severity at a railroad grade crossing (RGC). Compared to accident risk analysis in terms of accident frequency and severity of a highway system, investigation of the factors contributing to traffic accidents at an RGC may be more complicated because of additional highway–railway interactions. Because the proportional odds assumption was violated while fitting cumulative logit modeled by the proportional odds models with stepwise variable selection to ordinal accident severity data collected at 592 RGCs in Taiwan, as suggested by Strokes et al. (2000, p. 249) a generalized logit model with stepwise variable selection was used instead to identify explanatory variables (factors or covariates) that were significantly associated with the severity of collisions. Hence, the fitted model was used to predict the level of accident severity, given a set of values in the explanatory variables. Number of daily trains, highway separation, number of daily trucks, obstacle detection device, and approaching crossing markings significantly affected levels of accident severity at an RGC (p-value = 0.0009, 0.0008, 0.0112, 0.0017, and 0.0003, respectively). Finally, marginal effect analysis on the number of daily trains and law enforcement camera was conducted to evaluate the effect of the number of daily trains and presence of a law enforcement camera on the potential accident severity. PMID:20161414

  6. Social support a key factor for adherence to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R D; Dhande, D J; Sachdeva, K S; Sreenivas, A N; Kumar, A M V; Parmar, M

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a major public health problem globally. Treatment success rates in MDR-TB across the globe are not encouraging as completing MDR-TB treatment successfully is challenging due to high proportion of lost to follow up. Using qualitative methods and grounded theory approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with MDR-TB patients and treatment providers. The social cognitive framework was explored as a way to guide understanding of the factors affecting treatment adherence among MDR-TB patients. Multiple factors influenced patient's decision to adhere to MDR-TB treatment. Self-motivation, awareness about disease and treatment, counselling support, family support, nutritional support and social support were important drivers for successful treatment. Providers related that motivational counselling, nutritional support, family support and social support encouraged treatment adherence. To improve MDR-TB treatment adherence, a patient-centric approach should be considered at the programmatic level. There is a need to formulate strategy that includes motivational counselling, nutritional supplementation and social support mobilisation for treatment adherence. Participants suggested a Patient Support Group led treatment care model for better adherence and treatment success rates in MDR-TB treatment. Copyright © 2017 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying key factors in homeowner's adoption of water quality best management practices.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Joan M; Pasko, Danielle K; Eisenhauer, Brian W

    2013-07-01

    The recognition of the significance of the residential environment in contributing to non-point source (NPS) pollution and the inherently dispersed nature of NPS pollution itself that presents significant challenges to effective regulation has led to the creation and dissemination of best management practices (BMPs) that can reduce the impacts of NPS pollution (Environmental Protection Agency US, Protecting water quality from urban runoff, http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/nps_urban-facts_final.pdf , 2003). However, very few studies have examined the factors that influence the adoption of BMPs by residential homeowners, despite the fact that residential environments have been identified as one of the most significant contributors to NPS pollution. Given this need, the purpose of this project was to explore how demographic and knowledge-based factors predict adoption of residential BMPs in an urbanizing watershed in Northern Illinois using statistical analyses of survey data collected as part of a watershed planning process. The findings indicate that broad knowledge of BMPs is the strongest predictor of use for a specific BMP. Knowledge of BMPs is strongly correlated with their use, which reinforces the need for educational programs, even among those assumed to be knowledgeable about BMPs.

  8. Developing Talented Soccer Players: An Analysis of Socio-Spatial Factors as Possible Key Constraints.

    PubMed

    Serra-Olivares, Jaime; Pastor-Vicedo, Juan C; González-Víllora, Sixto; Teoldo da Costa, Israel

    2016-12-01

    Most studies on the identification and development of soccer talent have been one-dimensional in nature. Although some multi-dimensional analyses have been conducted, few research studies have assessed in any depth the socio-spatial factors influencing talent development. The aim of this particular study was to analyse variations in the international representation of clubs (n = 821) and countries (n = 59) in the development of players who took part in the 2014 FIFA Soccer World Cup. Clubs and countries were ranked and divided into quartiles according to the number of players developed between the ages of 15 and 21 (clubs and countries that developed players for at least three years between these ages) and the number of official league matches played by these players up to the age of 23. Significant variations were observed between clubs in terms of the number of developed players who took part in the World Cup and the number of official league matches played by these players up to the age of 23 (p < .05), and also between countries (p < .05). The findings reveal the need to carry out more in-depth studies into the type of training and competition engaged in by elite players in the period of development between the ages of 15 and 21. It may be the case that these factors are potentially decisive socio-spatial constraints in the development of soccer talent.

  9. Developing Talented Soccer Players: An Analysis of Socio-Spatial Factors as Possible Key Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Vicedo, Juan C.; González-Víllora, Sixto; Teoldo da Costa, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Most studies on the identification and development of soccer talent have been one-dimensional in nature. Although some multi-dimensional analyses have been conducted, few research studies have assessed in any depth the socio-spatial factors influencing talent development. The aim of this particular study was to analyse variations in the international representation of clubs (n = 821) and countries (n = 59) in the development of players who took part in the 2014 FIFA Soccer World Cup. Clubs and countries were ranked and divided into quartiles according to the number of players developed between the ages of 15 and 21 (clubs and countries that developed players for at least three years between these ages) and the number of official league matches played by these players up to the age of 23. Significant variations were observed between clubs in terms of the number of developed players who took part in the World Cup and the number of official league matches played by these players up to the age of 23 (p < .05), and also between countries (p < .05). The findings reveal the need to carry out more in-depth studies into the type of training and competition engaged in by elite players in the period of development between the ages of 15 and 21. It may be the case that these factors are potentially decisive socio-spatial constraints in the development of soccer talent. PMID:28031773

  10. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  11. Social learning as a key factor in sustainability transitions: The case of Okayama City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didham, Robert J.; Ofei-Manu, Paul; Nagareo, Masaaki

    2017-12-01

    The Okayama Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Project is an ongoing initiative in Okayama City, Japan, established in 2005 by the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) Okayama and the Okayama Municipal Government with the aim "to create a community where people learn, think and act together towards realising a sustainable society". With a diverse participant base of over 240 organisations - including community learning centres ( kominkans), schools, universities and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) - this initiative has administered numerous programmes. It has engaged a large and diverse group of citizens from Okayama City in exploring sustainability issues through collective discussion, envisioning and practice with the aim of living more sustainable lives. The decade-long experience of the Okayama ESD Project has gained international attention, and the "Okayama Model" is considered an inspiring example of community-based ESD due to the positive changes it has supported. In this article, the Okayama ESD Project is presented as a case study on effective social learning for sustainability. In particular, the practical efforts made are examined to provide insights into how various elements of a social learning process were strengthened and linked to create active learning cycles among community members. In addition, the conditions for creating an effective learning community are investigated, while the practical actions taken are examined in relation to creating an effective social learning process. Finally, this article presents the important role which social learning has played in Okayama City's transition to sustainability and identifies the key efforts made to address and link each of these elements of social learning into a dynamic cycle.

  12. Hiring and Retention: Key Factors in Increasing Gender Diversity in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M.; O'Connell, S.; Frey, C.

    2004-12-01

    Graduation and hiring data of geoscientists over the last ten years indicate that the largest leak in the academic pipeline for women geoscientists is at hiring into tenure-track positions. Anecdotal explanations for this leak generally cite a lack of females in the applicant pool, but women in tenure-track positions anecdotally cite a lack of family-friendly practices by academic departments. Both ideas are currently being tested via surveys of geoscience departments. Is there a way to attract more women to the field to increase the applicant pool? Results of focus groups of geoscientists indicate that both men and women are attracted into the field of geosciences by the same types of events: over one-third became a geoscientist by randomly walking into an undergraduate class and finding themselves captivated by the topic and/or a dynamic instructor. The subject matter itself attracts another one-fourth, and family members encourage another one-fifth of geoscientists to initially enter the field. Slightly more women cite the first attractor of undergraduate class, but the principal draw for our future workforce, male and female, is good instruction of freshman courses. Retention of women in academia is another key issue. The proportion that considers leaving after working towards one or more degrees is highly skewed by gender: one-half of female and only one-third of male geoscientists considered leaving the field at some time in their career. The reasons for considering leaving also differ by gender. Males cite financial issues, including an uncertain job market. Females cite two principal reasons for considering leaving: family issues and difficulties with a graduate advisor. Strategies currently exist for "family issues", including stop-the-clock (of tenure for family needs), assignment shift, on-campus daycare facilities, and unflinching administrative support for such practices. Graduate advising is a learnable skill, and more attention needs to be paid to

  13. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  14. Syntactic computation in the human brain: the degree of merger as a key factor.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinri; Fukui, Naoki; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2013-01-01

    Our goal of this study is to characterize the functions of language areas in most precise terms. Previous neuroimaging studies have reported that more complex sentences elicit larger activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. F3op/F3t), although the most critical factor still remains to be identified. We hypothesize that pseudowords with grammatical particles and morphosyntactic information alone impose a construction of syntactic structures, just like normal sentences, and that "the Degree of Merger" (DoM) in recursively merged sentences parametrically modulates neural activations. Using jabberwocky sentences with distinct constructions, we fitted various parametric models of syntactic, other linguistic, and nonlinguistic factors to activations measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We demonstrated that the models of DoM and "DoM+number of Search (searching syntactic features)" were the best to explain activations in the L. F3op/F3t and supramarginal gyrus (L. SMG), respectively. We further introduced letter strings, which had neither lexical associations nor grammatical particles, but retained both matching orders and symbol orders of sentences. By directly contrasting jabberwocky sentences with letter strings, localized activations in L. F3op/F3t and L. SMG were indeed independent of matching orders and symbol orders. Moreover, by using dynamic causal modeling, we found that the model with a inhibitory modulatory effect for the bottom-up connectivity from L. SMG to L. F3op/F3t was the best one. For this best model, the top-down connection from L. F3op/F3t to L. SMG was significantly positive. By using diffusion-tensor imaging, we confirmed that the left dorsal pathway of the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi consistently connected these regions. Lastly, we established that nonlinguistic order-related and error-related factors significantly activated the right (R.) lateral premotor cortex and R. F3op/F3t, respectively. These

  15. Syntactic Computation in the Human Brain: The Degree of Merger as a Key Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinri; Fukui, Naoki; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal of this study is to characterize the functions of language areas in most precise terms. Previous neuroimaging studies have reported that more complex sentences elicit larger activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. F3op/F3t), although the most critical factor still remains to be identified. We hypothesize that pseudowords with grammatical particles and morphosyntactic information alone impose a construction of syntactic structures, just like normal sentences, and that “the Degree of Merger” (DoM) in recursively merged sentences parametrically modulates neural activations. Using jabberwocky sentences with distinct constructions, we fitted various parametric models of syntactic, other linguistic, and nonlinguistic factors to activations measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We demonstrated that the models of DoM and “DoM+number of Search (searching syntactic features)” were the best to explain activations in the L. F3op/F3t and supramarginal gyrus (L. SMG), respectively. We further introduced letter strings, which had neither lexical associations nor grammatical particles, but retained both matching orders and symbol orders of sentences. By directly contrasting jabberwocky sentences with letter strings, localized activations in L. F3op/F3t and L. SMG were indeed independent of matching orders and symbol orders. Moreover, by using dynamic causal modeling, we found that the model with a inhibitory modulatory effect for the bottom-up connectivity from L. SMG to L. F3op/F3t was the best one. For this best model, the top-down connection from L. F3op/F3t to L. SMG was significantly positive. By using diffusion-tensor imaging, we confirmed that the left dorsal pathway of the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi consistently connected these regions. Lastly, we established that nonlinguistic order-related and error-related factors significantly activated the right (R.) lateral premotor cortex and R. F3op/F3t, respectively

  16. Olive (Olea europaea L.) tree nitrogen status is a key factor for olive oil quality.

    PubMed

    Erel, Ran; Kerem, Zohar; Ben-Gal, Alon; Dag, Arnon; Schwartz, Amnon; Zipori, Isaac; Basheer, Loai; Yermiyahu, Uri

    2013-11-27

    The influence of macronutrient status on olive oil properties was studied for three years. Data were analyzed by a multivariate model considering N, P, K, and fruiting year as explanatory factors. Oil quality parameters were primarily associated with N concentration in leaves and fruits which increased with N in irrigation solution. The effect of P on oil quality was mainly indirect since increased P availability increased N accumulation. The potassium level had negligible effects. The oil phenolic content decreased linearly as a function of increased leaf N, indicating protein-phenol competition in leaves. The overall saturation level of the fatty acids decreased with fruit N, resulting in increased polyunsaturated fatty acids. Free fatty acids increased with increased levels of fruit N. High fruit load tended to reduce fruit N and subsequently improve oil quality. The effect of N on oil properties depended solely on its concentration in leaves or fruits, regardless of the cause.

  17. Study on the Key Factor Parameters to Increase Productivity in Construction and Manufacturing Industries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazyed, K.; Alaswad, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    Proper management of human and non-human resources in construction and manufacturing projects can give-in considerable savings in time and cost. Construction and Manufacturing industry faces issues in connection with problems related with productivity and the problems are usually connected with performance of employees. The performance of employees is affected by many factors. In this paper a survey was made on respondents who are employed various projects of Saudi Arabia. The researcher developed a theoretical framework from the existing research which was used as a Model to collect and analyze the field data to test the hypothesis. In this research activity three predictors (commitment, job satisfaction and job performance) for determining the change in productivity. The results highlight that commitment and job performance (respectively) are the two predictors which are explaining 37% of variation in the productivity of the companies. The results also show that Job Satisfaction has no role in the prediction of productivity.

  18. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: An Update of Key Imaging Techniques, Prognostic Factors, Treatment, and Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Llombart, B; Kindem, S; Chust, M

    2017-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma, though rare, is one of the most aggressive tumors a dermatologist faces. More than a third of patients with this diagnosis die from the disease. Numerous researchers have attempted to identify clinical and pathologic predictors to guide prognosis, but their studies have produced inconsistent results. Because the incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma is low and it appears in patients of advanced age, prospective studies have not been done and no clear treatment algorithm has been developed. This review aims to provide an exhaustive, up-to-date account of Merkel cell carcinoma for the dermatologist. We describe prognostic factors and the imaging techniques that are most appropriate for evaluating disease spread. We also discuss current debates on treating Merkel cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Leadership, Knowledge Sharing, and Creativity: The Key Factors in Nurses' Innovative Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Park, Myonghwa

    2015-12-01

    This study identified the factors that affect the innovative behaviors of nurses at general hospitals based on their individual and organizational characteristics. The predictors of innovative nursing behaviors, such as self-leadership, individual knowledge sharing, creative self-efficacy, organizational knowledge sharing, and innovative organizational cultures, should be explored at individual and organizational level. This study administered a cross-sectional survey to 347 registered nurses working at 6 general hospitals (with >300 beds) in central South Korea. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire and analyzed using structural equation modeling. Self-leadership, creative self-efficacy, and individual knowledge sharing directly affected individual innovative behaviors. Organizational knowledge sharing indirectly affected individual innovative behaviors, and this effect was mediated by an innovative organizational culture. This study contributes to the knowledge base regarding the effective management of individuals and organizations through innovative behavior; furthermore, it provides future directions for nursing interventions.

  20. Identification of transcriptional factors and key genes in primary osteoporosis by DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wengui; Ji, Lixin; Zhao, Teng; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-05-09

    A number of genes have been identified to be related with primary osteoporosis while less is known about the comprehensive interactions between regulating genes and proteins. We aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and regulatory effects of transcription factors (TFs) involved in primary osteoporosis. The gene expression profile GSE35958 was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 5 primary osteoporosis and 4 normal bone tissues. The differentially expressed genes between primary osteoporosis and normal bone tissues were identified by the same package in R language. The TFs of these DEGs were predicted with the Essaghir A method. DAVID (The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) was applied to perform the GO (Gene Ontology) and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway enrichment analysis of DEGs. After analyzing regulatory effects, a regulatory network was built between TFs and the related DEGs. A total of 579 DEGs was screened, including 310 up-regulated genes and 269 down-regulated genes in primary osteoporosis samples. In GO terms, more up-regulated genes were enriched in transcription regulator activity, and secondly in transcription factor activity. A total 10 significant pathways were enriched in KEGG analysis, including colorectal cancer, Wnt signaling pathway, Focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, total 7 TFs were enriched, of which CTNNB1, SP1, and TP53 regulated most up-regulated DEGs. The discovery of the enriched TFs might contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of primary osteoporosis. Further research on genes and TFs related to the WNT signaling pathway and MAPK pathway is urgent for clinical diagnosis and directing treatment of primary osteoporosis.

  1. DNA glycosylase activity and cell proliferation are key factors in modulating homologous recombination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Roytman, Megan D; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Samson, Leona D; Engelward, Bevin P

    2014-11-01

    Cancer susceptibility varies between people, affected by genotoxic exposures, genetic makeup and physiological state. Yet, how these factors interact among each other to define cancer risk is largely unknown. Here, we uncover the interactive effects of genetical, environmental and physiological factors on genome rearrangements driven by homologous recombination (HR). Using FYDR mice to quantify HR-driven rearrangements in pancreas tissue, we show that DNA methylation damage (induced by methylnitrosourea) and cell proliferation (induced by thyroid hormone) each induce HR and together act synergistically to induce HR-driven rearrangements in vivo. These results imply that developmental or regenerative proliferation as well as mitogenic exposures may sensitize tissues to DNA damaging exposures. We exploited mice genetically deficient in alkyl-adenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) to analyse the relative contributions of unrepaired DNA base lesions versus intermediates formed during base excision repair (BER). Remarkably, results show that, in the pancreas, Aag is a major driver of spontaneous HR, indicating that BER intermediates (including abasic sites and single strand breaks) are more recombinogenic than the spontaneous base lesions removed by Aag. Given that mammals have about a dozen DNA glycosylases, these results point to BER as a major source of pressure on the HR pathway in vivo. Taken together, methylation damage, cell proliferation and Aag interact to define the risk of HR-driven sequence rearrangements in vivo. These data identify important sources of sequence changes in a cancer-relevant organ, and advance the effort to identify populations at high-risk for cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A Key Role for Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in C26 Cancer Cachexia.

    PubMed

    Seto, Danielle N; Kandarian, Susan C; Jackman, Robert W

    2015-08-07

    Cachexia is an exacerbating event in many types of cancer that is strongly associated with a poor prognosis. We have identified cytokine, signaling, and transcription factors that are required for cachexia in the mouse C26 colon carcinoma model of cancer. C2C12 myotubes treated with conditioned medium from C26 cancer cells induced atrophy and activated a STAT-dependent reporter gene but not reporter genes dependent on SMAD, FOXO, C/EBP, NF-κB, or AP-1. Of the gp130 family members IL-11, IL-6, oncostatin M (OSM), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), only OSM and LIF were sufficient to activate the STAT reporter in myotubes. LIF was elevated in C26 conditioned medium (CM), but IL-6, OSM, TNFα, and myostatin were not. A LIF-blocking antibody abolished C26 CM-induced STAT reporter activation, STAT3 phosphorylation, and myotube atrophy but blocking antibodies to IL-6 or OSM did not. JAK2 inhibitors also blocked C26 CM-induced STAT reporter activation, STAT3 phosphorylation, and atrophy in myotubes. LIF at levels found in the C26 CM was sufficient for STAT reporter activation and atrophy in myotubes. In vivo, an increase in serum LIF preceded the increase in IL-6 in mice with C26 tumors. Overexpression of a dominant negative Stat3Cβ-EGFP gene in myotubes and in mouse muscle blocked the atrophy caused by C26 CM or C26 tumors, respectively. Taken together, these data support an important role of LIF-JAK2-STAT3 in C26 cachexia and point to a therapeutic approach for at least some types of cancer cachexia. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Season and region of birth as risk factors for coeliac disease a key to the aetiology?

    PubMed Central

    Namatovu, Fredinah; Lindkvist, Marie; Olsson, Cecilia; Ivarsson, Anneli; Sandström, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) incidence has increased in recent decades, characterised by variations according to sex, age at diagnosis, year of birth, month of birth and region of birth. Genetic susceptibility and exposure to gluten are the necessary factors in CD aetiology, although several environmental factors are considered. Methods A nationwide prospective cohort longitudinal study was conducted consisting of 1 912 204 children aged 0–14.9 years born in Sweden from 1991 to 2009. A total of 6569 children were diagnosed with biopsy-verified CD from 47 paediatric departments. Using Cox regression, we examined the association between CD diagnosis and season of birth, region of birth and year of birth. Results Overall, CD risk was higher for children born during spring, summer and autumn as compared with children born during winter: adjusted HR for spring 1.08 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.16), summer 1.10 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.18) and autumn 1.10 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.18). Increased CD risk was highest if born in the south, followed by central Sweden when compared with children born in northern Sweden. Children diagnosed at <2 years had an increased CD risk if born in spring while those diagnosed at 2–14.9 years the risk was increased for summer and autumn births. The birth cohort of 1991–1996 had increased CD risk if born during spring, for the 1997–2002 birth cohort the risk increased for summer and autumn births, while for the birth cohort of 2003–2009 the risk was increased if born during autumn. Conclusions Season of birth and region of birth are independently and jointly associated with increased risk of developing CD during the first 15 years of life. Seasonal variation in infectious load is the likely explanation. PMID:27528621

  4. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  5. Security Analysis and Improvements of Two-Factor Mutual Authentication with Key Agreement in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiye; Lee, Donghoon; Jeon, Woongryul; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    User authentication and key management are two important security issues in WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks). In WSNs, for some applications, the user needs to obtain real-time data directly from sensors and several user authentication schemes have been recently proposed for this case. We found that a two-factor mutual authentication scheme with key agreement in WSNs is vulnerable to gateway node bypassing attacks and user impersonation attacks using secret data stored in sensor nodes or an attacker's own smart card. In this paper, we propose an improved scheme to overcome these security weaknesses by storing secret data in unique ciphertext form in each node. In addition, our proposed scheme should provide not only security, but also efficiency since sensors in a WSN operate with resource constraints such as limited power, computation, and storage space. Therefore, we also analyze the performance of the proposed scheme by comparing its computation and communication costs with those of other schemes. PMID:24721764

  6. Security analysis and improvements of two-factor mutual authentication with key agreement in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiye; Lee, Donghoon; Jeon, Woongryul; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2014-04-09

    User authentication and key management are two important security issues in WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks). In WSNs, for some applications, the user needs to obtain real-time data directly from sensors and several user authentication schemes have been recently proposed for this case. We found that a two-factor mutual authentication scheme with key agreement in WSNs is vulnerable to gateway node bypassing attacks and user impersonation attacks using secret data stored in sensor nodes or an attacker's own smart card. In this paper, we propose an improved scheme to overcome these security weaknesses by storing secret data in unique ciphertext form in each node. In addition, our proposed scheme should provide not only security, but also efficiency since sensors in a WSN operate with resource constraints such as limited power, computation, and storage space. Therefore, we also analyze the performance of the proposed scheme by comparing its computation and communication costs with those of other schemes.

  7. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparedness for physiotherapy in private practice: Novices identify key factors in an interpretive description study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Robyn; McElroy, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Physiotherapists in Australia deliver services to a diverse range of clients, across many settings, however little research exists examining graduate preparedness for practice, even in the populous field of private practice. To explore novice physiotherapist perspectives on preparedness for work in private practice. The qualitative approach of interpretive description was used to guide in-depth interviews with 8 novice physiotherapists from 3 universities working in 5 private practices in Melbourne. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically. Four main themes influencing graduate preparedness for work in private practice were identified: 1) non-curricular experiences (e.g. sports training) 2) elective curricular: practicum experiences; 3) curricular: attainment of skills specific to private practice; and 4) the private practice setting: supportive colleagues. This combination of non-curricular, curricular, and practice setting factors offered the necessary scaffolding for the graduates to report feeling prepared for work in private practice. Non-curricular activities, radiological instruction, clinical placements, building supportive colleague relations and professional development in private practice are recommended as potential means of building preparedness in novice therapists. Findings have implications for physiotherapy students, educators and private practice clinics looking to recruit new graduates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research on key factors in the digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ziang; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Shengjia

    2015-08-01

    Digital shearing speckle pattern interferometry (DSSPI) is a powerful tool in the measurement of strain, residual stress and the non-destructive testing (NDT). It is widely used in the fields of wood testing, tire inspection and aerospace, etc. The DSSPI system based on the Wollaston prism is attractive because of its compact arrangement, high immunity to disturbance, and, most of all, the ability to measure strain directly. It could show the strain distribution of the measured object by producing fringe patterns. In conventional DSSPI systems, phase-shifting devices are commonly adopted to extract phase information from the fringe patterns, which means dynamical measurement cannot be realized. In this paper, the principle of a novel DSSPI system based on the temporal analysis is presented. Phase information is extracted with the Fourier Transform method instead of the phase-shifting devices in this system. In this way, dynamical measurement is realized. The measuring accuracy is mostly determined by the quality of the fringe patterns (the fringe width and the contrast ratio). There are several factors that influence the quality of the fringe patterns. Here we mainly discuss the influence of the shearing distance and the polarization state. The preliminary experiments with different shearing distances and polarization states are conducted. The ideal shearing distance and polarization state are suggested.

  10. Key factors for civilian injuries and deaths from exploding landmines and ordnance.

    PubMed

    Surrency, Amber B; Graitcer, Philip L; Henderson, Alden K

    2007-06-01

    To identify risk factors for death or injury from landmines and ordnance in Kabul City, Afghanistan, so programs can target preventive actions. Active surveillance in hospitals and communities for injuries and deaths from landmine and ordnance explosions in Kabul City. Of the 571 people the authors identified during the 25-month period, 161 suffered a traumatic amputation and 94 were killed from a landmine or ordnance explosion. Of those asked, 19% of victims had received mine awareness education before the incident, and of those, the majority was injured while handling or playing with an explosive device. Most victims were young males with a few years of education. The occupation types most at risk were students and laborers, and unemployment was common among the victims. Collecting wood or paper and playing with or handling an explosive were the most frequent activities associated with injuries and deaths. From May 1996 to July 1998, explosions from landmines and ordnance claimed 571 victims and were an important preventable cause of injury and death among people in Kabul City. Prevention strategies should focus on high-risk groups and changing risky behaviors, such as tampering with explosive devices.

  11. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Markus; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Kammann, Ulrike; Hudjetz, Sebastian; Cofalla, Catrina; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Preuss, Thomas; Hollert, Henner

    2014-07-01

    As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24°C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Cornelia M.; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics. PMID:24300396

  13. Sonic hedgehog from both nerves and epithelium is a key trophic factor for taste bud maintenance.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Azofeifa, David; Losacco, Justin T; Salcedo, Ernesto; Golden, Erin J; Finger, Thomas E; Barlow, Linda A

    2017-09-01

    The integrity of taste buds is intimately dependent on an intact gustatory innervation, yet the molecular nature of this dependency is unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of new taste bud cells, but not progenitor proliferation, is interrupted in mice treated with a hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitor (HPI), and that gustatory nerves are a source of sonic hedgehog (Shh) for taste bud renewal. Additionally, epithelial taste precursor cells express Shh transiently, and provide a local supply of Hh ligand that supports taste cell renewal. Taste buds are minimally affected when Shh is lost from either tissue source. However, when both the epithelial and neural supply of Shh are removed, taste buds largely disappear. We conclude Shh supplied by taste nerves and local taste epithelium act in concert to support continued taste bud differentiation. However, although neurally derived Shh is in part responsible for the dependence of taste cell renewal on gustatory innervation, neurotrophic support of taste buds likely involves a complex set of factors. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. A Robust and Anonymous Two Factor Authentication and Key Agreement Protocol for Telecare Medicine Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hu; Tao, Junyi; Chen, Yanan

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays people can get many services including health-care services from distributed information systems remotely via public network. By considering that these systems are built on public network, they are vulnerable to many malicious attacks. Hence it is necessary to introduce an effective mechanism to protect both users and severs. Recently many two-factor authentication schemes have been proposed to achieve this goal. In 2016, Li et al. demonstrated that Lee et al.'s scheme was not satisfactory to be deployed in practice because of its security weaknesses and then proposed a security enhanced scheme to overcome these drawbacks. In this paper, we analyze Li et al.'s scheme is still not satisfactory to be applied in telecare medicine information systems (TMIS) because it fails to withstand off-line dictionary attack and known session-specific temporary information attack. Moreover, their scheme cannot provide card revocation services for lost smart card. In order to solve these security problems, we propose an improved scheme. Then we analyze our scheme by using BAN-logic model and compare the improved scheme with related schemes to prove that our scheme is advantageous to be applied in practice.

  15. Economic incentives to promote healthier food purchases: exploring acceptability and key factors for success.

    PubMed

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Eyles, Helen; Dixon, Robyn; Matoe, Leonie; Teevale, Tasileta; Meagher-Lundberg, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    Despite increasing interest, little is known about the beliefs and views of the public in relation to the use of economic incentives as a means to promote healthy eating. This study explores views of ethnically and socioeconomically diverse shoppers regarding acceptability of economic incentives to promote healthier food purchases, and factors likely to affect the success of such schemes. Six focus groups (n = 36 participants; 14 Māori, 12 Pacific, 10 non-ethnic specific low income), were held in Auckland, New Zealand, in October 2009. A general inductive approach was used to identify common themes. The single most important reported food purchasing influence was cost. Focus group participants viewed the concept of economic incentives to promote healthy eating positively, as long as such schemes provided worthwhile incentives, and were simple and convenient to use. The preferred option for delivery was a pre-loaded electronic swipe card. Fruit and vegetables were the food group most participants said they would like to see incentivized. There was marked variability in the incentive amount thought sufficient to promote participation in such a scheme. Our findings suggest economic incentives hold promise as a means to promote healthier household food purchases, and their effectiveness should be evaluated using robust, randomized trials.

  16. Key Factors Determining Indoor Air PM10 Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Primary Schools in Belgrade, Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Branislava; Rakic, Uros; Jovanovic, Verica; Dejanovic, Snezana; Djonovic, Nela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Indoor air quality (IAQ) is rated as a serious public health issue. Knowing children are accounted as more vulnerable to environmental health hazards, data are needed on air quality in schools. Methods A project was conducted from 2007 until 2009 (SEARCH, School Environment and Respiratory Health of Children), aiming to verify links between IAQ and children’s respiratory health. Study was conducted in ten primary schools on 735 children, in 44 classrooms. Children were randomly selected. Research tools and indicators used for children’s exposure to school environment were indoor and outdoor pollutants, two standardized questionnaires for school and classroom characteristics. In both classroom air and ambient air in front of them we measured, during a 5-day exposure period for continuous 24h measuring: carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, indoor air temperature, relative humidity, and PM10 during classes. Results PM10 concentrations were significantly most frequent in an interval of ≥80.1μg/m3, that is, in the interval above 50μg/m3. Mean PM10 value was 82.24±42.43 μg/m3, ranging from 32.00μg/m3 to of 197.00μg/m3. Conclusion The increase of outdoor PM10 concentration significantly affects the increase of indoor PM10. A statistically significant difference exists for average IAQ PM10 concentrations vs. indicators of indoor thermal comfort zone (p<0.0001); they are lower in the classrooms with indicators within the comfort zone. Moreover, dominant factors for the increase of PM10 are: high occupancy rate in the classroom (<2m2 of space per child), high relative humidity (>75%), and indoor temperature beyond 23°C, as well as bad ventilation habits (keeping windows shut most of the time). PMID:29062397

  17. Aging and Parkinson's Disease: Inflammaging, neuroinflammation and biological remodeling as key factors in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Santoro, Aurelia; Monti, Daniela; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Latteri, Saverio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Zappia, Mario; Giordano, James; Calabrese, Edward J; Franceschi, Claudio

    2018-02-01

    In order to better understand the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) it is important to consider possible contributory factors inherent to the aging process, as age-related changes in a number of physiological systems (perhaps incurred within particular environments) appear to influence the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, we posit that a principal mechanism underlying PD is inflammaging, i.e. the chronic inflammatory process characterized by an imbalance of pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms which has been recognized as operative in several age-related, and notably neurodegenerative diseases. Recent conceptualization suggests that inflammaging is part of the complex adaptive mechanisms ("re-modeling") that are ongoing through the lifespan, and which function to prevent or mitigate endogenous processes of tissue disruption and degenerative change(s). The absence of an adequate anti-inflammatory response can fuel inflammaging, which propagates on both local (i.e.- from cell to cell) and systemic levels (e.g.- via exosomes and other molecules present in the blood). In general, this scenario is compatible with the hypothesis that inflammaging represents a hormetic or hormetic-like effect, in which low levels of inflammatory stress may prompt induction of anti-inflammatory mediators and mechanisms, while sustained pro-inflammatory stress incurs higher and more durable levels of inflammatory substances, which, in turn prompt a local-to-systemic effect and more diverse inflammatory response(s). Given this perspective, new treatments of PD may be envisioned that strategically are aimed at exerting hormetic effects to sustain anti-inflammatory responses, inclusive perhaps, of modulating the inflammatory influence of the gut microbiota. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Key Factors Determining Indoor Air PM10Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Primary Schools in Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Matic, Branislava; Rakic, Uros; Jovanovic, Verica; Dejanovic, Snezana; Djonovic, Nela

    2017-10-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is rated as a serious public health issue. Knowing children are accounted as more vulnerable to environmental health hazards, data are needed on air quality in schools. A project was conducted from 2007 until 2009 (SEARCH, School Environment and Respiratory Health of Children), aiming to verify links between IAQ and children's respiratory health. Study was conducted in ten primary schools on 735 children, in 44 classrooms. Children were randomly selected. Research tools and indicators used for children's exposure to school environment were indoor and outdoor pollutants, two standardized questionnaires for school and classroom characteristics. In both classroom air and ambient air in front of them we measured, during a 5-day exposure period for continuous 24h measuring: carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, indoor air temperature, relative humidity, and PM 10 during classes. PM 10 concentrations were significantly most frequent in an interval of ≥80.1μg/m 3 , that is, in the interval above 50μg/m 3 . Mean PM 10 value was 82.24±42.43 μg/m 3 , ranging from 32.00μg/m 3 to of 197.00μg/m 3 . The increase of outdoor PM 10 concentration significantly affects the increase of indoor PM 10 . A statistically significant difference exists for average IAQ PM 10 concentrations vs. indicators of indoor thermal comfort zone (p<0.0001); they are lower in the classrooms with indicators within the comfort zone. Moreover, dominant factors for the increase of PM 10 are: high occupancy rate in the classroom (<2m 2 of space per child), high relative humidity (>75%), and indoor temperature beyond 23°C, as well as bad ventilation habits (keeping windows shut most of the time).

  19. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  20. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor: Key Players in Plant Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Abdul F. A.; Sajad, Muhammad; Nazaruddin, Nazaruddin; Fauzi, Izzat A.; Murad, Abdul M. A.; Zainal, Zamri; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2017-01-01

    Recent achievements in plant microRNA (miRNA), a large class of small and non-coding RNAs, are very exciting. A wide array of techniques involving forward genetic, molecular cloning, bioinformatic analysis, and the latest technology, deep sequencing have greatly advanced miRNA discovery. A tiny miRNA sequence has the ability to target single/multiple mRNA targets. Most of the miRNA targets are transcription factors (TFs) which have paramount importance in regulating the plant growth and development. Various families of TFs, which have regulated a range of regulatory networks, may assist plants to grow under normal and stress environmental conditions. This present review focuses on the regulatory relationships between miRNAs and different families of TFs like; NF-Y, MYB, AP2, TCP, WRKY, NAC, GRF, and SPL. For instance NF-Y play important role during drought tolerance and flower development, MYB are involved in signal transduction and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, AP2 regulate the floral development and nodule formation, TCP direct leaf development and growth hormones signaling. WRKY have known roles in multiple stress tolerances, NAC regulate lateral root formation, GRF are involved in root growth, flower, and seed development, and SPL regulate plant transition from juvenile to adult. We also studied the relation between miRNAs and TFs by consolidating the research findings from different plant species which will help plant scientists in understanding the mechanism of action and interaction between these regulators in the plant growth and development under normal and stress environmental conditions. PMID:28446918

  1. Understanding key factors affecting electronic medical record implementation: a sociotechnical approach.

    PubMed

    Cucciniello, Maria; Lapsley, Irvine; Nasi, Greta; Pagliari, Claudia

    2015-07-17

    Recent health care policies have supported the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) but examples of failed ICT projects in this sector have highlighted the need for a greater understanding of the processes used to implement such innovations in complex organizations. This study examined the interaction of sociological and technological factors in the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system by a major national hospital. It aimed to obtain insights for managers planning such projects in the future and to examine the usefulness of Actor Network Theory (ANT) as a research tool in this context. Case study using documentary analysis, interviews and observations. Qualitative thematic analysis drawing on ANT. Qualitative analyses revealed a complex network of interactions between organizational stakeholders and technology that helped to shape the system and influence its acceptance and adoption. The EMR clearly emerged as a central 'actor' within this network. The results illustrate how important it is to plan innovative and complex information systems with reference to (i) the expressed needs and involvement of different actors, starting from the initial introductory phase; (ii) promoting commitment to the system and adopting a participative approach; (iii) defining and resourcing new roles within the organization capable of supporting and sustaining the change and (iv) assessing system impacts in order to mobilize the network around a common goal. The paper highlights the organizational, cultural, technological, and financial considerations that should be taken into account when planning strategies for the implementation of EMR systems in hospital settings. It also demonstrates how ANT may be usefully deployed in evaluating such projects.

  2. Innate immunity is a key factor for the resolution of inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnig, Cindy; Levy, Bruce D

    2015-03-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an integral and natural part of the physiological response to tissue injury, infection and allergens or other noxious stimuli. Resolution is now recognised as an active process with highly regulated cellular and biochemical events. Recent discoveries have highlighted that innate inflammatory cells have bimodal effector functions during the inflammatory response, including active roles during the resolution process. Several mediators displaying potent pro-resolving actions have recently been uncovered. Lipoxin A4, the lead member of this new class of pro-resolving mediators, has anti-inflammatory actions on type 2 innate lymphoid cells and pro-resolving actions through natural killer cells in asthma immunobiology. Eosinophils are also able to control crucial aspects of resolution through the generation of pro-resolving mediators. Uncontrolled asthma has been associated with a defect in the generation of specialised pro-resolving mediators, including lipoxin A4 and protectin D1. Thus, bioactive stable analogue mimetics of these mediators that can harness endogenous resolution mechanisms for inflammation may offer new therapeutic strategies for asthma and airway inflammation associated diseases. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  3. Pain-related work interference is a key factor in a worker/workplace model of work absence duration due to musculoskeletal conditions in Canadian nurses.

    PubMed

    Murray, Eleanor; Franche, Renée-Louise; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Smith, Peter; Carnide, Nancy; Côté, Pierre; Gibson, Jane; Guzman, Jaime; Koehoorn, Mieke; Mustard, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    To examine the role of pain experiences in relation to work absence, within the context of other worker health factors and workplace factors among Canadian nurses with work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) injury. Structural equation modeling was used on a sample of 941 employed, female, direct care nurses with at least one day of work absence due to a work-related MSK injury, from the cross-sectional 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses. The final model suggests that pain severity and pain-related work interference mediate the impact of the following worker health and workplace factors on work absence duration: depression, back problems, age, unionization, workplace physical demands and low job control. The model accounted for 14 % of the variance in work absence duration and 46.6 % of the variance in pain-related work interference. Our findings support a key role for pain severity and pain-related work interference in mediating the effects of workplace factors and worker health factors on work absence duration. Future interventions should explore reducing pain-related work interference through addressing workplace issues, such as providing modified work, reducing physical demands, and increasing job control.

  4. Psychophysics of a Nociceptive Test in the Mouse: Ambient Temperature as a Key Factor for Variation

    PubMed Central

    Pincedé, Ivanne; Pollin, Bernard; Meert, Theo; Plaghki, Léon; Le Bars, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background The mouse is increasingly used in biomedical research, notably in behavioral neurosciences for the development of tests or models of pain. Our goal was to provide the scientific community with an outstanding tool that allows the determination of psychophysical descriptors of a nociceptive reaction, which are inaccessible with conventional methods: namely the true threshold, true latency, conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers that trigger the response and latency of the central decision-making process. Methodology/Principal Findings Basically, the procedures involved heating of the tail with a CO2 laser, recording of tail temperature with an infrared camera and stopping the heating when the animal reacted. The method is based mainly on the measurement of three observable variables, namely the initial temperature, the heating rate and the temperature reached at the actual moment of the reaction following random variations in noxious radiant heat. The initial temperature of the tail, which itself depends on the ambient temperature, very markedly influenced the behavioral threshold, the behavioral latency and the conduction velocity of the peripheral fibers but not the latency of the central decision-making. Conclusions/Significance We have validated a psychophysical approach to nociceptive reactions for the mouse, which has already been described for rats and Humans. It enables the determination of four variables, which contribute to the overall latency of the response. The usefulness of such an approach was demonstrated by providing new fundamental findings regarding the influence of ambient temperature on nociceptive processes. We conclude by challenging the validity of using as “pain index" the reaction time of a behavioral response to an increasing heat stimulus and emphasize the need for a very careful control of the ambient temperature, as a prevailing environmental source of variation, during any behavioral testing of mice. PMID:22629325

  5. Vascular oxidative stress: a key factor in the development of hypertension associated with ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Ceron, Carla S; Marchi, Katia C; Muniz, Jaqueline J; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2014-01-01

    The observation that the excessive consumption of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) is associated with high blood pressure is nearing its centennial mark. Mechanisms linking ethanol consumption and hypertension are complex and not fully understood. It is established that chronic ethanol consumption leads to hypertension and that this process is a multimediated event involving increased sympathetic activity, stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with a subsequent increase in vascular oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Under physiological conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role as a signaling molecule in the control of vascular tone and endothelial function. Increased ROS bioavailability is associated with important processes underlying vascular injury in cardiovascular disease such as endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and inflammation. Studies focusing on molecular mechanisms showed a link between overproduction of ROS in the vasculature and ethanol-induced hypertension. Of the ROS generated in vascular cells, superoxide anion (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) appear to be especially important. Ethanol-mediated generation of O2(-) and H2O2 in vascular tissues is associated with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, endothelial dysfunction and vasoconstriction. O2(-) can also act as a vascular signaling molecule regulating signaling pathways that lead to vascular contraction. Thus, through increased generation of ROS and activation of redox-sensitive pathways, ethanol induces vascular dysfunction, a response that might contribute to the hypertension associated with ethanol consumption. The present article reviews the role of ROS in vascular (patho)biology of ethanol.

  6. Key factors influencing adoption of an innovation in primary health care: a qualitative study based on implementation theory.

    PubMed

    Carlfjord, Siw; Lindberg, Malou; Bendtsen, Preben; Nilsen, Per; Andersson, Agneta

    2010-08-23

    Bridging the knowledge-to-practice gap in health care is an important issue that has gained interest in recent years. Implementing new methods, guidelines or tools into routine care, however, is a slow and unpredictable process, and the factors that play a role in the change process are not yet fully understood. There is a number of theories concerned with factors predicting successful implementation in various settings, however, this issue is insufficiently studied in primary health care (PHC). The objective of this article was to apply implementation theory to identify key factors influencing the adoption of an innovation being introduced in PHC in Sweden. A qualitative study was carried out with staff at six PHC units in Sweden where a computer-based test for lifestyle intervention had been implemented. Two different implementation strategies, implicit or explicit, were used. Sixteen focus group interviews and two individual interviews were performed. In the analysis a theoretical framework based on studies of implementation in health service organizations, was applied to identify key factors influencing adoption. The theoretical framework proved to be relevant for studies in PHC. Adoption was positively influenced by positive expectations at the unit, perceptions of the innovation being compatible with existing routines and perceived advantages. An explicit implementation strategy and positive opinions on change and innovation were also associated with adoption. Organizational changes and staff shortages coinciding with implementation seemed to be obstacles for the adoption process. When implementation theory obtained from studies in other areas was applied in PHC it proved to be relevant for this particular setting. Based on our results, factors to be taken into account in the planning of the implementation of a new tool in PHC should include assessment of staff expectations, assessment of the perceived need for the innovation to be implemented, and of its

  7. Computer-aided study of key factors determining high mechanical properties of nanostructured surface layers in metal-ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Igor S.; Shilko, Evgeny V.; Ovcharenko, Vladimir E.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the movable cellular automaton method. It is based on numerical models of surface layers of the metal-ceramic composite NiCr-TiC modified under electron beam irradiation in inert gas plasmas. The models take into account different geometric, concentration and mechanical parameters of ceramic and metallic components. The authors study the contributions of key structural factors in mechanical properties of surface layers and determine the ranges of their variations by providing the optimum balance of strength, strain hardening and fracture toughness.

  8. Factors controlling dimethylsulfide emission from salt marshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacey, John W. H.; Wakeham, S. G.; Howes, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The factors that control the emission of methylated gases from salt marshes are being studied. Research focusses on dimethylsulfide (DMS) formation and the mechanism of DMS and CH4 emission to the atmosphere. The approach is to consider the plants as valves regulating the emission of methylated gases to the atmosphere with the goal of developing appropriate methods for emission measurement. In the case of CH4, the sediment is the source and transport to the atmosphere occurs primarily through the internal gas spaces in the plants. The source of DMS appears to be dimethyl sulfoniopropionate (DMSP) which may play a role in osmoregulation in plant tissues. Concentrations of DMSP in leaves are typically several-fold higher than in roots and rhizomes. Even so, the large below ground biomass of this plant means that 2/3 of the DMSP in the ecosystem is below ground on the aerial basis. Upon introduction to sediment water, DMSP rapidly decomposes to DMS and acrylic acid. The solubility of a gas (its equilibrium vapor pressure) is a fundamental aspect of gas exchange kinetics. The first comprehensive study was conducted of DMS solubility in freshwater and seawater. Data suggest that the Setchenow relation holds for H at intermediate salinities collected. These data support the concept that the concentration of DMS in the atmosphere is far from equilibrium with seawater.

  9. Liver glucokinase gene expression is controlled by the onecut transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-6.

    PubMed

    Lannoy, V J; Decaux, J F; Pierreux, C E; Lemaigre, F P; Rousseau, G G

    2002-08-01

    Glucokinase plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and the expression of its gene is differentially regulated in pancreatic beta cells and in the liver through distinct promoters. The factors that determine the tissue-specific expression of the glucokinase gene are not known. Putative binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-6, the prototype of the ONECUT family of transcription factors, are present in the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and hnf6 knockout mice are diabetic [corrected]. We hypothesized that HNF-6 controls the activity of the hepatic glucokinase promoter. We tested the binding of recombinant HNF-6 to DNA sequences from the mouse hepatic glucokinase promoter in vitro and the effect of HNF-6 on promoter activity in transfected cells. We investigated in vivo the role of HNF-6 in mice by examining the effect of inactivating the hnf6 gene on glucokinase gene-specific deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites in liver chromatin and on liver glucokinase mRNA concentration. HNF-6 bound to the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and stimulated its activity. Inactivation of the hnf6 gene did not modify the pattern of deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites but was associated with a decrease of liver glucokinase mRNA to half the control value. Although HNF-6 is not required to open chromatin of the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene, it stimulates transcription of the glucokinase gene in the liver. This could partly explain the diabetes observed in hnf6 knockout mice.

  10. Is progesterone the key regulatory factor behind ovulation rate in sheep?

    PubMed

    Bartlewski, P M; Sohal, J; Paravinja, V; Baby, T; Oliveira, M E F; Murawski, M; Schwarz, T; Zieba, D A; Keisler, D H

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian antral follicles in the ewe grow in an orderly succession, producing 3 to 4 waves per estrous cycle. In prolific sheep, some large antral follicles from the second-to-last wave of the estrous cycle are added to the ovulatory follicles emerging just before estrus to give a higher ovulation rate; it is feasible that regression of these follicles is prevented by an increase in serum concentrations of FSH or LH pulsatility at proestrus. Prolific sheep tend to have a shorter luteal phase than nonprolific ewes and there is a great deal of evidence that luteal progesterone (P 4 ), in addition to regulating LH release, may govern the secretion of FSH heralding the emergence of follicular waves. The specific purpose of this study was to determine whether or not extending the duration of the luteal phase in prolific sheep to that typically seen in nonprolific breeds would alter the follicle wave dynamics and ovulation rate. In 2 separate experiments, exogenous P 4 (7.5 mg per ewe intramuscularly) was administered on day 11 at PM and day 12 at AM (day 0 = first ovulation of the interovulatory interval studied) in moderately prolific Rideau Arcott × Polled Dorset ewes (experiment 1, n = 8) and highly prolific Olkuska ewes (experiment 2, n = 7; TRT), whereas the equinumerous groups of animals served as controls (CTR). Transrectal ovarian ultrasonography was performed daily, and jugular blood samples were drawn twice a day from day 9 until the next ovulation. Progesterone injections resulted in relatively uniform increments in serum P 4 levels, but the mean duration of the interovulatory interval did not differ (P > 0.05) between TRT and CTR groups of ewes in either experiment. The mean ovulation rate post-treatment was 1.6 ± 0.2 vs 3.2 ± 0.4 (experiment 1, P < 0.001) and 3.2 ± 0.8 vs 4.0 ± 1.0 (experiment 2, P > 0.05) in TRT vs CTR, respectively. The number and percentage of ovulating follicles from the penultimate wave of the interovulatory interval studied was

  11. Privacy Protection for Telecare Medicine Information Systems Using a Chaotic Map-Based Three-Factor Authenticated Key Agreement Scheme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Zhu, Shaohui; Tang, Shanyu

    2017-03-01

    Telecare medicine information systems (TMIS) provide flexible and convenient e-health care. However, the medical records transmitted in TMIS are exposed to unsecured public networks, so TMIS are more vulnerable to various types of security threats and attacks. To provide privacy protection for TMIS, a secure and efficient authenticated key agreement scheme is urgently needed to protect the sensitive medical data. Recently, Mishra et al. proposed a biometrics-based authenticated key agreement scheme for TMIS by using hash function and nonce, they claimed that their scheme could eliminate the security weaknesses of Yan et al.'s scheme and provide dynamic identity protection and user anonymity. In this paper, however, we demonstrate that Mishra et al.'s scheme suffers from replay attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks and fails to provide perfect forward secrecy. To overcome the weaknesses of Mishra et al.'s scheme, we then propose a three-factor authenticated key agreement scheme to enable the patient to enjoy the remote healthcare services via TMIS with privacy protection. The chaotic map-based cryptography is employed in the proposed scheme to achieve a delicate balance of security and performance. Security analysis demonstrates that the proposed scheme resists various attacks and provides several attractive security properties. Performance evaluation shows that the proposed scheme increases efficiency in comparison with other related schemes.

  12. [Development of mobile monitor for risk factor control on chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Yao, Danhua; Zhu, Chaoyang; Bao, Jiali

    2013-11-01

    In order to improve the control rate of risk factors of chronic disease, it is developed a status control method of risk factor and its mobile monitor. The monitor uses 32 bit RISC microprocessor of S3C2410X as a controller based on ARM920T core, and MC35i cellular engine GSM/GPRS supported by SIEMENS as the communication unit. The proving tests show that the physical activity, diet, smoking and alcohol of the controlled people can be controlled using the status control method, and the monitor plays a key role in the method. The conclusion is that status control method and mobile monitor can become an alternation method and technology for the risk factor control of chronic disease.

  13. Key drivers controlling stable isotope variations in daily precipitation of Costa Rica: Caribbean Sea versus Eastern Pacific Ocean moisture sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Murillo, R.; Birkel, C.; Welsh, K.; Esquivel-Hernández, G.; Corrales-Salazar, J.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Roupsard, O.; Sáenz-Rosales, O.; Katchan, I.; Arce-Mesén, R.; Soulsby, C.; Araguás-Araguás, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Costa Rica is located on the Central American Isthmus, which receives moisture inputs directly from the Caribbean Sea and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This location includes unique mountainous and lowland microclimates, but only limited knowledge exists about the impact of relief and regional atmospheric circulation patterns on precipitation origin, transport, and isotopic composition. Therefore, the main scope of this project is to identify the key drivers controlling stable isotope variations in daily-scale precipitation of Costa Rica. The monitoring sites comprise three strategic locations across Costa Rica: Heredia (Central Valley), Turrialba (Caribbean slope), and Caño Seco (South Pacific slope). Sporadic dry season rain is mostly related to isolated enriched events ranging from -5.8‰ to -0.9‰ δ18O. By mid-May, the Intertropical Convergence Zone reaches Costa Rica resulting in a notable depletion in isotope ratios (up to -18.5‰ δ18O). HYSPLIT air mass back trajectories indicate the strong influence on the origin and transport of precipitation of three main moisture transport mechanisms, the Caribbean Low Level Jet, the Colombian Low Level Jet, and localized convection events. Multiple linear regression models constructed based on Random Forests of surface meteorological information and atmospheric sounding profiles suggest that lifted condensation level and surface relative humidity are the main factors controlling isotopic variations. These findings diverge from the recognized 'amount effect' in monthly composite samples across the tropics. Understanding of stable isotope dynamics in tropical precipitation can be used to a) enhance groundwater modeling efforts in ungauged basins where scarcity of long-term monitoring data drastically limit current and future water resources management, b) improve the re-construction of paleoclimatic records in the Central American land bridge, c) calibrate and validate regional circulation models.

  14. Controlling Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution with Entanglement in the Middle Using Tunable Linear Optics Cloning Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao Dong; Chen, Feng; Wu, Xiang Hua; Guo, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) can provide detection efficiency, as compared to discrete-variable quantum key distribution (DVQKD). In this paper, we demonstrate a controllable CVQKD with the entangled source in the middle, contrast to the traditional point-to-point CVQKD where the entanglement source is usually created by one honest party and the Gaussian noise added on the reference partner of the reconciliation is uncontrollable. In order to harmonize the additive noise that originates in the middle to resist the effect of malicious eavesdropper, we propose a controllable CVQKD protocol by performing a tunable linear optics cloning machine (LOCM) at one participant's side, say Alice. Simulation results show that we can achieve the optimal secret key rates by selecting the parameters of the tuned LOCM in the derived regions.

  15. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-12-21

    significantly increased SFRP1 mRNA levels in children compared to normal adult samples ( P < 0.05). In CRC tissue the mRNA expression of 117 age-related genes were changed, while in adenoma samples 102 genes showed differential expression compared with normal colonic tissue ( P < 0.05, logFC > 0.5). The change of expression for several genes including SYNE1 , CLEC3B , LTBP3 and SFRP1 , followed the same pattern in aging and carcinogenesis, though not for all genes ( e.g ., MGP). Several age-related DNA methylation alterations can be observed during CRC development and progression affecting the mRNA expression of certain CRC- and adenoma-related key control genes.

  16. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-01-01

    with significantly increased SFRP1 mRNA levels in children compared to normal adult samples (P < 0.05). In CRC tissue the mRNA expression of 117 age-related genes were changed, while in adenoma samples 102 genes showed differential expression compared with normal colonic tissue (P < 0.05, logFC > 0.5). The change of expression for several genes including SYNE1, CLEC3B, LTBP3 and SFRP1, followed the same pattern in aging and carcinogenesis, though not for all genes (e.g., MGP). CONCLUSION Several age-related DNA methylation alterations can be observed during CRC development and progression affecting the mRNA expression of certain CRC- and adenoma-related key control genes. PMID:28058013

  17. Secure NFV Orchestration Over an SDN-Controlled Optical Network With Time-Shared Quantum Key Distribution Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Alejandro; Hugues-Salas, Emilio; Haigh, Paul Anthony; Marhuenda, Jaume; Price, Alasdair B.; Sibson, Philip; Kennard, Jake E.; Erven, Chris; Rarity, John G.; Thompson, Mark Gerard; Lord, Andrew; Nejabati, Reza; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, a secure optical network architecture that combines NFV orchestration and SDN control with quantum key distribution (QKD) technology. A novel time-shared QKD network design is presented as a cost-effective solution for practical networks.

  18. Interplay between REST and nucleolin transcription factors: a key mechanism in the overexpression of genes upon increased phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tediose, Teeo; Kolev, Martin; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Brennan, Paul; Morgan, B Paul; Donev, Rossen

    2010-05-01

    Non-malignant cells can be transformed via the activation of kinases that control degradation of neural-restrictive silencer factor (REST). Here, we identify a mechanism that contributes to the activation of genes, expression of which is controlled by responsive elements containing overlapping binding sites for REST and nucleolin. We demonstrate that both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated nucleolin-bound DNA; however, only phosphorylated nucleolin successfully competed with either full-length REST or a REST-derived DNA-binding peptide, REST68, for binding to the overlapping binding sites. We show that this interplay between the two transcription factors regulates the activation of cell survival and immunomodulatory genes in tumors and non-malignant cells with activated protein kinase C, which is accompanied with alterations in cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose a model for the regulation of these genes, which brings a new insight into the molecular mechanisms that control cellular transformation driven by activation of protein kinases.

  19. Sweat, Brain-Power, Horsepower, and Time - The Keys to Controlling Weeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed control in organic crop production is difficult and costly. Early studies on organic weed control in conservation tillage systems were disappointing. Research shifted to organic weed control in conventional tillage systems. Intense cultivation with a tine weeder was the most consistent metho...

  20. The Cyber War: Maintaining and Controlling the Key Cyber Terrain of the Cyberspace Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-26

    terrain.5 The U.S. Army describes this key terrain as “any locality or area, the seizure or retention of which affords a marked advantage to either...at this level includes a wide range of software systems, services, and protocols that keep networks running and computers doing useful work. 4...Physical Plane. The physical plane includes components of a computer system and attached hardware. This plane is comprised of the devices that are

  1. Chilling Stress—The Key Predisposing Factor for Causing Alternaria alternata Infection and Leading to Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Leaf Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingqing; Li, Sha; Jiang, Tengfei; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Wenwei; Jian, Guiliang; Qi, Fangjun

    2012-01-01

    Leaf senescence plays a vital role in nutrient recycling and overall capacity to assimilate carbon dioxide. Cotton premature leaf senescence, often accompanied with unexpected short-term low temperature, has been occurring with an increasing frequency in many cotton-growing areas and causes serious reduction in yield and quality of cotton. The key factors for causing and promoting cotton premature leaf senescence are still unclear. In this case, the relationship between the pre-chilling stress and Alternaria alternata infection for causing cotton leaf senescence was investigated under precisely controlled laboratory conditions with four to five leaves stage cotton plants. The results showed short-term chilling stress could cause a certain degree of physiological impairment to cotton leaves, which could be recovered to normal levels in 2–4 days when the chilling stresses were removed. When these chilling stress injured leaves were further inoculated with A. alternata, the pronounced appearance and development of leaf spot disease, and eventually the pronounced symptoms of leaf senescence, occurred on these cotton leaves. The onset of cotton leaf senescence at this condition was also reflected in various physiological indexes such as irreversible increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage, irreversible decrease in soluble protein content and chlorophyll content, and irreversible damage in leaves' photosynthesis ability. The presented results demonstrated that chilling stress acted as the key predisposing factor for causing A. alternata infection and leading to cotton leaf senescence. It could be expected that the understanding of the key factors causing and promoting cotton leaf senescence would be helpful for taking appropriate management steps to prevent cotton premature leaf senescence. PMID:22558354

  2. Cortistatin Is a Key Factor Regulating the Sex-Dependent Response of the GH and Stress Axes to Fasting in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; de Lecea, Luis; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2016-07-01

    Cortistatin (CORT) shares high structural and functional similarities with somatostatin (SST) but displays unique sex-dependent pituitary actions. Indeed, although female CORT-knockout (CORT-KO) mice exhibit enhanced GH expression/secretion, Proopiomelanocortin expression, and circulating ACTH/corticosterone/ghrelin levels, male CORT-KO mice only display increased plasma GH/corticosterone levels. Changes in peripheral ghrelin and SST (rather than hypothalamic levels) seem to regulate GH/ACTH axes in CORT-KOs under fed conditions. Because changes in GH/ACTH axes during fasting provide important adaptive mechanisms, we sought to determine whether CORT absence influences GH/ACTH axes during fasting. Accordingly, fed and fasted male/female CORT-KO were compared with littermate controls. Fasting increased circulating GH levels in male/female controls but not in CORT-KO, suggesting that CORT can be a relevant regulator of GH secretion during fasting. However, GH levels were already higher in CORT-KO than in controls in fed state, which might preclude a further elevation in GH levels. Interestingly, although fasting-induced pituitary GH expression was elevated in both male/female controls, GH expression only increased in fasted female CORT-KOs, likely owing to specific changes observed in key factors controlling somatotrope responsiveness (ie, circulating ghrelin and IGF-1, and pituitary GHRH and ghrelin receptor expression). Fasting increased corticosterone levels in control and, most prominently, in CORT-KO mice, which might be associated with a desensitization to SST signaling and to an augmentation in CRH and ghrelin-signaling regulating corticotrope function. Altogether, these results provide compelling evidence that CORT plays a key, sex-dependent role in the regulation of the GH/ACTH axes in response to fasting.

  3. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is a key neurotrophin in the postnatal enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, D M; Li, A Y; Nair, D G; Blennerhassett, M G

    2011-02-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) continues its structural and functional growth after birth, with formation of ganglia and the innervation of growing smooth muscle. However, little is known about factors in the postnatal intestine that influence these processes. We examined the presence and potential role of glial cell line-derived nerve growth factor (GDNF) in the rat postnatal ENS using neonatal tissue, primary co-cultures of the myenteric plexus, smooth muscle, and glial cells as well as cell lines of smooth muscle or glial cells. Western blot analysis showed that GDNF and its co-receptors rearranged during transfection (RET) and GDNF family receptor alpha-1 were expressed in the muscle layer of the neonatal and adult rat intestine. Immunohistochemistry localized the receptors for GDNF to myenteric neurons, while GDNF was localized to smooth muscle cells. In a co-culture model, GDNF but not nerve growth factor, brain derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 significantly increased neuronal survival and more than doubled the numbers of neurites in vitro. RT-PCR, qPCR, Western blotting, ELISA, and immunocytochemistry as well as bioassays of neuronal survival and of RET phosphorylation all identified intestinal smooth muscle as the source of GDNF in vitro. GDNF also induced morphological changes in the structure and organization of neurons and axons, causing marked aggregation of neuronal cell bodies and collinear development of axons. As well, GDNF (50-150 ng mL(-1)) significantly increased [(3)H]-choline uptake and stimulated [(3)H]-acetylcholine release. We conclude that GDNF derived from intestinal smooth muscle cells is a key factor influencing the structural and functional development of postnatal myenteric neurons. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Key role of integrin α(IIb)β (3) signaling to Syk kinase in tissue factor-induced thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Paola E J; Feijge, Marion A H; Swieringa, Frauke; Gilio, Karen; Nergiz-Unal, Reyhan; Hamulyák, Karly; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2012-10-01

    The fibrin(ogen) receptor, integrin α(IIb)β(3), has a well-established role in platelet spreading, aggregation and clot retraction. How α(IIb)β(3) contributes to platelet-dependent coagulation is less well resolved. Here, we demonstrate that the potent suppressing effect of clinically used α(IIb)β(3) blockers on tissue factor-induced thrombin generation is linked to diminished platelet Ca(2+) responses and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. The same blockers suppress these responses in platelets stimulated with collagen and thrombin receptor agonists, whereas added fibrinogen potentiates these responses. In platelets spreading on fibrinogen, outside-in α(IIb)β(3) signaling similarly enhances thrombin-induced Ca(2+) rises and PS exposure. These responses are reduced in α(IIb)β(3)-deficient platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. Furthermore, the contribution of α(IIb)β(3) to tissue factor-induced platelet Ca(2+) rises, PS exposure and thrombin generation in plasma are fully dependent on Syk kinase activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation analysis confirms a key role of Syk activation, which is largely but not exclusively dependent on α(IIb)β(3) activation. It is concluded that the majority of tissue factor-induced procoagulant activity of platelets relies on Syk activation and ensuing Ca(2+) signal generation, and furthermore that a considerable part of Syk activation relies on α(IIb)β(3) signaling. These results hence point to a novel role of Syk in integrin-dependent thrombin generation.

  5. Proteomic profiling of isogenic primary and metastatic medulloblastoma cell lines reveals differential expression of key metastatic factors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuo; Chen, Kai; Yin, Minzhi; Wu, Zhixiang; Wu, Yeming

    2017-05-08

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Around 30% of medulloblastoma patients are diagnosed with metastasis, which often results in a poor prognosis. Unfortunately, molecular mechanisms of medulloblastoma metastasis remain largely unknown. In this study, we employed the recently developed deep proteome analysis approach to quantitatively profile the expression of >10,000 proteins from CHLA-01-MED and CHLA-01R-MED isogenic cell lines derived from the primary and metastatic tumor of the same patient diagnosed with a group IV medulloblastoma. Using statistical analysis, we identified ~1400 significantly altered proteins between the primary and metastatic cell lines including known factors such as placental growth factor (PLGF), LIM homeobox 1 (LHX1) and prominim 1 (PROM1), as well as the negative regulator secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC). Additional transwell experiments and immunohistochemical analysis of clinical medulloblastoma samples implicated yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) as a potential key factor contributing to metastasis. Taken together, our data broadly defines the metastasis-relevant regulated proteome and provides a precious resource for further investigating potential mechanisms of medulloblastoma metastasis. This study represented the first deep proteome analysis of metastatic medulloblastomas and provided a valuable candidate list of altered proteins in metastatic medulloblastomas. The primary data suggested YAP1 as a potential driver for the metastasis of medulloblastoma. These results open up numerous avenues for further investigating the underlying mechanisms of medulloblastoma metastasis and improving the prognosis of medulloblastoma patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CENP-C and CENP-I are key connecting factors for kinetochore and CENP-A assembly.

    PubMed

    Shono, Nobuaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M C; Nagase, Takahiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-12-15

    Although it is generally accepted that chromatin containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A is an epigenetic mark maintaining centromere identity, the pathways leading to the formation and maintenance of centromere chromatin remain unclear. We previously generated human artificial chromosomes (HACs) whose centromeres contain a synthetic alpha-satellite (alphoid) DNA array containing the tetracycline operator (alphoid(tetO)). We also obtained cell lines bearing the alphoid(tetO) array at ectopic integration sites on chromosomal arms. Here, we have examined the regulation of CENP-A assembly at centromeres as well as de novo assembly on the ectopic arrays by tethering tetracycline repressor (tetR) fusions of substantial centromeric factors and chromatin modifiers. This analysis revealed four classes of factors that influence CENP-A assembly. Interestingly, many kinetochore structural components induced de novo CENP-A assembly at the ectopic site. We showed that these components work by recruiting CENP-C and subsequently recruiting M18BP1. Furthermore, we found that CENP-I can also recruit M18BP1 and, as a consequence, enhances M18BP1 assembly on centromeres in the downstream of CENP-C. Thus, we suggest that CENP-C and CENP-I are key factors connecting kinetochore to CENP-A assembly. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. An adipoinductive role of inflammation in adipose tissue engineering: key factors in the early development of engineered soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Heidi E; Morrison, Wayne A; Han, Xiao-Lian; Palmer, Jason; Taylor, Caroline; Tee, Richard; Möller, Andreas; Thompson, Erik W; Abberton, Keren M

    2013-05-15

    Tissue engineering and cell implantation therapies are gaining popularity because of their potential to repair and regenerate tissues and organs. To investigate the role of inflammatory cytokines in new tissue development in engineered tissues, we have characterized the nature and timing of cell populations forming new adipose tissue in a mouse tissue engineering chamber (TEC) and characterized the gene and protein expression of cytokines in the newly developing tissues. EGFP-labeled bone marrow transplant mice and MacGreen mice were implanted with TEC for periods ranging from 0.5 days to 6 weeks. Tissues were collected at various time points and assessed for cytokine expression through ELISA and mRNA analysis or labeled for specific cell populations in the TEC. Macrophage-derived factors, such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), appear to induce adipogenesis by recruiting macrophages and bone marrow-derived precursor cells to the TEC at early time points, with a second wave of nonbone marrow-derived progenitors. Gene expression analysis suggests that TNFα, LCN-2, and Interleukin 1β are important in early stages of neo-adipogenesis. Increasing platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial cell growth factor expression at early time points correlates with preadipocyte proliferation and induction of angiogenesis. This study provides new information about key elements that are involved in early development of new adipose tissue.

  8. CENP-C and CENP-I are key connecting factors for kinetochore and CENP-A assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shono, Nobuaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Otake, Koichiro; Martins, Nuno M. C.; Nagase, Takahiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C.; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although it is generally accepted that chromatin containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A is an epigenetic mark maintaining centromere identity, the pathways leading to the formation and maintenance of centromere chromatin remain unclear. We previously generated human artificial chromosomes (HACs) whose centromeres contain a synthetic alpha-satellite (alphoid) DNA array containing the tetracycline operator (alphoidtetO). We also obtained cell lines bearing the alphoidtetO array at ectopic integration sites on chromosomal arms. Here, we have examined the regulation of CENP-A assembly at centromeres as well as de novo assembly on the ectopic arrays by tethering tetracycline repressor (tetR) fusions of substantial centromeric factors and chromatin modifiers. This analysis revealed four classes of factors that influence CENP-A assembly. Interestingly, many kinetochore structural components induced de novo CENP-A assembly at the ectopic site. We showed that these components work by recruiting CENP-C and subsequently recruiting M18BP1. Furthermore, we found that CENP-I can also recruit M18BP1 and, as a consequence, enhances M18BP1 assembly on centromeres in the downstream of CENP-C. Thus, we suggest that CENP-C and CENP-I are key factors connecting kinetochore to CENP-A assembly. PMID:26527398

  9. Factors controlling inter- and intramodel variability in global mean OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, L. T.; Fiore, A. M.; Shindell, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Recent ensemble simulations of the 16 models of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) show that there are large differences between models in global mean OH and its temporal evolution, even with the use of identical anthropogenic emission inventories. We find global mean OH in each individual ACCMIP model to linearly respond to convolved changes in tropospheric ozone photolysis frequencies, water vapor concentrations, and the ratio of reactive nitrogen to reactive carbon emissions. However, the ensemble members show a spread in both the slope and offset of these individual linear relationships. We present a series of sensitivity simulations using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model driven by MERRA reanalysis fields and the ACCMIP/MACCity (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition & Climate/City Zen) emissions for 1980-2010 to diagnose potential factors that may be driving differences between the different ACCMIP models. We examine in particular the role of different gas-phase and heterogeneous chemical mechanisms, the spatial and temporal distribution of mean emissions, and the implementation of natural emissions (e.g., lightning, biogenic). Determining the key factors leading to the model differences in OH is a critical step to guide future efforts for identifying observation-based constraints for processes controlling OH variability.

  10. An efficient key-management scheme for hierarchical access control in e-medicine system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuhua; Chen, Kefei

    2012-08-01

    In e-medicine system, the sharing of patients' medical histories scattered among medical institutions through the Internet is highly desirable. The most immediate cryptographic need certainly is an efficient key management method to solve dynamic access problems in a user hierarchy. In this paper, we propose a practical solution for dynamic access problem in a user hierarchy based on hybrid cryptosystems. When compared with Nikooghadam et al.'s scheme proposed most recently, the time complexity and the required storage space is reduced significantly. Moreover, it provides provable security, and is easy to implement. Therefore, our scheme is more suitable for e-medicine system.

  11. Expert Panel Consensus for and Analysis of Key Attributes on Websites Devoted to Weight Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen L.; Land, Diane; Johnson, Chandrika; Miller, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity presents major challenges to public health in the United States. Trials of web-based interventions for weight control suggest that the Internet is a promising option for program delivery. Purpose: This study sought consensus among experts regarding critical components of successful weight control and to systematically examine…

  12. Power factor control system for ac induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A power control circuit for an induction motor is disclosed in which a servo loop is used to control power input by controlling the power factor of motor operation. The power factor is measured by summing the voltage and current derived square wave signals.

  13. Digital Single-Phase Power-Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Digital circuit has faster response to load changes. Digital power-factor controller senses changing motor-load torques by sampling open-circuit voltage across gate-controlled silicon switch. Circuit responds more rapidly to hanging loads than analog power-factor controllers because no low-pass filter is in feedback loop.

  14. Spirituality: a key factor in coping among Iranians chronically affected by mustard gas in the disaster of war.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Ghanei, Mostafa; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to explore the approach used by Iranians chronically affected by mustard gas in the disaster of war to cope with their chronic illness complications. A qualitative approach was adopted using content analysis of unstructured interviews carried out with 20 patients in a medical center in Tehran and an outpatient clinic in the North West of Iran. Two main themes that emerged from the study were "religious sentiment" and "patriotism". The subthemes that emerged were "divine will", "illness as a means of absolving sin", "saying prayers in the anticipation of divine rewards", "defending the motherland" and "self-sacrifice as a source of pride". To sum up, spirituality was recognized as a key factor among the participants in accepting and coping with their chronic illness complications.

  15. A new player in X identification: the CLAMP protein is a key factor in Drosophila dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Soruco, Marcela M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation adjusts the expression levels of genes on one or both targeted sex chromosomes in heterogametic species. This process results in the normalized transcriptional output of important and essential gene families encoded on multiple chromosomes. The mechanisms of dosage compensation have been studied in many model organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster (fly), Caenorhabditis elegans (worm), and Mus musculus (mouse). Although the mechanisms of dosage compensations differ among these species, all of these processes rely on the initial discrimination of the X chromosome from autosomes. Recently, a new paradigm for how the X chromosome is targeted for regulation was identified in Drosophila. This mechanism involves a newly identified zinc finger protein, CLAMP. Here, we review important factors involved in dosage compensation across species with special focus on the fly. Understanding how the newly identified CLAMP protein is involved in X targeting in the fly could provide key insights into how the X chromosome is initially identified across species. PMID:25102930

  16. Novel image compression-encryption hybrid algorithm based on key-controlled measurement matrix in compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Zhang, Aidi; Zheng, Fen; Gong, Lihua

    2014-10-01

    The existing ways to encrypt images based on compressive sensing usually treat the whole measurement matrix as the key, which renders the key too large to distribute and memorize or store. To solve this problem, a new image compression-encryption hybrid algorithm is proposed to realize compression and encryption simultaneously, where the key is easily distributed, stored or memorized. The input image is divided into 4 blocks to compress and encrypt, then the pixels of the two adjacent blocks are exchanged randomly by random matrices. The measurement matrices in compressive sensing are constructed by utilizing the circulant matrices and controlling the original row vectors of the circulant matrices with logistic map. And the random matrices used in random pixel exchanging are bound with the measurement matrices. Simulation results verify the effectiveness, security of the proposed algorithm and the acceptable compression performance.

  17. Policy-based secure communication with automatic key management for industrial control and automation systems

    DOEpatents

    Chernoguzov, Alexander; Markham, Thomas R.; Haridas, Harshal S.

    2016-11-22

    A method includes generating at least one access vector associated with a specified device in an industrial process control and automation system. The specified device has one of multiple device roles. The at least one access vector is generated based on one or more communication policies defining communications between one or more pairs of devices roles in the industrial process control and automation system, where each pair of device roles includes the device role of the specified device. The method also includes providing the at least one access vector to at least one of the specified device and one or more other devices in the industrial process control and automation system in order to control communications to or from the specified device.

  18. Policy-based secure communication with automatic key management for industrial control and automation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoguzov, Alexander; Markham, Thomas R.; Haridas, Harshal S.

    2016-11-22

    A method includes generating at least one access vector associated with a specified device in an industrial process control and automation system. The specified device has one of multiple device roles. The at least one access vector is generated based on one or more communication policies defining communications between one or more pairs of devices roles in the industrial process control and automation system, where each pair of device roles includes the device role of the specified device. The method also includes providing the at least one access vector to at least one of the specified device and one ormore » more other devices in the industrial process control and automation system in order to control communications to or from the specified device.« less

  19. Key Human System Integration Plan Elements for Command and Control Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Control is to enable the effective transfer of information between and among systems and operational users to gain situational awareness , make decisions...decision-making in the networked command environments of this century. It is essential that Command & Control architectures consider how to effectively ...Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be

  20. Physical control of the distributions of a key Arctic copepod in the Northeast Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Stephen M.; Ashjian, Carin J.; Feng, Zhixuan; Jones, Benjamin; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Yu

    2017-10-01

    The Chukchi Sea is a highly advective regime dominated by a barotropically driven northward flow modulated by wind driven currents that reach the bottom boundary layer of this shallow environment. A general northward gradient of decreasing temperature and food concentration leads to geographically divergent copepod growth and development rates between north and south. The physics of this system establish the biological connection potential between specific regions. The copepod Calanus glacialis is a key grazer, predator, and food source in Arctic shelf seas. Its summer distribution and abundance have direct effects on much of the food web, from phytoplankton to migrating bowhead whales. In August 2012 and 2013, C. glacialis distributions were quantified over Hanna Shoal in the northeast Chukchi Sea. Here an individual-based model with Lagrangian tracking and copepod life stage development capabilities is used to advect and develop these distributions forward and backward in time to determine the source (production locations) and sink (potential overwintering locations) regions of the transient Hanna Shoal C. glacialis population. Hanna Shoal supplies diapause competent C. glacialis to both the Beaufort Slope and the Chukchi Cap, mainly receives juveniles from the broad slope between Hanna Shoal and Herald Valley and receives second year adults from as far south as the Anadyr Gulf and as near as the broad slope between Hanna Shoal and Herald Valley. The 2013 sink region was shifted west relative to the 2012 region and the 2013 adult source region was shifted north relative to the 2012 adult source region. These connection potentials were not sensitive to precise times and locations of release, but were quite sensitive to depth of release. These patterns demonstrate how interannual differences in the physical conditions well south of Hanna Shoal play a critical role in determining the abundance and distribution of a key food source over Hanna Shoal and in the

  1. Citizen science participation in research in the environmental sciences: key factors related to projects' success and longevity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Davi G F; Marques, Jonatas F; Resende, Juliana C DE; Falco, Patrícia B DE; Souza, Chrislaine M DE; Loiselle, Steven A

    2017-01-01

    The potential impacts of citizen science initiatives are increasing across the globe, albeit in an imbalanced manner. In general, there is a strong element of trial and error in most projects, and the comparison of best practices and project structure between different initiatives remains difficult. In Brazil, the participation of volunteers in environmental research is limited. Identifying the factors related to citizen science projects' success and longevity within a global perspective can contribute for consolidating such practices in the country. In this study, we explore past and present projects, including a case study in Brazil, to identify the spatial and temporal trends of citizen science programs as well as their best practices and challenges. We performed a bibliographic search using Google Scholar and considered results from 2005-2014. Although these results are subjective due to the Google Scholar's algorithm and ranking criteria, we highlighted factors to compare projects across geographical and disciplinary areas and identified key matches between project proponents and participants, project goals and local priorities, participant profiles and engagement, scientific methods and funding. This approach is a useful starting point for future citizen science projects, allowing for a systematic analysis of potential inconsistencies and shortcomings in this emerging field.

  2. Control circuit maintains unity power factor of reactive load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, M.; Martinage, L. H.

    1966-01-01

    Circuit including feedback control elements automatically corrects the power factor of a reactive load. It maintains power supply efficiency where negative load reactance changes and varies by providing corrective error signals to the control windings of a power supply transformer.

  3. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Koshi

    2012-01-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade. PMID:27877465

  4. Recognizing Developmental Stages in Southern Pine Flowers: The Key to Controlled Pollination

    Treesearch

    David L. Bramlett; Claude H. O' Gwynn

    1980-01-01

    Controlled pollinations are vital in southern pine tree improvement programs. Effective pollinations depend upon three operations. First, female flowers must be enclosed in isolation bags when they are in the proper stage of development. Then, viable pollen must be supplied to the ovules when the female flowers are most receptive. Finally, the developing cones must...

  5. Deconstructing the Instruction of the Control of Variables Strategy: Key Components of Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freer, Benjamin D.; Lorch, Elizabeth P.; Lorch, Robert F., Jr.; Calderhead, William

    2011-01-01

    A crucial element of the logic of the scientific method is the Control of Variables Strategy (CVS), in which conclusions about causal relations are enabled by manipulating a focal variable of interest while holding all other variables constant. Understanding CVS in elementary grades generally is poor, but can be improved with systematic…

  6. Bombyx mori P-element Somatic Inhibitor (BmPSI) Is a Key Auxiliary Factor for Silkworm Male Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuqing; Zeng, Baosheng; James, Anthony A.; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation of sex determination pathways in insects provides the basis for a wide spectrum of strategies to benefit agriculture and public health. Furthermore, insects display a remarkable diversity in the genetic pathways that lead to sex differentiation. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been cultivated by humans as a beneficial insect for over two millennia, and more recently as a model system for studying lepidopteran genetics and development. Previous studies have identified the B. mori Fem piRNA as the primary female determining factor and BmMasc as its downstream target, while the genetic scenario for male sex determination was still unclear. In the current study, we exploite the transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate a comprehensive set of knockout mutations in genes BmSxl, Bmtra2, BmImp, BmImpM, BmPSI and BmMasc, to investigate their roles in silkworm sex determination. Absence of Bmtra2 results in the complete depletion of Bmdsx transcripts, which is the conserved downstream factor in the sex determination pathway, and induces embryonic lethality. Loss of BmImp or BmImpM function does not affect the sexual differentiation. Mutations in BmPSI and BmMasc genes affect the splicing of Bmdsx and the female reproductive apparatus appeared in the male external genital. Intriguingly, we identify that BmPSI regulates expression of BmMasc, BmImpM and Bmdsx, supporting the conclusion that it acts as a key auxiliary factor in silkworm male sex determination. PMID:28103247

  7. Bombyx mori P-element Somatic Inhibitor (BmPSI) Is a Key Auxiliary Factor for Silkworm Male Sex Determination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Shuqing; Zeng, Baosheng; James, Anthony A; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation of sex determination pathways in insects provides the basis for a wide spectrum of strategies to benefit agriculture and public health. Furthermore, insects display a remarkable diversity in the genetic pathways that lead to sex differentiation. The silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been cultivated by humans as a beneficial insect for over two millennia, and more recently as a model system for studying lepidopteran genetics and development. Previous studies have identified the B. mori Fem piRNA as the primary female determining factor and BmMasc as its downstream target, while the genetic scenario for male sex determination was still unclear. In the current study, we exploite the transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate a comprehensive set of knockout mutations in genes BmSxl, Bmtra2, BmImp, BmImpM, BmPSI and BmMasc, to investigate their roles in silkworm sex determination. Absence of Bmtra2 results in the complete depletion of Bmdsx transcripts, which is the conserved downstream factor in the sex determination pathway, and induces embryonic lethality. Loss of BmImp or BmImpM function does not affect the sexual differentiation. Mutations in BmPSI and BmMasc genes affect the splicing of Bmdsx and the female reproductive apparatus appeared in the male external genital. Intriguingly, we identify that BmPSI regulates expression of BmMasc, BmImpM and Bmdsx, supporting the conclusion that it acts as a key auxiliary factor in silkworm male sex determination.

  8. Human factors measurement for future air traffic control systems.

    PubMed

    Langan-Fox, Janice; Sankey, Michael J; Canty, James M

    2009-10-01

    This article provides a critical review of research pertaining to the measurement of human factors (HF) issues in current and future air traffic control (ATC). Growing worldwide air traffic demands call for a radical departure from current ATC systems. Future systems will have a fundamental impact on the roles and responsibilities of ATC officers (ATCOs). Valid and reliable methods of assessing HF issues associated with these changes, such as a potential increase (or decrease) in workload, are of utmost importance for advancing theory and for designing systems, procedures, and training. We outline major aviation changes and how these relate to five key HF issues in ATC. Measures are outlined, compared, and evaluated and are followed by guidelines for assessing these issues in the ATC domain. Recommendations for future research are presented. A review of the literature suggests that situational awareness and workload have been widely researched and assessed using a variety of measures, but researchers have neglected the areas of trust, stress, and boredom. We make recommendations for use of particular measures and the construction of new measures. It is predicted that, given the changing role of ATCOs and profound future airspace requirements and configurations, issues of stress, trust, and boredom will become more significant. Researchers should develop and/or refine existing measures of all five key HF issues to assess their impact on ATCO performance. Furthermore, these issues should be considered in a holistic manner. The current article provides an evaluation of research and measures used in HF research on ATC that will aid research and ATC measurement.

  9. Soft-Starting Power-Factor Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    Three-phase power-factor controller with soft start is based on earlier version that does not control starting transients. Additional components serve to turn off "run" command signal and substitute gradual startup command signal during preset startup interval. Improved controller reduces large current surge that usually accompanies starting. Controller applies power smoothly, without causing motor vibrations.

  10. Human Factors in Air Traffic Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    with man- machine systems gives rise to difficulties and to unfounded charges of bias. A human- machine system would seem to be a kind of robot, so I...COMPON’NT 22 a. LIMITATIONS OF THE CONCEPT 22 b. THE ALLOCATION OF FUNCTIONS 23 a. EFFECTS OF AUTOVATION AND COFPUTER ASSISTANCE 25 d. THE MAN- MACHINE ...must be presented to the controller, or accessible to him, in a form that he oaa use. A modehi air traffic control system is a complex man-- machine

  11. Dirt and disgust as key drivers in nurses' infection control behaviours: an interpretative, qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C; Griffiths, P

    2014-06-01

    Infection prevention remains a significant challenge for healthcare systems. Yet despite considerable work to provide clear policies and scientifically proven techniques to reduce infection transmission, beliefs and practices of healthcare workers do not always concur with scientific rationale. To provide explanations for nurses' infection prevention behaviours. An interpretative, qualitative approach was taken using semi-structured interviews. Twenty interviews with registered nurses working in an acute hospital setting were conducted. Analysis was conducted using the Framework method. This paper focuses on the theme 'protection from dirt'. Within the findings clear distinction was made between infection and dirt. Fear of contact with dirt, particularly dirt belonging to those who were unknown, was a key driver in behaviour carried out to reduce threat. Familiarity with the patient resulted in a reduction of the protective behaviours required. These behaviours, which initially appeared as part of an infection prevention strategy, were primarily a form of self-protection from patients, who at first encounter were considered as dirty. Behaviours do not always fit with a rational response to infection, but instead may be responses to dirt. Any programme that simply attempts to address scientific knowledge and behaviour deficits is unlikely to have the desired goals if it does not take into account existing social constructions of dirt and the response it evokes. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Factors Controlling Miscibility of Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    The lattice cluster theory is applied to study the competing molecular factors influencing the miscibility of polymer blends. These factors include monomer molecular structures, local chain stiffnesses, asymmetries in monomer-monomer interactions, non-random mixing, and compressibility. The treatment of blends as compressible is necessary in order to compute the pressure dependence of the phase diagrams and other thermodynamic properties. Specific applications are given for blends of polyolefins and for blends containing random copolymers. The theory provides an explicit monomer structure dependent expression for the entropic \\chi parameter, and this parameter is shown to exhibit a remarkable correlation with the computed critical temperatures. Comparisons are made with the general trends predicted by previous models and theories of polyolefin miscibilities. Of particular interest is the explanation of the observed significantly different miscibilities of atactic poly(propylene) and head-to-head poly(propylene) with poly(ethylene propylene).

  13. What factors control dimerization of coniferyl alcohol?

    Treesearch

    Carl J. Houtman

    1999-01-01

    Data suggest that the dimerization of coniferyl alcohol is not under thermodynamic control. In this study, molecular dynamics calculations were used to estimate the effect of the solvent environment. In water, the coniferyl alcohol radicals were forced to associate by the formation of a solvent cage. In glycerol, the solvent cage effect appeared to be absent. These...

  14. Multi-level risk factors associated with sex trading among women living with HIV in Kazakhstan: A neglected key population.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alissa; Jiwatram-Negrón, Tina; Primbetova, Sholpan; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Bilokon, Yelena; Chubukova, Lyubov; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and risk factors associated with sex trading among HIV-positive women. A total of 242 HIV-positive women were recruited in five regions in Kazakhstan. These women completed a survey containing items on socio-demographics, HIV stigma, intimate partner violence, and partner risk behaviors. Multivariate regression was used to examine associations between risk factors and sex trading after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Fifty-six (23.1%) women reported trading sex in the past 90 days. Women who reported recent sex trading were more likely than women who did not trade sex in the past 90 days to experience intimate partner violence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-4.73), to have been homeless in the past 90 days (AOR: 4.12; 95% CI: 1.19-14.29), and to know or suspect a male partner had a sexually transmitted infection (AOR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.07-4.53), had sex with another partner (AOR: 4.53; 95% CI: 2.25-9.14), or injected drugs in the past year (AOR: 3.31; 95% CI: 1.64-6.65). These findings underscore the need for comprehensive HIV prevention and intervention programs that address the multi-level risk factors associated with sex trading for women infected with HIV.

  15. Carotenoid derivatives inhibit nuclear factor kappa B activity in bone and cancer cells by targeting key thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Linnewiel-Hermoni, Karin; Motro, Yair; Miller, Yifat; Levy, Joseph; Sharoni, Yoav

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) transcription system contributes to cancer progression, and has a harmful effect on bone health. Several major components of the NFkB pathway such as IkB Kinase (IKK) and the NFkB subunits contain cysteine residues that are critical for their activity. The interaction of electrophiles with these cysteine residues results in NFkB inhibition. Carotenoids, hydrophobic plant pigments, are devoid of electrophilic groups, and we have previously demonstrated that carotenoid derivatives, but not the native compounds activate the Nrf2 transcription system. The aim of the current study was to examine whether carotenoid derivatives inhibit NFkB, and, if so, to determine the molecular mechanism underpinning the inhibitory action. We report in the present study that a mixture of oxidized derivatives, prepared by ethanol extraction from partially oxidized lycopene preparation, inhibited NFkB reporter gene activity. In contrast, the intact carotenoid was inactive. A series of synthetic dialdehyde carotenoid derivatives inhibited reporter activity as well as several stages of the NFkB pathway in both cancer and bone cells. The activity of the carotenoid derivatives depended on the reactivity of the electrophilic groups in reactions such as Michael addition to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. Specifically, carotenoid derivatives directly interacted with two key proteins of the NFkB pathway: the IKKβ and the p65 subunit. Direct interaction with IKKβ was found in an in vitro kinase assay with a recombinant enzyme. The inhibition by carotenoid derivatives of p65 transcriptional activity was observed in a reporter gene assay performed in the presence of excess p65. This inhibition action resulted, at least in part, from direct interaction of the carotenoid derivative with p65 leading to reduced binding of the protein to DNA as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) experiments. Importantly, we found by using

  16. Controllers and Pilots Play a Key Role in Runway Safety Initiatives Through Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Mike; Bender, Kim

    2004-01-01

    A new and innovative way to evaluate runway safety initiatives for airports is through the use of interactive real-time simulation. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) operates an integrated suite of simulators that can give both pilots and tower controllers the ability to simultaneously "try out" ideas in the safety of virtual reality. In February of 2003, the FAA conducted a demonstration in the NASA facilities for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) of a concept to reduce runway crossings and enhance the efficiency of the airport. Currently DFW experiences about 1,700 runway crossings per day, which contribute to arrival and departure delays and the potential for runway incursions. The proposed concept included the addition of new perimeter taxiways on the East and West sides of the airport. Through use of NASA's unique simulation capabilities, DFW controllers and commercial pilots provided expert feedback on the safety and operational implications by directly experiencing the proposed changes. Overall, the data collected from the participants and the simulators demonstrated that the concept would improve operations at DFW, if implemented. Improvements were observed in many areas including departure rates, taxi duration, runway crossings, and controller and pilot communications.

  17. The mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channel: key component of a plasmalemmal control centre?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.; Ding, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channels probably serve to detect not only mechanical stress but also electrical, thermal, and diverse chemical stimuli. Because all stimuli result in a common output, most notably a shift in second messenger calcium concentration, the channels are presumed to serve as signal integrators. Further, insofar as second messenger calcium in turn gives rise to mechanical, electrical, and diverse chemical changes, the channels are postulated to initiate regulatory feedbacks. It is proposed that the channels and the feedback loops play a wide range of roles in regulating normal plant function, as well as in mediating disturbance of normal function by environmental stressors and various pathogens. In developing evidence for the physiological performance of the channel, a model for a cluster of regulatory plasmalemmal proteins and cytoskeletal elements grouped around a set of wall-to-membrane and transmembrane linkers has proved useful. An illustration of how the model might operate is presented. It is founded on the demonstration that several xenobiotics interfere both with normal channel behaviour and with gravitropic reception. Accordingly, the first part of the illustration deals with how the channels and the control system within which they putatively operate might initiate gravitropism. Assuming that gravitropism is an asymmetric expression of growth, the activities of the channels and the plasmalemmal control system are extrapolated to account for regulation of both rate and allometry of cell expansion. Finally, it is discussed how light, hormones, redox agents and herbicides could in principle affect growth via the putative plasmalemmal control cluster or centre.

  18. Controls on the spatial variability of key soil properties: comparing field data with a mechanistic soilscape evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanwalleghem, T.; Román, A.; Giraldez, J. V.

    2016-12-01

    There is a need for better understanding the processes influencing soil formation and the resulting distribution of soil properties. Soil properties can exhibit strong spatial variation, even at the small catchment scale. Especially soil carbon pools in semi-arid, mountainous areas are highly uncertain because bulk density and stoniness are very heterogeneous and rarely measured explicitly. In this study, we explore the spatial variability in key soil properties (soil carbon stocks, stoniness, bulk density and soil depth) as a function of processes shaping the critical zone (weathering, erosion, soil water fluxes and vegetation patterns). We also compare the potential of a geostatistical versus a mechanistic soil formation model (MILESD) for predicting these key soil properties. Soil core samples were collected from 67 locations at 6 depths. Total soil organic carbon stocks were 4.38 kg m-2. Solar radiation proved to be the key variable controlling soil carbon distribution. Stone content was mostly controlled by slope, indicating the importance of erosion. Spatial distribution of bulk density was found to be highly random. Finally, total carbon stocks were predicted using a random forest model whose main covariates were solar radiation and NDVI. The model predicts carbon stocks that are double as high on north versus south-facing slopes. However, validation showed that these covariates only explained 25% of the variation in the dataset. Apparently, present-day landscape and vegetation properties are not sufficient to fully explain variability in the soil carbon stocks in this complex terrain under natural vegetation. This is attributed to a high spatial variability in bulk density and stoniness, key variables controlling carbon stocks. Similar results were obtained with the mechanistic soil formation model MILESD, suggesting that more complex models might be needed to further explore this high spatial variability.

  19. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  20. Srebf1a is a key regulator of transcriptional control for adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Velez-Delvalle, Cristina; Beltrán-Langarica, Alicia; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Cerbón-Solorzano, Jorge; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is regulated by a complex cascade of transcriptional factors, but little is known about the early events that regulate the adipogenic program. Here, we report the role of the srebf1a gene in the differentiation of fibroblastic 3T3-F442A cells. We found that expression of srebf1a depended on GSK3β activity and that GSK3β activity was necessary for C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr188. Knockdown of srebf1a inhibited the adipogenic program because it blocked the expression of genes encoding PPARγ2, C/EBPα, SREBP1c and even FABP4, demonstrating that SREBP1a activation is upstream of these three essential adipogenic transcription factors. Kinetic analysis during differentiation illustrated that the order of expression of adipogenic genes was the following: cebpb, srebf1a, pparg2, cebpa, srebp1c and fabp4. Our data suggest that srebf1a acts as an essential link between the GSK3β-C/EBPβ signaling axis and the beginning of the adipogenic transcriptional cascade.

  1. Srebf1a is a key regulator of transcriptional control for adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Velez-delValle, Cristina; Beltrán-Langarica, Alicia; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Cerbón-Solorzano, Jorge; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is regulated by a complex cascade of transcriptional factors, but little is known about the early events that regulate the adipogenic program. Here, we report the role of the srebf1a gene in the differentiation of fibroblastic 3T3-F442A cells. We found that expression of srebf1a depended on GSK3β activity and that GSK3β activity was necessary for C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr188. Knockdown of srebf1a inhibited the adipogenic program because it blocked the expression of genes encoding PPARγ2, C/EBPα, SREBP1c and even FABP4, demonstrating that SREBP1a activation is upstream of these three essential adipogenic transcription factors. Kinetic analysis during differentiation illustrated that the order of expression of adipogenic genes was the following: cebpb, srebf1a, pparg2, cebpa, srebp1c and fabp4. Our data suggest that srebf1a acts as an essential link between the GSK3β-C/EBPβ signaling axis and the beginning of the adipogenic transcriptional cascade. PMID:22355693

  2. The Circadian Clock in Murine Chondrocytes Regulates Genes Controlling Key Aspects of Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gossan, Nicole; Zeef, Leo; Hensman, James; Hughes, Alun; Bateman, John F; Rowley, Lynn; Little, Christopher B; Piggins, Hugh D; Rattray, Magnus; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo characterize the circadian clock in murine cartilage tissue and identify tissue-specific clock target genes, and to investigate whether the circadian clock changes during aging or during cartilage degeneration using an experimental mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). MethodsCartilage explants were obtained from aged and young adult mice after transduction with the circadian clock fusion protein reporter PER2::luc, and real-time bioluminescence recordings were used to characterize the properties of the clock. Time-series microarrays were performed on mouse cartilage tissue to identify genes expressed in a circadian manner. Rhythmic genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction using mouse tissue, primary chondrocytes, and a human chondrocyte cell line. Experimental OA was induced in mice by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), and articular cartilage samples were microdissected and subjected to microarray analysis. ResultsMouse cartilage tissue and a human chondrocyte cell line were found to contain intrinsic molecular circadian clocks. The cartilage clock could be reset by temperature signals, while the circadian period was temperature compensated. PER2::luc bioluminescence demonstrated that circadian oscillations were significantly lower in amplitude in cartilage from aged mice. Time-series microarray analyses of the mouse tissue identified the first circadian transcriptome in cartilage, revealing that 615 genes (∼3.9% of the expressed genes) displayed a circadian pattern of expression. This included genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and survival, as well as genes with potential importance in the pathogenesis of OA. Several clock genes were disrupted in the early stages of cartilage degeneration in the DMM mouse model of OA. ConclusionThese results reveal an autonomous circadian clock in chondrocytes that can be implicated in key aspects of cartilage biology and pathology. Consequently

  3. DOD Business Systems Modernization. Navy Implementing a Number of Key Management Controls on Enterprise Resource Planning System, but Improvements Still Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Navy Implementing a Number of Key Management Controls on Enterprise Resource Planning System, but Improvements Still Needed September 2009...Navy Implementing a Number of Key Management Controls on Enterprise Resource Planning System, but Improvements Still Needed 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Implementing a Number of Key Management Controls on Enterprise Resource Planning System, but Improvements Still Needed Highlights of GAO-09-841, a report to

  4. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Control of Secreted Factors for Blood Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Julia; Wang, Weijia; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of umbilical cord blood has typically been limited by the need to expand hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) ex vivo. This expansion is challenging due to the accumulation of secreted signaling factors in the culture that have a negative regulatory effect on HSPC output. Strategies for global regulation of these factors through dilution have been developed, but do not accommodate the dynamic nature or inherent variability of hematopoietic cell culture. We have developed a mathematical model to simulate the impact of feedback control on in vitro hematopoiesis, and used it to design a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control algorithm. This algorithm was implemented with a fed-batch bioreactor to regulate the concentrations of secreted factors. Controlling the concentration of a key target factor, TGF-β1, through dilution limited the negative effect it had on HSPCs, and allowed global control of other similarly-produced inhibitory endogenous factors. The PID control algorithm effectively maintained the target soluble factor at the target concentration. We show that feedback controlled dilution is predicted to be a more cost effective dilution strategy compared to other open-loop strategies, and can enhance HSPC expansion in short term culture. This study demonstrates the utility of secreted factor process control strategies to optimize stem cell culture systems, and motivates the development of multi-analyte protein sensors to automate the manufacturing of cell therapies. PMID:26348930

  5. Well-controlled experimentation in artificial catchments as the key to better understand natural hydrologic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holländer, H.; Schoenheinz, D.; Stadler, S.

    2012-04-01

    Catchments are open dynamic systems that process mass and momentum, and drive energy and entropy towards an equilibrium state of development. The formulation of equations to explain these systems results in a number of redundant variables for which constitutive relationships are required at the scale of integration. This so called "closure problem" exists due to the generally unknown relationship between hydrologic state variables and fluxes. Traditionally, we deal with two complementary approaches in hydrological research: i) experimental catchment studies and ii) physically-based hydrological modelling. The unique character of each catchment and of its eco-hydrological processes often does not allow conclusions by analogy, which would require similarity and homogeneity of catchment features. Generalised theories to cope with both the closure problem and the singularity of catchments in hydrological research have not been derived so far, and the modelling of flow processes in catchments is still impeded e. g. by scale incompatibilities of involved parameters. One of the main questions addressed in our contribution is: How much improvement in hydrological research is possible by well-controlled experimentation fields as artificially created catchments? The definition of parameters and boundary conditions in such well-controlled experiments allows for an improvement in observation strategies and therefore a systematic learning from observed data and an enhanced understanding of the interrelation of given structures and process triggers. Also, the conditions for targeted testing of hydrological hypotheses are considered to be the best possible. In our contribution we identify examples for the determination of such processes and their description e.g. for water transport in the soil matrix, structure and dynamics of sedimentation as well as erosion in the artificial catchment Chicken Creek, Lusatia, Germany. We also show that there are still challenging aspects even

  6. Control of Cellular Morphology by Mechanical Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoumine, Olivier

    1996-11-01

    This short review deals with the influence of mechanical factors on eucaryotic cell morphology and structure. We classify these factors into two types: i) external forces (e.g. gravitational forces or hemodynamic stresses), which when applied experimentally allow characterization of passive mechanical properties; and ii) internal forces, e.g. generated by molecular motors or polymerization processes. Perturbation of one or more of these forces induces significant changes in cell shape, cytoskeleton and pericellular matrix organization. We describe these phenomena in view of current models. Cette brève revue traite de l'influence des facteurs mécaniques sur la morphologie et la structure des cellules eucaryotes. Nous classifions ces facteurs en deux catégories : i) les forces externes (par exemple les forces de gravitation et les contraintes hèmodynamiques) qui, imposées in vitro, permettent de caractériser les propriétés mécaniques passives ; et ii) les forces internes, par exemple celles générées par les moteurs moléculaires ou les processus de polymérisation. La perturbation de l'une ou de l'autre de ces forces provoque des changements significatifs de la morphologie cellulaire ainsi que l'organisation du cytosquelette et de la matrice péricellulaire. Nous décrivons ces phénomènes en fonction de modèles existants.

  7. RNA Quality Control as a Key to Suppressing RNA Silencing of Endogenous Genes in Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-06-06

    RNA quality control of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of eukaryotic gene expression and often relies on exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional transcripts. In parallel, exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs are degraded through RNA silencing, which is a genome defense mechanism used by many eukaryotes. In plants, RNA silencing is triggered by the production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASEs (RDRs) and proceeds through small interfering (si) RNA-directed, ARGONAUTE (AGO)-mediated cleavage of homologous transcripts. Many studies revealed that plants avert inappropriate posttranscriptional gene silencing of endogenous coding genes by using RNA surveillance mechanisms as a safeguard to protect their transcriptome profiles. The tug of war between RNA surveillance and RNA silencing ensures the appropriate partitioning of endogenous RNA substrates among these degradation pathways. Here we review recent advances on RNA quality control and its role in the suppression of RNA silencing at endogenous genes and discuss the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk among these pathways. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Motor power factor controller with a reduced voltage starter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A power factor type motor controller is disclosed in which the conventional power factor constant voltage command signal is replaced during a starting interval with a graduated control voltage. This continuation-impart of a pending patent application (Serial No. 199, 765: Three Phase Factor Controller) provides a means for modifying the operation of the system for a motor start-up interval of 5 to 30 second. Using a ramp generators, an initial ramp-like signal replaces a constant power factor signal supplied by a potentiometer. The ramp-like signal is applied to a 15 terminal where it is summed with an operating power factor signal from phase detectors in order to obtain a control signal for ultimately controlling SCR devices. The SCR devices are turned on at an advancing rate with time responsive to the combination signal described rather than simply a function of a ramp-like signal alone.

  9. Identification of Key Factors Involved in the Biosorption of Patulin by Inactivated Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors involved in patulin adsorption by heat-inactivated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cells. For preventing bacterial contamination, a sterilization process was involved in the adsorption process. The effects of various physical, chemical, and enzymatic pre-treatments, simultaneous treatments, and post-treatments on the patulin adsorption performances of six LAB strains were evaluated. The pre-treated cells were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the removal of patulin by viable cells was mainly based on adsorption or degradation, depending on the specific strain. The adsorption abilities were widely increased by NaOH and esterification pre-treatments, and reduced by trypsin, lipase, iodate, and periodate pre-treatments. Additionally, the adsorption abilities were almost maintained at pH 2.2–4.0, and enhanced significantly at pH 4.0–6.0. The effects of sodium and magnesium ions on the adsorption abilities at pH 4 were slight and strain-specific. A lower proportion of patulin was released from the strain with higher adsorption ability. Analyses revealed that the physical structure of peptidoglycan was not a principal factor. Vicinal OH and carboxyl groups were not involved in patulin adsorption, while alkaline amino acids, thiol and ester compounds were important for patulin adsorption. Additionally, besides hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction also participated in patulin adsorption, which was enhanced with the increase in pH (4.0–6.0). PMID:26581099

  10. An effective and secure key-management scheme for hierarchical access control in E-medicine system.

    PubMed

    Odelu, Vanga; Das, Ashok Kumar; Goswami, Adrijit

    2013-04-01

    Recently several hierarchical access control schemes are proposed in the literature to provide security of e-medicine systems. However, most of them are either insecure against 'man-in-the-middle attack' or they require high storage and computational overheads. Wu and Chen proposed a key management method to solve dynamic access control problems in a user hierarchy based on hybrid cryptosystem. Though their scheme improves computational efficiency over Nikooghadam et al.'s approach, it suffers from large storage space for public parameters in public domain and computational inefficiency due to costly elliptic curve point multiplication. Recently, Nikooghadam and Zakerolhosseini showed that Wu-Chen's scheme is vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attack. In order to remedy this security weakness in Wu-Chen's scheme, they proposed a secure scheme which is again based on ECC (elliptic curve cryptography) and efficient one-way hash function. However, their scheme incurs huge computational cost for providing verification of public information in the public domain as their scheme uses ECC digital signature which is costly when compared to symmetric-key cryptosystem. In this paper, we propose an effective access control scheme in user hierarchy which is only based on symmetric-key cryptosystem and efficient one-way hash function. We show that our scheme reduces significantly the storage space for both public and private domains, and computational complexity when compared to Wu-Chen's scheme, Nikooghadam-Zakerolhosseini's scheme, and other related schemes. Through the informal and formal security analysis, we further show that our scheme is secure against different attacks and also man-in-the-middle attack. Moreover, dynamic access control problems in our scheme are also solved efficiently compared to other related schemes, making our scheme is much suitable for practical applications of e-medicine systems.

  11. Leadership, Control, Communication and Comprehension: Key Factors in Successful Implementation of SBDM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, Carol Plata; And Others

    This study examines the effects of principal leadership styles on the development of the working styles of seven local school councils in Memphis (Tennessee) during their first 15 months of operation. The successful implementation of a school-based decision making (SBDM) management model depends upon the ability of the local school council to…

  12. Controlled ovarian stimulation and triggers in in vitro fertilization: protocol personalization key to optimize outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jacqueline Y; Christianson, Mindy S

    2018-03-01

    The past four decades have delivered many advancements to improve in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. These include a delicate balance of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without causing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a safe oocyte retrieval, fertilization and embryo culture, endometrial growth and receptivity to promote implantation, and luteal support to maintain the pregnancy. Contemporary IVF practice includes both the classic COH protocols as well as protocols for poor responders and those for specific patient populations. An assortment of agents have been developed and utilized in various combinations to improve COH outcomes and promote oocyte maturation while decreasing the risk of OHSS. Various protocols have evolved over time. Ideal practices involve selecting the optimal protocol for a personalized, patient-specific stimulation and trigger.

  13. Information and professional support: key factors in the provision of family-centred early childhood intervention services.

    PubMed

    Fordham, L; Gibson, F; Bowes, J

    2012-09-01

    Much has been written on the principles of family-centred practice and on the service delivery methods and skills required of its practitioners. Far less has been written from the perspective of families whose children have a disability. The aims of this study were twofold: firstly to understand families' experiences of family-centred early childhood intervention services and secondly to explore other factors that might impact on these experiences. One hundred and thirty families attending two established early childhood intervention services in New South Wales, Australia completed a survey incorporating the Measure of Processes of Care-56, the Family Empowerment Scale, the Family Support Scale and the Parenting Daily Hassles Scale. Consistent with previous research using the Measure of Processes of Care-56, 'respectful and supportive care' was the domain of care families rated to occur most and 'provision of general information' was the domain they rated to occur least. Significant positive relationships existed between families' ratings of family-centred care and feelings of empowerment. Being provided with general information was strongly correlated with family empowerment. Families' social support networks played an important role but support from professionals was most strongly correlated with families' experiences of family-centred care. Finally, families whose children's early intervention services were co-ordinated by a professional experienced significantly better care. The provision of general information and professional support are key components of family-centred early childhood intervention services. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The Drosophila Duox maturation factor is a key component of a positive feedback loop that sustains regeneration signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andrea; Tian, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Regenerating tissue must initiate the signaling that drives regenerative growth, and sustain that signaling long enough for regeneration to complete. How these key signals are sustained is unclear. To gain a comprehensive view of the changes in gene expression that occur during regeneration, we performed whole-genome mRNAseq of actively regenerating tissue from damaged Drosophila wing imaginal discs. We used genetic tools to ablate the wing primordium to induce regeneration, and carried out transcriptional profiling of the regeneration blastema by fluorescently labeling and sorting the blastema cells, thus identifying differentially expressed genes. Importantly, by using genetic mutants of several of these differentially expressed genes we have confirmed that they have roles in regeneration. Using this approach, we show that high expression of the gene moladietz (mol), which encodes the Duox-maturation factor NIP, is required during regeneration to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn sustain JNK signaling during regeneration. We also show that JNK signaling upregulates mol expression, thereby activating a positive feedback signal that ensures the prolonged JNK activation required for regenerative growth. Thus, by whole-genome transcriptional profiling of regenerating tissue we have identified a positive feedback loop that regulates the extent of regenerative growth. PMID:28753614

  15. Spectrin-ankyrin interaction mechanics: A key force balance factor in the red blood cell membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masakazu; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Machida, Shinichi; Osada, Toshiya; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    As major components of red blood cell (RBC) cytoskeleton, spectrin and F-actin form a network that covers the entire cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane. The cross-linked two layered structure, called the membrane skeleton, keeps the structural integrity of RBC under drastically changing mechanical environment during circulation. We performed force spectroscopy experiments on the atomic force microscope (AFM) as a means to clarify the mechanical characteristics of spectrin-ankyrin interaction, a key factor in the force balance of the RBC cytoskeletal structure. An AFM tip was functionalized with ANK1-62k and used to probe spectrin crosslinked to mica surface. A force spectroscopy study gave a mean unbinding force of ~30 pN under our experimental conditions. Two energy barriers were identified in the unbinding process. The result was related to the well-known flexibility of spectrin tetramer and participation of ankyrin 1-spectrin interaction in the overall balance of membrane skeleton dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying a key physical factor sensitive to the performance of Madden-Julian oscillation simulation in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Go-Un; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2018-01-01

    A key physical factor in regulating the performance of Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) simulation is examined by using 26 climate model simulations from the World Meteorological Organization's Working Group for Numerical Experimentation/Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric System Study (WGNE and MJO-Task Force/GASS) global model comparison project. For this, intraseasonal moisture budget equation is analyzed and a simple, efficient physical quantity is developed. The result shows that MJO skill is most sensitive to vertically integrated intraseasonal zonal wind convergence (ZC). In particular, a specific threshold value of the strength of the ZC can be used as distinguishing between good and poor models. An additional finding is that good models exhibit the correct simultaneous convection and large-scale circulation phase relationship. In poor models, however, the peak circulation response appears 3 days after peak rainfall, suggesting unfavorable coupling between convection and circulation. For an improving simulation of the MJO in climate models, we propose that this delay of circulation in response to convection needs to be corrected in the cumulus parameterization scheme.

  17. The Drosophila Duox maturation factor is a key component of a positive feedback loop that sustains regeneration signaling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumbul Jawed; Abidi, Syeda Nayab Fatima; Skinner, Andrea; Tian, Yuan; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2017-07-01

    Regenerating tissue must initiate the signaling that drives regenerative growth, and sustain that signaling long enough for regeneration to complete. How these key signals are sustained is unclear. To gain a comprehensive view of the changes in gene expression that occur during regeneration, we performed whole-genome mRNAseq of actively regenerating tissue from damaged Drosophila wing imaginal discs. We used genetic tools to ablate the wing primordium to induce regeneration, and carried out transcriptional profiling of the regeneration blastema by fluorescently labeling and sorting the blastema cells, thus identifying differentially expressed genes. Importantly, by using genetic mutants of several of these differentially expressed genes we have confirmed that they have roles in regeneration. Using this approach, we show that high expression of the gene moladietz (mol), which encodes the Duox-maturation factor NIP, is required during regeneration to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn sustain JNK signaling during regeneration. We also show that JNK signaling upregulates mol expression, thereby activating a positive feedback signal that ensures the prolonged JNK activation required for regenerative growth. Thus, by whole-genome transcriptional profiling of regenerating tissue we have identified a positive feedback loop that regulates the extent of regenerative growth.

  18. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  19. Research on key factors and their interaction effects of electromagnetic force of high-speed solenoid valve.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Liyun; Hayat, Qaisar; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined.

  20. Research on Key Factors and Their Interaction Effects of Electromagnetic Force of High-Speed Solenoid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liyun; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined. PMID:25243217

  1. [Risk assessments and control strategies of plague in five key surveillance counties, Zhejiang province].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guoxiang; Ju, Cheng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Zheng; Sun, Jimin; Wang, Miaoruo; Zhang, Xiaohe; Ye, Xianming; Zhu, Zhihong; Xing, Jianguang; Liao, Xiaowei; Chen, Zhiping

    2015-10-01

    evaluation five counties (cities) belong to the plague had a lower risk areas, according to the level of risk score (Pf) Longquan city and Yiwu (Pf was 0.314, 0.292, respectively) plague risk were higher than three other regions (Pf were all 0.292). The main host and media were lower in five key plague surveillance counties (cities) of Zhejiang province; The result of Borda count method and Delphi approach for risk assessment indicated that endogenous plague recrudescence was at lower level, but Longquan city and Yiwu city risk were higher than other counties (cities).

  2. Getting the Dimensions Right - Human Nutrition as Key for the Control of Regional Nitrogen Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zessner, M.; Thaler, S.; Ruzicka, K.; Natho, S.

    2009-04-01

    to consider emissions to the air inside and outside the considered region (NH3 volatilisation from manure and NOX-emissions from burning processes as traffic) in addition to the direct losses to the water system (optimised fertiliser application). Basically, the key to improved nutrient management on national/catchment scale is the human nutrition. Nutrition of the population in accordance to health recommendations (50 % less meet consumption, contra balanced by an increasing amount of vegetarian food) would dramatically optimise the national nitrogen balance. Assuming the same basic nitrogen efficiency of agricultural as it is performed at present, this shift in production would lead to a dramatic relief in respect to environmental pressure. It would lead to a reduction of the needed nitrogen input (mineral fertiliser and import fooder) by about 40 % and a reduction of NH3 losses to the atmosphere of about 40 % as well. Assuming that the same reduction of meet production would be realised in neighbouring countries the deposition could be reduced by about 25 %. Finally, this would lead to reduced losses of nitrogen to the water system by about 35 %, which could be counter acted to some extent, if areas no longer needed for food production are used for cultivation of crops for renewable energy production.

  3. Factors controlling the seasonality of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Hsu, Pang-Chi

    2017-06-01

    By analyzing observational data, previous studies have indicated that the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is active during the boreal winter but relatively weak during the boreal summer. However, the factors that control seasonal MJO variation are not clear. To quantitatively understand the relative contributions of the occurrence frequency of enhanced MJO events and their averaged strength and lifespan to seasonal MJO amplitude, we defined the MJO events of 1979-2014 and analyzed their features in different seasons by using the Real-time Multivariate MJO (RMM) index and the newly proposed RMM-r index. The results indicate that the MJO events show a higher frequency of occurrence, a stronger intensity and a longer duration during the boreal winter (Dec.-Feb.) and spring (Mar.-May). However, the frequency, strength and lifespan of MJO events are all reduced during the boreal summer (Jun.-Aug.) and autumn (Sep.-Nov.). The enhanced MJO events in winter-spring also show a large ratio of variance for eastward to westward components. To elucidate how large-scale background fields affect seasonal MJO variation, a series of sensitivity experiments was conducted by using a 2.5-layer model that can simulate MJO-like features. It is found that the variation in low-level moisture (vertical wind shear) is the key large-scale factor affecting the seasonal variation in MJO strength (in propagation). In comparison with the summer-autumn seasons when the MJO is relatively weakened, the relatively abundant low-level moisture near the equator during boreal winter-spring may strengthen the development of MJO convection and circulation, whereas the relatively weak easterly shear (or the westerly shear anomaly) is conducive to the enhancement of an eastward-propagating MJO component.

  4. Key controls of surface carbonate system dynamics around the northwest European continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Hydes, D. J.; Hartman, S. E.; Hartman, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    Monthly sampling coupled to continuous underway observation from a ship-of-opportunity (Pride of Bilbao) provides new insights into the relative importance of processes controlling the seasonal to inter-annual variability of the carbonate system around the northwest European continental margin. Total alkalinity (TA) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined alongside measurements of nutrients and continuous records of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-fluorescence, and dissolved oxygen (DO). The northwest European continental margin is temperate latitude system with a strong seasonal cycle in biological productivity determined by light, nutrient supply, and stratification. Here we contrast findings in two areas: the shallow non stratified English Channel (depth ~50 m) and seasonally stratified oligotrophic waters of the central Bay of Biscay (depth >3000 m). In the Bay of Biscay, the seasonal variations of the carbonate system, nutrient, and DO were mainly controlled by the winter mixing and spring phytoplankton bloom. DIC and nutrients in the Bay increased from autumn and reached the annual maxima in later winter, they then decreased significantly during the spring bloom corresponding to the biological uptake. DIC fell during the spring bloom with a near Redfield ratio in relation to the nutrient uptake. In contrast, post bloom in summer, a continued decrease in DIC in the absence of measurable nitrate was possibly related to the nutrient supply from the turbulent mixing. pCO2 and pH showed a double peak in the annual cycles modulated by temperature which counterbalanced the influence of winter mixing and biological production. The inter-annual biogeochemical variability was closely related to the changes in winter mixed layer depth and the phytoplankton biomass. The Bay of Biscay acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 in all seasons, with higher air-to-sea CO2 fluxes observed in cold winter and the productive spring season. In the more dynamic

  5. Intensive risk factor control in stroke prevention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke prevention is an urgent priority because of the aging of the population and the steep association of age and risk of stroke. Direct costs of stroke are expected to more than double in the US between 2012 and 2030. By getting everything right, patients can reduce the risk of stroke by 80% or more; however, getting everything right is a tall order. Roughly in order of importance, this requires smoking cessation, maintenance of a healthy weight, a Cretan Mediterranean diet, blood pressure control, lipid-lowering drugs, appropriate use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and appropriate carotid endarterectomy and stenting. A new approach called “treating arteries instead of targeting risk factors” appears promising but requires validation in randomized trials. PMID:24167723

  6. Particulate phases are key in controlling dissolved iron concentrations in the (sub)tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Angela; Schlosser, Christian; Wake, Bronwyn D.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R.; Forryan, Alex; Lohan, Maeve C.

    2017-03-01

    The supply and bioavailability of iron (Fe) controls primary productivity and N2 fixation in large parts of the global ocean. An important, yet poorly quantified, source to the ocean is particulate Fe (pFe). Here we present the first combined dataset of particulate, labile-particulate (L-pFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe) from the (sub)tropical North Atlantic. We show a strong relationship between L-pFe and dFe, indicating a dynamic equilibrium between these two phases whereby particles "buffer" dFe and maintain the elevated concentrations observed. Moreover, L-pFe can increase the overall "available" (L-pFe + dFe) Fe pool by up to 55%. The lateral shelf flux of this available Fe was similar in magnitude to observed soluble aerosol-Fe deposition, a comparison that has not been previously considered. These findings demonstrate that L-pFe is integral to Fe cycling and hence plays a role in regulating carbon cycling, warranting its inclusion in Fe budgets and biogeochemical models.

  7. Key to enhance thermoelectric performance by controlling crystal size of strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Ye, Xinxin; Yaer, Xinba; Wu, Yin; Zhang, Boyu; Miao, Lei

    2015-09-01

    One-step molten salt synthesis process was introduced to fabricate nano to micrometer sized SrTiO3 powders in which effects of synthesis temperature, oxide-to-flux ratios and raw materials on the generation of SrTiO3 powders were examined. 100 nm or above sized pure SrTiO3 particles were obtained at relatively lower temperature of 900∘C. Micro-sized rhombohedral crystals with a maximum size of approximately 12 μm were obtained from SrCO3 or Sr(NO3)2 strontium source with 1:1 O/S ratio. Controlled crystal size and morphology of Nb-doped SrTiO3 particles are prepared by using this method to confirm the performance of thermoelectric properties. The Seebeck coefficient obtained is significantly high when compared with the reported data, and the high ratio of nano particles in the sample has a positive effect on the increase of Seebeck coefficient too, which is likely due to the energy filtering effect at large numbers of grain boundaries resulting from largely distributed structure.

  8. Initiator protein dimerization plays a key role in replication control of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Jyoti K.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2014-01-01

    RctB, the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (chr2), binds to the origin of replication to specific 12-mer sites both as a monomer and a dimer. Binding to 12-mers is essential for initiation. The monomers also bind to a second kind of site, 39-mers, which inhibits initiation. Mutations in rctB that reduce dimer binding increase monomer binding to 12-mers but decrease monomer binding to 39-mers. The mechanism of this paradoxical binding behavior has been unclear. Using deletion and alanine substitution mutants of RctB, we have now localized to a 71 amino acid region residues important for binding to the two kinds of DNA sites and for RctB dimerization. We find that the dimerization domain overlaps with both the DNA binding domains, explaining how changes in the dimerization domain can alter both kinds of DNA binding. Moreover, dimerization-defective mutants could be initiation-defective without apparent DNA binding defect. These results suggest that dimerization might be important for initiation beyond its role in controlling DNA binding. The finding that determinants of crucial initiator functions reside in a small region makes the region an attractive target for anti-V. cholerae drugs. PMID:25159619

  9. Surface temperature: A key parameter to control the propanethiol plasma polymer chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Thiry, Damien Aparicio, Francisco J.; Laha, Priya; Terryn, Herman; Snyders, Rony

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the influence of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the chemical composition of propanethiol plasma polymers was investigated for a given set of plasma conditions. In a first study, a decrease in the atomic sulfur content (at. %S) with the deposition time (t{sub d}) was observed. This behavior is explained by the heating of the growing film during deposition process, limiting the incorporation of stable sulfur-based molecules produced in the plasma. Experiments carried out by controlling the substrate temperature support this hypothesis. On the other hand, an empirical law relating the T{sub s} and the at. %S was established. This allows for the formation of gradient layer presenting a heterogeneous chemical composition along the thickness, as determined by depth profile analysis combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and C{sub 60} ion gun sputtering. The experimental data fit with the one predicted from our empiric description. The whole set of our results provide new insights in the relationship between the substrate temperature and the sulfur content in sulfur-based plasma polymers, essential for future developments.

  10. The cutting crew - ribonucleases are key players in the control of plastid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Rhea; Meurer, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis requires constant adjustment of RNA homeostasis under conditions of on-going developmental and environmental change and its regulation is achieved mainly by post-transcriptional control mechanisms mediated by various nucleus-encoded ribonucleases. More than 180 ribonucleases are annotated in Arabidopsis, but only 17 are predicted to localize to the chloroplast. Although different ribonucleases act at different RNA target sites in vivo, most nucleases that attack RNA are thought to lack intrinsic cleavage specificity and show non-specific activity in vitro. In vivo, specificity is thought to be imposed by auxiliary RNA-binding proteins, including members of the huge pentatricopeptide repeat family, which protect RNAs from non-specific nucleolytic attack by masking otherwise vulnerable sites. RNA stability is also influenced by secondary structure, polyadenylation, and ribosome binding. Ribonucleases may cleave at internal sites (endonucleases) or digest successively from the 5' or 3' end of the polynucleotide chain (exonucleases). In bacteria, RNases act in the maturation of rRNA and tRNA precursors, as well as in initiating the degradation of mRNAs and small non-coding RNAs. Many ribonucleases in the chloroplasts of higher plants possess homologies to their bacterial counterparts, but their precise functions have rarely been described. However, many ribonucleases present in the chloroplast process polycistronic rRNAs, tRNAs, and mRNAs. The resulting production of monocistronic, translationally competent mRNAs may represent an adaptation to the eukaryotic cellular environment. This review provides a basic overview of the current knowledge of RNases in plastids and highlights gaps to stimulate future studies.

  11. Control and the Aged: Environmental or Personality Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiffany, Phyllis G.; Dey, Kay

    Control over self, lifestyle, and environment is a major factor in how one ages. To investigate how age acts as an environmental force in affecting perceptions of control, 45 adults, aged 60-80, from western Kansas were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), the Tiffany Experienced Control Scales (ECS), the Minnesota…

  12. Chalcopyrite leaching: The rate controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Kawashima, N.; Kaplun, K.; Absolon, V. J.; Gerson, A. R.

    2010-05-01

    The processes that determine the rate of chalcopyrite leaching are central to understanding how chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) behaves under the environmentally adverse conditions of acid rock drainage. To this end the effect of the acid anion on chalcopyrite leach rates using a variety of acidic media (H 2SO 4, HClO 4, HCl and H 2SO 4 with 0.25 M NaCl) under carefully controlled solution conditions (pH 1 and 2, Eh 750 mV (SHE) and 75 °C) has been examined. These conditions have been chosen to enable sufficient leach rates for accurate experimental determination and to compare to the previous mechanistic analysis carried out by Harmer et al. (2006). Extensive surface analysis of leach residues demonstrated that variations in the surface speciation could not be responsible for the observed variations in leach rate. The rate of Cu release, however, was found to be first order with respect to Fe 3+ activity and inversely proportional with respect to H + activity to the power of 0.7: {1}/{S}{dC}/{dt}=(2.0±0.2){a}/{aH0.7} where S is the relative surface area, C is concentration of Cu in the solution (M), t is the time (h), 2.0 is the rate constant (M 0.7 h -1) and a and a are Fe 3+ and H + activities, respectively (M). The rate model was further validated against additional leaches carried out in H 2SO 4 media with the initial addition of Fe 3+ (8 mM as Fe 2(SO 4) 3) at 75 °C under various pH and Eh regimes. The only condition under which this rate model was found not to hold was at simultaneously low a and high a, that is at pH 1 and a<5×10-5M, where the concentration of dissolved O 2 may be leach rate determining.

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a key mediator in experimental osteoarthritis pain and disease development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to be important in the development of inflammatory models of rheumatoid arthritis and there is encouraging data that its blockade may have clinical relevance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aims of the current study were to determine whether GM-CSF may also be important for disease and pain development in a model of osteoarthritis. Methods The role of GM-CSF was investigated using the collagenase-induced instability model of osteoarthritis. We studied both GM-CSF-/- mice and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice treated prophylactically or therapeutically with a monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF. Disease development (both early and late) was evaluated by histology and knee pain development was measured by assessment of weight distribution. Results In the absence of GM-CSF, there was less synovitis and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated neoepitope expression at week 2 post disease induction, and less cartilage damage at week 6. GM-CSF was absolutely required for pain development. Therapeutic neutralization of GM-CSF not only abolished the pain within 3 days but also led to significantly reduced cartilage damage. Conclusions GM-CSF is key to the development of experimental osteoarthritis and its associated pain. Importantly, GM-CSF neutralization by a therapeutic monoclonal antibody-based protocol rapidly and completely abolished existing arthritic pain and suppressed the degree of arthritis development. Our results suggest that it would be worth exploring the importance of GM-CSF for pain and disease in other osteoarthritis models and perhaps clinically for this form of arthritis. PMID:22995428

  14. Maintaining the momentum: Key factors influencing acceptance of influenza vaccination among pregnant women following the H1N1 pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Beth A; MacKinnon-Cameron, Donna; McNeil, Shelly; Kalil, Jennifer; Halperin, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    This survey study compared pre- and post-pandemic knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and intended behaviors of pregnant women regarding influenza vaccination (seasonal and/or pandemic) during pregnancy in order to determine key factors influencing their decision to adhere to influenza vaccine recommendations. Only 36% of 662 pre-pandemic respondents knew that influenza was more severe in pregnant women, compared to 62% of the 159 post-pandemic respondents. Of the pre-pandemic respondents, 41% agreed or strongly agreed that that it was safer to wait until after the first 3 months to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine, whereas 23% of the post-pandemic cohort agreed or strongly agreed; 32% of pre-pandemic participants compared to 11% of post-pandemic respondents felt it was best to avoid all vaccines while pregnant. Despite 61% of the pre-pandemic cohort stating that they would have the vaccine while pregnant if their doctor recommended it and 54% citing their doctor/nurse as their primary source of vaccine information, only 20% said their doctor discussed influenza vaccination during their pregnancy, compared to 77% of the post-pandemic respondents who reported having this conversation. Women whose doctors discussed influenza vaccine during pregnancy had higher overall knowledge scores (P < 0.0001; P = 0.005) and were more likely to believe the vaccine is safe in all stages of pregnancy (P < 0.0001; P = 0.001) than those whose doctors did not discuss influenza vaccination. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic experience appeared to change attitudes and behaviours of health care providers and their pregnant patients toward influenza vaccination. PMID:25668670

  15. Characterization of key transcription factors as molecular signatures of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral cancers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Gaurav; Vishnoi, Kanchan; Tyagi, Abhishek; Jadli, Mohit; Singh, Tejveer; Goel, Ankit; Sharma, Ankita; Agarwal, Kiran; Prasad, Subhash Chandra; Pandey, Durgatosh; Sharma, Shashi; Mehrotra, Ravi; Singh, Sukh Mahendra; Bharti, Alok Chandra

    2017-03-01

    Prior studies established constitutively active AP-1, NF-κB, and STAT3 signaling in oral cancer. Differential expression/activation of specific members of these transcription factors has been documented in HPV-positive oral lesions that respond better to therapy. We performed a comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed, transcriptionally active members of these pivotal signaling mediators to develop specific signatures of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral lesions by immunohistochemical method that is applicable in low-resource settings. We examined a total of 31 prospective and 30 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from treatment-naïve, histopathologically and clinically confirmed cases diagnosed as oral or oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC). Following determination of their HPV status by GP5 + /GP6 +  PCR, the sequential sections of the tissues were evaluated for expression of JunB, JunD, c-Fos, p50, p65, STAT3, and pSTAT3(Y705), along with two key regulatory proteins pEGFR and p16 by IHC. Independent analysis of JunB and p65 showed direct correlation with HPV positivity, whereas STAT3 and pSTAT3 were inversely correlated. A combined analysis of transcription factors revealed a more restrictive combination, characterized by the presence of AP-1 and NF-κB lacking involvement of STAT3 that strongly correlated with HPV-positive tumors. Presence of STAT3/pSTAT3 with NF-κB irrespective of the presence or absence of AP-1 members was present in HPV-negative lesions. Expression of pSTAT3 strongly correlated with all the AP-1/NF-κB members (except JunD), its upstream activator pEGFR Y 1092 , and HPV infection-related negative regulator p16. Overall, we show a simple combination of AP-1, NF-κB, and STAT3 members' expression that may serve as molecular signature of HPV-positive lesions or more broadly the tumors that show better prognosis. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification of the key weather factors affecting overwintering success of Apolygus lucorum eggs in dead host tree branches.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Lu, Yanhui; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba). Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking) was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches), very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009-2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in summer.

  17. Identification of the Key Weather Factors Affecting Overwintering Success of Apolygus lucorum Eggs in Dead Host Tree Branches

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Lu, Yanhui; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of weather on insect population dynamics is crucial to simulate and forecast pest outbreaks, which is becoming increasingly important with the effects of climate change. The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is an important pest on cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and primarily lays its eggs on dead parts of tree branches in the fall for subsequent overwintering. As such, the eggs that hatch the following spring are most strongly affected by ambient weather factors, rather than by host plant biology. In this study, we investigated the effects of three major weather factors: temperature, relative humidity and rainfall, on the hatching rate of A. lucorum eggs overwintering on dead branches of Chinese date tree (Ziziphus jujuba). Under laboratory conditions, rainfall (simulated via soaking) was necessary for the hatching of overwintering A. lucorum eggs. In the absence of rainfall (unsoaked branches), very few nymphs successfully emerged under any of the tested combinations of temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, following simulated rainfall, the hatching rate of the overwintering eggs increased dramatically. Hatching rate and developmental rate were positively correlated with relative humidity and temperature, respectively. Under field conditions, the abundance of nymphs derived from overwintering eggs was positively correlated with rainfall amount during the spring seasons of 2009–2013, while the same was not true for temperature and relative humidity. Overall, our findings indicate that rainfall is the most important factor affecting the hatching rate of overwintering A. lucorum eggs on dead plant parts and nymph population levels during the spring season. It provides the basic information for precisely forecasting the emergence of A. lucorum and subsequently timely managing its population in spring, which will make it possible to regional control of this insect pest widely occurring in multiple crops in summer. PMID

  18. Unraveling condition-dependent networks of transcription factors that control metabolic pathway activity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Christen, Stefan; Picotti, Paola; Dechant, Reinhard Christoph; Sauer, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Which transcription factors control the distribution of metabolic fluxes under a given condition? We address this question by systematically quantifying metabolic fluxes in 119 transcription factor deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under five growth conditions. While most knockouts did not affect fluxes, we identified 42 condition-dependent interactions that were mediated by a total of 23 transcription factors that control almost exclusively the cellular decision between respiration and fermentation. This relatively sparse, condition-specific network of active metabolic control contrasts with the much larger gene regulation network inferred from expression and DNA binding data. Based on protein and transcript analyses in key mutants, we identified three enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle as the key targets of this transcriptional control. For the transcription factor Gcn4, we demonstrate that this control is mediated through the PKA and Snf1 signaling cascade. The discrepancy between flux response predictions, based on the known regulatory network architecture and our functional 13C-data, demonstrates the importance of identifying and quantifying the extent to which regulatory effectors alter cellular functions. PMID:21119627

  19. Risk factors associated with lipomyelomeningocele: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Arash; Hanaei, Sara; Fadakar, Kaveh; Dadkhah, Sahar; Arjipour, Mahdi; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, it seems that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the induction of neural tube defects. Lipomyelomeningocele (LipoMMC) is a rather common type of closed neural tube defect, but only limited studies have investigated the potential risk factors of this anomaly. Therefore, the purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the risk factors involved in LipoMMC formation. Various risk factors were evaluated in 35 children between 1 month and 10 years of age with LipoMMC in a hospital-based case-control study. The 2 control arms consisted of 35 children with myelomeningocele (MMC group) and 35 children with congenital anomalies other than central nervous system problems (control group). All groups were matched for age and visited the same hospital. A structured questionnaire was used for the collection of all data, including the mothers' weight and height during pregnancy, education, reproductive history, previous abortions, and socioeconomic status, as well as the parents' consanguinity and family history of the same anomalies. Univariate analysis of the children with LipoMMC compared to the control group showed that the use of periconceptional folic acid supplementation was significantly lower in the MMC and LipoMMC groups compared to the control group. In addition, comparison of the MMC and control groups revealed statistically significant differences regarding the use of folic acid and maternal obesity. In multivariate analysis, use of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester was an independent risk factor for LipoMMC and MMC. Furthermore, maternal obesity was a significantly positive risk factor for MMC. The probable risk factors for LipoMMC were investigated in this case-control study. Consumption of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester is an independent protective factor against LipoMMC. It seems that larger studies are needed to examine other possible

  20. Other Factors That Affect Heart Disease: Birth Control Pills

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Handbook for Women Other Factors That Affect Heart Disease Birth Control Pills Studies show that women who ... t had any more complications because of my heart disease." — Diane Pay attention to diabetes. Levels of glucose, ...

  1. Performance ratings and personality factors in radar controllers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1970-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether primary or second-order personality questionnaire factors were related to job performance ratings on the Employee Appraisal Record in a sample of 264 radar controllers. A Pearson correlation matrix wa...

  2. Factors Controlling Cloud Droplet Number Concentrations in Continental Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Leaitch, W. R.; Strapp, J. W.; MacDonald, A. M.; Hayden, K. L.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Anlauf, K. G.; Leithead, A.; Li, S.; Shantz, N.; Couture, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    One of the key processes in aerosol-cloud interactions is aerosol activation. It controls cloud droplet number concentration, which has direct implication on cloud optical properties and cloud microphysical processes (e.g., precipitation formation). It also determines where the aerosol mass addition due to in-cloud production (e.g., of sulfate) will reside after cloud evaporation and, hence, the cloud processed aerosol size spectrum, which will again impact aerosol optical properties and potentially activation in subsequent cloud cycles [Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000]. A number of factors, (dynamical, microphysical, and chemical), affect the ability of aerosols to take up water and act as cloud condensation nuclei. There have been numerous studies devoted to the effect of aerosol physical and chemical properties on droplet activation (see McFiggans et al., 2005 for an in-depth review). As part of the ICARTT 2004 campaign, an aircraft study of Chemical transformation and Transport by Clouds (CTC) was conducted by Canadian government and university scientists. Measurements of trace gases, aerosol particle physics and chemistry, and cloud microphysics and dynamics were made (below and in clouds) from the NRCC Convair 580 aircraft between July 20 and August 18, 2004 over southwestern Ontario, northern Ohio, and eastern Michigan. In this study, the observed cloud droplet number concentrations in non- precipitating towering cumulus clouds are compared with the predictions from a detailed aerosol parcel model, which solves the diffusional growth equation for condensation of water on aerosol particles following an air parcel during its adiabatic ascend. The parcel model is also coupled with a size-resolved aqueous-phase chemistry module to allow the interaction between aerosol water uptake and aqueous-phase chemistry (mass transfer and oxidation). Effects of updraft velocity, below-cloud aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution, and composition), and

  3. Chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCD2 regulates transcriptional networks controlling differentiation of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Maximilian; Petersheim, Daniel; Fan, Yanxin; Bahrami, Ehsan; Racek, Tomas; Rohlfs, Meino; Puchałka, Jacek; Mertes, Christian; Gagneur, Julien; Ziegenhain, Christoph; Enard, Wolfgang; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Arkwright, Peter D; Abboud, Miguel R; Pazhakh, Vahid; Lieschke, Graham J; Krawitz, Peter M; Dahlhoff, Maik; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Horny, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, Heinrich; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    We identify SMARCD2 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily D, member 2), also known as BAF60b (BRG1/Brahma-associated factor 60b), as a critical regulator of myeloid differentiation in humans, mice, and zebrafish. Studying patients from three unrelated pedigrees characterized by neutropenia, specific granule deficiency, myelodysplasia with excess of blast cells, and various developmental aberrations, we identified three homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMARCD2. Using mice and zebrafish as model systems, we showed that SMARCD2 controls early steps in the differentiation of myeloid-erythroid progenitor cells. In vitro, SMARCD2 interacts with the transcription factor CEBPɛ and controls expression of neutrophil proteins stored in specific granules. Defective expression of SMARCD2 leads to transcriptional and chromatin changes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) human promyelocytic cells. In summary, SMARCD2 is a key factor controlling myelopoiesis and is a potential tumor suppressor in leukemia.

  4. Response Surfaces for Key Controlled Variables in a Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, William G; Banta, Larry; Gorrell, Megan

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid generation systems have been extensively modeled as a first step toward the development of automatic controls for the system. In most cases, it is impossible to validate mathematical models against real hardware because only a handful of hardware systems exist in the world. Data taken from the existing hardware has demonstrated significant nonlinearity, complex coupling between controlled variables, and sometimes non-intuitive behavior. This work exploits the capability of the HyPer hardware test bed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to generate data from a real recuperated gas turbine coupled with hardware simulations of a fuel cell cathode andmore » appropriate ancillary equipment. Prior work has characterized the system only over a limited range of its operating envelope, due to the inability to manipulate multiple control inputs simultaneously. The work presented here fills the gaps using data from a 34 factorial experiment to generate quasi-continuous response surfaces describing the operating state space of the HyPer system. Polynomial correlation functions have been fitted to the data with excellent agreement. Relationships between the control inputs and critical state variables such as cathode mass flow, cathode temperature, turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures and other key system parameters are presented.« less

  5. Key Source Habitats and Potential Dispersal of Triatoma infestans Populations in Northwestern Argentina: Implications for Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Cecere, María C.; Fernández, María del Pilar; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Kitron, Uriel; Cohen, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans —the principal vector of the infection that causes Chagas disease— defies elimination efforts in the Gran Chaco region. This study identifies the types of human-made or -used structures that are key sources of these bugs in the initial stages of house reinfestation after an insecticide spraying campaign. Methodology and Principal Findings We measured demographic and blood-feeding parameters at two geographic scales in 11 rural communities in Figueroa, northwest Argentina. Of 1,297 sites searched in spring, 279 (21.5%) were infested. Bug abundance per site and female fecundity differed significantly among habitat types (ecotopes) and were highly aggregated. Domiciles (human sleeping quarters) had maximum infestation prevalence (38.7%), human-feeding bugs and total egg production, with submaximal values for other demographic and blood-feeding attributes. Taken collectively peridomestic sites were three times more often infested than domiciles. Chicken coops had greater bug abundance, blood-feeding rates, engorgement status, and female fecundity than pig and goat corrals. The host-feeding patterns were spatially structured yet there was strong evidence of active dispersal of late-stage bugs between ecotopes. Two flight indices predicted that female fliers were more likely to originate from kitchens and domiciles, rejecting our initial hypothesis that goat and pig corrals would dominate. Conclusions and Significance Chicken coops and domiciles were key source habitats fueling rapid house reinfestation. Focusing control efforts on ecotopes with human-fed bugs (domiciles, storerooms, goat corrals) would neither eliminate the substantial contributions to bug population growth from kitchens, chicken coops, and pig corrals nor stop dispersal of adult female bugs from kitchens. Rather, comprehensive control of the linked network of ecotopes is required to prevent feeding on humans, bug population growth, and bug dispersal simultaneously. Our

  6. Key design factors affecting microbial community composition and pathogenic organism removal in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Morató, Jordi; Codony, Francesc; Sánchez, Olga; Pérez, Leonardo Martín; García, Joan; Mas, Jordi

    2014-05-15

    Constructed wetlands constitute an interesting option for wastewater reuse since high concentrations of contaminants and pathogenic microorganisms can be removed with these natural treatment systems. In this work, the role of key design factors which could affect microbial removal and wetland performance, such as granular media, water depth and season effect was evaluated in a pilot system consisting of eight parallel horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetlands treating urban wastewater from Les Franqueses del Vallès (Barcelona, Spain). Gravel biofilm as well as influent and effluent water samples of these systems were taken in order to detect the presence of bacterial indicators such as total coliforms (TC), Escherichia coli, fecal enterococci (FE), Clostridium perfringens, and other microbial groups such as Pseudomonas and Aeromonas. The overall microbial inactivation ratio ranged between 1.4 and 2.9 log-units for heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), from 1.2 to 2.2 log units for total coliforms (TC) and from 1.4 to 2.3 log units for E. coli. The presence of fine granulometry strongly influenced the removal of all the bacterial groups analyzed. This effect was significant for TC (p=0.009), E. coli (p=0.004), and FE (p=0.012). Shallow HSSF constructed wetlands were more effective for removing Clostridium spores (p=0.039), and were also more efficient for removing TC (p=0.011) and E. coli (p=0.013) when fine granulometry was used. On the other hand, changes in the total bacterial community from gravel biofilm were examined by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragments of the 16S rRNA gene recovered from DGGE bands. Cluster analysis of the DGGE banding pattern from the different wetlands showed that microbial assemblages separated according to water depth, and sequences of different phylogenetic groups, such as Alpha, Beta and Delta-Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Bacteroidetes

  7. Topography and crop management are key factors for the development of american leaf spot epidemics on coffee in costa rica.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Jacques; Cabut, Sandrine; Barboza, Bernardo; Barquero, Miguel; Alfaro, Ronny; Esquivel, César; Durand, Jean-François; Cilas, Christian

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT We monitored the development of American leaf spot of coffee, a disease caused by the gemmiferous fungus Mycena citricolor, in 57 plots in Costa Rica for 1 or 2 years in order to gain a clearer understanding of conditions conducive to the disease and improve its control. During the investigation, characteristics of the coffee trees, crop management, and the environment were recorded. For the analyses, we used partial least-squares regression via the spline functions (PLSS), which is a nonlinear extension to partial least-squares regression (PLS). The fungus developed well in areas located between approximately 1,100 and 1,550 m above sea level. Slopes were conducive to its development, but eastern-facing slopes were less affected than the others, probably because they were more exposed to sunlight, especially in the rainy season. The distance between planting rows, the shade percentage, coffee tree height, the type of shade, and the pruning system explained disease intensity due to their effects on coffee tree shading and, possibly, on the humidity conditions in the plot. Forest trees and fruit trees intercropped with coffee provided particularly propitious conditions. Apparently, fertilization was unfavorable for the disease, probably due to dilution phenomena associated with faster coffee tree growth. Finally, series of wet spells interspersed with dry spells, which were frequent in the middle of the rainy season, were critical for the disease, probably because they affected the production and release of gemmae and their viability. These results could be used to draw up a map of epidemic risks taking topographical factors into account. To reduce those risks and improve chemical control, our results suggested that farmers should space planting rows further apart, maintain light shading in the plantation, and prune their coffee trees.

  8. [Consideration about chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) key problems in simplified registration of classical traditional Chinese medicine excellent prescriptions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Ju-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Wang, De-Qin; Yan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Jin-Jin; Gao, Hui-Min; Li, Chun; Wang, Jin-Yu; Li, Chu-Yuan; Ni, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ji-Sheng; Lin, Juan

    2017-05-01

    As an outstanding representative of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) prescriptions accumulated from famous TCM doctors' clinical experiences in past dynasties, classical TCM excellent prescriptions (cTCMeP) are the most valuable part of TCM system. To support the research and development of cTCMeP, a series of regulations and measures were issued to encourage its simplified registration. There is still a long-way to go because many key problems and puzzles about technology, registration and administration in cTCMeP R&D process are not resolved. Based on the analysis of registration and management regulations of botanical drug products in FDA of USA and Japan, and EMA of Europe, the possible key problems and countermeasures in chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) of simplified registration of cTCMeP were analyzed on the consideration of its actual situation. The method of "reference decoction extract by traditional prescription" (RDETP) was firstly proposed as standard to evaluate the quality and preparation uniformity between the new developing product under simplified registration and traditional original usages of cTCMeP, instead of Standard Decoction method in Japan. "Totality of the evidence" approach, mass balance and bioassay/biological assay of cTCMeP were emphatically suggested to introduce to the quality uniformity evaluation system in the raw drug material, drug substance and final product between the modern product and traditional decoction. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Characterisation of genes encoding key enzymes involved in sugar metabolism of apple fruit in controlled atmosphere storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2013-12-15

    Sugars are essential contributors to fruit flavour. Controlled atmosphere (CA) storage has been proved to be beneficial for maintaining harvested fruit quality. To explore regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in fruit stored in CA condition, we cloned several genes, encoding key enzymes, involved in sugar metabolism in apple fruit, and analyzed sugar contents, along with gene expression and enzyme activities in fruits stored in air and CA. The results indicated that CA could maintain higher contents of sugars, including sucrose, fructose and glucose. Expression levels of key genes, such as sucrose synthase (SS), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), fructokinase (FK) and hexokinase (HK), were shown to be correlated with the corresponding enzyme activities. We found that activities of neutral invertase (NI), vacuolar invertase (VI), FK and HK were inhibited, but SPS activity was promoted in apple fruit stored in CA, suggesting that CA storage could enhance sucrose synthesis and delay hydrolysis of sucrose and hexose. These findings provided molecular evidence to explain why higher sugar levels in harvested fruit are maintained under CA storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leaf extrafloral nectaries enhance biological control of a key economic pest, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in peach (Rosales: Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clarissa R; Brown, Mark W; Bottrell, Dale G

    2007-04-01

    Extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) in many plant species produce sugary secretions that commonly attract ants. This research determined the impact of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) EFNs on the biological control of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a key economic pest in peach orchards, and studied interactions of EFNs and ants. Studies (2002-2005) in peach orchards of the mid-Atlantic United States showed that 'Lovell' peach trees with EFNs supported more parasitic Hymenoptera in the spring and increased the parasitism of G. molesta larvae later in the season than those trees without EFNs. Ant exclusion experiments revealed that trees with EFNs harbored fewer G. molesta larvae when ants were permitted access to the tree canopies. Furthermore, the trees with EFNs had approximately 90% less fruit injury by G. molesta, indicating that EFNs have a protective role for the fruit as well. The results show that the combined actions of ants and parasitic Hymenoptera confer an EFN-mediated protective effect spanning the whole fruit growing season. When EFNs are present, naturally occurring biological control agents can reduce damage by G. molesta in peach orchards without insecticide inputs. The EFNs are an important host-plant characteristic that should be retained in future peach cultivar selections as a means of enhancing biological control.

  11. Statistical key variable analysis and model-based control for improvement performance in a deep reactive ion etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chen; Tianhong, Pan; Zhengming, Li; Shi-Shang, Jang

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes to develop a data-driven via's depth estimator of the deep reactive ion etching process based on statistical identification of key variables. Several feature extraction algorithms are presented to reduce the high-dimensional data and effectively undertake the subsequent virtual metrology (VM) model building process. With the available on-line VM model, the model-based controller is hence readily applicable to improve the quality of a via's depth. Real operational data taken from a industrial manufacturing process are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can decrease the MSE from 2.2 × 10-2 to 9 × 10-4 and has great potential in improving the existing DRIE process.

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Key Factors of Academic Innovation and Faculties' Teaching Goals--The Mediatory Role of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mehdi; Marzooghi, Rahmatullah; Dehghani, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    The following research tries to study the Relationship between key factors of academic innovations and faculties' teaching goals with the mediatory role of their pedagogical, technological and content knowledge. The statistical population in this research included faculty members of Shiraz University. By simple random sampling, 127 faculty members…

  13. Motor power factor controller with a reduced voltage starter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A power factor type motor controller in which the conventional power factor constant voltage command signal is replaced during a starting interval with a graduated control voltage. The present invention adds to the three-phase system of pending application Ser. No. 199,765, filed Oct. 23, 1980, means for modifying the operation of the system for a motor start-up interval of 5 to 30 seconds. The modification is that of providing via ramp generator 174 an initial ramp-like signal which replaces a constant power factor signal supplied by potentiometer 70. The ramp-like signal is applied to terminal 40 where it is summed with an operating power factor signal from phase detectors 32, 34, and 36 to thereby obtain a control signal for ultimately controlling SCR devices 12, 14, and 16 to effect a gradual turn-on of motor 10. The significant difference of the present invention over prior art is that the SCR devices are turned on at an advancing rate with time responsive to the combination signal described rather than simply a function of a ramp-like signal alone. The added signal, the operating power factor signal, enables the production of a control signal which effectively eliminates a prior problem with many motor starting circuits, which is that of accompanying motor instabilities.

  14. The Sigma Factor AlgU Plays a Key Role in Formation of Robust Biofilms by Nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Bazire, Alexis; Shioya, Kouki; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Ryder, Cynthia; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Hémery, Gaëlle; Linossier, Isabelle; Chevalier, Sylvie; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor AlgU of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for alginate overproduction, leading to mucoidy and chronic infections of cystic fibrosis patients. We investigated here the role of AlgU in the formation of nonmucoid biofilms. The algU mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 (PAOU) showed a dramatic impairment in biofilm formation under dynamic conditions. PAOU was defective both in cell attachment to glass and in development of robust, shear-resistant biofilms. This was explained by an impaired production of extracellular matrix, specifically of the exopolysaccharide Psl, as revealed by microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Complementing the algU mutation with a plasmid-borne algU gene restored wild-type phenotypes. Compared with that in PAO1, expression of the psl operon was reduced in the PAOU strain, and the biofilm formation ability of this strain was partially restored by inducing the transcription of the psl operon. Furthermore, expression of the lectin-encoding lecA and lecB genes was reduced in the PAOU strain. In agreement with the requirement of LecB for type IV pilus biogenesis, PAOU displayed impaired twitching motility. Collectively, these genetic downregulation events explain the biofilm formation defect of the PAOU mutant. Promoter mapping indicated that AlgU is probably not directly responsible for transcription of the psl operon and the lec genes, but AlgU is involved in the expression of the ppyR gene, whose product was reported to positively control psl expression. Expressing the ppyR gene in PAOU partially restored the formation of robust biofilms. PMID:20348252

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor-D is a key molecule that enhances lymphatic metastasis of soft tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, Takashi, E-mail: tyanagaw@med.gunma-u.ac.jp; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2012-04-15

    Studies on lymph node metastasis of soft tissue sarcomas are insufficient because of its rarity. In this study, we examined the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and VEGF-D in soft tissue sarcomas metastasized to lymph nodes. In addition, the effects of the two molecules on the barrier function of a lymphatic endothelial cell monolayer against sarcoma cells were analyzed. We examined 7 patients who had soft tissue sarcomas with lymph node metastases and who had undergone neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy before lymphadenectomy. Immunohistochemistry revealed that 2 of 7 sarcomas that metastasized to lymph nodes expressed VEGF-C both inmore » primary and metastatic lesions. On the other hand, VEGF-D expression was detected in 4 of 7 primary and 7 of 7 metastatic lesions, respectively. Interestingly, 3 cases that showed no VEGF-D expression at primary sites expressed VEGF-D in metastatic lesions. Recombinant VEGF-C at 10{sup -8} and VEGF-D at 10{sup -7}and 10{sup -8} g/ml significantly increased the random motility of lymphatic endothelial cells compared with controls. VEGF-D significantly increased the migration of sarcoma cells through lymphatic endothelial monolayers. The fact that VEGF-D induced the migration of fibrosarcomas through the lymphatic endothelial monolayer is the probable reason for the strong relationship between VEGF-D expression and lymph node metastasis in soft tissue sarcomas. The important propensities of this molecule for the increase of lymph node metastases are not only lymphangiogenesis but also down-regulation of the barrier function of lymphatic endothelial monolayers, which facilitates sarcoma cells entering the lymphatic circulation.« less

  16. The Evaluation of Vehicle Mass Reduction and Material Choice in Life Cycle Assessments: Key Factors and Dynamic Industries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developments in the realm of lightweight materials for automotive use continue to be announced by the industry and by academia. This session will provide new and updated information on new generation of materials. Additionally, this session will focus on the key topics involved i...

  17. Growth factor independence 1b. A key player in the genesis and maintenance of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thivakaran, Aniththa; Botezatu, Lacramiora; Hönes, Judith M; Schütte, Judith; Vassen, Lothar; Al-Matary, Yahya S; Patnana, Pradeep; Zeller, Amos; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Gabdoulline, Razif; Olberding, Nadine; Frank, Daria; Suslo, Marina; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Görgens, Andre; Giebel, Bernd; Opalka, Bertram; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2018-01-11

    Differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells is regulated by a concert of different transcription factors. Disturbed transcription factors function can be the basis of (pre)malignancies such as myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukaemia. Growth factor independence 1b is a repressing transcription factor regulating quiescence of hematopoietic stem cellss and differentiation of erythrocytes and platelets. Here, we show that low expression of Growth factor independence 1b in blast cells is associated with an inferior prognosis of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia patients. Using different models of human myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukaemia, we demonstrate that acute myeloid leukaemia development was accelerated with heterozygous loss of Growth factor independence 1b, and latency was further decreased when Growth factor independence 1b was conditionally deleted. Loss of Growth factor independence 1b significantly increased the number of leukaemic stem cells with upregulation of genes involved in leukaemia development. On a molecular level, we found that loss of Growth factor independence 1b led to epigenetic changes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species as well as alteration in the p38/Akt/FoXO pathways. These results demonstrate that Growth factor independence 1b functions as an oncosuppressor in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia development. Copyright © 2018, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. An Expressive, Lightweight and Secure Construction of Key Policy Attribute-Based Cloud Data Sharing Access Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guofen; Hong, Hanshu; Xia, Yunhao; Sun, Zhixin

    2017-10-01

    Attribute-based encryption (ABE) is an interesting cryptographic technique for flexible cloud data sharing access control. However, some open challenges hinder its practical application. In previous schemes, all attributes are considered as in the same status while they are not in most of practical scenarios. Meanwhile, the size of access policy increases dramatically with the raise of its expressiveness complexity. In addition, current research hardly notices that mobile front-end devices, such as smartphones, are poor in computational performance while too much bilinear pairing computation is needed for ABE. In this paper, we propose a key-policy weighted attribute-based encryption without bilinear pairing computation (KP-WABE-WB) for secure cloud data sharing access control. A simple weighted mechanism is presented to describe different importance of each attribute. We introduce a novel construction of ABE without executing any bilinear pairing computation. Compared to previous schemes, our scheme has a better performance in expressiveness of access policy and computational efficiency.

  19. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Jacques; Clefton, Gordon; Joe, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by various resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.

  20. Notification: FY 2017 Update of Proposed Key Management Challenges and Internal Control Weaknesses Confronting the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Jan 5, 2017. The EPA OIG is beginning work to update for fiscal year 2017 its list of proposed key management challenges and internal control weaknesses confronting the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).

  1. Critical factors influencing the establishment, maintenance and sustainability of population-based cancer control programs.

    PubMed

    Trapido, Edward J; Borras, Josep Maria; Burton, Robert; Samiei, Massoud; Elwood, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Developing and maintaining a comprehensive cancer control program are two distinct entities. Key issues related to building and sustaining cancer control programs include how to integrate initiatives and efforts across multiple constituencies addressing components of the implementation of cancer control and non-communicable disease programs, the processes used in different resource settings to achieve effective drug budgeting, health technology assessment and health economics, and how countries can support public and societal engagement. There are promising examples in both resource-rich and resource-challenged countries of constituencies that have developed programs which can contribute to comprehensive cancer control. Some take advantage of newer technology and information services, while others are more people and patient focused. Critical issues and factors for establishing and maintaining population-based comprehensive cancer control programs are identified and reviewed.

  2. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Poorly Controlled Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dizdarevic-Bostandzic, Amela; Begovic, Ermin; Burekovic, Azra; Velija-Asimi, Zelija; Godinjak, Amina; Karlovic, Vanja

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus(DM) is considered an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Having in mind concomitant occurence of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors, it is expected that patients with poor glucoregulation will have more cardiovascular risk factors and higher cardiovascular risk than patients with good glucoregulation. To compare cardiovascular risk and cardiovascular risk factors between patients with poorly controlled and patients with well-controlled Diabetes mellitus. Hundered ten patients aged 40-70 years suffering from Diabetes mellitus type 2 were included. Research is designed as a retrospective, descriptive study. Patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7% were considered to have poorly controlled diabetes. The following data and parameters were monitored: age,sex, family history, data on smoking and alcohol consumption, BMI (body mass index), blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, fibrinogen, uric acid. For the assessment of cardiovascular risk, the WHO / ISH (World Health Organization/International Society of hypertension) tables of the 10-year risk were used, and due to the assessment of the risk factors prevalence, the optimal values of individual numerical variables were defined. Differences in the mean values of systolic, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol are statistically significant higher in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. Hypertension more frequently occurre in patients with poorly controlled DM. The majority of patients with well-controlled DM belong to the group of low and medium cardiovascular risk, while the majority of patients with poorly controlled DM belong to the group of high and very high cardiovascular risk. In our research, there was a significant difference in cardiovascular risk in relation to the degree of DM regulation, and HbA1c proved to be an important indicator for the emergence of the CVD. There are significant

  3. The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Guoan; Li, Xiaoliang; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

  4. Three-phase power factor controller with induced EMF sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power factor controller for an ac induction motor is provided which is of the type comprising thyristor switches connected in series with the motor, phase detectors for sensing the motor current and voltage and providing an output proportional to the phase difference between the motor voltage and current, and a control circuit, responsive to the output of the phase detector and to a power factor command signal, for controlling switching of the thyristor. The invention involves sensing the induced emf produced by the motor during the time interval when the thyristor is off and for producing a corresponding feedback signal for controlling switching of the thyristor. The sensed emf is also used to enhance soft starting of the motor.

  5. Florida Keys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West. This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03890

  6. Neurotrophic Factor Control of Satiety and Body Weight

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoji; Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Energy balance, the relationship between energy intake and expenditure, is regulated by a complex interplay of hormones, brain circuits and peripheral tissues. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine that suppresses appetite and increases energy expenditure. Ironically, obese individuals have high levels of plasma leptin and are resistant to leptin treatment. Neurotrophic factors, particularly ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are also important for the control of body weight. CNTF can overcome leptin resistance to reduce body weight, although CNTF and leptin activate similar signalling cascades. Mutations in the gene for BDNF lead to insatiable appetite and severe obesity. PMID:27052383

  7. Factors associated with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia: A case control study

    SciTech Connect

    Napora, C.; Cohen, E.J.; Genvert, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    Familial and environmental factors may play a role in the development of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Nineteen patients with biopsy-proven CIN completed a questionnaire to evaluate possible predisposing factors. Nineteen age-matched and sex-matched controls completed questionnaires and received slit-lamp examinations. Factors associated with a relatively increased risk of developing CIN included exposure to petroleum products, heavy cigarette smoking, light hair and ocular pigmentation, and family origin in the British Isles, Austria or Switzerland. Non-office and nonprofessional workers were more likely to develop conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (p = .05), as were those who were not college graduates (p = .07).

  8. Teleoperator hand controllers: A contextual human factors assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides a human factors assessment of controllers for use with remotely controlled manipulators deployed to remove hazardous waste from underground storage tanks. The analysis concentrates on controller technique (i.e., the broad class of hand controller) and not on details of controller ergonomics. Examples of controller techniques include, for example, direct rate control, resolved unilateral position control, and direct bilateral position control. Using an existing concept, the Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System, as a reference, two basic types of manipulators may be identified for this application. A long reach, gross-positioning manipulator (LRM) may be used to position a smallermore » manipulator or an end-effector within a work site. For a Long Reach Manipulator, which will have an enormous motion range and be capable of high end-effector velocity, it will be safest and most efficient to use a resolved rate control system. A smaller, dexterous manipulator may be used to perform handling work within a relatively small work site, (i.e., to complete tasks requiring near-human dexterity). For a Dexterous Manipulator, which will have a smaller motion range than the LRM and be required to perform more difficult tasks, a resolved bilateral position control system will be safest and most efficient. However, during some waste recovery tasks it may be important to support the users by restricting movements to a single plane or axis. This can be done with a resolved bilateral position control system by (1) using the master controller force output to restrict controller inputs or (2) switching the controller to a multiaxis rate control mode and using the force output to provide a spring return to center functionality.« less

  9. Teleoperator hand controllers: A contextual human factors assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides a human factors assessment of controllers for use with remotely controlled manipulators deployed to remove hazardous waste from underground storage tanks. The analysis concentrates on controller technique (i.e., the broad class of hand controller) and not on details of controller ergonomics. Examples of controller techniques include, for example, direct rate control, resolved unilateral position control, and direct bilateral position control. Using an existing concept, the Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System, as a reference, two basic types of manipulators may be identified for this application. A long reach, gross-positioning manipulator (LRM) may be used to position a smaller manipulator or an end-effector within a work site. For a Long Reach Manipulator, which will have an enormous motion range and be capable of high end-effector velocity, it will be safest and most efficient to use a resolved rate control system. A smaller, dexterous manipulator may be used to perform handling work within a relatively small work site, (i.e., to complete tasks requiring near-human dexterity). For a Dexterous Manipulator, which will have a smaller motion range than the LRM and be required to perform more difficult tasks, a resolved bilateral position control system will be safest and most efficient. However, during some waste recovery tasks it may be important to support the users by restricting movements to a single plane or axis. This can be done with a resolved bilateral position control system by (1) using the master controller force output to restrict controller inputs or (2) switching the controller to a multiaxis rate control mode and using the force output to provide a spring return to center functionality.

  10. The role of medical and psychosocial factors for unfavourable coronary risk factor control.

    PubMed

    Munkhaugen, John; Sverre, Elise; Peersen, Kari; Gjertsen, Erik; Gullestad, Lars; Moum, Torbjorn; Otterstad, Jan Erik; Perk, Joep; Husebye, Einar; Dammen, Toril

    2016-01-01

    This project aims to identify socio-demographic, medical and psychosocial factors (study factors) associated with coronary risk control and prognosis, and to test their impact in a representative sample of coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. The first phase includes a cross-sectional study designed to explore the association between the study factors and coronary risk factor control in CHD patients. Data from hospital records, a questionnaire, clinical examination and blood samples were collected. The independent effects of study factors on subsequent coronary events will be explored prospectively by controlling for baseline coronary risk factors. In the second phase, we will test the effect of tailored interventions to modify the study factors associated with unfavourable risk profile in phase I. In all 1366 patients (21% women), aged 18-80 years with a coronary event on average 17 (2-38) months prior to study participation were identified (83% participation rate). Of the 239 patients who refused participation, 229 patients consented to analysis of hospital record data (non- participants). If the study variables contribute to CHD risk factors and prognosis, the present project may be important for the development of prevention programs by tailoring these to the patients perceived needs and behaviour profiles.

  11. Selenium: a key element that controls NF-kappa B activation and I kappa B alpha half life.

    PubMed

    Kretz-Remy, C; Arrigo, A P

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of mammalian cells with hydrogen peroxide induces the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B and its binding to kappa B DNA sequences present in the promoter region of numerous genes. The role of selenium in NF-kappa B activation was analyzed in human T47D cells overexpressing the seleno-dependent detoxifiant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Following exposure to H(2)O(2), these cells showed a seleno-dependent decreased accumulation of intracellular ROS and NF-kappa B activation. This phenomenon was correlated with an inhibition of the nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B (p50 subunit) and with an absence of I kappa B alpha degradation. We also report that the half-life of I kappa B alpha in untreated cells was increased two-fold by the overexpression of active glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that selenium is a key element that through its modulation of glutathione peroxidase activity can inhibit NF-kappa B activation and can up-regulate I kappa B alpha normal half life.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor 3 as key element of the interferon signature in plasmacytoid dendritic cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients: novel genetic associations in the Mexican mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Santana-de Anda, K; Gómez-Martín, D; Monsivais-Urenda, A E; Salgado-Bustamante, M; González-Amaro, R; Alcocer-Varela, J

    2014-12-01

    Many genetic studies have found an association between interferon regulatory factors (IRF) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, specific dendritic cell (DC) alterations have not been assessed. The aim of the present study was to address the expression of IRF3 and IRF5 on different DC subsets from SLE patients, as well as their association with interferon (IFN)-α production and novel SNPs. For the genetic association analyses, 156 SLE patients and 272 healthy controls from the Mexican mestizo population were included. From these, 36 patients and 36 controls were included for functional analysis. Two IRF3 SNPs - rs2304206 and rs2304204 - were determined. We found an increased percentage of circulating pDC in SLE patients in comparison to controls (8.04 ± 1.48 versus 3.35 ± 0.8, P = 0.032). We also observed enhanced expression of IRF3 (64 ± 6.36 versus 36.1 ± 5.57, P = 0.004) and IRF5 (40 ± 5.25 versus 22.5 ± 2.6%, P = 0.010) restricted to this circulating pDC subset from SLE patients versus healthy controls. This finding was associated with higher IFN-α serum levels in SLE (160.2 ± 21 versus 106.1 ± 14 pg/ml, P = 0.036). Moreover, the IRF3 rs2304206 polymorphism was associated with increased susceptibility to SLE [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.401 (1.187-4.858), P = 0.021] as well as enhanced levels of serum type I IFN in SLE patients who were positive for dsDNA autoantibodies. The IRF3 rs2304204 GG and AG genotypes conferred decreased risk for SLE. Our findings suggest that the predominant IRF3 expression on circulating pDC is a key element for the increased IFN-α activation based on the interplay between the rs2304206 gene variant and the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies in Mexican mestizo SLE patients. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  13. Interferon regulatory factor 3 as key element of the interferon signature in plasmacytoid dendritic cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients: novel genetic associations in the Mexican mestizo population

    PubMed Central

    Santana-de Anda, K; Gómez-Martín, D; Monsivais-Urenda, A E; Salgado-Bustamante, M; González-Amaro, R; Alcocer-Varela, J

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic studies have found an association between interferon regulatory factors (IRF) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, specific dendritic cell (DC) alterations have not been assessed. The aim of the present study was to address the expression of IRF3 and IRF5 on different DC subsets from SLE patients, as well as their association with interferon (IFN)-α production and novel SNPs. For the genetic association analyses, 156 SLE patients and 272 healthy controls from the Mexican mestizo population were included. From these, 36 patients and 36 controls were included for functional analysis. Two IRF3 SNPs − rs2304206 and rs2304204 – were determined. We found an increased percentage of circulating pDC in SLE patients in comparison to controls (8·04 ± 1·48 versus 3·35 ± 0·8, P = 0·032). We also observed enhanced expression of IRF3 (64 ± 6·36 versus 36·1 ± 5·57, P = 0·004) and IRF5 (40 ± 5·25 versus 22·5 ± 2·6%, P = 0·010) restricted to this circulating pDC subset from SLE patients versus healthy controls. This finding was associated with higher IFN-α serum levels in SLE (160·2 ± 21 versus 106·1 ± 14 pg/ml, P = 0·036). Moreover, the IRF3 rs2304206 polymorphism was associated with increased susceptibility to SLE [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2·401 (1·187–4·858), P = 0·021] as well as enhanced levels of serum type I IFN in SLE patients who were positive for dsDNA autoantibodies. The IRF3 rs2304204 GG and AG genotypes conferred decreased risk for SLE. Our findings suggest that the predominant IRF3 expression on circulating pDC is a key element for the increased IFN-α activation based on the interplay between the rs2304206 gene variant and the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies in Mexican mestizo SLE patients. PMID:25130328

  14. Power factor control system for AC induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A power factor control system for use with ac induction motors was designed which samples lines voltage and current through the motor and decreases power input to the motor proportional to the detected phase displacement between current and voltage. This system provides, less power to the motor, as it is less loaded.

  15. Power-Factor Controller With Fast Load Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    Sudden changes in induced emf sensed. In refinement of soft starting three phase power-factor controller, additional components enable circuit to respond quickly to sudden increase in motor load. Rapid-load-response addition senses induced motor emf to detect sudden load increase and generates command signal to increase applied power in response.

  16. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  17. The ORCA2 transcription factor plays a key role in regulation of the terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L; Sander, Guy W; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I

    2013-10-08

    The terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway leads to the production of pharmaceutically important drugs, such as the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Unfortunately, these drugs are produced in trace amounts, causing them to be very costly. To increase production of these drugs, an improved understanding of the TIA regulatory pathway is needed. Towards this end, transgenic Catharanthus roseus hairy roots that overexpress the ORCA2 TIA transcriptional activator were generated and characterized. Transcriptional profiling experiments revealed that overexpression of ORCA2 results in altered expression of key genes from the indole and terpenoid pathways, which produce precursors for the TIA pathway, and from the TIA pathway itself. In addition, metabolite-profiling experiments revealed that overexpression of ORCA2 significantly affects the levels of several TIA metabolites. ORCA2 overexpression also causes significant increases in transcript levels of several TIA regulators, including TIA transcriptional repressors. Results presented here indicate that ORCA2 plays a critical role in regulation of TIA metabolism. ORCA2 regulates expression of key genes from both feeder pathways, as well as the genes (STR and SGD) encoding the enzymes that catalyze the first two steps in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA2 may play an especially important role in regulation of the downstream branches of the TIA pathway, as it regulates four out of five genes characterized from this part of the pathway. Regulation of TIA transcriptional repressors by ORCA2 may provide a mechanism whereby increases in TIA metabolite levels in response to external stimuli are transient and limited in magnitude.

  18. Improvement of the performances of a tandem simulated moving bed chromatography by controlling the yield level of a key product of the first simulated moving bed unit.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungyong; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2017-03-10

    One of the trustworthy processes for ternary separation is a tandem simulated moving bed (SMB) process, which consists of two subordinate four-zone SMB units (Ring I and Ring II). To take full advantage of a tandem SMB as a means of recovering all three products with high purities and high economical efficiency, it is important to understand how the separation condition in Ring II is affected by that in Ring I, and further to reflect such point in the stage of designing a tandem SMB. In regard to such issue, it was clarified in this study that the Ring I factors affecting the Ring II condition could be represented by the yield level of a key product of Ring I (Y key RingI ). As the Y key RingI level became higher, the amount of the Ring I key-product that was reloaded into Ring II was reduced, which affected favorably the Ring II separation condition. On the other hand, the higher Y key RingI level caused a larger dilution for the stream from Ring I to Ring II, which affected adversely the Ring II separation condition. As a result, a minimum in the desorbent usage of a tandem SMB occurred at the Y key RingI level where the two aforementioned factors could be balanced with each other. If such an optimal Y key RingI level was adopted, the desorbent usage could be reduced by up to 25%. It was also found that as the throughput of a tandem SMB became higher, the factor related to the migration of the Ring I key-product into Ring II was more influential in the performances of a tandem SMB than the factor related to the dilution of the stream from Ring I to Ring II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Transcription Factors Key for Mouse Pancreatic Development Establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 Mutations as Causes of Neonatal Diabetes in Man

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Edge, Julie A.; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A.L.; Edghill, Emma L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development. PMID:24411943

  20. Factors Impacting Student Service Utilization at Ontario Colleges: Key Performance Indicators as a Measure of Success: A Niagara College View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veres, David

    2015-01-01

    Student success in Ontario College is significantly influenced by the utilization of student services. At Niagara College there has been a significant investment in student services as a strategy to support student success. Utilizing existing KPI data, this quantitative research project is aimed at measuring factors that influence both the use of…

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitors (HAI-1 and HAI-2): Emerging key players in epithelial integrity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Kawaguchi, Makiko; Fukushima, Tsuyoshi; Shimomura, Takeshi

    2018-03-01

    The growth, survival, and metabolic activities of multicellular organisms at the cellular level are regulated by intracellular signaling, systemic homeostasis and the pericellular microenvironment. Pericellular proteolysis has a crucial role in processing bioactive molecules in the microenvironment and thereby has profound effects on cellular functions. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type 1 (HAI-1) and HAI-2 are type I transmembrane serine protease inhibitors expressed by most epithelial cells. They regulate the pericellular activities of circulating hepatocyte growth factor activator and cellular type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), proteases required for the activation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/scatter factor (SF). Activated HGF/SF transduces pleiotropic signals through its receptor tyrosine kinase, MET (coded by the proto-oncogene MET), which are necessary for cellular migration, survival, growth and triggering stem cells for accelerated healing. HAI-1 and HAI-2 are also required for normal epithelial functions through regulation of TTSP-mediated activation of other proteases and protease-activated receptor 2, and also through suppressing excess degradation of epithelial junctional proteins. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the mechanism of pericellular HGF/SF activation and highlights emerging roles of HAIs in epithelial development and integrity, as well as tumorigenesis and progression of transformed epithelial cells. © 2018 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic. PMID:27438790

  3. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    PubMed

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  4. Heat-shock protein 40 is the key farnesylation target in meristem size control, abscisic acid signaling, and drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Barghetti, Andrea; Sjögren, Lars; Floris, Maïna; Paredes, Esther Botterweg; Wenkel, Stephan; Brodersen, Peter

    2017-11-15

    Protein farnesylation is central to molecular cell biology. In plants, protein farnesyl transferase mutants are pleiotropic and exhibit defective meristem organization, hypersensitivity to the hormone abscisic acid, and increased drought resistance. The precise functions of protein farnesylation in plants remain incompletely understood because few relevant farnesylated targets have been identified. Here, we show that defective farnesylation of a single factor-heat-shock protein 40 (HSP40), encoded by the J2 and J3 genes-is sufficient to confer ABA hypersensitivity, drought resistance, late flowering, and enlarged meristems, indicating that altered function of chaperone client proteins underlies most farnesyl transferase mutant phenotypes. We also show that expression of an abiotic stress-related microRNA (miRNA) regulon controlled by the transcription factor SPL7 requires HSP40 farnesylation. Expression of a truncated SPL7 form mimicking its activated proteolysis fragment of the membrane-bound SPL7 precursor partially restores accumulation of SPL7-dependent miRNAs in farnesyl transferase mutants. These results implicate the pathway directing SPL7 activation from its membrane-bound precursor as an important target of farnesylated HSP40, consistent with our demonstration that HSP40 farnesylation facilitates its membrane association. The results also suggest that altered gene regulation via select miRNAs contributes to abiotic stress-related phenotypes of farnesyl transferase mutants. © 2017 Barghetti et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Vilma Costa; de Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; de Frias, Paulo Germano; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. PMID:28832758

  6. The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor pathway: a key player in cancer therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Dearth, Robert K; Litzenburger, Beate C; Lee, Adrian V; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2008-05-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands stimulate cellular proliferation and survival by activating the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR). As a result, the IGF signaling system is implicated in a number of cancers, including those of the breast, prostate, and lung. In addition to mitogenic and anti-apoptotic roles that may directly influence tumor development, IGF-IR also appears to be a critical determinant of response to numerous cancer therapies. This review describes the role of the IGF-IR pathway in mediating resistance to both general cytotoxic therapies, such as radiation and chemotherapy, and targeted therapies, such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab. It concludes with a description of approaches to target IGF-IR and argues that inhibition of IGF signaling, in conjunction with standard therapies, may enhance the response of cancer cells to multiple modalities.

  7. Key parameters controlling OH-initiated formation of secondary organic aerosol in the aqueous phase (aqSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, Barbara; Sorooshian, Armin; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2014-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA) might contribute substantially to the total SOA burden and help to explain discrepancies between observed and predicted SOA properties. In order to implement aqSOA formation in models, key processes controlling formation within the multiphase system have to be identified. We explore parameters affecting phase transfer and OH(aq)-initiated aqSOA formation as a function of OH(aq) availability. Box model results suggest OH(aq)-limited photochemical aqSOA formation in cloud water even if aqueous OH(aq) sources are present. This limitation manifests itself as an apparent surface dependence of aqSOA formation. We estimate chemical OH(aq) production fluxes, necessary to establish thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases (based on Henry's law constants) for both cloud and aqueous particles. Estimates show that no (currently known) OH(aq) source in cloud water can remove this limitation, whereas in aerosol water, it might be feasible. Ambient organic mass (oxalate) measurements in stratocumulus clouds as a function of cloud drop surface area and liquid water content exhibit trends similar to model results. These findings support the use of parameterizations of cloud-aqSOA using effective droplet radius rather than liquid water volume or drop surface area. Sensitivity studies suggest that future laboratory studies should explore aqSOA yields in multiphase systems as a function of these parameters and at atmospherically relevant OH(aq) levels. Since aerosol-aqSOA formation significantly depends on OH(aq) availability, parameterizations might be less straightforward, and oxidant (OH) sources within aerosol water emerge as one of the major uncertainties in aerosol-aqSOA formation.

  8. Quality control of CT systems by automated monitoring of key performance indicators: a two-year study.

    PubMed

    Nowik, Patrik; Bujila, Robert; Poludniowski, Gavin; Fransson, Annette

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of performing routine periodical quality controls (QC) of CT systems by automatically analyzing key performance indicators (KPIs), obtainable from images of manufacturers' quality assurance (QA) phantoms. A KPI pertains to a measurable or determinable QC parameter that is influenced by other underlying fundamental QC parameters. The established KPIs are based on relationships between existing QC parameters used in the annual testing program of CT scanners at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The KPIs include positioning, image noise, uniformity, homogeneity, the CT number of water, and the CT number of air. An application (MonitorCT) was developed to automatically evaluate phantom images in terms of the established KPIs. The developed methodology has been used for two years in clinical routine, where CT technologists perform daily scans of the manufacturer's QA phantom and automatically send the images to MonitorCT for KPI evaluation. In the cases where results were out of tolerance, actions could be initiated in less than 10 min. 900 QC scans from two CT scanners have been collected and analyzed over the two-year period that MonitorCT has been active. Two types of errors have been registered in this period: a ring artifact was discovered with the image noise test, and a calibration error was detected multiple times with the CT number test. In both cases, results were outside the tolerances defined for MonitorCT, as well as by the vendor. Automated monitoring of KPIs is a powerful tool that can be used to supplement established QC methodologies. Medical physicists and other professionals concerned with the performance of a CT system will, using such methods, have access to comprehensive data on the current and historical (trend) status of the system such that swift actions can be taken in order to ensure the quality of the CT examinations, patient safety, and minimal disruption of service.

  9. Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Judith; Gosbee, Laura Lin; Bessesen, Mary; Williams, Linda

    2010-08-01

    Human factors engineering is a discipline that studies the capabilities and limitations of humans and the design of devices and systems for improved performance. The principles of human factors engineering can be applied to infection prevention and control to study the interaction between the healthcare worker and the system that he or she is working with, including the use of devices, the built environment, and the demands and complexities of patient care. Some key challenges in infection prevention, such as delayed feedback to healthcare workers, high cognitive workload, and poor ergonomic design, are explained, as is how human factors engineering can be used for improvement and increased compliance with practices to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  10. Barriers to participation in surgical randomized controlled trials in pediatric urology: A qualitative study of key stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vemulakonda, Vijaya M; Jones, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for assessing treatment efficacy. However, pediatric surgical RCTs have been limited in their ability to recruit patients. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and motivators to pediatric participation in surgical RCTs. We conducted a series of two focus groups with parents and one focus group with urology providers for children aged <2 years of age with a diagnosis of Society for Fetal Urology grade 3 or 4 hydronephrosis. We then administered a survey to referring pediatricians based on the initial analysis of focus group findings. Theme analysis was used for all qualitative transcribed text data obtained from focus groups and open-ended survey questions using team-based inductive approaches. Descriptive statistics were obtained for the remainder of the provider survey. Using qualitative text from stakeholders (n = 38) we identified four key themes across the data: responsibility to my child; responsibility to my patient; responsibility to the field; and irreversibility of surgery. Participants felt there was an obligation to be informed of relevant scientific research within a clinic research culture. However, there remains a disconnect for parents between randomized research studies that may ultimately benefit their child, depending on their age and concern their child is being treated as a 'guinea pig'. Some parents were willing to participate in RCTs but all were more open to participate in an observational study where the treatment decisions were felt to be under their control even when there was no "right answer" or multiple equivalent options for treatment. There was mixed opinion across the parents and providers whether research trial education and enrollment should be provided by the pediatrician or urologist. Active physician decisions were seen as critical within the context of a long term clinical relationship and provision of information of risks and benefits without

  11. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR-1 (PAI-1): A KEY FACTOR LINKING FIBRINOLYSIS AND AGE-RELATED SUBCLINICAL AND CLINICAL CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Matteo; Pahor, Marco; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2010-01-01

    The close relationship existing between aging and thrombosis has growingly been studied in this last decade. The age-related development of a pro-thrombotic imbalance in the fibrinolysis homeostasis has been hypothesized at the basis of this increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk. Fibrinolysis is the resulting of the interactions among multiple plasminogen activators and inhibitors constituing the enzymatic cascade, and ultimately leading to the degradation of fibrin. The plasminogen activator system plays a key role in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a member of the superfamily of serine-protease inhibitors (or serpins), and the principal inhibitor of both the tissue-type and the urinary-type plasminogen activator, the two plasminogen activators able to activate plasminogen. In this review, current evidence describing the central role played by PAI-1 in a number of age-related subclinical (i.e., inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance) and clinical (i.e., obesity, comorbidities, Werner syndrome) conditions is presented. Despite some controversial and unclear issues, PAI-1 represents an extremely promising marker which may become a biological parameter to be growingly considered in the prognostic evaluation, in the disease monitoring, and as treatment target of age-related conditions in the next future. PMID:20626406

  12. Human factors in aviation: Terminal control area boundary conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monan, William P.

    1989-01-01

    Air-to-air conflicts in the vicinity of Terminal Control Area (TCA) boundaries were studied to obtain a better understanding of the causal dynamics of these events with particular focus on human factor issues. The study dataset consisted of 381 Instrument Flight Rules/Visual Flight Rules (IFR/VFR) traffic conflicts in airspace layers above TCA ceiling and below TCA floors; 213 reports of incursions in TCA terminal airspace by VFR aircraft, of which 123 resulted in conflicts; and an additional set of reports describing problems with Air Traffic Control (ATC) services in and around TCAs. Results and conclusions are detailed.

  13. Contextual factors as a key to understanding the heterogeneity of effects of a maternal health policy in Burkina Faso?

    PubMed Central

    Belaid, Loubna; Ridde, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    Burkina Faso implemented a national subsidy for emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) covering 80% of the cost of normal childbirth in public health facilities. The objective was to increase coverage of facility-based deliveries. After implementation of the EmONC policy, coverage increased across the country, but disparities were observed between districts and between primary healthcare centres (PHC). To understand the variation in coverage, we assessed the contextual factors and the implementation of EmONC in six PHCs in a district. We conducted a contrasted multiple case study. We interviewed women (n = 71), traditional birth attendants (n = 7), clinic management committees (n = 11), and health workers and district health managers (n = 26). Focus groups (n = 62) were conducted within communities. Observations were carried out in the six PHCs. Implementation was nearly homogeneous in the six PHCs but the contexts and human factors appeared to explain the variations observed on the coverage of facility-based deliveries. In the PHCs of Nogo and Tara, the immediate increase in coverage was attributed to health workers’ leadership in creatively promoting facility-based deliveries and strengthening relationships of trust with communities, users’ positive perceptions of quality of care and the arrival of female professional staff. The change of healthcare team at Iata’s PHC and a penalty fee imposed for home births in Belem may have caused the delayed effects there. Finally, the unchanged coverage in the PHCs of Fati and Mata was likely due to lack of promotion of facility-based deliveries, users’ negative perceptions of quality of care, and conflicts between health workers and users. Before implementation, decision-makers should perform pilot studies to adapt policies according to contexts and human factors. PMID:24633914

  14. Submersible Aircraft Concept Design Study - Amendment 1. Additional Assessment of Design Risks & Sensitivities within the Original Study, and an Initial Assessment of Key Control Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    was to develop an understanding of the control aspects of the proposed submersible aircraft concept, however in conducting this analysis a more...understanding of the control aspects of the proposed submersible aircraft concept. However, in conducting this analysis, a more detailed review of the key...consider the use of a computerized active flight control system; removing the reflex airfoil eliminates the natural stability of the aircraft . Take-off

  15. Participation a Key Factor for Life Recovery After Disaster: A Grounded Theory Study in an Iranian Context

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei, Maryam; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Masoumi, Gholam Reza; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Parsa-Yekta, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background Since life recovery after disasters is a subjective and multifaceted construct influenced by different factors, and survivors’ main concerns and experiences are not clear, the researchers intended to explore this process. Materials and Methods This study was conducted in 2011 - 2014 based on the grounded theory approach. Participants were selected by purposeful sampling followed by theoretical sampling to achieve conceptual and theoretical saturation. Data were collected through interviews, observation, focus group discussion, and document reviews. Data were analyzed by Strauss and Corbin’s (2008) recommended approach. Results Transcribed data from 26 interviews (managers, health care providers, and receivers), field notes, and other documents were analyzed, and 1,652 open codes were identified. The codes were categorized, using constant comparative analysis, into five main categories including reactive exposure, subsiding emotions, need for comprehensive health recovery, improvement of normalization (new normality achievement), and contextual factors. The process of life recovery after disaster was also explored. Conclusions The results clarified a deep perception of participants’ experiences after disaster. The path of life recovery after disasters involves participants’ striving to achieve a comprehensive health recovery, which starts with the need for all-inclusive health recovery as a main concern; this is the motivator for a responding strategy. This strategy is participatory, and the process is progressive; achievement of a new normality is the final goal, with new development and levels of empowerment. PMID:27703797

  16. Exploring key factors in the choice of e-health using an asthma care mobile service model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ping; Yang, Hung-Yu

    2009-11-01

    Asthma care mobile service (ACMS) is a care platform for asthma patients using mobile phones to monitor asthma patients' real-time conditions. The anticipated benefits and development of the healthcare network platform rely on people's adoptive willingness and behavioral intention. The goal of this study is to understand and predict patients' acceptance behavior for ACMS as an application of e-health. The study is based on the technology acceptance model and integrates "subjective norm" and "innovativeness" to understand and predict the patient's attitude and behavioral intention. Employing a convenience sampling method, valid questionnaire responses were obtained from 229 patients. A confirmatory factor analysis examined the reliability and validity of the measurement model, while the structural equation modeling technique was employed to interpret the causal model. The model was used in the study to explain and predict the utilization of ACMS with a high explanatory power as a good-fit model. The results indicated the most critical factor that affects behavioral intentions related to ACMS is user attitude, followed by perceived usefulness, subjective norm, perceived ease of use, and innovativeness. The results provide the government developing high-tech, preventive medicine strategies the necessary data to define an appropriate policy to use in attracting greater participation in the effort.

  17. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  18. Participation a Key Factor for Life Recovery After Disaster: A Grounded Theory Study in an Iranian Context.

    PubMed

    Nakhaei, Maryam; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Masoumi, Gholam Reza; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Parsa-Yekta, Zohreh

    2016-07-01

    Since life recovery after disasters is a subjective and multifaceted construct influenced by different factors, and survivors' main concerns and experiences are not clear, the researchers intended to explore this process. This study was conducted in 2011 - 2014 based on the grounded theory approach. Participants were selected by purposeful sampling followed by theoretical sampling to achieve conceptual and theoretical saturation. Data were collected through interviews, observation, focus group discussion, and document reviews. Data were analyzed by Strauss and Corbin's (2008) recommended approach. Transcribed data from 26 interviews (managers, health care providers, and receivers), field notes, and other documents were analyzed, and 1,652 open codes were identified. The codes were categorized, using constant comparative analysis, into five main categories including reactive exposure, subsiding emotions, need for comprehensive health recovery, improvement of normalization (new normality achievement), and contextual factors. The process of life recovery after disaster was also explored. The results clarified a deep perception of participants' experiences after disaster. The path of life recovery after disasters involves participants' striving to achieve a comprehensive health recovery, which starts with the need for all-inclusive health recovery as a main concern; this is the motivator for a responding strategy. This strategy is participatory, and the process is progressive; achievement of a new normality is the final goal, with new development and levels of empowerment.

  19. A Novel Method of Evaluating Key Factors for Success in a Multifaceted Critical Care Fellowship Using Data Envelopment Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vikram; Kumar, Avinash B

    2018-01-01

    The current system of summative multi-rater evaluations and standardized tests to determine readiness to graduate from critical care fellowships has limitations. We sought to pilot the use of data envelopment analysis (DEA) to assess what aspects of the fellowship program contribute the most to an individual fellow's success. DEA is a nonparametric, operations research technique that uses linear programming to determine the technical efficiency of an entity based on its relative usage of resources in producing the outcome. Retrospective cohort study. Critical care fellows (n = 15) in an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited fellowship at a major academic medical center in the United States. After obtaining institutional review board approval for this retrospective study, we analyzed the data of 15 anesthesiology critical care fellows from academic years 2013-2015. The input-oriented DEA model develops a composite score for each fellow based on multiple inputs and outputs. The inputs included the didactic sessions attended, the ratio of clinical duty works hours to the procedures performed (work intensity index), and the outputs were the Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP) score and summative evaluations of fellows. A DEA efficiency score that ranged from 0 to 1 was generated for each of the fellows. Five fellows were rated as DEA efficient, and 10 fellows were characterized in the DEA inefficient group. The model was able to forecast the level of effort needed for each inefficient fellow, to achieve similar outputs as their best performing peers. The model also identified the work intensity index as the key element that characterized the best performers in our fellowship. DEA is a feasible method of objectively evaluating peer performance in a critical care fellowship beyond summative evaluations alone and can potentially be a powerful tool to guide individual performance during the fellowship.

  20. The intrinsic flexibility of the aptamer targeting the ribosomal protein S8 is a key factor for the molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Autiero, Ida; Ruvo, Menotti; Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Aptamers are RNA/DNA biomolecules representing an emerging class of protein interactors and regulators. Despite the growing interest in these molecules, current understanding of chemical-physical basis of their target recognition is limited. Recently, the characterization of the aptamer targeting the protein-S8 has suggested that flexibility plays important functional roles. We investigated the structural versatility of the S8-aptamer by molecular dynamics simulations. Five different simulations have been conducted by varying starting structures and temperatures. The simulation of S8-aptamer complex provides a dynamic view of the contacts occurring at the complex interface. The simulation of the aptamer in ligand-free state indicates that its central region is intrinsically endowed with a remarkable flexibility. Nevertheless, none of the trajectory structures adopts the structure observed in the S8-aptamer complex. The aptamer ligand-bound is very rigid in the simulation carried out at 300 K. A structural transition of this state, providing insights into the aptamer-protein recognition process, is observed in a simulation carried out at 400 K. These data indicate that a key event in the binding is linked to the widening of the central region of the aptamer. Particularly relevant is switch of the A26 base from its ligand-free state to a location that allows the G13-C28 base-pairing. Intrinsic flexibility of the aptamer is essential for partner recognition. Present data indicate that S8 recognizes the aptamer through an induced-fit rather than a population-shift mechanism. The present study provides deeper understanding of the structural basis of the structural versatility of aptamers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Jacques; Clefton, Gordon; Joe, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by variousmore » resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.« less

  2. Global profiling of rice and poplar transcriptomes highlights key conserved circadian-controlled pathways and cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Filichkin, Sergei A; Breton, Ghislain; Priest, Henry D; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Fox, Samuel E; Michael, Todd P; Chory, Joanne; Kay, Steve A; Mockler, Todd C

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks provide an adaptive advantage through anticipation of daily and seasonal environmental changes. In plants, the central clock oscillator is regulated by several interlocking feedback loops. It was shown that a substantial proportion of the Arabidopsis genome cycles with phases of peak expression covering the entire day. Synchronized transcriptome cycling is driven through an extensive network of diurnal and clock-regulated transcription factors and their target cis-regulatory elements. Study of the cycling transcriptome in other plant species could thus help elucidate the similarities and differences and identify hubs of regulation common to monocot and dicot plants. Using a combination of oligonucleotide microarrays and data mining pipelines, we examined daily rhythms in gene expression in one monocotyledonous and one dicotyledonous plant, rice and poplar, respectively. Cycling transcriptomes were interrogated under different diurnal (driven) and circadian (free running) light and temperature conditions. Collectively, photocycles and thermocycles regulated about 60% of the expressed nuclear genes in rice and poplar. Depending on the condition tested, up to one third of oscillating Arabidopsis-poplar-rice orthologs were phased within three hours of each other suggesting a high degree of conservation in terms of rhythmic gene expression. We identified clusters of rhythmically co-expressed genes and searched their promoter sequences to identify phase-specific cis-elements, including elements that were conserved in the promoters of Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. Our results show that the cycling patterns of many circadian clock genes are highly conserved across poplar, rice, and Arabidopsis. The expression of many orthologous genes in key metabolic and regulatory pathways is diurnal and/or circadian regulated and phased to similar times of day. Our results confirm previous findings in Arabidopsis of three major classes of cis-regulatory modules within

  3. Paradigm of Professional Integration for Disabled People in Fundació Integralia Vallès: Key Success Factors.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ma Emilia; De Oña, Javier; Picola, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Fundació Integralia Vallès is a pioneer contact center in Europe that has involved the creation of a healthcare reference center managed exclusively by people with disabilities and degenerative diseases to enable their professional development and ultimately integration into the labour market. The environment created under this project enables effective training and building of skills, capacity and work experience as well as promoting social responsibility among a population group that is at risk of exclusion. The major differentiating factor in Fundació Integralia Vallés is the quality of service provided by its staff, who are particularly sensitive to the issues of health, and who provide professional and human dimension in every attention.

  4. Identification of Key Items Regarding Personality, Environment, and Life Events to Assess Risk and Resilience Factors for Harmful Alcohol Drinking in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Angela; Schumann, Gunter; Flor, Herta; Nees, Frauke

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol misuse often develops during adolescence involving interacting factors deriving from personality, environment and life events that can be assessed with well-established instruments. However, for specific research purposes, involving the assessment of large data sets, it may be beneficial having a short tool of key items representing the most important risk factors. We identified a set of key items from standard questionnaires assessed in about 2000 adolescents. In our longitudinal study we identified important items on personality, environment, and life events explaining alcohol drinking behaviour at the age of 14 years and the increase of alcohol consumption 2 years later. The key items explained 33.4% of variance in alcohol drinking behaviour (vs. 34.8% for original battery) and can be completed in six minutes. Our item list represents a powerful easy-to-use tool for the examination of alcohol drinking behaviour in adolescents. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Soil pH and electrical conductivity are key edaphic factors shaping bacterial communities of greenhouse soils in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Roh, An-Sung; Choi, Seung-Chul; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Moon-Tae; Ahn, Byung-Koo; Kim, Sun-Kuk; Lee, Young-Han; Joa, Jae-Ho; Kang, Seong-Soo; Lee, Shin Ae; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in soil ecosystem processes such as organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling, and plant nutrient availability. The land use for greenhouse cultivation has been increasing continuously, which involves an intensive input of agricultural materials to enhance productivity; however, relatively little is known about bacterial communities in greenhouse soils. To assess the effects of environmental factors on the soil bacterial diversity and community composition, a total of 187 greenhouse soil samples collected across Korea were subjected to bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis. A total of 11,865 operational taxonomic units at a 97% similarity cutoff level were detected from 847,560 sequences. Among nine soil factors evaluated; pH, electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable cations (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Na + , and K + ), available P 2 O 5 , organic matter, and NO 3 -N, soil pH was most strongly correlated with bacterial richness (polynomial regression, pH: R 2 = 0.1683, P < 0.001) and diversity (pH: R 2 = 0.1765, P < 0.001). Community dissimilarities (Bray-Curtis distance) were positively correlated with Euclidean distance for pH and EC (Mantel test, pH: r = 0.2672, P < 0.001; EC: r = 0.1473, P < 0.001). Among dominant phyla (> 1%), the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were also more strongly correlated with pH and EC values, compared with other soil cation contents, such as Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Na + , and K + . Our results suggest that, despite the heterogeneity of various environmental variables, the bacterial communities of the intensively cultivated greenhouse soils were particularly influenced by soil pH and EC. These findings therefore shed light on the soil microbial ecology of greenhouse cultivation, which should be helpful for devising effective management strategies to enhance soil microbial diversity and improving crop

  6. Short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity ameliorates the suppressed expression of key β-cell factors under diabetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shimo, Naoki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Takebe, Satomi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneto, Hideaki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-11-27

    Alleviation of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia improves pancreatic β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how the expression alterations of key β-cell factors are altered by the short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity or lipotoxicity. We treated db/db mice for one week with empagliflozin and/or bezafibrate to alleviate glucotoxicity and/or liptotoxicity, respectively. The gene expression levels of Pdx1 and Mafa, and their potential targets, insulin 1, Slc2a2, and Glp1r, were higher in the islets of empagliflozin-treated mice, and levels of insulin 2 were higher in mice treated with both reagents, than in untreated mice. Moreover, compared to the pretreatment levels, Mafa and insulin 1 expression increased in empagliflozin-treated mice, and Slc2a2 increased in combination-treated mice. In addition, empagliflozin treatment enhanced β-cell proliferation assessed by Ki-67 immunostaining. Our date clearly demonstrated that the one-week selective alleviation of glucotoxicity led to the better expression levels of the key β-cell factors critical for β-cell function over pretreatment levels, and that the alleviation of lipotoxicity along with glucotoxicity augmented the favorable effects under diabetic conditions. - Highlights: • One-week selective reduction of gluco- and lipo-toxicity in db/db mice was performed. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction increases key pancreatic β-cell factors expression. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction improves β-cell factors over pretreatment levels. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction turns β-cell mass toward increase. • Lipotoxicity reduction has additive effects on glucotoxicity reduction.

  7. Short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity ameliorates the suppressed expression of key β-cell factors under diabetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shimo, Naoki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki, E-mail: matsuoka@endmet.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Miyatsuka, Takeshi

    2015-11-27

    Alleviation of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia improves pancreatic β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how the expression alterations of key β-cell factors are altered by the short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity or lipotoxicity. We treated db/db mice for one week with empagliflozin and/or bezafibrate to alleviate glucotoxicity and/or liptotoxicity, respectively. The gene expression levels of Pdx1 and Mafa, and their potential targets, insulin 1, Slc2a2, and Glp1r, were higher in the islets of empagliflozin-treated mice, and levels of insulin 2 were higher in micemore » treated with both reagents, than in untreated mice. Moreover, compared to the pretreatment levels, Mafa and insulin 1 expression increased in empagliflozin-treated mice, and Slc2a2 increased in combination-treated mice. In addition, empagliflozin treatment enhanced β-cell proliferation assessed by Ki-67 immunostaining. Our date clearly demonstrated that the one-week selective alleviation of glucotoxicity led to the better expression levels of the key β-cell factors critical for β-cell function over pretreatment levels, and that the alleviation of lipotoxicity along with glucotoxicity augmented the favorable effects under diabetic conditions. - Highlights: • One-week selective reduction of gluco- and lipo-toxicity in db/db mice was performed. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction increases key pancreatic β-cell factors expression. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction improves β-cell factors over pretreatment levels. • Selective glucotoxicity reduction turns β-cell mass toward increase. • Lipotoxicity reduction has additive effects on glucotoxicity reduction.« less

  8. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants. PMID:26432878

  9. A human factors approach to range scheduling for satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Cameron H. G.; Aitken, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Range scheduling for satellite control presents a classical problem: supervisory control of a large-scale dynamic system, with unwieldy amounts of interrelated data used as inputs to the decision process. Increased automation of the task, with the appropriate human-computer interface, is highly desirable. The development and user evaluation of a semi-automated network range scheduling system is described. The system incorporates a synergistic human-computer interface consisting of a large screen color display, voice input/output, a 'sonic pen' pointing device, a touchscreen color CRT, and a standard keyboard. From a human factors standpoint, this development represents the first major improvement in almost 30 years to the satellite control network scheduling task.

  10. Coffee Drinking Is Widespread in the United States, but Usual Intake Varies by Key Demographic and Lifestyle Factors.

    PubMed

    Loftfield, Erikka; Freedman, Neal D; Dodd, Kevin W; Vogtmann, Emily; Xiao, Qian; Sinha, Rashmi; Graubard, Barry I

    2016-09-01

    Despite widespread popularity and possible health effects, the prevalence and distribution of coffee consumption in US adults are poorly characterized. We sought to estimate usual daily coffee intakes from all coffee-containing beverages, including decaffeinated and regular coffee, among US adults according to demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. Dietary intake data from ≤2 nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls and a food-frequency questionnaire administered during the NHANES 2003-2006 were used to estimate the person-specific probability of consuming coffee on a particular day and the usual amount consumed on consumption days. Trends in population mean coffee consumption over time were evaluated by using multiple linear regression and 1-d 24-h recall data from NHANES 2003-2012. Analyses were weighted to be representative of the US adult population aged ≥20 y. An estimated 154 million adults, or 75% of the US population, aged ≥20 y reported drinking coffee; 49% reported drinking coffee daily. Prevalence did not vary by sex, education, income, or self-reported general health (all P ≥ 0.05) but did vary by age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, and alcohol drinking (all P < 0.05). Among coffee drinkers, the mean ± SE usual intake was 14.1 ± 0.5 fluid ounces/d (417 ± 15 mL/d). Mean usual intakes were higher in men than women, in older age groups than in those aged 20 to <30 y, in non-Hispanic whites than in non-Hispanic blacks or Hispanic/other races, in smokers than in never smokers, and in daily alcohol consumers than in nonconsumers (all P < 0.05). Population mean coffee consumption was stable from 2003 to 2012 (P-trend = 0.09). Coffee is widely consumed in the United States, with usual intakes varying by lifestyle and demographic factors, most notably by age. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether observed differences by age reflect birth cohort effects or changes in drinking patterns over the lifetime. © 2016 American

  11. DYNAMIC CHANGES IN COLORED DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND TOTAL SUSPENDED MATTER CONTROL UV EXPOSURE OF CORAL REEFS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variation in ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is one important environmental factor that influences the health of coral reefs. Here we present evidence that the reef tract in the Florida Keys experiences significantly higher variability in UV exposure than other surrounding coast...

  12. Key factors for a high-quality peritoneal dialysis program--the role of the PD team and continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi

    2014-06-01

    The proportion of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) has increased very fast in China over the last decade. Renji Hospital, affiliated with Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, is a recognized high-quality PD unit with a high PD utilization rate, excellent patient and technique survival (1-year and 5-year patient survival rate of 93% and 71%, and 1-year and 5-year technique survival of 96% and 82%, respectively), low peritonitis rate and a well-documented good quality of life of the treated patients. We believe that a dedicated and experienced PD team, a structured patient training program, continuous patient support, establishing and utilizing standardized protocols, starting PD with low dialysis dose, monitoring key performance indicators (KPIs), and continuous quality improvement (CQI) are the key factors underlying this successful PD program. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  13. Key Factors for a High-Quality Peritoneal Dialysis Program — The Role of the PD Team and Continuous Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) has increased very fast in China over the last decade. Renji Hospital, affiliated with Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, is a recognized high-quality PD unit with a high PD utilization rate, excellent patient and technique survival (1-year and 5-year patient survival rate of 93% and 71%, and 1-year and 5-year technique survival of 96% and 82%, respectively), low peritonitis rate and a well-documented good quality of life of the treated patients. We believe that a dedicated and experienced PD team, a structured patient training program, continuous patient support, establishing and utilizing standardized protocols, starting PD with low dialysis dose, monitoring key performance indicators (KPIs), and continuous quality improvement (CQI) are the key factors underlying this successful PD program. PMID:24962961

  14. Tannin is a key factor in the determination and prediction of energy content in sorghum grains fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pan, L; Li, P; Ma, X K; Xu, Y T; Tian, Q Y; Liu, L; Li, D F; Piao, X S

    2016-07-01

    DE and 3,973 - (262 × % tannin) - (27.24 × % ADF) for ME. Our results strongly indicate that the DE and ME content of sorghum grains are related to their chemical composition, especially their tannin content. The DE and ME content could decrease by more than 200 kcal/kg when the tannin content is increased by 1% in the sorghum grain. Overall, tannin is a key predictor for the DE and ME content as well as the ATTD of GE in sorghum grains, and the potent antinutritive properties from tannin should not be ignored when sorghum is used as an energy source for pigs.

  15. Gelatin Methacrylate Microspheres for Growth Factor Controlled Release

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15–90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor over conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite an order of magnitude greater gelatin content of GA MPs. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery. PMID:25463489

  16. Searching for a Role of Nursing Personnel in Developing Landscape of Ehealth: Factors Determining Attitudes toward Key Patient Empowering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Duplaga, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nurses may play an important role in the delivery of medical services based on the use of ehealth tools. Nevertheless, their taking an active role in an ehealth environment depends on their possessing the appropriate skills and mindset. The main objective of this paper was to assess nurses’ opinions and to analyze the predictors of their acceptance of ehealth features relevant to patient empowerment with a strong focus on chronic care. Methods A survey was conducted among nurses from hospital centers of south-eastern Poland based on a questionnaire designed to assess their attitudes toward the ehealth domain. The predictors of the nurses’ acceptance of ehealth usage within specific contexts were assessed with uni- and multivariate logistic regression. Results An analysis was performed on data from 648 questionnaires retained after a quality check. The duration of Internet use was consistently related to higher acceptance of ehealth applications and more certainty regarding the reliability of health-related information available on the Internet. Nurses from urban medical centers were more skeptical about the use of specific ehealth solutions. Conclusion Previous experience in using information technologies is the main factor influencing the acceptance of specific ehealth solutions relevant for care provided to patients suffering from chronic conditions. PMID:27049525

  17. Plant Actin-Depolymerizing Factors Possess Opposing Biochemical Properties Arising from Key Amino Acid Changes throughout Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nan, Qiong; Qian, Dong; Niu, Yue; He, Yongxing; Tong, Shaofei; Niu, Zhimin; Ma, Jianchao; Yang, Yang; An, Lizhe; Wan, Dongshi; Xiang, Yun

    2017-02-01

    Functional divergence in paralogs is an important genetic source of evolutionary innovation. Actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are among the most important actin binding proteins and are involved in generating and remodeling actin cytoskeletal architecture via their conserved F-actin severing or depolymerizing activity. In plants, ADFs coevolved with actin, but their biochemical properties are diverse. Unfortunately, the biochemical function of most plant ADFs and the potential mechanisms of their functional divergence remain unclear. Here, in vitro biochemical analyses demonstrated that all 11 ADF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit opposing biochemical properties. Subclass III ADFs evolved F-actin bundling (B-type) function from conserved F-actin depolymerizing (D-type) function, and subclass I ADFs have enhanced D-type function. By tracking historical mutation sites on ancestral proteins, several fundamental amino acid residues affecting the biochemical functions of these proteins were identified in Arabidopsis and various plants, suggesting that the biochemical divergence of ADFs has been conserved during the evolution of angiosperm plants. Importantly, N-terminal extensions on subclass III ADFs that arose from intron-sliding events are indispensable for the alteration of D-type to B-type function. We conclude that the evolution of these N-terminal extensions and several conserved mutations produced the diverse biochemical functions of plant ADFs from a putative ancestor. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Key Factors to Improve the Outcome of Retinal Reattachment Surgery in Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Hanns; Singh, Pankaj; Kohnen, Thomas; Wagner, Clemens; Koch, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Introduction For management of complicated retinal detachments, a pars plana vitrectomy with temporary silicone oil (SO) fill is the method of choice. According to literature, the retinal redetachment rate varies between <10% and >70% with around 36% in our own group (retrospective data analysis, n = 119 eyes). Methods The main goal was to reduce the retinal redetachment rate. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) and evaluation protocols (EVALPs) were developed to prospectively analyse risk factors. Lab analysis of SO was performed, and the role of surgical experience was evaluated and investigated with Eyesi®. Results We achieved a significant reduction of the retinal redetachment rate (to 6.80%, n = 101, p = 0.002). After surgery with SO injection, neither further membrane peeling (in 16.5%) nor retinal laser coagulation (in 100%) during revision surgery had a significant effect on the reattachment rate (p = 0.167, p = 0.23), while extensive additional laser coagulation reduced visual acuity (p = 0.01). A 3-port approach had to be set up to complete SO removal. A difference in success rate depending on surgical experience was confirmed, and the performance in Eyesi correlated with that in the patients' eye. Conclusions A SOP- and EVALP-based management and new strategies to secure the surgical performance seem to be essential for successful surgery. PMID:28770107

  19. Replication and extension of a hierarchical model of social anxiety and depression: fear of positive evaluation as a key unique factor in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Wang, Hsu, Chiu, and Liang (2012, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26, 215-224) recently proposed a hierarchical model of social interaction anxiety and depression to account for both the commonalities and distinctions between these conditions. In the present paper, this model was extended to more broadly encompass the symptoms of social anxiety disorder, and replicated in a large unselected, undergraduate sample (n = 585). Structural equation modeling (SEM) and hierarchical regression analyses were employed. Negative affect and positive affect were conceptualized as general factors shared by social anxiety and depression; fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and disqualification of positive social outcomes were operationalized as specific factors, and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) was operationalized as a factor unique to social anxiety. This extended hierarchical model explicates structural relationships among these factors, in which the higher-level, general factors (i.e., high negative affect and low positive affect) represent vulnerability markers of both social anxiety and depression, and the lower-level factors (i.e., FNE, disqualification of positive social outcomes, and FPE) are the dimensions of specific cognitive features. Results from SEM and hierarchical regression analyses converged in support of the extended model. FPE is further supported as a key symptom that differentiates social anxiety from depression.

  20. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Nevoigt, Elke; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-11-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Functional and transcriptomic analysis of the key unfolded protein response transcription factor HacA in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Xie, Jingyi; Liu, Xiaokai; Wang, Bin; Pan, Li

    2016-11-15

    HacA is a conserved basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as the master transcriptional regulator in the unfolded protein response (UPR). To comprehensively evaluate the role of HacA in Aspergillus oryzae, a homokaryotic hacA disruption mutant (HacA-DE) and a strain that expressed a constitutively active form of HacA (HacA-CA) were successfully generated, and transcriptome analyses of these mutants were performed. Growth and phenotypic profiles demonstrated that hyphal growth and sporulation were impaired in the HacA-DE and HacA-CA strains that were grown on complete and minimal media, and the growth impairment was more pronounced for the HacA-CA strain. Compared with a wild-type (WT) strain, the transcriptome results indicated that differentially expressed genes in these mutants mainly fell into four categories: the protein secretory pathway, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, we identified 80 and 36 genes of the secretory pathway whose expression significantly differed in the HacA-CA strain (compared with the WT and HacA-DE strains) and HacA-DE strain (compared with the WT strain), respectively, which mostly belonged to protein folding/UPR, glycosylation, and vesicle transport processes. Both the HacA-CA and HacA-DE strains exhibited reduced expression of extracellular enzymes, especially amylolytic enzymes, which resulted from the activation of the repression under secretion stress mechanism in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Collectively, our results suggest that the function of HacA is important not only for UPR induction, but also for growth and fungal physiology, as it serves to reduce secretion stress in A. oryzae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Statistical study to identify the key factors governing ground water recharge in the watersheds of the arid Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Binq-Qi; Wang, Yue-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the source and recharge of ground waters is of great significance to our knowledge in hydrological cycles in arid environments over the world. Northern Xinjiang in northwestern China is a significant repository of information relating to the hydrological evolution and climatic changes in central Asia. In this study, two multivariate statistical techniques, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to assess the ground water recharge and its governing factors, with the principal idea of exploring the above techniques to utilize all available hydrogeochemical variables in the quality assessment, which are not considered in the conventional techniques like Stiff and Piper diagrams. Q-mode HCA and R-mode PCA were combined to partition the water samples into seven major water clusters (C1-C7) and three principal components (PC1-PC3, PC1 salinity, PC2 hydroclimate, PC3 contaminant). The water samples C1 + C4 were classified as recharge area waters (Ca-HCO3 water), C2 + C3 as transitional zone waters (Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water), and C5 + C6 + C7 as discharge area waters (Na-SO4 water). Based on the Q-mode PCA scores, three groups of geochemical processes influencing recharge regimes were identified: geogenic (i.e., caused by natural geochemical processes), geomorphoclimatic (caused by topography and climate), and anthropogenic (caused by ground water contamination). It is proposed that differences in recharge mechanism and ground water evolution, and possible bedrock composition difference, are responsible for the chemical genesis of these waters. These will continue to influence the geochemistry of the northern Xinjiang drainage system for a long time due to its steady tectonics and arid climate. This study proved that the chemistry differentiation of ground water can effectively support the identification of ground water recharge and evolution patterns.

  3. Nurses' Perceptions of Interventions for the Management of Patient-Oriented Outcomes: A Key Factor for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Souraya; Manojlovich, Milisa; Doran, Diane; Fox, Mary; Covell, Christine L; Kelly, Helen; Jeffs, Lianne; McAllister, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Various barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based interventions in practice have been acknowledged. Nurses' perspectives on these interventions were overlooked as potential factors that influence their uptake in practice. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' perception of evidence-based interventions targeting patient-oriented outcomes. A mixed method design involving concurrent application of quantitative and qualitative approaches was used. Nurses (n = 56) working in acute and rehabilitation care settings completed the Intervention Acceptability scale and responded to open-ended questions. The scale presented information on the components, activities, dose, and mode of delivering evidence-based interventions targeting each patient-oriented outcome (fatigue, nausea and vomiting, dyspnea, pain, physical function, self-care) and items to rate the interventions on five attributes (relevance, applicability, frequency of use, likelihood, and comfort in implementation). The open-ended questions inquired about the appropriateness and resources needed to use the interventions in practice. The quantitative results indicated favorable perceptions of most interventions. Nurses rated acupressure, guided imagery, massage, and relaxation as having limited appropriateness and they reported low levels of comfort in applying them. The qualitative themes clarified the reasons underlying nurses' ratings. This study's findings highlight the importance of examining nurses' perceptions of evidence-based interventions as an initial step toward promoting the adoption of interventions in practice. Effective interventions that are considered of limited relevance are unlikely to be implemented in practice. Nurses' perceptions can guide the design or selection of dissemination strategies to clarify any misconception about the effectiveness and risk of evidence-based interventions. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris

    2015-01-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH. PMID:26341199

  5. Nitrous oxide emissions from intensive agricultural systems: Variations between crops and seasons, key driving variables, and mean emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, K. E.; McTaggart, I. P.; Smith, K. A.

    1999-11-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide from intensively managed agricultural fields were measured over 3 years. Exponential increases in flux occurred with increasing soil water- filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature; increases in soil mineral N content due to fertilizer application also stimulated emissions. Fluxes were low when any of these variables was below a critical value. The largest fluxes occurred when WFPS values were very high (70-90%), indicating that denitrification was the major process responsible. The relationships with the driving variables showed strong similarities to those reported for very different environments: irrigated sugar cane crops, pastures, and forest in the tropics. Annual emissions varied widely (0.3-18.4 kg N2O-N ha-1). These variations were principally due to the degree of coincidence of fertilizer application and major rainfall events. It is concluded therefore that several years' data are required from any agricultural ecosystem in a variable climate to obtain a robust estimate of mean N2O fluxes. The emissions from small-grain cereals (winter wheat and spring barley) were consistently lower (0.2-0.7 kg N2O-N per 100 kg N applied) than from cut grassland (0.3-5.8 kg N2O- N per 100 kg N). Crops such as broccoli and potatoes gave emissions of the same order as those from the grassland. Although these differences between crop types are not apparent in general data comparisons, there may well be distinct regional differences in the relative and absolute emissions from different crops, due to local factors relating to soil type, weather patterns, and agricultural management practices. This will only be determined by more detailed comparative studies.

  6. Social and cultural factors in the successful control of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, A J; Garro, L C

    1992-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis on the public health is staggering. Worldwide, annual incidence of new cases is estimated to be about 8 million. Almost 3 million deaths occur yearly. Early case identification and adherence to treatment regimens are the remaining barriers to successful control. In many nations, however, fewer than half those with active disease receive a diagnosis, and fewer than half those beginning treatment complete it. The twin problems of delay in seeking treatment and abandonment of a prescribed regimen derive from complex factors. People's confusion as to the implications of the tuberculosis symptoms, costs of transportation to clinic services, the social stigma that attaches to tuberculosis, the high cost of medication, organizational problems in providing adequate followup services, and patients' perception of clinic facilities as inhospitable all contribute to the complexity. Sociocultural factors are emphasized in this report because hitherto they have not been adequately explored. Salient among those sociocultural factors is the health culture of the patients. That is, the understanding and information people have from family, friends, and neighbors as to the nature of a health problem, its cause, and its implications. A knowledge of the health culture of their patients has become a critical tool if tuberculosis control programs are to be successful. Several anthropological procedures are recommended to help uncover the health culture of people served by tuberculosis clinics. PMID:1454974

  7. Emerging and reemerging neglected tropical diseases: a review of key characteristics, risk factors, and the policy and innovation environment.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A; Cuomo, Raphael; Hafen, Ryan; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Lee, Daniel E

    2014-10-01

    In global health, critical challenges have arisen from infectious diseases, including the emergence and reemergence of old and new infectious diseases. Emergence and reemergence are accelerated by rapid human development, including numerous changes in demographics, populations, and the environment. This has also led to zoonoses in the changing human-animal ecosystem, which are impacted by a growing globalized society where pathogens do not recognize geopolitical borders. Within this context, neglected tropical infectious diseases have historically lacked adequate attention in international public health efforts, leading to insufficient prevention and treatment options. This subset of 17 infectious tropical diseases disproportionately impacts the world's poorest, represents a significant and underappreciated global disease burden, and is a major barrier to development efforts to alleviate poverty and improve human health. Neglected tropical diseases that are also categorized as emerging or reemerging infectious diseases are an even more serious threat and have not been adequately examined or discussed in terms of their unique risk characteristics. This review sets out to identify emerging and reemerging neglected tropical diseases and explore the policy and innovation environment that could hamper or enable control efforts. Through this examination, we hope to raise awareness and guide potential approaches to addressing this global health concern. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Emerging and Reemerging Neglected Tropical Diseases: a Review of Key Characteristics, Risk Factors, and the Policy and Innovation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bryan A.; Cuomo, Raphael; Hafen, Ryan; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Lee, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In global health, critical challenges have arisen from infectious diseases, including the emergence and reemergence of old and new infectious diseases. Emergence and reemergence are accelerated by rapid human development, including numerous changes in demographics, populations, and the environment. This has also led to zoonoses in the changing human-animal ecosystem, which are impacted by a growing globalized society where pathogens do not recognize geopolitical borders. Within this context, neglected tropical infectious diseases have historically lacked adequate attention in international public health efforts, leading to insufficient prevention and treatment options. This subset of 17 infectious tropical diseases disproportionately impacts the world's poorest, represents a significant and underappreciated global disease burden, and is a major barrier to development efforts to alleviate poverty and improve human health. Neglected tropical diseases that are also categorized as emerging or reemerging infectious diseases are an even more serious threat and have not been adequately examined or discussed in terms of their unique risk characteristics. This review sets out to identify emerging and reemerging neglected tropical diseases and explore the policy and innovation environment that could hamper or enable control efforts. Through this examination, we hope to raise awareness and guide potential approaches to addressing this global health concern. PMID:25278579

  9. Key Spatial Factors Influencing the Perceived Privacy in Nursing Units: An Exploration Study With Eight Nursing Units in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Cai, Hui; Bosch, Sheila J

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how the spatial characteristics of patient beds, which are influenced by patient room design and nursing unit configuration, affect patients' perceptions about privacy. In the hospital setting, most patients expect a certain degree of privacy but also understand that their caregivers need appropriate access to them in order to provide high-quality care. Even veteran healthcare designers may struggle to create just the right balance between privacy and accessibility. A paper-based survey was conducted with 159 participants in Hong Kong-72 (45.3%) participants had been hospitalized and 87 (54.7%) participants had not-to document their selection of high-privacy beds, given simplified plans of eight nursing units. Two types of information, comprised of six variables, were examined for each bed. These include (1) room-level variables, specifically the number of beds per room and area per bed and (2) relational variables, including walking distance, directional change, integration, and control. The results demonstrate that when asked to identify high-privacy beds, participants selected beds in patient rooms with fewer beds per room, a larger area per bed, and a longer walking distance to the care team workstation. Interestingly, the participants having been hospitalized also chose beds with a visual connection to the care team workstation as being high in privacy. The participants with hospitalization experience may be willing to accept a bed with reduced visual privacy, perhaps out of a concern for safety.

  10. Implementing an Injury Prevention Briefing to aid delivery of key fire safety messages in UK children's centres: qualitative study nested within a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Kate; Goodenough, Trudy; Deave, Toity; Jaeckle, Sally; McDaid, Lisa; Benford, Penny; Hayes, Mike; Towner, Elizabeth; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-12-10

    To improve the translation of public health evidence into practice, there is a need to increase practitioner involvement in initiative development, to place greater emphasis on contextual knowledge, and to address intervention processes and outcomes. Evidence that demonstrates the need to reduce childhood fire-related injuries is compelling but its translation into practice is inconsistent and limited. With this knowledge the Keeping Children Safe programme developed an "Injury Prevention Briefing (IPB)" using a 7 step process to combine scientific evidence with practitioner contextual knowledge. The IPB was designed specifically for children's centres (CCs) to support delivery of key fire safety messages to parents. This paper reports the findings of a nested qualitative study within a clustered randomised controlled trial of the IPB, in which staff described their experiences of IPB implementation to aid understanding of why or how the intervention worked. Interviews were conducted with key staff at 24 CCs participating in the two intervention arms: 1) IPB supplemented by initial training and regular facilitation; 2) IPB sent by post with no facilitation. Framework Analysis was applied to these interview data to explore intervention adherence including; exposure or dose; quality of delivery; participant responsiveness; programme differentiation; and staff experience of IPB implementation. This included barriers, facilitators and suggested improvements. 83% of CCs regarded the IPB as a simple, accessible tool which raised awareness, and stimulated discussion and behaviour change. 15 CCs suggested minor modifications to format and content. Four levels of implementation were identified according to content, frequency, duration and coverage. Most CCs (75%) achieved 'extended' or 'essential' IPB implementation. Three universal factors affected all CCs: organisational change and resourcing; working with hard to engage groups; additional demands of participating in a

  11. Is strength-training frequency a key factor to develop performance adaptations in young elite soccer players?

    PubMed

    Otero-Esquina, Carlos; de Hoyo Lora, Moisés; Gonzalo-Skok, Óliver; Domínguez-Cobo, Sergio; Sánchez, Hugo

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of a combined strength-training programme (full-back squat, YoYo TM leg curl, plyometrics and sled towing exercises) on performance in elite young soccer players and to examine the effects when this training programme was performed one or two days per week. Thirty-six male soccer players (U-17 to U-19) were recruited and assigned to experimental groups (EXP1: 1 s w -1 ; EXP2: 2 s w -1 ) or a control group (CON). Performance was assessed through a countermovement jump (CMJ) test (relative peak power [CMJ PP ] and CMJ height [CMJ H ]), a 20-m linear sprint test with split-times at 10-m, and a change of direction test (V-cut test) 1 week before starting the training programme and also 1 week after performing such training programme. Within-group analysis showed substantial improvements in CMJ variables (ES: 0.39-0.81) and COD (ES: 0.70 and 0.76) in EXP1 and EXP2, while EXP2 also showed substantial enhancements in all linear sprinting tests (ES: 0.43-0.52). Between-group analysis showed substantially greater improvements in CMJ variables (ES: 0.39-0.68) in experimental groups in comparison to CON. Furthermore, EXP2 achieved a substantial better performance in 20-m (ES: 0.48-0.64) than EXP1 and CON. Finally, EXP2 also showed greater enhancements in 10-m (ES: 0.50) and V-cut test (ES: 0.52) than EXP1. In conclusion, the combined strength-training programme improved jumping ability, independently of training frequency, though the achievement of two sessions per week also enhanced sprinting abilities (linear and COD) in young soccer players.

  12. Type 2 Diabetes: Model of Factors Associated with Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Aghili, Rokhsareh; Polonsky, William H; Valojerdi, Ameneh Ebrahim; Malek, Mojtaba; Keshtkar, Abbas Ali; Esteghamati, Alireza; Heyman, Mark; Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the related factors and their intercorrelated impacts on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited for this study during their regular clinic visits at a major medical centre in Iran. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels were used as the indicator of glycemic control. Regression analysis was used to determine the relationships between glycemic control and demographics, self-care behaviours, resources and affective variables. Moreover, the associations between diabetes-related distress and measured variables were tested. Three hundred eighty people with type 2 diabetes completed the study. The mean duration of diabetes was 8.94±6.57 years, and the mean A1C levels were 7.78%±1.7%. Diabetes-related distress was significantly associated with A1C levels, controlling for all other variables (p=0.01). On the other hand, depression (p<0.001), self-management (p<0.001), anxiety (p<0.001) and patient-physician relationship (p=0.023) were significantly associated with diabetes-related distress. Diabetes-related distress was found to be associated with glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes, whereas age, depression, anxiety, self-management and family and social support may affect glycemic control indirectly through diabetes-related distress. Thus, it is important to assess and, if appropriate, treat people with diabetes for diabetes-related distress in order to identify and help them overcome barriers to optimal glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Shoreline as a controlling factor in commercial shrimp production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ecological model was developed that relates marsh detritus export and shrimp production. It was based on the hypothesis that the shoreline is a controlling factor in the production of shrimp through regulation of detritus export from the marsh. LANDSAT data were used to develop measurement of shoreline length and areas of marsh having more than 5.0 kilometers of shoreline per square kilometer of area for the Louisiana coast, demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to provide important geographic information. These factors were combined with published tidal ranges and salinities to develop a mathematical model that predicted shrimp production for nine geographic units of the Louisiana coast, as indicated by the long term average commercial shrimp yield.

  14. Pou1f1, the key transcription factor related to somatic growth in tilapia (Orechromis niloticus), is regulated by two independent post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Qin, Jingkai; Jia, Jirong; Yan, Peipei; Li, Wensheng

    2017-01-29

    This study aims to determine the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism of the transcription factor pou1f1 (pou class 1 homeobox 1), which is the key gene for pituitary development, somatic growth in vertebrates, and transcription of several hormone genes in teleost fish. MicroRNA miR-223-3p was identified as a bona fide target of pou1f; overexpression of miR-223-3p in primary pituitary cells led to the down-regulation of pou1f1 and downstream genes, and inhibition of miR-223-3p led to the up-regulation of pou1f1 in Nile tilapia dispersed primary pituitary cells. An adenylate-uridylate-rich element (AU-Rich element) was found in the 3'UTR of pou1f1 mRNA, and deletion of the AU-Rich element led to slower mRNA decay and therefore more protein output. A potential mutual relationship between miR-223-3p and the AU-rich element was also investigated, and the results demonstrated that with or without the AU-Rich element, miR-223-3p induced the up-regulation of a reporter system under serum starvation conditions, indicating that miR-223-3p and the AU-Rich element function independent of each other. This study is the first to investigate the post-transcriptional mechanism of pou1f1, which revealed that miR-223-3p down-regulated pou1f1 and downstream gene expressions, and the AU-Rich element led to rapid decay of pou1f1 mRNA. MicroRNA miR-223-3p and the AU-Rich element co-regulated the post-transcriptional expression of pou1f1 independently in Nile tilapia, demonstrating that pou1f1 is under the control of a dual post-transcription regulation mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Prest, Emmanuelle I; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  16. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  17. Interactions between transcription factors and chromatin regulators in the control of flower development.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Gilles; Engelhorn, Julia; Carles, Cristel C

    2018-03-01

    Chromatin modifiers and remodelers are involved in generating dynamic changes at the chromatin, which allow differential and specific readouts of the genome. While genetic evidence indicates that several chromatin factors play a key role in controlling basic developmental programs for inflorescence and flower morphogenesis, it remained unknown until recently how they exert their specificity toward gene expression, both temporally and spatially. An emerging topic is the recruitment or eviction of chromatin factors through the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding domains. In this review, we summarise recent progress that has been made in this regard in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We further outline the different possible modes through which chromatin complexes specifically target gene involved in flower development.

  18. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  19. The Microglial α7-Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptor Is a Key Element in Promoting Neuroprotection by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 via Nuclear Factor Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Esther; Egea, Javier; Buendia, Izaskun; Negredo, Pilar; Cunha, Ana C.; Cardoso, Silvia; Soares, Miguel P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We asked whether the neuroprotective effect of cholinergic microglial stimulation during an ischemic event acts via a mechanism involving the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and/or the expression of its target cytoprotective gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Specifically, the protective effect of the pharmacologic alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist PNU282987 was analyzed in organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro as well as in photothrombotic stroke in vivo. Results: OHCs exposed to OGD followed by reoxygenation elicited cell death, measured by propidium iodide and 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide staining. Activation of α7 nAChR by PNU282987, after OGD, reduced cell death, reactive oxygen species production, and tumor necrosis factor release. This was associated with induction of HO-1 expression, an effect reversed by α-bungarotoxin and by tin–protoporphyrin IX. The protective effect of PNU282987 was lost in microglial-depleted OHCs as well as in OHCs from Nrf2-deficient-versus-wild-type mice, an effect associated with suppression of HO-1 expression in microglia. Administration of PNU282987 1 h after induction of photothrombotic stroke in vivo reduced the infarct size and improved motor skills in Hmox1lox/lox mice that express normal levels of HO-1, but not in LysMCreHmox1Δ/Δ in which HO-1 expression is inhibited in myeloid cells, including the microglia. Innovation: This study suggests the participation of the microglial α7 nAChR in the brain cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Conclusion: Activation of the α7 nAChR/Nrf2/HO-1 axis in microglia regulates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, affording neuroprotection under brain ischemic conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1135–1148. PMID:23311871

  20. Steps to prevent SUDEP: the validity of risk factors in the SUDEP and seizure safety checklist: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Rohit; Walker, Matthew; McLean, Brendan; Laugharne, Richard; Ferrand, Fucundo; Hanna, Jane; Newman, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Our objectives were to compare people with epilepsy (PWE) who died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) with live controls using the risk factor items of the SUDEP and Seizure Safety Checklist. All 48 SUDEPs of 93 epilepsy deaths which occurred in Cornwall UK 2004-2012 were compared to 220 live controls using the SUDEP and Seizure Safety Checklist, an evidenced based tool used to communicate person centered risk of SUDEP to PWE. The odds ratio for having a specific factor in those who died was compared to controls and ranked according to P value using a sequential Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Of the 17 modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors analyzed 9 were statistically significant of which 7 are potentially modifiable. Well known modifiable factors such as nocturnal monitoring, compliance and sleeping position featured prominently in the risk association. This is the first case control study exploring the risk factors for SUDEP since 2009. The findings are compared to the current considered risk factors as identified in a major recent review. The study further validates certain SUDEP risk factors. It highlights that the majority of risk factors strongly associated with SUDEP are potentially modifiable. There is an emerging profile to rank the risk factors. It furthers the evidence to use structured risk assessment and communication tools such as the SUDEP and Seizure Safety Checklist in daily clinical practice. It highlights key areas for a person centered discussion to empower PWE to mitigate risk.

  1. Quantitative analysis of factors controlling sediment yield in mountainous watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z. H.; Huang, X. D.; Ai, L.; Fang, N. F.; Wu, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment and turbidity are primary causes of impaired river ecosystems; remedial action for these impairments requires the identification of their sources and controlling factors. This paper examines the combined effects of watershed complexity in terms of land use and physiography on the specific sediment yield of the upper Du River watershed (8973 km2) in China. The land use composition, land use pattern, morphometric variables, and soil properties of the watershed were calculated at the subwatershed scale and considered to be potentially influential factors. Because these watershed characteristics are highly codependent, a partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was used to elucidate the linkages between the specific sediment yield and metrics composed of 19 selected watershed characteristics. The first-order factors were identified by calculating the variable importance for the projection (VIP). The results revealed that the land use composition and land use pattern exerted the largest effects on the specific sediment yield and explained 65.2% of the variation in the specific sediment yield. A set of physiographic indices was also found to have a large effect on the specific sediment yield and explained 17.7% of the observed variation in the specific sediment yield. The following are the dominant first-order factors of the specific sediment yield at the subwatershed scale: the areal percentages of agriculture and forest, patch density, value of the Shannon's diversity index, contagion, value of the hypsometric integral, and saturated soil hydraulic conductivity. The watershed size exerted a substantial effect on the sediment delivery ratio (SDR). The VIP values also suggested that the Shannon's diversity index, contagion, and hypsometric integral are important factors in the SDR. With a readily available digital spatial database and rapid developments in geographic information system (GIS) technology, this practical and simple PLSR approach could be applied to

  2. A case-control investigation of adenomyosis: impact of control group selection on risk factor strength.

    PubMed

    Trabert, Britton; Weiss, Noel S; Rudra, Carole B; Scholes, Delia; Holt, Victoria L

    2011-01-01

    Using a medical record abstraction-based case-control study with two control groups, we evaluated adenomyosis risk factors and investigated differences related to comparison group selection. Medical records of all female 18- to 49-year-old Group Health (GH) enrollees with ICD-9 code 617.0 were abstracted using a standard data collection form. Cases were enrollees diagnosed with adenomyosis (n = 174) between April 1996 and September 2001. For comparison, medical records of two control groups were selected from the GH population: An age-matched sample of female enrollees (population-based controls; n = 149) and all female 18- to 49-year-old enrollees undergoing a hysterectomy (hysterectomy controls; n = 106) during the same time without adenomyosis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusted for identified covariates. Compared with normal and underweight women, overweight and obese women had increased adenomyosis risk using hysterectomy controls (OR, 2.2, 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; obese: OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.3) and population controls (overweight: OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0; obese: OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.0-7.0). Using population controls, women with at least one live birth were more likely to have adenomyosis than nulliparous women (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-6.2). Although some risk factors persisted in analyses using either control group, divergent results in relation to other risk factors for adenomyosis suggest that results of investigations of this disease may be affected by the choice of the comparison population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  4. Factors controlling nitrate fluxes in groundwater in agricultural areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, Lixia; Green, Christopher T.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of agricultural chemicals on groundwater quality depends on the interactions of biogeochemical and hydrologic factors. To identify key processes affecting distribution of agricultural nitrate in groundwater, a parsimonious transport model was applied at 14 sites across the U.S. Simulated vertical profiles of NO3-, N2 from denitrification, O2, Cl-, and environmental tracers of groundwater age were matched to observations by adjusting the parameters for recharge rate, unsaturated zone travel time, fractions of N and Cl- inputs leached to groundwater, O2 reduction rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and denitrification rate. Model results revealed important interactions among biogeochemical and physical factors. Chloride fluxes decreased between the land surface and water table possibly because of Cl- exports in harvested crops (averaging 22% of land-surface Cl- inputs). Modeled zero-order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification were correlated. Denitrification rates at depth commonly exceeded overlying O2 reduction rates, likely because shallow geologic sources of reactive electron donors had been depleted. Projections indicated continued downward migration of NO3- fronts at sites with denitrification rates -1 yr-1. The steady state depth of NO3- depended to a similar degree on application rate, leaching fraction, recharge, and NO3- and O2 reaction rates. Steady state total mass in each aquifer depended primarily on the N application rate. In addition to managing application rates at land surface, efficient water use may reduce the depth and mass of N in groundwater because lower recharge was associated with lower N fraction leached. Management actions to reduce N leaching could be targeted over aquifers with high-recharge and low-denitrification rates.

  5. Risk factors associated with actinic prurigo: a case control study*

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Vega-Memíje, María Elisa; Borges-Yáñez, Socorro Aída; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika

    2017-01-01

    Background Actinic prurigo (AP) is an idiopathic photodermatosis. Although its initial manifestations can appear in 6 to 8-year-old children, cases are diagnosed later, between the second and fourth decades of life, when the injuries are exacerbated. Objective To identify risk factors associated with clinical manifestations of AP such as skin and mucosal lesions. Methods Thirty patients with AP and 60 controls were included in the study, the dependent variable was the presence of skin or labial mucosal lesions, the independent variables were age, sex, solar exposure, living with pets or farm animals, exposure to wood smoke, smoking habit, years smoking, and hours spent per day and per week in contact with people who smoke. Results Of the 30 diagnosed AP patients, 66.7% were female. Patients age ranged from 7 to 71 years and the mean age was 35.77 ± 14.55 years. We found significant differences with the age and cohabitation with farm animals. Those who lived with farm animals presented 14.31 times higher probability of developing AP (95% CI 3-78.06). Study limitations This is a case-control study; therefore, a causal relationship cannot be proven, and these results cannot be generalized to every population. Conclusions The identification of factors related to the development of AP increases our knowledge of its physiopathology. Moreover, identifying antigens that possibly trigger the allergic reaction will have preventive and therapeutic applications in populations at risk of AP. PMID:29364431

  6. A single parasitoid segregating factor controls immune suppression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupas, S; Frey, F; Carton, Y

    1998-01-01

    Encapsulation has evolved as an efficient mechanism whereby an insect host can survive infection by parasitoids This ability is controlled by a major gene in Drosophila melanogaster hosts. The parasitoid Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera Eucoilidae) can suppress the Drosophila immune reaction by injecting viruslike particles. Analysis of Mendelian crosses between strains of L. boulardi of opposite immune suppressive abilities indicated that the trait is controlled by a single chromosomal factor with semidominant effect. We developed a method to test the monogenic hypothesis. The range of possible genotypic values in back-crosses was studied using various progeny that were genotypically homogenous. These could be obtained because of the arrhenotokous mode of reproduction. The progeny groups were divided into two clusters according to the major gene classification and the hypothesis of another unlinked genetic factor was rejected. Lastly, there was a residual progeny effect within the major groups, indicating that minor genes are also present. This study rules out the polygenic effect for a trait governing the interaction between the insect and parasitoid. It demonstrates that the gene-for-gene model commonly found in plant-parasite interactions may also explain natural variations in insect-parasitoid traits.

  7. Factors controlling phosphorus release from sediments in coastal archipelago areas.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Irma; Kohonen, Tuula; Mattila, Johanna

    2016-07-15

    In coastal archipelago areas of the northern Baltic Sea, significantly higher phosphate concentrations (6.0±4.5μmol/l, mean±SD) were measured in water samples close to the sediment surface compared with those from 1m above the seafloor (1.6±2.0μmol/l). The results indicated notable phosphate release from sediments under the bottom water oxygen concentrations of up to 250μmol/l, especially in areas that had experienced recent temporal fluctuation between oxic and hypoxic/anoxic conditions. No single factor alone was found to control the elevated PO4-P concentrations in the near-bottom water. In addition to the oxygen in the water, the contents of potentially mobile phosphorus fractions, grain-size, the organic content at the sediment surface, and the water depth were all important factors controlling the internal loading of phosphorus. The complexity of this process needs to be accounted for in assessments of the internal loading of phosphorus and in potential mitigation plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcription Factor ATAF1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Senescence by Direct Regulation of Key Chloroplast Maintenance and Senescence Transcriptional Cascades1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Xue, Gang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Senescence represents a fundamental process of late leaf development. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role for expression reprogramming during senescence; however, the gene regulatory networks through which they exert their functions, and their physiological integration, are still largely unknown. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) abscisic acid (ABA)- and hydrogen peroxide-activated TF Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIVATING FACTOR1 (ATAF1) as a novel upstream regulator of senescence. ATAF1 executes its physiological role by affecting both key chloroplast maintenance and senescence-promoting TFs, namely GOLDEN2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and ORESARA1 (ARABIDOPSIS NAC092), respectively. Notably, while ATAF1 activates ORESARA1, it represses GLK1 expression by directly binding to their promoters, thereby generating a transcriptional output that shifts the physiological balance toward the progression of senescence. We furthermore demonstrate a key role of ATAF1 for ABA- and hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence, in accordance with a direct regulatory effect on ABA homeostasis genes, including NINE-CIS-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE3 involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABC TRANSPORTER G FAMILY MEMBER40, encoding an ABA transport protein. Thus, ATAF1 serves as a core transcriptional activator of senescence by coupling stress-related signaling with photosynthesis- and senescence-related transcriptional cascades. PMID:25953103

  9. Comparison of atherogenic risk factors among poorly controlled and well-controlled adolescent phenylketonuria patients.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Çakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Makay, Balahan; Arslan, Nur

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies investigating the known risk factors of atherosclerosis in phenylketonuria patients have shown conflicting results. The primary aim of our study was to investigate the serum atherogenic markers in adolescent classical phenylketonuria patients and compare these parameters with healthy peers. The secondary aim was to compare these atherogenic markers in well-controlled and poorly controlled patients. A total of 59 patients (median age: 12.6 years, range: 11-17 years) and 44 healthy controls (median age: 12.0 years, range: 11-15 years) were enrolled in our study. Phenylketonuria patients were divided into two groups: well-controlled (serum phenylalanine levels below 360 µmol/L; 24 patients) and poorly controlled patients (serum phenylalanine levels higher than 360 µmol/L). The mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of well-controlled patients (1.0±0.2 mmol/L) were significantly lower compared with poorly controlled patients and controls (1.1±0.2 mmol/L, p=0.011 and 1.4±0.2 mmol/L, p<0.001, respectively). Poorly controlled patients had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than healthy controls (p=0.003). Homocysteine levels of both well-controlled (9.8±6.4 µmol/L) and poorly controlled (9.2±5.6 µmol/L) patients were higher compared with controls (5.8±1.8 µmol/L, p<0.01). The mean platelet volume of well-controlled patients (9.5±1.1 fL) was higher than that of poorly controlled patients and controls (8.9±0.8 fL, p=0.024 and 7.7±0.6 fL, p<0.001, respectively). Lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher homocysteine and mean platelet volume levels were detected in phenylketonuria patients. In particular, these changes were more prominent in well-controlled patients. We conclude that phenylketonuria patients might be at risk for atherosclerosis, and therefore screening for atherosclerotic risk factors should be included in the phenylketonuria therapy and follow-up in addition to other parameters.

  10. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  11. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  12. Occupational Risk Factors for COPD: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Moustapha; Lebargy, Francois; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to examine the occupational risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) in a range of occupations. Methods Eleven occupations involving different types of exposure were observed in this multicenter case-control study. Controls and cases were matched for sex, age and smoking. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 1,519 participants were initially recruited between September 2004 and September 2012. After matching, 547 pairs were obtained. The mean age was 56.3 +/- 10.4 years. Smelter workers were the only ones with an increased risk of COPD in this study (OR = 7.6, p < 0.0001, 95% CI [4.5, 12.9]). Physical activity was protective (OR = 0.7), while living in the city was a risk (OR = 1.6). The main used metals were cast iron, aluminum and alloys. Molds and cores were mainly made from sand and synthetic resins. Machine maintenance (65.2%), molding (49.6%), finishing (41.1%) and casting (41.0%) were the most common activities. Almost all workers