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Sample records for key insulin regulatory

  1. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald G; Weise, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  2. Drug Development and Potential Regulatory Paths for Insulin Biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Mukul; Gobburu, Jogarao

    2014-01-01

    Under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCI Act), a biological product may be demonstrated to be "biosimilar" if data show that, among other things, the product is "highly similar" to an already-approved biological product. Biosimilar insulins have the potential to reduce ever growing costs associated with insulin treatment by allowing competition. In this article, we describe the current drug development and regulatory paths for biosimilar insulins. Most likely basis of market approval for biosimilar insulins by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and guidance for developing insulin biosimilars by European Medicines Agency (EMA) are discussed in detail. Currently, no product specific biosimilar FDA guidance for insulin biosimilarity assessment exists. We propose efficient and cost-effective drug development and potential regulatory paths based on scientific justification. In addition, novel trial designs for demonstrating interchangeability between the biosimilar and the reference insulin products are presented. PMID:24876531

  3. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece: Review-Toxicological Pathology Profile and Regulatory Expectations for Nonclinical Development of Insulins and Insulin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Thomas; Wäse, Kerstin; Heinrichs, Martin; Stolte, Manuela; Roome, Nigel; Scherer, Petra; Lindauer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    The toxicological profile of insulins is exclusively due to exaggerated pharmacology resulting in hypoglycemic findings. Insulin analogues displaying modifications and aimed at improving pharmacokinetics do not induce different toxicity. The main target is the brain displaying neuronal necrosis. Wallerian degeneration of nerves occurs rarely after severe hypoglycemia. These findings are of potential human relevance; nevertheless, these changes are induced in normoglycemic animals whereas diabetic patients suffer from hyperglycemia. Therefore, it is usually not difficult to achieve a therapeutic window for subsequent use in patients. Based upon this and in the absence of classical toxicity, there has been no scientific need for diabetic animal models. A greater challenge is the mitogenicity already inherent with regular insulin. Thus, the focus for preclinical safety evaluation of analogues is to demonstrate that modifications in regular insulin do not result in enhanced mitogenicity. The approaches used to assess the mitogenic potential of insulin analogues have changed over time driven by scientific progression and changes within the regulatory environment. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of cell proliferation has become common practice, and to date there has been no evidence that the mitogenic potential of insulin analogues may be increased compared to regular insulin. PMID:27663844

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: the key switch mechanism in insulin signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, P R; Withers, D J; Siddle, K

    1998-01-01

    Insulin plays a key role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. However, until recently little was known about the signalling pathways that are involved in linking the insulin receptor with downstream responses. It is now apparent that the activation of class 1a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is necessary and in some cases sufficient to elicit many of insulin's effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The lipid products of PI 3-kinase act as both membrane anchors and allosteric regulators, serving to localize and activate downstream enzymes and their protein substrates. One of the major ways these lipid products of PI 3-kinase act in insulin signalling is by binding to pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase (PDK) and protein kinase B (PKB) and in the process regulating the phosphorylation of PKB by PDK. Using mechanisms such as this, PI 3-kinase is able to act as a molecular switch to regulate the activity of serine/threonine-specific kinase cascades important in mediating insulin's effects on endpoint responses. PMID:9677303

  5. An Insulin-to-Insulin Regulatory Network Orchestrates Phenotypic Specificity in Development and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Fardel, Pascal; Stroustrup, Nicholas; Chen, Zhunan; Lee, KyungHwa; Keyes, William D.; Nash, Zachary M.; López-Moyado, Isaac F.; Vaggi, Federico; Cornils, Astrid; Regenass, Martin; Neagu, Anca; Ostojic, Ivan; Liu, Chang; Cho, Yongmin; Sifoglu, Deniz; Shen, Yu; Fontana, Walter; Lu, Hang; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Murphy, Coleen T.; Antebi, Adam; Blanc, Eric; Apfeld, Javier; Zhang, Yun; Alcedo, Joy; Ch'ng, QueeLim

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) play highly conserved roles in development and physiology. Most animal genomes encode multiple ILPs. Here we identify mechanisms for how the forty Caenorhabditis elegans ILPs coordinate diverse processes, including development, reproduction, longevity and several specific stress responses. Our systematic studies identify an ILP-based combinatorial code for these phenotypes characterized by substantial functional specificity and diversity rather than global redundancy. Notably, we show that ILPs regulate each other transcriptionally, uncovering an ILP-to-ILP regulatory network that underlies the combinatorial phenotypic coding by the ILP family. Extensive analyses of genetic interactions among ILPs reveal how their signals are integrated. A combined analysis of these functional and regulatory ILP interactions identifies local genetic circuits that act in parallel and interact by crosstalk, feedback and compensation. This organization provides emergent mechanisms for phenotypic specificity and graded regulation for the combinatorial phenotypic coding we observe. Our findings also provide insights into how large hormonal networks regulate diverse traits. PMID:24675767

  6. Drug lag and key regulatory barriers in the emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-04-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development.The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag.The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated.This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; 'Western Approval', local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation.

  7. Drug Lag and Key Regulatory Barriers in the Emerging Markets

    PubMed Central

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-01-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development. The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag. The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated. This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; ‘Western Approval’, local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation. PMID:21829782

  8. An Overview of Current Regulatory Requirements for Approval of Biosimilar Insulins

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Hootan; McKinnon, Ross; Home, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insulin analog patent expiry is likely to mean that, increasingly, copies of original biopharmaceutical products will be submitted for authorization. Experience with biosimilars in other therapeutic areas suggests that careful regulation and caution are needed. Published guidelines of regulatory authorities around the world on approval of biosimilars and, where available, insulin biosimilars were reviewed. Information was sourced through Internet searching and cross-referencing guidelines. As of August 2014, general biosimilar and insulin-specific guidelines are available in 34 countries and two countries/regulatory domains, respectively. Many guidelines are clearly related to, or partly derived from, the general and insulin-specific European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. Areas covered by these guidelines are fairly consistent, covering preclinical, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in humans and clinical areas; however, there are differences in emphasis. The EMA insulin-specific guidelines include detailed criteria on PK/PD studies, as do most other general biosimilar guidelines and, to a lesser extent, clinical studies. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has general biosimilar guidelines, emphasizing consideration of the whole package of in vitro, biological, and human studies, rather than concentrating on any one aspect. In countries such as Mexico, guidelines are broad, leaving wide discretion to the regulatory authority. In conclusion, from a global perspective, this area of drug regulation is heterogeneous and evolving, and the authors call for an initiative aimed at harmonizing the requirements for biosimilar insulins. PMID:25789689

  9. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  10. Autocrine signaling is a key regulatory element during osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kopesky, Paul; Tiedemann, Kerstin; Alkekhia, Dahlia; Zechner, Christoph; Millard, Bjorn; Schoeberl, Birgit; Komarova, Svetlana V.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoclasts are responsible for bone destruction in degenerative, inflammatory and metastatic bone disorders. Although osteoclastogenesis has been well-characterized in mouse models, many questions remain regarding the regulation of osteoclast formation in human diseases. We examined the regulation of human precursors induced to differentiate and fuse into multinucleated osteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). High-content single cell microscopy enabled the time-resolved quantification of both the population of monocytic precursors and the emerging osteoclasts. We observed that prior to induction of osteoclast fusion, RANKL stimulated precursor proliferation, acting in part through an autocrine mediator. Cytokines secreted during osteoclastogenesis were resolved using multiplexed quantification combined with a Partial Least Squares Regression model to identify the relative importance of specific cytokines for the osteoclastogenesis outcome. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) was identified as one of RANKL-induced cytokines and validated for its role in osteoclast formation using inhibitors of the IL-8 cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 or an IL-8 blocking antibody. These insights demonstrate that autocrine signaling induced by RANKL represents a key regulatory component of human osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25063197

  11. Regulatory and Stakeholder Involvement is Key to Successful Project Completion

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, K. S.; Coleman, S. J.; Shoemake, J. M.; Olds, T. E.

    2006-07-01

    Order (Tri-Party Agreement).[1] The key governmental or regulatory organizations that can influence the ORP Mission include, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Washington State Department of Ecology and Health, and the Washington State Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Stakeholders include the concerned citizen groups, the congressionally recognized-Hanford Advisory Board, signatories to regional agreements, Tribal Nations with treaty rights, other DOE sites, other government agencies with cross-cutting programs and local state, county, and municipal governments. [2] ORP understands that while quality work and planning are essential elements of completing their mission, they cannot accomplish it fully without public confidence and trust. Given the length of the mission, many changes will occur in the external environment of national attitudes, priorities, standards, expectations and economic conditions over the life span of the mission. There will be unanticipated events, and difficult periods of change and complex decisions that will occur over the next several years. Under these conditions, the question of how to respond is as important as the quality plans and technical abilities of the ORP. The strategy ORP employs is designed to increase effectiveness and provide meaningful opportunities for public input across many DOE missions, activities and decisions. Diverse minds working together can often come up with better solutions to problems. In addition, if people can participate in decisions that affect them, they are more likely to support those decisions, even when dissention occurs. Public involvement is not a vote, or a popularity contest. Public involvement is a process to give

  12. IKKε is key to induction of insulin resistance in the hypothalamus, and its inhibition reverses obesity.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Laís; Quaresma, Paula G F; Santos, Andressa C; de Matos, Alexandre H B; Pascoal, Vínicius D'Ávila Bittencourt; Zanotto, Tamires M; Castro, Gisele; Guadagnini, Dioze; da Silva, Joelcimar Martins; Velloso, Licio A; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Saad, Mario J A; Prada, Patricia O

    2014-10-01

    IKK epsilon (IKKε) is induced by the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Whole-body IKKε knockout mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) were protected from insulin resistance and showed altered energy balance. We demonstrate that IKKε is expressed in neurons and is upregulated in the hypothalamus of obese mice, contributing to insulin and leptin resistance. Blocking IKKε in the hypothalamus of obese mice with CAYMAN10576 or small interfering RNA decreased NF-κB activation in this tissue, relieving the inflammatory environment. Inhibition of IKKε activity, but not TBK1, reduced IRS-1(Ser307) phosphorylation and insulin and leptin resistance by an improvement of the IR/IRS-1/Akt and JAK2/STAT3 pathways in the hypothalamus. These improvements were independent of body weight and food intake. Increased insulin and leptin action/signaling in the hypothalamus may contribute to a decrease in adiposity and hypophagia and an enhancement of energy expenditure accompanied by lower NPY and increased POMC mRNA levels. Improvement of hypothalamic insulin action decreases fasting glycemia, glycemia after pyruvate injection, and PEPCK protein expression in the liver of HFD-fed and db/db mice, suggesting a reduction in hepatic glucose production. We suggest that IKKε may be a key inflammatory mediator in the hypothalamus of obese mice, and its hypothalamic inhibition improves energy and glucose metabolism.

  13. Eat to reproduce: a key role for the insulin signaling pathway in adult insects

    PubMed Central

    Badisco, Liesbeth; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Insects, like all heterotrophic organisms, acquire from their food the nutrients that are essential for anabolic processes that lead to growth (larval stages) or reproduction (adult stage). In adult females, this nutritional input is processed and results in a very specific output, i.e., the production of fully developed eggs ready for fertilization and deposition. An important role in this input-output transition is attributed to the insulin signaling pathway (ISP). The ISP is considered to act as a sensor of the organism's nutritional status and to stimulate the progression of anabolic events when the status is positive. In several insect species belonging to different orders, the ISP has been demonstrated to positively control vitellogenesis and oocyte growth. Whether or not ISP acts herein via a mediator action of lipophilic insect hormones (ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone) remains debatable and might be differently controlled in different insect orders. Most likely, insulin-related peptides, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone are involved in a complex regulatory network, in which they mutually influence each other and in which the insect's nutritional status is a crucial determinant of the network's output. The current review will present an overview of the regulatory role of the ISP in female insect reproduction and its interaction with other pathways involving nutrients, lipophilic hormones and neuropeptides. PMID:23966944

  14. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pump is connected to your body by a flexible tube that has a tip that sticks under your skin. A cartridge of insulin is put in the pump. The insulin flows through the tube into your body. The pump controls how much insulin goes into your body. The ...

  15. IRS2 and PTEN are key molecules in controlling insulin sensitivity in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Beatriz; Marquez, Eva; Lay, Abigail; Carew, RoseaMarie M; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Welsh, Gavin I; Ni, Lan; Hale, Lorna J; Ortiz, Alberto; Saleem, Moin A; Brazil, Derek P; Coward, Richard J; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-12-01

    Insulin signaling to the glomerular podocyte is important for normal kidney function and is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study determined the role of the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) in this system. Conditionally immortalized murine podocytes were generated from wild-type (WT) and insulin receptor substrate 2-deficient mice (Irs2(-/-)). Insulin signaling, glucose transport, cellular motility and cytoskeleton rearrangement were then analyzed. Within the glomerulus IRS2 is enriched in the podocyte and is preferentially phosphorylated by insulin in comparison to IRS1. Irs2(-/-) podocytes are significantly insulin resistant in respect to AKT signaling, insulin-stimulated GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake, filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton remodeling and cell motility. Mechanistically, we discovered that Irs2 deficiency causes insulin resistance through up-regulation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Importantly, suppressing PTEN in Irs2(-/-) podocytes rescued insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study has identified for the first time IRS2 as a critical molecule for sensitizing the podocyte to insulin actions through its ability to modulate PTEN expression. This finding reveals two potential molecular targets in the podocyte for modulating insulin sensitivity and treating DN.

  16. Insulin resistance as a key link for the increased risk of cognitive impairment in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bhumsoo; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that includes obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Accumulating evidence implies that MetS contributes to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the factors connecting this association have not been determined. Insulin resistance (IR) is at the core of MetS and likely represent the key link between MetS and AD. In the central nervous system, insulin plays key roles in learning and memory, and AD patients exhibit impaired insulin signaling that is similar to that observed in MetS. As we face an alarming increase in obesity and T2D in all age groups, understanding the relationship between MetS and AD is vital for the identification of potential therapeutic targets. Recently, several diabetes therapies that enhance insulin signaling are being tested for a potential therapeutic benefit in AD and dementia. In this review, we will discuss MetS as a risk factor for AD, focusing on IR and the recent progress and future directions of insulin-based therapies. PMID:25766618

  17. Mathematical model of the glucose-insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose-insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose-insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  18. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  19. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  20. Insulin Is a Key Modulator of Fetoplacental Endothelium Metabolic Disturbances in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sobrevia, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Lilian; Silva, Luis; Pizarro, Carolina; Subiabre, Mario; Villalobos, Roberto; Araos, Joaquín; Toledo, Fernando; González, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Farías, Marcelo; Chiarello, Delia I.; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease of the mother that associates with altered fetoplacental vascular function. GDM-associated maternal hyperglycaemia result in fetal hyperglycaemia, a condition that leads to fetal hyperinsulinemia and altered L-arginine transport and synthesis of nitric oxide, i.e., endothelial dysfunction. These alterations in the fetoplacental endothelial function are present in women with GDM that were under diet or insulin therapy. Since these women and their newborn show normal glycaemia at term, other factors or conditions could be altered and/or not resolved by restoring normal level of circulating D-glucose. GDM associates with metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal handling of the locally released vasodilator adenosine, and biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol lipoproteins, or metabolic diseases resulting in endoplasmic reticulum stress and altered angiogenesis. Insulin acts as a potent modulator of all these phenomena under normal conditions as reported in primary cultures of cells obtained from the human placenta; however, GDM and the role of insulin regarding these alterations in this disease are poorly understood. This review focuses on the potential link between insulin and endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypercholesterolemia, and angiogenesis in GDM in the human fetoplacental vasculature. Based in reports in primary culture placental endothelium we propose that insulin is a factor restoring endothelial function in GDM by reversing ERS, hypercholesterolaemia and angiogenesis to a physiological state involving insulin activation of insulin receptor isoforms and adenosine receptors and metabolism in the human placenta from GDM pregnancies. PMID:27065887

  1. Counterregulation of insulin by leptin as key component of autonomic regulation of body weight

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Katarina T

    2014-01-01

    A re-examination of the mechanism controlling eating, locomotion, and metabolism prompts formulation of a new explanatory model containing five features: a coordinating joint role of the (1) autonomic nervous system (ANS); (2) the suprachiasmatic (SCN) master clock in counterbalancing parasympathetic digestive and absorptive functions and feeding with sympathetic locomotor and thermogenic energy expenditure within a circadian framework; (3) interaction of the ANS/SCN command with brain substrates of reward encompassing dopaminergic projections to ventral striatum and limbic and cortical forebrain. These drive the nonhomeostatic feeding and locomotor motivated behaviors in interaction with circulating ghrelin and lateral hypothalamic neurons signaling through melanin concentrating hormone and orexin-hypocretin peptides; (4) counterregulation of insulin by leptin of both gastric and adipose tissue origin through: potentiation by leptin of cholecystokinin-mediated satiation, inhibition of insulin secretion, suppression of insulin lipogenesis by leptin lipolysis, and modulation of peripheral tissue and brain sensitivity to insulin action. Thus weight-loss induced hypoleptimia raises insulin sensitivity and promotes its parasympathetic anabolic actions while obesity-induced hyperleptinemia supresses insulin lipogenic action; and (5) inhibition by leptin of bone mineral accrual suggesting that leptin may contribute to the maintenance of stability of skeletal, lean-body, as well as adipose tissue masses. PMID:25317239

  2. Insulin Delivery Into the Peripheral Circulation: A Key Contributor to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Justin M; Kraft, Guillaume; Scott, Melanie F; Neal, Doss W; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta S; Hastings, Jon R; Allen, Eric J; Donahue, E Patrick; Rivera, Noelia; Winnick, Jason J; Edgerton, Dale S; Nishimura, Erica; Fledelius, Christian; Brand, Christian L; Cherrington, Alan D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycemia limits optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), making novel strategies to mitigate it desirable. We hypothesized that portal (Po) vein insulin delivery would lessen hypoglycemia. In the conscious dog, insulin was infused into the hepatic Po vein or a peripheral (Pe) vein at a rate four times of basal. In protocol 1, a full counterregulatory response was allowed, whereas in protocol 2, glucagon was fixed at basal, mimicking the diminished α-cell response to hypoglycemia seen in T1DM. In protocol 1, glucose fell faster with Pe insulin than with Po insulin, reaching 56 ± 3 vs. 70 ± 6 mg/dL (P = 0.04) at 60 min. The change in area under the curve (ΔAUC) for glucagon was similar between Pe and Po, but the peak occurred earlier in Pe. The ΔAUC for epinephrine was greater with Pe than with Po (67 ± 17 vs. 36 ± 14 ng/mL/180 min). In protocol 2, glucose also fell more rapidly than in protocol 1 and fell faster in Pe than in Po, reaching 41 ± 3 vs. 67 ± 2 mg/dL (P < 0.01) by 60 min. Without a rise in glucagon, the epinephrine responses were much larger (ΔAUC of 204 ± 22 for Pe vs. 96 ± 29 ng/mL/180 min for Po). In summary, Pe insulin delivery exacerbates hypoglycemia, particularly in the presence of a diminished glucagon response. Po vein insulin delivery, or strategies that mimic it (i.e., liver-preferential insulin analogs), should therefore lessen hypoglycemia. PMID:26085570

  3. Sirtuin3 Dysfunction Is the Key Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Longaretti, Lorena; Morigi, Marina; Cassis, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance. The mechanism underlying this abnormality, however, is still poorly defined. In a different setting, skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling are regulated by Sirtuin3. Objective Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is associated with Sirtuin3 dysregulation and whether pharmacological manipulation of Sirtuin3 confers protection. Study Design Parental and GLUT4-myc L6 rat skeletal muscle cells exposed to angiotensin II are used as in vitro models of insulin resistance. GLUT4 translocation, glucose uptake, intracellular molecular signals such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, Sirtuin3 protein expression and activity, along with its downstream targets and upstream regulators, are analyzed both in the absence and presence of acetyl-L-carnitine. The role of Sirtuin3 in GLUT4 translocation and intracellular molecular signaling is also studied in Sirtuin3-silenced as well as over-expressing cells. Results Angiotensin II promotes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells via mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in a two-fold increase in superoxide generation. In this context, reactive oxygen species open the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and significantly lower Sirtuin3 levels and activity impairing the cell antioxidant defense. Angiotensin II-induced Sirtuin3 dysfunction leads to the impairment of AMP-activated protein kinase/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase signaling. Acetyl-L-carnitine, by lowering angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial superoxide formation, prevents Sirtuin3 dysfunction. This phenomenon implies the restoration of manganese superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Acetyl-L-carnitine protection is abrogated by specific Sirtuin3 siRNA. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II-induced insulin resistance fosters mitochondrial superoxide generation, in

  4. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent. PMID:17293706

  5. Regulatory vs. inflammatory cytokine T-cell responses to mutated insulin peptides in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Maki; McDaniel, Kristen; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Kiekhaefer, Carol; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Davidson, Howard W.; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping; Gottlieb, Peter; Kappler, John W.; Michels, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Certain class II MHC (MHCII) alleles in mice and humans confer risk for or protection from type 1 diabetes (T1D). Insulin is a major autoantigen in T1D, but how its peptides are presented to CD4 T cells by MHCII risk alleles has been controversial. In the mouse model of T1D, CD4 T cells respond to insulin B-chain peptide (B:9–23) mimotopes engineered to bind the mouse MHCII molecule, IAg7, in an unfavorable position or register. Because of the similarities between IAg7 and human HLA-DQ T1D risk alleles, we examined control and T1D subjects with these risk alleles for CD4 T-cell responses to the same natural B:9–23 peptide and mimotopes. A high proportion of new-onset T1D subjects mounted an inflammatory IFN-γ response much more frequently to one of the mimotope peptides than to the natural peptide. Surprisingly, the control subjects bearing an HLA-DQ risk allele also did. However, these control subjects, especially those with only one HLA-DQ risk allele, very frequently made an IL-10 response, a cytokine associated with regulatory T cells. T1D subjects with established disease also responded to the mimotope rather than the natural B:9–23 peptide in proliferation assays and the proliferating cells were highly enriched in certain T-cell receptor sequences. Our results suggest that the risk of T1D may be related to how an HLA-DQ genotype determines the balance of T-cell inflammatory vs. regulatory responses to insulin, having important implications for the use and monitoring of insulin-specific therapies to prevent diabetes onset. PMID:25831495

  6. Regulatory vs. inflammatory cytokine T-cell responses to mutated insulin peptides in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Maki; McDaniel, Kristen; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Kiekhaefer, Carol; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Davidson, Howard W; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping; Gottlieb, Peter; Kappler, John W; Michels, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Certain class II MHC (MHCII) alleles in mice and humans confer risk for or protection from type 1 diabetes (T1D). Insulin is a major autoantigen in T1D, but how its peptides are presented to CD4 T cells by MHCII risk alleles has been controversial. In the mouse model of T1D, CD4 T cells respond to insulin B-chain peptide (B:9-23) mimotopes engineered to bind the mouse MHCII molecule, IA(g7), in an unfavorable position or register. Because of the similarities between IA(g7) and human HLA-DQ T1D risk alleles, we examined control and T1D subjects with these risk alleles for CD4 T-cell responses to the same natural B:9-23 peptide and mimotopes. A high proportion of new-onset T1D subjects mounted an inflammatory IFN-γ response much more frequently to one of the mimotope peptides than to the natural peptide. Surprisingly, the control subjects bearing an HLA-DQ risk allele also did. However, these control subjects, especially those with only one HLA-DQ risk allele, very frequently made an IL-10 response, a cytokine associated with regulatory T cells. T1D subjects with established disease also responded to the mimotope rather than the natural B:9-23 peptide in proliferation assays and the proliferating cells were highly enriched in certain T-cell receptor sequences. Our results suggest that the risk of T1D may be related to how an HLA-DQ genotype determines the balance of T-cell inflammatory vs. regulatory responses to insulin, having important implications for the use and monitoring of insulin-specific therapies to prevent diabetes onset. PMID:25831495

  7. Gut microbiota as a key player in triggering obesity, systemic inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Galileo; López-Ortiz, Eduardo; Torres-Castro, Israel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-related systemic inflammation contributes to develop insulin resistance. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with systemic inflammation and insulin resistance have not been completely elucidated. Microbiota includes around 1013 to 1014 microbes harboring the human gut, which are clustered in approximately a thousand different bacterial species. Several studies suggest that imbalance in the intestinal bacterial population could result in obesity, systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Here, we review the main bacterial groups observed in obesity as well as their possible role in increasing the intestinal permeability and lipopolysaccharide-related endotoxemia. Furthermore, we point out the role of intestinal dysbiosis in the inflammatory activation of macrophages with the ability to infiltrate in the visceral adipose tissue and induce insulin resistance. Finally, we discuss the apparent beneficial use of prebiotics and probiotics in ameliorating both systemic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Present information may be useful in the future design of novel therapies focused on treating obesity and insulin resistance by restoring the gut microbiota balance.

  8. Key Regulatory Issues for Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2008-01-01

    To help reduce the uncertainty associated with application of digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued six Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) documents that address the current regulatory positions on what are considered the significant digital I&C issues. These six documents address the following topics: Cyber Security, Diversity and Defense-in-Depth, Risk Informed Digital I&C Regulation, Communication issues, Human Factors and the Digital I&C Licensing Process (currently issued as Draft). After allowing for further refinement based on additional technical insight gathered by NRC staff through near-term research and detailed review of relevant experience, it is expected that updated positions ultimately will be incorporated into regulatory guides and staff review procedures. This paper presents an overview of the guidance provided by the NRC-issued ISGs on key technology considerations (i.e., the first five documents above) for safety-related digital I&C systems.

  9. Biosimilar insulins: a European perspective

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, J H; Gough, S C L; Kiljanski, J; Heinemann, L

    2015-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins are likely to enter clinical practice in Europe in the near future. It is important that clinicians are familiar with and understand the concept of biosimilarity and how a biosimilar drug may differ from its reference product. The present article provides an overview of biosimilars, the European regulatory requirements for biosimilars and safety issues. It also summarizes the current biosimilars approved in Europe and the key clinical issues associated with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:25376600

  10. The key role of growth hormone — insulin — IGF-1 signaling in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors in aging. GH/Insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling molecules that have been linked to longevity include daf-2 and InR and their homologues in mammals, and inactivation of the corresponding genes increases lifespan in nematodes, fruit flies and mice. The life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction are likely related to decreasing IGF-1 levels. Evidence has emerged that antidiabetic drugs are promising candidates for both lifespan extension and prevention of cancer. Thus, antidiabetic drugs postpone spontaneous carcinogenesis in mice and rats, as well as chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in mice, rats and hamsters. Furthermore, metformin seems to decrease the risk for cancer in diabetic patients. PMID:23434537

  11. Dynamic chromatin environment of key lytic cycle regulatory regions of the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Flower, Kirsty; Sinclair, Alison J

    2012-02-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency allows it to evade the immune system and to persist for the lifetime of its host; one distinguishing characteristic is the lack of transcription of the majority of viral genes. Entry into the lytic cycle is coordinated by the viral transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, and EB1), and downstream effectors, while viral genome replication requires the concerted action of Zta and six other viral proteins at the origins of lytic replication. We explored the chromatin context at key EBV lytic cycle promoters (BZLF1, BRLF1, BMRF1, and BALF5) and the origins of lytic replication during latency and lytic replication. We show that a repressive heterochromatin-like environment (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 [H3K9me3] and lysine 27 [H3K27me3]), which blocks the interaction of some transcription factors with DNA, encompasses the key early lytic regulatory regions. Epigenetic silencing of the EBV genome is also imposed by DNA methylation during latency. The chromatin environment changes during the lytic cycle with activation of histones H3, H4, and H2AX occurring at both the origins of replication and at the key lytic regulatory elements. We propose that Zta is able to reverse the effects of latency-associated repressive chromatin at EBV early lytic promoters by interacting with Zta response elements within the H3K9me3-associated chromatin and demonstrate that these interactions occur in vivo. Since the interaction of Zta with DNA is not inhibited by DNA methylation, it is clear that Zta uses two routes to overcome epigenetic silencing of its genome. PMID:22090141

  12. Dynamic chromatin environment of key lytic cycle regulatory regions of the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Flower, Kirsty; Sinclair, Alison J

    2012-02-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency allows it to evade the immune system and to persist for the lifetime of its host; one distinguishing characteristic is the lack of transcription of the majority of viral genes. Entry into the lytic cycle is coordinated by the viral transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, and EB1), and downstream effectors, while viral genome replication requires the concerted action of Zta and six other viral proteins at the origins of lytic replication. We explored the chromatin context at key EBV lytic cycle promoters (BZLF1, BRLF1, BMRF1, and BALF5) and the origins of lytic replication during latency and lytic replication. We show that a repressive heterochromatin-like environment (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 [H3K9me3] and lysine 27 [H3K27me3]), which blocks the interaction of some transcription factors with DNA, encompasses the key early lytic regulatory regions. Epigenetic silencing of the EBV genome is also imposed by DNA methylation during latency. The chromatin environment changes during the lytic cycle with activation of histones H3, H4, and H2AX occurring at both the origins of replication and at the key lytic regulatory elements. We propose that Zta is able to reverse the effects of latency-associated repressive chromatin at EBV early lytic promoters by interacting with Zta response elements within the H3K9me3-associated chromatin and demonstrate that these interactions occur in vivo. Since the interaction of Zta with DNA is not inhibited by DNA methylation, it is clear that Zta uses two routes to overcome epigenetic silencing of its genome.

  13. Nucleosomal occupancy changes locally over key regulatory regions during cell differentiation and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason A.; Cook, April; Alver, Burak H.; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Deaton, Aimee M.; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Park, Peter J.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structure determines DNA accessibility. We compare nucleosome occupancy in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiated cell types using MNase-seq. To address variability inherent in this technique, we developed a bioinformatic approach to identify regions of difference (RoD) in nucleosome occupancy between pluripotent and somatic cells. Surprisingly, most chromatin remains unchanged; a majority of rearrangements appear to affect a single nucleosome. RoDs are enriched at genes and regulatory elements, including enhancers associated with pluripotency and differentiation. RoDs co-localize with binding sites of key developmental regulators, including the reprogramming factors Klf4, Oct4/Sox2 and c-Myc. Nucleosomal landscapes in ESC enhancers are extensively altered, exhibiting lower nucleosome occupancy in pluripotent cells than in somatic cells. Most changes are reset during reprogramming. We conclude that changes in nucleosome occupancy are a hallmark of cell differentiation and reprogramming and likely identify regulatory regions essential for these processes. PMID:25158628

  14. Glucokinase regulatory proten genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3...

  15. The effect of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations, expression of hepatic glucose transporters and key gluconeogenic enzymes during the perinatal period in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Franssens, Lies; Lesuisse, Jens; Wang, Yufeng; Willems, Els; Willemsen, Hilke; Koppenol, Astrid; Guo, Xiaoquan; Buyse, Johan; Decuypere, Eddy; Everaert, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    Chickens have blood glucose concentrations that are twofold higher than those observed in mammals. Moreover, the insulin sensitivity seems to decrease with postnatal age in both broiler and layer chickens. However, little is known about the response of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations and mRNA abundance of hepatic glucose transporters 1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12 (GLUT1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12) and three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and 2 (PCK1 and 2) or fructose-1,6-biphosphatase 1 (FBP1) in chicks during the perinatal period. In the present study, broiler embryos on embryonic day (ED)16, ED18 or newly-hatched broiler chicks were injected intravenously with bovine insulin (1μg/g body weight (BW)) to examine plasma glucose response and changes in hepatic mRNA abundance of the GLUTs, PCK1 and 2 and FBP1. Results were compared with a non-treated control group and a saline-injected sham group. Plasma glucose levels of insulin-treated ED18 embryos recovered faster from their minimum level than those of insulin-treated ED16 embryos or newly-hatched chicks. In addition, at the minimum plasma glucose level seven hours post-injection (PI), hepatic GLUT2, FBP1 and PCK2 mRNA abundance was decreased in insulin-injected embryos, compared to sham and control groups, being most pronounced when insulin injection occurred on ED16. PMID:26723190

  16. The effect of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations, expression of hepatic glucose transporters and key gluconeogenic enzymes during the perinatal period in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Franssens, Lies; Lesuisse, Jens; Wang, Yufeng; Willems, Els; Willemsen, Hilke; Koppenol, Astrid; Guo, Xiaoquan; Buyse, Johan; Decuypere, Eddy; Everaert, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    Chickens have blood glucose concentrations that are twofold higher than those observed in mammals. Moreover, the insulin sensitivity seems to decrease with postnatal age in both broiler and layer chickens. However, little is known about the response of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations and mRNA abundance of hepatic glucose transporters 1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12 (GLUT1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12) and three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and 2 (PCK1 and 2) or fructose-1,6-biphosphatase 1 (FBP1) in chicks during the perinatal period. In the present study, broiler embryos on embryonic day (ED)16, ED18 or newly-hatched broiler chicks were injected intravenously with bovine insulin (1μg/g body weight (BW)) to examine plasma glucose response and changes in hepatic mRNA abundance of the GLUTs, PCK1 and 2 and FBP1. Results were compared with a non-treated control group and a saline-injected sham group. Plasma glucose levels of insulin-treated ED18 embryos recovered faster from their minimum level than those of insulin-treated ED16 embryos or newly-hatched chicks. In addition, at the minimum plasma glucose level seven hours post-injection (PI), hepatic GLUT2, FBP1 and PCK2 mRNA abundance was decreased in insulin-injected embryos, compared to sham and control groups, being most pronounced when insulin injection occurred on ED16.

  17. Hepatic PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status via insulin and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lambert, Gilles; Lalanne, Florent; Lardeux, Bernard; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Grefhorst, Aldo; Staels, Bart; Krempf, Michel

    2006-03-10

    Familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is associated with high risk for cardiovascular accidents and is related to mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor or its ligand apolipoprotein B (apoB). Mutations in a third gene, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9), were recently associated to this disease. PCSK9 acts as a natural inhibitor of the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway, and both genes are regulated by depletion of cholesterol cell content and statins, via sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Here we investigated the regulation of PCSK9 gene expression during nutritional changes. We showed that PCSK9 mRNA quantity is decreased by 73% in mice after 24 h of fasting, leading to a 2-fold decrease in protein level. In contrast PCSK9 expression was restored upon high carbohydrate refeeding. PCSK9 mRNA increased by 4-5-fold in presence of insulin in rodent primary hepatocytes, whereas glucose had no effect. Moreover, insulin up-regulated hepatic PCSK9 expression in vivo during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in mice. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a dominant or negative form of SREBP-1c confirmed the implication of this transcription factor in insulin-mediated stimulation of PCSK9 expression. Liver X receptor agonist T0901317 also regulated PCSK9 expression via this same pathway (a 2-fold increase in PCSK9 mRNA of primary hepatocytes cultured for 24 h in presence of 1 microm T0901317). As our last investigation, we isolated PCSK9 proximal promoter and verified the functionality of a SREBP-1c responsive element located from 335 bp to 355 bp upstream of the ATG. Together, these results show that PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status and insulinemia. PMID:16407292

  18. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  19. Regulation of sterol regulatory-element binding protein 1 gene expression in liver: role of insulin and protein kinase B/cAkt.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, M; Iynedjian, P B

    2000-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the transcription of the sterol regulatory- element binding protein (SREBP) 1/ADD1 gene in liver. Hepatocytes in primary culture were used to delineate the insulin signalling pathway for induction of SREBP1 gene expression. The inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), wortmannin and LY 294002, abolished the insulin-dependent increase in SREBP1 mRNA, whereas the inhibitor of the mitogen- activated protein kinase cascade, PD 98059, was without effect. To investigate the role of protein kinase B (PKB)/cAkt downstream of PI 3-kinase, hepatocytes were transduced with an adenovirus encoding a PKB--oestrogen receptor fusion protein. The PKB activity of this recombinant protein was rapidly activated in hepatocytes challenged with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), as was endogenous PKB in hepatocytes challenged with insulin. The addition of OHT to transduced hepatocytes resulted in accumulation of SREBP1 mRNA, with a time-course and magnitude similar to the effect of insulin in non-transduced cells. The level of SREBP1 mRNA was not increased by OHT in hepatocytes expressing a mutant form of the recombinant protein whose PKB activity was not activated by OHT. Thus acute activation of PKB is sufficient to induce SREBP1 mRNA accumulation in primary hepatocytes, and might be the major signalling event by which insulin induces SREBP1 gene expression in the liver. PMID:10861205

  20. Effects of inhibitors of key enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism on insulin-induced glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in liver cells of old rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, N A; Kharchenko, V S

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Ceramides are the most potent inhibitors of insulin signal transduction. Ceramides are generated in response to stress stimuli and in old age. In this work, we studied the possible contribution of different pathways of sphingolipid metabolism in age-dependent insulin resistance development in liver cells. Inhibition of key enzymes of sphingolipid synthesis (serine palmitoyl transferase, ceramide synthase) and degradation (neutral and acidic SMases) by means of specific inhibitors (myriocin, fumonisin B1, imipramine, and GW4869) was followed with the reduction of ceramide level and partly improved insulin regulation of glucose metabolism in "old" hepatocytes. Imipramine and GW4869 decreased significantly the acidic and neutral SMase activities, respectively. Treatment of "old" cells with myriocin or fumonisin B1 reduced the elevated in old age ceramide and SM synthesis. Ceramide and SM levels and glucose metabolism regulation by insulin could be improved with concerted action of all tested inhibitors of sphingolipid turnover on hepatocytes. The data demonstrate that not only newly synthesized ceramide and SM but also neutral and acidic SMase-dependent ceramide accumulation plays an important role in development of age-dependent insulin resistance.

  1. Association of insulin gene variable number of tandem repeats regulatory polymorphism with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mei-Si; Liang, Guan-Ying; Xia, Bai-Rong; Liu, Duan-Yang; Kong, Dan; Jin, Xiao-Ming

    2014-10-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between insulin gene variable number of tandem repeats (INS VNTR) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Systematic searches of electronic databases, reference lists of included articles, and the abstracts presented at related scientific societies meetings were performed. Statistical analyses were conducted using software Stata 11.0. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were applied. Publication bias was tested by Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression test. A total of 9 studies including 1075 PCOS patients and 2878 controls were included in the meta-analysis. There were evidence of statistical significant association between INS VNTR and PCOS in allelic model (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.08-1.43, P=0.002) and dominant model (OR=1.34, 95% CI=1.11-1.63, P=0.003) but not in additive model (OR=1.38, 95% CI=0.93-2.04, P=0.11) and recessive model (OR=1.26, 95% CI=0.96-1.65, P=0.09). No significant publication bias was shown by funnel plots and Egger's regression tests. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that the III allele of INS VNTR is associated with increased risk of PCOS.

  2. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  3. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nieves; Mecha, Miriam; Espejo, Carmen; Mestre, Leyre; Eixarch, Herena; Montalban, Xavier; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Guaza, Carmen; Villar, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain) and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens) mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55). We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P = 0.001) and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P = 0.02) compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P = 0.02) and IL-17 (P = 0.009) and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P = 0.04) than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism. PMID:24868560

  4. Regulatory roles for Tiam1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1, in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Madathilparambil, Suresh Vasu; McDonald, Phillip; Olson, Lawrence Karl; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2009-01-01

    Using various biochemical, pharmacological and molecular biological approaches, we have recently reported regulatory roles for Rac1, a small G-protein, in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, little is understood with respect to localization of, and regulation by, specific regulatory factors of Rac1 in GSIS. Herein, we investigated regulatory roles for Tiam1, a specific nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rac1, in GSIS in pancreatic beta-cells. Western blot analysis indicated that Tiam1 is predominantly cytosolic in distribution. NSC23766, a specific inhibitor of Tiam1-mediated activation of Rac1, markedly attenuated glucose-induced, but not KCl-induced insulin secretion in INS 832/13 cells and normal rat islets. Further, NSC23766 significantly reduced glucose-induced activation (i.e. GTP-bound form) and membrane association of Rac1 in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knock-down of Tiam1 markedly inhibited glucose-induced membrane trafficking and activation of Rac1 in INS 832/13 cells. Interestingly, however, in contrast to the inhibitory effects of NSC23766, Tiam1 gene depletion potentiated GSIS in these cells; such a potentiation of GSIS was sensitive to extracellular calcium. Together, our studies present the first evidence for a regulatory role for Tiam1/Rac1-sensitive signaling step in GSIS. They also provide evidence for the existence of a potential Rac1/Tiam1-independent, but calcium-sensitive component for GSIS in these cells.

  5. Biosimilar Insulins

    PubMed Central

    Hompesch, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Until now most of the insulin used in developed countries has been manufactured and distributed by a small number of multinational companies. Beyond the established insulin manufacturers, a number of new players have developed insulin manufacturing capacities based on modern biotechnological methods. Because the patents for many of the approved insulin formulations have expired or are going to expire soon, these not yet established companies are increasingly interested in seeking market approval for their insulin products as biosimilar insulins (BI) in highly regulated markets like the EU and the United States. Differences in the manufacturing process (none of the insulin manufacturing procedures are 100% identical) can lead to insulins that to some extent may differ from the originator insulin. The key questions are if subtle differences in the structure of the insulins, purity, and so on are clinically relevant and may result in different biological effects. The aim of this article is to introduce and discuss basic aspects that may be of relevance with regard to BI. PMID:24876530

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Wilms’ Tumor 1-Controlled Gene Expression in Podocytes Reveals Key Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Martin; Ettou, Sandrine; Jung, Youngsook L.; Lenz, Maximilian O.; Taglienti, Mary E.; Park, Peter J.; Schermer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms’ tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) is key to podocyte development and viability; however, WT1 transcriptional networks in podocytes remain elusive. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the genome-wide WT1 transcriptional network in podocytes in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIPseq) and RNA sequencing techniques. Our data show a specific role for WT1 in regulating the podocyte-specific transcriptome through binding to both promoters and enhancers of target genes. Furthermore, we inferred a podocyte transcription factor network consisting of WT1, LMX1B, TCF21, Fox-class and TEAD family transcription factors, and MAFB that uses tissue-specific enhancers to control podocyte gene expression. In addition to previously described WT1-dependent target genes, ChIPseq identified novel WT1-dependent signaling systems. These targets included components of the Hippo signaling system, underscoring the power of genome-wide transcriptional-network analyses. Together, our data elucidate a comprehensive gene regulatory network in podocytes suggesting that WT1 gene regulatory function and podocyte cell-type specification can best be understood in the context of transcription factor-regulatory element network interplay. PMID:25636411

  7. Metabolomic analysis reveals that carnitines are key regulatory metabolites in phase transition of the locusts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Wu, Zeming; Wang, Xianhui; Yang, Pengcheng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang; Kang, Le

    2012-02-28

    Phenotypic plasticity occurs prevalently and plays a vital role in adaptive evolution. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of alternate phenotypes remain unknown. Here, a density-dependent phase polyphenism of Locusta migratoria was used as the study model to identify key signaling molecules regulating the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Metabolomic analysis, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed that solitarious and gregarious locusts have distinct metabolic profiles in hemolymph. A total of 319 metabolites, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism, differed significantly in concentration between the phases. In addition, the time course of changes in the metabolic profiles of locust hemolymph that accompany phase transition was analyzed. Carnitine and its acyl derivatives, which are involved in the lipid β-oxidation process, were identified as key differential metabolites that display robust correlation with the time courses of phase transition. RNAi silencing of two key enzymes from the carnitine system, carnitine acetyltransferase and palmitoyltransferase, resulted in a behavioral transition from the gregarious to solitarious phase and the corresponding changes of metabolic profiles. In contrast, the injection of exogenous acetylcarnitine promoted the acquisition of gregarious behavior in solitarious locusts. These results suggest that carnitines mediate locust phase transition possibly through modulating lipid metabolism and influencing the nervous system of the locusts. PMID:22328148

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals that carnitines are key regulatory metabolites in phase transition of the locusts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Wu, Zeming; Wang, Xianhui; Yang, Pengcheng; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang; Kang, Le

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity occurs prevalently and plays a vital role in adaptive evolution. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the expression of alternate phenotypes remain unknown. Here, a density-dependent phase polyphenism of Locusta migratoria was used as the study model to identify key signaling molecules regulating the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Metabolomic analysis, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, showed that solitarious and gregarious locusts have distinct metabolic profiles in hemolymph. A total of 319 metabolites, many of which are involved in lipid metabolism, differed significantly in concentration between the phases. In addition, the time course of changes in the metabolic profiles of locust hemolymph that accompany phase transition was analyzed. Carnitine and its acyl derivatives, which are involved in the lipid β-oxidation process, were identified as key differential metabolites that display robust correlation with the time courses of phase transition. RNAi silencing of two key enzymes from the carnitine system, carnitine acetyltransferase and palmitoyltransferase, resulted in a behavioral transition from the gregarious to solitarious phase and the corresponding changes of metabolic profiles. In contrast, the injection of exogenous acetylcarnitine promoted the acquisition of gregarious behavior in solitarious locusts. These results suggest that carnitines mediate locust phase transition possibly through modulating lipid metabolism and influencing the nervous system of the locusts. PMID:22328148

  9. Regulatory networks and complex interactions between the insulin and angiotensin II signalling systems: models and implications for hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cizmeci, Deniz; Arkun, Yaman

    2013-01-01

    The cross-talk between insulin and angiotensin II signalling pathways plays a significant role in the co-occurrence of diabetes and hypertension. We developed a mathematical model of the system of interactions among the biomolecules that are involved in the cross-talk between the insulin and angiotensin II signalling pathways. We have identified several feedback structures that regulate the dynamic behavior of the individual signalling pathways and their interactions. Different scenarios are simulated and dominant steady-state, dynamic and stability characteristics are revealed. The proposed mechanistic model describes how angiotensin II inhibits the actions of insulin and impairs the insulin-mediated vasodilation. The model also predicts that poor glycaemic control induced by diabetes contributes to hypertension by activating the renin angiotensin aystem.

  10. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  11. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  12. Altered distribution of regulatory lymphocytes by oral administration of soy-extracts exerts a hepatoprotective effect alleviating immune mediated liver injury, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Shabat, Yehudit; Zolotarovya, Lidya; Snir, Ram; Ilan, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the immune-modulatory and the hepatoprotective effects of oral administration of two soy extracts in immune mediated liver injury and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). METHODS: Two soy extracts, M1 and OS, were orally administered to mice with concanavalin A (ConA) immune-mediated hepatitis, to high-fat diet (HFD) mice and to methionine and choline reduced diet combined with HFD mice. Animals were followed for disease and immune biomarkers. RESULTS: Oral administration of OS and M1 had an additive effect in alleviating ConA hepatitis manifested by a decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase serum levels. Oral administration of the OS and M1 soy derived fractions, ameliorated liver injury in the high fat diet model of NASH, manifested by a decrease in hepatic triglyceride levels, improvement in liver histology, decreased serum cholesterol and triglycerides and improved insulin resistance. In the methionine and choline reduced diet combined with the high fat diet model, we noted a decrease in hepatic triglycerides and improvement in blood glucose levels and liver histology. The effects were associated with reduced serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and alteration of regulatory T cell distribution. CONCLUSION: Oral administration of the combination of OS and M1 soy derived extracts exerted an adjuvant effect in the gut-immune system, altering the distribution of regulatory T cells, and alleviating immune mediated liver injury, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. PMID:26139990

  13. Expression of PD-1 Molecule on Regulatory T Lymphocytes in Patients with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Valentina; Russo, Benedetta; Crinò, Antonino; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Giorda, Ezio; Cappa, Marco; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoreactive T cells that destroy pancreatic beta cells. Animal models suggested that a CD4+CD25+ population has a regulatory function capable of preventing activation and effector functions of autoreactive T cells. However, the role of CD4+CD25high T cells in autoimmunity and their molecular mechanisms remain the subject of investigation. We therefore evaluated T regulatory cell frequencies and their PD-1 expression in the peripheral blood of long-standing diabetics under basal conditions and after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Under basal conditions, the percentages of T regulatory cells were significantly higher while that of T effector cells were significantly lower in patients than in controls. The ratio of regulatory to effector T cells was higher in patients than that in controls, suggesting that T regulatory cells were functional in patients. Percentages of total PD-1+, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing T regulatory cells did not change in patients and in controls. After stimulation, a defect in T regulatory cell proliferation was observed in diabetics and the percentages of total PD-1+, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing cells were lower in patients. Our data suggest a defective activation of T regulatory cells in long-standing diabetics due to a lower expression of PD-1 on their surface. PMID:26393578

  14. Expression of PD-1 Molecule on Regulatory T Lymphocytes in Patients with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perri, Valentina; Russo, Benedetta; Crinò, Antonino; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Giorda, Ezio; Cappa, Marco; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2015-09-18

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoreactive T cells that destroy pancreatic beta cells. Animal models suggested that a CD4⁺CD25⁺ population has a regulatory function capable of preventing activation and effector functions of autoreactive T cells. However, the role of CD4⁺CD25high T cells in autoimmunity and their molecular mechanisms remain the subject of investigation. We therefore evaluated T regulatory cell frequencies and their PD-1 expression in the peripheral blood of long-standing diabetics under basal conditions and after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Under basal conditions, the percentages of T regulatory cells were significantly higher while that of T effector cells were significantly lower in patients than in controls. The ratio of regulatory to effector T cells was higher in patients than that in controls, suggesting that T regulatory cells were functional in patients. Percentages of total PD-1⁺, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing T regulatory cells did not change in patients and in controls. After stimulation, a defect in T regulatory cell proliferation was observed in diabetics and the percentages of total PD-1⁺, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing cells were lower in patients. Our data suggest a defective activation of T regulatory cells in long-standing diabetics due to a lower expression of PD-1 on their surface.

  15. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  16. Identification and Comparison of Aberrant Key Regulatory Networks in Breast, Colon, Liver, Lung, and Stomach Cancers through Methylome Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungtak; Kang, Seongeun; Jeong, Gookjoo; Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Sun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of specific CpG sites at the promoter is widely responsible for genesis and development of various cancer types. Even though the microarray-based methylome analyzing techniques have contributed to the elucidation of the methylation change at the genome-wide level, the identification of key methylation markers or top regulatory networks appearing common in highly incident cancers through comparison analysis is still limited. In this study, we in silico performed the genome-wide methylation analysis on each 10 sets of normal and cancer pairs of five tissues: breast, colon, liver, lung, and stomach. The methylation array covers 27,578 CpG sites, corresponding to 14,495 genes, and significantly hypermethylated or hypomethylated genes in the cancer were collected (FDR adjusted p-value <0.05; methylation difference >0.3). Analysis of the dataset confirmed the methylation of previously known methylation markers and further identified novel methylation markers, such as GPX2, CLDN15, and KL. Cluster analysis using the methylome dataset resulted in a diagram with a bipartite mode distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells regardless of tissue types. The analysis further revealed that breast cancer was closest with lung cancer, whereas it was farthest from colon cancer. Pathway analysis identified that either the “cancer” related network or the “cancer” related bio-function appeared as the highest confidence in all the five cancers, whereas each cancer type represents its tissue-specific gene sets. Our results contribute toward understanding the essential abnormal epigenetic pathways involved in carcinogenesis. Further, the novel methylation markers could be applied to establish markers for cancer prognosis. PMID:24842468

  17. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor I regulatory region associates with colorectal cancer risk in singapore chinese.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Delellis, Katherine; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Koh, Woon-Puay; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C; Ingles, Sue A

    2005-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are a potential risk factor for several cancers, including colorectal cancer. Physiologic levels of plasma IGF-I vary greatly; this variation may be in part genetically determined. We identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with each other and in partial linkage disequilibrium with a previously studied cytosine-adenine microsatellite [-969(CA)(n)]. We investigated one of the SNPs, -533T/C,and the 969(CA)(n) in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within a cohort of Singapore Chinese (cases/controls = 290:873). The (CA)(21) allele, rather than the previously implicated (CA)(19) allele, was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio for 21/21 versus all other genotypes, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.84). For the -533C/T SNP, persons carrying one or more copies of the C allele had a decreased in risk of colorectal cancer compared with noncarriers (odds ratio for CC/CT versus TT, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.82). This association was specific for colon, as opposed to rectal cancer and was modified by age. We also examined a functional insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3) promoter SNP, -202 A/C, previously reported to predict serum IGFBP3 levels. Although we were able to confirm this genotype-phenotype association, the -202A/C IGFBP3 SNP was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. In conclusion, we report a novel SNP in the IGF-I regulatory region that is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  18. Optimization of codon composition and regulatory elements for expression of human insulin like growth factor-1 in transgenic chloroplasts and evaluation of structural identity and function

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, Henry; Ruiz, Gricel; Denes, Bela; Sandberg, Laurence; Langridge, William

    2009-01-01

    Background Transgenic chloroplasts are potential bioreactors for recombinant protein production, especially for achievement of high levels of protein expression and proper folding. Production of therapeutic proteins in leaves provides transgene containment by elimination of reproductive structures. Therefore, in this study, human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 is expressed in transgenic chloroplasts for evaluation of structural identity and function. Results Expression of the synthetic Insulin like Growth Factor 1 gene (IGF-1s, 60% AT) was observed in transformed E. coli. However, no native IGF-1 gene (IGF-1n, 41% AT) product was detected in the western blots in E. coli. Site-specific integration of the transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome was confirmed after transformation using PCR. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the transgenic lines were homoplasmic. The transgenic plant lines had IGF-1s expression levels of 11.3% of total soluble protein (TSP). The IGF-1n plants contained 9.5% TSP as IGF-1n, suggesting that the chloroplast translation machinery is more flexible than E. coli in codon preference and usage. The expression of IGF-1 was increased up to 32% TSP under continuous illumination by the chloroplast light regulatory elements. IgG-Sepharose affinity column chromatographic separation of Z domain containing chloroplast derived IGF-1 protein, single and two dimensional electrophoresis methods and mass spectrometer analysis confirmed the identity of human IGF-1 in transgenic chloroplasts. Two spots analyzed from 2-D focusing/phoresis acrylamide gel showed the correct amino acid sequence of human IGF-1 and the S. aureus Z-tag. Cell proliferation assays in human HU-3 cells demonstrated the biological activity of chloroplast derived IGF-1 even in the presence of the S. aureus Z tag. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the human Insulin like Growth Factor-1 expressed in transgenic chloroplasts is identical to the native protein and is fully

  19. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  20. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  1. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  2. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan. PMID:26220938

  3. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan.

  4. Mining the key regulatory genes of chicken inosine 5'-monophosphate metabolism based on time series microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lu; Chang, Guobin; Chen, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    IMP (inosine 5'-monophosphate) is a compound that enhances the flavor of poultry meat. IMP has become a new breeding trait to improve poultry meat quality. We tried to identify several potential regulatory genes, and construct their predicted regulatory relationships. Time series gene expression profiles of thigh muscle tissues of Rugao chicken, a famous indigenous breed in China, were performed for analysis of genes that are co-expressed or correlated with the concentration of IMP. We found 15 crucial co-expression genes, which are Hspa2, Pten, Gabpa, Bpi, Mkl1, Srf, Cd34, Hspa4, Etv6, Bmpr2, Gde1, Igfbp5, Cd28, Pecam1 and Gja1, that may directly or indirectly regulate IMP metabolism. Eventually, we computed the correlation coefficient between 19 IMP Genes and 15 CGs (15 co-expression genes), and we identified and constructed a predicted regulation network. In conclusion, variation of IMP concentration was primarily connected with the muscle development process. During this process, 15 CGs were identified that may have significant influence on IMP metabolism. In particular, Bmpr2, Pten and co-expression genes correlated with Entpd8 might play important roles in regulating IMP de novo synthesis, decomposition and salvage synthesis.

  5. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  6. Expression-based network biology identifies alteration in key regulatory pathways of type 2 diabetes and associated risk/complications.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Urmi; Ukil, Sanchaita; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Agrawal, Shipra

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease which leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. The advanced form of disease causes acute cardiovascular, renal, neurological and microvascular complications. Thus there is a constant need to discover new and efficient treatment against the disease by seeking to uncover various novel alternate signalling mechanisms that can lead to diabetes and its associated complications. The present study allows detection of molecular targets by unravelling their role in altered biological pathways during diabetes and its associated risk factors and complications. We have used an integrated functional networks concept by merging co-expression network and interaction network to detect the transcriptionally altered pathways and regulations involved in the disease. Our analysis reports four novel significant networks which could lead to the development of diabetes and other associated dysfunctions. (a) The first network illustrates the up regulation of TGFBRII facilitating oxidative stress and causing the expression of early transcription genes via MAPK pathway leading to cardiovascular and kidney related complications. (b) The second network demonstrates novel interactions between GAPDH and inflammatory and proliferation candidate genes i.e., SUMO4 and EGFR indicating a new link between obesity and diabetes. (c) The third network portrays unique interactions PTPN1 with EGFR and CAV1 which could lead to an impaired vascular function in diabetic nephropathy condition. (d) Lastly, from our fourth network we have inferred that the interaction of beta-catenin with CDH5 and TGFBR1 through Smad molecules could contribute to endothelial dysfunction. A probability of emergence of kidney complication might be suggested in T2D condition. An experimental investigation on this aspect may further provide more decisive observation in drug target identification and better understanding of

  7. Role of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, hyperglycaemic food and milk consumption in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-01

    It is the purpose of this viewpoint article to delineate the regulatory network of growth hormone (GH), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signalling during puberty, associated hormonal changes in adrenal and gonadal androgen metabolism, and the impact of dietary factors and smoking involved in the pathogenesis of acne. The key regulator IGF-1 rises during puberty by the action of increased GH secretion and correlates well with the clinical course of acne. In acne patients, associations between serum levels of IGF-1, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, dihydrotestosterone, acne lesion counts and facial sebum secretion rate have been reported. IGF-1 stimulates 5alpha-reductase, adrenal and gonadal androgen synthesis, androgen receptor signal transduction, sebocyte proliferation and lipogenesis. Milk consumption results in a significant increase in insulin and IGF-1 serum levels comparable with high glycaemic food. Insulin induces hepatic IGF-1 secretion, and both hormones amplify the stimulatory effect of GH on sebocytes and augment mitogenic downstream signalling pathways of insulin receptors, IGF-1 receptor and fibroblast growth factor receptor-2b. Acne is proposed to be an IGF-1-mediated disease, modified by diets and smoking increasing insulin/IGF1-signalling. Metformin treatment, and diets low in milk protein content and glycaemic index reduce increased IGF-1 signalling. Persistent acne in adulthood with high IGF-1 levels may be considered as an indicator for increased risk of cancer, which may require appropriate dietary intervention as well as treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents.

  8. Berberine-improved visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance associated with altered sterol regulatory element-binding proteins, liver x receptors, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors transcriptional programs in diabetic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Han; Zhu, Hua; Huang, Lan; Liu, Ya-Li; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic "lipotoxicity" hypothesis presents that fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Berberine, a hypolipidemic agent, has been reported to have antidiabetic activities. The molecular mechanisms for this property are, however, not well clarified. Therefore in this study type 2 diabetic hamsters were induced by high-fat diet with low-dose streptozotocin. Then, we investigated the gene expression alterations and explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in diabetic hamsters by microarray analysis followed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmation. Type 2 diabetic hamsters exhibited hyperglycemia and relative hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, intra-adipocyte lipid accumulation, significant increase in body weight and visceral white adipose tissue weight, abnormal serum adipokines levels, and deleterious dyslipidemia. Furthermore, they had increased sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) expression and decreased liver X receptors (LXRs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) expression in visceral white adipose tissue. After 9-week berberine treatment, fat-induced insulin resistance and diabetic phenotype in type 2 diabetic hamsters were significantly improved. Compared with diabetic hamsters, expression of LXRs and PPARs significantly increased and SREBPs significantly decreased in visceral white adipose tissue from berberine-treated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that altered visceral white adipose tissue LXRs, PPARs, and SREBPs transcriptional programs are involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic hamsters.

  9. Transcriptomics profiling of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) under arsenate stress identifies key candidate genes and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Srivastava, Ashish K; Sablok, Gaurav; Deshpande, Tejaswini U; Suprasanna, Penna

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a non-essential element, a groundwater pollutant, whose uptake by plants produces toxic effects. The use of As-contaminated groundwater for irrigation can affect the crop productivity. Realizing the importance of the Brassica juncea as a crop plant in terms of oil-yield, there is a need to unravel mechanistic details of response to As stress and identify key functional genes and pathways. In this research, we studied time-dependent (4-96 h) transcriptome changes in roots and shoots of B. juncea under arsenate [As(V)] stress using Agilent platform. Among the whole transcriptome profiled genes, a total of 1,285 genes showed significant change in expression pattern upon As(V) exposure. The differentially expressed genes were categorized to various signaling pathways including hormones (jasmonate, abscisic acid, auxin, and ethylene) and kinases. Significant effects were also noticed on genes related to sulfur, nitrogen, CHO, and lipid metabolisms along with photosynthesis. Biochemical assays were conducted using specific inhibitors of glutathione and jasmonate biosynthesis, and kinases. The inhibitor studies revealed interconnection among sulfur metabolism, jasmonate, and kinase signaling pathways. In addition, various transposons also constituted a part of the altered transcriptome. Lastly, we profiled a set of key functional up- and down-regulated genes using real-time RT-PCR, which could act as an early indicators of the As stress.

  10. Transcriptomics profiling of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) under arsenate stress identifies key candidate genes and regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Srivastava, Ashish K.; Sablok, Gaurav; Deshpande, Tejaswini U.; Suprasanna, Penna

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a non-essential element, a groundwater pollutant, whose uptake by plants produces toxic effects. The use of As-contaminated groundwater for irrigation can affect the crop productivity. Realizing the importance of the Brassica juncea as a crop plant in terms of oil-yield, there is a need to unravel mechanistic details of response to As stress and identify key functional genes and pathways. In this research, we studied time-dependent (4–96 h) transcriptome changes in roots and shoots of B. juncea under arsenate [As(V)] stress using Agilent platform. Among the whole transcriptome profiled genes, a total of 1,285 genes showed significant change in expression pattern upon As(V) exposure. The differentially expressed genes were categorized to various signaling pathways including hormones (jasmonate, abscisic acid, auxin, and ethylene) and kinases. Significant effects were also noticed on genes related to sulfur, nitrogen, CHO, and lipid metabolisms along with photosynthesis. Biochemical assays were conducted using specific inhibitors of glutathione and jasmonate biosynthesis, and kinases. The inhibitor studies revealed interconnection among sulfur metabolism, jasmonate, and kinase signaling pathways. In addition, various transposons also constituted a part of the altered transcriptome. Lastly, we profiled a set of key functional up- and down-regulated genes using real-time RT-PCR, which could act as an early indicators of the As stress. PMID:26347763

  11. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  12. A Single Host-Derived Glycan Impacts Key Regulatory Nodes of Symbiont Metabolism in a Coevolved Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Min; Schwartzman, Julia A.; Dunn, Anne K.; Lu, Zuhong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most animal-microbe mutualistic associations are characterized by nutrient exchange between the partners. When the host provides the nutrients, it can gain the capacity to shape its microbial community, control the stability of the interaction, and promote its health and fitness. Using the bioluminescent squid-vibrio model, we demonstrate how a single host-derived glycan, chitin, regulates the metabolism of Vibrio fischeri at key points in the development and maintenance of the symbiosis. We first characterized the pathways for catabolism of chitin sugars by V. fischeri, demonstrating that the Ccr-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) prioritizes transport of these sugars in V. fischeri by blocking the uptake of non-PTS carbohydrates, such as glycerol. Next, we found that PTS transport of chitin sugars into the bacterium shifted acetate homeostasis toward a net excretion of acetate and was sufficient to override an activation of the acetate switch by AinS-dependent quorum sensing. Finally, we showed that catabolism of chitin sugars decreases the rate of cell-specific oxygen consumption. Collectively, these three metabolic functions define a physiological shift that favors fermentative growth on chitin sugars and may support optimal symbiont luminescence, the functional basis of the squid-vibrio mutualism. PMID:26173698

  13. Pax3 and Zic1 trigger the early neural crest gene regulatory network by the direct activation of multiple key neural crest specifiers.

    PubMed

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Roche, Daniel D; Pegoraro, Caterina; Figueiredo, Ana Leonor; Maczkowiak, Frédérique; Brunet, Lisa J; Milet, Cécile; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Pollet, Nicolas; Harland, Richard M; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2014-02-15

    Neural crest development is orchestrated by a complex and still poorly understood gene regulatory network. Premigratory neural crest is induced at the lateral border of the neural plate by the combined action of signaling molecules and transcription factors such as AP2, Gbx2, Pax3 and Zic1. Among them, Pax3 and Zic1 are both necessary and sufficient to trigger a complete neural crest developmental program. However, their gene targets in the neural crest regulatory network remain unknown. Here, through a transcriptome analysis of frog microdissected neural border, we identified an extended gene signature for the premigratory neural crest, and we defined novel potential members of the regulatory network. This signature includes 34 novel genes, as well as 44 known genes expressed at the neural border. Using another microarray analysis which combined Pax3 and Zic1 gain-of-function and protein translation blockade, we uncovered 25 Pax3 and Zic1 direct targets within this signature. We demonstrated that the neural border specifiers Pax3 and Zic1 are direct upstream regulators of neural crest specifiers Snail1/2, Foxd3, Twist1, and Tfap2b. In addition, they may modulate the transcriptional output of multiple signaling pathways involved in neural crest development (Wnt, Retinoic Acid) through the induction of key pathway regulators (Axin2 and Cyp26c1). We also found that Pax3 could maintain its own expression through a positive autoregulatory feedback loop. These hierarchical inductions, feedback loops, and pathway modulations provide novel tools to understand the neural crest induction network.

  14. Translating PrEP effectiveness into public health impact: key considerations for decision-makers on cost-effectiveness, price, regulatory issues, distributive justice and advocacy for access

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Catherine; Macklin, Ruth; Warren, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The extraordinary feat of proving the effectiveness of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in clinical trials in different populations in a variety of settings may prove to have been easier than ensuring it is used well. Decision-makers must make difficult choices to realize the promise of antiretroviral prophylaxis for their countries. This paper outlines key economic, regulatory and distributive justice issues that must be addressed for effective and acceptable PrEP implementation. Discussion In considering the role that PrEP can play in combination prevention programmes, decision-makers must determine who can benefit most from PrEP, how PrEP can be provided safely and efficiently, and what kind of health system support will ensure successful implementation. To do this, they need contextualized information on disease burden by population, analyses of how PrEP services might best be delivered, and projections of the human resource and infrastructure requirements for each potential delivery model. There are cost considerations, varying cost-effectiveness results and regulatory challenges. The principles of ethics can inform thorny discussions about who should be prioritized for oral PrEP and how best to introduce it fairly. We describe the cost-effectiveness of PrEP in different populations at higher risk of HIV exposure, its price in low- and middle-income countries, and the current regulatory situation. We explore the principles of ethics that can inform resource allocation decision-making about PrEP anchored in distributive justice, at a time when universal access to antiretroviral treatment remains to be assured. We then highlight the role of advocacy in moving the PrEP agenda forward. Conclusions The time is ripe now for decisions about whether, how and for whom PrEP should be introduced into a country's HIV response. It has the potential to contribute significantly to high impact HIV prevention if it is tailored to those who can most benefit

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis reveals a key role of insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase in human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men.

  17. Over-expression of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) in rat pancreatic islets induces lipogenesis and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin release: modulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR).

    PubMed Central

    Diraison, Frédérique; Parton, Laura; Ferré, Pascal; Foufelle, Fabienne; Briscoe, Celia P; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular lipid by pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to inhibit normal glucose-regulated insulin secretion ('glucolipotoxicity'). In the present study, we determine whether over-expression in rat islets of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBP1c (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c) affects insulin release, and whether changes in islet lipid content may be reversed by activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Infection with an adenovirus encoding the constitutively active nuclear fragment of SREBP1c resulted in expression of the protein in approx. 20% of islet cell nuclei, with a preference for beta-cells at the islet periphery. Real-time PCR (TaqMan) analysis showed that SREBP1c up-regulated the expression of FAS (fatty acid synthase; 6-fold), acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (2-fold), as well as peroxisomal-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (7-fold), uncoupling protein-2 (1.4-fold) and Bcl2 (B-cell lymphocytic-leukaemia proto-oncogene 2; 1.3-fold). By contrast, levels of pre-proinsulin, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase and GLUT2 (glucose transporter isoform-2) mRNAs were unaltered. SREBP1c-transduced islets displayed a 3-fold increase in triacylglycerol content, decreased glucose oxidation and ATP levels, and a profound inhibition of glucose-, but not depolarisation-, induced insulin secretion. Culture of islets with the AMPK activator 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside decreased the expression of the endogenous SREBP1c and FAS genes, and reversed the effect of over-expressing active SREBP1c on FAS mRNA levels and cellular triacylglycerol content. We conclude that SREBP1c over-expression, even when confined to a subset of beta-cells, leads to defective insulin secretion from islets and may contribute to some forms of Type II diabetes. PMID:14690455

  18. Insulin Signaling And Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Elmus G.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance or its sequelae may be the common etiology of maladies associated with metabolic syndrome (e.g., hypertension, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke and kidney failure). It is thus important to understand those factors that affect insulin sensitivity. This review stems from the surprising discovery that interference with angiotensin signaling improves insulin sensitivity and it provides a general overview of insulin action and factors that control insulin sensitivity. PMID:23111650

  19. MicroRNA-16 modulates macrophage polarization leading to improved insulin sensitivity in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Talari, Malathi; Kapadia, Bandish; Kain, Vasundhara; Seshadri, Sriram; Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth; Misra, Parimal; Parsa, Kishore V L

    2015-12-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation leads to several diseases such as insulin resistance, T2D and several types of cancers. The functional role of microRNAs in inflammation induced insulin resistance is poorly studied. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules which mediate diverse biological processes. We here show that miR-16 expression levels are down-regulated in different inflammatory conditions such as LPS/IFNγ or palmitate treated macrophages, palmitate exposed myoblasts and insulin responsive tissues of high sucrose diet induced insulin resistant rats. Importantly, forced expression of miR-16 in macrophages impaired the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-β leading to enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in co-cultured skeletal myoblasts. Further, ectopic expression of miR-16 enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal myoblasts via the up-regulation of GLUT4 and MEF2A, two key players involved in insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Collectively, our data highlight the important role of miR-16 in ameliorating inflammation induced insulin resistance. PMID:26453808

  20. Identification of putative regulatory region of insulin-like androgenic gland hormone gene (IAG) in the prawn Macrobrachium nipponense and proteins that interact with IAG by using yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Yi; Li, Jia-Le; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like androgenic gland hormone gene (IAG) is a sex regulator specifically expressed in male crustaceans, controlling the male sexual differentiation, spermatogenesis and reproductive strategy. Our previous study reported the cloning and characterization of the prawn Macrobrachium nipponense IAG (MnIAG). In this study, we further identified a 2214-bp MnIAG 5'-flanking region, and analyzed its transcription factor binding sites and transcriptional activity. The results showed that there were two potential promoter core sequences, three TATA boxes and one CAAT box existing in the MnIAG 5'-flanking region as well as many potential transcription factor binding sites, such as SRY, Sox-5, GATA-1, etc. Notably, the transcriptional activity was weak in this region, and a negative regulatory region was found in -604 to -231bp. In addition, we constructed M. nipponense yeast libraries and identified proteins interacting with the MnIAG protein by yeast two hybridization assay. The yeast two-hybrid screening yielded ten positive clones, of which five were annotated by NCBI database, namely heat shock protein 21, NADH dehydrogenase, zinc finger protein, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and a hypothetical protein. The identification of MnIAG putative regulatory region and proteins that interact with IAG will facilitate our understanding of the regulatory role of MnIAG and provide a foundation for deep insight into the prawn sex differentiation mechanism and signaling transduction pathways. PMID:26979275

  1. Drosophila Adiponectin Receptor in Insulin Producing Cells Regulates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism by Controlling Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Bajracharya, Rijan; Yang, Se-Yeol; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Yu, Kweon

    2013-01-01

    Adipokines secreted from adipose tissue are key regulators of metabolism in animals. Adiponectin, one of the adipokines, modulates pancreatic beta cell function to maintain energy homeostasis. Recently, significant conservation between Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian metabolism has been discovered. Drosophila insulin like peptides (Dilps) regulate energy metabolism similarly to mammalian insulin. However, in Drosophila, the regulatory mechanism of insulin producing cells (IPCs) by adipokine signaling is largely unknown. Here, we describe the discovery of the Drosophila adiponectin receptor and its function in IPCs. Drosophila adiponectin receptor (dAdipoR) has high homology with the human adiponectin receptor 1. The dAdipoR antibody staining revealed that dAdipoR was expressed in IPCs of larval and adult brains. IPC- specific dAdipoR inhibition (Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri) showed the increased sugar level in the hemolymph and the elevated triglyceride level in whole body. Dilps mRNA levels in the Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri flies were similar with those of controls. However, in the Dilp2>dAdipoR-Ri flies, Dilp2 protein was accumulated in IPCs, the level of circulating Dilp2 was decreased, and insulin signaling was reduced in the fat body. In ex vivo fly brain culture with the human adiponectin, Dilp2 was secreted from IPCs. These results indicate that adiponectin receptor in insulin producing cells regulates insulin secretion and controls glucose and lipid metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster. This study demonstrates a new adipokine signaling in Drosophila and provides insights for the mammalian adiponectin receptor function in pancreatic beta cells, which could be useful for therapeutic application. PMID:23874700

  2. [Novel insulins].

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan G; Laine, Merja K

    2016-01-01

    Novel insulins have entered the market during recent years. The ultra-long acting insulins, insulin degludek and insulin glargine, the latter having a strength of 300 U/ml, exhibit a steady and predictable action curve. Studies have indicated that significantly fewer hypoglycemiae occur when using degludek in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, whereas similar evidence about glargine (300 U/mI) has been obtained in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The long duration of action of both insulins brings long-needed flexibility to.their dosing. PMID:27089618

  3. A mitochondrial kinase complex is essential to mediate an ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Converso, Daniela P; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Galli, Soledad; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Paz, Cristina; Carreras, María C; Poderoso, Juan J; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-01-16

    ERK1/2 is known to be involved in hormone-stimulated steroid synthesis, but its exact roles and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Both ERK1/2 phosphorylation and steroidogenesis may be triggered by cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent and-independent mechanisms; however, ERK1/2 activation by cAMP results in a maximal steroidogenic rate, whereas canonical activation by epidermal growth factor (EGF) does not. We demonstrate herein by Western blot analysis and confocal studies that temporal mitochondrial ERK1/2 activation is obligatory for PKA-mediated steroidogenesis in the Leydig-transformed MA-10 cell line. PKA activity leads to the phosphorylation of a constitutive mitochondrial MEK1/2 pool with a lower effect in cytosolic MEKs, while EGF allows predominant cytosolic MEK activation and nuclear pERK1/2 localization. These results would explain why PKA favors a more durable ERK1/2 activation in mitochondria than does EGF. By means of ex vivo experiments, we showed that mitochondrial maximal steroidogenesis occurred as a result of the mutual action of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein -a key regulatory component in steroid biosynthesis-, active ERK1/2 and PKA. Our results indicate that there is an interaction between mitochondrial StAR and ERK1/2, involving a D domain with sequential basic-hydrophobic motifs similar to ERK substrates. As a result of this binding and only in the presence of cholesterol, ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR at Ser(232). Directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) to a non-phosphorylable amino acid such as Ala (StAR S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR phosphorylation by active ERK1/2. Transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. In summary, here we show that StAR is a novel substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric protein kinase complex that regulates cholesterol transport. The role of MAPKs in mitochondrial function is underlined.

  4. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Quantification of key periodontal pathogens in insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients with generalized chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aemaimanan, Piyamas; Amimanan, Piyawan; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2013-08-01

    Periodontitis is a common problem in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), however, differences in the putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with DM compared to non-DM subjects are still inconclusive. The red complex, which includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, encompasses the most important pathogens in adult periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare cell numbers of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, T. forsythia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival sulcus of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis sites of non-diabetes mellitus (NDM), controlled and poorly controlled insulin-dependent DM (CDM and PDM) patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 19 CDM, 19 PDM and 19 NDM patients. Taqman real time-PCR was used to determine bacterial cell number. At subject level, the quantity of red complex bacteria was significantly higher in PDM than those of NDM and positively correlated with HbA1c. At site level (total 342 sites), cell numbers of T. denticola and T. forsythia in healthy sites of CDM and PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM. In gingivitis sites, the numbers of P. gingivalis in CDM and PDM and T. forsythia in PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM while in periodontitis sites, higher quantity of P. gingivalis in PDM was observed. Our study indicated that poor glycemic control is associated with increasing cell numbers of red complex bacteria in subgingival biofilm. PMID:23827459

  6. Insulin oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D. J.; Pritchard-Jones, K.; Trotman-Dickenson, B.

    1986-01-01

    A 35 year old markedly underweight woman presented with uncontrolled diabetes. Following insulin therapy she developed gross fluid retention with extensive peripheral oedema, bilateral pleural effusions and weight gain of 18.8 kg in 22 days, accompanied by a fall in plasma albumin. She responded well to treatment with diuretics and salt-poor albumin, losing 10.3 kg in 6 days without recurrence of oedema. Severe insulin oedema is an uncommon complication of insulin therapy and may be due to effects of insulin on both vascular permeability and the renal tubule. Images Figure 2 PMID:3529068

  7. Maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation interact to influence body weight, insulin resistance, and food intake regulatory gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Huot, Pedro S P; Ly, Anna; Szeto, Ignatius M Y; Reza-López, Sandra A; Cho, Daniel; Kim, Young-In; Anderson, G Harvey

    2016-04-01

    Maternal intake of multivitamins or folic acid above the basal dietary requirement alters the growth and metabolic trajectory of rat offspring. We hypothesized that a modest increase in the folic acid content of maternal diets would alter the offspring's metabolic phenotype, and that these effects could be corrected by matching the folic acid content of the offspring's diet with that of the maternal diet. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control or a 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet prior to mating and during pregnancy and lactation. At weaning, pups from each maternal diet group were randomized to the control or to the 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet for 25 weeks. Male pups from dams fed the folic acid-supplemented diet were 3.7% heavier than those from control-fed dams and had lower mRNA expression for leptin receptor Obrb isoform (Lepr) (11%) and Agouti-related protein (Agrp) (14%). In contrast, female pups from folic acid-supplemented dams were 5% lighter than those from control-fed dams and had lower proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) (42%), Lepr (32%), and Agrp (13%), but higher neuropeptide Y (Npy) (18%) mRNA expression. Folic acid supplementation ameliorated the alterations induced by maternal folic acid supplementation in male pups and led to the lowest insulin resistance, but the effects were smaller in female pups and led to the highest insulin resistance. In conclusion, maternal folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control level was associated with alterations in body weight and hypothalamic gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner, and some of these effects were attenuated by postweaning folic acid supplementation.

  8. ["Prostatic" kallikreins, sex hormones and insulin-like growth factors: complex of male and female regulatory elements in health and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Zezerov, E G; Severin, E S

    1999-01-01

    Publications (up to the year 1997) on the interactions of "prostatic" kallikreins (prostatic specific antigen-PSA, etc.), sex hormones, insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and proteins binding them (IGFBP) in physiological processes (ageing, menstrual cycle, pregnancy) and oncogenesis (prostatic and mammary cancer) are reviewed. The concentrations of PSA, IGF, and IGFBP in organs and liquid media of men and women are presented. A concept of similarity in the mechanisms of interactions of sex hormones (dihydrotestosterone in men and progesterone in women), PSA, IGFBP, and IGF during activation of anabolic and proliferative processes in health and carcinogenesis is presented as a scheme. The diagnostic and prognostic value of PSA as a cancer marker should not be confined to male tumors (prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia). Our data permits us to regard PSA as an oncofetal marker for men and women, indicating normal and neoplastic proliferative processes in the prostatic, mammary, salivary, and other glands and in the lungs and endometrium. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of PSA in breast cancer is shown. The traditional name "PSA" does not reflect its physiological and pathogenetic role as a member of the kallikrein family with chymotrypsin-like activity. PSA is not absolutely specific towards the producer organ and sex. Its relative specificity for the prostate is undoubted, because the content of PSA in prostatic tissue and seminal plasma is 10(6)-10(8) times higher than in the serum and other organs of men and women. Therefore, although the terms "prostatic, "specific", and "antigen" now became trivial and it is difficult to refuse from them, they can be used only in quotation marks.

  9. Overview and discussion of the key regulatory issues in implementing the electric utility provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.; Burns, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Title 4 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) created a new regulatory instrument that electric power producers (utilities and others) will be required to possess and expand in order to emit sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) into the atmosphere. The emission allowance system created by the CAAA will be grafted onto an already complex system of state and federal electric utility regulation. How public utility commissions (PUCs) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulate these allowances will greatly affect the decisions that electric utilities under their jurisdiction make to comply with the CAAA and, therefore, the cost of compliance to ratepayers. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Højlund, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO(2) phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number of different mitochondrial phosphopeptides (87 ± 7 vs 40 ± 7, p = 0.015) and phosphoproteins (46 ± 2 vs 26 ± 3, p = 0.005) identified in each mitochondrial preparation. Almost half of the mitochondrial phosphorylation sites (n = 94) were exclusively identified in the insulin-stimulated state and included the majority of novel sites. Phosphorylation sites detected more often or exclusively in insulin-stimulated samples include multiple sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism, as well as several components of the newly defined mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial processes by phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms.

  11. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  12. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  13. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with type 2 diabetes , polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A ... resistance), especially in obese individuals and those with PCOS . This test involves an IV-infusion of insulin, ...

  14. The International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--chapter 1: Key ethical requirements and progress toward the definition of an international regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Emanuele; Tallacchini, Mariachiara; Flanagan, Enda B; Pierson, Richard N; Sykes, Megan; Vanderpool, Harold Y

    2009-01-01

    The outstanding results recently obtained in islet xenotransplantation suggest that porcine islet clinical trials may soon be scientifically appropriate. Before the initiation of such clinical studies, however, it is essential that a series of key ethical and regulatory conditions are satisfied. As far as ethics is concerned, the fundamental requirements have been previously reported in a position paper of the Ethics Committee of the International Xenotransplantation Association. These include aspects related to the selection of adequately informed, appropriate recipients; animal breeding and welfare; safety issues and the need for a favorable risk/benefit assessment based on strong efficacy data in relevant xenotransplantation studies in the primate. As most diabetic patients are not at risk of short-term mortality without islet transplantation, only a small subset of patients could currently be considered for any type of islet transplant. However, there are potential advantages to xenotransplantation that could result in a favorable benefit-over-harm determination for islet xenotransplantation in this subpopulation and ultimately in a broader population of diabetic patients. With regard to regulatory aspects, the key concepts underlying the development of the regulatory models in existence in the United States, Europe and New Zealand are discussed. Each of these models provides an example of a well-defined regulatory approach to ensure the initiation of well-regulated and ethically acceptable clinical islet xenotransplantation trials. At this stage, it becomes apparent that only a well-coordinated international effort such as that initiated by the World Health Organization, aimed at harmonizing xenotransplantation procedures according to the highest ethical and regulatory standards on a global scale, will enable the initiation of clinical xenotransplantation trials under the best auspices for its success and minimize any risk of failure. PMID:19799760

  15. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  16. Insulin and insulin like growth factor II endocytosis and signaling via insulin receptor B

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act on tetrameric tyrosine kinase receptors controlling essential functions including growth, metabolism, reproduction and longevity. The insulin receptor (IR) binds insulin and IGFs with different affinities triggering different cell responses. Results We showed that IGF-II induces cell proliferation and gene transcription when IR-B is over-expressed. We combined biotinylated ligands with streptavidin conjugated quantum dots and visible fluorescent proteins to visualize the binding of IGF-II and insulin to IR-B and their ensuing internalization. By confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in living cells, we studied the internalization kinetic through the IR-B of both IGF-II, known to elicit proliferative responses, and insulin, a regulator of metabolism. Conclusions IGF-II promotes a faster internalization of IR-B than insulin. We propose that IGF-II differentially activates mitogenic responses through endosomes, while insulin-activated IR-B remains at the plasma membrane. This fact could facilitate the interaction with key effector molecules involved in metabolism regulation. PMID:23497114

  17. Insulin resistance and muscle insulin receptor substrate‐1 serine hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Cartwright, Brian M.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Lee, Michelle L.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects is profound in spite of muscle insulin receptor and insulin‐responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression being nearly normal. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 (IRS‐1) at Tyr896 is a necessary step in insulin stimulation of translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. Serine phosphorylation of IRS‐1 by some kinases diminishes insulin action in mice. We evaluated the phosphorylation status of muscle IRS‐1 in 33 subjects with the metabolic syndrome and seventeen lean controls. Each underwent euglycemic insulin clamps and a thigh muscle biopsy before and after 8 weeks of either strength or endurance training. Muscle IRS‐1 phosphorylation at six sites was quantified by immunoblots. Metabolic syndrome muscle IRS‐1 had excess phosphorylation at Ser337 and Ser636 but not at Ser307, Ser789, or Ser1101. Ser337 is a target for phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and Ser636 is phosphorylated by c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Exercise training without weight loss did not change the IRS‐1 serine phosphorylation. These data suggest that baseline hyperphosphorylation of at least two key serines within muscle IRS‐1 diminishes the transmission of the insulin signal and thereby decreases the insulin‐stimulated translocation of GLUT4. Excess fasting phosphorylation of muscle IRS‐1 at Ser636 may be a major cause of the insulin resistance seen in obesity and might prevent improvement in insulin responsiveness when exercise training is not accompanied by weight loss. PMID:25472611

  18. Acute regulation by insulin of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, Rad, Glut 4, and lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Laville, M; Auboeuf, D; Khalfallah, Y; Vega, N; Riou, J P; Vidal, H

    1996-07-01

    We have investigated the acute regulation by insulin of the mRNA levels of nine genes involved in insulin action, in muscle biopsies obtained before and at the end of a 3-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Using reverse transcription-competitive PCR, we have measured the mRNAs encoding the two insulin receptor variants, the insulin receptor substrate-1, the p85alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, Ras associated to diabetes (Rad), the glucose transporter Glut 4, glycogen synthase, 6-phosphofructo-l-kinase, lipoprotein lipase, and the hormone-sensitive lipase. Insulin infusion induced a significant increase in the mRNA level of Glut 4 (+56 +/- 13%), Rad (+96 +/- 25%), the p85alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (+92 +/- 18%) and a decrease in the lipoprotein lipase mRNA level (-49 +/- 5%), while the abundance of the other mRNAs was unaffected. The relative expression of the two insulin receptor variants was not modified. These results demonstrate an acute coordinated regulation by insulin of the expression of genes coding key proteins involved in its action in human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rad and the p85alpha regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase can be added to the list of the genes controlled by insulin. PMID:8690802

  19. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... years, but may eventually need insulin to maintain glucose control. What are the different types of insulin? Different ... glulisine • Short-acting: regular human insulin Basal insulin. Controls blood glucose levels between meals and throughout the night. This ...

  20. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. PMID:27594187

  1. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes.

  2. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible. PMID:27480901

  3. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible.

  4. Insulin therapies: Current and future trends at dawn

    PubMed Central

    Yaturu, Subhashini

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a key player in the control of hyperglycemia for type 1 diabetes patients and selective individuals in patients of type 2 diabetes. Insulin delivery systems that are currently available for the administration of insulin include insulin syringes, insulin infusion pumps, jet injectors and pens. The traditional and most predictable method for the administration of insulin is by subcutaneous injections. The major drawback of current forms of insulin therapy is their invasive nature. To decrease the suffering, the use of supersonic injectors, infusion pumps, sharp needles and pens has been adopted. Such invasive and intensive techniques have spurred the search for alternative, more acceptable methods for administering insulin. Several non-invasive approaches for insulin delivery are being pursued. The newer methods explored include the artificial pancreas with closed-loop system, transdermal insulin, and buccal, oral and pulmonary routes. This review focuses on the new concepts that are being explored for use in future. PMID:23493823

  5. Insulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar ...

  6. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  7. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.

  8. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD. PMID:26317977

  9. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2010-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy is now more than 30 years old, and is an established part of the routine care of selected people with type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, there are still significant areas of concern, particularly how pumps compare with modern injection therapy, whether the increasingly sophisticated pump technologies like onboard calculators and facility for computer download offer any real benefit, and whether we have a consensus on the clinical indications. The following papers offer some insight into these and other current questions.

  10. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domainmore » of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.« less

  11. The Transcription Factor Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) Plays a Key Role in the Terminal Effector Pathways of Human Preterm Labor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ratana; Tran, Ha Thi; Liong, Stella; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is the largest single cause of neonatal death and morbidity. By activating cytokine- and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-signaling pathways, infection and/or inflammation are strongly associated with preterm delivery. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is an important regulator of the inflammatory response. The aims of this study were to establish the effect of 1) labor on IRF1 expression in human fetal membranes and myometrium, 2) prolabor mediators on IRF1 expression and activity, and 3) IRF1 small interfering RNA on the expression of prolabor mediators. IRF1 expression was higher in fetal membranes and myometrium after spontaneous term labor and in preterm fetal membranes with infection. The proinflammatory cytokine IL1B, the bacterial product fsl-1, and viral analog polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly [I:C]) significantly increased IRF1 mRNA expression and transcriptional activity in human primary myometrial cells. In addition, IL1B increased IRF1 activity in primary amnion cells. IRF1 silencing in myometrial cells decreased IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced cytokine (IL6, TNF, IL1B) and chemokine (CXCL8, CCL2) mRNA expression and IL6, CXCL8, and CCL2 release. IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced PTGS2 mRNA expression and IL1B-induced prostaglandin release was also decreased by IRF1 silencing. In conclusion, IRF1 upregulation in fetal membranes and myometrium after term labor indicates a proinflammatory role for IRF1 in human parturition. IRF1 is involved in TLR- and cytokine-mediated signaling in human myometrium. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with inflammation- and infection-associated preterm birth. IRF1 inhibitors as therapeutics for the management of spontaneous preterm birth warrants further investigation. PMID:26674566

  12. Role of Sp1 and SREBP-1a in the insulin-mediated regulation of glucokinase transcription in the liver of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Egea, Miriam; Metón, Isidoro; Córdoba, Marlon; Fernández, Felipe; Baanante, Isabel V

    2008-01-15

    Insulin induction of glucokinase (GCK) transcription in the liver is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis. To study the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of hepatic GCK expression in the carnivorous fish gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), we analysed the role of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a) and specificity protein (Sp) 1 in insulin-dependent GCK transcription. Transient transfection experiments performed in HepG2 cells and electrophoretic mobility shift assays allowed us to identify a cis-element in the proximal region of GCK promoter implicated in transactivation by SREBP-1a. Consistently, mutations in the SRE binding site completely abolished the enhancing effect of SREBP-1a. These results and previous findings suggest that SREBP-1a plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of key enzymes in glycolysis-gluconeogenesis. Since SREBP-1a and Sp1 may mediate insulin action on S. aurata GCK transcription, we analysed the effect of insulin on HepG2 cells transfected with GCK promoter reporter constructs carrying intact or mutated SRE or Sp boxes. Insulin transactivated GCK irrespective of the presence of an intact or mutated SRE box. However, insulin failed to induce GCK transcription when using reporter constructs that had either a mutated Sp site or no Sp site. Our findings indicate that Sp1, rather than SREBP-1a, mediates the insulin-dependent induction of S. aurata GCK.

  13. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system. PMID:24966532

  14. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system. PMID:24966532

  15. Steatosis and insulin resistance in hepatitis C: a way out for the virus?

    PubMed

    Del Campo, José A; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2009-10-28

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces lipid accumulation in vitro and in vivo. The pathogenesis of steatosis is due to both viral and host factors. Viral steatosis is mostly reported in patients with genotype 3a, whereas metabolic steatosis is often associated with genotype 1 and metabolic syndrome. Several molecular mechanisms responsible for steatosis have been associated with the HCV core protein, which is able to induce gene expression and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), increasing the transcription of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid synthesis. Steatosis has been also implicated in viral replication. In infected cells, HCV core protein is targeted to lipid droplets which serve as intracellular storage organelles. These studies have shown that lipid droplets are essential for virus assembly. Thus, HCV promotes steatosis as an efficient mechanism for stable viral replication. Chronic HCV infection can also induce insulin resistance. In patients with HCV, insulin resistance is more strongly associated with viral load than visceral obesity. HCV seems to lead to insulin resistance through interference of intracellular insulin signalling by HCV proteins, mainly, the serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1) and impairment of the downstream Akt signalling pathway. The HCV core protein interferes with in vitro insulin signalling by genotype-specific mechanisms, where the role of suppressor of cytokine signal 7 (SOCS-7) in genotype 3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in genotype 1 in IRS-1 downregulation play key roles. Steatosis and insulin resistance have been associated with fibrosis progression and a reduced rate of sustained response to peginterferon plus ribavirin. PMID:19859993

  16. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... want. Put the needle into and through the rubber top of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger ... longer-acting insulin. Put the needle into the rubber top of that insulin bottle. Push the plunger ...

  17. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development

    PubMed Central

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W.; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such “bivalent” chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. PMID:25568052

  18. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  19. [Inhaled insulin, new perspective for insulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Radermecker, R P; Sélam, J L

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of insulin and its use in diabetes care, patients, physicians and nurses dream of another way of insulin administration than the subcutaneous injections actually used. Different types of insulin administration have been evaluated and, particularly, that using the pulmonary route. The use of this alternative method to deliver insulin may result in improved patient compliance, facilitate intensified therapies and avoid the delay of initiating insulin administration because patient's reluctance. The different insulin pulmonary delivering devices actually studied will be presented. Preliminary data comparing this way of administration and the subcutaneous injection of human regular insulin are good, but sufficient data comparing inhaled insulin with the new short-acting insulin analogues are not yet available. Among various difficulties of the pulmonary insulin delivery, the finding of an effective promoter, capable of increasing the bioavailability of insulin, is a crucial issue. The cost of such insulin administration might also be a problem. Finally, careful studies concerning the safety of this kind of administration, particularly potential long-term pulmonary toxicity, are mandatory. Nevertheless, inhaled insulin is an attractive topic in which most important pharmaceutical companies are currently involved.

  20. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Lamos, Elizabeth M; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK) and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration. PMID:27022271

  1. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  2. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate.

  3. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate. PMID:26558987

  4. A PPARγ-Bnip3 Axis Couples Adipose Mitochondrial Fusion-Fission Balance to Systemic Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tol, Marc J; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Zelcer, Noam; Aten, Jan; Houten, Sander M; Geerts, Dirk; van Roomen, Cindy; Bierlaagh, Marlou C; Scheij, Saskia; Hoeksema, Marten A; Aerts, Johannes M; Bogan, Jonathan S; Dorn, Gerald W; Argmann, Carmen A; Verhoeven, Arthur J

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial fission plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. However, fusion-fission dynamics are physiologically regulated by inherent tissue-specific and nutrient-sensitive processes that may have distinct or even opposing effects with respect to insulin sensitivity. Based on a combination of mouse population genetics and functional in vitro assays, we describe here a regulatory circuit in which peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the adipocyte master regulator and receptor for the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic drugs, controls mitochondrial network fragmentation through transcriptional induction of Bnip3. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Bnip3 in cultured adipocytes shifts the balance toward mitochondrial elongation, leading to compromised respiratory capacity, heightened fatty acid β-oxidation-associated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, insulin resistance, and reduced triacylglycerol storage. Notably, the selective fission/Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 mimics the effects of Bnip3 knockdown on adipose mitochondrial bioenergetics and glucose disposal. We further show that Bnip3 is reciprocally regulated in white and brown fat depots of diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient ob/ob mouse models. Finally, Bnip3(-/-) mice trade reduced adiposity for increased liver steatosis and develop aggravated systemic insulin resistance in response to high-fat feeding. Together, our data outline Bnip3 as a key effector of PPARγ-mediated adipose mitochondrial network fragmentation, improving insulin sensitivity and limiting oxidative stress. PMID:27325287

  5. Preserved Na/HCO3 cotransporter sensitivity to insulin may promote hypertension in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamazaki, Osamu; Shirai, Ayumi; Horita, Shoko; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Noiri, Eisei; Kume, Haruki; Enomoto, Yutaka; Homma, Yukio; Seki, George

    2015-03-01

    Hyperinsulinemia can contribute to hypertension through effects on sodium transport. To test whether the stimulatory effect of insulin on renal proximal tubule sodium transport is preserved in insulin resistance, we compared the effects of insulin on abdominal adipocytes and proximal tubules in rats and humans. Insulin markedly stimulated the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) activity in isolated proximal tubules through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathway. Gene silencing in rats showed that while insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1 mediates the insulin effect on glucose uptake into adipocytes, IRS2 mediates the insulin effect on proximal tubule transport. The stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake into adipocytes was severely reduced, but its stimulatory effect on NBCe1 activity was completely preserved in insulin-resistant Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and patients with insulin resistance. Despite widespread reduction of IRS1 and IRS2 expression in insulin-sensitive tissues, IRS2 expression in the kidney cortex was exceptionally preserved in both OLETF rats and patients with insulin resistance. Unlike liver, acute insulin injection failed to change the expression levels of IRS2 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in rat kidney cortex, indicating that regulatory mechanisms of IRS2 expression are distinct in liver and kidney. Thus, preserved stimulation of proximal tubule transport through the insulin/IRS2/PI3-K pathway may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension associated with metabolic syndrome.

  6. Is insulin signaling molecules misguided in diabetes for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation?

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Sampathkumar, Rangasamy; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2005-07-01

    Recent mining of the human and mouse genomes, use of yeast genetics, and detailed analyses of several biochemical pathways, have resulted in the identification of many new roles for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation of proteins. In the context of last year's award of Noble Prize (Chemistry) work, the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications are increasingly recognized as key regulatory events in health and disease. Although the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system has evolved as premier cellular proteolytic machinery, dysregulation of this system by several different mechanisms leads to inappropriate degradation of specific proteins and pathological consequences. While aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been implicated in certain malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate a role for this system in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Inappropriate degradation of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2) has been demonstrated in experimental diabetes, mediated in part through the up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). It appears that altered ubiquitin-proteasome system might be one of the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in many pathological situations. Drugs that modulate the SOCS action and/or proteasomal degradation of proteins could become novel agents for the treatment of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

  7. PALMITATE INHIBITS INSULIN GENE EXPRESSION BY ALTERING PDX-1 NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION AND REDUCING MAFA EXPRESSION IN ISOLATED RAT ISLETS OF LANGERHANS*

    PubMed Central

    Hagman, Derek K.; Hays, Lori B.; Parazzoli, Susan D.; Poitout, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Abnormalities in lipid metabolism have been proposed as contributing factors to both defective insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cell and peripheral insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Previously, we have shown that prolonged exposure of isolated rat islets of Langerhans to excessive fatty acid levels impairs insulin gene transcription. This study was designed to assess whether palmitate alters the expression and binding activity of the key regulatory factors pancreas-duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1), MafA, and Beta2, which respectively bind to the A3, C1, and E1 elements in the proximal region of the insulin promoter. Nuclear extracts of isolated rat islets cultured with 0.5 mM palmitate exhibited reduced binding activity to the A3 and C1 elements, but not the E1 element. Palmitate did not affect the overall expression of PDX-1, but reduced its nuclear localization. In contrast, palmitate blocked the stimulation of MafA mRNA and protein expression by glucose. Combined, adenovirus-mediated, over-expression of PDX-1 and MafA in islets completely prevented the inhibition of insulin gene expression by palmitate. These results demonstrate that prolonged exposure of islets to palmitate inhibits insulin gene transcription by impairing nuclear localization of PDX-1 and cellular expression of MafA. PMID:15944145

  8. Insulin receptor alternative splicing is regulated by insulin signaling and modulates beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Malakar, Pushkar; Chartarifsky, Lital; Hija, Ayat; Leibowitz, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) affects more than 300 million people worldwide. One of the hallmarks of T2DM is peripheral insulin resistance, in part due to unproductive insulin signaling through the insulin receptor. The insulin receptor (INSR) exists as two isoforms, INSR-A and INSR-B, which results from skipping or inclusion of exon 11 respectively. What determines the relative abundance of the different insulin receptor splice variants is unknown. Moreover, it is not yet clear what the physiological roles of each of the isoforms are in normal and diseased beta cells. In this study, we show that insulin induces INSR exon 11 inclusion in pancreatic beta cells in both human and mouse. This occurs through activation of the Ras-MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and up-regulation of the splicing factor SRSF1. Induction of exon 11 skipping by a splice-site competitive antisense oligonucleotide inhibited the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway downstream of the insulin receptor, sensitizing the pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 to stress-induced apoptosis and lipotoxicity. These results assign to insulin a regulatory role in INSR alternative splicing through the Ras-MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. We suggest that in beta cells, INSR-B has a protective role, while INSR-A expression sensitizes beta cells to programmed cell death. PMID:27526875

  9. Fatty acid-induced mitochondrial uncoupling in adipocytes as a key protective factor against insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction: a new concept in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Romijn, J. A.; Heine, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessive food intake and a sedentary lifestyle. Local inflammation of white adipose tissue induces cytokine-mediated insulin resistance of adipocytes. This results in enhanced lipolysis within these cells. The fatty acids that are released into the cytosol can be removed by mitochondrial β-oxidation. The flux through this pathway is normally limited by the rate of ADP supply, which in turn is determined by the metabolic activity of the adipocyte. It is expected that the latter does not adapt to an increased rate of lipolysis. We propose that elevated fatty acid concentrations in the cytosol of adipocytes induce mitochondrial uncoupling and thereby allow mitochondria to remove much larger amounts of fatty acids. By this, release of fatty acids out of adipocytes into the circulation is prevented. When the rate of fatty acid release into the cytosol exceeds the β-oxidation capacity, cytosolic fatty acid concentrations increase and induce mitochondrial toxicity. This results in a decrease in β-oxidation capacity and the entry of fatty acids into the circulation. Unless these released fatty acids are removed by mitochondrial oxidation in active muscles, these fatty acids result in ectopic triacylglycerol deposits, induction of insulin resistance, beta cell damage and diabetes. Thiazolidinediones improve mitochondrial function within adipocytes and may in this way alleviate the burden imposed by the excessive fat accumulation associated with the metabolic syndrome. Thus, the number and activity of mitochondria within adipocytes contribute to the threshold at which fatty acids are released into the circulation, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:17712547

  10. Mice Lacking the p43 Mitochondrial T3 Receptor Become Glucose Intolerant and Insulin Resistant during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Christelle; Blanchet, Emilie; Pessemesse, Laurence; Annicotte, Jean Sébastien; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Chabi, Béatrice; Levin, Jonathan; Fajas, Lluis; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Casas, François

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play an important regulatory role in energy expenditure regulation and are key regulators of mitochondrial activity. We have previously identified a mitochondrial triiodothyronine (T3) receptor (p43) which acts as a mitochondrial transcription factor of the organelle genome, which leads in vitro and in vivo, to a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice carrying a specific p43 invalidation. At 2 months of age, we reported that p43 depletion in mice induced a major defect in insulin secretion both in vivo and in isolated pancreatic islets, and a loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The present study was designed to determine whether p43 invalidation influences life expectancy and modulates blood glucose and insulin levels as well as glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity during aging. We report that from 4 months old onwards, mice lacking p43 are leaner than wild-type mice. p43−/− mice also have a moderate reduction of life expectancy compared to wild type. We found no difference in blood glucose levels, excepted at 24 months old where p43−/− mice showed a strong hyperglycemia in fasting conditions compared to controls animals. However, the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was maintained whatever the age of mice lacking p43. If up to 12 months old, glucose tolerance remained unchanged, beyond this age p43−/− mice became increasingly glucose intolerant. In addition, if up to 12 months old p43 deficient animals were more sensitive to insulin, after this age we observed a loss of this capacity, culminating in 24 months old mice with a decreased sensitivity to the hormone. In conclusion, we demonstrated that during aging the depletion of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 in mice progressively induced an increased glycemia in the fasted state, glucose intolerance and an insulin-resistance several features of type-2 diabetes. PMID:24098680

  11. Ligand-independent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by insulin and C-peptide in kidney proximal tubular cells: dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Chana, Ravinder S; Baines, Richard J; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-11-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) has key roles in the regulation of adipogenesis, inflammation, and lipid and glucose metabolism. C-peptide is believed to be inert and without appreciable biological functions. Recent studies suggest that C-peptide possesses multiple functions. The present study investigated the effects of insulin and C-peptide on PPARgamma transcriptional activity in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells. Both insulin and C-peptide induced a concentration-dependent stimulation of PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Both agents substantially augmented thiazolidinedione-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Neither insulin nor C-peptide had any effect on the expression levels of PPARgamma. GW9662, a PPARgamma antagonist, blocked PPARgamma activation by thiazolidinediones but had no effect on either insulin- or C-peptide-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity. Co-transfection of opossum kidney cells with dominant negative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase significantly depressed basal PPARgamma transcriptional activity but had no effect on that induced by either insulin or C-peptide. Both insulin- and C-peptide-stimulated PPARgamma transcriptional activity were attenuated by wortmannin and by expression of a dominant negative phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit. In addition PI 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of PPARgamma was observed after stimulation by C-peptide or insulin. C-peptide effects but not insulin on PPARgamma transcriptional activity were abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Finally both C-peptide and insulin positively control the expression of the PPARgamma-regulated CD36 scavenger receptor in human THP-1 monocytes. We concluded that insulin and C-peptide can stimulate PPARgamma activity in a ligand-independent fashion and that this effect is mediated by PI 3-kinase. These results support a new and potentially important physiological role for C-peptide in

  12. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016.

  13. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. PMID:27094023

  14. Use of insulin in diabetes: a century of treatment.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Savita; Shahani, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a key player in the control of hyperglycaemia for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. There have been many advances in insulin drug delivery from its first administration as a crude pancreatic extract till today. The traditional and most predictable method for administration of insulin is by subcutaneous injection. Currently available insulin delivery systems include insulin syringes, infusion pumps, jet injectors, and pens. The major drawback of insulin therapy is its invasive nature. Non-invasive delivery of insulin has long been a major goal for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Although there have been improvements in insulin therapy since it was first conceived, it is still far from mimicking the physiological secretion of pancreatic β-cells, and research to find new insulin formulations and new routes of administration continues. This article reviews the emerging technologies, including insulin inhalers, insulin buccal spray, insulin pill, islet cell transplant, and stem cell therapy, as treatment options for diabetes mellitus.

  15. Correlations between the expression of the insulin sensitizing hormones, adiponectin, visfatin, and omentin, and the appetite regulatory hormone, neuropeptide Y and its receptors in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Nway, Nay Chi; Sitticharoon, Chantacha; Chatree, Saimai; Maikaew, Pailin

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin, visfatin, and omentin are adipokines involved in insulin sensitivity. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors, Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R, are involved in appetite regulation. Here we examined the correlations between these two hormones groups in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues. We demonstrated that in subcutaneous adipose tissue, the adiponectin, visfatin and omentin expression positively correlated with that of subcutaneous NPY. Subcutaneous adiponectin expression positively correlated with subcutaneous Y1R and Y5R. Subcutaneous visfatin expression positively correlated with subcutaneous Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R. Subcutaneous omentin expression positively correlated with subcutaneous Y5R. In visceral adipose tissue, adiponectin, visfatin and omentin expression positively correlated with visceral NPY. Visceral visfatin expression positively correlated with visceral Y1R, Y2R and Y5R. There was no correlation between the subcutaneous and visceral expression of these adipokines and receptors. BMI correlated better with visceral adipocyte characteristics including width, height, perimeter, and area than with those of subcutaneous adipocyte. Visceral, but not subcutaneous, adipocyte parameters positively correlated with insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), but negatively associated with Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). These results suggest that adiponectin, omentin, and visfatin expression correlated with NPY expression in either type of adipose tissue, with no evidence of cross-linking between adipose tissue depots, suggesting that there might be (a) different regulation mechanism(s) between subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues with regard to expressions of these two hormone groups. Further studies are required to identify factors that regulate the linkage between these hormones in each adipose tissue type.

  16. The study of regulatory effects of Pdx-1, MafA and NeuroD1 on the activity of porcine insulin promoter and the expression of human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Dan; Ruan, Jin-Xue; Xia, Ji-Han; Yang, Shu-Lin; Fan, Jun-Hua; Li, Kui

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the activation of porcine insulin promoter (PIP) by three transcription factors: pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx-1), v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene (MafA) and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1) in non-beta islet cells cultured in vitro. In addition, the expression of the exogenous human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) gene driving by PIP in porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells co-transfected with these transcription factors was also examined. In the present study, a series of vectors for gene overexpression were constructed, including pGL3-Pdx-1, pGL3-MafA, pGL3-NeuroD1, pGL3-PIP-LUC and pcDNA3.1-PIP-hIAPP. The dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that the PIP activity was increased in PK15 cells when overexpressing the exogenous transcription factors Pdx-1, MafA and NeuroD1. Introducing the PIP-hIAPP expression vector into PK15 cells combined with exogenous Pdx-1, MafA and NeuroD1 resulted in the efficient expression of hIAPP at the gene level, but not the protein. The current systematic porcine insulin promoter analysis provided the basic information for future utilization of porcine insulin.

  17. Application of network construction to estimate functional changes to insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 in Huh7 cells following infection with the hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingkun; Wang, Linbang; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Yaping; Jia, Xiaoli; Zhai, Song; Shi, Juan; Dang, Shuangsuo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with insulin resistance (IS), acting primarily by interfering with insulin signaling pathways, increasing cytokine-mediated (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6) inflammatory responses and enhancing oxidative stress. In the insulin signaling pathways, the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) is one of the key regulatory factors. The present study constructed gene regulatory sub-networks specific for IRS1 and IRS2 in Huh7 cells and HCV-infected Huh7 (HCV-Huh7) cells using linear programming and a decomposition algorithm, and investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the function of IRS1/2 in HCV-induced IS in Huh7 cells. All data were obtained from GSE20948 of the Gene Expression Omnibus database from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Genes which were significantly differentially expressed between Huh7 and HCV-Huh7 cells were analyzed using the significance analysis of microarray algorithm. The top 50 genes, including IRS1/2, were used as target genes to determine the gene regulatory networks and next the sub-networks of IRS1 and IRS2 in HCV-Huh7 and Huh7 cells using Gene Regulatory Network Inference Tool, an algorithm based on linear programming and the decomposition process. The IRS1/2 sub-networks were divided into upstream/downstream groups and activation/suppression clusters, and were further analyzed using Molecule Annotation System 3.0 and Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery software, two online platforms for enrichment and clustering analysis and visualization. The results indicated that in Huh7 cells, the downstream network of IRS2 is more complex than that of IRS1, indicating that the insulin metabolism in Huh7 cells may be primarily mediated by IRS2. In HCV-Huh7 cells, the downstream pathway of IRS2 is blocked, suggesting that this may be the underlying mechanism in HCV infection that leads to insulin resistance. The present findings add a further dimension

  18. Overexpression of Insulin Degrading Enzyme could Greatly Contribute to Insulin Down-regulation Induced by Short-Term Swimming Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Goo, Jun Seo; Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, So Hee; Choi, Sun Il; Lee, Hye Ryun; Hwang, In Sik; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Bae, Chang Joon; Cho, Jung Sik; Cho, Jun Yong; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-03-01

    Exercise training is highly correlated with the reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), although it enhanced insulin sensitivity, glucose uptake and glucose transporter expression to reduce severity of diabetic symptoms. This study investigated the impact of short-term swimming exercise on insulin regulation in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat as a non-obese model of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Wistar (W/S) and GK rats were trained 2 hours daily with the swimming exercise for 4 weeks, and then the changes in the metabolism of insulin and glucose were assessed. Body weight was markedly decreased in the exercised GK rats compare to their non-exercised counterpart, while W/S rats did not show any exercise-related changes. Glucose concentration was not changed by exercise, although impaired glucose tolerance was improved in GK rats 120 min after glucose injection. However, insulin concentration was decreased by swimming exercise as in the decrease of GSIS after running exercise. To identify the other cause for exercise-induced insulin down-regulation, the changes in the levels of key factors involved in insulin production (C-peptide) and clearance (insulin-degrading enzyme; IDE) were measured in W/S and GK rats. The C-peptide level was maintained while IDE expression increased markedly. Therefore, these results showed that insulin down-regulation induced by short-term swimming exercise likely attributes to enhanced insulin clearance via IDE over-expression than by altered insulin production.

  19. Misadventures in insulin therapy: are you at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Grissinger, Matthew; Lease, Michael

    2003-01-01

    About dollar 1 out of every dollar 7 spent on health care is related to diabetes mellitus, a leading cause of blindness and kidney failure and a strong risk factor for heart disease. Prevalence of the disease has increased by a third among adults in general in the last decade, but intensive therapy has been shown to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetes-related complications. While insulin therapy remains key in the management of type 1 diabetes, many patients with type 2, or insulin-resistant, diabetes encounter insulin administration errors that compromise the quality of insulin delivery. Insulin errors are a major, but modifiable, barrier to dosing accuracy and optimal diabetes control for many patients. Future trends to combat the problem include increased use of insulin inhalers and smaller doses of rapid- or short-acting insulin to supplement longer-acting injections. PMID:12653373

  20. Misadventures in insulin therapy: are you at risk?

    PubMed

    Grissinger, Matthew; Lease, Michael

    2003-02-01

    About dollar 1 out of every dollar 7 spent on health care is related to diabetes mellitus, a leading cause of blindness and kidney failure and a strong risk factor for heart disease. Prevalence of the disease has increased by a third among adults in general in the last decade, but intensive therapy has been shown to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetes-related complications. While insulin therapy remains key in the management of type 1 diabetes, many patients with type 2, or insulin-resistant, diabetes encounter insulin administration errors that compromise the quality of insulin delivery. Insulin errors are a major, but modifiable, barrier to dosing accuracy and optimal diabetes control for many patients. Future trends to combat the problem include increased use of insulin inhalers and smaller doses of rapid- or short-acting insulin to supplement longer-acting injections. PMID:12653373

  1. Insulin Human Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used in ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  2. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  3. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  4. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  5. Plasma BDNF Is Reduced among Middle-Aged and Elderly Women with Impaired Insulin Function: Evidence of a Compensatory Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arentoft, Alyssa; Sweat, Victoria; Starr, Vanessa; Oliver, Stephen; Hassenstab, Jason; Bruehl, Hannah; Tirsi, Aziz; Javier, Elizabeth; McHugh, Pauline F.; Convit, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and has been linked to glucose regulation and cognition. Associations among plasma BDNF, cognition, and insulin function were explored. Forty-one participants with impaired insulin function (IIF), ranging from insulin resistance to…

  6. Insulin, insulin analogues and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst; Kimmerle, Renate; Meyer-Schwickerath, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    Insulin is absolutely vital for living beings. It is not only involved in metabolism, but also in the regulation of growth factors, e.g. IGF-1. In this review we address the role insulin has in the natural evolution of diabetic retinopathy. On the one hand, chronic deficiency of insulin and IGF-1 at the retina is thought to cause capillary degeneration, with subsequent ischaemia. On the other hand, acute abundance of (exogenously administered) insulin and IGF-1 enhances ischaemia-induced VEGF expression. A critical ratio of tissue VEGF-susceptibility: VEGF-availability triggers vascular proliferation (i.e. of micro-aneurysms and/or abnormal vessels). The patent-protected insulin analogues Lispro, Glulisine, Aspart, Glargine and Detemir are artificial insulin derivatives with altered biological responses compared to natural insulin (e.g. divergent insulin and /or IGF-1 receptor-binding characteristics, signalling patterns, and mitogenicity). Their safety profiles concerning diabetic retinopathy remain to be established by randomised controlled trials. Anecdotal reports and circumstantial evidence suggest that Lispro and Glargine might worsen diabetic retinopathy.

  7. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  8. Insulin therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jawad, Fatema

    2016-09-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of pharmacotherapy in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. This review covers the various insulin regimes and preparations, explaining how to use them, and decide appropriate doses in pregnancy. It approaches insulin treatment from a patient - centred, as well as physician and obstetrician friendly viewpoint, providing pragmatic guidance for management of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:27582152

  9. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  10. Insulin-derived amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yashdeep; Singla, Gaurav; Singla, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the term for diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of insoluble polymeric protein fibrils in tissues and organs. Insulin-derived amyloidosis is a rare, yet significant complication of insulin therapy. Insulin-derived amyloidosis at injection site can cause poor glycemic control and increased insulin dose requirements because of the impairment in insulin absorption, which reverse on change of injection site and/or excision of the mass. This entity should be considered and assessed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry, in patients with firm/hard local site reactions, which do not regress after cessation of insulin injection at the affected site. Search strategy: PubMed was searched with terms “insulin amyloidosis”. Full text of articles available in English was reviewed. Relevant cross references were also reviewed. Last search was made on October 15, 2014. PMID:25593849

  11. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6), Zusanli (ST36), and Sanyinjiao (SP6); in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23) was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36), needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA) apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG) was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS) and serum C peptide (C-P) were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules. PMID:27738449

  12. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K(+) (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K(+) channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology.

  13. Phytic acid and myo-inositol support adipocyte differentiation and improve insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid, also known as myo-inositol hexaphosphate, has been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin sensitivity in rodents. We investigated the effects of phytic acid and myo-inositol on differentiation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipolysis of adipocytes to test the hypothesis that the antidiabetic properties of phytic acid and myo-inositol are mediated directly through adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 10, 50, or 200 μmol/L of phytic acid or myo-inositol. Oil Red O staining and an intracellular triacylglycerol assay were used to determine lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to evaluate expression of transcription factors, a target protein, and insulin signaling molecules. Phytic acid and myo-inositol exposures increased lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (P < .01). The expression of key transcription factors associated with adipocyte differentiation, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, and the expression of fatty acid synthase increased upon treatments with phytic acid and myo-inositol (P < .05). Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mature adipocytes increased with phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments (P < .01). In addition, mRNA levels of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), mRNA levels of glucose transporter 4, and phosphorylation of tyrosine in IRS1 increased upon phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments. In fully differentiated adipocytes, phytic acid and myo-inositol reduced basal lipolysis dose dependently (P < .01). These results suggest that phytic acid and myo-inositol increase insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by increasing lipid storage capacity, improving glucose uptake, and inhibiting lipolysis.

  14. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID

  15. Molecular basis of catalytic chamber-assisted unfolding and cleavage of human insulin by human insulin-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-05-22

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  16. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-06-02

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  17. Genetic variation in insulin-induced kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Isabel Xiaorong; Ramrattan, Girish; Cheung, Vivian G

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in sensitivity to insulin contribute to disease susceptibility including diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Cellular responses to insulin are well studied. However, which steps in these response pathways differ across individuals remains largely unknown. Such knowledge is needed to guide more precise therapeutic interventions. Here, we studied insulin response and found extensive individual variation in the activation of key signaling factors, including ERK whose induction differs by more than 20-fold among our subjects. This variation in kinase activity is propagated to differences in downstream gene expression response to insulin. By genetic analysis, we identified cis-acting DNA variants that influence signaling response, which in turn affects downstream changes in gene expression and cellular phenotypes, such as protein translation and cell proliferation. These findings show that polymorphic differences in signal transduction contribute to individual variation in insulin response, and suggest kinase modulators as promising therapeutics for diseases characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:26202599

  18. Biosimilar Insulin and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The costs for insulin treatment are high, and the steady increase in the number of patients with diabetes on insulin presents a true challenge to health care systems. Therefore, all measures to lower these costs are welcomed by patients, physicians, and health care providers. The market introduction of biosimilar insulins presents an option to lower treatment costs as biosimilars are usually offered at a lower price than the originator product. However, the assumption that a drastic reduction in insulin prices will take place, as was observed with many generic drugs, is most probably not realistic. As the first biosimilar insulin has now been approved in the EU, this commentary discusses a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to the potential cost reduction we will see with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:26350722

  19. Aberrant insulin signaling in Alzheimer's disease: current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Bedse, Gaurav; Di Domenico, Fabio; Serviddio, Gaetano; Cassano, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting elderly people. AD is a multifaceted pathology characterized by accumulation of extracellular neuritic plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuronal loss mainly in the cortex and hippocampus. AD etiology appears to be linked to a multitude of mechanisms that have not been yet completely elucidated. For long time, it was considered that insulin signaling has only peripheral actions but now it is widely accepted that insulin has neuromodulatory actions in the brain. Insulin signaling is involved in numerous brain functions including cognition and memory that are impaired in AD. Recent studies suggest that AD may be linked to brain insulin resistance and patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing AD compared to healthy individuals. Indeed insulin resistance, increased inflammation and impaired metabolism are key pathological features of both AD and diabetes. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the development of AD in patients with diabetes are not yet fully understood. In this review we will discuss the role played by aberrant brain insulin signaling in AD. In detail, we will focus on the role of insulin signaling in the deposition of neuritic plaques and intracellular NFTs. Considering that insulin mitigates beta-amyloid deposition and phosphorylation of tau, pharmacological strategies restoring brain insulin signaling, such as intranasal delivery of insulin, could have significant therapeutic potential in AD treatment. PMID:26136647

  20. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate. PMID:12428980

  1. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-14

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27585675

  2. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-14

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Muscle expression of a malonyl-CoA-insensitive carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 protects mice against high-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Vavrova, Eliska; Lenoir, Véronique; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Denis, Raphaël G; Castel, Julien; Esnous, Catherine; Dyck, Jason R B; Luquet, Serge; Metzger, Daniel; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Prip-Buus, Carina

    2016-09-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (mFAO) has been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) is a key regulatory enzyme of mFAO whose activity is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, a lipogenic intermediate. Whereas increasing CPT1 activity in vitro has been shown to exert a protective effect against lipid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells, only a few studies have addressed this issue in vivo. We thus examined whether a direct modulation of muscle CPT1/malonyl-CoA partnership is detrimental or beneficial for insulin sensitivity in the context of diet-induced obesity. By using a Cre-LoxP recombination approach, we generated mice with skeletal muscle-specific and inducible expression of a mutated CPT1 form (CPT1mt) that is active but insensitive to malonyl-CoA inhibition. When fed control chow, homozygous CPT1mt transgenic (dbTg) mice exhibited decreased CPT1 sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition in isolated muscle mitochondria, which was sufficient to substantially increase ex vivo muscle mFAO capacity and whole body fatty acid utilization in vivo. Moreover, dbTg mice were less prone to high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced insulin resistance and muscle lipotoxicity despite similar body weight gain, adiposity, and muscle malonyl-CoA content. Interestingly, these CPT1mt-protective effects in dbTg-HFHS mice were associated with preserved muscle insulin signaling, increased muscle glycogen content, and upregulation of key genes involved in muscle glucose metabolism. These beneficial effects of muscle CPT1mt expression suggest that a direct modulation of the malonyl-CoA/CPT1 partnership in skeletal muscle could represent a potential strategy to prevent obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27507552

  5. Regulatory mechanisms of immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes and their failures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Chantal; Besançon, Alix; Lemoine, Sébastien; You, Sylvaine; Marquet, Cindy; Candon, Sophie; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-07-01

    In this brief review we propose to discuss salient data showing the importance of immune regulatory mechanisms, and in particular of Treg, for the control of pathogenic anti-β-cell response in autoimmune diabetes. Disease progression that culminates with the massive destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells and advent of hyperglycemia and glycosuria tightly correlates with a functional deficit in immune regulation. Better dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which the immune system normally sustains tolerance to "self", and which become defective when autoimmune aggression is overt, is the only direct and robust way to learn how to harness these effectively, so as to restore immune tolerance in patients with insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. No doubt that regulatory T cells are a privileged mechanism underlying this self-tolerance in the periphery. The discovery of the key role of the transcription factor FoxP3, represented the cornerstone leading to the great advances in the field we are witnessing today. Type 1 diabetes is certainly one of the prototypic T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases where immune regulatory mechanisms relying on specialized subsets of T cells have been the most thoroughly analyzed from the fundamental point of view and also largely exploited in a translational therapeutic perspective. PMID:27216249

  6. Regulatory mechanisms of immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes and their failures.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Chantal; Besançon, Alix; Lemoine, Sébastien; You, Sylvaine; Marquet, Cindy; Candon, Sophie; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-07-01

    In this brief review we propose to discuss salient data showing the importance of immune regulatory mechanisms, and in particular of Treg, for the control of pathogenic anti-β-cell response in autoimmune diabetes. Disease progression that culminates with the massive destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells and advent of hyperglycemia and glycosuria tightly correlates with a functional deficit in immune regulation. Better dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which the immune system normally sustains tolerance to "self", and which become defective when autoimmune aggression is overt, is the only direct and robust way to learn how to harness these effectively, so as to restore immune tolerance in patients with insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. No doubt that regulatory T cells are a privileged mechanism underlying this self-tolerance in the periphery. The discovery of the key role of the transcription factor FoxP3, represented the cornerstone leading to the great advances in the field we are witnessing today. Type 1 diabetes is certainly one of the prototypic T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases where immune regulatory mechanisms relying on specialized subsets of T cells have been the most thoroughly analyzed from the fundamental point of view and also largely exploited in a translational therapeutic perspective.

  7. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C; Nasiri, Ali R; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J; Green, Michael R; Shulman, Gerald I; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  8. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C.; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J.; Green, Michael R.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  9. Application of network construction to estimate functional changes to insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 in Huh7 cells following infection with the hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingkun; Wang, Linbang; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Yaping; Jia, Xiaoli; Zhai, Song; Shi, Juan; Dang, Shuangsuo

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with insulin resistance (IS), acting primarily by interfering with insulin signaling pathways, increasing cytokine-mediated (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6) inflammatory responses and enhancing oxidative stress. In the insulin signaling pathways, the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) is one of the key regulatory factors. The present study constructed gene regulatory sub‑networks specific for IRS1 and IRS2 in Huh7 cells and HCV‑infected Huh7 (HCV‑Huh7) cells using linear programming and a decomposition algorithm, and investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the function of IRS1/2 in HCV‑induced IS in Huh7 cells. All data were obtained from GSE20948 of the Gene Expression Omnibus database from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Genes which were significantly differentially expressed between Huh7 and HCV‑Huh7 cells were analyzed using the significance analysis of microarray algorithm. The top 50 genes, including IRS1/2, were used as target genes to determine the gene regulatory networks and next the sub‑networks of IRS1 and IRS2 in HCV‑Huh7 and Huh7 cells using Gene Regulatory Network Inference Tool, an algorithm based on linear programming and the decomposition process. The IRS1/2 sub‑networks were divided into upstream/downstream groups and activation/suppression clusters, and were further analyzed using Molecule Annotation System 3.0 and Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery software, two online platforms for enrichment and clustering analysis and visualization. The results indicated that in Huh7 cells, the downstream network of IRS2 is more complex than that of IRS1, indicating that the insulin metabolism in Huh7 cells may be primarily mediated by IRS2. In HCV‑Huh7 cells, the downstream pathway of IRS2 is blocked, suggesting that this may be the underlying mechanism in HCV infection that leads to insulin resistance. The present

  10. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Insulin granules. Insulin secretory granules control autophagy in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Goginashvili, Alexander; Zhang, Zhirong; Erbs, Eric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Mihlan, Michael; Pasquier, Adrien; Krupina, Ksenia; Schieber, Nicole; Cinque, Laura; Morvan, Joëlle; Sumara, Izabela; Schwab, Yannick; Settembre, Carmine; Ricci, Romeo

    2015-02-20

    Pancreatic β cells lower insulin release in response to nutrient depletion. The question of whether starved β cells induce macroautophagy, a predominant mechanism maintaining energy homeostasis, remains poorly explored. We found that, in contrast to many mammalian cells, macroautophagy in pancreatic β cells was suppressed upon starvation. Instead, starved β cells induced lysosomal degradation of nascent secretory insulin granules, which was controlled by protein kinase D (PKD), a key player in secretory granule biogenesis. Starvation-induced nascent granule degradation triggered lysosomal recruitment and activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin that suppressed macroautophagy. Switching from macroautophagy to insulin granule degradation was important to keep insulin secretion low upon fasting. Thus, β cells use a PKD-dependent mechanism to adapt to nutrient availability and couple autophagy flux to secretory function.

  12. Importance of transcapillary insulin transport on insulin action in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between transcapillary insulin transport and insulin action was examined in normal conscious dogs. Plasma and thoracic duct lymph insulin, and insulin action were simultaneously measured during euglycemic clamps and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. During the clamps, while {sup 14}C-inulin reached an equilibrium, steady-state (ss) plasma insulin was higher than lymph and the ratio of 3:2 was maintained during basal, activation and deactivation phases: 18 {+-} 2 vs. 12 {+-} 1, 51 {+-} 2 vs. 32 {+-} 1, and 18 {+-} 3 vs. 13 {+-} 1 {mu}U/ml. In addition, it took longer for lymph insulin to reach ss than plasma insulin during activation and deactivation: 11 {+-} 2 vs. 31 {+-} 5 and 8 {+-} 2 vs. 32 {+-} 6 min. During IVGTT, plasma insulin peaked within 5 {+-} 2 min; lymph insulin rose slowly to a lower peak. The significant gradient and delay between plasma and lymph insulin concentrations suggest a restricted transcapillary insulin transport.

  13. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  14. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity. PMID:27179965

  15. Insulin and glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2002-08-01

    Abnormally high or low blood glucose and insulin concentrations after standardized glucose tolerance tests can reflect disorders such as pituitary dysfunction, polysaccharide storage myopathies, and other clinical disorders. Glucose and insulin responses, however, are modified by the diet to which the animal has adapted, time since it was last fed, and what it was fed. Body fat (obesity), fitness level, physiologic status, and stress also alter glucose and insulin metabolism. Therefore, it is important to consider these factors when evaluating glucose and insulin tests, especially if only one sample it taken. This article describes the factors affecting glucose and insulin metabolism in horses and how they might influence the interpretation of standardized tests of glucose tolerance.

  16. Fully Convergent Chemical Synthesis of Ester Insulin: Determination of the High Resolution X-ray Structure by Racemic Protein Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Gates, Zachary P.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Weiss, Michael A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient total synthesis of insulin is important to enable the application of medicinal chemistry to the optimization of the properties of this important protein molecule. Recently we described ‘ester insulin’ – a novel form of insulin in which the function of the 35 residue C-peptide of proinsulin is replaced by a single covalent bond – as a key intermediate for the efficient total synthesis of insulin. Here we describe a fully convergent synthetic route to the ester insulin molecule from three unprotected peptide segments of approximately equal size. The synthetic ester insulin polypeptide chain folded much more rapidly than proinsulin, and at physiological pH. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin (i.e. [AspB10, LysB28, ProB29]ester insulin) were prepared by total chemical synthesis. The atomic structure of the synthetic ester insulin molecule was determined by racemic protein X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Diffraction quality crystals were readily obtained from the racemic mixture of {D-DKP ester insulin + L-DKP ester insulin}, whereas crystals were not obtained from the L-ester insulin alone even after extensive trials. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin were assayed for receptor binding and in diabetic rats, before and after conversion by saponification to the corresponding DKP insulin enantiomers. L-DKP ester insulin bound weakly to the insulin receptor, while synthetic L-DKP insulin derived from the L-DKP ester insulin intermediate was fully active in binding to the insulin receptor. The D- and L-DKP ester insulins and D-DKP insulin were inactive in lowering blood glucose in diabetic rats, while synthetic L-DKP insulin was fully active in this biological assay. The structural basis of the lack of biological activity of ester insulin is discussed. PMID:23343390

  17. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  18. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  19. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G.; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser858 of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:26499801

  20. [Insulin and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Louis-Sylvestre, J

    1987-04-01

    Secretion of some pituitary hormones and sympatho-adrenal activity increase very early during exercise. Sympathetic activation is of major importance in cardiovascular adaptation, thermoregulation, etc. Furthermore among the hormonal consequences of such activation those related to insulin are capital. In animal and human subjects basal insulin level decrease during prolonged and progressive exercise. With habitual exercise, both basal and stimulated insulin levels are reduced. It seems that the reduced basal level could be due to alpha-adrenergic inhibition of the islets of Langerhans, while the reduced stimulated response could be the consequence of increased clearance. In trained subjects, in spite of reduced insulin secretion tolerance to glucose is normal due to increased sensitivity to insulin. Sensitivity to insulin is particularly enhanced at the muscular tissue level; it is accompanied by increased hexokinase and glycogen synthetase activity. As a consequence glucose uptake remains optimal at the muscular level. In the liver, both insulin sensitivity and glucokinase activity are reduced, so that glucose is spared and the muscular glycogen store can be restored. At the adipocyte level, metabolic adaptations are such that triglyceride turnover is greatly increased, favouring fuel supply and resaturation of stores.

  1. [Alleged suicide by insulin].

    PubMed

    Birngruber, Christoph G; Krüll, Ralf; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man, who was on probation, was found dead in his home by his mother. Insulin vials and 2 insulin pens, which the man's stepfather (an insulin-dependent diabetic) had been missing for over a week, were found next to the deceased. The circumstances suggested suicide by an injected insulin overdose. At the time of the autopsy, the corpse showed already marked signs of autolysis. Clinical chemical tests confirmed the injection of insulin, but indicated hyperglycemia at the time of death. Toxicological analyses revealed that the man had consumed amphetamine, cannabinoids, and tramadol in the recent past. Histological examination finally revealed extensive bronchopneumonia as the cause of death. The most plausible explanation for the results of the autopsy and the additional examinations was an injection of insulin as a failed attempt of self-treatment. It is conceivable that the man had discovered by a rapid test that he was a diabetic, but had decided not to go to a doctor to avoid disclosure of parole violation due to continued drug abuse. He may have misinterpreted the symptoms caused by his worsening bronchitis and the developing bronchopneumonia as symptoms of a diabetic metabolic status and may have felt compelled to treat himself with insulin. PMID:26419091

  2. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  3. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  4. Pancreatic expression of human insulin gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bucchini, D; Ripoche, M A; Stinnakre, M G; Desbois, P; Lorès, P; Monthioux, E; Absil, J; Lepesant, J A; Pictet, R; Jami, J

    1986-04-01

    We have investigated the possibility of obtaining integration and expression of a native human gene in transgenic mice. An 11-kilobase (kb) human chromosomal DNA fragment including the insulin gene (1430 base pairs) was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. This fragment was present in the genomic DNA of several developing animals. One transgenic mouse and its progeny were analyzed for expression of the foreign gene. Synthesis and release of human insulin was revealed by detection of the human C-peptide in the plasma and urine. Human insulin mRNA was found in pancreas but not in other tissues. These findings indicate that the 11-kb human DNA fragment carries the sequences necessary for tissue-specific expression of the insulin gene and the human regulatory sequences react to homologous signals in the mouse.

  5. Insulin and the law.

    PubMed

    Marks, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Hypoglycaemia, if it can be proved, may be used as a defence against almost any criminal charge provided it can be established that the perpetrator was in a state of neuroglycopenic (hypoglycaemic) automatism at the time of the offence. Hypoglycaemia produced by exogenous insulin can also be used as a suicidal or homicidal weapon. This paper discusses some of the pitfalls confronting the investigator of suspected insulin misuse including problems arising from the increasing prevalence of insulin analogues and the unreliability of immunoassays for their detection and measurement in the forensic context. PMID:26092979

  6. Insulin inhalation: NN 1998.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Aradigm Corporation has developed an inhaled form of insulin using its proprietary AERx drug delivery system. The system uses liquid insulin that is converted into an aerosol containing very small particles (1-3 micro in diameter), and an electronic device suitable for either the rapid transfer of molecules of insulin into the bloodstream or localised delivery within the lung. The AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS), AERx iDMS, instructs the user on breathing technique to achieve the best results. Aradigm Corporation and Novo Nordisk have signed an agreement to jointly develop a pulmonary delivery system for insulin [AERx iDMS, NN 1998]. Under the terms of the agreement, Novo Nordisk has exclusive rights for worldwide marketing of any products resulting from the development programme. Aradigm Corporation will initially manufacture the product covered by the agreement, and in return will receive a share of the overall gross profits from Novo Nordisk's sales. Novo Nordisk will cover all development costs incurred by Aradigm Corporation while both parties will co-fund final development of the AERx device. Both companies will explore the possibilities of the AERx platform to deliver other compounds for the regulation of blood glucose levels. Additionally, the agreement gives Novo Nordisk an option to develop the technology for delivery of agents outside the diabetes area. In April 2001, Aradigm Corporation received a milestone payment from Novo Nordisk related to the completion of certain clinical and product development stages of the AERx drug delivery system. Profil, a CRO in Germany, is cooperating with Aradigm and Novo Nordisk in the development of inhaled insulin. Aradigm and Novo Nordisk initiated a pivotal phase III study with inhaled insulin formulation in September 2002. This 24-month, 300-patient trial is evaluating inhaled insulin in comparison with insulin aspart. Both medications will be given three times daily before meals in addition to basal

  7. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  8. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that cutting calories, being active, and losing weight can reverse insulin resistance and lower your ... you’ll lose weight. Studies have shown that losing even 7% of your weight, may help. For ...

  9. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels. PMID:19160674

  10. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  11. Insulin signaling and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Daws, Lynette C.; Avison, Malcolm J.; Robertson, Sabrina D.; Niswender, Kevin D.; Galli, Aurelio; Saunders, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Across species, the brain evolved to respond to natural rewards such as food and sex. These physiological responses are important for survival, reproduction and evolutionary processes. It is no surprise, therefore, that many of the neural circuits and signaling pathways supporting reward processes are conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to Drosophilae, to rats, monkeys and humans. The central role of dopamine (DA) in encoding reward and in attaching salience to external environmental cues is well recognized. Less widely recognized is the role of reporters of the “internal environment”, particularly insulin, in the modulation of reward. Insulin has traditionally been considered an important signaling molecule in regulating energy homeostasis and feeding behavior rather than a major component of neural reward circuits. However, research over recent decades has revealed that DA and insulin systems do not operate in isolation from each other, but instead, work together to orchestrate both the motivation to engage in consummatory behavior and to calibrate the associated level of reward. Insulin signaling has been found to regulate DA neurotransmission and to affect the ability of drugs that target the DA system to exert their neurochemical and behavioral effects. Given that many abused drugs target the DA system, the elucidation of how dopaminergic, as well as other brain reward systems, are regulated by insulin will create opportunities to develop therapies for drug and potentially food addiction. Moreover, a more complete understanding of the relationship between DA neurotransmission and insulin may help to uncover etiological bases for “food addiction” and the growing epidemic of obesity. This review focuses on the role of insulin signaling in regulating DA homeostasis and DA signaling, and the potential impact of impaired insulin signaling in obesity and psychostimulant abuse. PMID:21420985

  12. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes. PMID:26560137

  13. Healthcare regulatory concepts in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Robson Rocha de; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon

    2012-06-01

    The healthcare regulatory concepts used in Brazilian scientific publications on healthcare management were reviewed. A typo-logical classification for regulatory concepts was developed from the most current ideas in five disciplines: life sciences, law, economics, sociology and political science. Four ideas stood out: control, balance, adaptation and direction, with greatest emphasis on the technical nature of regulation. The political nature of regulation was secondary. It was considered that dis-cussion of healthcare regulatory concepts was connected with comprehension of the role that the state plays in this sector. De-finition of the forms of state intervention is the key convergence point between the different ways of conceptualizing healthcare regulation.

  14. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Absence of Inflammation Characterize Insulin-Resistant Grade I Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Annick; Lambert, Karen; Birot, Olivier; Fédou, Christine; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Sutra, Thibault; Molinari, Nicolas; Maimoun, Laurent; Mariano-Goulart, Denis; Galtier, Florence; Avignon, Antoine; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise; Mercier, Jacques; Sultan, Ariane; Bisbal, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Context Obesity is associated with insulin-resistance (IR), the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Although chronic low-grade inflammation has been identified as a central effector of IR development, it has never been investigated simultaneously at systemic level and locally in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in obese humans characterized for their insulin sensitivity. Objectives We compared metabolic parameters and inflammation at systemic and tissue levels in normal-weight and obese subjects with different insulin sensitivity to better understand the mechanisms involved in IR development. Methods 30 post-menopausal women were classified as normal-weight insulin-sensitive (controls, CT) and obese (grade I) insulin-sensitive (OIS) or insulin-resistant (OIR) according to their body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of IR index. They underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, blood sampling, skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, an activity questionnaire and a self-administrated dietary recall. We analyzed insulin sensitivity, inflammation and IR-related parameters at the systemic level. In tissues, insulin response was assessed by P-Akt/Akt expression and inflammation by macrophage infiltration as well as cytokines and IκBα expression. Results Systemic levels of lipids, adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides were equivalent between OIS and OIR subjects. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, the number of anti-inflammatory macrophages was higher in OIR than in CT and OIS and was associated with higher IL-6 level. Insulin induced Akt phosphorylation to the same extent in CT, OIS and OIR. In skeletal muscle, we could not detect any inflammation even though IκBα expression was lower in OIR compared to CT. However, while P-Akt/Akt level increased following insulin stimulation in CT and OIS, it remained unchanged in OIR. Conclusion Our results show that systemic IR occurs without any change in systemic and tissues

  15. In vivo JNK activation in pancreatic β-cells leads to glucose intolerance caused by insulin resistance in pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lanuza-Masdeu, Jordi; Arévalo, M Isabel; Vila, Cristina; Barberà, Albert; Gomis, Ramon; Caelles, Carme

    2013-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a key condition in the development of type 2 diabetes. It is well established that exacerbated Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is involved in promoting insulin resistance in peripheral insulin-target tissues; however, this involvement is less documented in pancreatic β-cells. Using a transgenic mouse model, here we show that JNK activation in β-cells led to glucose intolerance as a result of impaired capacity to increase insulinemia in response to hyperglycemia. Pancreatic islets from these mice showed no obvious morphostructural abnormalities or decreased insulin content. In contrast, these islets failed to secrete insulin in response to glucose or insulin but were competent in succinate-, ketoisocaproate-, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX-), KCl-, and tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion. At the molecular level, JNK activation in β-cells inhibited insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and transcription of insulin-target genes. Remarkably, rosiglitazone restored insulin secretion in response to hyperglycemia in mice and insulin-induced insulin secretion and signaling in isolated islets. In conclusion, the mere activation of JNK suffices to induce insulin resistance in pancreatic β-cells by inhibition of insulin signaling in these cells, but it is not sufficient to elicit β-cell death. In addition, we provide the first evidence that thiazolidinediones exert insulin-sensitizing action directly on pancreatic β-cells.

  16. Role of Ceramide in Apoptosis and Development of Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, D I; Klimentyeva, T K

    2016-09-01

    This review presents data on the functional biochemistry of ceramide, one of the key sphingolipids with properties of a secondary messenger. Molecular mechanisms of the involvement of ceramide in apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells and its role in the formation of insulin resistance in pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes are reviewed. One of the main predispositions for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes is obesity, which is associated with ectopic fat deposition and significant increase in intracellular concentrations of cytotoxic ceramides. A possible approach to the restoration of tissue sensitivity to insulin in type 2 diabetes based on selective reduction of the content of cytotoxic ceramides is discussed. PMID:27682164

  17. Insulin pump therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2016-09-01

    Control of blood glucose during pregnancy is difficult because of wide variations, ongoing hormonal changes and mood swings. The need for multiple injections, pain at the injection site, regular monitoring and skillful handling of the syringes/pen further makes insulin therapy inconvenient. Insulin pump is gaining popularity in pregnancy because it mimics the insulin delivery of a healthy human pancreas. Multiple guidelines have also recommended the use of insulin pump in pregnancy to maintain the glycaemic control. The pump can release small doses of insulin continuously (basal), or a bolus dose close to mealtime to control the spike in blood glucose after a meal and the newer devices can shut down insulin delivery before the occurrence of hypoglycaemia. Pump insulin of choice is rapid acting analogue insulin. This review underscores the role of insulin pump in pregnancy, their usage, advantages and disadvantages in the light of existing literature and clinic experience. PMID:27582150

  18. Insulin signaling controls neurotransmission via the 4eBP-dependent modification of the exocytotic machinery.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Rebekah Elizabeth; Azpurua, Jorge; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Altered insulin signaling has been linked to widespread nervous system dysfunction including cognitive dysfunction, neuropathy and susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. However, knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on neuronal function is incomplete. Here, we show that cell autonomous insulin signaling within the Drosophila CM9 motor neuron regulates the release of neurotransmitter via alteration of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. This effect of insulin utilizes the FOXO-dependent regulation of the thor gene, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the eif-4e binding protein (4eBP). A critical target of this regulatory mechanism is Complexin, a synaptic protein known to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We find that the amounts of Complexin protein observed at the synapse is regulated by insulin and genetic manipulations of Complexin levels support the model that increased synaptic Complexin reduces neurotransmission in response to insulin signaling. PMID:27525480

  19. Influence of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays in the autoimmune insulin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casesnoves, A; Mauri, M; Dominguez, J R; Alfayate, R; Picó, A M

    1998-11-01

    The autoimmune insulin syndrome (AIS) is a rare, benign syndrome characterized by hyperinsulinaemia and hypoglycaemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been treated with insulin. We report here the case of a 52-year-old patient with recurrent attacks of severe postprandial hypoglycaemia and we also present the effect of anti-insulin antibodies on insulin immunoassays. The patient was submitted to the following diagnostic tests: 5-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a prolonged 72-h fast and an insulin tolerance test (ITT). Serum glucose, total and free insulin, C-peptide, proinsulin, insulin antibodies and other autoantibodies were measured. Insulin concentrations were measured by two methods: a double antibody radioimmunoassay (RIA) and an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Insulin concentration measured by RIA was extremely high in the OGTT and 72-h fast. In contrast, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were between 120 and 888 pmol/L in the OGTT and between 37 and 133 pmol/L during the 72-h fast. Fasting free-insulin concentrations measured by RIA were between 2224 and 2669 pmol/L, whereas free-insulin concentrations measured by IRMA ranged between 93 and 237 pmol/L. Total insulin concentrations measured by RIA and IRMA were 57,615 and 94,021 pmol/L, respectively. The C-peptide concentrations were moderately high in the three tests. Serum insulin antibody concentrations were extremely high (62-71%), compared with less than 3% in normal serum samples. In conclusion, the high insulin concentrations measured by RIA were caused by insulin autoantibodies. However, insulin concentrations measured by IRMA were not influenced by them. We conclude that IRMA is the more accurate method for measuring insulin concentrations in such cases.

  20. Insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S; Kania, Gabriela; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Wobus, Anna M

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells offer great potential for cell replacement and tissue engineering therapies because of their almost unlimited proliferation capacity and the potential to differentiate into cellular derivatives of all three primary germ layers. This chapter describes a strategy for the in vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells into insulin-producing cells. The three-step protocol does not select for nestin-expressing cells as performed in previous differentiation systems. It includes (1) the spontaneous differentiation of ES cells via embryoid bodies and (2) the formation of progenitor cells of all three primary germ layers (multilineage progenitors) followed by (3) directed differentiation into the pancreatic lineage. The application of growth and extracellular matrix factors, including laminin, nicotinamide, and insulin, leads to the development of committed pancreatic progenitors, which subsequently differentiate into islet-like clusters that release insulin in response to glucose. During differentiation, transcript levels of pancreas-specific transcription factors (i.e., Pdx1, Pax4) and of genes specific for early and mature beta cells, including insulin, islet amyloid pancreatic peptide, somatostatin, and glucagon, are upregulated. C-peptide/insulin-positive islet-like clusters are formed, which release insulin in response to high glucose concentrations at terminal stages. The differentiated cells reveal functional properties with respect to voltage-activated Na+ and ATP-modulated K+ channels and normalize blood glucose levels in streptozotocin-treated diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate the efficient differentiation of murine ES cells into insulin-producing cells, which may help in the future to establish ES cell-based therapies in diabetes mellitus.

  1. An insulin signaling feedback loop regulates pancreas progenitor cell differentiation during islet development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lihua; Robertson, Morgan A.; Mastracci, Teresa L.; Anderson, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    As one of the key nutrient sensors, insulin signaling plays an important role in integrating environmental energy cues with organism growth. In adult organisms, relative insufficiency of insulin signaling induces compensatory expansion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta (β) cells. However, little is known about how insulin signaling feedback might influence neogenesis of β cells during embryonic development. Using genetic approaches and a unique cell transplantation system in developing zebrafish, we have uncovered a novel role for insulin signaling in the negative regulation of pancreatic progenitor cell differentiation. Blocking insulin signaling in the pancreatic progenitors hastened the expression of the essential β cell genes insulin and pdx1, and promoted β cell fate at the expense of alpha cell fate. In addition, loss of insulin signaling promoted β cell regeneration and destabilization of alpha cell character. These data indicate that insulin signaling constitutes a tunable mechanism for β cell compensatory plasticity during early development. Moreover, using a novel blastomere-to-larva transplantation strategy, we found that loss of insulin signaling in endoderm-committed blastomeres drove their differentiation into β cells. Furthermore, the extent of this differentiation was dependent on the function of the β cell mass in the host. Altogether, our results indicate that modulation of insulin signaling will be crucial for the development of β cell restoration therapies for diabetics; further clarification of the mechanisms of insulin signaling in β cell progenitors will reveal therapeutic targets for both in vivo and in vitro β cell generation. PMID:26658317

  2. An insulin signaling feedback loop regulates pancreas progenitor cell differentiation during islet development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lihua; Robertson, Morgan A; Mastracci, Teresa L; Anderson, Ryan M

    2016-01-15

    As one of the key nutrient sensors, insulin signaling plays an important role in integrating environmental energy cues with organism growth. In adult organisms, relative insufficiency of insulin signaling induces compensatory expansion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta (β) cells. However, little is known about how insulin signaling feedback might influence neogenesis of β cells during embryonic development. Using genetic approaches and a unique cell transplantation system in developing zebrafish, we have uncovered a novel role for insulin signaling in the negative regulation of pancreatic progenitor cell differentiation. Blocking insulin signaling in the pancreatic progenitors hastened the expression of the essential β cell genes insulin and pdx1, and promoted β cell fate at the expense of alpha cell fate. In addition, loss of insulin signaling promoted β cell regeneration and destabilization of alpha cell character. These data indicate that insulin signaling constitutes a tunable mechanism for β cell compensatory plasticity during early development. Moreover, using a novel blastomere-to-larva transplantation strategy, we found that loss of insulin signaling in endoderm-committed blastomeres drove their differentiation into β cells. Furthermore, the extent of this differentiation was dependent on the function of the β cell mass in the host. Altogether, our results indicate that modulation of insulin signaling will be crucial for the development of β cell restoration therapies for diabetics; further clarification of the mechanisms of insulin signaling in β cell progenitors will reveal therapeutic targets for both in vivo and in vitro β cell generation. PMID:26658317

  3. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control.

  4. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. PMID:26233724

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  6. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Matilda H. C.; Lau, K. H. William

    2014-01-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed. PMID:24707466

  7. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice.

    PubMed

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5(-/-)) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1(-/-)), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  8. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S.; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5−/−) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1−/−), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  9. Leptin Deficiency Causes Insulin Resistance Induced by Uncontrolled Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    German, Jonathan P.; Wisse, Brent E.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Oh-I, Shinsuke; Sarruf, David A.; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Fischer, Jonathan D.; Matsen, Miles E.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Morton, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Depletion of body fat stores during uncontrolled, insulin-deficient diabetes (uDM) results in markedly reduced plasma leptin levels. This study investigated the role of leptin deficiency in the genesis of severe insulin resistance and related metabolic and neuroendocrine derangements induced by uDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adult male Wistar rats remained nondiabetic or were injected with the β-cell toxin, streptozotocin (STZ) to induce uDM and subsequently underwent subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump containing either vehicle or leptin at a dose (150 μg/kg/day) designed to replace leptin at nondiabetic plasma levels. To control for leptin effects on food intake, another group of STZ-injected animals were pair fed to the intake of those receiving leptin. Food intake, body weight, and blood glucose levels were measured daily, with body composition and indirect calorimetry performed on day 11, and an insulin tolerance test to measure insulin sensitivity performed on day 16. Plasma hormone and substrate levels, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, and measures of tissue insulin signal transduction were also measured. RESULTS Physiologic leptin replacement prevented insulin resistance in uDM via a mechanism unrelated to changes in food intake or body weight. This effect was associated with reduced total body fat and hepatic triglyceride content, preservation of lean mass, and improved insulin signal transduction via the insulin receptor substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-hydroxy kinase pathway in the liver, but not in skeletal muscle or adipose tissue. Although physiologic leptin replacement lowered blood glucose levels only slightly, it fully normalized elevated plasma glucagon and corticosterone levels and reversed the increased hepatic expression of gluconeogenic enzymes characteristic of rats with uDM. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that leptin deficiency plays a key role in the pathogenesis of severe insulin resistance and related endocrine

  10. A Hazard Analysis for a Generic Insulin Infusion Pump

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jones, Paul L.; Jetley, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    Background Researchers at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Center for Device and Radiological Health/Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories have been exploring the concept of model-based engineering as a means for improving the quality of medical device software. Insulin pumps were chosen as a research subject because their design provides the desired degree of research complexity and these types of devices present an ongoing regulatory challenge. Methods Insulin pump hazards and their contributing factors are considered in the context of a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model. Hazards were identified by consulting with manufacturers, pump users, and clinicians; by reviewing national and international standards and adverse event reports collected by the FDA; and from workshops sponsored by Diabetes Technology Society. This information has been consolidated in tabular form to facilitate further community analysis and discussion. Results A generic insulin infusion pump model architecture has been established. A fairly comprehensive hazard analysis document, corresponding to the GIIP model, is presented in this article. Conclusions We believe that this work represents the genesis of an insulin pump safety reference standard upon which future insulin pump designs can be based to help ensure a basic level of safety. More interaction with the diabetes community is needed to assure the quality of this safety modeling process. PMID:20307387

  11. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  12. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  13. Epigenetic markers to further understand insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Charlotte; Rönn, Tina

    2016-11-01

    Epigenetic variation in human adipose tissue has been linked to type 2 diabetes and its related risk factors including age and obesity. Insulin resistance, a key risk factor for type 2 diabetes, may also be associated with altered DNA methylation in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, linking epigenetic variation in target tissues to similar changes in blood cells may identify new blood-based biomarkers. In this issue of Diabetologia, Arner et al studied the transcriptome and methylome in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue of 80 obese women who were either insulin-sensitive or -resistant (DOI 10.1007/s00125-016-4074-5 ). While they found differences in gene expression between the two groups, no alterations in DNA methylation were found after correction for multiple testing. Nevertheless, based on nominal p values, their methylation data overlapped with methylation differences identified in adipose tissue of individuals with type 2 diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Differential methylation of these overlapping CpG sites may predispose to diabetes by occurring already in the insulin-resistant state. Furthermore, some methylation changes may contribute to an inflammatory process in adipose tissue since the identified CpG sites were annotated to genes encoding proteins involved in inflammation. Finally, the methylation pattern in circulating leucocytes did not mirror the adipose tissue methylome of these 80 women. Together, identifying novel molecular mechanisms contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may help advance the search for new therapeutic alternatives. PMID:27650286

  14. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-Å resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity (∼100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages. PMID:19321446

  15. Insulin tolerance in laminitic ponies.

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, J R; Colles, C M

    1983-01-01

    Sensitivity to insulin was assessed in ponies episodically affected with chronic laminitis by measurement of blood glucose and arterial blood pressure during insulin tolerance tests. In terms of blood glucose values, laminitic ponies were significantly less sensitive to insulin than controls. Conversely, a post-insulin decline in diastolic, systolic and mean blood pressure values was significantly greater in laminitic ponies than in controls. PMID:6357412

  16. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  17. Oral Insulin and Buccal Insulin: A Critical Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Jacques, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Despite the availability of modern insulin injection devices with needles that are so sharp and thin that practically no injection pain takes place, it is still the dream of patients with diabetes to, for example, swallow a tablet with insulin. This is not associated with any pain and would allow more discretion. Therefore, availability of oral insulin would not only ease insulin therapy, it would certainly increase compliance. However, despite numerous attempts to develop such a “tablet” in the past 85 years, still no oral insulin is commercially available. Buccal insulin is currently in the last stages of clinical development by one company and might become available in the United States and Europe in the coming years (it is already on the market in some other countries). The aim of this review is to critically describe the different approaches that are currently under development. Optimal coverage of prandial insulin requirements is the aim with both routes of insulin administration (at least with most approaches). The speed of onset of metabolic effect seen with some oral insulin approaches is rapid, but absorption appears to be lower when the tablet is taken immediately prior to a meal. With all approaches, considerable amounts of insulin have to be applied in order to induce therapeutically relevant increases in the metabolic effect because of the low relative biopotency of buccal insulin. Unfortunately, the number of publications about clinical–experimental and clinical studies is surprisingly low. In addition, there is no study published in which the variability of the metabolic effect induced (with and without a meal) was studied adequately. In summary, after the failure of inhaled insulin, oral insulin and buccal insulin are hot candidates to come to the market as the next alternative routes of insulin administration. PMID:20144297

  18. Insulin resistance: Is it time for primary prevention?

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Valeria; Fazio, Serafino

    2012-01-26

    Insulin resistance is a clinical condition characterized by a decrease in sensitivity and responsiveness to the metabolic actions of insulin, so that a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed to maintain normal glucose tolerance. Hyperinsulinemia, indeed, is one of the principal characteristics of insulin resistance states. This feature is common in several pathologic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia, and it is also a prominent component of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and atherosclerosis. The presence of endothelial dysfunction, related to insulin resistance, plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in all of these disorders. Insulin resistance represents the earliest detectable abnormality in type 2 diabetes, and is one of the major underlying mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Its early detection could be of great importance, in order to set a therapeutic attack and to counteract the higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Insulin resistance in the liver: Deficiency or excess of insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Bazotte, Roberto B; Silva, Lorena G; Schiavon, Fabiana PM

    2014-01-01

    In insulin-resistant states (obesity, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes), hepatic production of glucose and lipid synthesis are heightened in concert, implying that insulin deficiency and insulin excess coexists in this setting. The fact that insulin may be inadequate or excessive at any one point in differing organs and tissues has many biologic ramifications. In this context the concept of metabolic compartmentalization in the liver is offered herein as one perspective of this paradox. In particular, we focus on the hypothesis that insulin resistance accentuates differences in periportal and perivenous hepatocytes, namely periportal glucose production and perivenous lipid synthesis. Subsequently, excessive production of glucose and accumulation of lipids could be expected in the livers of patients with obesity and insulin resistance. Overall, in this review, we provide our integrative perspective regarding how excessive production of glucose in periportal hepatocytes and accumulation of lipids in perivenous hepatocytes interact in insulin resistant states. PMID:25486190

  20. [Insulin therapy of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Roden, Michael; Weitgasser, Raimund; Ludvik, Bernhard; Fasching, Peter; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schernthaner, Guntram; Prager, Rudolf; Wascher, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. Thus, reaching treatment targets with regard to control of glycemia is a central goal in the therapy of diabetic patients. The present article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the practical use of insulin according to current scientific evidence and clinical studies. PMID:27052221

  1. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be used in most health care providers' offices. The clamp is a research tool used by scientists to learn more about glucose metabolism. Research has shown that if blood tests indicate prediabetes, insulin ... care provider's office or commercial facility and sending the sample to ...

  2. 10 CFR 95.18 - Key personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Key personnel. 95.18 Section 95.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.18 Key personnel. The senior management official...

  3. Insulin therapy and exercise.

    PubMed

    Kourtoglou, Georgios I

    2011-08-01

    Medical nutrition therapy and physical exercise are the cornerstones of the diabetes management. Patients with type 1 DM always need exogenous insulin administration, recently available in the form of insulin analogs. In type 2 DM, characterized by increased insulin resistance and progressive decline of the beta-cell function, various antidiabetic medications are used. Most of the subjects with type 2 DM will finally need insulin. The main site of insulin action is the skeletal muscle, while the liver is the main site of glucose storage in the form of glycogen. With the modern diabetes therapies it is possible to rapidly reach and maintain normoglycemia in both types of DM but with the cost of higher incidence of hypoglycemia, especially related to exercise. Regular physical exercise causes a lot of beneficial effects in healthy as well as diabetic subjects of all age groups. In type 1 DM physical exercise is a fundamental element for both physical and mental development. In type 2 DM it has a main role in diabetes control. The increased hepatic glucose production and the increased muscular glucose uptake during exercise are closely interrelated in all exercise intensities. In diabetes mellitus there is a disturbed energy substrate use during exercise leading to either hypo- or hyperglycemia. The influence of low or moderate intensity aerobic exercise on diabetes control has been well studied. The inappropriately high insulinemia combined with the low glucose levels can lead to severe hypoglycemia if proper measures are not taken. Prolonged exercise can also predispose to decreased glucose counter regulation. It is better for the type 1 diabetic subject to postpone the exercise session in very high (>300 mg/dl) or very low (<70 mg/dl) BG levels. Every insulin treated subject is recommended to be checked for any existing diabetic complication before the start of every exercise program. Glucose measurement with glucose meters or sometimes with Continuous Glucose

  4. Purification and functional characterization of pancreatic insulin from camel (Camelus dromedarius)

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Babiker A.; Al-Maleki, Abdulmajeed; Ismael, Mohammad A.; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of insulin still represents the key step in helping diabetic patients throughout the world. Many species and approaches have been used for the production of insulin. In this study, we purified and characterized for the first time pancreatic insulin from the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius) using a modified acid-alcohol extraction method. After extraction insulin was purified using a one-step gel filtration on a Sephadex G-50 column leading to a purification yield of 80 mg/kg (20%) of camel pancreas. The purity of camel insulin was assessed by SDS–PAGE and HPLC using insulin from human, bovine and porcine as standards. Molecular weight was determined for purified camel insulin as 5800 Daltons and its amino acid composition is similar to that known for other species. The functional characterization of purified crude camel insulin was demonstrated in vitro by positive competition by radioimmunoassay and in vivo showing camel insulin inducing acute hypoglycaemia in mice. Together, our study reports for the first time the successful purification of functional insulin from camel pancreas with similar properties compared to other insulin species. This is of great interest given that the camel represents considerable economic worth in many countries. PMID:25473366

  5. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years.

  6. Evidence against extrapancreatic insulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    Labeled and unlabeled insulin in acid/ethanol tissue extracts can be concentrated up to 100-fold by using a hydrophobic adsorption technique. After adsorption to and elution from an octadecylsilyl silica column, insulin is recovered in yields greater than 75%. By using this method of concentration, insulin in brain tissues of three of four fed rats and one rabbit was found to be less than 20% of plasma concentration. The kidney is the only extrapancreatic organ in which insulin is observed to be markedly above plasma levels. Porcine-insulin-like material was not detectable in guinea pig tissues (less than 0.02 ng/g). It is concluded that insulin is not synthesized in brain or other extrapancreatic tissues and that other mammalian insulins are not found in guinea pig tissues. PMID:6270683

  7. Insulin degludec for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Over the last few years there has been a steady increase in the number of prescriptions dispensed in primary care for intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues and a reduction in prescriptions for biphasic isophane insulin. For example, in England, the volume of intermediate and long-acting insulin analogues in general practice has risen from approximately 650,000 prescriptions per quarter in 2007 to over 850,000 per quarter in 2012.(1) ▾Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is a new long acting basal insulin analogue for the management of diabetes mellitus in adults.(2) Two strengths of insulin degludec (100 units/mL and 200 units/mL) were launched in the UK in February 2013. Here we discuss evidence for the effectiveness and safety of insulin degludec. PMID:23842634

  8. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  9. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/GLP-2) are coproduced and highlighted as key modulators to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity after bariatric surgery. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays any physiological role in the control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. We sho...

  10. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  11. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  12. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  13. Comparison of the physiological relevance of systemic vs. portal insulin delivery to evaluate whole body glucose flux during an insulin clamp

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany D.; Jenkins, Erin C.; O'Brien, Tracy P.; McCoy, Gregory A.; Havlik, Allison E.; Nass, Erik R.; Nicholson, Wendell E.; Printz, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the underlying pathology of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, an accurate determination of whole body glucose flux needs to be made by a method that maintains key physiological features. One such feature is a positive differential in insulin concentration between the portal venous and systemic arterial circulation (P/S-IG). P/S-IG during the determination of the relative contribution of liver and extra-liver tissues/organs to whole body glucose flux during an insulin clamp with either systemic (SID) or portal (PID) insulin delivery was examined with insulin infusion rates of 1, 2, and 5 mU·kg−1·min−1 under either euglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions in 6-h-fasted conscious normal rats. A P/S-IG was initially determined with endogenous insulin secretion to exist with a value of 2.07. During an insulin clamp, while inhibiting endogenous insulin secretion by somatostatin, P/S-IG remained at 2.2 with PID, whereas, P/S-IG disappeared completely with SID, which exhibited higher arterial and lower portal insulin levels compared with PID. Consequently, glucose disappearance rates and muscle glycogen synthetic rates were higher, but suppression of endogenous glucose production and liver glycogen synthetic rates were lower with SID compared with PID. When the insulin clamp was performed with SID at 2 and 5 mU·kg−1·min−1 without managing endogenous insulin secretion under euglycemic but not hyperglycemic conditions, endogenous insulin secretion was completely suppressed with SID, and the P/S-IG disappeared. Thus, compared with PID, an insulin clamp with SID underestimates the contribution of liver in response to insulin to whole body glucose flux. PMID:25516552

  14. Understanding Genetic Heterogeneity in Type 2 Diabetes by Delineating Physiological Phenotypes: SIRT1 and its Gene Network in Impaired Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shafat; Nafis, Shazia; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Rai, Ekta; Sharma, Swarkar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic metabolic disease which shows an exponential increase in all parts of the world. However, the disease is controllable by early detection and modified lifestyle. A series of factors have been associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, and genes are considered to play a critical role. The individual risk of developing T2D is determined by an altered genetic background of the en-zymes involved in several metabolism-related biological mechanisms, including glucose homeostasis, insulin metab-olism, the glucose and ion transporters involved in glucose uptake, transcription factors, signaling intermediates of insulin signaling pathways, insulin production and secretion, pancreatic tissue development, and apoptosis. However, many candidate genes have shown heterogeneity of associations with the disease in different populations. A possible approach to resolving this complexity and under-standing genetic heterogeneity is to delineate the physiological phenotypes one by one as studying them in combination may cause discrepancies in association studies. A systems biology approach involving regulatory proteins, transcription factors, and microRNAs is one way to understand and identify key factors in complex diseases such as T2D. Our earlier studies have screened more than 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) belonging to more than 60 globally known T2D candidate genes in the Indian population. We observed that genes invariably involved in the activity of pancreatic β-cells provide susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). Encouraged by these results, we attempted to delineate in this review one of the commonest physiological phenotypes in T2D, namely impaired insulin secretion, as the cause of hyperglycemia. This review is also intended to explain the genetic basis of the pathophysiology of insulin secretion in the context of variations in the SIRT1 gene, a major switch that modulates insulin secretion, and a set of other genes such

  15. The interplay between regulatory T cells and metabolism in immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for peripheral tolerance and are intimately involved in immunological diseases and cancer. Recent studies have highlighted a key role for Tregs in metabolic disorders, for instance as they accumulate in the adipose tissue to protect against obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance. Conversely, the generation and immunosuppressive functions of Tregs are influenced by both systemic and cellular metabolism. The nutritional status as well as metabolic cues such as those provided by leptin impinge upon the proliferation of Tregs. In addition, the mTOR-dependent lipid metabolism has a crucial role in programming the activity of Tregs under steady-state conditions as well as upon activation. This review discusses the intricate interaction between Tregs and metabolism, focusing on the roles of Tregs in systemic and local metabolic circuitries as well as on the regulation of Treg abundance and function by metabolic signals. PMID:24404429

  16. Effects of food restriction and insulin treatment on (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase response to insulin in kidney basolateral membranes of noninsulin-dependent diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Levy, J; Grunberger, G; Karl, I; Gavin, J R

    1990-01-01

    Insulin increases (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in cell membranes of normal rats but fails to do so in membranes of non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDD) rats. The loss of regulatory effect of the hormone on the enzyme might contribute to the insulin resistance observed in the NIDD animals. To further test this hypothesis, the effects of insulin treatment and acute food restriction on the ability of insulin to regulate the ATPase activity in kidney basolateral membranes (BLM) of NIDD rats were studied. Although insulin levels in NIDD and control rats were similar, plasma glucose was higher in the NIDD rats (18.3 +/- 1.5 v 19.3 +/- 1.7 microU/mL and 236 +/- 32 v 145 +/- 3 mg/dL, respectively). Insulin treatment (2 U/100 g), which increased plasma insulin in the NIDD rats (47.8 +/- 11.5 microU/mL; P less than .05), did not decrease their glucose (221 +/- 25 mg/dL). Higher insulin dose (4 U/100 g) decreased glucose level in the NIDD rats (73 +/- 3 mg/dL; P less than .001) but increased their plasma insulin 10-fold (202.5 +/- 52.5 microU/mL). Acute food restriction decreased glucose levels in the NIDD rats to levels seen in controls (135 +/- 3 mg/dL), while their insulin decreased by half (8.5 +/- 1.0 microU/mL; P less than .05). Basal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in BLM of all diabetic rats was higher than in controls (P less than .05). None of the treatments reversed this defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2136760

  17. Use of aglepristone for the treatment of P4 induced insulin resistance in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bresciani, Carla; Callegari, Daniela; Di Ianni, Francesco; Morini, Giorgio; Parmigiani, Enrico; Bianchi, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in dogs is suspected when hyperglycemia is present despite administration of insulin doses greater than 1.0 to 1.5 UI/kg. IR is caused by increases in counter regulatory hormones concentrations (glucagon, glucocorticoids, catecholamines and growth hormone). This study was conducted to investigate the use of aglepristone (RU 46534), a P4 receptor antagonist, for the treatment of IR diabetes mellitus in bitches during the luteal phase. All animals were treated with porcine insulin zinc suspension (Caninsulin) and aglepristone (Alizin) 10 mg/kg subcutaneously at day 1, 2, 9 and 17 from diagnosis. At day 5, no significant variation in glycemia was shown. At day 12 and 20, serum glucose concentrations were significant lower (p < 0.05). From day 12 the insulin dose was reduced to 0.8 IU BID. Insulin was reduced in the following weeks and glycemia was controlled. PMID:24378588

  18. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Aires, Ricardo S; Francisco, Alexandre P; Madeira, Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules) under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1) apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2) ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3) neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4) limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots). Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in functionally enriched

  19. Does salmon brain produce insulin?

    PubMed

    Plisetskaya, E M; Bondareva, V M; Duan, C; Duguay, S J

    1993-07-01

    To address the question whether fish brain can produce insulin, pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbusha) brains were extracted and processed according to the procedure developed for purification of pancreatic insulin (Rusakov and Bondareva, 1979). Biological and immunological activity of the resulting material was evaluated respectively by a cartilage sulfation assay and by radioimmunoassay homologous for salmon insulin. Preparations from salmon brain stimulated the [35S]sulfate uptake into salmon branchial cartilage with a potency comparable to pure mammalian or salmon insulins but lower than that of mammalian insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). In contrast, only trace amounts of radioimmunoreactive insulin could be detected by homologous radioimmunoassay. To determine whether insulin mRNA was present in salmon brain, primers specific for salmon proinsulin and salmon prepro-IGF-I were designed to amplify corresponding cDNA regions by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Insulin mRNA was found only in the endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) while IGF-I mRNA was detected in the brain, liver, and the Brockmann body. Our results suggest that in fish pancreatic-type insulin is most likely produced only in the endocrine pancreas and then transported to the brain through blood/cerebrospinal fluid system. However, it does not exclude a possibility that some yet unknown insulin-like substances may be expressed in the neural system of ectotherm vertebrates.

  20. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  1. Treating insulin resistance: future prospects.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Clifford J

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance typically reflects multiple defects of insulin receptor and post-receptor signalling that impair a diverse range of metabolic and vascular actions. Many potential intervention targets and compounds with therapeutic activity have been described. Proof of principle for a non-peptide insulin mimetic has been demonstrated by specific activation of the intracellular B-subunit of the insulin receptor. Potentiation of insulin action has been achieved with agents that enhance phosphorylation and prolong the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor and its protein substrates after activation by insulin. These include inhibitors of phosphatases and serine kinases that normally prevent or terminate tyrosine kinase signalling. Additional approaches involve increasing the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and other downstream components of the insulin signalling pathways. Experimental interventions to remove signalling defects caused by cytokines, certain adipocyte hormones, excess fatty acids, glucotoxicity and negative feedback by distal signalling steps have also indicated therapeutic possibilities. Several hormones, metabolic enzymes, minerals, co-factors and transcription co-activators have shown insulin-sensitising potential. Since insulin resistance affects many metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, it provides an opportunity for simultaneous therapeutic attack on a broad front.

  2. Insulin self-association and the relationship to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    DeFelippis, M R; Chance, R E; Frank, B H

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of type 1 diabetes requires multiple, daily injections of insulin. While many improvements involving formulation adjustments have been made in an attempt to optimize therapy, clinical experience indicates that the commercially available insulin preparations used for treatment have significant limitations. One principal deficiency relates to poor simulation of the physiological insulin secretion pattern, making achieving normalization of blood glucose concentrations difficult. Endogenous insulin secretion in nondiabetic subjects is characterized by a pulsatile profile that displays multiple, meal-stimulated phases and low basal concentrations between meals and overnight. Optimal diabetes therapy, therefore, requires insulin preparations that display a rapid onset of action with corresponding rapid clearance to provide for meal ingestion as well as preparations that can maintain a sustained, peakless profile for basal requirements. Recent efforts in pharmaceutical research have used the concept of rational-based design of the insulin molecule in an attempt to produce preparations that display more ideal pharmacological profiles. Using detailed structural information obtained from X-ray crystallographic studies to guide design strategies and exploit the nonrestrictive synthetic capabilities of recombinant DNA technology, researchers have prepared a number of insulin analogs that display a reduced propensity towards self-association. Clinical evaluations have shown that these so called "monomeric" analogs better mimic the meal-stimulated pharmacokinetics of insulin secretion observed in nondiabetics. Two monomeric insulin analog preparations have successfully obtained regulatory approval and are now commercially available. Efforts to produce optimized basal-acting insulin analogs have lagged behind. While some of these analogs have been engineered using recombinant DNA technology, design strategies in many cases exploit physicochemical properties of

  3. Glycoconjugate Vaccines: The Regulatory Framework.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines, including the currently available glycoconjugate vaccines, are administered to healthy infants, to prevent future disease. The safety of a prospective vaccine is a key prerequisite for approval. Undesired side effects would not only have the potential to damage the individual infant but also lead to a loss of confidence in the respective vaccine-or vaccines in general-on a population level. Thus, regulatory requirements, particularly with regard to safety, are extremely rigorous. This chapter highlights regulatory aspects on carbohydrate-based vaccines with an emphasis on analytical approaches to ensure the consistent quality of successive manufacturing lots.

  4. PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule for diabetic blood glucose management under nonmeal announcement.

    PubMed

    Teddy, S D; Quek, C; Lai, E M-K; Cinar, A

    2010-03-01

    Therapeutically, the closed-loop blood glucose-insulin regulation paradigm via a controllable insulin pump offers a potential solution to the management of diabetes. However, the development of such a closed-loop regulatory system to date has been hampered by two main issues: 1) the limited knowledge on the complex human physiological process of glucose-insulin metabolism that prevents a precise modeling of the biological blood glucose control loop; and 2) the vast metabolic biodiversity of the diabetic population due to varying exogneous and endogenous disturbances such as food intake, exercise, stress, and hormonal factors, etc. In addition, current attempts of closed-loop glucose regulatory techniques generally require some form of prior meal announcement and this constitutes a severe limitation to the applicability of such systems. In this paper, we present a novel intelligent insulin schedule based on the pseudo self-evolving cerebellar model articulation controller (PSECMAC) associative learning memory model that emulates the healthy human insulin response to food ingestion. The proposed PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule requires no prior meal announcement and delivers the necessary insulin dosage based only on the observed blood glucose fluctuations. Using a simulated healthy subject, the proposed PSECMAC insulin schedule is demonstrated to be able to accurately capture the complex human glucose-insulin dynamics and robustly addresses the intraperson metabolic variability. Subsequently, the PSECMAC intelligent insulin schedule is employed on a group of type-1 diabetic patients to regulate their impaired blood glucose levels. Preliminary simulation results are highly encouraging. The work reported in this paper represents a major paradigm shift in the management of diabetes where patient compliance is poor and the need for prior meal announcement under current treatment regimes poses a significant challenge to an active lifestyle.

  5. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion does not require activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase: impact of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDH kinase and PDH phosphate phosphatase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Linda I; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-03-01

    Glucose-stimulated increases in mitochondrial metabolism are generally thought to be important for the activation of insulin secretion. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulatory enzyme, believed to govern the rate of pyruvate entry into the citrate cycle. We show here that elevated glucose concentrations (16 or 30 vs 3 mM) cause an increase in PDH activity in both isolated rat islets, and in a clonal beta-cell line (MIN6). However, increases in PDH activity elicited with either dichloroacetate, or by adenoviral expression of the catalytic subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase, were without effect on glucose-induced increases in mitochondrial pyridine nucleotide levels, or cytosolic ATP concentration, in MIN6 cells, and insulin secretion from isolated rat islets. Similarly, the above parameters were unaffected by blockade of the glucose-induced increase in PDH activity by adenovirus-mediated over-expression of PDH kinase (PDK). Thus, activation of the PDH complex plays an unexpectedly minor role in stimulating glucose metabolism and in triggering insulin release.

  6. [Intensified insulin therapy and insulin micro-pumps during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Galuppi, V

    1994-06-01

    Before conception and during pregnancy in diabetic patients, every possible effort should be made in order to obtain a good, if not perfect, metabolic control and to warrant maternal and fetal health. Multiple daily injections are required to achieve a very strict glucose regulation in pregnant patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The most usual intensive insulin administration patterns require 3 premeal doses of short-acting insulin and 1 (at bedtime) or 2 (one in the morning and one at bedtime) injections of intermediate or slow-acting insulin. As an alternative choice, insulin pumps allow a continuous subcutaneous infusion with short-acting insulin according to a basal rate which cover the insulin need during the night and between meals. Premeal and presnack surges of insulin are administrated by the patient herself. Home glucose monitoring must be used to adjust insulin doses. Target glucose levels every diabetic pregnant woman should try to achieve are lower than in non-pregnant women: fasting glycaemia should be below 100 mg/dl, 1 hour post-prandial value below 140 mg/dl and 2 hour post-prandial level below 120 mg/dl. The stricter the control and treatment goals are, the more frequently hypoglycaemia may occur. Hypoglycaemia may be harmful especially for patients with severe diabetic complications and may affect the fetus. Therefore, every pregnant diabetic woman should receive individualized treatment and glycaemic goals according to her clinical features, her compliance and her social and cultural background.

  7. Clinical Use and Evaluation of Insulin Pens

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin pens are more accurate and easier to teach than other methods of insulin delivery. They also do not suffer from the risk of mismatch of insulin concentration and type of insulin syringe. The ISO standard used to test insulin pens, however, needs to be updated to reflect their clinical use. PMID:26323484

  8. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Sami N.; Reynolds, L. Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism of action is based on multihexamer formation after subcutaneous injection. This reportedly allows for less pharmacodynamic variability and within-subject variability than currently available insulin analogs, and a duration of action that is over 24 hours.3 The lack of proof of carcinogenicity with insulin degludec is yet another factor that would be taken into consideration when choosing the optimal basal insulin for a diabetic individual.4 A formulation of insulin degludec with insulin aspart, Insulin degludec 70%/aspart 30%, may permit improved flexibly of dosing without compromising glycemic control or safety.5 PMID:22879797

  9. Extrapancreatic insulin effect of glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Mulder, H; Schopman, W; van der Lely, A J

    1991-01-01

    In eight patients with uncomplicated non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, serum insulin levels, serum C-peptide levels and blood glucose levels were measured before and after oral administration of glibenclamide 0.1 mg/kg body weight and a test meal, or after a test meal alone. The rise in serum insulin levels persisted longer after glibenclamide. The initial rise in serum insulin was of the same magnitude in both situations, as was the rise in serum C-peptide levels during the entire 5 h study. It is concluded that glibenclamide is able to maintain a more prolonged increase in serum insulin levels by inhibiting the degradation of insulin in the vascular endothelial cells of the liver. The inhibition contributes to the blood glucose lowering effect of glibenclamide. PMID:1904820

  10. Regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and insulin secretion by differential expression of Pdx-1.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huijuan; Liu, Hongmei; Tian, Rui; Li, Jie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, major effort has been made to differentiate embryonic stem cells, pancreatic ductal epithelial multipotent progenitor cells, and bone marrow stem cells into insulin secreting cells. Our previous work has also demonstrated the feasibility of inducing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to insulin secreting cells through overexpression of Pdx-1, a pancreas and islet-specific transcription factor that plays a major role in differentiation of islet β-cells during development (Yuan et al. in Mol Biol Rep 37:4023-4031, 2010). However, the levels of insulin secretion among these differentiated MSC were quite variable. The purpose of this study is to address the issue whether the insulin secretion level from the differentiated MSC lines are determined by the expression level of the Pdx-1 transgene. To do so, we have generated several differentiated MSC lines with stable transfection of the Pdx-1 gene. Using RT-PCR analysis and insulin secretion assay, we have analyzed Pdx-1 mRNA levels and insulin secretion from these stable MSC lines. Our results showed that Pdx-1 expression is absolutely required for the differentiation of MSC lines to insulin secreting cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the level of Pdx-1 expression is closely correlated with level of insulin mRNA and insulin secretion level in differentiated MSC stable cell lines. These findings suggest that the level of Pdx-1 expression plays a key role in induction of MSCs to insulin secreting cells.

  11. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  12. Leptin selectively decreases visceral adiposity and enhances insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    Barzilai, N; Wang, J; Massilon, D; Vuguin, P; Hawkins, M; Rossetti, L

    1997-01-01

    Intraabdominal adiposity and insulin resistance are risk factors for diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and mortality. Leptin, a fat-derived protein encoded by the ob gene, has been postulated to be a sensor of energy storage in adipose tissue capable of mediating a feedback signal to sites involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence for specific effects of leptin on fat distribution and in vivo insulin action. Leptin (LEP) or vehicle (CON) was administered by osmotic minipumps for 8 d to pair-fed adult rats. During the 8 d of the study, body weight and total fat mass decreased similarly in LEP and in CON. However, while moderate calorie restriction (CON) resulted in similar decreases in whole body (by 20%) and visceral (by 21%) fat, leptin administration led to a specific and marked decrease (by 62%) in visceral adiposity. During physiologic hyperinsulinemia (insulin clamp), leptin markedly enhanced insulin action on both inhibition of hepatic glucose production and stimulation of glucose uptake. Finally, leptin exerted complex effects on the hepatic gene expression of key metabolic enzymes and on the intrahepatic partitioning of metabolic fluxes, which are likely to represent a defense against excessive storage of energy in adipose depots. These studies demonstrate novel actions of circulating leptin in the regulation of fat distribution, insulin action, and hepatic gene expression and suggest that it may play a role in the pathophysiology of abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:9399957

  13. Salt, aldosterone, and insulin resistance: impact on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Dhuper, Sonal; Johnson, Megan S; Sowers, James R

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), both of which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of CVD and CKD risk factors has identified salt sensitivity and insulin resistance as key elements underlying the relationship between hypertension and T2DM. Excess dietary salt and caloric intake, as commonly found in westernized diets, is linked not only to increased blood pressure, but also to defective insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose homeostasis. In this setting, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), as well as increased signaling through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), result in increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, which in turn contribute to insulin resistance and impaired vascular function. In addition, insulin resistance is not limited to classic insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle, but it also affects the cardiovascular system, where it participates in the development of CVD and CKD. Current clinical knowledge points towards an impact of salt restriction, RAAS blockade, and MR antagonism on cardiovascular and renal protection, but also on improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  14. Diabetic lipohypertrophy delays insulin absorption.

    PubMed

    Young, R J; Hannan, W J; Frier, B M; Steel, J M; Duncan, L J

    1984-01-01

    The effect of lipohypertrophy at injection sites on insulin absorption has been studied in 12 insulin-dependent diabetic patients. The clearance of 125I-insulin from sites with lipohypertrophy was significantly slower than from complementary nonhypertrophied sites (% clearance in 3 h, 43.8 +/- 3.5 +/- SEM) control; 35.3 +/- 3.9 lipohypertrophy, P less than 0.05). The degree of the effect was variable but sufficient in several patients to be of clinical importance. Injection-site lipohypertrophy is another factor that modifies the absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin.

  15. Insulin Glulisine (rDNA origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a short-acting, man-made version of human insulin. Insulin glulisine works by replacing the insulin ... medications for asthma and colds; certain medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) including amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), ...

  16. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  17. Regulatory and quality considerations for continuous manufacturing. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Allison, Gretchen; Cain, Yanxi Tan; Cooney, Charles; Garcia, Tom; Bizjak, Tara Gooen; Holte, Oyvind; Jagota, Nirdosh; Komas, Bekki; Korakianiti, Evdokia; Kourti, Dora; Madurawe, Rapti; Morefield, Elaine; Montgomery, Frank; Nasr, Moheb; Randolph, William; Robert, Jean-Louis; Rudd, Dave; Zezza, Diane

    2015-03-01

    This paper assesses the current regulatory environment, relevant regulations and guidelines, and their impact on continuous manufacturing. It summarizes current regulatory experience and learning from both review and inspection perspectives. It outlines key regulatory aspects, including continuous manufacturing process description and control strategy in regulatory files, process validation, and key Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) requirements. In addition, the paper identifies regulatory gaps and challenges and proposes a way forward to facilitate implementation. PMID:25830179

  18. Regulatory and quality considerations for continuous manufacturing. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Allison, Gretchen; Cain, Yanxi Tan; Cooney, Charles; Garcia, Tom; Bizjak, Tara Gooen; Holte, Oyvind; Jagota, Nirdosh; Komas, Bekki; Korakianiti, Evdokia; Kourti, Dora; Madurawe, Rapti; Morefield, Elaine; Montgomery, Frank; Nasr, Moheb; Randolph, William; Robert, Jean-Louis; Rudd, Dave; Zezza, Diane

    2015-03-01

    This paper assesses the current regulatory environment, relevant regulations and guidelines, and their impact on continuous manufacturing. It summarizes current regulatory experience and learning from both review and inspection perspectives. It outlines key regulatory aspects, including continuous manufacturing process description and control strategy in regulatory files, process validation, and key Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) requirements. In addition, the paper identifies regulatory gaps and challenges and proposes a way forward to facilitate implementation.

  19. Paediatrics, insulin resistance and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Marlais, Matko; Coward, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Systemic insulin resistance is becoming more prevalent in the young due to modern lifestyles predisposing to the metabolic syndrome and obesity. There is also evidence that there are critical insulin-resistant phases for the developing child, including puberty, and that renal disease per se causes systemic insulin resistance. This review considers the factors that render children insulin resistant, as well as the accumulating evidence that the kidney is an insulin-responsive organ and could be affected by insulin resistance.

  20. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  1. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins.

  2. Impact of patient attitudes and beliefs to insulin therapy upon initiation, and their attitudinal changes after initiation: the DAWN Japan study.

    PubMed

    Odawara, Masato; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a part of the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Japan study, a multi-center, questionnaire-based survey conducted between 2004 and 2005, this analysis aimed to (1) explore patients' attitudes and beliefs contributing to their decision to start insulin therapy, and (2) assess the changes in their attitudes and beliefs after actual initiation. Methods Insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes who were recommended to start insulin therapy (n = 149) were invited to answer a 21-item questionnaire consisting of five clusters assessing their attitudes and beliefs toward insulin therapy. The questionnaire was administered twice: first upon insulin recommendation, and then 1 month after insulin initiation for those who started and 4 months after for those who did not. Results Of 130 patients included in the analysis, 74 patients (56.9%) started insulin therapy. 'Negative image of injections' and 'Positive image toward insulin therapy' were significantly associated with patient decision to start insulin therapy (odds ratios [95% CI]: 0.49 [0.32-0.76] and 2.58 [1.51-4.42], respectively). After insulin initiation, 'Negative image of injections', 'Positive image toward insulin therapy', 'Feelings of guilt regarding diabetes self-management', and 'Negative image toward insulin therapy' decreased significantly (P < 0.001 for all). 'Social/interpersonal effects' did not change after insulin initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrated that patients who started insulin therapy were less likely to have negative images of injections and more likely to have positive images toward insulin therapy. Starting insulin therapy did not deteriorate the patient's overall impression of therapy. The key limitation is the relatively small sample size (n = 130). The results suggest that education about the benefits of insulin therapy may help patients who are not ready to initiate insulin overcome their barrier to early insulin initiation and practical

  3. Glucose and insulin metabolism in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Petrides, A S; DeFronzo, R A

    1989-01-01

    Glucose intolerance, overt diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance are characteristic features of patients with cirrhosis. Insulin secretion, although increased in absolute terms, is insufficient to offset the presence of insulin resistance. The defect in insulin-mediated glucose disposal involves peripheral tissues, primarily muscle, and most likely reflects a disturbance in glycogen synthesis. Hepatic glucose production is normally sensitive to insulin; at present, it is unknown whether hepatic glucose uptake is impaired in cirrhosis. One of the more likely candidates responsible for the insulin-resistant state is insulin itself. The hyperinsulinemia results from three abnormalities: diminished hepatic extraction, portosystemic/intrahepatic shunting, and enhanced insulin secretion. PMID:2646365

  4. A model integration approach linking signalling and gene-regulatory logic with kinetic metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Ryll, A; Bucher, J; Bonin, A; Bongard, S; Gonçalves, E; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Niklas, J; Klamt, S

    2014-10-01

    Systems biology has to increasingly cope with large- and multi-scale biological systems. Many successful in silico representations and simulations of various cellular modules proved mathematical modelling to be an important tool in gaining a solid understanding of biological phenomena. However, models spanning different functional layers (e.g. metabolism, signalling and gene regulation) are still scarce. Consequently, model integration methods capable of fusing different types of biological networks and various model formalisms become a key methodology to increase the scope of cellular processes covered by mathematical models. Here we propose a new integration approach to couple logical models of signalling or/and gene-regulatory networks with kinetic models of metabolic processes. The procedure ends up with an integrated dynamic model of both layers relying on differential equations. The feasibility of the approach is shown in an illustrative case study integrating a kinetic model of central metabolic pathways in hepatocytes with a Boolean logical network depicting the hormonally induced signal transduction and gene regulation events involved. In silico simulations demonstrate the integrated model to qualitatively describe the physiological switch-like behaviour of hepatocytes in response to nutritionally regulated changes in extracellular glucagon and insulin levels. A simulated failure mode scenario addressing insulin resistance furthermore illustrates the pharmacological potential of a model covering interactions between signalling, gene regulation and metabolism. PMID:25063553

  5. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  6. [Local lipohypertrophy in insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Herold, D A; Albrecht, G

    1993-01-01

    Local lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy at injection sites are well known side effects of treatment with insulin. Conditions favouring these local complications are created when repeated or continuous injections are given into the same areas. We report on a 27-year-old female patient who suffered from persistent local swellings after use of an external pump which continuously injected human insulin via indwelling cannulas.

  7. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  8. Nox2 mediates skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Souto Padron de Figueiredo, Alvaro; Salmon, Adam B; Bruno, Francesca; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Herman G; Halade, Ganesh V; Ahuja, Seema S; Clark, Robert A; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; El Jamali, Amina

    2015-05-22

    Inflammation and oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are consistently associated with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes. Although the role of Nox2, a major ROS-generating enzyme, is well described in host defense and inflammation, little is known about its potential role in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet was mitigated in Nox2-null mice compared with wild-type mice after 3 or 9 months on the diet. High fat feeding increased Nox2 expression, superoxide production, and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle tissue of wild-type mice but not in Nox2-null mice. Exposure of C2C12 cultured myotubes to either high glucose concentration, palmitate, or H2O2 decreases insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Pretreatment with catalase abrogated these effects, indicating a key role for H2O2 in mediating insulin resistance. Down-regulation of Nox2 in C2C12 cells by shRNA prevented insulin resistance induced by high glucose or palmitate but not H2O2. These data indicate that increased production of ROS in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in skeletal muscle cells is a consequence of Nox2 activation. This is the first report to show that Nox2 is a key mediator of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  9. [Comparison of biosynthetic human insulin and purified pork insulin. Studies in insulin-resistant obese patients using the insulin suppression test].

    PubMed

    Richard, J L; Rodier, M; Cavalie, G; Lachkar, H; Orsetti, A; Monnier, L; Mirouze, J

    1986-02-01

    An insulin suppression test performed in random order with either biosynthetic human insulin or purified pork insulin was used to compare biological activity of these two insulins in obese patients suffering from varying degrees of glucose intolerance. Blood glucose curve, steady-state blood glucose levels, insulin sensitivity indices and steady-state plasma insulin levels were identical during the two sets of tests. Furthermore endogenous insulin and glucagon secretion were similarly suppressed. The insulin suppression test is a simple and rapid procedure to compare the biological activity of fast-acting insulins. Our results confirm the insulin-resistance in obesity and clearly show that biosynthetic human and porcine insulins have similar biological potency.

  10. Novel Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Akt2 Protein Interaction Partners in L6 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Michael; Zhang, Xiangmin; Ma, Danjun; Yang, Zhao; Qi, Yue; Yi, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes are marked by an aberrant response in the insulin signaling network. The phosphoinositide-dependent serine/threonine kinase, Akt2, plays a key role in insulin signaling and glucose uptake, most notably within skeletal muscle. Protein-protein interaction regulates the functional consequence of Akt2 and in turn, Akt2’s role in glucose uptake. However, only few insulin-responsive Akt2 interaction partners have been identified in skeletal muscle cells. In the present work, rat L6 myoblasts, a widely used insulin sensitive skeletal muscle cell line, were used to examine endogenous, insulin-stimulated Akt2 protein interaction partners. Akt2 co-immunoprecipitation was coupled with 1D-SDS-PAGE and fractions were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS to reveal Akt2 protein-protein interactions. The pull-down assay displayed specificity for the Akt2 isoform; Akt1 and Akt3 unique peptides were not detected. A total of 49 were detected with a significantly increased (47) or decreased (2) association with Akt2 following insulin administration (n = 4; p<0.05). Multiple pathways were identified for the novel Akt2 interaction partners, such as the EIF2 and ubiquitination pathways. These data suggest that multiple new endogenous proteins may associate with Akt2 under basal as well as insulin-stimulated conditions, providing further insight into the insulin signaling network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002557. PMID:26465754

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Insulin: Elucidating the Conformational Changes that Enable Its Binding

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    A sequence of complex conformational changes is required for insulin to bind to the insulin receptor. Recent experimental evidence points to the B chain C-terminal (BC-CT) as the location of these changes in insulin. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations of insulin that reveal new insights into the structural changes occurring in the BC-CT. We find three key results: 1) The opening of the BC-CT is inherently stochastic and progresses through an open and then a “wide-open” conformation—the wide-open conformation is essential for receptor binding, but occurs only rarely. 2) The BC-CT opens with a zipper-like mechanism, with a hinge at the Phe24 residue, and is maintained in the dominant closed/inactive state by hydrophobic interactions of the neighboring Tyr26, the critical residue where opening of the BC-CT (activation of insulin) is initiated. 3) The mutation Y26N is a potential candidate as a therapeutic insulin analogue. Overall, our results suggest that the binding of insulin to its receptor is a highly dynamic and stochastic process, where initial docking occurs in an open conformation and full binding is facilitated through interactions of insulin receptor residues with insulin in its wide-open conformation. PMID:26629689

  12. Progranulin induces adipose insulin resistance and autophagic imbalance via TNFR1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Li, Huixia; Liu, Jiali; Xu, Lin; Guo, Qinyue; Sun, Hongzhi; Wu, Shufang

    2015-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) has recently emerged as an important regulator for insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of PGRN in vivo and the underlying role of progranulin in adipose insulin resistance involving the autophagy mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, mice treated with PGRN for 21 days exhibited the impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, remarkable adipose autophagy as well as attenuated insulin signaling via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, blockade of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) by TNFR1BP-Fc injection resulted in the restoration of impaired insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling induced by PGRN. Consistent with these findings in vivo, PGRN treatment induced defective insulin signaling, abnormal autophagic and mitochondrial activity in cultured adipocytes, while such effects were nullified by the blockade of TNFR1. In addition, PGRN-deficient adipocytes were more refractory to tunicamycin- or dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance, indicating the causative role of the TNFR1 pathway in the action of PGRN. Collectively, our findings support the notion that PGRN is a key regulator of insulin resistance and that PGRN may mediate its effects, at least in part, by inducing autophagy via the TNFR1-dependent mechanism.

  13. Stress-impaired transcription factor expression and insulin secretion in transplanted human islets

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhua; Kayton, Nora S.; Shostak, Alena; Poffenberger, Greg; Cyphert, Holly A.; Aramandla, Radhika; Thompson, Courtney; Papagiannis, Ioannis G.; Shiota, Masakazu; Stafford, John M.; Greiner, Dale L.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Stein, Roland; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and progressive β cell dysfunction. Excess glucose and lipid impair β cell function in islet cell lines, cultured rodent and human islets, and in vivo rodent models. Here, we examined the mechanistic consequences of glucotoxic and lipotoxic conditions on human islets in vivo and developed and/or used 3 complementary models that allowed comparison of the effects of hyperglycemic and/or insulin-resistant metabolic stress conditions on human and mouse islets, which responded quite differently to these challenges. Hyperglycemia and/or insulin resistance impaired insulin secretion only from human islets in vivo. In human grafts, chronic insulin resistance decreased antioxidant enzyme expression and increased superoxide and amyloid formation. In human islet grafts, expression of transcription factors NKX6.1 and MAFB was decreased by chronic insulin resistance, but only MAFB decreased under chronic hyperglycemia. Knockdown of NKX6.1 or MAFB expression in a human β cell line recapitulated the insulin secretion defect seen in vivo. Contrary to rodent islet studies, neither insulin resistance nor hyperglycemia led to human β cell proliferation or apoptosis. These results demonstrate profound differences in how excess glucose or lipid influence mouse and human insulin secretion and β cell activity and show that reduced expression of key islet-enriched transcription factors is an important mediator of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. PMID:27064285

  14. Insulin receptor binding motif tagged with IgG4 Fc (Yiminsu) works as an insulin sensitizer to activate Akt signaling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zou, T; Yang, H X; Gong, Y Z; Xie, X J; Liu, H Y; Liao, D F

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Interaction of insulin with the insulin receptor (IR) leads to both its auto-phosphorylation and phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on the IR substrate (IRS) proteins, initiating the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. The metabolic effects of IRS are known to be mediated through pathways involving phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), which result in the activation of Akt signaling. The C-terminal region of the IR ectodomain is required to facilitate the conformational changes that are required for high-affinity binding to insulin. Furthermore, the CH2 and CH3 domains in the Fc fragments of immunoglobulins are responsible for their binding to the Fc receptor, which triggers transcytosis. In this study, we created a fusion peptide of the C-terminal end of the human IR ectodomain with the IgG4 Fc fragment, including an intervening polyG fragment to ensure enough space for insulin binding. We named this new peptide "Yiminsu", meaning an insulin sensitizer. The results of our analyses show that Yiminsu significantly facilitates insulin signaling via the activation of Akt in hepatocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies are required to determine whether Yiminsu can act as an insulin sensitizer. PMID:26345813

  15. Effect of adiponectin on the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression, progesterone and androstenedione production by the porcine uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, N; Dobrzyn, K; Kiezun, M; Szeszko, K; Maleszka, A; Kaminski, T

    2016-06-01

    Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the human and porcine uterus and this endocrine system has important role in the regulation of reproductive processes. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B1) were observed in the human and porcine uterus during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy. The de novo synthesis of steroids in the uterus might be a crucial factor for effective implantation and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that adiponectin modulates the expression of key enzymes in the synthesis of the steroids: StAR, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) and HSD3B1, as well as progesterone (P4) and androstenedione (A4) secretion by the porcine uterus. Endometrial and myometrial explants harvested from gilts (n = 5) on days 10 to 11, 12 to 13, 15 to 16 and 27 to 28 of pregnancy and on days 10 to 11 of the oestrous cycle were cultured in vitro in the presence of adiponectin (1, 10 μg/ml), adiponectin with insulin (10 ng/ml) and insulin alone (10 ng/ml). Gene expression was examined by real-time PCR, and the secretion of the steroids was determined by radioimmunoassay. The content of StAR, CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 mRNAs and the secretion of P4 and A4 was modulated by adiponectin in endometrial and myometrial tissue explants during early pregnancy and the oestrous cycle. In this action adiponectin interacted with insulin. Insulin itself also regulated the steroidogenic activity of the porcine uterus. ere we reported, for the first time, the expression of CYP11A1 genes in the porcine endometrium and myometrium. Our novel findings indicate that adiponectin affects basal and insulin-stimulated expression of key steroidogenic genes and production of steroid hormones by the porcine uterus during maternal recognition of pregnancy and implantation. PMID:27512005

  16. Slow-Twitch Fiber Proportion in Skeletal Muscle Correlates With Insulin Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    McCurry, Melanie P.; Marino, Anna; South, Mark A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Layne, Andrew S.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The metabolic syndrome, characterized by central obesity with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, identifies people at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Objective: Our objective was to determine how the insulin resistance of the metabolic syndrome is related to muscle fiber composition. Design: Thirty-nine sedentary men and women (including 22 with the metabolic syndrome) had insulin responsiveness quantified using euglycemic clamps and underwent biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. Expression of insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate-1, glucose transporter 4, and ATP synthase were quantified with immunoblots and immunohistochemistry. Participants and Setting: Participants were nondiabetic, metabolic syndrome volunteers and sedentary control subjects studied at an outpatient clinic. Main Outcome Measures: Insulin responsiveness during an insulin clamp and the fiber composition of a muscle biopsy specimen were evaluated. Results: There were fewer type I fibers and more mixed (type IIa) fibers in metabolic syndrome subjects. Insulin responsiveness and maximal oxygen uptake correlated with the proportion of type I fibers. Insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and glucose transporter 4 expression were not different in whole muscle but all were significantly less in the type I fibers of metabolic syndrome subjects when adjusted for fiber proportion and fiber size. Fat oxidation and muscle mitochondrial expression were not different in the metabolic syndrome subjects. Conclusion: Lower proportion of type I fibers in metabolic syndrome muscle correlated with the severity of insulin resistance. Even though whole muscle content was normal, key elements of insulin action were consistently less in type I muscle fibers, suggesting their distribution was important in mediating insulin effects. PMID:23515448

  17. Insulin resistance in penile arteries from a rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Cristina; Sánchez, Ana; Martínez, Pilar; Raposo, Rafaela; Climent, Belén; García-Sacristán, Albino; Benedito, Sara; Prieto, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities accompanying metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, are all associated with endothelial dysfunction and are independent risk factors for erectile dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the vascular effects of insulin in penile arteries and whether these effects are impaired in a rat model of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZR) and their counterpart, lean Zucker rats (LZR), were mounted on microvascular myographs and the effects of insulin were assessed in the absence and presence of endothelium and of specific inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Insulin-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i were also examined. KEY RESULTS OZR exhibited mild hyperglycaemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertryglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin induced endothelium- and NO-dependent relaxations in LZR that were impaired in OZR. Inhibition of PI3K reduced relaxation induced by insulin and by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline, mainly in arteries from LZR. Antagonism of endothelin 1 (ET-1) receptors did not alter insulin-induced relaxation in either LZR or OZR, but MAPK blockade increased the responses in OZR. Insulin decreased [Ca2+]i, a response impaired in OZR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Insulin-induced relaxation was impaired in penile arteries of OZR due to altered NO release through the PI3K pathway and unmasking of a MAPK-mediated vasoconstriction. This vascular insulin resistance is likely to contribute to the endothelial dysfunction and erectile dysfunction associated with insulin resistant states. PMID:20735420

  18. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  19. Urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; Harlow, Siobán D; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.

  20. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  1. Mitotic Checkpoint Regulators Control Insulin Signaling and Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunhee; Zhang, Xiangli; Xing, Chao; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-07-28

    Insulin signaling regulates many facets of animal physiology. Its dysregulation causes diabetes and other metabolic disorders. The spindle checkpoint proteins MAD2 and BUBR1 prevent precocious chromosome segregation and suppress aneuploidy. The MAD2 inhibitory protein p31(comet) promotes checkpoint inactivation and timely chromosome segregation. Here, we show that whole-body p31(comet) knockout mice die soon after birth and have reduced hepatic glycogen. Liver-specific ablation of p31(comet) causes insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia and diminishes the plasma membrane localization of the insulin receptor (IR) in hepatocytes. MAD2 directly binds to IR and facilitates BUBR1-dependent recruitment of the clathrin adaptor AP2 to IR. p31(comet) blocks the MAD2-BUBR1 interaction and prevents spontaneous clathrin-mediated IR endocytosis. BUBR1 deficiency enhances insulin sensitivity in mice. BUBR1 depletion in hepatocytes or the expression of MAD2-binding-deficient IR suppresses the metabolic phenotypes of p31(comet) ablation. Our findings establish a major IR regulatory mechanism and link guardians of chromosome stability to nutrient metabolism. PMID:27374329

  2. Regulation of pancreatic somatostatin gene expression by insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Melissa M; Melroe, Gregory T; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2005-05-12

    Rainbow trout were used as a model system to study the effects of insulin and glucagon on the expression of preprosomatostatins (PPSS). We previously showed that the endocrine pancreas of trout contains three mRNAs that encode for distinct somatostatin-containing peptides: PPSS I, which contains somatostain-14 (SS-14) at its C-terminus, and two separate PPSS IIs, PPSS II' and PPSS II'', each containing [Tyr7, Gly10]-SS-14 at their C-terminus. Rainbow trout injected (100 ng/g body weight) with insulin displayed elevated expression of PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs. Glucagon-injected (100 ng/g body weight) animals displayed elevated pancreatic expression of all PPSS mRNAs compared to saline-injected control animals. Insulin directly stimulated the expression of pancreatic PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs in vitro in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of 4mM glucose. Glucagon, in the presence of 10mM glucose, directly stimulated the expression of all PPSS mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results indicate that the pancreatic expression of PPSS mRNAs is differentially regulated by insulin and glucagon and that the regulatory pattern is dependent on glucose concentration. PMID:15866425

  3. A Stress Signaling Pathway in Adipose Tissue Regulates Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Das, Madhumita; Mora, Alfonso; Zhang, Zhiyou; Jun, John Y.; Ko, Hwi Jin; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    A high-fat diet causes activation of the regulatory protein cJun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and triggers the development of insulin resistance. JNK1 is therefore a potential target for therapeutic treatment of metabolic syndrome. We explored the mechanism of JNK1 signaling by engineering mice in which the Jnk1 gene was ablated selectively in adipose tissue. JNK1-deficiency in adipose tissue suppressed high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in the liver. JNK1-dependent secretion of the inflammatory cytokine IL6 by adipose tissue caused increased expression of liver SOCS3, a protein that induces hepatic insulin resistance. Thus, JNK1 activation in adipose tissue can cause insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:19056984

  4. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling. PMID:24533033

  5. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling.

  6. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  7. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  8. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  9. Caveolin-2 regulation of the cell cycle in response to insulin in Hirc-B fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sangmin; Pak, Yunbae . E-mail: ybpak@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr

    2005-04-29

    The regulatory function of caveolin-2 in cell cycle regulation by insulin was investigated in human insulin receptor-overexpressed rat 1 fibroblast (Hirc-B) cells. Insulin increased induction of the caveolin-2 gene in a time-dependent manner. Direct interaction between ERK and caveolin-2 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and phosphorylated ERK increased the specific interaction in response to insulin. That insulin induced their nuclear co-localization over time was demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Insulin increased the S phase in the cell cycle by 6-fold. When recombinant caveolin-1 was transiently expressed, a decrease in the S phase was detected by flow-cytometry. The results indicate that the up-regulation of caveolin-2 in response to insulin activates the downstream signal cascades in the cell cycle, chiefly the increased phosphorylation of ERK, the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated ERK, and the subsequent activation of G0/G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. The results also suggest that DNA synthesis and the activation of the cell cycle by insulin are achieved concomitantly with an increase in the interaction between caveolin-2 and phosphorylated ERK, and the nuclear translocation of that complex. Taken together, we conclude that caveolin-2 positively regulates the insulin-induced cell cycle through activation of and direct interaction with ERK in Hirc-B cells.

  10. FOXO1 is Regulated by Insulin and IGF1 in Pituitary Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Skarra, Danalea V.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXO1 transcription factor is important for multiple aspects of reproductive function. We previously reported that FOXO1 functions as a repressor of gonadotropin hormone synthesis, but how FOXO1 is regulated in pituitary gonadotropes is unknown. The growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) function as key regulators of cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis in multiple cell types through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we found that insulin and IGF1 signaling in gonadotropes induced FOXO1 phosphorylation through the PI3K/AKT pathway in immortalized and primary cells, resulting in FOXO1 relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, insulin administration in vivo induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 and AKT in the pituitary. Thus, insulin and IGF1 act as negative regulators of FOXO1 activity and may serve to fine-tune gonadotropin expression. PMID:25676570

  11. 5α-Reductase inhibitors alter steroid metabolism and may contribute to insulin resistance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and vascular disease: a medical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Guay, Andre T; Zitzmann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    5α-reductases, a unique family of enzymes with a wide host of substrates and tissue distributions, play a key role in the metabolism of androgens, progestins, mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. These enzymes are the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of a host of neurosteroids, which are critical for central nervous system function. Androgens and glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function, carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism and energy balance. Thus, the inhibition of these regulatory enzymes results in an imbalance in steroid metabolism and clearance rates, which leads to altered physiological processes. In this report, we advance the hypothesis that inhibition of 5α-reductases by finasteride and dutasteride alters not only steroid metabolism but also interferes with the downstream actions and signaling of these hormones. We suggest that finasteride and dutasteride inhibit 5α-reductase activities and reduce the clearance of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids, potentiating insulin resistance, diabetes and vascular disease. PMID:25460297

  12. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. PMID:26017184

  13. Insulin Augments Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Induction of Translation in LβT2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Amy M.; Song, Hyunjin; Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Santos, Sharon J.; Low, Janine M.; Do, Minh-Ha T.; Lawson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The integrated signaling of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the pituitary gonadotropes may have a profound bearing on reproductive function, although the cross-receptor signaling mechanisms are unclear. We demonstrate that the insulin receptor is constitutively localized to non-caveolar lipid raft microdomains in the pituitary gonadotrope cell line LβT2. The localization to rafts is consistent with similar localization of the GnRH receptor. Insulin receptor phosphorylation occurs in raft domains and activates the downstream signaling targets Insulin Receptor Substrate1 and Akt/Protein Kinase B. Although insulin alone does not strongly activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase second messenger cascade, co-stimulation potentiates the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase by gonadotropin-releasing hormone. The co-stimulatory effect of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone is also evident in increased activation of cap-dependent translation. In contrast, co-stimulation attenuates Akt/Protein Kinase B activation. Our results show that both gonadotropin-releasing hormone and insulin are capable of mutually altering their respective regulatory signaling cascades. We suggest that this provides a mechanism to integrate neuropeptide and energy homeostatic signals to modulate reproductive function. PMID:19632296

  14. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B.; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. PMID:26017184

  15. Dual-mode of insulin action controls GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingke; Rubin, Bradley R.; Orme, Charisse M.; Karpikov, Alexander; Yu, Chenfei

    2011-01-01

    Insulin stimulates translocation of GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) to the surface of adipocytes, but precisely where insulin acts is controversial. Here we quantify the size, dynamics, and frequency of single vesicle exocytosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We use a new GSV reporter, VAMP2-pHluorin, and bypass insulin signaling by disrupting the GLUT4-retention protein TUG. Remarkably, in unstimulated TUG-depleted cells, the exocytic rate is similar to that in insulin-stimulated control cells. In TUG-depleted cells, insulin triggers a transient, twofold burst of exocytosis. Surprisingly, insulin promotes fusion pore expansion, blocked by acute perturbation of phospholipase D, which reflects both properties intrinsic to the mobilized vesicles and a novel regulatory site at the fusion pore itself. Prolonged stimulation causes cargo to switch from ∼60 nm GSVs to larger exocytic vesicles characteristic of endosomes. Our results support a model whereby insulin promotes exocytic flux primarily by releasing an intracellular brake, but also by accelerating plasma membrane fusion and switching vesicle traffic between two distinct circuits. PMID:21555461

  16. Modelling the regulatory system for diabetes mellitus with a threshold window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    Piecewise (or non-smooth) glucose-insulin models with threshold windows for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are proposed and analyzed with a view to improving understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. For glucose-insulin models with a single threshold, the existence and stability of regular, virtual, pseudo-equilibria and tangent points are addressed. Then the relations between regular equilibria and a pseudo-equilibrium are studied. Furthermore, the sufficient and necessary conditions for the global stability of regular equilibria and the pseudo-equilibrium are provided by using qualitative analysis techniques of non-smooth Filippov dynamic systems. Sliding bifurcations related to boundary node bifurcations were investigated with theoretical and numerical techniques, and insulin clinical therapies are discussed. For glucose-insulin models with a threshold window, the effects of glucose thresholds or the widths of threshold windows on the durations of insulin therapy and glucose infusion were addressed. The duration of the effects of an insulin injection is sensitive to the variation of thresholds. Our results indicate that blood glucose level can be maintained within a normal range using piecewise glucose-insulin models with a single threshold or a threshold window. Moreover, our findings suggest that it is critical to individualise insulin therapy for each patient separately, based on initial blood glucose levels.

  17. Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... the day. Pumps can also give "bolus" doses—one-time larger doses—of insulin at meals and at times when blood glucose is too high based on the programming set by the user. Frequent blood glucose monitoring ...

  18. Insulin and TOR signal in parallel through FOXO and S6K to promote epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Kakanj, Parisa; Moussian, Bernard; Grönke, Sebastian; Bustos, Victor; Eming, Sabine A.; Partridge, Linda; Leptin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The TOR and Insulin/IGF signalling (IIS) network controls growth, metabolism and ageing. Although reducing TOR or insulin signalling can be beneficial for ageing, it can be detrimental for wound healing, but the reasons for this difference are unknown. Here we show that IIS is activated in the cells surrounding an epidermal wound in Drosophila melanogaster larvae, resulting in PI3K activation and redistribution of the transcription factor FOXO. Insulin and TOR signalling are independently necessary for normal wound healing, with FOXO and S6K as their respective effectors. IIS is specifically required in cells surrounding the wound, and the effect is independent of glycogen metabolism. Insulin signalling is needed for the efficient assembly of an actomyosin cable around the wound, and constitutively active myosin II regulatory light chain suppresses the effects of reduced IIS. These findings may have implications for the role of insulin signalling and FOXO activation in diabetic wound healing. PMID:27713427

  19. Maternal Overweight Programs Insulin and Adiponectin Signaling in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Kartik; Kang, Ping; Harrell, Amanda; Zhong, Ying; Marecki, John C.; Ronis, Martin J. J.; Badger, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Gestational exposure to maternal overweight (OW) influences the risk of obesity in adult life. Male offspring from OW dams gain greater body weight and fat mass and develop insulin resistance when fed high-fat diets (45% fat). In this report, we identify molecular targets of maternal OW-induced programming at postnatal d 21 before challenge with the high-fat diet. We conducted global transcriptome profiling, gene/protein expression analyses, and characterization of downstream signaling of insulin and adiponectin pathways in conjunction with endocrine and biochemical characterization. Offspring born to OW dams displayed increased serum insulin, leptin, and resistin levels (P < 0.05) at postnatal d 21 preceding changes in body composition. A lipogenic transcriptome signature in the liver, before development of obesity, was evident in OW-dam offspring. A coordinated locus of 20 sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1-regulated target genes was induced by maternal OW. Increased nuclear levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and recruitment to the fatty acid synthase promoter were confirmed via ELISA and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. Higher fatty acid synthase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase protein and pAKT (Thr308) and phospho-insulin receptor-β were confirmed via immunoblotting. Maternal OW also attenuated AMP kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α signaling in the offspring liver, including transcriptional down-regulation of several peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-regulated genes. Hepatic mRNA and circulating fibroblast growth factor-21 levels were significantly lower in OW-dam offspring. Furthermore, serum levels of high-molecular-weight adiponectin (P < 0.05) were decreased in OW-dam offspring. Phosphorylation of hepatic AMP-kinase (Thr172) was significantly decreased in OW-dam offspring, along with lower AdipoR1 mRNA. Our results strongly suggest that gestational exposure to maternal

  20. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  1. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  2. Massive insulin overdose managed by monitoring daily insulin levels.

    PubMed

    Mork, Tyler A; Killeen, Colin T; Patel, Neel K; Dohnal, James M; Karydes, Harry C; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2011-09-01

    We present a case of a significant insulin overdose that was managed by monitoring daily plasma insulin levels. A 39-year-old male with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus presented to the Emergency Department via emergency medical services after an attempted suicide by insulin overdose. In the attempted suicide, he injected 800 U of insulin lispro and 3800 U of insulin glargine subcutaneously over several parts of his abdomen. The patient was conscious upon arrival to the emergency department. His vital parameters were within normal range. The abdominal examination, in particular, was nonfocal and showed no evidence of hematomas. He was awake, alert, conversant, tearful, and without any focal deficits. An infusion of 10% dextrose was begun at 100 mL/h with hourly blood glucose (BG) checks. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where his BG began to decrease and fluctuate between 50 and 80 mg/dL, and the rate of 10% dextrose was increased to 200 mL/h where it was maintained for the next 48 hours. The initial plasma insulin level was found to be 3712.6 uU/mL (reference range 2.6-31.1 uU/mL). At 10 hours, this had decreased to 1582.1 uU/ml. On five occasions, supplemental dextrose was needed when the BG was <70 mg/dL. Thirty-four hours after admission, the plasma insulin level was 724.8 uU/mL. Fifty-eight hours after admission, the plasma insulin level was 321.2 uU/mL, and the 10% dextrose infusion was changed to 5% dextrose solution at 200 mL/h. The plasma insulin levels continued to fall daily to 112.7 uU/mL at 80 hours and to 30.4 uU/mL at 108 hours. He was transferred to an inpatient psychiatric facility 109 hours after initial presentation. Monitoring daily plasma insulin levels and adjusting treatment on a day-to-day basis in terms of basal glucose infusions provides fewer opportunities for episodic hypoglycemia. Furthermore, it was easier to predict daily glucose requirements and eventual medical clearance based on the plasma levels.

  3. Insulin resistance uncoupled from dyslipidemia due to C-terminal PIK3R1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Tomlinson, Patsy; Payne, Felicity; Gast, Alexandra; Sleigh, Alison; Bottomley, William; Harris, Julie; Daly, Allan; Rocha, Nuno; Rudge, Simon; Clark, Jonathan; Kwok, Albert; Romeo, Stefano; McCann, Emma; Müksch, Barbara; Dattani, Mehul; Zucchini, Stefano; Wakelam, Michael; Foukas, Lazaros C.; Savage, David B.; Murphy, Rinki; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and low plasma adiponectin. Insulin resistance due to insulin receptor (INSR) dysfunction is associated with none of these, but when due to dysfunction of the downstream kinase AKT2 phenocopies obesity-related insulin resistance. We report 5 patients with SHORT syndrome and C-terminal mutations in PIK3R1, encoding the p85α/p55α/p50α subunits of PI3K, which act between INSR and AKT in insulin signaling. Four of 5 patients had extreme insulin resistance without dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis. In 3 of these 4, plasma adiponectin was preserved, as in insulin receptor dysfunction. The fourth patient and her healthy mother had low plasma adiponectin associated with a potentially novel mutation, p.Asp231Ala, in adiponectin itself. Cells studied from one patient with the p.Tyr657X PIK3R1 mutation expressed abundant truncated PIK3R1 products and showed severely reduced insulin-stimulated association of mutant but not WT p85α with IRS1, but normal downstream signaling. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, mutant p85α overexpression attenuated insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and adipocyte differentiation. Thus, PIK3R1 C-terminal mutations impair insulin signaling only in some cellular contexts and produce a subphenotype of insulin resistance resembling INSR dysfunction but unlike AKT2 dysfunction, implicating PI3K in the pathogenesis of key components of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27766312

  4. The insulin sensitizing effect of topiramate involves KATP channel activation in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, C P; Geerling, J J; van den Berg, S A A; van Diepen, H C; Garcia-Tardón, N; Thomas, A; Schröder-van der Elst, J P; Ouwens, D M; Pijl, H; Rensen, P C N; Havekes, L M; Guigas, B; Romijn, J A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Topiramate improves insulin sensitivity, in addition to its antiepileptic action. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the mechanism of the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate both in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a run-in high-fat diet for 6 weeks, before receiving topiramate or vehicle mixed in high-fat diet for an additional 6 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. The extent to which the insulin sensitizing effects of topiramate were mediated through the CNS were determined by concomitant i.c.v. infusion of vehicle or tolbutamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in neurons. The direct effects of topiramate on insulin signalling and glucose uptake were assessed in vivo and in cultured muscle cells. KEY RESULTS In hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp conditions, therapeutic plasma concentrations of topiramate (∼4 μg·mL−1) improved insulin sensitivity (glucose infusion rate + 58%). Using 2-deoxy-D-[3H]glucose, we established that topiramate improved the insulin-mediated glucose uptake by heart (+92%), muscle (+116%) and adipose tissue (+586%). Upon i.c.v. tolbutamide, the insulin-sensitizing effect of topiramate was completely abrogated. Topiramate did not directly affect glucose uptake or insulin signalling neither in vivo nor in cultured muscle cells. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS In conclusion, topiramate stimulates insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vivo through the CNS. These observations illustrate the possibility of pharmacological modulation of peripheral insulin resistance through a target in the CNS. PMID:23957854

  5. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  6. Cross-sectional association of dietary patterns with insulin resistance phenotypes among adults without diabets in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have linked dietary patterns which derived by cluster analysis with metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are key metabolic abnormalities which drive the metabolic syndrome. However, whether dietary patterns identified by cluster analysis are also associated wi...

  7. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics: effect of insulin on glucose disposal in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas P J; Haus, Jacob M; Saidel, Gerald M; Cabrera, Marco E; Kirwan, John P

    2010-06-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively distinguish significant transport and metabolic mechanisms from limited experimental data, we developed a physiologically based, multiscale mathematical model of cellular metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle. The model describes mass transport and metabolic processes including distinctive processes of the cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data: intracellular metabolite concentrations and patterns of glucose disposal. Model variations were simulated to investigate three alternative mechanisms to explain insulin enhancements: Model 1 (M.1), simple mass action; M.2, insulin-mediated activation of key metabolic enzymes (i.e., hexokinase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate dehydrogenase); or M.3, parallel activation by a phenomenological insulin-mediated intracellular signal that modifies reaction rate coefficients. These simulations indicated that models M.1 and M.2 were not sufficient to explain the experimentally measured metabolic responses. However, by application of mechanism M.3, the model predicts metabolite concentration changes and glucose partitioning patterns consistent with experimental data. The reaction rate fluxes quantified by this detailed model of insulin/glucose metabolism provide information that can be used to evaluate the development of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Large Size Cells in the Visceral Adipose Depot Predict Insulin Resistance in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Morvarid; Stefanovski, Darko; Hsu, Isabel R.; Iyer, Malini; Woolcott, Orison O.; Zheng, Dan; Catalano, Karyn J.; Chiu, Jenny D.; Kim, Stella P.; Harrison, Lisa N.; Ionut, Viorica; Lottati, Maya; Bergman, Richard N.; Richey, Joyce M.

    2015-01-01

    Adipocyte size plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance. We examined longitudinal changes in adipocyte size and distribution in visceral (VIS) and subcutaneous (SQ) fat during obesity-induced insulin resistance and after treatment with CB-1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant (RIM) in canines. We also examined whether adipocyte size and/or distribution is predictive of insulin resistance. Adipocyte morphology was assessed by direct microscopy and analysis of digital images in previously studied animals 6 weeks after high-fat diet (HFD) and 16 weeks of HFD + placebo (PL; n = 8) or HFD + RIM (1.25 mg/kg/day; n = 11). At 6 weeks, mean adipocyte diameter increased in both depots with a bimodal pattern only in VIS. Sixteen weeks of HFD+PL resulted in four normally distributed cell populations in VIS and a bimodal pattern in SQ. Multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with random-effects model of repeated measures showed that size combined with share of adipocytes >75 µm in VIS only was related to hepatic insulin resistance. VIS adipocytes >75 µm were predictive of whole body and hepatic insulin resistance. In contrast, there was no predictive power of SQ adipocytes >75 µm regarding insulin resistance. RIM prevented the formation of large cells, normalizing to pre-fat status in both depots. The appearance of hypertrophic adipocytes in VIS is a critical predictor of insulin resistance, supporting the deleterious effects of increased VIS adiposity in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:21836643

  9. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  10. Insulin Regulates Hepatic Triglyceride Secretion and Lipid Content via Signaling in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Thomas; Lindtner, Claudia; O'Hare, James; Hackl, Martina; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Tödter, Klaus; Heeren, Joerg; Krššák, Martin; Scheja, Ludger; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Buettner, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in obesity and insulin resistance and results from a net retention of lipids in the liver. A key mechanism to prevent steatosis is to increase secretion of triglycerides (TG) packaged as VLDLs. Insulin controls nutrient partitioning via signaling through its cognate receptor in peripheral target organs such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue and via signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) to orchestrate organ cross talk. While hepatic insulin signaling is known to suppress VLDL production from the liver, it is unknown whether brain insulin signaling independently regulates hepatic VLDL secretion. Here, we show that in conscious, unrestrained male Sprague Dawley rats the infusion of insulin into the third ventricle acutely increased hepatic TG secretion. Chronic infusion of insulin into the CNS via osmotic minipumps reduced the hepatic lipid content as assessed by noninvasive (1)H-MRS and lipid profiling independent of changes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis and food intake. In mice that lack the insulin receptor in the brain, hepatic TG secretion was reduced compared with wild-type littermate controls. These studies identify brain insulin as an important permissive factor in hepatic VLDL secretion that protects against hepatic steatosis. PMID:26861781

  11. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a physiologically relevant inhibitor of insulin signaling. GRK2 abundanceis increased in humans with metabolic syndrome and in different murine models of insulin resistance. To support GRK2 as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes and obesity, we investigated whether lowering GRK2 abundance reversed an ongoing systemic insulin-resistant phenotype, using a mouse model of tamoxifen-induced GRK2 ablation after high fat diet-dependent obesity and insulin resistance. Tamoxifen-triggered GRK2 deletion impeded further body weight gain, normalized fa sting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance and was associated with preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, thereby maintaining whole body glucose homeostasis. Moreover, when continued to be fed a high fat diet, these animals displayed reduced fat mass and smaller adipocytes, were resistant to the development of liver steatosis, and showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory markers in the liver. Our results indicate that GRK2 acts as a hub to control metabolic functions in different tissues, which is key to controlling insulin resistance development in vivo. These data suggest that inhibiting GRK2 could reverse an established insulin-resistant and obese phenotype, thereby putting forward this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target linking glucose homeostasis and regulation of adiposity. PMID:26198359

  12. Consensus evidence-based guidelines for insulin initiation, optimization and continuation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shah, Siddharth; Sharma, S K; Singh, Parminder; Muruganathan, A; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of diabetes continues to increase despite advances in detection and therapy. Majority of the patients fail to achieve desired glycaemic targets even with maximal tolerated doses of oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs, necessitating insulin therapy. Although, much attention has been given to early insulin initiation, yet substantial proportion of patients do not achieve glycaemic targets as they fail to initiate or intensify insulin therapy at the appropriate time. The choice of an insulin regimen and timely initiation and intensification of insulin therapy are key factors in achieving optimal glycaemic control. This current consensus guideline developed by a panel of experts aims to provide specific recommendations based on existing guidelines and published data on initiation and intensification of insulin therapy in management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using basal, premixed and basal-bolus insulin regimens in Indian clinical practice. The panel recognized the need to upgrade the existing guidelines for management of T2DM and endorsed recommendations that are in line with Indian insulin guidelines.

  13. The role of exogenous insulin in the complex of hepatic lipidosis and ketosis associated with insulin resistance phenomenon in postpartum dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Hayirli, A

    2006-10-01

    As a result of a marked decline in dry matter intake (DMI) prior to parturition and a slow rate of increase in DMI relative to milk production after parturition, dairy cattle experience a negative energy balance. Changes in nutritional and metabolic status during the periparturient period predispose dairy cattle to develop hepatic lipidosis and ketosis. The metabolic profile during early lactation includes low concentrations of serum insulin, plasma glucose, and liver glycogen and high concentrations of serum glucagon, adrenaline, growth hormone, plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate and non-esterified fatty acids, and liver triglyceride. Moreover, during late gestation and early lactation, flow of nutrients to fetus and mammary tissues are accorded a high degree of metabolic priority. This priority coincides with lowered responsiveness and sensitivity of extrahepatic tissues to insulin, which presumably plays a key role in development of hepatic lipidosis and ketosis. Hepatic lipidosis and ketosis compromise production, immune function, and fertility. Cows with hepatic lipidosis and ketosis have low tissue responsiveness to insulin owing to ketoacidosis. Insulin has numerous roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Insulin is an anabolic hormone and acts to preserve nutrients as well as being a potent feed intake regulator. In addition to the major replacement therapy to alleviate severity of negative energy balance, administration of insulin with concomitant delivery of dextrose increases efficiency of treatment for hepatic lipidosis and ketosis. However, data on use of insulin to prevent these lipid-related metabolic disorders are limited and it should be investigated.

  14. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-W; Biggar, K K; Storey, K B

    2013-01-01

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans.

  15. Activation of G proteins by GIV-GEF is a pivot point for insulin resistance and sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Pedram, Shabnam; Midde, Krishna; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Henry, Robert R.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a metabolic disorder characterized by impaired insulin signaling and cellular glucose uptake. The current paradigm for insulin signaling centers upon the insulin receptor (InsR) and its substrate IRS1; the latter is believed to be the sole conduit for postreceptor signaling. Here we challenge that paradigm and show that GIV/Girdin, a guanidine exchange factor (GEF) for the trimeric G protein Gαi, is another major hierarchical conduit for the metabolic insulin response. By virtue of its ability to directly bind InsR, IRS1, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, GIV serves as a key hub in the immediate postreceptor level, which coordinately enhances the metabolic insulin response and glucose uptake in myotubes via its GEF function. Site-directed mutagenesis or phosphoinhibition of GIV-GEF by the fatty acid/protein kinase C-theta pathway triggers IR. Insulin sensitizers reverse phosphoinhibition of GIV and reinstate insulin sensitivity. We also provide evidence for such reversible regulation of GIV-GEF in skeletal muscles from patients with IR. Thus GIV is an essential upstream component that couples InsR to G-protein signaling to enhance the metabolic insulin response, and impairment of such coupling triggers IR. We also provide evidence that GIV-GEF serves as therapeutic target for exogenous manipulation of physiological insulin response and reversal of IR in skeletal muscles. PMID:26378251

  16. Activation of G proteins by GIV-GEF is a pivot point for insulin resistance and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gary S; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Pedram, Shabnam; Midde, Krishna; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Henry, Robert R; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-11-15

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a metabolic disorder characterized by impaired insulin signaling and cellular glucose uptake. The current paradigm for insulin signaling centers upon the insulin receptor (InsR) and its substrate IRS1; the latter is believed to be the sole conduit for postreceptor signaling. Here we challenge that paradigm and show that GIV/Girdin, a guanidine exchange factor (GEF) for the trimeric G protein Gαi, is another major hierarchical conduit for the metabolic insulin response. By virtue of its ability to directly bind InsR, IRS1, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, GIV serves as a key hub in the immediate postreceptor level, which coordinately enhances the metabolic insulin response and glucose uptake in myotubes via its GEF function. Site-directed mutagenesis or phosphoinhibition of GIV-GEF by the fatty acid/protein kinase C-theta pathway triggers IR. Insulin sensitizers reverse phosphoinhibition of GIV and reinstate insulin sensitivity. We also provide evidence for such reversible regulation of GIV-GEF in skeletal muscles from patients with IR. Thus GIV is an essential upstream component that couples InsR to G-protein signaling to enhance the metabolic insulin response, and impairment of such coupling triggers IR. We also provide evidence that GIV-GEF serves as therapeutic target for exogenous manipulation of physiological insulin response and reversal of IR in skeletal muscles. PMID:26378251

  17. Exploring the Evolutionary Relationship of Insulin Receptor Substrate Family Using Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy; Hsu, Minna J.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate (IRS) harbors proteins such as IRS1, IRS2, IRS3, IRS4, IRS5 and IRS6. These key proteins act as vital downstream regulators in the insulin signaling pathway. However, little is known about the evolutionary relationship among the IRS family members. This study explores the potential to depict the evolutionary relationship among the IRS family using bioinformatics, algorithm analysis and mathematical models. PMID:21364910

  18. Metabolic flexibility and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Jose E; Moro, Cedric; Ravussin, Eric

    2008-11-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability. The inability to modify fuel oxidation in response to changes in nutrient availability has been implicated in the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid and insulin resistance. The metabolic flexibility assessed by the ability to switch from fat to carbohydrate oxidation is usually impaired during a hyperinsulinemic clamp in insulin-resistant subjects; however, this "metabolic inflexibility" is mostly the consequence of impaired cellular glucose uptake. Indeed, after controlling for insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate (amount of glucose available for oxidation), metabolic flexibility is not altered in obesity regardless of the presence of type 2 diabetes. To understand how intramyocellular lipids accumulate and cause insulin resistance, the assessment of metabolic flexibility to high-fat diets is more relevant than metabolic flexibility during a hyperinsulinemic clamp. An impaired capacity to upregulate muscle lipid oxidation in the face of high lipid supply may lead to increased muscle fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Surprisingly, very few studies have investigated the response to high-fat diets. In this review, we discuss the role of glucose disposal rate, adipose tissue lipid storage, and mitochondrial function on metabolic flexibility. Additionally, we emphasize the bias of using the change in respiratory quotient to calculate metabolic flexibility and propose novel approaches to assess metabolic flexibility. On the basis of current evidence, one cannot conclude that impaired metabolic flexibility is responsible for the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid and insulin resistance. We propose to study metabolic flexibility in response to high-fat diets in individuals having contrasting degree of insulin sensitivity and/or mitochondrial characteristics. PMID:18765680

  19. Expression and localization of insulin-like growth factor system in corpus luteum during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and the effect of insulin-like growth factor I on production of vascular endothelial growth factor and progesterone in luteal cells cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uniyal, S; Panda, R P; Chouhan, V S; Yadav, V P; Hyder, I; Dangi, S S; Gupta, M; Khan, F A; Sharma, G T; Bag, S; Sarkar, M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the expression and localization of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system at different stages of buffalo CL and the role of IGF-I in stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and progesterone (P4) production in cultured luteal cells. The mRNA expression of IGF system, VEGF, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450scc, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression of IGF was demonstrated by Western blot and localization by immunohistochemistry. Progesterone and VEGF production was assayed using RIA and ELISA. A relatively high mRNA expression of IGF-I and IGF-II in early, mid- and late luteal phases with immunoreactivity mostly restricted to cytoplasm of large luteal cells indicates their autocrine role, whereas very weak immunoreactivity in endothelial cells during the mid-luteal phase indicates their paracrine role. Insulin-like growth factor receptors, IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, were restricted to large luteal cells with high mRNA and protein expressions in the mid-luteal phase. The significantly higher expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, -3, -5, and -6 in the early or mid-luteal phase suggested their stimulatory role, whereas that of IGFBP-2 and -4 in mid-, late, and regressive luteal stages implied their inhibitory role. The mRNA expressions of key steroidogenic factors and VEGF were significantly higher (P < 0.05) when the culture medium was supplemented with 100 ng/mL of IGF-I for 72 hours. Moreover, IGF-I at a dose of 100 ng/mL increased P4 and VEGF production (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that IGF family members via their autocrine and paracrine effect play significant roles in promoting angiogenesis through the production of VEGF in luteal cells and steroid synthesis through the production of key steroidogenic factors.

  20. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. The story of insulin discovery.

    PubMed

    Karamitsos, Dimitrios T

    2011-08-01

    Many researchers had tried to isolate insulin from animal pancreas, but Frederick Banting, a young surgeon, and Charles Best, a medical student, were the ones that succeeded. They both worked hard in very difficult conditions in the late 1921 and early 1922 until final success. They encountered problems with the impurities of their extract that was causing inflammations, but J. Collip, their late biochemist collaborator, worked many hours and was soon able to prepare cleaner insulin, free from impurities. This extract was administered successfully to L. Thomson, a ketotic young diabetic patient, on 23 January 1922. Following this, Eli Lilly & Co of USA started the commercial production of insulin, soon followed by the Danish factories Nordisc and NOVO as well as the British Wellcome. Nicolae Paulescu who was professor of Physiology in Bucharest, was also quite close to the discovery of insulin but the researchers in Toronto were faster and more efficient. Banting and Macleod won the Nobel price, which Banting shared with Best and Macleod with J. Collip. The contribution of Paulescu in insulin discovery was recognized after his death. PMID:21864746

  2. Patient Perspectives on Biosimilar Insulin.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Alasdair R; Venkat, Manu V; Brown, Adam S; Dong, Jessica P; Ran, Nina A; Hirsch, James S; Close, Kelly L

    2014-01-01

    Given that a new wave of biosimilar insulins will likely enter the market in coming years, it is important to understand patient perspectives on these biosimilars. A survey (N = 3214) conducted by the market research company dQ&A, which maintains a 10 000-patient panel of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in roughly equal measure, investigated these perspectives. The survey asked whether patients would switch to a hypothetical less expensive biosimilar insulin that was approved by their provider. Approximately 66% of respondents reported that they would "definitely" or "likely" use a biosimilar insulin, while 17% reported that they were "unlikely" to use or would "definitely not use" such a product. Type 2 diabetes patients demonstrated slightly more willingness to use biosimilars than type 1 diabetes patients. Common patient concerns included whether biosimilars would be as effective as reference products (~650 respondents), whether side effect profiles would deviate from those of reference products (~220 respondents), and the design of the delivery device (~50 respondents). While cost savings associated with biosimilar insulins could increase patient uptake, especially among patients without health insurance (some recent estimates suggest that biosimilars will come at a substantial discount), patients may still need assurance that a cheaper price tag is not necessarily associated with substandard quality. Overall, the dQ&A survey indicates that the majority of patients are willing to consider biosimilar insulins, but manufacturers will need to work proactively to address and assuage patient concerns regarding efficacy, safety, drug administration, and other factors. PMID:24876533

  3. Oral insulin--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Raj, N K Kavitha; Sharma, Chandra P

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally controlled quite well with the administration of oral medications or by the use of insulin injections. The current practice is the use of one or more doses, intermediate or long acting insulin per day. Oral insulin is a promising yet experimental method providing tight glycemic control for patients with diabetes. A biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantage over conventional drug delivery systems. The engineered polymer microspheres made of erodable polymer display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular lining can traverse both the mucosal epithelium and the follicle associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. Alginate, a natural polymer recovered from seaweed is being developed as a nanoparticle for the delivery of insulin without being destroyed in the stomach. Alginate is in fact finding application in biotechnology industry as thickening agent, a gelling agent and a colloid stabilizer. Alginate has in addition, several other properties that have enabled it to be used as a matrix for entrapment and for the delivery of a variety of proteins such as insulin and cells. These properties include: a relatively inert aqueous environment within the matrix; a mild room temperature encapsulation process free of organic solvents; a high gel porosity which allows for high diffusion rates of macromolecules; the ability to control this porosity with simple coating procedures and dissolution and biodegradation of the system under normal physiological conditions.

  4. Protection against the synaptic targeting and toxicity of Alzheimer's-associated Aβ oligomers by insulin mimetic chiro-inositols

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Jason; Thorner, Michael; Brautigan, David; Larner, Joseph; Klein, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that correlates highly with synapse loss. This loss appears due to the synaptic accumulation of toxic Aβ oligomers (ADDLs), which damages synapse structure and function. Although it has been reported that oligomer binding and toxicity can be prevented by stimulation of neuronal insulin signaling with PPARγ agonists, these agonists have problematic side effects. We therefore investigated the therapeutic potential of chiro-inositols, insulin-sensitizing compounds safe for human consumption. Chiro-inositols have been studied extensively for treatment of diseases associated with peripheral insulin resistance, but their insulin mimetic function in memory-relevant central nervous system (CNS) cells is unknown. Here we demonstrate that mature cultures of hippocampal neurons respond to d-chiro-inositol (DCI), pinitol (3-O-methyl DCI), and the inositol glycan INS-2 (pinitol β-1-4 galactosamine) with increased phosphorylation in key upstream components in the insulin-signaling pathway (insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and Akt). Consistent with insulin stimulation, DCI treatment promotes rapid withdrawal of dendritic insulin receptors. With respect to neuroprotection, DCI greatly enhances the ability of insulin to prevent ADDL-induced synapse damage (EC50 of 90 nM). The mechanism comprises inhibition of oligomer binding at synapses and requires insulin/IGF signaling. DCI showed no effects on Aβ oligomerization. We propose that inositol glycans and DCI, a compound already established as safe for human consumption, have potential as AD therapeutics by protecting CNS synapses against Aβ oligomers through their insulin mimetic activity.—Pitt, J., Thorner, M., Brautigan, D., Larner, J., Klein, W. L. Protection against the synaptic targeting and toxicity of Alzheimer's-associated Aβ oligomers by insulin mimetic chiro-inositols. PMID:23073831

  5. Transplacental passage of insulin complexed to antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, W A; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    The passage of plasma proteins across the placental barrier in humans is known to be highly selective. Thus, free maternal insulin has been reported not to cross the normal maternofetal barrier, although insulin-binding antibodies have been detected in newborn infants whose diabetic mothers received insulin therapy. In this report we demonstrate, with the use of a human antiserum that permits distinction between human and animal insulins, that insulin in the cord blood of each of two neonates of insulin-treated diabetic mothers was, in part, animal insulin. The higher the antibody titer of the mother the greater was the total insulin in the cord plasma and the greater was the fraction that was animal insulin. In case 1 cord plasma insulin was 0.7 unit/liter, of which 10% was animal insulin; in case 2 cord plasma insulin was 3.5 units/liter, of which 25% was animal insulin. The demonstration that antigen restricted from transplacental passage can be transferred while complexed to antibody raises the question whether such fetal exposure would induce partial or total immunologic unresponsiveness subsequently if the fetus were rechallenged with the same antigen. PMID:7027265

  6. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  7. Insulin-glycerolipid mediators and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, M.L.; Pollet, R.J. )

    1988-06-01

    Insulin is an anabolic polypeptide hormone with pleiotrophic effects. During the decades since the initial description by Banting and Best, the acute effects of insulin have been widely studied with particular focus on the mechanism or mechanisms of insulin activation of hexose transport and regulation of metabolic enzyme activity. However, recently there has been a major expansion of investigation to include insulin regulation of gene expression with multiple insulin-sensitive specific mRNAs now reported. In this review, we explore the involvement of insulin-induced changes in plasma membrane glycerolipid metabolism in the transmembrane signaling process required for insulin regulation of mRNA levels. Insulin increase diacylglycerol levels in insulin-responsive cells, and synthetic diacylglycerols or their phorbol ester diacylglycerol analogs, such as 4{beta}, 9{alpha}, 12{beta}, 13{alpha}, 20-pentahydroxytiglia-1,6-dien-3-one 12{beta}-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), mimic insulin regulation of ornithine decarboxylase mRNA, c-fos mRNA, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels. This suggests that insulin regulation of specific mRNA levels may be mediated by insulin-induced changes in phospholipid metabolism and that diacylglycerol may play a pivotal role in insulin regulation of gene expression.

  8. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  9. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  10. 76 FR 40118 - Spring 2011 Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    .../ , http:// Not in FR www.regulations.gov , and http://www.epa.gov/lawsregs/search/regagenda.html...://www.regulations.gov/ Not in FR fdmspublic/component/ main?main=DocketDetail&d=EPA-HQ- OA-2008-0265 and... in FR B. What Are EPA's Regulatory Priorities, and What Key Principles, Statutes, and...

  11. Ultra-structural study of insulin granules in pancreatic β-cells of db/db mouse by scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanhong; Zhao, Wei; Du, Wen; Zhang, Xiang; Ji, Gang; Ying, Wang; Xu, Tao

    2012-07-01

    Insulin granule trafficking is a key step in the secretion of glucose-stimulated insulin from pancreatic β-cells. The main feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the failure of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient amounts of insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. In this work, we developed and applied tomography based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image intact insulin granules in the β-cells of mouse pancreatic islets. Using three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, we found decreases in both the number and the grey level of insulin granules in db/db mouse pancreatic β-cells. Moreover, insulin granules were closer to the plasma membrane in diabetic β-cells than in control cells. Thus, 3D ultra-structural tomography may provide new insights into the pathology of insulin secretion in T2D.

  12. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor γ (RORγ): A Novel Participant in the Diurnal Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Kang, Hong Soon; Freudenberg, Johannes; DeGraff, Laura M.; Jothi, Raja; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic circadian clock plays a key role in the daily regulation of glucose metabolism, but the precise molecular mechanisms that coordinate these two biological processes are not fully understood. In this study, we identify a novel connection between the regulation of RORγ by the clock machinery and the diurnal regulation of glucose metabolic networks. We demonstrate that particularly at daytime, mice deficient in RORγ exhibit improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance due to reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis. This is associated with a reduced peak expression of several glucose metabolic genes critical in the control of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. Genome-wide cistromic profiling, promoter and mutation analysis support the concept that RORγ regulates the transcription of several glucose metabolic genes directly by binding ROREs in their promoter regulatory region. Similar observations were made in liver-specific RORγ-deficient mice suggesting that the changes in glucose homeostasis were directly related to the loss of hepatic RORγ expression. Altogether, our study shows that RORγ regulates several glucose metabolic genes downstream of the hepatic clock and identifies a novel metabolic function for RORγ in the diurnal regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis and insulin sensitivity. The inhibition of the activation of several metabolic gene promoters by an RORγ antagonist suggests that antagonists may provide a novel strategy in the management of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. PMID:24831725

  13. Deepure Tea Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Na; Li, Juan; Mu, Hong-Na; Liu, Yu-Ying; Wang, Ming-Xia; Pan, Chun-Shui; Fan, Jing-Yu; Ye, Fei; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the protective effects of Deepure tea against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and elucidate the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks to induce the metabolic syndrome. In the Deepure tea group, HFD mice were administrated with Deepure tea at 160 mg/kg/day by gavage for 14 days. The mice in HFD group received water in the same way over the same period. The age-matched C57BL/6 mice fed with standard chow were used as normal control. Compared to the mice in HFD group, mice that received Deepure tea showed significantly reduced plasma insulin and improved insulin sensitivity. Deepure tea increased the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2), which plays an important role in hepatic insulin signaling pathway. Deepure tea also led to a decrease in hepatic fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation, which were mediated by the downregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthesis (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins that are involved in liver lipogenesis. These results suggest that Deepure tea may be effective for protecting against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis via modulating IRS-2 and downstream signaling SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC. PMID:26504484

  14. PTPRD silencing by DNA hypermethylation decreases insulin receptor signaling and leads to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yng-Tay; Lin, Wei-D; Liao, Wen-Lin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2015-05-30

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) data showed that the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta (PTPRD) is associated with increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Han Chinese. A replication study indicated that PTPRD is involved in the insulin signaling pathway; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We evaluated PTPRD expression in patients with T2D and controls. PTPRD expression levels were lower in patients and were correlated with the duration of the disease. Overexpression of the human insulin receptor PPARγ2 in HepG2 cells induced overexpression of PTPRD and the insulin receptor. PTPRD knockdown, using a shRNA, resulted in down-regulation of the insulin receptor. These results indicate that PTPRD activates PPARγ2 in the insulin signaling pathway. Similar results for PTPRD expression were found using a T2D mouse model. Silencing of PTPRD was caused by DNA methylation in T2D mice and patients, and correlated with DNMT1 expression. Furthermore, we showed that a DNMT1 SNP (rs78789647) was correlated with susceptibility to T2D. This study shows for the first time that DNMT1 caused PTPRD DNA hypermethylation and induced insulin signaling silencing in T2D patients. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the crucial roles of these regulatory elements in human T2D. PMID:26079428

  15. PTPRD silencing by DNA hypermethylation decreases insulin receptor signaling and leads to type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yng-Tay; Lin, Wei-De; Liao, Wen-Lin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) data showed that the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta (PTPRD) is associated with increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Han Chinese. A replication study indicated that PTPRD is involved in the insulin signaling pathway; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We evaluated PTPRD expression in patients with T2D and controls. PTPRD expression levels were lower in patients and were correlated with the duration of the disease. Overexpression of the human insulin receptor PPARγ2 in HepG2 cells induced overexpression of PTPRD and the insulin receptor. PTPRD knockdown, using a shRNA, resulted in down-regulation of the insulin receptor. These results indicate that PTPRD activates PPARγ2 in the insulin signaling pathway. Similar results for PTPRD expression were found using a T2D mouse model. Silencing of PTPRD was caused by DNA methylation in T2D mice and patients, and correlated with DNMT1 expression. Furthermore, we showed that a DNMT1 SNP (rs78789647) was correlated with susceptibility to T2D. This study shows for the first time that DNMT1 caused PTPRD DNA hypermethylation and induced insulin signaling silencing in T2D patients. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the crucial roles of these regulatory elements in human T2D. PMID:26079428

  16. MiR-155 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity by Coordinated Regulation of Multiple Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Taoyan; Lin, Xia; Chen, Li; Zeng, Hui; Han, Yanjiang; Wu, Lihong; Huang, Shun; Wang, Meng; Huang, Shenhao; Xie, Raoying; Liang, Liqi; Liu, Yu; Liu, Ruiyu; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Jing; Wang, Shengchun; Sun, Penghui; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xu, Kang; Du, Tao; Xiao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    miR-155 plays critical roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes, however, its function in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity and underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we reveal that miR-155 levels are downregulated in serum from type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, suggesting that miR-155 might be involved in blood glucose control and diabetes. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mice demonstrate that miR-155 has no effects on the pancreatic β-cell proliferation and function. Global transgenic overexpression of miR-155 in mice leads to hypoglycaemia, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Conversely, miR-155 deficiency in mice causes hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. In addition, consistent with a positive regulatory role of miR-155 in glucose metabolism, miR-155 positively modulates glucose uptake in all cell types examined, while mice overexpressing miR-155 transgene show enhanced glycolysis, and insulin-stimulated AKT and IRS-1 phosphorylation in liver, adipose tissue or skeletal muscle. Furthermore, we reveal these aforementioned phenomena occur, at least partially, through miR-155-mediated repression of important negative regulators (i.e. C/EBPβ, HDAC4 and SOCS1) of insulin signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-155 is a positive regulator of insulin sensitivity with potential applications for diabetes treatment. PMID:27711113

  17. PTPRD silencing by DNA hypermethylation decreases insulin receptor signaling and leads to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yng-Tay; Lin, Wei-D; Liao, Wen-Lin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2015-05-30

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) data showed that the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta (PTPRD) is associated with increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Han Chinese. A replication study indicated that PTPRD is involved in the insulin signaling pathway; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We evaluated PTPRD expression in patients with T2D and controls. PTPRD expression levels were lower in patients and were correlated with the duration of the disease. Overexpression of the human insulin receptor PPARγ2 in HepG2 cells induced overexpression of PTPRD and the insulin receptor. PTPRD knockdown, using a shRNA, resulted in down-regulation of the insulin receptor. These results indicate that PTPRD activates PPARγ2 in the insulin signaling pathway. Similar results for PTPRD expression were found using a T2D mouse model. Silencing of PTPRD was caused by DNA methylation in T2D mice and patients, and correlated with DNMT1 expression. Furthermore, we showed that a DNMT1 SNP (rs78789647) was correlated with susceptibility to T2D. This study shows for the first time that DNMT1 caused PTPRD DNA hypermethylation and induced insulin signaling silencing in T2D patients. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the crucial roles of these regulatory elements in human T2D.

  18. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the KRLB Region in Insulin Receptor Substrate-2

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Tseng, Y.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; White, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1 and -2) are crucial adaptor proteins in mediating the metabolic and mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. These proteins consist of a pleckstrin homology domain, a phosphotyrosine binding domain and a C-terminal region containing numerous sites of tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation. Previous yeast two-hybrid studies identified a region unique to IRS2, termed the kinase regulatory-loop binding (KRLB) region, which interacts with the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the insulin receptor kinase in complex with a 15-residue peptide from the KRLB region. In the structure, this segment of IRS2 is bound in the kinase active site with Tyr628 positioned for phosphorylation. Although Tyr628 was phosphorylated by the insulin receptor, its catalytic turnover was poor, resulting in kinase inhibition. Our studies indicate that the KRLB region functions to limit tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2.

  19. Insulin signaling controls neurotransmission via the 4eBP-dependent modification of the exocytotic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Rebekah Elizabeth; Azpurua, Jorge; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Altered insulin signaling has been linked to widespread nervous system dysfunction including cognitive dysfunction, neuropathy and susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. However, knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on neuronal function is incomplete. Here, we show that cell autonomous insulin signaling within the Drosophila CM9 motor neuron regulates the release of neurotransmitter via alteration of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. This effect of insulin utilizes the FOXO-dependent regulation of the thor gene, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the eif-4e binding protein (4eBP). A critical target of this regulatory mechanism is Complexin, a synaptic protein known to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We find that the amounts of Complexin protein observed at the synapse is regulated by insulin and genetic manipulations of Complexin levels support the model that increased synaptic Complexin reduces neurotransmission in response to insulin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16807.001 PMID:27525480

  20. Insulin induction of SREBP-1c in rodent liver requires LXRα-C/EBPβ complex

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin increases lipid synthesis in liver by activating transcription of the gene encoding sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). SREBP-1c activates the transcription of all genes necessary for fatty acid synthesis. Insulin induction of SREBP-1c requires LXRα, a nuclear receptor. Transcription of SREBP-1c also requires transcription factor C/EBPβ, but a connection between LXRα and C/EBPβ has not been made. Here we show that LXRα and C/EBPβ form a complex that can be immunoprecipitated from rat liver nuclei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the LXRα-C/EBPβ complex binds to the SREBP-1c promoter in a region that contains two binding sites for LXRα and is known to be required for insulin induction. Knockdown of C/EBPβ in fresh rat hepatocytes or mouse livers in vivo reduces the ability of insulin to increase SREBP-1c mRNA. The LXRα-C/EBPβ complex is bound to the SREBP-1c promoter in the absence or presence of insulin, indicating that insulin acts not by increasing the formation of this complex, but rather by activating it. PMID:27382175

  1. Insulin Glargine (rDNA origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  2. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  3. Insulin Detemir (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  4. Insulin Degludec (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  5. Metabolism A higher power for insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, Fiona M.

    2005-04-01

    Glucose output from the liver is tightly regulated by insulin. But insulin holds sway over more than the liver - an unappreciated circuit in glucose control involves the opening of ion channels in the brain.

  6. Quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    In metabolically healthy humans, adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to insulin. Similar to muscle and liver, adipose tissue lipolysis is insulin resistant in adults with central obesity and type 2 diabetes. Perhaps uniquely, however, insulin resistance in adipose tissue may directly contribute to development of insulin resistance in muscle and liver because of the increased delivery of free fatty acids to those tissues. It has been hypothesized that insulin adipose tissue resistance may precede other metabolic defects in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, precise and reproducible quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, in vivo, in humans, is an important measure. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on how to determine adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. We review the methods available to quantitate adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  7. Emerging Trends in Noninvasive Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Arun; Kumar, Nitin; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with various aspects of oral insulin delivery system. Insulin is used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by the elevated glucose level (above the normal range) in the blood stream, that is, hyperglycemia. Oral route of administration of any drug is the most convenient route. Development of oral insulin is still under research. Oral insulin will cause the avoidance of pain during the injection (in subcutaneous administration), anxiety due to needle, and infections which can be developed. Different types of enzyme inhibitors, like sodium cholate, camostat, mesilate, bacitracin, leupeptin, and so forth, have been used to prevent insulin from enzymatic degradation. Subcutaneous route has been used for administration of insulin, but pain and itching at the site of administration can occur. That is why various alternative routes of insulin administration like oral route are under investigation. In this paper authors summarized advancement in insulin delivery with their formulation aspects. PMID:26556194

  8. Public Key Cryptography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  9. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Langston, M.E.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  11. An Overview of Concentrated Insulin Products.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nathan A; Sisson, Evan

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF This article provides a summary of the use of available concentrated insulins in the outpatient treatment of patients with diabetes. Concentrated insulins work through the same mechanisms as other insulin products. They vary from each other in concentrations and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics profiles but are each similar to their U-100 concentration counterparts. Patient education is important to minimize errors and the risk of hypoglycemia when using these insulin formulations.

  12. Insulin action on the liver in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, A D; Moore, M C; Sindelar, D K; Edgerton, D S

    2007-11-01

    Insulin has a potent inhibitory effect on hepatic glucose production by direct action at hepatic receptors. The hormone also inhibits glucose production by suppressing both lipolysis in the fat cell and secretion of glucagon by the alpha-cell. Neural sensing of insulin levels appears to participate in control of hepatic glucose production in rodents, but a role for brain insulin sensing has not been documented in dogs or humans. The primary effect of insulin on the liver is its direct action.

  13. Keys to Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Up ahead, a foreboding wooden door showing wear from passage of earlier travelers is spotted. As the old porch light emits a pale yellow glow, a key ring emerges from deep inside the coat pocket. Searching for just the right key, the voyager settles on one that also shows age. As the key enters its receptacle and begins to turn, a clicking noise…

  14. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force. The reports are as…

  15. Generation of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soria, Bernat; Roche, Enrique; Reig, Juan A; Martin, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Islet transplantation as a potential treatment for diabetes will always be limited mainly because of the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large numbers of purified islets from cadaveric donors. One alternative to organ or tissue transplantation is the use of a renewable source of cells. Stem cells are clonogenic cells capable of both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Therefore, these cells have the potential to proliferate and differentiate into any type of cell and to be genetically modified in vitro, thus providing cells which can be isolated and used for transplantation. Moreover, these derived cells have proven to be useful in different animal models. In this regard, insulin-secreting cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells normalize blood glucose when transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. Using a combination of several differentiation methods and a 'cell trapping' system, we have obtained insulin-secreting cells from undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. The construct used allows the expression of a neomycin selection system under the control of the regulatory regions of insulin gene and other beta cell genes, such as Nkx6.1. Transplanted animals correct hyperglycaemia within 1 week and restore body weight in four weeks. Graft removal rescued the diabetic condition. Glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and blood glucose normalization after a challenge meal was similar in control and in transplanted animals. This approach opens new possibilities for tissue transplantation in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes.

  16. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine

    PubMed Central

    Belhekar, Mahesh N.; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  17. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine.

    PubMed

    Belhekar, Mahesh N; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  18. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I on glucose tolerance, insulin levels, and insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Zenobi, P D; Graf, S; Ursprung, H; Froesch, E R

    1992-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin interact with related receptors to lower plasma glucose and to exert mitogenic effects. Recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was recently shown to decrease serum levels of insulin and C-peptide in fasted normal subjects without affecting plasma glucose levels. In this study we have investigated in six healthy volunteers the responses of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels to intravenous rhIGF-I infusions (7 and 14 micrograms/kg.h) during standard oral glucose tolerance tests (oGTT) and meal tolerance tests (MTT), respectively. Glucose tolerance remained unchanged during the rhIGF-I infusions in the face of lowered insulin and C-peptide levels. The decreased insulin/glucose-ratio presumably is caused by an enhanced tissue sensitivity to insulin. The lowered area under the insulin curve during oGTT and MTT as a result of the administration of rhIGF-I were related to the fasting insulin levels during saline infusion (oGTT: r = 0.825, P less than 0.05; MTT: r = 0.895, P less than 0.02). RhIGF-I, however, did not alter the ratio between C-peptide and insulin, suggesting that the metabolic clearance of endogenous insulin remained unchanged. In conclusion, rhIGF-I increased glucose disposal and directly suppressed insulin secretion. RhIGF-I probably increased insulin sensitivity as a result of decreased insulin levels and suppressed growth hormone secretion. RhIGF-I, therefore, may be therapeutically useful in insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. PMID:1601998

  19. Effect of insulin on renal calcium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gollaher, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author has investigated both the indirect effect of insulin parathyroid hormone (PTH) activity, and the direct effect of insulin on renal calcium transport. The indirect study was performed by comparing calcium excretion in sham-operated and parathyroidectomized rats infused with the insulin secretagogue, arginine. Arginine infusion increased urinary calcium excretion in both groups. Therefore, it is concluded that neither PTH activity nor secretion is involved in this response. The direct effects of insulin were investigated by exposing rat kidney slices in vitro to varying concentrations of insulin and performing a kinetic analysis to interpret insulin's effect on calcium transport through cellular compartments. Steady state calcium transport through the plasma membrane, cytosol and mitochondria were compared in the presence and absence of insulin. Insulin had no effect on any calcium pool size or exchange rate. The direct effect of insulin was also studied in an acute experiment, which simulates conditions where insulin levels are raised rapidly as in the case with protein or glucose consumption. Under these conditions insulin treatment caused a rapid, but transient increase in /sup 45/Ca efflux from rat kidney slices. This pattern is usually indicative of a stimulation of calcium efflux across the plasma membrane. Finally, insulin caused a slight decrease in slice chemical calcium concentration.

  20. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  1. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    PubMed

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  2. 21 CFR 522.1160 - Insulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS...) of insulin. (2) Each mL of protamine zinc recombinant human insulin suspension contains 40 IU of... or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. (2) Cats—(i) Amount—(A) Porcine insulin zinc....

  3. Thyroid-stimulating hormone improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle cells via cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway-dependent upregulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Moon, Min Kyong; Kang, Geun Hyung; Kim, Hwan Hee; Han, Sun Kyoung; Koo, Young Do; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Ye An; Oh, Byung-Chul; Park, Do Joon; Chung, Sung Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Park, Young Joo

    2016-11-15

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor is expressed in extrathyroidal tissues such as hepatocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle, which suggests a possible novel role of TSH in various metabolic processes in extrathyroidal tissues independent of thyroid hormones. We investigated whether TSH has any effects on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle using diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse models and rodent skeletal muscle cells. TSH improved glucose tolerance in DIO mice and this was associated with an improvement of skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity resulting from the increased expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 protein and mRNA therein. TSH significantly increased both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in rat L6 myotubes and increased the expression of IRS-1 protein and mRNA in these cells as well. TSH also stimulated Irs1 promoter activation; this stimulation was abolished by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition using H89 or by mutation of the cAMP-response element site located at -1155 to -875 bp of the Irs1 promoter region, supporting a novel role of TSH activated-cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling in the regulation of Irs1 expression. In conclusion, TSH improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle by increasing Irs1 gene expression. This regulatory effect is mediated by a PKA-CREB-dependent pathway.

  4. [A21-Asparaginimide] insulin. Saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester, I.

    PubMed

    Gattner, H G; Schmitt, E W

    1977-01-01

    [Asn A21]Insulin is formed as the main product during alkaline saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester. Purification was achieved by gel chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose at pH 4 or by preparative isoelectric focusing in a granulated gel over a narrow pH range. Two main products could be isolated. One of them showed the electrophoretic behaviour of insulin (A), whilst the other corresponded to insulin with a blocked carboxyl function (B). Incubation of this product B with carboxypeptidase A liberated only the C-terminal alanine of the B-chain, but not the asparagine of the C-terminus of the A-chain. Chymotryptic digestion of the isolated S-sulfonate A-chain derivative (C) followed by high-voltage electrophoresis confirmed that the carboxyl function of asparagine A21 was blocked. In order to determine the free carboxyl functions of the A-chain derivative C, it was coupled with glycine methyl ester yielding D. Amino acid analysis of the chymotryptic peptides of D showed that the carboxyl functions of glutamic acid A4 and A17 had been free prior to coupling. The amino acid analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysate (subtilisin, aminopeptidase M) of the A-chain derivative C showed an additional peak with an elution position identical to the model compound aminosuccinimide. The biological activity of the [Asm A21[insulin was found to be about 40% in the fat cell test and 13.2 units/mg measured by the mouse convulsion method.

  5. A receptor state space model of the insulin signalling system in glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Gray, Catheryn W; Coster, Adelle C F

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a potent peptide hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Insulin-sensitive cells respond to insulin stimulation with the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM), enabling the clearance of glucose from the blood. Defects in this process can give rise to insulin resistance and ultimately diabetes. One widely cited model of insulin signalling leading to glucose transport is that of Sedaghat et al. (2002) Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 283, E1084-E1101. Consisting of 20 deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs), it is the most comprehensive model of insulin signalling to date. However, the model possesses some major limitations, including the non-conservation of key components. In the current work, we detail mathematical and sensitivity analyses of the Sedaghat model. Based on the results of these analyses, we propose a reduced state space model of the insulin receptor subsystem. This reduced model maintains the input-output relation of the original model but is computationally more efficient, analytically tractable and resolves some of the limitations of the Sedaghat model.

  6. MondoA coordinately regulates skeletal myocyte lipid homeostasis and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byungyong; Soundarapandian, Mangala M; Sessions, Hampton; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Roth, Gregory P; Li, Jian-Liang; Sugarman, Eliot; Koo, Ada; Malany, Siobhan; Wang, Miao; Yea, Kyungmoo; Brooks, Jeanne; Leone, Teresa C; Han, Xianlin; Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Intramuscular lipid accumulation is a common manifestation of chronic caloric excess and obesity that is strongly associated with insulin resistance. The mechanistic links between lipid accumulation in myocytes and insulin resistance are not completely understood. In this work, we used a high-throughput chemical biology screen to identify a small-molecule probe, SBI-477, that coordinately inhibited triacylglyceride (TAG) synthesis and enhanced basal glucose uptake in human skeletal myocytes. We then determined that SBI-477 stimulated insulin signaling by deactivating the transcription factor MondoA, leading to reduced expression of the insulin pathway suppressors thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and arrestin domain-containing 4 (ARRDC4). Depleting MondoA in myocytes reproduced the effects of SBI-477 on glucose uptake and myocyte lipid accumulation. Furthermore, an analog of SBI-477 suppressed TXNIP expression, reduced muscle and liver TAG levels, enhanced insulin signaling, and improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. These results identify a key role for MondoA-directed programs in the coordinated control of myocyte lipid balance and insulin signaling and suggest that this pathway may have potential as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and lipotoxicity. PMID:27500491

  7. Molecular Events Linking Oxidative Stress and Inflammation to Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Kevin Noel; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide, a consequence of the alarming rise in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and inflammation are key physiological and pathological events linking obesity, insulin resistance, and the progression of type 2 DM (T2DM). Unresolved inflammation alongside a “glucolipotoxic” environment of the pancreatic islets, in insulin resistant pathologies, enhances the infiltration of immune cells which through secretory activity cause dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells and ultimately cell death. Recent molecular investigations have revealed that mechanisms responsible for insulin resistance associated with T2DM are detected in conditions such as obesity and MetS, including impaired insulin receptor (IR) signalling in insulin responsive tissues, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The aim of the present review is to describe the evidence linking oxidative stress and inflammation with impairment of insulin secretion and action, which result in the progression of T2DM and other conditions associated with metabolic dysregulation. PMID:26257839

  8. Interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin: a theoretical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Wenjing; Kang, Zhengzhong; Li, Youzhao; Sun, Tianyang; Wang, Lipei; Liang, Lijun; Lai, Maode; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) can bind to insulin with high affinity which inhibits the early steps of insulin action. Lack of recognition mechanism impairs our understanding of insulin regulation before it binds to insulin receptor. Here we combine computational simulations with experimental methods to investigate the interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that His200 and Arg198 in IGFBP7 were key residues. Verified by experimental data, the interaction remained strong in single mutation systems R198E and H200F but became weak in double mutation system R198E-H200F relative to that in wild-type IGFBP7. The results and methods in present study could be adopted in future research of discovery of drugs by disrupting protein–protein interactions in insulin signaling. Nevertheless, the accuracy, reproducibility, and costs of free-energy calculation are still problems that need to be addressed before computational methods can become standard binding prediction tools in discovery pipelines. PMID:27101796

  9. Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified the Interdigitated Chain Electrode for an Insulin Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Park, Jinsoo; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key regulator in glucose homeostasis and its deficiency or alternations in the human body causes various types of diabetic disorders. In this paper, we present the development of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified interdigitated chain electrode (ICE) for direct capacitive detection of insulin. The impedance properties of rGO-ICE were characterized by equivalent circuit modeling. After an electrochemical deposition of rGO on ICE, the electrode was modified with self-assembled monolayers and insulin antibodies in order to achieve insulin binding reactions. The impedance spectra and capacitances were measured with respect to the concentrations of insulin and the capacitance change (ΔC) was analyzed to quantify insulin concentration. The antibody immobilized electrode showed an increment of ΔC according to the insulin concentration in human serum ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL. The proposed sensor is feasible for label-free and real-time measuring of the biomarker and for point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:26784202

  10. Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified the Interdigitated Chain Electrode for an Insulin Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Park, Jinsoo; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key regulator in glucose homeostasis and its deficiency or alternations in the human body causes various types of diabetic disorders. In this paper, we present the development of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified interdigitated chain electrode (ICE) for direct capacitive detection of insulin. The impedance properties of rGO-ICE were characterized by equivalent circuit modeling. After an electrochemical deposition of rGO on ICE, the electrode was modified with self-assembled monolayers and insulin antibodies in order to achieve insulin binding reactions. The impedance spectra and capacitances were measured with respect to the concentrations of insulin and the capacitance change (ΔC) was analyzed to quantify insulin concentration. The antibody immobilized electrode showed an increment of ΔC according to the insulin concentration in human serum ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL. The proposed sensor is feasible for label-free and real-time measuring of the biomarker and for point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:26784202

  11. Interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenjing; Kang, Zhengzhong; Li, Youzhao; Sun, Tianyang; Wang, Lipei; Liang, Lijun; Lai, Maode; Wu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) can bind to insulin with high affinity which inhibits the early steps of insulin action. Lack of recognition mechanism impairs our understanding of insulin regulation before it binds to insulin receptor. Here we combine computational simulations with experimental methods to investigate the interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that His200 and Arg198 in IGFBP7 were key residues. Verified by experimental data, the interaction remained strong in single mutation systems R198E and H200F but became weak in double mutation system R198E-H200F relative to that in wild-type IGFBP7. The results and methods in present study could be adopted in future research of discovery of drugs by disrupting protein-protein interactions in insulin signaling. Nevertheless, the accuracy, reproducibility, and costs of free-energy calculation are still problems that need to be addressed before computational methods can become standard binding prediction tools in discovery pipelines.

  12. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V.; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S.; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Wright, Robert C.; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ryan, Terence E.; Norquay, Lisa D.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; Colmers, William F.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Yeh, Edward T.H.; Newgard, Christopher B.; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D. PMID:26389676

  13. Interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenjing; Kang, Zhengzhong; Li, Youzhao; Sun, Tianyang; Wang, Lipei; Liang, Lijun; Lai, Maode; Wu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) can bind to insulin with high affinity which inhibits the early steps of insulin action. Lack of recognition mechanism impairs our understanding of insulin regulation before it binds to insulin receptor. Here we combine computational simulations with experimental methods to investigate the interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that His200 and Arg198 in IGFBP7 were key residues. Verified by experimental data, the interaction remained strong in single mutation systems R198E and H200F but became weak in double mutation system R198E-H200F relative to that in wild-type IGFBP7. The results and methods in present study could be adopted in future research of discovery of drugs by disrupting protein–protein interactions in insulin signaling. Nevertheless, the accuracy, reproducibility, and costs of free-energy calculation are still problems that need to be addressed before computational methods can become standard binding prediction tools in discovery pipelines.

  14. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells.

    PubMed

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F; Wright, Robert C; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L; Ryan, Terence E; Norquay, Lisa D; Brosnan, M Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K; Rolph, Timothy P; Kibbey, Richard G; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Colmers, William F; Shirihai, Orian S; Neufer, P Darrell; Yeh, Edward T H; Newgard, Christopher B; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2015-10-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D.

  15. Effects of Insulin and High Glucose on Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Liu, Yang; Sullivan, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). We hypothesize that this diabetic impact is due, at least in part, to the effects of insulin resistance/deficiency and hyperglycemia on human meibomian gland epithelial cells (HMGECs). To begin to test this hypothesis, we examined whether insulin and high glucose influence immortalized (I) HMGECs. Methods Immortalized HMGECs were cultured in serum-containing or -free media and treated with insulin, insulin-like growth factor–1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor (R) blocking antibody, and glucose or mannitol for varying time periods. Specific proteins were detected by Western blots, cell proliferation was evaluated by manual cell counting and lipids were assessed with LipidTOX and high performance thin layer chromatography. Results We found that insulin induces a dose-dependent increase in phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt (AKT) signaling in IHMGECs. This effect involves the IGF-1R, but not the insulin receptor (IR), and is associated with a stimulation of cell proliferation and neutral lipid accumulation. In contrast, high glucose exposure alters cell morphology, causes a progressive cell loss, and significantly reduces the levels of IGF-1R, phospho (p)-AKT, Foxhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1) in IHMGECs. Conclusions Our data show that insulin stimulates, and that high glucose is toxic for, IHMGECs. These results support our hypothesis that insulin resistance/deficiency and hyperglycemia are deleterious for HMGECs and may help explain why type II diabetes is a risk factor for MGD. PMID:26658502

  16. High fasting serum insulin level due to autoantibody interference in insulin immunoassay discloses autoimmune insulin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Sault, Corinne; Renard, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Insulin-antibodies are a cause of misleading results in insulin immunoassays. They may also mediate deleterious blood glucose variations. A patient presented with overtiredness, recurrent episodes of sweating, dizziness and fainting fits. A fasting serum insulin assay performed on a Modular platform (Modular analytic E170, Roche Diagnostic, Meylan, France) showed a highly elevated value of 194.7 mIU/L, whereas on the same sample glucose and C-peptide levels were normal. Other immunometric insulin assays were performed, as well as antibodies anti-insulin radiobinding assay (RBA) and gel filtration chromatography (GFC). While complementary insulin assays yielded closer to normal fasting levels, the free insulin concentration assessed after PEG precipitation was 14.0 mIU/L and the RBA was positive. GFC revealed that most of the insulin was complexed with a 150 kDa molecule, corresponding to an immunoglobulin G (IgG). A high fasting serum insulin level in a patient with neuroglucopenic symptoms was related to a high insulin-antibody level, suggesting an insulin autoimmune syndrome. PMID:27492703

  17. Globular Adiponectin Enhances Muscle Insulin Action via Microvascular Recruitment and Increased Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Chai, Weidong; Fu, Zhuo; Dong, Zhenhua; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Adiponectin enhances insulin action and induces nitric oxide–dependent vasodilatation. Insulin delivery to muscle microcirculation and transendothelial transport are 2 discrete steps that limit insulin's action. We have shown that expansion of muscle microvascular surface area increases muscle insulin delivery and action. Objective To examine whether adiponectin modulates muscle microvascular recruitment thus insulin delivery and action in vivo. Methods and Results Overnight fasted adult male rats were studied. We determined the effects of adiponectin on muscle microvascular recruitment, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, on insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and whole-body glucose disposal, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and insulin clamp, and on muscle insulin clearance and uptake with 125I-insulin. Globular adiponectin potently increased muscle microvascular blood volume without altering microvascular blood flow velocity, leading to a significantly increased microvascular blood flow. This was paralleled by a ≈30% to 40% increase in muscle insulin uptake and clearance, and ≈30% increase in insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disposal. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase abolished globular adiponectin-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and insulin uptake. In cultured endothelial cells, globular adiponectin dose-dependently increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation but had no effect on endothelial cell internalization of insulin. Conclusions Globular adiponectin increases muscle insulin uptake by recruiting muscle microvasculature, which contributes to its insulin-sensitizing action. PMID:23459195

  18. Mitochondrial metabolism of pyruvate is essential for regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jessica N; Cousteils, Katelyn; Lou, Jennifer W; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E; Joseph, Jamie W

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that mitochondrial metabolism of pyruvate is critical for insulin secretion; however, we know little about how pyruvate is transported into mitochondria in β-cells. Part of the reason for this lack of knowledge is that the carrier gene was only discovered in 2012. In the current study, we assess the role of the recently identified carrier in the regulation of insulin secretion. Our studies show that β-cells express both mitochondrial pyruvate carriers (Mpc1 and Mpc2). Using both pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA-mediated knockdown of the MPCs we show that this carrier plays a key role in regulating insulin secretion in clonal 832/13 β-cells as well as rat and human islets. We also show that the MPC is an essential regulator of both the ATP-regulated potassium (KATP) channel-dependent and -independent pathways of insulin secretion. Inhibition of the MPC blocks the glucose-stimulated increase in two key signaling molecules involved in regulating insulin secretion, the ATP/ADP ratio and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio. The MPC also plays a role in in vivo glucose homeostasis as inhibition of MPC by the pharmacological inhibitor α-cyano-β-(1-phenylindol-3-yl)-acrylate (UK5099) resulted in impaired glucose tolerance. These studies clearly show that the newly identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier sits at an important branching point in nutrient metabolism and that it is an essential regulator of insulin secretion. PMID:24675076

  19. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  20. Obesity genes and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of ‘metabolically healthy but obese’ (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. Recent findings The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Summary Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients. PMID:20585247

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the rules... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  2. B-cell translocation gene 2 positively regulates GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion via induction of PDX-1 in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kwon, Okyun; Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2013-05-24

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent glucoincretin hormone and an important agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a crucial regulator in GLP-1-induced insulin gene expression and insulin secretion via upregulation of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 treatment significantly increased BTG2, PDX-1 and insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Notably, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of BTG2 significantly elevated insulin secretion, as well as insulin and PDX-1 gene expression. Physical interaction studies showed that BTG2 is associated with increased PDX-1 occupancy on the insulin gene promoter via a direct interaction with PDX-1. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 agonist, and GLP-1 in pancreatic β-cells increased insulin secretion through the BTG2-PDX-1-insulin pathway, which was blocked by endogenous BTG2 knockdown using a BTG2 small interfering RNA knockdown system. Finally, we revealed that Ex-4 and GLP-1 significantly elevated insulin secretion via upregulation of the BTG2-PDX-1 axis in pancreatic islets, and this phenomenon was abolished by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Collectively, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 positively regulates insulin gene expression via BTG2, suggesting that BTG2 has a key function in insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

  3. Analysis of in vitro insulin-resistance models and their physiological relevance to in vivo diet-induced adipose insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kinyui Alice; Labadorf, Adam; Kennedy, Norman J; Han, Myoung Sook; Yap, Yoon Sing; Matthews, Bryan; Xin, Xiaofeng; Sun, Lei; Davis, Roger J; Lodish, Harvey F; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2013-10-17

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) predisposes individuals to insulin resistance, and adipose tissue has a major role in the disease. Insulin resistance can be induced in cultured adipocytes by a variety of treatments, but what aspects of the in vivo responses are captured by these models remains unknown. We use global RNA sequencing to investigate changes induced by TNF-α, hypoxia, dexamethasone, high insulin, and a combination of TNF-α and hypoxia, comparing the results to the changes in white adipose tissue from DIO mice. We found that different in vitro models capture distinct features of DIO adipose insulin resistance, and a combined treatment of TNF-α and hypoxia is most able to mimic the in vivo changes. Using genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity followed by sequencing, we further examined the transcriptional regulation of TNF-α-induced insulin resistance, and we found that C/EPBβ is a potential key regulator of adipose insulin resistance.

  4. Insulin receptor substrate-1 involvement in epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor receptor signalling: implication for Gefitinib ('Iressa') response and resistance.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Janice M; Jones, Helen E; Barrow, Denise; Gee, Julia M W; Nicholson, Robert I; Hutcheson, Iain R

    2008-09-01

    Classically the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is an essential component of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) signalling, providing an interface between the receptor and key downstream signalling cascades. Here, however, we show that in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (Tam-R) breast cancer cells, that are highly dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for growth, IRS-1 can interact with EGFR and be preferentially phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) 896, a Grb2 binding site. Indeed, phosphorylation of this site is greatly enhanced by exposure of these cells, and other EGFR-positive cell lines, to EGF. Importantly, while IGF-II promotes phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Y612, a PI3-K recruitment site, it has limited effect on Y896 phosphorylation in Tam-R cells. Furthermore, EGF and IGF-II co-treatment, reduces the ability of IGF-II to phosphorylate Y612, whilst maintaining Y896 phosphorylation, suggesting that the EGFR is the dominant recruiter of IRS-1 in this cell line. Significantly, challenge of Tam-R cells with the EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, for 7 days, reduces IRS-1/EGFR association and IRS-1 Y896 phosphorylation, while promoting IRS-1/IGF-IR association and IRS-1 Y612 phosphorylation. Furthermore, gefitinib significantly enhances IGF-II-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 Y612 and AKT in Tam-R cells. Importantly, induction of this pathway by gefitinib can be abrogated by inhibition/downregulation of the IGF-IR. Our data would therefore suggest a novel association exists between the EGFR and IRS-1 in several EGFR-positive cancer cell lines. This association acts to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Y896 and drive MAPK signalling whilst preventing recruitment of IRS-1 by the IGF-IR and inhibiting signalling via this receptor. Treatment with gefitinib alters the dynamics of this system, promoting IGF-IR signalling, the dominant gefitinib-resistant growth regulatory pathway in Tam-R cells, thus, potentially limiting

  5. Study on interaction of mangiferin to insulin and glucagon in ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui; Chen, Rui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sheng, Fenling; Zhang, Haixia

    2010-05-01

    The binding of mangiferin to insulin and glucagon was investigated in the presence and absence of another Peptide by optical spectroscopy. Fluorescence titration experiments revealed that mangiferin quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of insulin and glucagon by static quenching. The ratios of binding constants of glucagon-mangiferin to insulin-mangiferin at different temperatures were calculated in "pure" and ternary system, respectively. The results indicated that the Peptides were competitive with each other to act on mangiferin. Values of the thermodynamic parameters and the experiments of pH effect proved that the key interacting forces between mangiferin and the Peptides were hydrophobic interaction. In addition, UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared measurements showed that the conformation of insulin and glucagon were changed after adding mangiferin.

  6. IL-4/STAT6 immune axis regulates peripheral nutrient metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Red Eagle, Alex; Odegaard, Justin I; Jouihan, Hani; Morel, Christine R; Heredia, Jose E; Mukundan, Lata; Wu, Davina; Locksley, Richard M; Chawla, Ajay

    2010-12-28

    Immune cells take residence in metabolic tissues, providing a framework for direct regulation of nutrient metabolism. Despite conservation of this anatomic relationship through evolution, the signals and mechanisms by which the immune system regulates nutrient homeostasis and insulin action remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-4/STAT6 immune axis, a key pathway in helminth immunity and allergies, controls peripheral nutrient metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Disruption of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) decreases insulin action and enhances a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) driven program of oxidative metabolism. Conversely, activation of STAT6 by IL-4 improves insulin action by inhibiting the PPARα-regulated program of nutrient catabolism and attenuating adipose tissue inflammation. These findings have thus identified an unexpected molecular link between the immune system and macronutrient metabolism, suggesting perhaps the coevolution of these pathways occurred to ensure access to glucose during times of helminth infection.

  7. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  8. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  9. Redox regulation of insulin sensitivity due to enhanced fatty acid utilization in the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Rindler, Paul M; Crewe, Clair L; Fernandes, Jolyn; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2013-09-01

    Obesity enhances the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Loss in insulin sensitivity and diminished ability of muscle to take up and use glucose are characteristics of type 2 diabetes. Paradoxically, regulatory mechanisms that promote utilization of fatty acids appear to initiate diet-induced insulin insensitivity. In this review, we discuss recent findings implicating increased mitochondrial production of the prooxidant H2O2 due to enhanced utilization of fatty acids, as a signal to diminish reliance on glucose and its metabolites for energy. In the short term, the ability to preferentially use fatty acids may be beneficial, promoting a metabolic shift that ensures use of available fat by skeletal muscle and heart while preventing intracellular glucose accumulation and toxicity. However, with prolonged consumption of high dietary fat and ensuing obesity, the near exclusive dependence on fatty acid oxidation for production of energy by the mitochondria drives insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

  10. [Insulin autoimmune syndrome: Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Alejandra; Paredes, Ana; Espinosa, Consuelo; Caamaño, Egardo; Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Pinto, Rodrigo; Iñiguez, Germán; Martínez, Darío; Soto, Néstor

    2015-07-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is characterized by spontaneous hypoglycemia with extremely high insulin levels and the presence of circulating autoantibodies against insulin, in patients who have never been exposed to exogenous insulin. We report two patients with the syndrome. A 36 years old male presenting with hypoglycemia in the emergency room had an oral glucose tolerance test showed basal and 120 min glucose levels of 88 and 185 mg/dl. The basal and 120 min insulin levels were 2,759 and 5,942 μUI/ml. The presence of an insulin secreting tumor was discarded. Anti-insulin antibodies were positive. He was successfully treated with a diet restricted in carbohydrates and frequent meals in small quantities. A 65 years old female presenting with hypoglycemia in the emergency room had the fasting insulin levels of 1,910 µUI/ml. No insulin secreting tumor was detected by images and anti-insulin antibodies were positive. The polyethylene glycol precipitation test showed a basal and after exposition insulin level 1,483 and 114 µUI/ml, respectively. She responded partially to diet and acarbose and required the use of prednisone with a good clinical response. PMID:26361032

  11. Insulin secretion at high altitude in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Singh, T.; Rai, R. M.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of hypoxia on circulatory levels of insulin, its response to oral glucose administration (100 g) and changes in circadian rhythms of glucose as well as insulin were evaluated in euglycemic males at sea level (SL, 220 m) during their stay at high altitude (3500 m, SJ) and in high altitude natives (HAN). Basal glucose levels were not altered at high altitude but the rise in glucose (δ glucose) after glucose load was significantly higher in SJ and HAN (p<0.01) as compared to SL values. An increase (p<0.01) both in basal as well as glucose induced rise in insulin secretion (δ insulin) was observed at HA. The rise in insulin in SJ was significantly higher (p<0.01) than in HAN. This elevation in glucose and insulin levels was also evident at different times of the day. The circadian rhythmicity of glucose as well as insulin was altered by the altitude stress. The findings of the study show a rise in insulin level at HA but the hyperglycemia in the face of hyper-insulinism require the presumption of a simultaneous and dispropotionate rise of insulin antagonistic hormones upsetting the effect of insulin on glucose metabolism.

  12. Insulin-responsiveness of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst

    2009-05-01

    In October 2008, the 2nd International Insulin & Cancer Workshop convened roughly 30 researchers from eight countries in Düsseldorf/Germany. At this meeting, which was industry-independent like the preceding one in 2007, the following issues were discussed a) association between certain cancers and endogenous insulin production in humans, b) growth-promoting effects of insulin in animal experiments, c) mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity of pharmaceutic insulin and insulin analogues in in vitro experiments, d) potential mechanisms of insulin action on cell growth, mediated by IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling, and e) IGF-1 receptor targeting for inhibition of tumor growth. It was concluded that further research is necessary to elucidate the clinical effects of these observations, and their potential for human neoplastic disease and treatment.

  13. The evolutionary benefit of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Maarten R; Soeters, Peter B

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance is perceived as deleterious, associated with conditions as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and critical illness. However, insulin resistance is evolutionarily well preserved and its persistence suggests that it benefits survival. Insulin resistance is important in various states such as starvation, immune activation, growth and cancer, to spare glucose for different biosynthetic purposes such as the production of NADPH, nucleotides in the pentose phosphate pathway and oxaloacetate for anaplerosis. In these conditions, total glucose oxidation by the tricarboxylic acid cycle is actually low and energy demands are largely met by fatty acid and ketone body oxidation. This beneficial role of insulin resistance has consequences for treatment and research. Insulin resistance should be investigated at the cellular, tissue and whole organism level. The metabolic pathways discussed here, should be integrated in the accepted and valid mechanistic events of insulin resistance before interfering with them to promote insulin sensitivity at any cost.

  14. [Insulin-induced lipohypertrophy treated by liposuction].

    PubMed

    Brun, A; Comparin, J-P; Voulliaume, D; Chekaroua, K; Foyatier, J-L; Perrot, P

    2007-06-01

    The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus increase permanently, with early diagnosis. Insulin is the treatment of this pathology. Insulin therapy is associated with complication such as lipodystrophies at injection sites leading functional and aesthetics disorders (pain, reduction of treatment efficiency, haematomas and oedemas). Our report two cases to illustrate the effectiveness of the suction-assisted lipectomy (SAL) on these lipodystrophies. We present two cases of insulin dependent diabetics patients with lipodystrophies of thighs, abdomen, and shoulders treated by SAL. The various analyzed parameters are: aesthetic aspect, efficiency of insulin treatment, ease injection, and pain reduction. We observe a significant reduction of insulin dose necessary to obtain a normoglycemia half time. This treatment allow a better control of pain, control of haematomas and oedemas at the injection sites and an aesthetic improvement. The lipoaspiration is thus a simple and effective treatment of lipodystrophies due to insulin.

  15. A framework for the in vitro evaluation of cancer-relevant molecular characteristics and mitogenic potency of insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Baricevic, Ivona; Jones, David R; Roberts, Darren L; Lutzen, Anne; Lundby, Anders; Worm, Jesper; Hansen, Bo F; Renehan, Andrew G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory studies raise the possibility of a link between clinically prescribed insulin analogues and increased cancer risk. Accordingly, there is a regulatory mandate for cancer-related pre-clinical safety evaluation during insulin analogue development, but currently, there is no standardized framework for such in vitro evaluation. We tested human insulin; the super-mitogenic insulin, X10 and insulin-like growth factor I, in four cancer cell lines with a range of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR)/IR (insulin receptor) ratios (HCT 116, HT-29, COLO 205 and MCF7) and related these to IGF-IR and IR expression in 17 human adenocarcinomas. All cell types were IR-A isoform dominant. We determined IGF-IR/IR signalling pathway endpoints in dose- and time-varying experiments, and performed mitogenic dose-response equivalent assays to derive EC50 values, and correlated these with IGF-IR/IR ratios. We superimposed relative EC50 values onto data from the literature in a meta-analysis. The IGF-IR/IR ratios varied from <1 to 12 in the selected cell lines; similar pattern ranges were observed in human adenocarcinomas. The three ligands demonstrated differential IR/IGF-IR and Akt phosphorylation, which correlated with cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratios. Mitogenic profiles of X10 mimicked those for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and correlated with IGF-IR/IR ratios. The meta-analysis, adding data from five additional studies, supported the hypothesis that ligand mitogenic potency, relative to human insulin, increases with increasing cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratio. This study established a framework for the in vitro evaluation of cancer-relevant bioassays for comparisons of insulin analogues, and specifically consolidated earlier studies that determination of the cell-specific IGF-IR/IR ratio is crucial for the interpretation of ranking relative biological activities.

  16. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12–18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  17. Inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation by cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Keisuke; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Hayashi, Yuya; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Yamashita, Taro; Jono, Hirofumi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Localized insulin-derived amyloid masses occasionally form at the site of repeated insulin injections in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and cause subcutaneous insulin resistance. Various kinds of insulin including porcine insulin, human insulin, and insulin analogues reportedly formed amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo, but the impact of the amino acid replacement in insulin molecules on amyloidogenicity is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated the difference in amyloid fibril formation kinetics of human insulin and insulin analogues, which suggests an important role of the C-terminal domain of the insulin B chain in nuclear formation of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, we determined that cyclodextrins, which are widely used as drug carriers in the pharmaceutical field, had an inhibitory effect on the nuclear formation of insulin amyloid fibrils. These findings have significant implications for the mechanism underlying insulin amyloid fibril formation and for developing optimal additives to prevent this subcutaneous adverse effect.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases.

  19. Functional link between bone morphogenetic proteins and insulin-like peptide 3 signaling in modulating ovarian androgen production

    PubMed Central

    Glister, Claire; Satchell, Leanne; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Wade, John D.; Dai, Yanzhenzi; Ivell, Richard; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Rodgers, Raymond J.; Knight, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are firmly implicated as intra-ovarian regulators of follicle development and steroidogenesis. Here we report a microarray analysis showing that treatment of cultured bovine theca cells (TC) with BMP6 significantly (>twofold; P < 0.01) up- or down-regulated expression of 445 genes. Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) was the most heavily down-regulated gene (−43-fold) with cytochrome P450, subfamily XVII (CYP17A1) and other key steroidogenic transcripts including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 family 11, subfamily A1 (CYP11A1) and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD3B1) also down-regulated. BMP6 also reduced expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 5A1 (NR5A1) known to target the promoter regions of the aforementioned genes. Real-time PCR confirmed these findings and also revealed a marked reduction in expression of INSL3 receptor, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2). Secretion of INSL3 protein and androstenedione were also suppressed suggesting a functional link between BMP and INSL3 pathways in controlling androgen synthesis. RNAi-mediated knockdown of INSL3 reduced INSL3 mRNA (75%) and protein (94%) level and elicited a 77% reduction in CYP17A1 mRNA and 83% reduction in androstenedione secretion. Knockdown of RXFP2 also reduced CYP17A1 expression (81%) and androstenedione secretion (88%). Conversely, treatment with exogenous (human) INSL3 increased androstenedione secretion ∼twofold. The CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone abolished androgen secretion and reduced expression of both INSL3 and RXFP2. Collectively, these findings indicate a positive autoregulatory role for INSL3 signaling in maintaining thecal androgen production, and visa versa. Moreover, BMP6-induced suppression of thecal androgen synthesis may be mediated, at least in part, by reduced INSL3-RXFP2 signaling. PMID:23530236

  20. TCF2 attenuates FFA-induced damage in islet β-cells by regulating production of insulin and ROS.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yingna; Liang, Chunlian

    2014-07-30

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are cytotoxic to pancreatic islet β-cells and play a crucial role in the diabetes disease process. A recent study revealed a down-regulation of transcription factor 2 (TCF2) levels during FFA-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells. However, its function during this process and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, treatment with palmitic acid (PA) at high levels (400 and 800 μM) decreased β-cell viability and TCF2 protein expression, along with the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Western and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the positive regulatory effect of TCF2 on GSIS through promotion of the key regulators pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in β-cells. In addition, both PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK showed decreased expression in PA (800 μM)-treated β-cells. Overexpression of TCF2 could effectively restore the inhibitory effect of PA on the activation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK as well as β-cell viability, simultaneously, inhibited PA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. After blocking the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signals with their specific inhibitor, the effect of overexpressed TCF2 on β-cell viability and ROS production was obviously attenuated. Furthermore, a protective effect of TCF2 on GSIS by positive modulation of JNK-PDX1/GLUT2 signaling was also confirmed. Accordingly, our study has confirmed that TCF2 positively modulates insulin secretion and further inhibits ROS generation via the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Our work may provide a new therapeutic target to achieve prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  1. Chromium-Insulin Reduces Insulin Clearance and Enhances Insulin Signaling by Suppressing Hepatic Insulin-Degrading Enzyme and Proteasome Protein Expression in KKAy Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Yu, Yongmei; Zhang, Xian H; Komorowski, James

    2014-01-01

    JDS-chromium-insulin (CRI)-003 is a novel form of insulin that has been directly conjugated with chromium (Cr) instead of zinc. Our hypothesis was that CRI enhances insulin's effects by altering insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and proteasome enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we measured hepatic IDE content and proteasome parameters in a diabetic animal model. Male KKAy mice were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8/group); Sham (saline), human regular insulin (Reg-In), and chromium conjugated human insulin (CRI), respectively. Interventions were initiated at doses of 2 U insulin/kg body weight daily for 8-weeks. Plasma glucose and insulin were measured. Hepatic IDE, proteasome, and insulin signaling proteins were determined by western blotting. Insulin tolerance tests at week 7 showed that both insulin treatments significantly reduced glucose concentrations and increased insulin levels compared with the Sham group, CRI significantly reduced glucose at 4 and 6 h relative to Reg-In (P < 0.05), suggesting the effects of CRI on reducing glucose last longer than Reg-In. CRI treatment significantly increased hepatic IRS-1 and Akt1 and reduced IDE, 20S as well as 19S protein abundance (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively), but Reg-In only significantly increased Akt1 (P < 0.05). Similar results were also observed in Reg-In- and CRI-treated HepG2 cells. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that CRI reduces plasma insulin clearance by inhibition of hepatic IDE protein expression and enhances insulin signaling as well as prevents degradation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 by suppressing ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in diabetic mice.

  2. Insulin resistance, polycystic ovary syndrome and metformin.

    PubMed

    Pugeat, M; Ducluzeau, P H

    1999-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common disorder of ovarian function in premenopausal women. PCOS is characterised by chronic anovulation and androgen excess with clinical manifestation of irregular menstrual cycles, hirsutism and/or acne. Insulin resistance with resultant hyperinsulinaemia, irrespective of excess weight or frank obesity, has been reported in patients with PCOS, and, as insulin has a direct effect on ovarian androgen production in vitro, insulin resistance may play a crucial role in the physiopathology of PCOS. Although the molecular mechanism(s) of insulin resistance in PCOS is unclear, excessive insulin-independent serine phosphorylation of the beta subunit of the insulin receptor, as reported in some patients with PCOS, has been put forward as a new mechanism for insulin resistance. Insulin-sensitising agents have recently been investigated for their role in the short term treatment of insulin resistance in PCOS. Controlled studies have shown that metformin administration, by promoting bodyweight loss, can decrease fasting and stimulated plasma insulin levels. However, other studies have shown metformin 500 mg 3 times daily to decrease insulin secretion and to reduce ovarian production of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone with recovery of spontaneous or clomifene-induced ovulation, independently of weight loss. These findings suggest a new indication for metformin and present insulin-sensitising agents as a novel approach in the treatment of ovarian hyperandrogenism and abnormal ovulation in PCOS. They also suggest that long term administration of metformin might be helpful in treating insulin resistance, thus reducing risks of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes and cardiovascular disease in these patients.

  3. A novel processing system of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c regulated by polyunsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Nakakuki, Masanori; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    The proteolytic cascade is the key step in transactivation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a transcriptional factor of lipid synthesis. Proteolysis of SREBP-2 is strictly regulated by sterols, but that of SREBP-1c was not strongly sterol-regulated, but inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this study, the proteolytic processing of SREBP-1 and -2 was examined by transfection studies of cDNA-encoding mutants in which all the known cleavage sites were disrupted. In cultured cells, sterol-regulated SREBP-2 processing was completely eliminated by mutation of cleavage sites. In contrast, the corresponding SREBP-1c mutants as well as wild type exhibited large amounts of cleaved products in the nuclear extracts from culture cells and murine liver in vivo. The nuclear form of the mutant SREBP-1c was induced by delipidated condition and suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 PUFA, but not by sterols. This novel processing mechanism was affected by neither SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) nor insulin-induced gene (Insig)-1, unlike SREBP-2, but abolished by a serine protease inhibitor. Through analysis of deletion mutant, a site-2 protease recognition sequence (DRSR) was identified to be involved in this novel processing. These findings suggest that SREBP-1c cleavage could be subjected to a novel PUFA-regulated cleavage system in addition to the sterol-regulatory SCAP/Insig system.

  4. Genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lili; Feng, Haiyan; Gong, Dezheng; Zhao, Xu; Cai, Li; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jie; Zou, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) increases with age and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are supposed to be major factors leading to age-related IR. Genipin, an extract from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit, has been reported to stimulate insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells by regulating mitochondrial function. In this study, we first investigated the effects of genipin on insulin sensitivity and the potential mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver of aging rats. The rats were randomly assigned to receive intraperitoneal injections of either 25mg/kg genipin or vehicle once daily for 12days. The aging rats showed hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance as examined by the decreased glucose decay constant rate during insulin tolerance test (kITT). The hepatic tissues showed steatosis and reduced glycogen content. Hepatic malondialdehyde level and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were higher, and levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP were lower as compared with the normal control rats. Administration of genipin ameliorated systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, alleviated hyperinsulinemia, hyperglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, relieved hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rats. Furthermore, genipin not only improved insulin sensitivity by promoting insulin-stimulated glucose consumption and glycogen synthesis, inhibited cellular ROS overproduction and alleviated the reduction of levels of MMP and ATP, but also reversed oxidative stress-associated JNK hyperactivation and reduced Akt phosphorylation in palmitate-treated L02 hepatocytes. In conclusion, genipin ameliorates age-related insulin resistance through inhibiting hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24041487

  5. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  6. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  7. Excess exposure to insulin is the primary cause of insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhong; Ning, Jie; Yang, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to provide more specific and effective targets for prevention and treatment of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis. Modern technologies and medicine have vastly improved human health and prolonged the average life span of humans primarily by eliminating various premature deaths and infectious diseases. The modern technologies have also provided us abundant food and convenient transportation tools such as cars. As a result, more people are becoming overfed and sedentary. People are generally ingesting more calories than their bodies' need, leading to the so-called "positive energy imbalance", which is inseparable from the development of insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis. A direct consequence of insulin resistance is hyperinsulinemia. The current general view is that insulin is not functional properly in the presence of insulin resistance. Thus, the role of insulin itself in the development of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis has not been recognized. We have recently observed that the basal level of insulin signaling is increased in the presence of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. In this review, we will explain how the increased basal insulin signaling contributes to the development of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis. We will first explain how insulin causes insulin resistance through two arbitrary stages (before and after the presence of obvious insulin resistance), and, then, explain how the excess exposure to insulin and the relative insulin insufficiency contributes to the atherosclerotic diseases. We propose that blockade of the excess insulin signaling is a viable approach to prevent and/or reverse insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis.

  8. Class III PI3K regulates organismal glucose homeostasis by providing negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Montagnac, Guillaume; Russell, Ryan C.; Morzyglod, Lucille; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Guan, Kun-Liang; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Defective hepatic insulin receptor (IR) signalling is a pathogenic manifestation of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. The endo/lysosomal trafficking system may coordinate insulin action and nutrient homeostasis by endocytosis of IR and the autophagic control of intracellular nutrient levels. Here we show that class III PI3K—a master regulator of endocytosis, endosomal sorting and autophagy—provides negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling. The ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene protein (UVRAG)-associated class III PI3K complex interacts with IR and is stimulated by insulin treatment. Acute and chronic depletion of hepatic Vps15, the regulatory subunit of class III PI3K, increases insulin sensitivity and Akt signalling, an effect that requires functional IR. This is reflected by FoxO1-dependent transcriptional defects and blunted gluconeogenesis in Vps15 mutant cells. On depletion of Vps15, the metabolic syndrome in genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance and diabetes is alleviated. Thus, feedback regulation of IR trafficking and function by class III PI3K may be a therapeutic target in metabolic conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:26387534

  9. Identification and evolution of two insulin receptor genes involved in Tribolium castaneum development and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sang, Ming; Li, Chengjun; Wu, Wei; Li, Bin

    2016-07-10

    The insulin and insulin-like signaling (IIS) pathway exists in a wide range of organisms from mammals to invertebrates and regulates several vital physiological functions. A phylogenetic analysis have indicated that insulin receptors have been duplicated at least twice among vertebrates, whereas only one duplication occurred in insects before the differentiation of Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera. Thus, we cloned two putative insulin receptor genes, T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2, from T. castaneum and determined that T.cas-ir1 is most strongly expressed during the late adult and early pupal stages, whereas T.cas-ir2 is most strongly expressed during the late larval stage. We found that larval RNAi against T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2 causes 100% and 42.0% insect death, respectively, and that parental RNAi against T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2 leads to 100% and 33.3% reductions in beetle fecundity, respectively. The hatching rate of ds-ir2 insects was 66.2%. Moreover, RNAi against these two genes increased the expression of the pkc, foxo, jnk, cdc42, ikk, and mekk genes but decreased erk gene expression. Despite these similarities, these two genes act via distinct regulatory pathways. These results indicate that these two receptors have functionally diverged with respect to the development and reproduction of T. castaneum, even though they retain some common regulatory signaling pathways.

  10. Systemically modeling the dynamics of plasma insulin in subcutaneous injection of insulin analogues for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaxu; Kuang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetics must inject exogenous insulin or insulin analogues one or more times daily. The timing and dosage of insulin administration have been a critical research area since the invention of insulin analogues. Several pharmacokinetical models have been proposed, and some are applied clinically in modeling various insulin therapies. However, their plasma insulin concentration must be computed separately from the models' output. Furthermore, minimal analytical study was performed in these existing models. We propose two systemic and simplified ordinary differential equation models to model the subcutaneous injection of rapid-acting insulin analogues and long-acting insulin analogues, respectively. Our models explicitly model the plasma insulin and hence have the advantage of computing the plasma insulin directly. The profiles of plasma insulin concentrations obtained from these two models are in good agreement with the experimental data. We also study the dynamics of insulin analogues, plasma insulin concentrations, and, in particular, the shape of the dynamics of plasma insulin concentrations. PMID:19292507

  11. Regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    The web resource Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat) offers a collection of software tools dedicated to the prediction of regulatory sites in non-coding DNA sequences. These tools include sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, pattern matching, genome-scale pattern matching, feature-map drawing, random sequence generation and other utilities. Alternative formats are supported for the representation of regulatory motifs (strings or position-specific scoring matrices) and several algorithms are proposed for pattern discovery. RSAT currently holds >100 fully sequenced genomes and these data are regularly updated from GenBank.

  12. The Hygiene Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Increased Frequency of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2012-01-01

    The steadily increasing frequency of insulin-dependent diabetes in several countries is best explained today by the decline of infections. Epidemiologic and animal data support this conclusion, which, however, requires confirmation by intervention trials in man. The mechanisms of the protective effect of infections on diabetes onset are diverse including competition for homeostatic factors and stimulation of regulatory T cells and of Toll-like receptors. These considerations might have interesting therapeutic applications for the prevention of the disease. PMID:22355800

  13. An organ boundary-enriched gene regulatory network uncovers regulatory hierarchies underlying axillary meristem initiation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Zhang, Xiaoni; He, Jun; Yu, Haopeng; Wang, Ying; Shi, Bihai; Han, Yingying; Wang, Guoxun; Feng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Cui; Wang, Jin; Qi, Jiyan; Yu, Rong; Jiao, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) control development via cell type-specific gene expression and interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory promoter regions. Plant organ boundaries separate lateral organs from the apical meristem and harbor axillary meristems (AMs). AMs, as stem cell niches, make the shoot a ramifying system. Although AMs have important functions in plant development, our knowledge of organ boundary and AM formation remains rudimentary. Here, we generated a cellular-resolution genomewide gene expression map for low-abundance Arabidopsis thaliana organ boundary cells and constructed a genomewide protein–DNA interaction map focusing on genes affecting boundary and AM formation. The resulting GRN uncovers transcriptional signatures, predicts cellular functions, and identifies promoter hub regions that are bound by many TFs. Importantly, further experimental studies determined the regulatory effects of many TFs on their targets, identifying regulators and regulatory relationships in AM initiation. This systems biology approach thus enhances our understanding of a key developmental process. PMID:25358340

  14. Insulin degludec. Uncertainty over cardiovascular harms.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    Insulin isophane (NPH) is the standard long-acting human insulin for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Long-acting human insulin analogues are also available: insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Uncertainties remain concerning their long-term adverse effects. Insulin degludec (Tresiba, Novo Nordisk) is another long-acting human insulin analogue, also approved in the EU for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It was authorised at a concentration of 100 units per ml, like other insulins, and also at a concentration of 200 units per ml. There are no comparative data on insulin degludec 200 units per ml in patients using high doses of insulin. Insulin degludec has mainly been evaluated in ten randomised, unblinded, "non-inferiority" trials lasting 26 to 52 weeks, nine versus insulin glargine and one versus insulin detemir. Insulin degludec was administered at a fixed time each evening, or in either the morning or evening on alternate days, at varying intervals of 8 to 40 hours between doses. Efficacy in terms of HbA1c control was similar to that of the other insulin analogues administered once a day. The frequency of severe hypoglycaemia was similar in the groups treated with insulin degludec and those treated with the other insulins (10% to 12% among patients with type 1 diabetes and less than 5% in patients with type 2 diabetes). Deaths and other serious adverse events were similarly frequent in the different groups. A meta-analysis of clinical trials, carried out by the US Food and Drug Administration, suggested an increase of about 60% in the incidence of cardiovascular complications, based on a composite endpoint combining myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. Other adverse effects observed in these trials were already known to occur with human insulin and its analogues, including weight gain, hypersensitivity reactions, reactions at the injection site, etc. The trials were too short in duration to assess long-term harms

  15. Three key imperatives

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Joe F.

    2004-06-01

    This article is an excerpt from a speech given by Joe F. Colvin, president and CEO, Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) at NEI's Nuclear Energy Assembly on May 13, 2004 in New Orleans. Three areas were highlighted in the excerpt as critical to the industry: finalizing a regulatory framework that is safety-focused; ensuring a stable and reliable reactor fuel supply; and, finishing the job of securing an operating used fuel repository at Yucca Mountain.

  16. Insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, W

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, impaired metabolism and storage of important nutrients, evidence of autoimmunity, and long-term vascular and neurologic complications. Insulin secretory function is limited. Cell membrane binding is not primarily involved. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and to achieve blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible without severe hypoglycemia. However, even with education and self-monitoring of the blood glucose level, attaining recommended target values (plasma glucose level less than 8.0 mmol/L before main meals for adults) remains difficult. Human insulin offers no advantage in glycemic control but is important in the management and prevention of immune-related clinical problems (e.g., injection-site lipoatrophy, insulin resistance and allergy) associated with the use of beef or pork insulin. Therapy with one or two injections per day of mixed short-acting or intermediate-acting insulin preparations is a compromise between convenience and the potential for achieving target plasma glucose levels. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections or continuous infusion with an insulin pump improves mean glycated hemoglobin levels; however, it increases rates of severe hypoglycemia and has not been shown to decrease the incidence of clinically significant renal, retinal or neurologic dysfunction. Future prospects include automated techniques of insulin delivery, immunosuppression to preserve endogenous insulin secretion and islet transplantation. PMID:1933705

  17. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  18. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, T

    2000-09-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However, expression of a cDNA encoding a proinsulin-like molecule with deletion of threonine(B30) as a fusion protein with the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor prepro-peptide (leader), followed either by replacement of the human proinsulin C-peptide with a small C-peptide (e.g. AAK), or by direct fusion of lysine(B29) to glycine(A1), results in the efficient secretion of folded single-chain proinsulin-like molecules to the culture supernatant. The secreted single-chain insulin precursor can then be purified and subsequently converted to human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation in organic aqueous medium in the presence of a threonine ester. The leader confers secretory competence to the insulin precursor, and constructed (synthetic) leaders have been developed for efficient secretory expression of the insulin precursor in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Pichia pastories. The Kex2 endoprotease, specific for dibasic sites, cleaves the leader-insulin precursor fusion protein in the late secretory pathway and the folded insulin precursor is secreted to the culture supernatant. However, the Kex2 endoprotease processing of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is incomplete and a significant part of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is secreted to the culture supernatant in a hyperglycosylated form. A spacer peptide localised between the leader and the insulin precursor has been developed to optimise Kex2 endoprotease processing and insulin precursor fermentation yield. PMID:11030562

  19. Acute Glucagon Induces Postprandial Peripheral Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patarrão, Rita S.; Lautt, W. Wayne; Macedo, M. Paula

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon levels are often moderately elevated in diabetes. It is known that glucagon leads to a decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH) synthesis that in turn is associated with decreased postprandial insulin sensitivity. Given that cAMP pathway controls GSH levels we tested whether insulin sensitivity decreases after intraportal (ipv) administration of a cAMP analog (DBcAMP), and investigated whether glucagon promotes insulin resistance through decreasing hepatic GSH levels.Insulin sensitivity was determined in fed male Sprague-Dawley rats using a modified euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp in the postprandial state upon ipv administration of DBcAMP as well as glucagon infusion. Glucagon effects on insulin sensitivity was assessed in the presence or absence of postprandial insulin sensitivity inhibition by administration of L-NMMA. Hepatic GSH and NO content and plasma levels of NO were measured after acute ipv glucagon infusion. Insulin sensitivity was assessed in the fed state and after ipv glucagon infusion in the presence of GSH-E. We founf that DBcAMP and glucagon produce a decrease of insulin sensitivity, in a dose-dependent manner. Glucagon-induced decrease of postprandial insulin sensitivity correlated with decreased hepatic GSH content and was restored by administration of GSH-E. Furthermore, inhibition of postprandial decrease of insulin sensitivity L-NMMA was not overcome by glucagon, but glucagon did not affect hepatic and plasma levels of NO. These results show that glucagon decreases postprandial insulin sensitivity through reducing hepatic GSH levels, an effect that is mimicked by increasing cAMP hepatic levels and requires physiological NO levels. These observations support the hypothesis that glucagon acts via adenylate cyclase to decrease hepatic GSH levels and induce insulin resistance. We suggest that the glucagon-cAMP-GSH axis is a potential therapeutic target to address insulin resistance in pathological conditions. PMID:25961284

  20. Insulin-like activity in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.

    1986-01-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated that insulin or a homologous peptide may be synthesized outside the pancreas also. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin-like activity exists in the retina, and if it exists, whether it is due to local synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide in the retina. To determine whether the insulin-like immunoreactivity in retinal glial cells is due to binding and uptake or local synthesis of insulin, a combined approach of immunocytochemistry and in situ DNA-RNA hybridization techniques was used on cultured rat retinal glial cells. Insulin-like immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the cytoplasma of these cells. In situ hybridization studies using labeled rat insulin cDNA indicated that these cells contain the mRNA necessary for de novo synthesis of insulin or a closely homologous peptide. Since human retinal cells have, as yet, not been conveniently grown in culture, an ocular tumor cell line, human Y79 retinoblastoma was used as a model to extend these investigations. The presence of insulin-like immunoreactivity as well as insulin-specific mRNA was demonstrated in this cell line. Light microscopic autoradiography following incubation of isolated rat retinal cells with /sup 125/I-insulin showed the presence of insulin binding sites on the photoreceptors and amarcine cells. On the basis of these observations that rat retina glial cells, including Muller cells are sites of synthesis of insulin or a similar peptide, a model for the pathogenesis of dabetic retinopathy is proposed.

  1. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  2. Regulatory considerations for companion diagnostic devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice Y; Shen, Hsin-Chieh Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of companion diagnostic devices has been spurred by drug discovery and development efforts towards targeted therapies, particularly in oncology. Companion diagnostics and their corresponding therapeutics are often codeveloped, or developed in parallel, to ensure the safe and effective use of the products. The regulatory framework for companion diagnostics has gradually evolved as a result of the essential role of diagnostic tests to identify the intended population for a corresponding treatment. Here, we describe the current regulatory model for companion diagnostics in the US and outline key strategies for a successful codevelopment program from the device perspective. We also discuss how technological advances and changes in clinical management may challenge the regulatory model in the future. PMID:25605456

  3. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... been learned since that time. Far more is now known about regulation—not only about when it is... interests of future generations; identify methods of ensuring that regulatory review does not produce...

  4. A physiological increase of insulin in the olfactory bulb decreases detection of a learned aversive odor and abolishes food odor-induced sniffing behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Aimé, Pascaline; Hegoburu, Chloé; Jaillard, Tristan; Degletagne, Cyril; Garcia, Samuel; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Thevenet, Marc; Lorsignol, Anne; Duchamp, Claude; Mouly, Anne-Marie; Julliard, Andrée Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Insulin is involved in multiple regulatory mechanisms, including body weight and food intake, and plays a critical role in metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. An increasing body of evidence indicates that insulin is also involved in the modulation of olfactory function. The olfactory bulb (OB) contains the highest level of insulin and insulin receptors (IRs) in the brain. However, a role for insulin in odor detection and sniffing behavior remains to be elucidated. Using a behavioral paradigm based on conditioned olfactory aversion (COA) to isoamyl-acetate odor, we demonstrated that an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 14 mU insulin acutely decreased olfactory detection of fasted rats to the level observed in satiated animals. In addition, whereas fasted animals demonstrated an increase in respiratory frequency upon food odor detection, this effect was absent in fasted animals receiving a 14 mU insulin ICV injection as well as in satiated animals. In parallel, we showed that the OB and plasma insulin levels were increased in satiated rats compared to fasted rats, and that a 14 mU insulin ICV injection elevated the OB insulin level of fasted rats to that of satiated rats. We further quantified insulin receptors (IRs) distribution and showed that IRs are preferentially expressed in the caudal and lateral parts of the main OB, with the highest labeling found in the mitral cells, the main OB projection neurons. Together, these data suggest that insulin acts on the OB network to modulate olfactory processing and demonstrate that olfactory function is under the control of signals involved in energy homeostasis regulation and feeding behaviors. PMID:23251461

  5. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  6. Insulin Degludec Versus Insulin Glargine in Insulin-Naive Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand; Handelsman, Yehuda; Rodbard, Helena W.; Johansen, Thue; Endahl, Lars; Mathieu, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 1-year, parallel-group, randomized, open-label, treat-to-target trial, adults with type 2 diabetes with A1C of 7−10% taking OADs were randomized 3:1 to receive once daily degludec or glargine, both with metformin. Insulin was titrated to achieve prebreakfast plasma glucose (PG) of 3.9−4.9 mmol/L. The primary end point was confirmation of noninferiority of degludec to glargine in A1C reduction after 52 weeks in an intent-to-treat analysis. RESULTS In all, 1,030 participants (mean age 59 years; baseline A1C 8.2%) were randomized (degludec 773, glargine 257). Reduction in A1C with degludec was similar (noninferior) to that with glargine (1.06 vs. 1.19%), with an estimated treatment difference of degludec to glargine of 0.09% (95% CI −0.04 to 0.22). Overall rates of confirmed hypoglycemia (PG <3.1 mmol/L or severe episodes requiring assistance) were similar, with degludec and glargine at 1.52 versus 1.85 episodes/patient-year of exposure (PYE). There were few episodes of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia in the overall population, and these occurred at a lower rate with degludec versus glargine (0.25 vs. 0.39 episodes/PYE; P = 0.038). Similar percentages of patients in both groups achieved A1C levels <7% without hypoglycemia. End-of-trial mean daily insulin doses were 0.59 and 0.60 units/kg for degludec and glargine, respectively. Adverse event rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Insulins degludec and glargine administered once daily in combination with OADs provided similar long-term glycemic control in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes, with lower rates of nocturnal hypoglycemia with degludec. PMID:23043166

  7. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J.; Arner, P.

    1982-10-01

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono-/sup 125/I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis.

  8. BMP4-BMPR1A signaling in beta cells is required for and augments glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Goulley, Joan; Dahl, Ulf; Baeza, Nathalie; Mishina, Yuji; Edlund, Helena

    2007-03-01

    Impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and perturbed proinsulin processing are hallmarks of beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Signals that can preserve and/or enhance beta cell function are therefore of great therapeutic interest. Here we show that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) and its high-affinity receptor, Bmpr1a, are expressed in beta cells. Mice with attenuated BMPR1A signaling in beta cells show decreased expression of key genes involved in insulin gene expression, proinsulin processing, glucose sensing, secretion stimulus coupling, incretin signaling, and insulin exocytosis and develop diabetes due to impaired insulin secretion. We also show that transgenic expression of Bmp4 in beta cells enhances GSIS and glucose clearance and that systemic administration of BMP4 protein to adult mice significantly stimulates GSIS and ameliorates glucose tolerance in a mouse model of glucose intolerance. Thus, BMP4-BMPR1A signaling in beta cells plays a key role in GSIS.

  9. Assessing the regulatory picture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses the safety of the nation's drinking water supply and discusses compliance of the Clean Water Act. Right now, the shape of the regulatory future is uncertain. The results of the D-DBP regulatory negotiation are imminent. Congress is ready to begin debating reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and utilities are trying to comply with the regulations while trying not to price water out of the reach of some of their customers.

  10. NRC regulatory initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.C.

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is addressing several low-level waste disposal issues that will be important to waste generators and to States and Compacts developing new disposal capacity. These issues include Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed waste, below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, and the low-level waste data base. This paper discusses these issues and their current status.

  11. FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is mediated by PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Park, Edward; Mori, Yusaku; Haber, C Andrew; Han, Ping; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Stavar, Laura; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Ivovic, Alexander; Yu, Zhiwen; Li, Deling; Bowman, Thomas A; Dewald, Jay; El-Benna, Jamel; Brindley, David N; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K T; Najjar, Sonia M; McKay, Robert A; Bhanot, Sanjay; Fantus, I George; Giacca, Adria

    2014-07-01

    Fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although PKC and inflammatory pathways have been implicated in fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance, the sequence of events leading to impaired insulin signaling is unknown. We used Wistar rats to investigate whether PKCδ and oxidative stress play causal roles in this process and whether this occurs via IKKβ- and JNK-dependent pathways. Rats received a 7-h infusion of Intralipid plus heparin (IH) to elevate circulating free fatty acids (FFA). During the last 2 h of the infusion, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tracer was performed to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), prevented IH-induced hepatic insulin resistance in parallel with prevention of decreased IκBα content, increased JNK phosphorylation (markers of IKKβ and JNK activation, respectively), increased serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, and impaired insulin signaling in the liver without affecting IH-induced hepatic PKCδ activation. Furthermore, an antisense oligonucleotide against PKCδ prevented IH-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) (marker of NADPH oxidase activation) and hepatic insulin resistance. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevented IH-induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance similarly to NAC. These results demonstrate that PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress play a causal role in FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo and suggest that the pathway of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is FFA → PKCδ → NADPH oxidase and oxidative stress → IKKβ/JNK → impaired hepatic insulin signaling.

  12. Involvement of mTOR in Type 2 CRF Receptor Inhibition of Insulin Signaling in Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hongxia; Li, Haochen; Grande, Rebecca; Lira, Vitor; Yan, Zhen; Harris, Thurl E; Li, Chien

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFR2) is expressed in skeletal muscle and stimulation of the receptor has been shown to inhibit the effect of insulin on glucose uptake in muscle cells. Currently, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this process. In this study, we first showed that both in vivo and in vitro CRFR2 expression in muscle was closely correlated with insulin sensitivity, with elevated receptor levels observed in insulin resistant muscle cells. Stimulation of CRFR2 by urocortin 2 (Ucn 2), a CRFR2-selective ligand, in C2C12 myotubes greatly attenuated insulin-induced glucose uptake. The inhibitory effect of CRFR2 signaling required cAMP production and is involved the mammalian target of rapamycine pathway, as rapamycin reversed the inhibitory effect of CRFR2 stimulation on insulin-induced glucose uptake. Moreover, stimulation of CRFR2 failed to inhibit glucose uptake in muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor, which, similar to insulin, signals through Akt-mediated pathway but is independently of insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins to promote glucose uptake. This result argues that CRFR2 signaling modulates insulin's action likely at the levels of IRS. Consistent with this notion, Ucn 2 reduced insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and treatment with rapamycin reversed the inhibitory effect of Ucn 2 on IRS-1 and Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of CRFR2 signaling on insulin action is mediated by cAMP in a mammalian target of rapamycine-dependent manner, and IRS-1 is a key nodal point where CRFR2 signaling modulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle cells.

  13. Resistance training improves indices of muscle insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in overweight/obese, sedentary young men

    PubMed Central

    Croymans, Daniel M.; Paparisto, Ergit; Lee, Mary M.; Brandt, Nina; Le, Brian K.; Lohan, Derek; Lee, Cathy C.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of RT on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived indices of muscle insulin sensitivity, hepatic insulin resistance, β-cell function, and skeletal muscle proteins related to glucose transport in overweight/obese, sedentary young men. Twenty-eight participants [median body mass index (BMI) 30.9 kg/m2; age 22 yr] completed 12 wk of RT (3 sessions/wk) and were assessed for changes in OGTT-derived indices, resting metabolic rate, body composition, serum adipokines, and skeletal muscle protein content [hexokinase 2 (HK2), glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), RAC-β serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT2), glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and insulin receptor substrate 1]. Individualized responses to RT were also evaluated. RT significantly improved insulin and glucose area under the curve (both P < 0.03). With the use of OGTT indices of insulin action, we noted improved muscle insulin sensitivity index (mISI; P = 0.03) and oral disposition index (P = 0.03). BMI, lean body mass (LBM), and relative strength also increased (all P < 0.03), as did skeletal muscle protein content of HK2, GLUT4, and AKT2 (26–33%; all P < 0.02). Hepatic insulin resistance index, adiponectin, leptin, and total amylin did not change. Further analysis demonstrated the presence of highly individualized responsiveness to RT for glucose tolerance and other outcomes. RT improved oral indices of muscle insulin sensitivity and β-cell function but not hepatic insulin resistance in overweight/obese young men. In addition to the increase in LBM, the improvements in insulin action may be due, in part, to increases in key insulin signaling proteins. PMID:23970530

  14. Nuclear SREBP-1a causes loss of pancreatic {beta}-cells and impaired insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kato, Toyonori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yahagi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2009-01-16

    Transgenic mice expressing nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a under the control of the insulin promoter were generated to determine the role of SREBP-1a in pancreatic {beta}-cells. Only low expressors could be established, which exhibited mild hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced plasma insulin levels compared to C57BL/6 controls. The islets isolated from the transgenic mice were fewer and smaller, and had decreased insulin content and unaltered glucagon staining. Both glucose- and potassium-stimulated insulin secretions were decreased. The transgenic islets consistently expressed genes for fatty acids and cholesterol synthesis, resulting in accumulation of triglycerides but not cholesterol. PDX-1, {beta}{epsilon}{tau}{alpha}2, MafA, and IRS-2 were suppressed, partially explaining the loss and dysfunction of {beta}-cell mass. The transgenic mice on a high fat/high sucrose diet still exhibited impaired insulin secretion and continuous {beta}-cell growth defect. Therefore, nuclear SREBP-1a, even at a low level, strongly disrupts {beta}-cell mass and function.

  15. Methylated trivalent arsenicals are potent inhibitors of glucose stimulated insulin secretion by murine pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Douillet, Christelle; Currier, Jenna; Saunders, Jesse; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2013-02-15

    Epidemiologic evidence has linked chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) with an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Laboratory studies have identified several mechanisms by which iAs can impair glucose homeostasis. We have previously shown that micromolar concentrations of arsenite (iAs{sup III}) or its methylated trivalent metabolites, methylarsonite (MAs{sup III}) and dimethylarsinite (DMAs{sup III}), inhibit the insulin-activated signal transduction pathway, resulting in insulin resistance in adipocytes. Our present study examined effects of the trivalent arsenicals on insulin secretion by intact pancreatic islets isolated from C57BL/6 mice. We found that 48-hour exposures to low subtoxic concentrations of iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but not basal insulin secretion. MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} were more potent than iAs{sup III} as GSIS inhibitors with estimated IC{sub 50} ≤ 0.1 μM. The exposures had little or no effects on insulin content of the islets or on insulin expression, suggesting that trivalent arsenicals interfere with mechanisms regulating packaging of the insulin transport vesicles or with translocation of these vesicles to the plasma membrane. Notably, the inhibition of GSIS by iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} could be reversed by a 24-hour incubation of the islets in arsenic-free medium. These results suggest that the insulin producing pancreatic β-cells are among the targets for iAs exposure and that the inhibition of GSIS by low concentrations of the methylated metabolites of iAs may be the key mechanism of iAs-induced diabetes. - Highlights: ► Trivalent arsenicals inhibit glucose stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. ► MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} are more potent inhibitors than arsenite with IC{sub 50} ∼ 0.1 μM. ► The arsenicals have little or no effects on insulin expression in pancreatic islets. ► The inhibition of

  16. [FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF THE BRAIN INSULIN SIGNALING SYS TEM IN NORM AND IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O

    2015-10-01

    The insulin signaling system of the brain has a key role in the regulation of fundamental cell processes in neurons and controls metabolic processes in the CNS and periphery. In hypothalamic neurons insulin signaling system interacts closely with the other signaling systems regulated by leptin, melanocortin peptides, dopamine, serotonin, and is the key component of the hypothalamic signaling network, which integrates and transforms the central and peripheral signals. The disturbances in the brain insulin system lead to central insulin resistance, which is one of the primary causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), metabolic syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The early restoration of the functions of this system provides an effective approach to prevent and treat type 2 DM and neurodegenerative diseases associated to it. In this review the literature data and own results on structural functional organization of the brain insulin signaling system, causes and functional consequences of central insulin resistance, abnormalities of insulin signaling in the CNS and approaches to its restoration in type 2 DM are analyzed and discussed.

  17. Amyloid-β induces hepatic insulin resistance by activating JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jingxia; Hu, Yanan; Liu, Yang; Zhai, Qiwei

    2012-06-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and experimental studies suggest that AD exacerbates T2DM, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. This study aims to investigate whether amyloid-β (Aβ), a key player in AD pathogenesis, contributes to the development of insulin resistance, as well as the underlying mechanism. We find that plasma Aβ40/42 levels are increased in patients with hyperglycemia. APPswe/PSEN1dE9 transgenic AD model mice with increased plasma Aβ40/42 levels show impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, Aβ impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and cultured hepatocytes. Aβ can upregulate suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, a well-known insulin signaling inhibitor. Knockdown of SOCS-1 alleviates Aβ-induced impairment of insulin signaling. Moreover, JAK2/STAT3 is activated by Aβ, and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling attenuates Aβ-induced upregulation of SOCS-1 and insulin resistance in hepatocytes. Our results demonstrate that Aβ induces hepatic insulin resistance by activating JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling pathway and have implications toward resolving insulin resistance and T2DM.

  18. An Alternative to Keys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagan, James

    1977-01-01

    For the secondary school, the author discourages the use of dichotomous keys in favor of a punch-card system. The system is readily constructed by students for use in plant and animal classification. (CP)

  19. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  20. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells exhibiting autocrine insulin-like growth factor-I secretion.

    PubMed

    Tazzari, P L; Tabellini, G; Bortul, R; Papa, V; Evangelisti, C; Grafone, T; Martinelli, G; McCubrey, J A; Martelli, A M

    2007-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its receptor (IGF-IR) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many human cancers, including those of hematopoietic lineage. We investigated the therapeutic potential of the novel IGF-IR tyrosine kinase activity inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, on human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. NVP-AEW541 was tested on a HL60 cell subclone, which is dependent on autocrine secretion of IGF-I for survival and drug resistance, as well as primary drug resistant leukemia cells. NVP-AEW541 treatment (24 h) induced dephosphorylation of IGF-IR. NVP-AEW541 also caused Akt dephosphorylation and changes in the expression of key regulatory proteins of the cell cycle. At longer incubation times (48 h), NVP-AEW541-induced apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by caspase-3 cleavage. Apoptosis was accompanied by decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. NVP-AEW541 enhanced sensitivity of HL60 cells to either cytarabine or etoposide. Moreover, NVP-AEW541 reduced the clonogenic capacity of AML CD34(+) cells cultured in the presence of IGF-I. Chemoresistant AML blasts displayed enhanced IGF-I secretion, and were sensitized to etoposide-induced apoptosis by NVP-AEW541. Our findings indicate that NVP-AEW541 might be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of those AML cases characterized by IGF-I autocrine secretion.

  1. Public Key FPGA Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hymel, Ross

    2013-07-25

    The Public Key (PK) FPGA software performs asymmetric authentication using the 163-bit Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) on an embedded FPGA platform. A digital signature is created on user-supplied data, and communication with a host system is performed via a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus. Software includes all components necessary for signing, including custom random number generator for key creation and SHA-256 for data hashing.

  2. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  3. Food Purchase Decision-Making Typologies of Women with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla; Warland, Rex; Achterberg, Cheryl

    1997-01-01

    Food selection is a key factor in the nutritional management of diabetes. Criteria that influence point-of-purchase decision making in women with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were identified. Four types of shoppers were distinguished from interviews; cluster analysis was used to confirm the analysis. Usefulness in patient education is…

  4. Low-dose insulin infusions in diabetic patients with high insulin requirements.

    PubMed

    Dandona, P; Foster, M; Healey, F; Greenbury, E; Beckett, A G

    1978-08-01

    Six patients with high insulin requirements (range 120-3000 units daily) have been infused with much smaller doses (range 50-63 units daily) of insulin intravenously. All six maintained adequate glucose homoestasis on this regimen. It is suggested that subcutaneous tissue at the site of injection may alter insulin or impair its absorption. Insulin resistance in some patients may be due to these mechanisms.

  5. Altered insulin distribution and metabolism in type I diabetics assessed by (123I)insulin scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Hachiya, H.L.; Treves, S.T.; Kahn, C.R.; Sodoyez, J.C.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.

    1987-04-01

    Scintigraphic scanning with (/sup 123/I)insulin provides a direct and quantitative assessment of insulin uptake and disappearance at specific organ sites. Using this technique, the biodistribution and metabolism of insulin were studied in type 1 diabetic patients and normal subjects. The major organ of (/sup 123/I)insulin uptake in both diabetic and normal subjects was the liver. After iv injection in normal subjects, the uptake of (/sup 123/I)insulin by the liver was rapid, with peak activity at 7 min. Activity declined rapidly thereafter, consistent with rapid insulin degradation and clearance. Rapid uptake of (/sup 123/I)insulin also occurred in the kidneys, although the uptake of insulin by the kidneys was about 80% of that by liver. In type 1 diabetic patients, uptake of (/sup 123/I)insulin in these organ sites was lower than that in normal subjects; peak insulin uptakes in liver and kidneys were 21% and 40% lower than those in normal subjects, respectively. The kinetics of insulin clearance from the liver was comparable in diabetic and normal subjects, whereas clearance from the kidneys was decreased in diabetics. The plasma clearance of (/sup 123/I)insulin was decreased in diabetic patients, as was insulin degradation, assessed by trichloroacetic acid precipitability. Thirty minutes after injection, 70.9 +/- 3.8% (+/- SEM) of (/sup 123/I)insulin in the plasma of diabetics was trichloroacetic acid precipitable vs. only 53.9 +/- 4.0% in normal subjects. A positive correlation was present between the organ uptake of (123I)insulin in the liver or kidneys and insulin degradation (r = 0.74; P less than 0.001).

  6. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22–B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26–B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity. PMID:26792393

  7. pVHL is a regulator of glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Zehetner, Jens; Danzer, Carsten; Collins, Stephan; Eckhardt, Katrin; Gerber, Philipp A.; Ballschmieter, Pia; Galvanovskis, Juris; Shimomura, Kenju; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Thorens, Bernard; Rorsman, Patrik; Krek, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is stimulated by glucose metabolism. However, the relative importance of metabolizing glucose via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation versus glycolysis for insulin secretion remains unclear. von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, pVHL, negatively regulates hypoxia-inducible factor HIF1α, a transcription factor implicated in promoting a glycolytic form of metabolism. Here we report a central role for the pVHL–HIF1α pathway in the control of β-cell glucose utilization, insulin secretion, and glucose homeostasis. Conditional inactivation of Vhlh in β cells promoted a diversion of glucose away from mitochondria into lactate production, causing cells to produce high levels of glycolytically derived ATP and to secrete elevated levels of insulin at low glucose concentrations. Vhlh-deficient mice exhibited diminished glucose-stimulated changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, electrical activity, and insulin secretion, which culminate in impaired systemic glucose tolerance. Importantly, combined deletion of Vhlh and Hif1α rescued these phenotypes, implying that they are the result of HIF1α activation. Together, these results identify pVHL and HIF1α as key regulators of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. They further suggest that changes in the metabolic strategy of glucose metabolism in β cells have profound effects on whole-body glucose homeostasis. PMID:19056893

  8. Paradoxical Acceleration of Dithiothreitol-Induced Aggregation of Insulin in the Presence of a Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bumagina, Zoya; Gurvits, Bella; Artemova, Natalya; Muranov, Konstantin; Kurganov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of human recombinant insulin and the effect of α-crystallin, a representative of the family of small heat shock proteins, on the aggregation process have been studied using dynamic light scattering technique. Analysis of the distribution of the particles by size measured in the course of aggregation showed that the initial stage of the aggregation process was the stage of formation of the start aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of about 90 nm. When studying the effect of α-crystallin on the rate of DTT-induced aggregation of insulin, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of α-crystallin dramatically accelerated the aggregation process, whereas high concentrations of α-crystallin suppressed insulin aggregation. In the present study, at the molar stoichiometric ratio (insulin:α-crystallin) less than 1:0.5, a pronounced accelerating effect of α-crystallin was observed; whereas a ratio exceeding the value of 1:0.6 caused suppression of insulin aggregation. The mechanisms underlying the dual effect of α-crystallin have been proposed. It is assumed that heterogeneous nucleation occurring on the surface of the α-crystallin particle plays the key role in the paradoxical acceleration of insulin aggregation by α-crystallin that may provide an alternative biologically significant pathway of the aggregation process. PMID:21151456

  9. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Tarazona Aviñó, Roberto J; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W; Watson, Christopher J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-21

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22-B30 segment, using the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26-B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone's B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  10. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nabilatul Hani; Ismail, W. I. W.; Adam, Zainah; Jaapar, Siti Safura; Adam, Aishah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNFα and PPARγ and serine kinases like JNK and IKKβ, asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities) were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24324517

  11. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22-B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26-B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  12. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22–B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26–B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  13. The Role of Hypothalamic mTORC1 Signaling in Insulin Regulation of Food Intake, Body Weight, and Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muta, Kenjiro; Morgan, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin action in the brain particularly the hypothalamus is critically involved in the regulation of several physiological processes, including energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve activity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is implicated in the control of diverse cellular functions, including sensing nutrients and energy status. Here, we examined the role of hypothalamic mTORC1 in mediating the anorectic, weight-reducing, and sympathetic effects of central insulin action. In a mouse hypothalamic cell line (GT1–7), insulin treatment increased mTORC1 activity in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin to mice activated mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a key site of central action of insulin. Interestingly, inhibition of hypothalamic mTORC1 with rapamycin reversed the food intake- and body weight-lowering effects of ICV insulin. Rapamycin also abolished the ability of ICV insulin to cause lumbar sympathetic nerve activation. In GT1–7 cells, we found that insulin activation of mTORC1 pathway requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Consistent with this, genetic disruption of PI3K in mice abolished insulin stimulation of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling as well as the lumbar sympathetic nerve activation evoked by insulin. These results demonstrate the importance of mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamus in mediating the action of insulin to regulate energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve traffic. Our data also highlight the key role of PI3K as a link between insulin receptor and mTORC1 signaling in the hypothalamus. PMID:25574706

  14. PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Cantin, Louis-David; Magnuson, Steven; Gunn, David; Barucci, Nicole; Breuhaus, Marina; Bullock, William H; Burke, Jennifer; Claus, Thomas H; Daly, Michelle; Decarr, Lynn; Gore-Willse, Ann; Hoover-Litty, Helana; Kumarasinghe, Ellalahewage S; Li, Yaxin; Liang, Sidney X; Livingston, James N; Lowinger, Timothy; Macdougall, Margit; Ogutu, Herbert O; Olague, Alan; Ott-Morgan, Ronda; Schoenleber, Robert W; Tersteegen, Adrian; Wickens, Philip; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Lei; Sweet, Laurel J

    2007-05-15

    Modulation of cAMP levels has been linked to insulin secretion in preclinical animal models and in humans. The high expression of PDE-10A in pancreatic islets suggested that inhibition of this enzyme may provide the necessary modulation to elicit increased insulin secretion. Using an HTS approach, we have identified quinoline-based PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues in vitro. Optimized compounds were evaluated in vivo where improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in insulin secretion were measured. PMID:17400452

  15. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Overexpression enhances Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Mondon, Carl E.; Schrader, Joerg; Konishi, Hakuoh; Cooke, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may modulate insulin-induced uptake of glucose in insulin-sensitive tissues. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that a reduction in endogenous ADMA would increase NO synthesis and thereby enhance insulin sensitivity. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis we employed a transgenic mouse in which we overexpressed human dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH-I). The DDAH-I mice had lower plasma ADMA at all ages (22–70 weeks) by comparison to wild-type (WT) littermates. With a glucose challenge, WT mice showed a prompt increase in ADMA, whereas DDAH-I mice had a blunted response. Furthermore, DDAH-I mice had a blunted increase in plasma insulin and glucose levels after glucose challenge, with a 50% reduction in the insulin resistence index, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to insulin. In liver, we observed an increased Akt phosphorylation in the DDAH-I mice after i.p. glucose challenge. Incubation of skeletal muscle from WT mice ex vivo with ADMA (2μM) markedly suppressed insulin-induced glycogen synthesis in fast-twitch but not slow-twitch muscle. Conclusions These findings suggest that the endogenous NOS inhibitor ADMA reduces insulin sensitivity, consistent with previous observations that NO plays a role in insulin sensitivity. PMID:18239148

  16. Diabetes therapy trials with inhaled insulin.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Samuel Edwin

    2006-07-01

    Administration of insulin by inhalation was first attempted > 50 years ago. At that time, little was known concerning effective delivery systems and insulin formulations. The recent development of pulmonary delivery systems for the administration of insulin is driven by the reluctance of patients and their providers to initiate insulin earlier in the course of Type 2 diabetes, the desire to reduce the number of daily insulin injections for both Type 1 and 2 patients, and the recent emphasis on intensified glycaemic control including postprandial glycaemic control. The deep lung is a unique mucosal tissue having a surface area of > 100 m2 and is readily accessible both to the external environment and to drug delivery, provided that appropriate conditions are met. There have been four mid- to late-phase pulmonary insulin programmes using modern inhalation devices that will be reported in this paper. The programmes differ in the choice of delivery systems, the formulations of insulin and reported bioavailability, pharmacokinetic and glucodynamic profiles and adverse events. However, all systems successfully deliver insulin to the deep lung and biological effectiveness compares favourably with injected subcutaneous insulins.

  17. Insulin Increases Ceramide Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M. E.; Tippetts, T. S.; Anderson, M. C.; Holub, Z. E.; Moulton, E. R.; Swensen, A. C.; Prince, J. T.; Bikman, B. T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscle. Methods. Skeletal muscle cells were treated with insulin with or without palmitate for various time periods. Lipids (ceramides and TAG) were isolated and gene expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes were quantified. Additionally, adult male mice received daily insulin injections for 14 days, followed by muscle ceramide analysis. Results. In muscle cells, insulin elicited an increase in ceramides comparable to palmitate alone. This is likely partly due to an insulin-induced increase in expression of multiple enzymes, particularly SPT2, which, when knocked down, prevented the increase in ceramides. In mice, 14 days of insulin injection resulted in increased soleus ceramides, but not TAG. However, insulin injections did significantly increase hepatic TAG compared with vehicle-injected animals. Conclusions. This study suggests that insulin elicits an anabolic effect on sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscle, resulting in increased ceramide accumulation. These findings reveal a potential mechanism of the deleterious consequences of the hyperinsulinemia that accompanies insulin resistance and suggest a possible novel therapeutic target to mitigate its effects. PMID:24949486

  18. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another outcome measure has not only clouded the assessment of basal insulin but has also polarized opinion worldwide about the utility of the newer basal insulin. A critical review of both the pre and post FDA analysis of all the basal insulin in this article attempts to clear some of the confusion surrounding the issues of hypoglycemia and glycemic control. This article also discusses all the trials and meta-analysis done on all the current basal insulin available along with their head-to-head comparison with particular attention to glycemic control and hypoglycemic events including severe and nocturnal hypoglycemia. This in-depth analysis hopes to provide a clear interpretation of the various analyses available in literature at this point of time thereby acting as an excellent guide to the readers in choosing the most appropriate basal insulin for their patient. PMID:25364672

  19. Worker hazard communications: The regulatory framework

    SciTech Connect

    West, A.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are a key element in the communication of chemical hazards in the workplace. Their use has grown far faster than earlier anticipated. This paper describes aspects of the regulatory requirements in the US, in Canada, and in Europe. Some concern is expressed that the length and complexity of some of the data sheets currently being published may be deleterious to the original intent.

  20. Insulin Control of Glucose Metabolism in Man

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Paul A.; Liljenquist, John E.; Tobin, Jordan D.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Watkins, Paul; Andres, Reubin; Berman, Mones

    1975-01-01

    Analyses of the control of glucose metabolism by insulin have been hampered by changes in bloog glucose concentration induced by insulin administration with resultant activation of hypoglycemic counterregulatory mechanisms. To eliminate such mechanisms, we have employed the glucose clamp technique which allows maintenance of fasting blood glucose concentration during and after the administration of insulin. Analyses of six studies performed in young healthy men in the postabsorptive state utilizing the concurrent administration of [14C]glucose and 1 mU/kg per min (40 mU/m2 per min) porcine insulin led to the development of kinetic models for insulin and for glucose. These models account quantitatively for the control of insulin on glucose utilization and on endogenous glucose production during nonsteady states. The glucose model, a parallel three-compartment model, has a central compartment (mass = 68±7 mg/kg; space of distribution = blood water volume) in rapid equilibrium with a smaller compartment (50±17 mg/kg) and in slow equilibrium with a larger compartment (96±21 mg/kg). The total plasma equivalent space for the glucose system averaged 15.8 liters or 20.3% body weight. Two modes of glucose loss are introduced in the model. One is a zero-order loss (insulin and glucose independent) from blood to the central nervous system; its magnitude was estimated from published data. The other is an insulin-dependent loss, occurring from the rapidly equilibrating compartment and, in the basal period, is smaller than the insulin-independent loss. Endogenous glucose production averaged 1.74 mg/kg per min in the basal state and enters the central compartment directly. During the glucose clamp experiments plasma insulin levels reached a plateau of 95±8 μU/ml. Over the entire range of insulin levels studied, glucose losses were best correlated with levels of insulin in a slowly equilibrating insulin compartment of a three-compartment insulin model. A proportional control

  1. Electrochemically triggered release of human insulin from an insulin-impregnated reduced graphene oxide modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Florina; Rolland, Laure; Ramarao, Viswanatha; Abderrahmani, Amar; Mandler, Daniel; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-09-28

    An electrochemical insulin-delivery system based on reduced graphene oxide impregnated with insulin is described. Upon application of a potential pulse of -0.8 V for 30 min, up to 70 ± 4% of human insulin was released into a physiological medium while preserving its biological activity.

  2. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M. )

    1988-08-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5{prime}-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5{prime}-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable ({sup 14}C)sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Adventures with Insulin in the Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin is a small but beautifully organized protein with a unique two-chain structure, the first protein to be sequenced. The mechanism of its biosynthesis invited much initial speculation but was finally clarified by the discovery of proinsulin, its single-chain precursor. The rich present-day field of protein precursor processing via post-translational proteolysis within the secretory pathway arose in the early 1970s as an offshoot of studies on insulin biosynthesis, which provided a novel paradigm for the generation of many other small neuroendocrine peptides. Before long, this mechanism was also found to play a role in the production of a much wider spectrum of proteins traversing the secretory pathway (receptors, growth factors, blood-clotting components, and even many viral envelope proteins) occurring in almost all eukaryotic cells. Indeed, yeast provided a key clue in the search for the proprotein convertases, the endoproteases that work along with carboxypeptidases and other modifying enzymes, such as the amidating enzyme complex (PAM), in converting inactive or less active precursor proteins into their fully active peptide products. In this “Reflections” article, I have tried to recount the people and events in my life that led to my involvement first in basic biochemical research and then on to insulin, proinsulin, and many relevant related areas that continue to fascinate and challenge my colleagues and me, as well as many other biomedical scientists today, as diabetes mellitus increasingly threatens human health throughout our contemporary world. PMID:21454641

  4. Fasting glucose insulin ratio: a useful measure of insulin resistance in girls with premature adrenarche.

    PubMed

    Vuguin, P; Saenger, P; Dimartino-Nardi, J

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fasting glucose/insulin ratio is a useful screening test for insulin resistance in prepubertal girls with premature adrenarche. The glucose/insulin ratio was compared with the insulin sensitivity index calculated from the frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide using the minimal model computer program. Thirty-three prepubertal girls (22 Caribbean Hispanic and 11 African American; mean age, 6.8 yr; bone age, 8 yr) were studied. All underwent a 60-min ACTH stimulation test. The fasting glucose/insulin ratio was also compared with IGF-binding protein-1 and ACTH-stimulated androgen levels. Insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with the glucose/insulin ratio (0.76; P < 0.001), fasting insulin (0.75; P < 0.001), and IGF-binding protein-1 (0.59; P < 0.005). Stepwise regression analysis with the insulin sensitivity index as the dependent variable showed that the fasting glucose/insulin ratio was significantly predictive of the insulin sensitivity index (P < 0.002). When viewed as a screening test, setting a value of the fasting glucose/insulin ratio of less than 7 as abnormal and of less than 5.7 x 10(-4) min/microU.ml for the insulin sensitivity index as evidence of insulin resistance (normal prepubertal insulin sensitivity index, >5.7 x 10(-4) min/microU.ml), the sensitivity of the fasting glucose/insulin ratio was 87%, and the specificity was 89%. Furthermore, those girls with a low glucose/insulin ratio (<7) had higher body mass index, fasting insulin, free T, and ACTH-stimulated 17-hydroxypregnenolone and lower fasting IGF-binding protein-1 and SHBG than those girls with a glucose/insulin ratio greater than 7. The fasting glucose/insulin ratio is a useful screening test for insulin resistance in prepubertal Caribbean Hispanic and African American girls with premature adrenarche.

  5. Postprandial Regulation of Hepatic MicroRNAs Predicted to Target the Insulin Pathway in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Mennigen, Jan A.; Panserat, Stéphane; Larquier, Mélanie; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Medale, Françoise; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow trout are carnivorous fish and poor metabolizers of carbohydrates, which established this species as a model organism to study the comparative physiology of insulin. Following the recent characterisation of key roles of several miRNAs in the insulin action on hepatic intermediary metabolism in mammalian models, we investigated the hypothesis that hepatic miRNA expression is postprandially regulated in the rainbow trout and temporally coordinated in the context of insulin-mediated regulation of metabolic gene expression in the liver. To address this hypothesis, we used a time-course experiment in which rainbow trout were fed a commercial diet after short-term fasting. We investigated hepatic miRNA expression, activation of the insulin pathway, and insulin regulated metabolic target genes at several time points. Several miRNAs which negatively regulate hepatic insulin signaling in mammalian model organisms were transiently increased 4 h after the meal, consistent with a potential role in acute postprandial negative feed-back regulation of the insulin pathway and attenuation of gluconeogenic gene expression. We equally observed a transient increase in omy- miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b 4 h after feeding, whose homologues have potent lipogenic roles in the liver of mammalian model systems. A concurrent increase in the activity of the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the expression of lipogenic genes (srebp1c, fas, acly) was equally observed, while lipolytic gene expression (cpt1a and cpt1b) decreased significantly 4 h after the meal. This suggests lipogenic roles of omy-miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b may be conserved between rainbow trout and mammals and that these miRNAs may furthermore contribute to acute postprandial regulation of de novo hepatic lipid synthesis in rainbow trout. These findings provide a framework for future research of miRNA regulation of hepatic metabolism in trout and will help to further elucidate the metabolic phenotype of rainbow trout

  6. Computational model of cellular metabolic dynamics: effect of insulin on glucose disposal in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Solomon, Thomas P. J.; Haus, Jacob M.; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms by which insulin regulates glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle is critical to understanding the etiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our knowledge of these mechanisms is limited by the difficulty of obtaining in vivo intracellular data. To quantitatively distinguish significant transport and metabolic mechanisms from limited experimental data, we developed a physiologically based, multiscale mathematical model of cellular metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle. The model describes mass transport and metabolic processes including distinctive processes of the cytosol and mitochondria. The model simulated skeletal muscle metabolic responses to insulin corresponding to human hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Insulin-mediated rate of glucose disposal was the primary model input. For model validation, simulations were compared with experimental data: intracellular metabolite concentrations and patterns of glucose disposal. Model variations were simulated to investigate three alternative mechanisms to explain insulin enhancements: Model 1 (M.1), simple mass action; M.2, insulin-mediated activation of key metabolic enzymes (i.e., hexokinase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate dehydrogenase); or M.3, parallel activation by a phenomenological insulin-mediated intracellular signal that modifies reaction rate coefficients. These simulations indicated that models M.1 and M.2 were not sufficient to explain the experimentally measured metabolic responses. However, by application of mechanism M.3, the model predicts metabolite concentration changes and glucose partitioning patterns consistent with experimental data. The reaction rate fluxes quantified by this detailed model of insulin/glucose metabolism provide information that can be used to evaluate the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20332360

  7. Efficient and simple production of insulin-producing cells from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using mouse neonate pancreas extract, as a natural inducer.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Esmaeili, Fariba; Cheraghi, Somayeh; Houshmand, Fariba; Shabani, Leila; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    An attractive approach to replace the destroyed insulin-producing cells (IPCs) is the generation of functional β cells from stem cells. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) stem cells are pluripotent cells which can differentiate into all cell types. The present study was carried out to establish a simple nonselective inductive culture system for generation of IPCs from P19 EC cells by 1-2 weeks old mouse pancreas extract (MPE). Since, mouse pancreatic islets undergo further remodeling and maturation for 2-3 weeks after birth, we hypothesized that the mouse neonatal MPE contains essential factors to induce in vitro differentiation of pancreatic lineages. Pluripotency of P19 cells were first confirmed by expression analysis of stem cell markers, Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog. In order to induce differentiation, the cells were cultured in a medium supplemented by different concentrations of MPE (50, 100, 200 and 300 µg/ml). The results showed that P19 cells could differentiate into IPCs and form dithizone-positive cell clusters. The generated P19-derived IPCs were immunoreactive to proinsulin, insulin and insulin receptor beta. The expression of pancreatic β cell genes including, PDX-1, INS1 and INS2 were also confirmed. The peak response at the 100 µg/ml MPE used for investigation of EP300 and CREB1 gene expression. When stimulated with glucose, these cells synthesized and secreted insulin. Network analysis of the key transcription factors (PDX-1, EP300, CREB1) during the generation of IPCs resulted in introduction of novel regulatory candidates such as MIR17, and VEZF1 transcription factors, as well as MORN1, DKFZp761P0212, and WAC proteins. Altogether, we demonstrated the possibility of generating IPCs from undifferentiated EC cells, with the characteristics of pancreatic β cells. The derivation of pancreatic cells from EC cells which are ES cell siblings would provide a valuable experimental tool in study of pancreatic development and function as well as rapid production of

  8. Efficient and simple production of insulin-producing cells from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using mouse neonate pancreas extract, as a natural inducer.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Esmaeili, Fariba; Cheraghi, Somayeh; Houshmand, Fariba; Shabani, Leila; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    An attractive approach to replace the destroyed insulin-producing cells (IPCs) is the generation of functional β cells from stem cells. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) stem cells are pluripotent cells which can differentiate into all cell types. The present study was carried out to establish a simple nonselective inductive culture system for generation of IPCs from P19 EC cells by 1-2 weeks old mouse pancreas extract (MPE). Since, mouse pancreatic islets undergo further remodeling and maturation for 2-3 weeks after birth, we hypothesized that the mouse neonatal MPE contains essential factors to induce in vitro differentiation of pancreatic lineages. Pluripotency of P19 cells were first confirmed by expression analysis of stem cell markers, Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog. In order to induce differentiation, the cells were cultured in a medium supplemented by different concentrations of MPE (50, 100, 200 and 300 µg/ml). The results showed that P19 cells could differentiate into IPCs and form dithizone-positive cell clusters. The generated P19-derived IPCs were immunoreactive to proinsulin, insulin and insulin receptor beta. The expression of pancreatic β cell genes including, PDX-1, INS1 and INS2 were also confirmed. The peak response at the 100 µg/ml MPE used for investigation of EP300 and CREB1 gene expression. When stimulated with glucose, these cells synthesized and secreted insulin. Network analysis of the key transcription factors (PDX-1, EP300, CREB1) during the generation of IPCs resulted in introduction of novel regulatory candidates such as MIR17, and VEZF1 transcription factors, as well as MORN1, DKFZp761P0212, and WAC proteins. Altogether, we demonstrated the possibility of generating IPCs from undifferentiated EC cells, with the characteristics of pancreatic β cells. The derivation of pancreatic cells from EC cells which are ES cell siblings would provide a valuable experimental tool in study of pancreatic development and function as well as rapid production of

  9. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression: Importance of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Sampson, Sanford R. . E-mail: sampsos@mail.biu.ac.il

    2007-01-05

    Protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) is a key molecule in insulin signaling essential for insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that insulin rapidly stimulates PKC{delta} activity and increases PKC{delta} protein and RNA levels, and that the SP-1 transcription factor is involved in insulin-induced transcription of the PKC{delta} gene. Activation of SP-1 involves serine phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. In this study we examined the possibility that PKC{alpha} might be involved in serine phosphorylation and activation of SP-1. We found that insulin rapidly phosphorylates and translocates SP-1. In the cytoplasm, SP-1 was constitutively associated with PKC{alpha}, and insulin stimulation caused these proteins to dissociate. In contrast, in the nucleus insulin induced an increase in association between PKC{alpha} and SP-1. PKC{alpha} inhibition blocked insulin-induced serine phosphorylation of SP-1 and its association with PKC{alpha} in the nucleus. Inhibition of PKC{alpha} also reduced the insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. We also attempted to determine if another transcription factor might be involved in regulation of PKC{delta} expression. We earlier showed that insulin did not affect nuclear NF{kappa}B levels. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B, however, increased insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Surprisingly, this inhibition reduced the insulin-induced increase in cytoplasmic and nuclear PKC{alpha} RNA and protein. Inhibition of PKC{delta} reduced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation as well as NF{kappa}B activation. Thus, PKC{alpha} regulates insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression levels and this regulation involves activation of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B.

  10. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  11. Mediated semiquantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawec, Walter O.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we design a quantum key distribution protocol, allowing two limited semiquantum or "classical" users to establish a shared secret key with the help of a fully quantum server. A semiquantum user can prepare and measure qubits only in the computational basis and so must rely on this quantum server to produce qubits in alternative bases and also to perform alternative measurements. However, we assume that the server is untrusted and we prove the unconditional security of our protocol even in the worst case: when this quantum server is an all-powerful adversary. We also compute a lower bound of the key rate of our protocol, in the asymptotic scenario, as a function of the observed error rate in the channel, allowing us to compute the maximally tolerated error of our protocol. Our results show that a semiquantum protocol may hold similar security to a fully quantum one.

  12. Suspension of basal insulin to avoid hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pump

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Rodríguez-Cordero, Julia; Jiménez-Ortega, Angelines; Nóvoa, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Treatment with continuous s.c. insulin infusion (CSII) provides better glycemic control and lower risk of hypoglycemia than conventional therapy with multiple daily insulin injections. These benefits have been related to a more reliable absorption and an improved pharmacokinetic profile of insulin delivered through CSII therapy. However, even for patients treated with CSII, exaggerated postmeal hyperglycemic excursions and late postabsorptive hypoglycemia can still constitute a therapeutic challenge. Two female patients with type 1 diabetes who began treatment with CSII required to increase their previous breakfast insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio in order to achieve postprandial glycemic goals. However, they simultaneously presented recurrent episodes of late hypoglycemia several hours after breakfast bolus. Advancing the timing of the bolus was ineffective and bothersome for patients. In both cases, the best therapeutic option was to set a basal insulin rate of zero units per hour during 6 h after breakfast. Even so, they need to routinely take a midmorning snack with 10–20 g of carbohydrates to avoid late postabsorptive hypoglycemia. They have been using this insulin schedule for about 3 years without complications. The action of prandial insulin delivered through insulin pumps can be inappropriately delayed for the requirements of some patients. Although suspension of basal rate can be an acceptable therapeutic alternative for them, these cases demonstrate that new strategies to improve the bioavailability of prandial insulin infused through CSII are still needed. Learning points CSII remains the most physiologically suitable system of insulin delivery available today.Additionally, the duration of action of prandial insulin delivered through insulin pumps can be excessively prolonged in some patients with type 1 diabetes.These patients can present recurrent late episodes of hypoglycemia several hours after the administration of insulin boluses

  13. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M; Holst, Jens J; Leiviskä, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G

    2013-11-14

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life (SGI group) and twelve controls. Subjects ate a test meal (whey meal, casein meal, SFA meal and PUFA meal) once in a random order. Plasma glucose, insulin, TAG, NEFA, ghrelin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and a satiety profile were measured in the fasting state and for 4 h after each test meal. Compared with the controls, the SGI group had about 1·5-fold higher insulin responses after the whey meal (P= 0·037), casein meal (P= 0·023) and PUFA meal (P= 0·002). TAG responses were 34-69 % higher for the SGI group, but only the PUFA-meal responses differed significantly between the groups. The PYY response of the SGI group was 44 % higher after the whey meal (P= 0·046) and 115 % higher after the casein meal (P= 0·025) compared with the controls. No other statistically significant differences were seen between the groups. In conclusion, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels.

  14. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes.

  15. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N.; Barros, S.P.; Zhang, S.; Moss, K.L.; Phillips, S.T.; Offenbacher, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  16. Cardiac Aging and Insulin Resistance: Could Insulin/Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Signaling be used as a Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Boudina, Sihem

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic cardiac aging is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with structural and functional changes that impede cardiac responses to stress and to cardio-protective mechanisms. Although systemic insulin resistance and the associated risk factors exacerbate cardiac aging, cardiac-specific insulin resistance without confounding systemic alterations, could prevent cardiac aging. Thus, strategies aimed to reduce insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in the heart prevent cardiac aging in lower organisms and in mammals but the mechanisms underlying this protection are not fully understood. In this review, we describe the impact of aging on the cardiovascular system and discuss the mounting evidence that reduced insulin/IGF signaling in the heart could alleviate age-associated alterations and preserve cardiac performance. PMID:23448491

  17. Insulin inhalation--Pfizer/Nektar Therapeutics: HMR 4006, inhaled PEG-insulin--Nektar, PEGylated insulin--Nektar.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Nektar Therapeutics (formerly Inhale Therapeutic Systems) has developed a pulmonary drug delivery system for insulin [HMR 4006, Exubera]. The rationale behind developing a pulmonary drug delivery system is to ensure that insulin powder is delivered deep into the lungs, where it is easily absorbed into the bloodstream, in a hand-held inhalation device. The device converts the insulin powder par