Science.gov

Sample records for key insulin regulatory

  1. Current european regulatory perspectives on insulin analogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Insulin analogues are increasingly considered as an alternative to human insulin in the therapy of diabetes mellitus. Insulin analogues (IAs) are chemically different from human insulin and may have different pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic properties. The significance of the modifications of the insulin molecule for the safety profile of IAs must be considered. This review describes the regulatory procedure and the expectations for the scientific content of European marketing authorization applications for innovative IAs submitted to the European Medicines Agency. Particular consideration is given to a potential cancer hazard. Specific regulatory guidance on how to address a possible carcinogenic or tumor promoting effect of innovative IAs in non-clinical studies is available. After marketing authorization, the factual access of patients to the new product will be determined to great extent by health technology assessment bodies, reimbursement decisions and the price. Whereas the marketing authorization is a European decision, pricing and reimbursement are national or regional responsibilities. The assessment of benefit and risk by the European Medicines Agency is expected to influence future decisions on price and reimbursement on a national or regional level. Collaborations between regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies have been initiated on European and national level to facilitate the use of the European Medicines Agency's benefit risk assessment as basis on which to build the subsequent health technology assessment. The option for combined or joint scientific advice procedures with regulators and health technology assessment bodies on European level or on a national level in several European Member States may help applicants to optimize their development program and dossier preparation in regard of both European marketing authorization application and reimbursement decisions. PMID:21736748

  2. Drug Development and Potential Regulatory Paths for Insulin Biosimilars

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCI Act), a biological product may be demonstrated to be “biosimilar” if data show that, among other things, the product is “highly similar” to an already-approved biological product. Biosimilar insulins have the potential to reduce ever growing costs associated with insulin treatment by allowing competition. In this article, we describe the current drug development and regulatory paths for biosimilar insulins. Most likely basis of market approval for biosimilar insulins by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and guidance for developing insulin biosimilars by European Medicines Agency (EMA) are discussed in detail. Currently, no product specific biosimilar FDA guidance for insulin biosimilarity assessment exists. We propose efficient and cost-effective drug development and potential regulatory paths based on scientific justification. In addition, novel trial designs for demonstrating interchangeability between the biosimilar and the reference insulin products are presented. PMID:24876531

  3. Key proteins involved in insulin vesicle exocytosis and secretion

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian-Yin; Yu, Cui; Zhang, Yao; Ling, Liefeng; Wang, Lizhuo; Gao, Jia-Lin

    2017-01-01

    In vivo insulin secretion is predominantly affected by blood glucose concentration, blood concentration of amino acids, gastrointestinal hormones and free nerve functional status, in addition to other factors. Insulin is one of the most important hormones in the body, and its secretion is precisely controlled by nutrients, neurotransmitters and hormones. The insulin exocytosis process is similar to the neurotransmitter release mechanism. There are various types of proteins and lipids that participate in the insulin secretory vesicle fusion process, such as soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein, Ras-related proteins and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Notably, the SNARE protein is the molecular basis of exocytotic activity. In the current review, the role of the vesicle membrane proteins (synaptobrevins, vesicle associated membrane proteins and target membrane proteins) and auxiliary proteins (Rab proteins and Munc-18 proteins) in vesicle fusion activity were summarized. A summary of these key proteins involved in insulin granule secretion will facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:28357064

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: the key switch mechanism in insulin signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, P R; Withers, D J; Siddle, K

    1998-01-01

    Insulin plays a key role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. However, until recently little was known about the signalling pathways that are involved in linking the insulin receptor with downstream responses. It is now apparent that the activation of class 1a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is necessary and in some cases sufficient to elicit many of insulin's effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The lipid products of PI 3-kinase act as both membrane anchors and allosteric regulators, serving to localize and activate downstream enzymes and their protein substrates. One of the major ways these lipid products of PI 3-kinase act in insulin signalling is by binding to pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase (PDK) and protein kinase B (PKB) and in the process regulating the phosphorylation of PKB by PDK. Using mechanisms such as this, PI 3-kinase is able to act as a molecular switch to regulate the activity of serine/threonine-specific kinase cascades important in mediating insulin's effects on endpoint responses. PMID:9677303

  5. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression reduces inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Cao, Shengxuan; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Wang, Songmei; Yin, Lianhua; Zhi, Xiuling

    2017-04-12

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a mitochondrial cholesterol delivery protein, plays a beneficial role in hyperlipidemia, NAFLD and endothelial inflammation. Elevated circulating fatty acids and low grade inflammation are known as key risk factors of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the present study, C57BL/6J mice were fed with a HFD and infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing StAR by tail-vein injection. Intraperitoneal glucose/insulin tolerance test was performed to assess the insulin sensitivity. Morphological analysis and intramuscular lipid determination were used to illustrate the adipose hypertrophy and ectopic fat accumulation in skeletal muscle. The levels of inflammatory factor and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. The fatty acids composition was analysis using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The expression of genes associated with inflammation and insulin resistance were determined by Western blotting and qPCR to elucidate the underlying mechanism.We demonstrated that StAR overexpression ameliorated insulin resistance and systemic inflammatory response with the reduction of adipose hypertrophy and intramuscular lipid in HFD fed mice. In addition, StAR overexpression increased serum unsaturated fatty acids and PPARγ expression in muscle and adipose tissue of obese mice. In conclusion, StAR may activate PPARγ by increasing unsaturated fatty acids, which leads to a protective role in systemic inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. An insulin-to-insulin regulatory network orchestrates phenotypic specificity in development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Fernandes de Abreu, Diana Andrea; Caballero, Antonio; Fardel, Pascal; Stroustrup, Nicholas; Chen, Zhunan; Lee, Kyunghwa; Keyes, William D; Nash, Zachary M; López-Moyado, Isaac F; Vaggi, Federico; Cornils, Astrid; Regenass, Martin; Neagu, Anca; Ostojic, Ivan; Liu, Chang; Cho, Yongmin; Sifoglu, Deniz; Shen, Yu; Fontana, Walter; Lu, Hang; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Murphy, Coleen T; Antebi, Adam; Blanc, Eric; Apfeld, Javier; Zhang, Yun; Alcedo, Joy; Ch'ng, Queelim

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) play highly conserved roles in development and physiology. Most animal genomes encode multiple ILPs. Here we identify mechanisms for how the forty Caenorhabditis elegans ILPs coordinate diverse processes, including development, reproduction, longevity and several specific stress responses. Our systematic studies identify an ILP-based combinatorial code for these phenotypes characterized by substantial functional specificity and diversity rather than global redundancy. Notably, we show that ILPs regulate each other transcriptionally, uncovering an ILP-to-ILP regulatory network that underlies the combinatorial phenotypic coding by the ILP family. Extensive analyses of genetic interactions among ILPs reveal how their signals are integrated. A combined analysis of these functional and regulatory ILP interactions identifies local genetic circuits that act in parallel and interact by crosstalk, feedback and compensation. This organization provides emergent mechanisms for phenotypic specificity and graded regulation for the combinatorial phenotypic coding we observe. Our findings also provide insights into how large hormonal networks regulate diverse traits.

  7. Insulin sensitivity and counter-regulatory hormones in hypothyroidism and during thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Stanická, Sona; Vondra, Karel; Pelikánová, Terezie; Vlcek, Petr; Hill, Martin; Zamrazil, Václav

    2005-01-01

    We examined insulin sensitivity and secretion, together with the levels of selected glucoregulatory hormones, in 15 female patients with severe hypothyroidism (H) and during subsequent thyroid hormone replacement therapy (HRT) using the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp technique. Insulin action, as evaluated by glucose disposal, the insulin sensitivity index, and fasting post-hepatic insulin delivery rate were established. The basal levels of insulin, C-peptide and counter-regulatory hormones were measured in basal condition. In H, glucose disposal (p<0.01), the insulin sensitivity index (p<0.01) and post-hepatic insulin delivery rate (p<0.05) were significantly lower than during HRT. No significant changes in the levels of fasting insulin and C-peptide were observed. The levels of counter-regulatory hormones in patients with H were significantly higher than during HRT (glucagon, p<0.05; epinephrine, p<0.01; cortisol, p<0.05; growth hormone, p<0.05). In H, an inverse correlation between insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion was observed (p<0.05). Cortisol was the most important factor affecting the variability of insulin sensitivity values, regardless of thyroid function (p=0.0012). In conclusion, H altered both insulin sensitivity and the levels of selected counter-regulatory hormones. The situation was restored by HRT, as manifested not only by normalisation of insulin sensitivity, secretion and levels of glucoregulatory hormones, but also by improvement of their relationships.

  8. A computational model of the human glucose-insulin regulatory system☆

    PubMed Central

    Shiang, Keh-Dong; Kandeel, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    Objective A computational model of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism for assisting the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in clinical research is introduced. The proposed method for the estimation of parameters for a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that represent the time course of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations during glucose tolerance test (GTT) in physiological studies is presented. The aim of this study was to explore how to interpret those laboratory glucose and insulin data as well as enhance the Ackerman mathematical model. Methods Parameters estimation for a system of ODEs was performed by minimizing the sum of squared residuals (SSR) function, which quantifies the difference between theoretical model predictions and GTT's experimental observations. Our proposed perturbation search and multiple-shooting methods were applied during the estimating process. Results Based on the Ackerman's published data, we estimated the key parameters by applying R-based iterative computer programs. As a result, the theoretically simulated curves perfectly matched the experimental data points. Our model showed that the estimated parameters, computed frequency and period values, were proven a good indicator of diabetes. Conclusion The present paper introduces a computational algorithm to biomedical problems, particularly to endocrinology and metabolism fields, which involves two coupled differential equations with four parameters describing the glucose-insulin regulatory system that Ackerman proposed earlier. The enhanced approach may provide clinicians in endocrinology and metabolism field insight into the transition nature of human metabolic mechanism from normal to impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:23554650

  9. Key intestinal genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism are downregulated in dyslipidemic men with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Couture, Patrick; Tremblay, André J; Kelly, Isabelle; Lemelin, Valéry; Droit, Arnaud; Lamarche, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with elevated plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of intestinal origin. However, the mechanisms underlying the overaccumulation of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48-containing TRLs in individuals with IR are not yet fully understood. This study examined the relationships between apoB-48-containing TRL kinetics and the expression of key intestinal genes and proteins involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism in 14 obese nondiabetic men with IR compared with 10 insulin-sensitive (IS) men matched for waist circumference. The in vivo kinetics of TRL apoB-48 were assessed using a primed-constant infusion of L-[5,5,5-D₃]leucine for 12 h with the participants in a constantly fed state. The expression of key intestinal genes and proteins involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism was assessed by performing real-time PCR quantification and LC-MS/MS on duodenal biopsy specimens. The TRL apoB-48 pool size and production rate were 102% (P < 0.0001) and 87% (P = 0.01) greater, respectively, in the men with IR versus the IS men. On the other hand, intestinal mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element binding factor-2, hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein were significantly lower in the men with IR than in the IS men. These data indicate that IR is associated with intestinal overproduction of lipoproteins and significant downregulation of key intestinal genes involved in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism.

  10. Key role of succinate dehydrogenase in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Pomytkin, I A; Kolesova, O E

    2002-06-01

    We studied the role of mitochondria in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the liver. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an insulin-sensitive source of H(2)O(2)that acts as a physiological inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Succinate dehydrogenase plays a key role in insulin-stimulated generation of H(2)O(2)and inactivation of liver protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  11. Drug Lag and Key Regulatory Barriers in the Emerging Markets

    PubMed Central

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-01-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development. The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag. The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated. This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; ‘Western Approval’, local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation. PMID:21829782

  12. Drug lag and key regulatory barriers in the emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-04-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development.The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag.The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated.This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; 'Western Approval', local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation.

  13. Palmitate induces insulin resistance in human HepG2 hepatocytes by enhancing ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of key insulin signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Megumi; Maeda, Ayumi; Tani, Shuji; Akagawa, Mitsugu

    2015-01-15

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance is a major pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. High concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) are involved in the etiology of obesity-associated insulin resistance. However, the detailed mechanism by which FFAs contribute to the development of insulin resistance is not yet fully understood. We investigated the molecular basis of insulin resistance elicited by FFAs using the human hepatocyte cell line HepG2. Among major human FFAs, palmitate markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of key insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and Akt, indicating that palmitate is the principal inducer of insulin resistance. We revealed that palmitate facilitates ubiquitination of the key insulin signaling molecules, and subsequently elicits their proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of ubiquitination by the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 inhibitor PYR41 significantly prevents palmitate-inducible insulin resistance but not by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying that ubiquitinated signaling molecules may be dysfunctional. In conclusion, inhibition of ubiquitination of the key insulin signaling molecules may be a potential strategy for preventing and treating obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  14. An Overview of Current Regulatory Requirements for Approval of Biosimilar Insulins

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Hootan; McKinnon, Ross; Home, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insulin analog patent expiry is likely to mean that, increasingly, copies of original biopharmaceutical products will be submitted for authorization. Experience with biosimilars in other therapeutic areas suggests that careful regulation and caution are needed. Published guidelines of regulatory authorities around the world on approval of biosimilars and, where available, insulin biosimilars were reviewed. Information was sourced through Internet searching and cross-referencing guidelines. As of August 2014, general biosimilar and insulin-specific guidelines are available in 34 countries and two countries/regulatory domains, respectively. Many guidelines are clearly related to, or partly derived from, the general and insulin-specific European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. Areas covered by these guidelines are fairly consistent, covering preclinical, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in humans and clinical areas; however, there are differences in emphasis. The EMA insulin-specific guidelines include detailed criteria on PK/PD studies, as do most other general biosimilar guidelines and, to a lesser extent, clinical studies. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has general biosimilar guidelines, emphasizing consideration of the whole package of in vitro, biological, and human studies, rather than concentrating on any one aspect. In countries such as Mexico, guidelines are broad, leaving wide discretion to the regulatory authority. In conclusion, from a global perspective, this area of drug regulation is heterogeneous and evolving, and the authors call for an initiative aimed at harmonizing the requirements for biosimilar insulins. PMID:25789689

  15. An Overview of Current Regulatory Requirements for Approval of Biosimilar Insulins.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Khatami, Hootan; McKinnon, Ross; Home, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Insulin analog patent expiry is likely to mean that, increasingly, copies of original biopharmaceutical products will be submitted for authorization. Experience with biosimilars in other therapeutic areas suggests that careful regulation and caution are needed. Published guidelines of regulatory authorities around the world on approval of biosimilars and, where available, insulin biosimilars were reviewed. Information was sourced through Internet searching and cross-referencing guidelines. As of August 2014, general biosimilar and insulin-specific guidelines are available in 34 countries and two countries/regulatory domains, respectively. Many guidelines are clearly related to, or partly derived from, the general and insulin-specific European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. Areas covered by these guidelines are fairly consistent, covering preclinical, pharmacokinetic (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in humans and clinical areas; however, there are differences in emphasis. The EMA insulin-specific guidelines include detailed criteria on PK/PD studies, as do most other general biosimilar guidelines and, to a lesser extent, clinical studies. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has general biosimilar guidelines, emphasizing consideration of the whole package of in vitro, biological, and human studies, rather than concentrating on any one aspect. In countries such as Mexico, guidelines are broad, leaving wide discretion to the regulatory authority. In conclusion, from a global perspective, this area of drug regulation is heterogeneous and evolving, and the authors call for an initiative aimed at harmonizing the requirements for biosimilar insulins.

  16. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  17. Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Genetic Variant Interacts with Omega-3 PUFA to Influence Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Mc Monagle, Jolene; Gulseth, Hanne L.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Shaw, Danielle I.; Karlström, Brita; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Blaak, Ellen E.; Helal, Olfa; Malczewska-Malec, Małgorzata; Defoort, Catherine; Risérus, Ulf; Saris, Wim H. M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Drevon, Christian A.; Roche, Helen M.; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Objective To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects. Design Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort. Results Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019), C-peptide (P = 0.004), HOMA-IR (P = 0.008) and CRP (P = 0.032) as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446). In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele. Conclusions We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195 PMID:21674002

  18. Persistence of counter-regulatory abnormalities in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus after pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Battezzati, A; Luzi, L; Perseghin, G; Bianchi, E; Spotti, D; Secchi, A; Vergani, S; Di Carlo, V; Pozza, G

    1994-11-01

    Conventional insulin therapy does not correct the counter-regulatory abnormalities of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Pancreas transplantation is an alternative therapy that restores the endogenous insulin secretion in diabetes. In this study, the effects of segmental pancreas transplantation on counter-regulation to mild hypoglycaemia were evaluated. Glucose kinetics and the counter-regulatory hormonal responses were assessed in eight insulin-dependent diabetics with end-stage renal failure who had received pancreas and kidney transplantation 1 year previously, seven diabetic uraemic subjects (candidates for combined transplantation), five patients with chronic uveitis on immunosuppressive therapy comparable to pancreas recipients and 10 normal subjects. Insulin (0.3 mU kg-1 min-1) was infused for 2 h to induce mild hypoglycaemia (plasma glucose 3.2-3.5 mmol l-1) and exogenous glucose was infused as required to prevent any glucose decrease below 3.1 mmol l-1. After transplantation, two of eight recipients had hypoglycaemic episodes reported in their medical records. During the study, hepatic glucose production was rapidly suppressed in the controls and in the patients on immunosuppression (-80 +/- 7 and -54 +/- 7%, P < 0.001 vs. basal), and rebounded to the baseline values within 1 h (-3 +/- 1 and -6 +/- 2%, P = NS vs. basal). The transplant recipients had similar suppression in the first hour (-88 +/- 8%, P < 0.001 vs. basal), but the suppression persisted in the second hour (-69 +/- 11%, P < 0.001 vs. basal) indicating a lack of glucose counter-regulatory response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor plays a key role in insulin resistance-associated compensatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Tiago G; Oliveira, Alexandre G; Carvalho, Bruno M; Guadagnini, Dioze; Protzek, André O P; Carvalheira, Jose B C; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mario J A

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance is present in obesity and in type 2 diabetes and is associated with islet cell hyperplasia and hyperinsulinemia, but the driving forces behind this compensatory mechanism are incompletely understood. Previous data have suggested the involvement of an unknown circulating insulin resistance-related β-cell growth factor. In this context, looking for candidates to be a circulating factor, we realized that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a strong candidate as a link between insulin resistance and increased mass of islets/hyperinsulinemia. Our approach aimed to show a possible cause-effect relationship between increase in circulating HGF levels and compensatory islet hyperplasia/hyperinsulinemia by showing the strength of the association, whether or not is a dose-dependent response, the temporality, consistency, plausibility, and reversibility of the association. In this regard, our data showed: 1) a strong and consistent correlation between HGF and the compensatory mechanism in three animal models of insulin resistance; 2) HGF increases β-cell mass in a dose-dependent manner; 3) blocking HGF shuts down the compensatory mechanisms; and 4) an increase in HGF levels seems to precede the compensatory response associated with insulin resistance, indicating that these events occur in a sequential mode. Additionally, blockages of HGF receptor (Met) worsen the impaired insulin-induced insulin signaling in liver of diet-induced obesity rats. Overall, our data indicate that HGF is a growth factor playing a key role in islet mass increase and hyperinsulinemia in diet-induced obesity rats and suggest that the HGF-Met axis may have a role on insulin signaling in the liver.

  20. Brain insulin signaling: a key component of cognitive processes and a potential basis for cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McNay, Ewan C.; Recknagel, Andrew K.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding of the role of insulin in the brain has gradually expanded, from initial conceptions of the brain as insulin-insensitive through identification of a role in regulation of feeding to recent demonstration of insulin as a key component of hippocampal memory processes. Conversely, systemic insulin resistance such as that seen in type 2 diabetes is associated with a range of cogntive and neural deficits. Here we review the evidence for insulin as a cognitive and neural modulator, including potential effector mechanisms, and examine the impact that type 2 diabetes has on these mechanisms in order to identify likely bases for the cognitive impairments seen in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:21907815

  1. Eat to reproduce: a key role for the insulin signaling pathway in adult insects

    PubMed Central

    Badisco, Liesbeth; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Insects, like all heterotrophic organisms, acquire from their food the nutrients that are essential for anabolic processes that lead to growth (larval stages) or reproduction (adult stage). In adult females, this nutritional input is processed and results in a very specific output, i.e., the production of fully developed eggs ready for fertilization and deposition. An important role in this input-output transition is attributed to the insulin signaling pathway (ISP). The ISP is considered to act as a sensor of the organism's nutritional status and to stimulate the progression of anabolic events when the status is positive. In several insect species belonging to different orders, the ISP has been demonstrated to positively control vitellogenesis and oocyte growth. Whether or not ISP acts herein via a mediator action of lipophilic insect hormones (ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone) remains debatable and might be differently controlled in different insect orders. Most likely, insulin-related peptides, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone are involved in a complex regulatory network, in which they mutually influence each other and in which the insect's nutritional status is a crucial determinant of the network's output. The current review will present an overview of the regulatory role of the ISP in female insect reproduction and its interaction with other pathways involving nutrients, lipophilic hormones and neuropeptides. PMID:23966944

  2. Signal regulatory protein-α interacts with the insulin receptor contributing to muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandhya S; Dong, Yanjun; Zhang, Liping; Mitch, William E

    2013-08-01

    Insulin resistance from chronic kidney disease (CKD) stimulates muscle protein wasting but mechanisms causing this resistance are controversial. To help resolve this, we used microarray analyses to identify initiators of insulin resistance in the muscles of mice with CKD, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. CKD raised mRNAs of inflammatory cytokines in muscles and there was a 5.2-fold increase in signal regulatory protein-α (SIRP-α), a transmembrane glycoprotein principally present in muscle membranes. By immunoprecipitation we found it interacts with the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Treatment of myotubes with a mixture of inflammatory cytokines showed that SIRP-α expression was increased by a NF-κB-dependent pathway. Blockade of NF-κB using a small-molecule chemical inhibitor or a dominant-negative IKKβ reduced cytokine-induced SIRP-α expression. The overexpression of SIRP-α in myotubes impaired insulin signaling and raised proteolysis while SIRP-α knockdown with siRNAs in skeletal muscle cells increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and IRS-1 despite inclusion of cytokines. This led to increased p-Akt and suppression of protein degradation. Thus, SIRP-α is part of a novel mechanism for inflammation-mediated insulin resistance in muscle. In catabolic conditions with impaired insulin signaling, targeting SIRP-α may improve insulin sensitivity and prevent muscle atrophy.

  3. Glucose and Insulin Stimulate Lipogenesis in Porcine Adipocytes: Dissimilar and Identical Regulation Pathway for Key Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhang Guo; Xiong, Lu Jian; Yan, Chen; Wei, Dai Hong; YingPai, ZhaXi; Qing, Zhao Yong; Lin, Qiao Zi; Fei, Feng Ruo; Ling, Wang Ya; Ren, Ma Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Lipogenesis is under the concerted action of ChREBP, SREBP-1c and other transcription factors in response to glucose and insulin. The isolated porcine preadipocytes were differentiated into mature adipocytes to investigate the roles and interrelation of these transcription factors in the context of glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis in pigs. In ChREBP-silenced adipocytes, glucose-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~70%, however insulin-induced lipogenesis was unaffected. Moreover, insulin had no effect on ChREBP expression of unperturbed adipocytes irrespective of glucose concentration, suggesting ChREBP mediate glucose-induced lipogenesis. Insulin stimulated SREBP-1c expression and when SREBP-1c activation was blocked, and the insulin-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~55%, suggesting SREBP-1c is a key transcription factor mediating insulin-induced lipogenesis. LXRα activation promoted lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression. In ChREBP-silenced or SREBP-1c activation blocked adipocytes, LXRα activation facilitated lipogenesis and SREBP-1c expression, but had no effect on ChREBP expression. Therefore, LXRα might mediate lipogenesis via SREBP-1c rather than ChREBP. When ChREBP expression was silenced and SREBP-1c activation blocked simultaneously, glucose and insulin were still able to stimulated lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression, and LXRα activation enhanced these effects, suggesting LXRα mediated directly glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis. In summary, glucose and insulin stimulated lipogenesis through both dissimilar and identical regulation pathway in porcine adipocytes. PMID:27871177

  4. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Novel Phosphorylation Events in Insulin Signaling Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulatory Subunit 12A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Ma, Danjun; Caruso, Michael; Lewis, Monique; Qi, Yue; Yi, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A) modulates the activity and specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1, regulating various cellular processes via dephosphorylation. Nonetheless, little is known about phosphorylation events controlled by PPP1R12A in skeletal muscle insulin signaling. Here, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to generate a global picture of phosphorylation events regulated by PPP1R12A in a L6 skeletal muscle cell line, which were engineered for inducible PPP1R12A knockdown. Phosphoproteomics revealed 3876 phosphorylation sites (620 were novel) in these cells. Furthermore, PPP1R12A knockdown resulted in increased overall phosphorylation in L6 cells at the basal condition, and changed phosphorylation levels for 698 sites (assigned to 295 phosphoproteins) at the basal and/or insulin-stimulated conditions. Pathway analysis on the 295 phosphoproteins revealed multiple significantly enriched pathways related to insulin signaling, such as mTOR signaling and RhoA signaling. Moreover, phosphorylation levels for numerous regulatory sites in these pathways were significantly changed due to PPP1R12A knockdown. These results indicate that PPP1R12A indeed plays a role in skeletal muscle insulin signaling, providing novel insights into the biology of insulin action. This new information may facilitate the design of experiments to better understand mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24972320

  5. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regeneration: interplay between the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Gailly, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle can regenerate in response to muscle damage. This ability is conferred by the presence of myogenic stem cells called satellite cells. In response to stimuli such as injury or exercise, these cells become activated and express myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), i.e., transcription factors of the myogenic lineage including Myf5, MyoD, myogenin, and Mrf4 to proliferate and differentiate into myofibers. The MRF family of proteins controls the transcription of important muscle-specific proteins such as myosin heavy chain and muscle creatine kinase. Different growth factors are secreted during muscle repair among which insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are the only ones that promote both muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and that play a key role in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy. Different isoforms of IGFs are expressed during muscle repair: IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, or IGF-IEc (also known as mechano growth factor, MGF) and IGF-II. MGF is expressed first and is observed in satellite cells and in proliferating myoblasts whereas IGF-Ia and IGF-II expression occurs at the state of muscle fiber formation. Interestingly, several studies report the induction of MRFs in response to IGFs stimulation. Inversely, IGFs expression may also be regulated by MRFs. Various mechanisms are proposed to support these interactions. In this review, we describe the general process of muscle hypertrophy and regeneration and decipher the interactions between the two groups of factors involved in the process.

  6. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... container that can be closed like a laundry detergent bottle. Check the expiration date on the insulin ... in a hard container like an empty laundry detergent bottle or a metal coffee can. Make sure ...

  7. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  8. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. PMID:26103991

  9. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M. Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:28005952

  10. Mathematical model of the glucose-insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose-insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose-insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  11. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  12. Key Role for Ceramides in Mediating Insulin Resistance in Human Muscle Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated non-esterified fatty acids, triglyceride, diacylglycerol and ceramide have all been associated with insulin resistance in muscle. We set out to investigate the role of intramyocellular lipid metabolites in the induction of insulin resistance in human primary myoblast cultures. Muscle cell...

  13. Insulin Is a Key Modulator of Fetoplacental Endothelium Metabolic Disturbances in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sobrevia, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Lilian; Silva, Luis; Pizarro, Carolina; Subiabre, Mario; Villalobos, Roberto; Araos, Joaquín; Toledo, Fernando; González, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Farías, Marcelo; Chiarello, Delia I.; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease of the mother that associates with altered fetoplacental vascular function. GDM-associated maternal hyperglycaemia result in fetal hyperglycaemia, a condition that leads to fetal hyperinsulinemia and altered L-arginine transport and synthesis of nitric oxide, i.e., endothelial dysfunction. These alterations in the fetoplacental endothelial function are present in women with GDM that were under diet or insulin therapy. Since these women and their newborn show normal glycaemia at term, other factors or conditions could be altered and/or not resolved by restoring normal level of circulating D-glucose. GDM associates with metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal handling of the locally released vasodilator adenosine, and biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol lipoproteins, or metabolic diseases resulting in endoplasmic reticulum stress and altered angiogenesis. Insulin acts as a potent modulator of all these phenomena under normal conditions as reported in primary cultures of cells obtained from the human placenta; however, GDM and the role of insulin regarding these alterations in this disease are poorly understood. This review focuses on the potential link between insulin and endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypercholesterolemia, and angiogenesis in GDM in the human fetoplacental vasculature. Based in reports in primary culture placental endothelium we propose that insulin is a factor restoring endothelial function in GDM by reversing ERS, hypercholesterolaemia and angiogenesis to a physiological state involving insulin activation of insulin receptor isoforms and adenosine receptors and metabolism in the human placenta from GDM pregnancies. PMID:27065887

  14. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent.

  15. Intergenic GWAS SNPs are key components of the spatial and regulatory network for human growth.

    PubMed

    Schierding, William; Antony, Jisha; Cutfield, Wayne S; Horsfield, Julia A; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2016-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has resulted in the identification of hundreds of genetic variants associated with growth and stature. Determining how these genetic variants influence growth is important, but most are non-coding, and there is little understanding of how these variants contribute to adult height. To determine the mechanisms by which human variation contributes to growth, we combined spatial genomic connectivity (high-throughput conformation capture) with functional (gene expression, expression Quantitative Trait Loci) data to determine how non-genic loci associated with infant length, pubertal and adult height and contribute to gene regulatory networks. This approach identified intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ∼85 kb upstream of FBXW11 that spatially connect with distant loci. These regulatory connections are reinforced by evidence of SNP-enhancer effects and altered expression in genes influencing the action of human growth hormone. Functional assays provided evidence for enhancer activity of the intergenic region near FBXW11 that harbors SNP rs12153391, which is associated with an expression Quantitative Trait Loci. Our results suggest that variants in this locus have genome-wide effects as key modifiers of growth (both overgrowth and short stature) acting through a regulatory network. We believe that the genes and pathways connected with this regulatory network are potential targets that could be investigated for diagnostic, prenatal and carrier testing for growth disorders. Finally, the regulatory networks we generated illustrate the power of using existing datasets to interrogate the contribution of intergenic SNPs to common syndromes/diseases.

  16. MicroRNA-29 fine-tunes the expression of key FOXA2-activated lipid metabolism genes and is dysregulated in animal models of insulin resistance and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, C Lisa; Peck, Bailey C E; Fannin, Emily E; Beysen, Carine; Miao, Ji; Landstreet, Stuart R; Ding, Shengli; Turaga, Vandana; Lund, P Kay; Turner, Scott; Biddinger, Sudha B; Vickers, Kasey C; Sethupathy, Praveen

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as biomarkers of metabolic status, etiological factors in complex disease, and promising drug targets. Recent reports suggest that miRNAs are critical regulators of pathways underlying the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate by deep sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR that hepatic levels of Foxa2 mRNA and miR-29 are elevated in a mouse model of diet-induced insulin resistance. We also show that Foxa2 and miR-29 are significantly upregulated in the livers of Zucker diabetic fatty (fa/fa) rats and that the levels of both returned to normal upon treatment with the insulin-sensitizing agent pioglitazone. We present evidence that miR-29 expression in human hepatoma cells is controlled in part by FOXA2, which is known to play a critical role in hepatic energy homeostasis. Moreover, we demonstrate that miR-29 fine-tunes FOXA2-mediated activation of key lipid metabolism genes, including PPARGC1A, HMGCS2, and ABHD5. These results suggest that miR-29 is an important regulatory factor in normal metabolism and may represent a novel therapeutic target in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic syndromes.

  17. Counterregulation of insulin by leptin as key component of autonomic regulation of body weight

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Katarina T

    2014-01-01

    A re-examination of the mechanism controlling eating, locomotion, and metabolism prompts formulation of a new explanatory model containing five features: a coordinating joint role of the (1) autonomic nervous system (ANS); (2) the suprachiasmatic (SCN) master clock in counterbalancing parasympathetic digestive and absorptive functions and feeding with sympathetic locomotor and thermogenic energy expenditure within a circadian framework; (3) interaction of the ANS/SCN command with brain substrates of reward encompassing dopaminergic projections to ventral striatum and limbic and cortical forebrain. These drive the nonhomeostatic feeding and locomotor motivated behaviors in interaction with circulating ghrelin and lateral hypothalamic neurons signaling through melanin concentrating hormone and orexin-hypocretin peptides; (4) counterregulation of insulin by leptin of both gastric and adipose tissue origin through: potentiation by leptin of cholecystokinin-mediated satiation, inhibition of insulin secretion, suppression of insulin lipogenesis by leptin lipolysis, and modulation of peripheral tissue and brain sensitivity to insulin action. Thus weight-loss induced hypoleptimia raises insulin sensitivity and promotes its parasympathetic anabolic actions while obesity-induced hyperleptinemia supresses insulin lipogenic action; and (5) inhibition by leptin of bone mineral accrual suggesting that leptin may contribute to the maintenance of stability of skeletal, lean-body, as well as adipose tissue masses. PMID:25317239

  18. A Generic Integrated Physiologically based Whole-body Model of the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Regulatory System.

    PubMed

    Schaller, S; Willmann, S; Lippert, J; Schaupp, L; Pieber, T R; Schuppert, A; Eissing, T

    2013-08-14

    Models of glucose metabolism are a valuable tool for fundamental and applied medical research in diabetes. Use cases range from pharmaceutical target selection to automatic blood glucose control. Standard compartmental models represent little biological detail, which hampers the integration of multiscale data and confines predictive capabilities. We developed a detailed, generic physiologically based whole-body model of the glucose-insulin-glucagon regulatory system, reflecting detailed physiological properties of healthy populations and type 1 diabetes individuals expressed in the respective parameterizations. The model features a detailed representation of absorption models for oral glucose, subcutaneous insulin and glucagon, and an insulin receptor model relating pharmacokinetic properties to pharmacodynamic effects. Model development and validation is based on literature data. The quality of predictions is high and captures relevant observed inter- and intra-individual variability. In the generic form, the model can be applied to the development and validation of novel diabetes treatment strategies.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2013) 2, e65; doi:10.1038/psp.2013.40; published online 14 August 2013.

  19. Glucokinase regulatory proten genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR) plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3...

  20. Impact of Biosimilar Insulins on Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dolinar, Richard O.; Heinemann, Lutz; Home, Philip; Goyal, Shefali; Polonsky, William H.; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-01-01

    The availability of biosimilar insulins can potentially lead to lower insulin costs and increased access for patients with diabetes, worldwide. However, clinicians and regulatory agencies have raised several concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of these new medications. The European regulatory agencies have established guidelines for market approval of biosimilar insulins; however, many issues remain unresolved. Moreover, although the FDA has developed preliminary pathways for biosimilar protein development and is prepared to review each application on a case-by-case basis, insulins do not fall under this pathway at this time. The development of effective postmarketing surveillance protocols, determination of product interchangeability, and product identification/labeling remain key concerns. Numerous issues surround the development and commercialization of biosimilar insulins; thus, it is important that all stakeholders fully understand the complexity of these issues and how they can potentially affect patient care. Bridging the educational gap among clinicians and regulatory agencies will be challenging but necessary for ensuring patient safety. PMID:24876554

  1. The key role of growth hormone — insulin — IGF-1 signaling in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors in aging. GH/Insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling molecules that have been linked to longevity include daf-2 and InR and their homologues in mammals, and inactivation of the corresponding genes increases lifespan in nematodes, fruit flies and mice. The life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction are likely related to decreasing IGF-1 levels. Evidence has emerged that antidiabetic drugs are promising candidates for both lifespan extension and prevention of cancer. Thus, antidiabetic drugs postpone spontaneous carcinogenesis in mice and rats, as well as chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in mice, rats and hamsters. Furthermore, metformin seems to decrease the risk for cancer in diabetic patients. PMID:23434537

  2. Drosophila neprilysins control insulin signaling and food intake via cleavage of regulatory peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hallier, Benjamin; Schiemann, Ronja; Cordes, Eva; Vitos-Faleato, Jessica; Walter, Stefan; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Malmendal, Anders; Paululat, Achim; Meyer, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and IGF signaling are critical to numerous developmental and physiological processes, with perturbations being pathognomonic of various diseases, including diabetes. Although the functional roles of the respective signaling pathways have been extensively studied, the control of insulin production and release is only partially understood. Herein, we show that in Drosophila expression of insulin-like peptides is regulated by neprilysin activity. Concomitant phenotypes of altered neprilysin expression included impaired food intake, reduced body size, and characteristic changes in the metabolite composition. Ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive mutant did not elicit any of the phenotypes, which confirms abnormal peptide hydrolysis as a causative factor. A screen for corresponding substrates of the neprilysin identified distinct peptides that regulate insulin-like peptide expression, feeding behavior, or both. The high functional conservation of neprilysins and their substrates renders the characterized principles applicable to numerous species, including higher eukaryotes and humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19430.001 PMID:27919317

  3. Self-regulatory depletion in dogs: insulin release is not necessary for the replenishment of persistence.

    PubMed

    Miller, Holly C; Pattison, Kristina F; Laude, Jennifer R; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that self-control is constrained by a limited energy resource that can be depleted through exertion. Once depleted, this resource can be replenished by the consumption or even the taste of glucose. For example, the need to inhibit reduces subsequent persistence at problem solving by humans and dogs, an effect that is not observed when a glucose drink (but not a placebo) is administered following initial inhibition. The mechanism for replenishment by glucose is currently unknown. Energy transfer is not necessary, although insulin secretion may be involved. This possibility was investigated in the current study by having dogs exert self-control (sit-stay) and subsequently giving them (1) glucose that causes the release of insulin, (2) fructose that does not result in the release of insulin nor does it affect glucose levels (but it is a carbohydrate), or (3) a calorie-free drink. Persistence measures indicated that both glucose and fructose replenished canine persistence, whereas the calorie-free drink did not. These results indicate that insulin release is probably not necessary for the replenishment that is presumed to be responsible for the increase in persistence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior.

  4. The effect of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations, expression of hepatic glucose transporters and key gluconeogenic enzymes during the perinatal period in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Franssens, Lies; Lesuisse, Jens; Wang, Yufeng; Willems, Els; Willemsen, Hilke; Koppenol, Astrid; Guo, Xiaoquan; Buyse, Johan; Decuypere, Eddy; Everaert, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    Chickens have blood glucose concentrations that are twofold higher than those observed in mammals. Moreover, the insulin sensitivity seems to decrease with postnatal age in both broiler and layer chickens. However, little is known about the response of insulin on plasma glucose concentrations and mRNA abundance of hepatic glucose transporters 1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12 (GLUT1, 2, 3, 8, 9 and 12) and three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and 2 (PCK1 and 2) or fructose-1,6-biphosphatase 1 (FBP1) in chicks during the perinatal period. In the present study, broiler embryos on embryonic day (ED)16, ED18 or newly-hatched broiler chicks were injected intravenously with bovine insulin (1μg/g body weight (BW)) to examine plasma glucose response and changes in hepatic mRNA abundance of the GLUTs, PCK1 and 2 and FBP1. Results were compared with a non-treated control group and a saline-injected sham group. Plasma glucose levels of insulin-treated ED18 embryos recovered faster from their minimum level than those of insulin-treated ED16 embryos or newly-hatched chicks. In addition, at the minimum plasma glucose level seven hours post-injection (PI), hepatic GLUT2, FBP1 and PCK2 mRNA abundance was decreased in insulin-injected embryos, compared to sham and control groups, being most pronounced when insulin injection occurred on ED16.

  5. The DRE/DREF transcriptional regulatory system: a master key for cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Matsukage, Akio; Hirose, Fumiko; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-02-01

    The coordinate expression of many cell proliferation-related genes is required for the cellular shift from the resting state into the proliferating state. One regulatory factor involved in this process, the transcription regulatory factor named DREF (DNA replication-related element-binding factor) was discovered in Drosophila and later found to have orthologues in other species including human. Drosophila DREF is a homo-dimer of a polypeptide of 709 amino acid residues, and shares about 22% identity in its amino acid sequence with the human homolog of 694 amino acid residues. The Drosophila DREF homo-dimer binds specifically to the DRE sequence (5'-TATCGATA) in the promoters of many DNA replication/ cell proliferation-related genes to activate their transcription, and the N-terminal region of DREF carries a domain for specific DRE-binding and homo-dimer formation. Ectopic expression of DREF in eye imaginal discs induces abnormal DNA synthesis, apoptosis and failure to differentiate. Conversely, expression of the dominant negative N-terminal region in larval salivary glands reduces endo-replication. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of DREF in vivo demonstrated its requirement for normal progression through the cell cycle and consequently for growth of imaginal discs and the endoreplicating organs. Both Drosophila and human DREF's interact genetically and physically with regulatory factors related to chromatin structures, suggesting that DREF activates the expression of proliferation-related genes through modification of the 3-D conformation of DNA. A search of the Drosophila genome database identified about 150 genes carrying DRE sequences in their promoter regions, many of which are related to reactions required for cell proliferation such as DNA replication, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle regulation, growth signal transduction and protein metabolism. Thus, DREF appears to be a master key-like factor for cell proliferation. Several

  6. Adjunct Strategies for Tuberculosis Vaccines: Modulating Key Immune Cell Regulatory Mechanisms to Potentiate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Hafner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of alarming proportions, resulting in 1.5 million deaths worldwide. The only available licensed vaccine, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin, does not confer lifelong protection against active TB. To date, development of an effective vaccine against TB has proven to be elusive, and devising newer approaches for improved vaccination outcomes is an essential goal. Insights gained over the last several years have revealed multiple mechanisms of immune manipulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in infected macrophages and dendritic cells that support disease progression and block development of protective immunity. This review provides an assessment of the known immunoregulatory mechanisms altered by Mtb, and how new interventions may reverse these effects. Examples include blocking of inhibitory immune cell coreceptor checkpoints (e.g., programed death-1). Conversely, immune mechanisms that strengthen immune cell effector functions may be enhanced by interventions, including stimulatory immune cell coreceptors (e.g., OX40). Modification of the activity of key cell “immunometabolism” signaling pathway molecules, including mechanistic target of rapamycin, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, wnt/β-catenin, adenosine monophosophate-activated protein kinase, and sirtuins, related epigenetic changes, and preventing induction of immune regulatory cells (e.g., regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells) are powerful new approaches to improve vaccine responses. Interventions to favorably modulate these components have been studied primarily in oncology to induce efficient antitumor immune responses, often by potentiation of cancer vaccines. These agents include antibodies and a rapidly increasing number of small molecule drug classes that have contributed to the dramatic immune-based advances in treatment of cancer and other diseases. Because immune responses to malignancies and to Mtb share many similar mechanisms

  7. Dynamic and distinct histone modifications modulate the expression of key adipogenesis regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Villanueva, Claudio J; Halperin, Daniel; Xu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    Histone modifications and their modifying enzymes are fundamentally involved in the epigenetic regulation of adipogenesis. This study aimed to define the roles of various histone modifications and their "division of labor" in fat cell differentiation. To achieve these goals, we examined the distribution patterns of eight core histone modifications at five key adipogenic regulatory genes, Pref-1, C/EBPβ, C/EBPα, PPARγ2 and aP2, during the adipogenesis of C3H 10T1/2 mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. We found that the examined histone modifications are globally stable throughout adipogenesis but show distinct and highly dynamic distribution patterns at specific genes. For example, the Pref-1 gene has lower levels of active chromatin markers and significantly higher H3 K27 tri-methylation in MSCs compared with committed preadipocytes; the C/EBPβ gene is enriched in active chromatin markers at its 3'-UTR; the C/EBPα gene is predominantly marked by H3 K27 tri-methylation in adipogenic precursor cells, and this repressive marker decreases dramatically upon induction; the PPARγ2 and aP2 genes show increased histone acetylation on both H3 and H4 tails during adipogenesis. Further functional studies revealed that the decreased level of H3 K27 tri-methylation leads to de-repression of Pref-1 gene, while the increased level of histone acetylation activates the transcription of PPARγ2 and aP2 genes. Moreover, the active histone modification-marked 3'-UTR of C/EBPβ gene was demonstrated as a strong enhancer element by luciferase assay. Our results indicate that histone modifications are gene-specific at adipogenic regulator genes, and they play distinct roles in regulating the transcriptional network during adipogenesis.

  8. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Zhan, Yongkun; Xu, Chen; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Zhi, Xiuling; Yin, Lianhua

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology. Intracellular lipid accumulation is the first step in the development and progression of NAFLD. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays an important role in the synthesis of bile acid and intracellular lipid homeostasis and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesize that StAR is involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. The hypothesis was identified using free fatty acid (FFA)-overloaded NAFLD in vitro model and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model transfected by recombinant adenovirus encoding StAR (StAR). StAR expression was also examined in pathology samples of patients with fatty liver by immunohistochemical staining. We found that the expression level of StAR was reduced in the livers obtained from fatty liver patients and NAFLD mice. Additionally, StAR overexpression decreased the levels of hepatic lipids and maintained the hepatic glucose homeostasis due to the activation of farnesoid x receptor (FXR). StAR overexpression attenuated the impairment of insulin signaling in fatty liver. This protective role of StAR was owing to a reduction of intracellular diacylglycerol levels and the phosphorylation of PKCε. Furthermore, FXR inactivation reversed the observed beneficial effects of StAR. The present study revealed that StAR overexpression can reduce hepatic lipid accumulation, regulate glucose metabolism and attenuate insulin resistance through a mechanism involving the activation of FXR. Our study suggests that StAR may be a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  9. Effects of inhibitors of key enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism on insulin-induced glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in liver cells of old rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, N A; Kharchenko, V S

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play an important role in the development of insulin resistance. Ceramides are the most potent inhibitors of insulin signal transduction. Ceramides are generated in response to stress stimuli and in old age. In this work, we studied the possible contribution of different pathways of sphingolipid metabolism in age-dependent insulin resistance development in liver cells. Inhibition of key enzymes of sphingolipid synthesis (serine palmitoyl transferase, ceramide synthase) and degradation (neutral and acidic SMases) by means of specific inhibitors (myriocin, fumonisin B1, imipramine, and GW4869) was followed with the reduction of ceramide level and partly improved insulin regulation of glucose metabolism in "old" hepatocytes. Imipramine and GW4869 decreased significantly the acidic and neutral SMase activities, respectively. Treatment of "old" cells with myriocin or fumonisin B1 reduced the elevated in old age ceramide and SM synthesis. Ceramide and SM levels and glucose metabolism regulation by insulin could be improved with concerted action of all tested inhibitors of sphingolipid turnover on hepatocytes. The data demonstrate that not only newly synthesized ceramide and SM but also neutral and acidic SMase-dependent ceramide accumulation plays an important role in development of age-dependent insulin resistance.

  10. Expression of the rat sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c gene in response to insulin is mediated by increased transactivating capacity of specificity protein 1 (Sp1).

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Yellaturu, Chandrahasa; Cagen, Lauren; Wilcox, Henry G; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Elam, Marshall B

    2007-06-15

    The induction of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis by insulin is mediated in part by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). SREBP-1c is directly regulated by insulin by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Previously, we have demonstrated that the insulin-responsive cis-acting unit of the rat SREBP-1c promoter is composed of several elements that include a sterol regulatory element, two liver X receptor elements, and a number of conserved GC boxes. Here we systematically dissected the role of these GC boxes and report that five bona fide Sp1-binding elements of the SREBP-1c promoter determine its basal and insulin-induced activation. Luciferase expression driven by the rat SREBP-1c promoter was accelerated by ectopic expression of Sp1, and insulin further enhanced the transactivation potential of Sp1. Introduction of a small interfering RNA against Sp1 reduced both basal and insulin-induced activation of the SREBP-1c promoter. We also found that Sp1 interacted with both SREBP-1c and LXRalpha proteins and that insulin promoted these interactions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed that insulin facilitated the recruitment of the steroid receptor coactivator-1 to the SREBP-1c promoter. These studies identify a novel mechanism by which maximal activation of the rat SREBP-1c gene expression by insulin is mediated by Sp1 and its enhanced ability to interact with other transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  11. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nieves; Mecha, Miriam; Espejo, Carmen; Mestre, Leyre; Eixarch, Herena; Montalban, Xavier; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Guaza, Carmen; Villar, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain) and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens) mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55). We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P = 0.001) and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P = 0.02) compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P = 0.02) and IL-17 (P = 0.009) and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P = 0.04) than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism. PMID:24868560

  12. Glutamate acts as a key signal linking glucose metabolism to incretin/cAMP action to amplify insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Gheni, Ghupurjan; Ogura, Masahito; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Yokoi, Norihide; Minami, Kohtaro; Nakayama, Yasumune; Harada, Kazuo; Hastoy, Benoit; Wu, Xichen; Takahashi, Harumi; Kimura, Kazushi; Matsubara, Toshiya; Hoshikawa, Ritsuko; Hatano, Naoya; Sugawara, Kenji; Shibasaki, Tadao; Inagaki, Nobuya; Bamba, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Rorsman, Patrik; Seino, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Incretins, hormones released by the gut after meal ingestion, are essential for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. The effect of incretins on insulin secretion occurs only at elevated glucose concentrations and is mediated by cAMP signaling, but the mechanism linking glucose metabolism and cAMP action in insulin secretion is unknown. We show here, using a metabolomics-based approach, that cytosolic glutamate derived from the malate-aspartate shuttle upon glucose stimulation underlies the stimulatory effect of incretins and that glutamate uptake into insulin granules mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling amplifies insulin release. Glutamate production is diminished in an incretin-unresponsive, insulin-secreting β cell line and pancreatic islets of animal models of human diabetes and obesity. Conversely, a membrane-permeable glutamate precursor restores amplification of insulin secretion in these models. Thus, cytosolic glutamate represents the elusive link between glucose metabolism and cAMP action in incretin-induced insulin secretion.

  13. Glutamate Acts as a Key Signal Linking Glucose Metabolism to Incretin/cAMP Action to Amplify Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gheni, Ghupurjan; Ogura, Masahito; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Yokoi, Norihide; Minami, Kohtaro; Nakayama, Yasumune; Harada, Kazuo; Hastoy, Benoit; Wu, Xichen; Takahashi, Harumi; Kimura, Kazushi; Matsubara, Toshiya; Hoshikawa, Ritsuko; Hatano, Naoya; Sugawara, Kenji; Shibasaki, Tadao; Inagaki, Nobuya; Bamba, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Rorsman, Patrik; Seino, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Incretins, hormones released by the gut after meal ingestion, are essential for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. The effect of incretins on insulin secretion occurs only at elevated glucose concentrations and is mediated by cAMP signaling, but the mechanism linking glucose metabolism and cAMP action in insulin secretion is unknown. We show here, using a metabolomics-based approach, that cytosolic glutamate derived from the malate-aspartate shuttle upon glucose stimulation underlies the stimulatory effect of incretins and that glutamate uptake into insulin granules mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling amplifies insulin release. Glutamate production is diminished in an incretin-unresponsive, insulin-secreting β cell line and pancreatic islets of animal models of human diabetes and obesity. Conversely, a membrane-permeable glutamate precursor restores amplification of insulin secretion in these models. Thus, cytosolic glutamate represents the elusive link between glucose metabolism and cAMP action in incretin-induced insulin secretion. PMID:25373904

  14. Main regulatory pathways, key genes and microRNAs involved in flower formation and development of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Zhanchao; Hou, Dan; Li, Xueping; Gao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Moso bamboo is characterized by infrequent sexual reproduction and erratic flowering habit; however, the molecular biology of flower formation and development is not well studied in this species. We studied the molecular regulation mechanisms of moso bamboo development and flowering by selecting three key regulatory pathways: plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum at different stages of flowering in moso bamboo. We selected PheDof1, PheMADS14 and six microRNAs involved in the three pathways through KEGG pathway and cluster analysis. Subcellular localization, transcriptional activation, Western blotting, in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR were used to further investigate the expression patterns and regulatory roles of pivotal genes at different flower development stages. Differential expression patterns showed that PheDof1, PheMADS14 and six miRNAs may play vital regulatory roles in flower development and floral transition in moso bamboo. Our research paves way for further studies on metabolic regulatory networks and provides insight into the molecular regulation mechanisms of moso bamboo flowering and senescence.

  15. A PP2A regulatory subunit PPTR-1 regulates the C. elegans Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway by modulating AKT-1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Srivatsan; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Narasimhan, Sri Devi; Tesz, Gregory; Czech, Michael P.; Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The C. elegans insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) cascade plays a central role in the regulation of lifespan, dauer diapause, metabolism and stress response. The major regulatory control of IIS is through phosphorylation of its components by serine/threonine-specific protein kinases. In a RNAi screen for serine/threonine protein phosphatases that counter-balance the effect of the kinases in the IIS pathway, we identified pptr-1, a B56 regulatory subunit of the PP2A holoenzyme. Modulation of pptr-1 affects phenotypes associated with the IIS pathway including lifespan, dauer, stress resistance and fat storage. We show that PPTR-1 functions by regulating worm AKT-1 phosphorylation at Thr 350. With striking conservation, mammalian B56β regulates Akt phosphorylation at Thr 308 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In C. elegans, this modulation ultimately leads to changes in subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of the forkhead transcription factor DAF-16. This study reveals a conserved role for the B56 regulatory subunit in modulating insulin signaling through AKT dephosphorylation and thereby has widespread implications in cancer and diabetes research. PMID:19249087

  16. Downregulation of key regulatory proteins in androgen dependent prostate tumor cells by oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Saraf, Pooja; Meseke, Tyler; Miller, Cathy L

    2015-11-01

    As prostate tumor cell growth depends on hormones, androgen ablation is an effective therapy for prostate cancer (PCa). However, progression of PCa cells to androgen independent growth (castrate resistant prostate cancer, CRPC) results in relapse and mortality. Hypoxia, a microenvironment of low oxygen that modifies the activity of PCa regulatory proteins including the androgen receptor (AR), plays a critical role in progression to CRPC. Therapies targeting hypoxia and the AR may lengthen the time to CRPC progression thereby increasing survival time of PCa patients. Mammalian Orthoreovirus (MRV) has shown promise for the treatment of prostate tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that MRV infection induces downregulation of proteins implicated in CRPC progression, interferes with hypoxia-induced AR activity, and induces apoptosis in androgen dependent cells. This suggests MRV possesses traits that could be exploited to create novel therapies for the inhibition of progression to CRPC.

  17. Development of novel cardiovascular therapeutics from small regulatory RNA molecules--an outline of key requirements.

    PubMed

    Poller, W; Fechner, H

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the roles of RNAs within the cell has changed and expanded dramatically during the past few years. Based on fundamentally new insights it is now increasingly possible to employ RNAs as highly valuable tools in molecular biology and medicine. At present, the most important therapeutic strategies are based on non-coding regulatory RNAs inducing RNA interference (RNAi) to silence single genes, and on modulation of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) to alter complex gene expression patterns in diseased organs. Only recently it became possible to target therapeutic RNAi to specific organs via organotropic viral vector systems and we discuss the most recent strategies in this field, e.g. heart failure treatment by cardiac-targeted RNAi. Due to the peculiar biochemical properties of small RNA molecules, true therapeutic translation of results in vitro is more demanding than with small molecule drugs or proteins. Specifically, there is a critical requirement for extensive studies in animal models of human disease after pre-testing of the RNAi tools in vitro. This requirement likewise applies for miRNA modulations which have complex consequences in the recipient dependent on biochemical stability and distribution of the therapeutic RNA. Problems not yet fully solved are the prediction of targets and specificity of the RNA tools. However, major progress has been made to achieve their tissue-specific and regulatable expression, and breakthroughs in vector technologies from the gene therapy field have fundamentally improved safety and efficacy of RNA-based therapeutic approaches, too. In summary, insight into the molecular mechanisms of action of regulatory RNAs in combination with new delivery tools for RNA therapeutics will significantly expand our cardiovascular therapeutic repertoire beyond classical pharmacology.

  18. Expression of flagellin and key regulatory flagellar genes in the non-motile bacterium Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Carril, Gabriela P; Gómez, Fernando A; Marshall, Sergio H

    2017-02-08

    The Piscirickettsia salmonis genome was screened to evaluate potential flagella-related open reading frames, as well as their genomic organization and eventual expression. A complete and organized set of flagellar genes was found for P. salmonis, although no structural flagellum has ever been reported for this bacterium. To gain further understanding, the hierarchical flagellar cascade described for Legionella pneumophila was used as a reference model for putative analysis in P. salmonis. Specifically, 5 of the most relevant genes from this cascade were chosen, including 3 regulatory genes (fleQ, triggers the cascade; fliA, regulates the σ28-coding gene; and rpoN, an RNA polymerase-dependent gene) and 2 terminal structural genes (flaA and flaB, flagellin and a flagellin-like protein, respectively). Kinetic experiments evaluated gene expressions over time, with P. salmonis assessed in 2 liquid, cell-free media and during infection of the SHK-1 fish cell line. Under all conditions, the 5 target genes were primarily expressed during early growth/infection and were differentially expressed when bacteria encountered environmental stress (i.e. a high-salt concentration). Intriguingly, the flagellin monomer was fully expressed under all growth conditions and was located near the bacterial membrane. While no structural flagellum was detected under any condition, the recombinant flagellin monomer induced a proinflammatory response in SHK-1 cells, suggesting a possible immunomodulatory function. The potential implications of these observations are discussed in the context of P. salmonis biology and pathogenic potential.

  19. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  20. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  1. mir-660-p53-mir-486 Network: A New Key Regulatory Pathway in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Borzi, Cristina; Calzolari, Linda; Centonze, Giovanni; Milione, Massimo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Fortunato, Orazio

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with limited therapeutic options and rapid development of drug resistance. MicroRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs that control different physiological processes, have been associated with cancer development, as either oncomiRNAs or tumor-suppressor miRNAs. In the present study we investigated the interaction between mir-486-5p and mir-660-5p, two independent tumor-suppressor miRNAs, to assess their possible role and synergistic effect in lung cancer treatment. Our data show that mir-660-5p over-expression in A549 lung cancer cells induced a remarkable increase in mir-486-5p expression level and activity, detected as a reduction of its target gene, p85. mir-486-5p expression was confirmed by microRNA in situ hybridization. mir-660-5p modulated mir-486-5p through the silencing of Mouse Double Minute 2 (MDM2), one of its direct target, and then through p53 stimulation. This regulatory pathway was effective in A549, but not in H1299; therefore, only in the context of a functional p53 protein. Our findings support the conclusion that mir-486-5p is positively regulated by mir-660-5p in lung cancer cell lines, through the mir-660-MDM2-p53 pathway, making mir-660-5p even more interesting for its potential successful use in lung cancer therapy. PMID:28124991

  2. Citrate, a Ubiquitous Key Metabolite with Regulatory Function in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Niels; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Belhage, Bo; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-05

    Citrate is key constituent of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, serves as substrate for fatty acid and sterol biosynthesis, and functions as a key regulator of intermediary energy metabolism. Ursula Sonnewald had initiated studies using for the first time both proton- and (13)C-NMR to investigate metabolic processes in cultured neurons and astrocytes resulting in the important observation that citrate was specifically synthesized in and released from astrocytes in large amounts which is in keeping with the high concentration found in the CSF. The aim of this review is to highlight the possible roles of citrate in physiological and pathophysiological processes in the CNS. An interesting feature of citrate is its ability to chelate Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Zn(2+)and thereby playing a pivotal role as an endogenous modulator of glutamate receptors and in particular the NMDA subtypes of these receptors in the CNS. Besides its presence in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) citrate is also found in high amounts in prostate fluid reaching concentrations as high as 180 mM and here Zn(2+) seems also to play an important role, which makes prostate cells interesting for comparison of features of citrate and Zn(2+) between these cells and cells in the CNS.

  3. Metabolomic analysis of key regulatory metabolites in hepatitis C virus-infected tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Piao, Chengyu; Li, Weiyun; Sun, Chang; Wu, Xiuhong; Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yun; Wang, Xijun

    2013-03-01

    Metabolomics is a powerful new technology that allows the assessment of global low-molecular-weight metabolites in a biological system and which shows great potential in biomarker discovery. Analysis of the key metabolites in body fluids has become an important part of improving the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major leading cause of liver disease worldwide and a serious burden on public health. However, the lack of a small-animal model has hampered the analysis of HCV pathogenesis. We hypothesize that an animal model (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) of HCV would produce a unique characterization of metabolic phenotypes. Ultra-performance liquid-chromatography/electrospray ionization-SYNAPT-high-definition mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-SYNAPT-HDMS) coupled with pattern recognition methods and system analysis was carried out to obtain comprehensive metabolomics profiling and pathways of large biological data sets. Taurine, hypotaurine, ether lipid, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid, tryptophan, and primary bile acid metabolism pathways were acutely perturbed, and 38 differential metabolites were identified. More important, five metabolite markers were selected via the "significance analysis for microarrays" method as the most discriminant and interesting biomarkers that were effective for the diagnosis of HCV. Network construction has led to the integration of metabolites associated with the multiple perturbation pathways. Integrated network analysis of the key metabolites yields highly related signaling pathways associated with the differentially expressed proteins, which suggests that the creation of new treatment paradigms targeting and activating these networks in their entirety, rather than single proteins, might be necessary for controlling and treating HCV efficiently.

  4. Metabolomic Analysis of Key Regulatory Metabolites in Hepatitis C Virus–infected Tree Shrews*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Piao, Chengyu; Li, Weiyun; Sun, Chang; Wu, Xiuhong; Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yun; Wang, Xijun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is a powerful new technology that allows the assessment of global low-molecular-weight metabolites in a biological system and which shows great potential in biomarker discovery. Analysis of the key metabolites in body fluids has become an important part of improving the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major leading cause of liver disease worldwide and a serious burden on public health. However, the lack of a small-animal model has hampered the analysis of HCV pathogenesis. We hypothesize that an animal model (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) of HCV would produce a unique characterization of metabolic phenotypes. Ultra-performance liquid-chromatography/electrospray ionization-SYNAPT-high-definition mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-SYNAPT-HDMS) coupled with pattern recognition methods and system analysis was carried out to obtain comprehensive metabolomics profiling and pathways of large biological data sets. Taurine, hypotaurine, ether lipid, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid, tryptophan, and primary bile acid metabolism pathways were acutely perturbed, and 38 differential metabolites were identified. More important, five metabolite markers were selected via the “significance analysis for microarrays” method as the most discriminant and interesting biomarkers that were effective for the diagnosis of HCV. Network construction has led to the integration of metabolites associated with the multiple perturbation pathways. Integrated network analysis of the key metabolites yields highly related signaling pathways associated with the differentially expressed proteins, which suggests that the creation of new treatment paradigms targeting and activating these networks in their entirety, rather than single proteins, might be necessary for controlling and treating HCV efficiently. PMID:23264353

  5. CodY orchestrates the expression of virulence determinants in emetic Bacillus cereus by impacting key regulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Elrike; Doll, Viktoria; Pauthner, Matthias; Lücking, Genia; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2012-07-01

    Bacillus cereus causes gastrointestinal diseases and local and systemic infections elicited by the depsipeptide cereulide, enterotoxins, phospholipases, cytolysins and proteases. The PlcR-PapR quorum sensing system activates the expression of several virulence factors, whereas the Spo0A-AbrB regulatory circuit partially controls the plasmid-borne cereulide synthetase (ces) operon. Here, we show that CodY, a nutrient-responsive regulator of Gram-positive bacteria, has a profound effect on both regulatory systems, which have been assumed to operate independently of each other. Deletion of codY resulted in downregulation of virulence genes belonging to the PlcR regulon and a concomitant upregulation of the ces genes. CodY was found to be a repressor of the ces operon, but did not interact with the promoter regions of PlcR-dependent virulence genes in vitro, suggesting an indirect regulation of the latter. Furthermore, CodY binds to the promoter of the immune inhibitor metalloprotease InhA1, demonstrating that CodY directly links B. cereus metabolism to virulence. In vivo studies using a Galleria mellonella infection model, showed that the codY mutant was substantially attenuated, highlighting the importance of CodY as a key regulator of pathogenicity. Our results demonstrate that CodY profoundly modulates the virulence of B. cereus, possibly controlling the development of pathogenic traits in suitable host environments.

  6. Sequential Regulatory Loops as Key Gatekeepers for Neuronal Reprogramming in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuanchao; Qian, Hao; Hu, Jing; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Yu; Hu, Xihao; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Pang, Zhiping; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Direct conversion of somatic cells into neurons holds great promise for regenerative medicine. However, as neuronal conversion is relatively inefficient on human cells compared to mouse cells, it has been unclear what might be key barriers to reprogramming in human cells. We recently elucidated an RNA program mediated by the polypyrimidine tract binding protein PTB to convert mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into functional neurons. On human adult fibroblasts (HAFs), however, we unexpectedly find that invoke of the documented PTB-REST-miR-124 loop only generates immature neurons. We now report that the functionality requires sequential inactivation of PTB and the PTB paralog nPTB in HAFs. Inactivation of nPTB triggers another self-enforcing loop essential for neuronal maturation, which comprises nPTB, the transcription factor BRN2, and miR-9. These findings suggest two separate gatekeepers to control neuronal conversion and maturation and consecutively overcoming these gatekeepers enables deterministic reprogramming of HAFs into functional neurons. PMID:27110916

  7. TRPM channels phosphorylation as a potential bridge between old signals and novel regulatory mechanisms of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Hiriart, Marcia

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential channels, especially the members of the melastatin family (TRPM), participate in insulin secretion. Some of them are substrates for protein kinases, which are involved in several neurotransmitter, incretin and hormonal signaling cascades in β cells. The functional relationships between protein kinases and TRPM channels in systems of heterologous expression and native tissues rise issues about novel regulation pathways of pancreatic β-cell excitability. The aim of the present work is to review the evidences about phosphorylation of TRPM channels in β cells and to discuss the perspectives on insulin secretion.

  8. Expression of PD-1 Molecule on Regulatory T Lymphocytes in Patients with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Perri, Valentina; Russo, Benedetta; Crinò, Antonino; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Giorda, Ezio; Cappa, Marco; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2015-09-18

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoreactive T cells that destroy pancreatic beta cells. Animal models suggested that a CD4⁺CD25⁺ population has a regulatory function capable of preventing activation and effector functions of autoreactive T cells. However, the role of CD4⁺CD25high T cells in autoimmunity and their molecular mechanisms remain the subject of investigation. We therefore evaluated T regulatory cell frequencies and their PD-1 expression in the peripheral blood of long-standing diabetics under basal conditions and after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Under basal conditions, the percentages of T regulatory cells were significantly higher while that of T effector cells were significantly lower in patients than in controls. The ratio of regulatory to effector T cells was higher in patients than that in controls, suggesting that T regulatory cells were functional in patients. Percentages of total PD-1⁺, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing T regulatory cells did not change in patients and in controls. After stimulation, a defect in T regulatory cell proliferation was observed in diabetics and the percentages of total PD-1⁺, PD-1low and PD-1high expressing cells were lower in patients. Our data suggest a defective activation of T regulatory cells in long-standing diabetics due to a lower expression of PD-1 on their surface.

  9. Longevity Pathways (mTOR, SIRT, Insulin/IGF-1) as Key Modulatory Targets on Aging and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Mazucanti, Caio Henrique; Cabral-Costa, João Victor; Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent data from epidemiologic studies have shown that the majority of the public health costs are related to age-related disorders, and most of these diseases can lead to neuronal death. The specific signaling mechanisms underpinning neurodegeneration and aging are incompletely understood. Much work has been directed to the search for the etiology of neurodegeneration and aging and to new therapeutic strategies, including not only drugs but also non-pharmacological approaches, such as physical exercise and low-calorie dietary intake. The most important processes in aging-associated conditions, including neurodegeneration, include the mammalian (or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, sirtuin (SIRT and insulin/insulin growth factor 1 signaling (IIS pathways. These longevity pathways are involved in an array of different processes, including metabolism, cognition, stress response and brain plasticity. In this review we focus on the current advances involving the mTOR, SIRT and IIS longevity pathways during the course of healthy aging processes and neurodegenerative diseases, bringing new insights in the form of a better understanding of the signaling mechanisms underpinning neurodegeneration and how these differ from physiological normal aging processes. This also provides new targets for the therapeutic management and/or prevention of these devastating age-related disorders.

  10. Key Role of STAT4 Deficiency in the Hematopoietic Compartment in Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kaiwen; Glenn, Lindsey M.; Hatcher, Margaret A.; Haynes, Bronson A.; Lehrer, Eric J.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is linked to the complications of obesity, including insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. Recent data from our lab showed that germline deficiency in STAT4 reduces inflammation and improves IR in obese mice. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of selective STAT4 deficiency in subsets of hematopoietic cells to IR and AT inflammation. To determine the contribution of hematopoietic lineage, we sublethally irradiated Stat4−/−C57Bl6 mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from Stat4+/+C57Bl6 congenic donors. We also established the contribution of selective STAT4 deficiency in CD4+ or CD8+ T cells using adoptive transfer in Rag1−/− mice. All mice received a HFD for 15 weeks (n = 7–12 mice/group). BMC that expressed STAT4 induced increases in glucose intolerance and IR compared to STAT4-deficient cells. Also, AT inflammation was increased and the numbers of CD8+ cells infiltrating AT were higher in mice with STAT4 expressing BMC. Studies in Rag1−/− mice further confirmed the prominent role of CD8+ cells expressing STAT4 in insulin resistance and AT and islet inflammation. Collectively our results show specific and dominant contribution of STAT4 in the hematopoietic compartment to metabolic health and inflammation in diet-induced obesity.

  11. Effect of one week of CPAP treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea on 24-hour profiles of glucose, insulin and counter-regulatory hormones in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mokhlesi, Babak; Grimaldi, Daniela; Beccuti, Guglielmo; Van Cauter, Eve

    2017-03-01

    Studies examining the impact of CPAP treatment on glycaemic control have yielded conflicting results, partly because of insufficient nightly CPAP use. We examined the 24-hour profiles of glucose, insulin and counter-regulatory hormones in 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes and OSA before and after 1 week of effective in-laboratory CPAP therapy over an entire 8-hour night thus ensuring optimal CPAP compliance. Blood samples were collected every 15 to 30 minutes for 24 hours under controlled conditions. The 24-hour mean glucose decreased from 153.2 ± 33.0 to 139.7 ± 24.2 mg/dL with CPAP (-13.5 ± 13.5 mg/dL; P = .005) without change in insulin levels. Morning fasting glucose levels decreased by 14.6 ± 3 mg/dL (P = .001) and the dawn phenomenon decreased by 7.8 ± 9.8 mg/dL (P = .019). CPAP treatment decreased norepinephrine levels while the 24-hour profiles of growth hormone and cortisol remained unchanged. In conclusion, 1 week of effective treatment of OSA over an entire 8-hour night results in a clinically significant improvement in glycaemic control via an amelioration of evening fasting glucose metabolism and a reduction in the dawn phenomenon, a late-night glucose increase that is not adequately treated by oral medications. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01136785.

  12. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  13. Functional interaction of hepatic nuclear factor-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha in CYP7A1 regulation is inhibited by a key lipogenic activator, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Fang, Sungsoon; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2007-11-01

    Insulin inhibits transcription of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), a key gene in bile acid synthesis, and the hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) site in the promoter was identified as a negative insulin response sequence. Using a fasting/feeding protocol in mice and insulin treatment in HepG2 cells, we explored the inhibition mechanisms. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), an insulin-induced lipogenic factor, inversely correlated with Cyp7a1 expression in mouse liver. Interaction of HNF-4 with its coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), was observed in livers of fasted mice and was reduced after feeding. Conversely, HNF-4 interaction with SREBP-1c was increased after feeding. In vitro studies suggested that SREBP-1c competed with PGC-1alpha for direct interaction with the AF2 domain of HNF-4. Reporter assays showed that SREBP-1c, but not of a SREBP-1c mutant lacking the HNF-4 interacting domain, inhibited HNF-4/PGC-1alpha transactivation of Cyp7a1. SREBP-1c also inhibited PGC-1alpha-coactivation of estrogen receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and farnesoid X receptor, implying inhibition of HNF-4 by SREBP-1c could extend to other nuclear receptors. In chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, HNF-4 binding to the promoter was not altered, but PGC-1alpha was dissociated, SREBP-1c and histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) were recruited, and acetylation of histone H3 was decreased upon feeding. Adenovirus-mediated expression of a SREBP-1c dominant-negative mutant, which blocks the interaction of SREBP-1c and HNF-4, partially but significantly reversed the inhibition of Cyp7a1 after feeding. Our data show that SREBP-1c functions as a non-DNA-binding inhibitor and mediates, in part, suppression of Cyp7a1 by blocking functional interaction of HNF-4 and PGC-1alpha. This mechanism may be relevant to known repression of many other HNF-4 target genes upon

  14. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor I regulatory region associates with colorectal cancer risk in singapore chinese.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Delellis, Katherine; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Koh, Woon-Puay; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C; Ingles, Sue A

    2005-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are a potential risk factor for several cancers, including colorectal cancer. Physiologic levels of plasma IGF-I vary greatly; this variation may be in part genetically determined. We identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with each other and in partial linkage disequilibrium with a previously studied cytosine-adenine microsatellite [-969(CA)(n)]. We investigated one of the SNPs, -533T/C,and the 969(CA)(n) in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within a cohort of Singapore Chinese (cases/controls = 290:873). The (CA)(21) allele, rather than the previously implicated (CA)(19) allele, was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio for 21/21 versus all other genotypes, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.84). For the -533C/T SNP, persons carrying one or more copies of the C allele had a decreased in risk of colorectal cancer compared with noncarriers (odds ratio for CC/CT versus TT, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.82). This association was specific for colon, as opposed to rectal cancer and was modified by age. We also examined a functional insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3) promoter SNP, -202 A/C, previously reported to predict serum IGFBP3 levels. Although we were able to confirm this genotype-phenotype association, the -202A/C IGFBP3 SNP was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. In conclusion, we report a novel SNP in the IGF-I regulatory region that is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  15. Glucose-regulated and drug-perturbed phosphoproteome reveals molecular mechanisms controlling insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Humphrey, Sean J.; Cox, Jürgen; Mischnik, Marcel; Schulte, Anke; Klabunde, Thomas; Schäfer, Matthias; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-secreting beta cells play an essential role in maintaining physiological blood glucose levels, and their dysfunction leads to the development of diabetes. To elucidate the signalling events regulating insulin secretion, we applied a recently developed phosphoproteomics workflow. We quantified the time-resolved phosphoproteome of murine pancreatic cells following their exposure to glucose and in combination with small molecule compounds that promote insulin secretion. The quantitative phosphoproteome of 30,000 sites clustered into three main groups in concordance with the modulation of the three key kinases: PKA, PKC and CK2A. A high-resolution time course revealed key novel regulatory sites, revealing the importance of methyltransferase DNMT3A phosphorylation in the glucose response. Remarkably a significant proportion of these novel regulatory sites is significantly downregulated in diabetic islets. Control of insulin secretion is embedded in an unexpectedly broad and complex range of cellular functions, which are perturbed by drugs in multiple ways. PMID:27841257

  16. Insulin use in NIDDM.

    PubMed

    Genuth, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of insulin treatment on the pathophysiology of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are reviewed herein. Short-term studies indicate variable and partial reduction in excessive hepatic glucose output, decrease in insulin resistance, and enhancement of beta-cell function. These beneficial actions may be due to a decrease in secondary glucose toxicity rather than a direct attack on the primary abnormality. Insulin should be used as initial treatment of new-onset NIDDM in the presence of ketosis, significant diabetes-induced weight loss (despite residual obesity), and severe hyperglycemic symptoms. In diet-failure patients, prospective randomized studies comparing insulin to sulfonylurea treatment show approximately equal glycemic outcomes or a slight advantage to insulin. A key goal of insulin therapy is to normalize the fasting plasma glucose level. In contrast to the conventional use of morning injections of intermediate- and long-acting insulin, preliminary studies suggest potential advantages of administering the same insulins only at bedtime. Obese patients may require several hundred units of insulin daily and still not achieve satisfactory control. In some, addition of a sulfonylurea to insulin may reduce hyperglycemia, the insulin dose, or both. However, long-term benefits from such combination therapy remain to be demonstrated conclusively. Established adverse effects of insulin treatment in NIDDM are hypoglycemia, particularly in the elderly, and weight gain. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can identify patients in whom excessive weight gain is caused by subtle hypoglycemia. Whether insulin causes weight gain by direct effects on appetite or energy utilization remains controversial. A potential adverse effect of insulin has been suggested by epidemiological studies showing associations between hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance and increased risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and hypertension. Although potential mechanisms

  17. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  18. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  19. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan.

  20. Conserved insulin signaling in the regulation of oocyte growth, development, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Das, Debabrata; Arur, Swathi

    2017-04-05

    Insulin signaling regulates various aspects of physiology, such as glucose homeostasis and aging, and is a key determinant of female reproduction in metazoans. That insulin signaling is crucial for female reproductive health is clear from clinical data linking hyperinsulinemic and hypoinsulinemic condition with certain types of ovarian dysfunction, such as altered steroidogenesis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and infertility. Thus, understanding the signaling mechanisms that underlie the control of insulin-mediated ovarian development is important for the accurate diagnosis of and intervention for female infertility. Studies of invertebrate and vertebrate model systems have revealed the molecular determinants that transduce insulin signaling as well as which biological processes are regulated by the insulin-signaling pathway. The molecular determinants of the insulin-signaling pathway, from the insulin receptor to its downstream signaling components, are structurally and functionally conserved across evolution, from worms to mammals - yet, physiological differences in signaling still exist. Insulin signaling acts cooperatively with gonadotropins in mammals and lower vertebrates to mediate various aspects of ovarian development, mainly owing to evolution of the endocrine system in vertebrates. In contrast, insulin signaling in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans directly regulates oocyte growth and maturation. In this review, we compare and contrast insulin-mediated regulation of ovarian functions in mammals, lower vertebrates, C. elegans, and Drosophila, and highlight conserved signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms in general while illustrating insulin's unique role in specific reproductive processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 hours and lasts 12 to 16 hours.Long-acting insulin (such as insulin glargine and insulin detemir) ... hard to time their meals around regular insulin injections. Sometimes they end up eating too soon or ...

  2. BDC12-4.1 T-cell receptor transgenic insulin-specific CD4 T cells are resistant to in vitro differentiation into functional Foxp3+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Fousteri, Georgia; Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Miller, Jacqueline F; Dave, Amy; Juntti, Therese; Coppieters, Ken T; von Herrath, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The infusion of ex vivo-expanded autologous T regulatory (Treg) cells is potentially an effective immunotherapeutic strategy against graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and several autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, in vitro differentiation of antigen-specific T cells into functional and stable Treg (iTreg) cells has proved challenging. As insulin is the major autoantigen leading to T1D, we tested the capacity of insulin-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic CD4(+) T cells of the BDC12-4.1 clone to convert into Foxp3(+) iTreg cells. We found that in vitro polarization toward Foxp3(+) iTreg was effective with a majority (>70%) of expanded cells expressing Foxp3. However, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+) BDC12-4.1 cells did not prevent diabetes onset in immunocompetent NOD mice. Thus, in vitro polarization of insulin-specific BDC12-4.1 TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells toward Foxp3+ cells did not provide dominant tolerance in recipient mice. These results highlight the disconnect between an in vitro acquired Foxp3(+) cell phenotype and its associated in vivo regulatory potential.

  3. Targeted sequencing for high-resolution evolutionary analyses following genome duplication in salmonid fish: Proof of concept for key components of the insulin-like growth factor axis.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Fiona M; Shaw, Rebecca L; Macqueen, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing has revolutionised comparative and evolutionary genome biology. It has now become relatively commonplace to generate multiple genomes and/or transcriptomes to characterize the evolution of large taxonomic groups of interest. Nevertheless, such efforts may be unsuited to some research questions or remain beyond the scope of some research groups. Here we show that targeted high-throughput sequencing offers a viable alternative to study genome evolution across a vertebrate family of great scientific interest. Specifically, we exploited sequence capture and Illumina sequencing to characterize the evolution of key components from the insulin-like growth (IGF) signalling axis of salmonid fish at unprecedented phylogenetic resolution. The IGF axis represents a central governor of vertebrate growth and its core components were expanded by whole genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor ~95Ma. Using RNA baits synthesised to genes encoding the complete family of IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) and an IGF hormone (IGF2), we captured, sequenced and assembled orthologous and paralogous exons from species representing all ten salmonid genera. This approach generated 299 novel sequences, most as complete or near-complete protein-coding sequences. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed congruent evolutionary histories for all nineteen recognized salmonid IGFBP family members and identified novel salmonid-specific IGF2 paralogues. Moreover, we reconstructed the evolution of duplicated IGF axis paralogues across a replete salmonid phylogeny, revealing complex historic selection regimes - both ancestral to salmonids and lineage-restricted - that frequently involved asymmetric paralogue divergence under positive and/or relaxed purifying selection. Our findings add to an emerging literature highlighting diverse applications for targeted sequencing in comparative-evolutionary genomics. We also set out a viable approach to obtain large sets of nuclear genes for any

  4. Dissociation between changes in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration and insulin secretion as evidenced from measurements in mouse single pancreatic islets.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsev, S V; Efendić, S; Arkhammar, P; Bertorello, A M; Berggren, P O

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and insulin release, in mouse single pancreatic islets, revealed a direct correlation only initially after stimulation with glucose or K+. Later, there is an apparent dissociation between these two parameters, with translocation of alpha and epsilon isoenzymes of protein kinase C to membranes and simultaneous desensitization of insulin release in response to glucose. Recovery of insulin release, without any concomitant changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, after addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, okadaic acid, and forskolin supports the notion that the desensitization process is accounted for by dephosphorylation of key regulatory sites of the insulin exocytotic machinery. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568203

  5. Berberine-improved visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance associated with altered sterol regulatory element-binding proteins, liver x receptors, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors transcriptional programs in diabetic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Han; Zhu, Hua; Huang, Lan; Liu, Ya-Li; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic "lipotoxicity" hypothesis presents that fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Berberine, a hypolipidemic agent, has been reported to have antidiabetic activities. The molecular mechanisms for this property are, however, not well clarified. Therefore in this study type 2 diabetic hamsters were induced by high-fat diet with low-dose streptozotocin. Then, we investigated the gene expression alterations and explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in diabetic hamsters by microarray analysis followed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmation. Type 2 diabetic hamsters exhibited hyperglycemia and relative hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, intra-adipocyte lipid accumulation, significant increase in body weight and visceral white adipose tissue weight, abnormal serum adipokines levels, and deleterious dyslipidemia. Furthermore, they had increased sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) expression and decreased liver X receptors (LXRs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) expression in visceral white adipose tissue. After 9-week berberine treatment, fat-induced insulin resistance and diabetic phenotype in type 2 diabetic hamsters were significantly improved. Compared with diabetic hamsters, expression of LXRs and PPARs significantly increased and SREBPs significantly decreased in visceral white adipose tissue from berberine-treated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that altered visceral white adipose tissue LXRs, PPARs, and SREBPs transcriptional programs are involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of berberine on fat-induced visceral white adipose tissue insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic hamsters.

  6. Insulin Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... long insulin continues to lower blood glucose. Insulin Strength All insulins come dissolved or suspended in liquids. The standard and most commonly used strength in the United States today is U-100, ...

  7. Construction of a Comprehensive Protein-Protein Interaction Map for Vitiligo Disease to Identify Key Regulatory Elements: A Systemic Approach.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Anvita Gupta; Jha, Mohit; Singh, Sudha; Pandey, Khushhali M

    2017-03-13

    Vitiligo is an idiopathic disorder characterized by depigmented patches on the skin due to progressive loss of melanocytes. Several genetic, immunological, and pathophysiological investigations have established vitiligo as a polygenetic disorder with multifactorial etiology. However, no definite model explaining the interplay between these causative factors has been established hitherto. Therefore, we studied the disorder at the system level to identify the key proteins involved by exploring their molecular connectivity in terms of topological parameters. The existing research data helped us in collating 215 proteins involved in vitiligo onset or progression. Interaction study of these proteins leads to a comprehensive vitiligo map with 4845 protein nodes linked with 107,416 edges. Based on centrality measures, a backbone network with 500 nodes has been derived. This has presented a clear overview of the proteins and processes involved and the crosstalk between them. Clustering backbone proteins revealed densely connected regions inferring major molecular interaction modules essential for vitiligo. Finally, a list of top order proteins that play a key role in the disease pathomechanism has been formulated. This includes SUMO2, ESR1, COPS5, MYC, SMAD3, and Cullin proteins. While this list is in fair agreement with the available literature, it also introduces new candidate proteins that can be further explored. A subnetwork of 64 vitiligo core proteins was built by analyzing the backbone and seed protein networks. Our finding suggests that the topology, along with functional clustering, provides a deep insight into the behavior of proteins. This in turn aids in the illustration of disease condition and discovery of significant proteins involved in vitiligo.

  8. Catecholamines are the key for explaining the biological relevance of insulin-melatonin antagonisms in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, E; Hofmann, K; Pönicke, K; Wedekind, D; Mühlbauer, E

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the biological relevance of melatonin in diabetogenesis. As has recently been demonstrated, melatonin decreases insulin secretion via specific melatonin receptor isoforms (MT1 and MT2) in the pancreatic β-cells. In addition, type 2 diabetic rats, as well as patients, exhibit decreased melatonin levels, whereas the levels in type 1 diabetic rats are increased. The latter effects were normalized by insulin substitution, which signifies that a specific receptor-mediated insulin-melatonin antagonism exists. These results are in agreement with several recent genome-wide association studies, which have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MTNR1B gene, encoding the MT2 receptor, that were closely associated with a higher prognostic risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesize that catecholamines, which decrease insulin levels and stimulate melatonin synthesis, control insulin-melatonin interactions. The present results support this assertion as we show that catecholamines are increased in type 1 but are diminished in type 2 diabetes. Another important line of inquiry involves the fact that melatonin protects the β-cells against functional overcharge and, consequently, hinders the development of type 2 diabetes. In this context, it is striking that at advanced ages, melatonin levels are reduced and the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increased. Thus, melatonin appears to have a protective biological role. Here, we strongly repudiate misconceptions, resulting from observations that melatonin reduces the plasma insulin level, that the blockage of melatonin receptors would be of benefit in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. A Single Host-Derived Glycan Impacts Key Regulatory Nodes of Symbiont Metabolism in a Coevolved Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Min; Schwartzman, Julia A.; Dunn, Anne K.; Lu, Zuhong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most animal-microbe mutualistic associations are characterized by nutrient exchange between the partners. When the host provides the nutrients, it can gain the capacity to shape its microbial community, control the stability of the interaction, and promote its health and fitness. Using the bioluminescent squid-vibrio model, we demonstrate how a single host-derived glycan, chitin, regulates the metabolism of Vibrio fischeri at key points in the development and maintenance of the symbiosis. We first characterized the pathways for catabolism of chitin sugars by V. fischeri, demonstrating that the Ccr-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) prioritizes transport of these sugars in V. fischeri by blocking the uptake of non-PTS carbohydrates, such as glycerol. Next, we found that PTS transport of chitin sugars into the bacterium shifted acetate homeostasis toward a net excretion of acetate and was sufficient to override an activation of the acetate switch by AinS-dependent quorum sensing. Finally, we showed that catabolism of chitin sugars decreases the rate of cell-specific oxygen consumption. Collectively, these three metabolic functions define a physiological shift that favors fermentative growth on chitin sugars and may support optimal symbiont luminescence, the functional basis of the squid-vibrio mutualism. PMID:26173698

  10. Translating PrEP effectiveness into public health impact: key considerations for decision-makers on cost-effectiveness, price, regulatory issues, distributive justice and advocacy for access

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Catherine; Macklin, Ruth; Warren, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The extraordinary feat of proving the effectiveness of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in clinical trials in different populations in a variety of settings may prove to have been easier than ensuring it is used well. Decision-makers must make difficult choices to realize the promise of antiretroviral prophylaxis for their countries. This paper outlines key economic, regulatory and distributive justice issues that must be addressed for effective and acceptable PrEP implementation. Discussion In considering the role that PrEP can play in combination prevention programmes, decision-makers must determine who can benefit most from PrEP, how PrEP can be provided safely and efficiently, and what kind of health system support will ensure successful implementation. To do this, they need contextualized information on disease burden by population, analyses of how PrEP services might best be delivered, and projections of the human resource and infrastructure requirements for each potential delivery model. There are cost considerations, varying cost-effectiveness results and regulatory challenges. The principles of ethics can inform thorny discussions about who should be prioritized for oral PrEP and how best to introduce it fairly. We describe the cost-effectiveness of PrEP in different populations at higher risk of HIV exposure, its price in low- and middle-income countries, and the current regulatory situation. We explore the principles of ethics that can inform resource allocation decision-making about PrEP anchored in distributive justice, at a time when universal access to antiretroviral treatment remains to be assured. We then highlight the role of advocacy in moving the PrEP agenda forward. Conclusions The time is ripe now for decisions about whether, how and for whom PrEP should be introduced into a country's HIV response. It has the potential to contribute significantly to high impact HIV prevention if it is tailored to those who can most benefit

  11. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  12. Insulin signaling and the regulation of insect diapause

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Cheolho; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A rich chapter in the history of insect endocrinology has focused on hormonal control of diapause, especially the major roles played by juvenile hormones (JHs), ecdysteroids, and the neuropeptides that govern JH and ecdysteroid synthesis. More recently, experiments with adult diapause in Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Culex pipiens, and pupal diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis provide strong evidence that insulin signaling is also an important component of the regulatory pathway leading to the diapause phenotype. Insects produce many different insulin-like peptides (ILPs), and not all are involved in the diapause response; ILP-1 appears to be the one most closely linked to diapause in C. pipiens. Many steps in the pathway leading from perception of daylength (the primary environmental cue used to program diapause) to generation of the diapause phenotype remain unknown, but the role for insulin signaling in mosquito diapause appears to be upstream of JH, as evidenced by the fact that application of exogenous JH can rescue the effects of knocking down expression of ILP-1 or the Insulin Receptor. Fat accumulation, enhancement of stress tolerance, and other features of the diapause phenotype are likely linked to the insulin pathway through the action of a key transcription factor, FOXO. This review highlights many parallels for the role of insulin signaling as a regulator in insect diapause and dauer formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:23885240

  13. Recommendations for Insulin Dose Calculator Risk Management.

    PubMed

    Rees, Christen

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the usefulness of an automated insulin dose bolus advisor (BA) in achieving improved glycemic control for insulin-using diabetes patients. Although regulatory agencies have approved several BAs over the past decades, these devices are not standardized in their approach to dosage calculation and include many features that may introduce risk to patients. Moreover, there is no single standard of care for diabetes worldwide and no guidance documents for BAs, specifically. Given the emerging and more stringent regulations on software used in medical devices, the approval process is becoming more difficult for manufacturers to navigate, with some manufacturers opting to remove BAs from their products altogether. A comprehensive literature search was performed, including publications discussing: diabetes BA use and benefit, infusion pump safety and regulation, regulatory submissions, novel BAs, and recommendations for regulation and risk management of BAs. Also included were country-specific and international guidance documents for medical device, infusion pump, medical software, and mobile medical application risk management and regulation. No definitive worldwide guidance exists regarding risk management requirements for BAs, specifically. However, local and international guidance documents for medical devices, infusion pumps, and medical device software offer guidance that can be applied to this technology. In addition, risk management exercises that are algorithm-specific can help prepare manufacturers for regulatory submissions. This article discusses key issues relevant to BA use and safety, and recommends risk management activities incorporating current research and guidance.

  14. Recommendations for Insulin Dose Calculator Risk Management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the usefulness of an automated insulin dose bolus advisor (BA) in achieving improved glycemic control for insulin-using diabetes patients. Although regulatory agencies have approved several BAs over the past decades, these devices are not standardized in their approach to dosage calculation and include many features that may introduce risk to patients. Moreover, there is no single standard of care for diabetes worldwide and no guidance documents for BAs, specifically. Given the emerging and more stringent regulations on software used in medical devices, the approval process is becoming more difficult for manufacturers to navigate, with some manufacturers opting to remove BAs from their products altogether. A comprehensive literature search was performed, including publications discussing: diabetes BA use and benefit, infusion pump safety and regulation, regulatory submissions, novel BAs, and recommendations for regulation and risk management of BAs. Also included were country-specific and international guidance documents for medical device, infusion pump, medical software, and mobile medical application risk management and regulation. No definitive worldwide guidance exists regarding risk management requirements for BAs, specifically. However, local and international guidance documents for medical devices, infusion pumps, and medical device software offer guidance that can be applied to this technology. In addition, risk management exercises that are algorithm-specific can help prepare manufacturers for regulatory submissions. This article discusses key issues relevant to BA use and safety, and recommends risk management activities incorporating current research and guidance. PMID:24876550

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  16. Crosstalk between cAMP-PKA and MAP kinase pathways is a key regulatory design necessary to regulate FLO11 expression.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Neelanjan; Vinod, P K; Venkatesh, K V

    2007-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways crosstalk with one another and play a central role in regulation of cellular events. Crosstalk brings complexity to the system, and hence, a systematic analysis of these crosstalks helps in relating the signaling network structure to its function. Here, we present a modular steady state approach to quantify the network comprising of cAMP-PKA and MAP kinase pathways involved in the regulation of FLO11, a gene which is required for pseudohyphae growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen starvation. These two pathways crosstalk by converging on the same target, i.e., FLO11 and through Ras2p, an upstream activator of both cAMP and MAPK pathway. Analysis of crosstalk at the gene level revealed that cAMP-PKA and MAPK pathways are indispensable to FLO11 expression. The dose response was highly sensitive and primarily controlled by cAMP-PKA pathway. We demonstrate that the highly sensitive response in the cAMP-PKA pathway was due to crosstalk and inhibitor ultrsensitivity, key regulatory designs present at the downstream of cAMP-PKA pathway. The analysis of the role of Ras2p in the crosstalk between the cAMP-PKA and MAPK pathways indicated that crosstalk essentially helped in amplification of the Gpa2p signal, another upstream activator of the cAMP-PKA pathway. However, the effect of crosstalk due to Ras2p on FLO11 expression was minimal under normal activation levels of Ras2p. Whereas, the crosstalk itself can bring about FLO11 expression under the hyperactivated Ras2p conditions thereby eliminating the requirement for the other activator Gpa2p. We also observed the presence of system level properties such as amplification, inhibitor ultrasensitvity and bistability, which can be attributed to the regulatory design present in the FLO11 expression system. These system level properties might help the organism to respond to varying nutritional status.

  17. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokine production by mast cells: a key factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mai; Sato, Yasuharu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Orita, Yorihisa; Ito, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disorder with unique clinicopathological features and uncertain etiological features and is frequently related to allergic disease. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines have been reported to be upregulated in the affected tissues; thus, the production of these cytokines by T helper 2 and regulatory T cells has been suggested as an important factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. However, it is not yet clear which cells produce these cytokines in IgG4-related disease, and some aspects of the disorder cannot be completely explained by T-cell-related processes. To address this, we analyzed paraffin-embedded sections of tissues from nine cases of IgG4-related submandibular gland disease, five cases of submandibular sialolithiasis, and six cases of normal submandibular gland in order to identify potential key players in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)4, IL10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) in IgG4-related disease. Interestingly, immunohistochemical studies indicated the presence of mast cells expressing these cytokines in diseased tissues. In addition, dual immunofluorescence assays identified cells that were double-positive for each cytokine and for KIT, which is expressed by mast cells. In contrast, the distribution of T cells did not correlate with cytokine distribution in affected tissues. We also found that the mast cells were strongly positive for IgE. This observation supports the hypothesis that mast cells are involved in IgG4-related disease, as mast cells are known to be closely related to allergic reactions and are activated in the presence of elevated non-specific IgE levels. In conclusion, our results indicate that mast cells produce T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines in tissues affected by IgG4-related disease and possibly have an important role in disease

  18. Insulin signaling and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance or its sequelae may be the common etiology of maladies associated with metabolic syndrome (eg, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure). It is thus important to understand those factors that affect insulin sensitivity. This review stems from the surprising discovery that interference with angiotensin signaling improves insulin sensitivity, and it provides a general overview of insulin action and factors that control insulin sensitivity.

  19. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A health practitioner also may order insulin and ... such as appears in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome Decreased insulin levels are seen with: Diabetes Hypopituitarism ...

  20. A mitochondrial kinase complex is essential to mediate an ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Converso, Daniela P; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Galli, Soledad; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Paz, Cristina; Carreras, María C; Poderoso, Juan J; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2008-01-16

    ERK1/2 is known to be involved in hormone-stimulated steroid synthesis, but its exact roles and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Both ERK1/2 phosphorylation and steroidogenesis may be triggered by cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent and-independent mechanisms; however, ERK1/2 activation by cAMP results in a maximal steroidogenic rate, whereas canonical activation by epidermal growth factor (EGF) does not. We demonstrate herein by Western blot analysis and confocal studies that temporal mitochondrial ERK1/2 activation is obligatory for PKA-mediated steroidogenesis in the Leydig-transformed MA-10 cell line. PKA activity leads to the phosphorylation of a constitutive mitochondrial MEK1/2 pool with a lower effect in cytosolic MEKs, while EGF allows predominant cytosolic MEK activation and nuclear pERK1/2 localization. These results would explain why PKA favors a more durable ERK1/2 activation in mitochondria than does EGF. By means of ex vivo experiments, we showed that mitochondrial maximal steroidogenesis occurred as a result of the mutual action of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein -a key regulatory component in steroid biosynthesis-, active ERK1/2 and PKA. Our results indicate that there is an interaction between mitochondrial StAR and ERK1/2, involving a D domain with sequential basic-hydrophobic motifs similar to ERK substrates. As a result of this binding and only in the presence of cholesterol, ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR at Ser(232). Directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) to a non-phosphorylable amino acid such as Ala (StAR S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR phosphorylation by active ERK1/2. Transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. In summary, here we show that StAR is a novel substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric protein kinase complex that regulates cholesterol transport. The role of MAPKs in mitochondrial function is underlined.

  1. [Insulin-like growth factor 1 and the key markers of proteolysis during the acute period of readaptation of the muscle atrophied as a result of unloading].

    PubMed

    Kachaeva, E V; Turtikova, O V; Leĭnsoo, T A; Shenkman, B S

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that, after prolonged disuse, the accumulation of muscle mass and the recovery of soleus fibers volume are caused by water accumulation rather than protein synthesis intensification. At the same time, expression rate of the main markers of the activity of ubiquitin-proteasome system remained increased on the 3rd day of reloading and decreased to the control by the 7th day. Both the quantity of the insulin-like growth factor 1 and the number of satellite cells fused with muscle fibers and of myonuclei began to increase only on the 7th day of reloading. The data obtained evidenced a significant inertness of the postural muscle during its adaptation to the load (normal gravity) after prolonged disuse.

  2. Insulin Signalling: The Inside Story.

    PubMed

    Posner, Barry I

    2017-02-01

    Insulin signalling begins with binding to its cell surface insulin receptor (IR), which is a tyrosine kinase. The insulin receptor kinase (IRK) is subsequently autophosphorylated and activated to tyrosine phosphorylate key cellular substrates that are essential for entraining the insulin response. Although IRK activation begins at the cell surface, it is maintained and augmented following internalization into the endosomal system (ENS). The peroxovanadium compounds (pVs) were discovered to activate the IRK in the absence of insulin and lead to a full insulin response. Thus, IRK activation is both necessary and sufficient for insulin signalling. Furthermore, this could be shown to occur with activation of only the endosomal IRK. The mechanism of pV action was shown to be the inhibition of IRK-associated phosphotyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Our studies showed that the duration and intensity of insulin signalling are modulated within ENS by the recruitment of cellular substrates to ENS; intra-endosomal acidification, which promotes dissociation of insulin from the IRK; an endosomal acidic insulinase, which degrades intra-endosomal insulin; and IRK-associated PTPs, which dephosphorylate and, hence, deactivate the IRK. Therefore, the internalization of IRKs is central to insulin signalling and its regulation.

  3. Insulin allergy.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Mohammad K; Johnston, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    Insulin reactions occur rarely but are of tremendous clinical importance. The first was reported in 1922 as a callus reaction at the injection site of insufficiently purified bovine insulin. Porcine insulin was subsequently found to be less allergenic than bovine insulin. Increasingly pure insulins have decreased the risk of adverse reactions, and the production of recombinant insulin with the same amino sequence as human insulin saw a large decrease in adverse reactions. Currently, the prevalence of allergic reactions to insulin products appears to be approximately 2%, and less than one-third of these events have been considered related to the insulin itself. Other reactions occur due to the preservatives added to insulin, including zinc, protamine, and meta-cresol. Allergic reactions can be type I or immunoglobulin E-mediated, type III or Arthus, and type IV or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Type I reactions are the most common and can, rarely, cause anaphylaxis. In contrast, type IV reactions can occur after a delay of several days. Investigations include skin prick testing, patch testing, intradermal testing, and occasionally, skin biopsy.

  4. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Replacing serum in culture medium with albumin and insulin, transferrin and selenium is the key to successful bovine embryo development in individual culture.

    PubMed

    Wydooghe, E; Heras, S; Dewulf, J; Piepers, S; Van den Abbeel, E; De Sutter, P; Vandaele, L; Van Soom, A

    2014-06-01

    Individual culture of bovine embryos is usually associated with low blastocyst development. However, during preliminary experiments in our laboratory we observed high blastocyst development after individual embryo culture in a serum-free culture system. We therefore hypothesised that serum has a negative effect on embryos cultured individually whereas embryos in groups can counteract this. First, we determined whether the timing of removal of serum (during maturation or culture) had an influence on individual embryo development. The results clearly showed that removal of serum during embryo culture was the main contributing factor since high blastocyst development was observed after individual culture in synthetic oviductal fluid supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and insulin, transferrin and selenium (ITS), independent of the maturation medium. Second, we investigated whether an individual factor of the ITS supplement was essential for individual embryo development. We demonstrated that repeatable high blastocyst percentages were due to the synergistic effect of ITS. Finally, we investigated if a group-culture effect can still be observed under serum-free conditions. Group culture generated blastocysts with higher total cell numbers and less apoptosis. These data show that individual culture in serum-free conditions leads to high blastocyst development, but group culture still improves blastocyst quality.

  6. Maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation interact to influence body weight, insulin resistance, and food intake regulatory gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Huot, Pedro S P; Ly, Anna; Szeto, Ignatius M Y; Reza-López, Sandra A; Cho, Daniel; Kim, Young-In; Anderson, G Harvey

    2016-04-01

    Maternal intake of multivitamins or folic acid above the basal dietary requirement alters the growth and metabolic trajectory of rat offspring. We hypothesized that a modest increase in the folic acid content of maternal diets would alter the offspring's metabolic phenotype, and that these effects could be corrected by matching the folic acid content of the offspring's diet with that of the maternal diet. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control or a 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet prior to mating and during pregnancy and lactation. At weaning, pups from each maternal diet group were randomized to the control or to the 2.5× folic acid-supplemented diet for 25 weeks. Male pups from dams fed the folic acid-supplemented diet were 3.7% heavier than those from control-fed dams and had lower mRNA expression for leptin receptor Obrb isoform (Lepr) (11%) and Agouti-related protein (Agrp) (14%). In contrast, female pups from folic acid-supplemented dams were 5% lighter than those from control-fed dams and had lower proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) (42%), Lepr (32%), and Agrp (13%), but higher neuropeptide Y (Npy) (18%) mRNA expression. Folic acid supplementation ameliorated the alterations induced by maternal folic acid supplementation in male pups and led to the lowest insulin resistance, but the effects were smaller in female pups and led to the highest insulin resistance. In conclusion, maternal folic acid supplementation at 2.5× the control level was associated with alterations in body weight and hypothalamic gene expression in rat offspring in a sex-specific manner, and some of these effects were attenuated by postweaning folic acid supplementation.

  7. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tamborlane, William V; Sikes, Kristin A

    2012-03-01

    Insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a key component in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in this population as well. A major aim of current insulin replacement therapy is to simulate the normal pattern of insulin secretion as closely as possible. This aim can best be achieved with basal-bolus therapy using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous insulin infusion (CSII) pump therapy. Only a few years ago, options for insulin formulations were limited. There are now more than 10 varieties of biosynthetic human and analogue insulin.

  8. Insulin receptor substrate-2 phosphorylation is necessary for protein kinase C zeta activation by insulin in L6hIR cells.

    PubMed

    Oriente, F; Formisano, P; Miele, C; Fiory, F; Maitan, M A; Vigliotta, G; Trencia, A; Santopietro, S; Caruso, M; Van Obberghen, E; Beguinot, F

    2001-10-05

    We have investigated glycogen synthase (GS) activation in L6hIR cells expressing a peptide corresponding to the kinase regulatory loop binding domain of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) (KRLB). In several clones of these cells (B2, F4), insulin-dependent binding of the KRLB to insulin receptors was accompanied by a block of IRS-2, but not IRS-1, phosphorylation, and insulin receptor binding. GS activation by insulin was also inhibited by >70% in these cells (p < 0.001). The impairment of GS activation was paralleled by a similarly sized inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha (GSK3 alpha) and GSK3 beta inactivation by insulin with no change in protein phosphatase 1 activity. PDK1 (a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate-dependent kinase) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation by insulin showed no difference in B2, F4, and in control L6hIR cells. At variance, insulin did not activate PKC zeta in B2 and F4 cells. In L6hIR, inhibition of PKC zeta activity by either a PKC zeta antisense or a dominant negative mutant also reduced by 75% insulin inactivation of GSK3 alpha and -beta (p < 0.001) and insulin stimulation of GS (p < 0.002), similar to Akt/PKB inhibition. In L6hIR, insulin induced protein kinase C zeta (PKC zeta) co-precipitation with GSK3 alpha and beta. PKC zeta also phosphorylated GSK3 alpha and -beta. Alone, these events did not significantly affect GSK3 alpha and -beta activities. Inhibition of PKC zeta activity, however, reduced Akt/PKB phosphorylation of the key serine sites on GSK3 alpha and -beta by >80% (p < 0.001) and prevented full GSK3 inactivation by insulin. Thus, IRS-2, not IRS-1, signals insulin activation of GS in the L6hIR skeletal muscle cells. In these cells, insulin inhibition of GSK3 alpha and -beta requires dual phosphorylation by both Akt/PKB and PKC zeta.

  9. Interferon regulatory factor 3 as key element of the interferon signature in plasmacytoid dendritic cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients: novel genetic associations in the Mexican mestizo population

    PubMed Central

    Santana-de Anda, K; Gómez-Martín, D; Monsivais-Urenda, A E; Salgado-Bustamante, M; González-Amaro, R; Alcocer-Varela, J

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic studies have found an association between interferon regulatory factors (IRF) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, specific dendritic cell (DC) alterations have not been assessed. The aim of the present study was to address the expression of IRF3 and IRF5 on different DC subsets from SLE patients, as well as their association with interferon (IFN)-α production and novel SNPs. For the genetic association analyses, 156 SLE patients and 272 healthy controls from the Mexican mestizo population were included. From these, 36 patients and 36 controls were included for functional analysis. Two IRF3 SNPs − rs2304206 and rs2304204 – were determined. We found an increased percentage of circulating pDC in SLE patients in comparison to controls (8·04 ± 1·48 versus 3·35 ± 0·8, P = 0·032). We also observed enhanced expression of IRF3 (64 ± 6·36 versus 36·1 ± 5·57, P = 0·004) and IRF5 (40 ± 5·25 versus 22·5 ± 2·6%, P = 0·010) restricted to this circulating pDC subset from SLE patients versus healthy controls. This finding was associated with higher IFN-α serum levels in SLE (160·2 ± 21 versus 106·1 ± 14 pg/ml, P = 0·036). Moreover, the IRF3 rs2304206 polymorphism was associated with increased susceptibility to SLE [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2·401 (1·187–4·858), P = 0·021] as well as enhanced levels of serum type I IFN in SLE patients who were positive for dsDNA autoantibodies. The IRF3 rs2304204 GG and AG genotypes conferred decreased risk for SLE. Our findings suggest that the predominant IRF3 expression on circulating pDC is a key element for the increased IFN-α activation based on the interplay between the rs2304206 gene variant and the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies in Mexican mestizo SLE patients. PMID:25130328

  10. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  11. Overview and discussion of the key regulatory issues in implementing the electric utility provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.; Burns, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Title 4 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) created a new regulatory instrument that electric power producers (utilities and others) will be required to possess and expand in order to emit sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) into the atmosphere. The emission allowance system created by the CAAA will be grafted onto an already complex system of state and federal electric utility regulation. How public utility commissions (PUCs) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulate these allowances will greatly affect the decisions that electric utilities under their jurisdiction make to comply with the CAAA and, therefore, the cost of compliance to ratepayers. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Essential role of PSM/SH2-B variants in insulin receptor catalytic activation and the resulting cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manchao; Deng, Youping; Tandon, Ruchi; Bai, Cheng; Riedel, Heimo

    2008-01-01

    The positive regulatory role of PSM/SH2-B downstream of various mitogenic receptor tyrosine kinases or gene disruption experiments in mice support a role of PSM in the regulation of insulin action. Here, four alternative PSM splice variants and individual functional domains were compared for their role in the regulation of specific metabolic insulin responses. We found that individual PSM variants in 3T3-L1 adipocytes potentiated insulin-mediated glucose and amino acid transport, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and key components in the metabolic insulin response including p70 S6 kinase, glycogen synthase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), Akt, Cbl, and IRS-1. Highest activity was consistently observed for PSM alpha, followed by beta, delta, and gamma with decreasing activity. In contrast, dominant-negative peptide mimetics of the PSM Pro-rich, pleckstrin homology (PH), or src homology 2 (SH2) domains inhibited any tested insulin response. Potentiation of the insulin response originated at the insulin receptor (IR) kinase level by PSM variant-specific regulation of the Km (ATP) whereas the Vmax remained unaffected. IR catalytic activation was inhibited by peptide mimetics of the PSM SH2 or dimerization domain (DD). Either peptide should disrupt the complex of a PSM dimer linked to IR via SH2 domains as proposed for PSM activation of tyrosine kinase JAK2. Either peptide abolished downstream insulin responses indistinguishable from PSM siRNA knockdown. Our results implicate an essential role of the PSM variants in the activation of the IR kinase and the resulting metabolic insulin response. PSM variants act as internal IR ligands that in addition to potentiating the insulin response stimulate IR catalytic activation even in the absence of insulin.

  13. Insulin in UW solution exacerbates hepatic ischemia / reperfusion injury by energy depletion through the IRS-2 / SREBP-1c pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian Liang; Man, Kwan; Ng, Kevin T; Lee, Terence K; Lo, Chung Mau; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2004-09-01

    Ischemia / reperfusion (I / R) injury is related to tissue graft energy status. Insulin, which is currently used in the University of Wisconsin (UW) preservation solution with insulin (UWI), is an anabolic hormone and was shown to exacerbate the hepatic I / R injury in our previous study. In this study, the energy status and regulation of metabolism genes by insulin were investigated in liver grafts preserved by UW solution. Insulin could significantly decrease adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level after 3 hours of preservation, as well as total adenine nucleotides (TANs) and energy charge (EC) levels. Energy regeneration deteriorated in the grafts preserved by insulin in terms of ATP and EC levels at 24 hours after transplantation. The insulin signal was transduced through the insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) pathway and the activity of IRS-2 was decreased gradually at the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level during cold preservation. Downstream targeting genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), glucokinase (GKC), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes, as well as phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) were activated and they showed the similar expression profiles during cold preservation. Lipoprotein metabolism was accelerated by insulin through upregulation of the activity of apolipoprotein C-III (Apo C-III) during cold preservation. The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 pathway was inhibited during cold preservation. In conclusion, insulin in UW solution exacerbates hepatic I / R injury by energy depletion as the graft maintains its anabolic activity. The key enzyme activities of the energy-consuming process of glycogen and fatty acid synthesis as well as lipoprotein metabolism were accelerated by insulin through the IRS-2 / SREBP-1c pathway.

  14. The International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--chapter 1: Key ethical requirements and progress toward the definition of an international regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Emanuele; Tallacchini, Mariachiara; Flanagan, Enda B; Pierson, Richard N; Sykes, Megan; Vanderpool, Harold Y

    2009-01-01

    The outstanding results recently obtained in islet xenotransplantation suggest that porcine islet clinical trials may soon be scientifically appropriate. Before the initiation of such clinical studies, however, it is essential that a series of key ethical and regulatory conditions are satisfied. As far as ethics is concerned, the fundamental requirements have been previously reported in a position paper of the Ethics Committee of the International Xenotransplantation Association. These include aspects related to the selection of adequately informed, appropriate recipients; animal breeding and welfare; safety issues and the need for a favorable risk/benefit assessment based on strong efficacy data in relevant xenotransplantation studies in the primate. As most diabetic patients are not at risk of short-term mortality without islet transplantation, only a small subset of patients could currently be considered for any type of islet transplant. However, there are potential advantages to xenotransplantation that could result in a favorable benefit-over-harm determination for islet xenotransplantation in this subpopulation and ultimately in a broader population of diabetic patients. With regard to regulatory aspects, the key concepts underlying the development of the regulatory models in existence in the United States, Europe and New Zealand are discussed. Each of these models provides an example of a well-defined regulatory approach to ensure the initiation of well-regulated and ethically acceptable clinical islet xenotransplantation trials. At this stage, it becomes apparent that only a well-coordinated international effort such as that initiated by the World Health Organization, aimed at harmonizing xenotransplantation procedures according to the highest ethical and regulatory standards on a global scale, will enable the initiation of clinical xenotransplantation trials under the best auspices for its success and minimize any risk of failure.

  15. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  16. The neuronal kinesin UNC-104/KIF1A is a key regulator of synaptic aging and insulin signaling-regulated memory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Bo; Lei, Haoyun; Arey, Rachel N.; Li, Pengpeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Murphy, Coleen T.; Xu, X.Z. Shawn; Shen, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aging is the greatest risk factor for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, normal aging is associated with a decline in sensory, motor, and cognitive functions. Emerging evidence suggests that synapse alterations, rather than neuronal cell death, are the causes of neuronal dysfunctions in normal aging, and in early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying age-related synaptic decline. Here we uncover a surprising role of the anterograde molecular motor UNC-104/KIF1A as a key regulator of neural circuit deterioration in aging C. elegans. Through analyses of synapse protein localization, synaptic transmission, and animal behaviors, we find that reduced function of UNC-104 accelerates motor circuit dysfunction with age, while upregulation of UNC-104 significantly improves motor function at advanced ages and also mildly extends lifespan. In addition, UNC-104-overexpressing animals outperform wild-type controls in associative learning and memory tests. Further genetic analyses suggest that UNC-104 functions downstream of the DAF-2 signaling pathway, and is regulated by the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, which contributes to the effects of DAF-2 in neuronal aging. Together, our cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses highlight the importance of axonal transport in the maintenance of synaptic structural integrity and function during aging, and raise the possibility of targeting kinesins to slow age-related neural circuit dysfunction. PMID:26877087

  17. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  18. Previtellogenic oocyte growth in salmon: relationships among body growth, plasma insulin-like growth factor-1, estradiol-17beta, follicle-stimulating hormone and expression of ovarian genes for insulin-like growth factors, steroidogenic-acute regulatory protein and receptors for gonadotropins, growth hormone, and somatolactin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B; Dickey, J; Beckman, B; Young, G; Pierce, A; Fukada, H; Swanson, P

    2006-07-01

    Body growth during critical periods is known to be an important factor in determining the age of maturity and fecundity in fish. However, the endocrine mechanisms controlling oogenesis in fish and the effects of growth on this process are poorly understood. In this study interactions between the growth and reproductive systems were examined by monitoring changes in various components of the FSH-ovary axis, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1), and ovarian gene expression in relation to body and previtellogenic oocyte growth in coho salmon. Samples were collected from females during two hypothesized critical periods when growth influences maturation in this species. Body growth during the fall-spring months was strongly related to the degree of oocyte development, with larger fish possessing more advanced oocytes than smaller, slower growing fish. The accumulation of cortical alveoli in the oocytes was associated with increases in plasma and pituitary FSH, plasma estradiol-17beta, and ovarian steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star) gene expression, whereas ovarian transcripts for growth hormone receptor and somatolactin receptor decreased. As oocytes accumulated lipid droplets, a general increase occurred in plasma Igf1 and components of the FSH-ovary axis, including plasma FSH, estradiol-17beta, and ovarian mRNAs for gonadotropin receptors, star, igf1, and igf2. A consistent positive relationship between plasma Igf1, estradiol-17beta, and pituitary FSH during growth in the spring suggests that these factors are important links in the mechanism by which body growth influences the rate of oocyte development.

  19. Insulin-Dependent Regulation of Insulin Receptor Concentrations: A Direct Demonstration in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, James R.; Roth, Jesse; Neville, David M.; De Meyts, Pierre; Buell, Donald N.

    1974-01-01

    Chronic (5-16 hr) exposure of cultured human lymphocytes to 10-8 M insulin at 37° in vitro produced a decrease in insulin receptor concentrations unaccounted for by simple occupancy of sites; acute exposure (0-2 hr) was without effect. These results reproduced observations in vivo where chronic hyperinsulinemia (e.g., 10-8 M insulin in the circulation of obese insulinresistant hyperglycemic mice) is associated with a substantial reduction in the concentration of insulin receptors per cell, while acute hyperinsulinemia in vivo has no effect on receptor concentration. These data suggest a reciprocal relationship between insulin in the extracellular fluid and the concentration of insulin receptors per cell, which is mediated at the target cell itself by intracellular insulin-sensitive regulatory processes and directly affects target-cell sensitivity to hormone. PMID:4359334

  20. Determination of a Comprehensive Alternative Splicing Regulatory Network and Combinatorial Regulation by Key Factors during the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yueqin; Park, Juw Won; Bebee, Thomas W.; Warzecha, Claude C.; Guo, Yang; Shang, Xuequn

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential biological process during embryonic development that is also implicated in cancer metastasis. While the transcriptional regulation of EMT has been well studied, the role of alternative splicing (AS) regulation in EMT remains relatively uncharacterized. We previously showed that the epithelial cell-type-specific proteins epithelial splicing regulatory proteins 1 (ESRP1) and ESRP2 are important for the regulation of many AS events that are altered during EMT. However, the contributions of the ESRPs and other splicing regulators to the AS regulatory network in EMT require further investigation. Here, we used a robust in vitro EMT model to comprehensively characterize splicing switches during EMT in a temporal manner. These investigations revealed that the ESRPs are the major regulators of some but not all AS events during EMT. We determined that the splicing factor RBM47 is downregulated during EMT and also regulates numerous transcripts that switch splicing during EMT. We also determined that Quaking (QKI) broadly promotes mesenchymal splicing patterns. Our study highlights the broad role of posttranscriptional regulation during the EMT and the important role of combinatorial regulation by different splicing factors to fine tune gene expression programs during these physiological and developmental transitions. PMID:27044866

  1. Role of insulin and insulin receptor in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W Q; Alkon, D L

    2001-05-25

    As one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, insulin and its receptor have been known to play key roles in a variety of important biological functions. Until recent years, the functions of insulin and insulin receptor (IR) in the central nervous system (CNS) have largely remained unclear. IR is abundantly expressed in several specific brain regions that govern fundamental behaviors such as food intake, reproduction and high cognition. The IR from the periphery and CNS exhibit differences in both structure and function. In addition to that from the peripheral system, locally synthesized insulin in the brain has also been identified. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that insulin/IR plays important roles in associative learning, as suggested by results from both interventive and correlative studies. Interruption of insulin production and IR activity causes deficits in learning and memory formation. Abnormal insulin/IR levels and activities are seen in Alzheimer's dementia, whereas administration of insulin significantly improves the cognitive performance of these patients. The synaptic bases for the action of insulin/IR include modifying neurotransmitter release processes at various types of presynaptic terminals and modulating the activities of both excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic receptors such as NMDA and GABA receptors, respectively. At the molecular level, insulin/IR participates in regulation of learning and memory via activation of specific signaling pathways, one of which is shown to be associated with the formation of long-term memory and is composed of intracellular molecules including the shc, Grb-r/SOS, Ras/Raf, and MEK/MAP kinases. Cross-talk with another IR pathway involving IRS1, PI3 kinase, and protein kinase C, as well as with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase pp60c-src, may also be associated with memory processing.

  2. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin lispro ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin lispro in a pump system, ...

  3. Administration of Biosimilar Insulin Analogs: Role of Devices.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fritz, Ingo; Khatami, Hootan; Edelman, Steven V

    2017-02-01

    With the expiration of patent protection for several originator insulin analog molecules, the availability of insulin analog copies is set to increase. Many regulatory authorities have developed, and continue to refine, guidelines for the approval of biosimilar insulin analogs. Aspects such as the structure, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of biosimilar insulin analogs are extensively addressed in these guidelines, but how the biosimilar insulin analog is administered to people with diabetes is not usually a topic. The aim of this article is to highlight that the delivery device-drug combination is of particular importance. Regulatory, legal, and practical aspects of the delivery device, be it a syringe, pen, or pump, have to be considered in the context of biosimilar insulin analogs. Although the safety and efficacy of biosimilar insulin analogs per se are of primary importance for physicians and people with diabetes, functions and features of the devices used for administration also require attention from a practical point of view. Unfortunately, although there are several clinical studies investigating the technical aspects of and patient preference for the originator insulin analog pens, there are currently very little published data for nonoriginator or biosimilar insulin analog pens. In addition, it is not known if it is safe to assume that a biosimilar insulin analog cartridge is compatible with an existing originator insulin analog pen. We believe that there is a need for more discussion on the role of devices for administration of biosimilar insulin analogs.

  4. Toward Development of Psychosocial Measures for Automated Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Hood, Korey; Laffel, Lori; Heinemann, Lutz; Ball, Dana; Kowalski, Aaron; Peters, Anne; Damiano, Edward; Schiller, Marie; Davis, Aaron; Beck, Stayce; Barnard, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    The INSPIRE study working group launched its initial workshop in February 2015 to facilitate collaboration among key stakeholders interested in automated insulin delivery (AID) systems and the psychosocial outcomes of individuals who may use these new technologies. Specifically, the INSPIRE team’s goal is to facilitate measure development assessing the psychosocial factors associated with AID systems. A second working group was held to foster exchange among key stakeholders in AID system development. Patient, health care provider, engineering, industry, academic, regulatory and payer perspectives were presented. The INSPIRE working group will continue to serve as a platform to encourage open dialogue among all stakeholders with the aim of facilitating technology that offers minimal user burden and maximum benefit from both a psychological and physiologic perspective. PMID:26645792

  5. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD. PMID:26317977

  6. Magnolol causes alterations in the cell cycle in androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro by affecting expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Brendan T; McDougall, Luke; Catalli, Adriana; Hurta, Robert A R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in the Western world, affects many men worldwide. This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on the behavior of 2 androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, in vitro. Magnolol, in a 24-h exposure at 40 and 80 μM, was found to be cytotoxic to cells. Magnolol also affected cell cycle progression of DU145 and PC3 cells, resulting in alterations to the cell cycle and subsequently decreasing the proportion of cells entering the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclins A, B1, D1, and E, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. Protein expression levels of pRBp107 decreased and pRBp130 protein expression levels increased in response to magnolol exposure, whereas p16(INK4a), p21, and p27 protein expression levels were apparently unchanged post 24-h exposure. Magnolol exposure at 6 h did increase p27 protein expression levels. This study has demonstrated that magnolol can alter the behavior of androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggests that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  7. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.

  8. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  9. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  10. The biosimilar insulin landscape: current developments.

    PubMed

    Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Khatami, Hootan

    2014-10-01

    Biosimilar insulins have the potential to increase access to treatment among patients with diabetes mellitus, reduce treatment costs, and expand market competition. The patents for several insulins are soon to expire, meaning there is room for copies of these products--or 'biosimilars'--to join the marketplace. It is vital that similar safety and efficacy to the innovator product is demonstrated for biosimilars. This presents many possible manufacturing and regulatory challenges. Complex manufacturing processes mean that even small differences between manufacturers can have a potential impact on the final product. Several companies are currently developing biosimilar insulins or are already producing these products in emerging markets with different regulatory requirements. For insulin biosimilars to be licensed in more established markets, manufacturers will need to meet the rigid criteria set out by agencies such as the European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration, and fulfill several pre-clinical, clinical, and pharmacovigilance surveillance criteria. As a result of differing regulatory requirements, there are possible gaps in the publically available clinical data to support the safety and efficacy of biosimilar insulins from around the world current as of July 2014. This review summarizes the current biosimilar insulin landscape.

  11. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; ...

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domainmore » of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.« less

  12. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) modulates the expression of key regulatory proteins of the inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) metabolism in TGF-β1-stimulated chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamade, Tala; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Cailotto, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The balance between extracellular inorganic phosphate (ePi) and extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) is controlled by four membrane proteins: the transporters ANK (exporting PPi outside the cells) and PiT-1 (importing ePi into the cells), and the enzymes PC-1 (generating ePPi from nucleotides) and Tissue Non-specific Alkaline Phosphatase (TNAP, hydrolyzing ePPi into ePi). TGF-β1 was shown to stimulate ANK and PC-1 expression in articular chondrocytes, and subsequent ePPi level, as well as to increase ePi uptake by inducing PiT-1 expression in a chondrogenic cell line. Thus, we investigated the ability of ePi to modulate the effect of TGF-β1 on the regulatory proteins of the ePi/ePPi balance in chondrocytes. In the pathophysiological range of 0.01-1 mM, ePi was inactive by itself but potentiated the stimulatory effects of TGF-β1 on ANK, PC-1 or PiT-1 mRNA (RT-qPCR) and protein (Western blot) levels. PC-1 activity was also increased by TGF-β1 and further potentiated by ePi supplementation. TNAP mRNA and activity became undetectable in response to TGF-β1. These data suggest that ePi could increase ePPi level by changing the control of ANK and PC-1 expression by TGF-β1, further highlighting an adaptative regulation of the Pi/PPi balance to prevent basic calcium phosphate deposition into the joints.

  13. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  14. Regulatory perspectives on pharmacogenomics: a review of the literature on key issues faced by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kathryn A; Van Bebber, Stephanie L

    2006-06-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx), the use of genetic information to individualize drug therapy, is an immediate and important application of the Human Genome Project. The advent of PGx presents challenges to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in pursuing its mandate of protecting public health and safety. The authors conducted a review of academic, industry, and government literature using a technology diffusion framework to identify issues faced by the FDA relevant to the application of PGx. Two hundred and ten articles were reviewed. Key issues were categorized as rationale and structure for PGx regulation, regulation of PGx-based testing technologies, regulation of applications in clinical settings, regulation of data, and regulation of product life cycles. This review identifies issues faced by the FDA with respect to PGx, which the FDA is addressing through several initiatives. It also illustrates the complex issues involved in developing, implementing, and adopting new technologies.

  15. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system. PMID:24966532

  16. Insilico docking study of compounds elucidated from helicteres isora fruits with ampkinase- insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Vennila, Subramanium; Bupesh, Giridharan; Saravanamurali, Krishnan; SenthilKumar, Viajayan; SenthilRaja, Ramalingam; Saran, Natarajan; Magesh, Sachidanandam

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) proteins were essential intracellular signaling peptides in the insulin action cascade. Insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS-1and IRS-2) serve and regulate the insulin level in the normal insulin action. The broad role of IRS-1 and IRS-2 in cell growth and survival reveals a common regulatory pathway linking development, somatic growth, fertility, neuronal proliferation, and aging to the core mechanisms used by vertebrates for nutrient sensing. Such type of proteins were cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, this proteins play a key role in the insulin response and regulation. Type -2 Diabetes mellitus occurs during prolonged periods of peripheral insulin resistance due to inactivation of IRS proteins. The compounds isolated from the medicinal plants were safer than synthetic drugs and possess high bio activity. In the present study, four compounds were elucidated from fruits of Helicteres isora. The elucidated compounds were evaluated for the antidiabetic activity using in silico docking study. The receptor was analyzed for the active site and pocket finder tools. The aminoacids such as Phenylalanine, Lysine, Glutamic acid and Asparigine were predicted as active site binding residues. Docking studies were done through Autodock 4 software. All the compounds from fruits of Helicteres isora showed good docking profiles with AMP Kinase, except compound-3 (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,5,6,8-tetramethyl-7-(2-methylprop-1-enylnaphthalene-4-ylpivalate). Finally the result from the study demonstrates that the HS-1, HS-2 and HS-4 posses potent anti diabetic activity against type-2 diabetes mellitus through drug action on AMP kinase cascade system.

  17. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development.

    PubMed

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel; van Nimwegen, Erik; Basler, Konrad; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼ 5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such "bivalent" chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue.

  18. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development

    PubMed Central

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W.; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such “bivalent” chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. PMID:25568052

  19. Animal models of insulin resistance: A review.

    PubMed

    Sah, Sangeeta Pilkhwal; Singh, Barinder; Choudhary, Supriti; Kumar, Anil

    2016-12-01

    Insulin resistance can be seen as a molecular and genetic mystery, with a role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a basis for a number of chronic diseases like hypertension, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular disease along with T2DM, thus the key is to cure and prevent insulin resistance. Critical perspicacity into the etiology of insulin resistance have been gained by the use of animal models where insulin action has been modulated by various transgenic and non-transgenic models which is not possible in human studies. The following review comprises the pathophysiology involved in insulin resistance, various factors causing insulin resistance, their screening and various genetic and non-genetic animal models highlighting the pathological and metabolic characteristics of each.

  20. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... want. Put the needle into and through the rubber top of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger ... longer-acting insulin. Put the needle into the rubber top of that insulin bottle. Push the plunger ...

  1. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  2. PEDF-induced alteration of metabolism leading to insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam M; Dass, Crispin R

    2015-02-05

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and neurotrophic serine protease inhibitor protein. PEDF is evolving as a novel metabolic regulatory protein that plays a causal role in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the central pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian disease, and metabolic syndrome, and PEDF is associated with them. The current evidence suggests that PEDF administration to animals induces insulin resistance, whereas neutralisation improves insulin sensitivity. Inflammation, lipolytic free fatty acid mobilisation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the proposed mechanism of PEDF-mediated insulin resistance. This review summarises the probable mechanisms adopted by PEDF to induce insulin resistance, and identifies PEDF as a potential therapeutic target in ameliorating insulin resistance.

  3. Amelioration of palmitate-induced insulin resistance in C₂C₁₂ muscle cells by rooibos (Aspalathus linearis).

    PubMed

    Mazibuko, S E; Muller, C J F; Joubert, E; de Beer, D; Johnson, R; Opoku, A R; Louw, J

    2013-07-15

    Increased levels of free fatty acids (FFAs), specifically saturated free fatty acids such as palmitate are associated with insulin resistance of muscle, fat and liver. Skeletal muscle, responsible for up to 80% of the glucose disposal from the peripheral circulation, is particularly vulnerable to increased levels of saturated FFAs. Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and its unique dihydrochalcone C-glucoside, aspalathin, shown to reduce hyperglycemia in diabetic rats, could play a role in preventing or ameliorating the development of insulin resistance. This study aims to establish whether rooibos can ameliorate experimentally-induced insulin-resistance in C₂C₁₂ skeletal muscle cells. Palmitate-induced insulin resistant C₂C₁₂ cells were treated with an aspalathin-enriched green (unfermented) rooibos extract (GRE), previously shown for its blood glucose lowering effect in vitro and in vivo or an aqueous extract of fermented rooibos (FRE). Glucose uptake and mitochondrial activity were measured using 2-deoxy-[³H]-D-glucose, MTT and ATP assays, respectively. Expression of proteins relevant to glucose metabolism was analysed by Western blot. GRE contained higher levels of all compounds, except the enolic phenylpyruvic acid-2-O-glucoside and luteolin-7-O-glucoside. Both rooibos extracts increased glucose uptake, mitochondrial activity and ATP production. Compared to FRE, GRE was more effective at increasing glucose uptake and ATP production. At a mechanistic level both extracts down-regulated PKC θ activation, which is associated with palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Furthermore, the extracts increased activation of key regulatory proteins (AKT and AMPK) involved in insulin-dependent and non-insulin regulated signalling pathways. Protein levels of the glucose transporter (GLUT4) involved in glucose transport via these two pathways were also increased. This in vitro study therefore confirms that rooibos can ameliorate palmitate-induced insulin resistance in

  4. Individualized correction of insulin measurement in hemolyzed serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Qi; Lu, Ju; Chen, Huanhuan; Chen, Wensen; Xu, Hua-Guo

    2016-11-05

    Insulin measurement plays a key role in the investigation of patients with hypoglycemia, subtype classification of diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and impaired beta cell function. However, even slight hemolysis can negatively affect insulin measurement due to RBC insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). Here, we derived and validated an individualized correction equation in an attempt to eliminate the effects of hemolysis on insulin measurement. The effects of hemolysis on insulin measurement were studied by adding lysed self-RBCs to serum. A correction equation was derived, accounting for both percentage and exposure time of hemolysis. The performance of this individualized correction was evaluated in intentionally hemolyzed samples. Insulin concentration decreased with increasing percentage and exposure time of hemolysis. Based on the effects of hemolysis on insulin measurement of 17 donors (baseline insulin concentrations ranged from 156 to 2119 pmol/L), the individualized hemolysis correction equation was derived: INScorr = INSmeas/(0.705lgHbplasma/Hbserum - 0.001Time - 0.612). This equation can revert insulin concentrations of the intentionally hemolyzed samples to values that were statistically not different from the corresponding insulin baseline concentrations (p = 0.1564). Hemolysis could lead to a negative interference on insulin measurement; by individualized hemolysis correction equation for insulin measurement, we can correct and report reliable serum insulin results for a wide range of degrees of sample hemolysis. This correction would increase diagnostic accuracy, reduce inappropriate therapeutic decisions, and improve patient satisfaction with care.

  5. Mechanisms for increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Bhat, Abhijit D; Sequea, Donel A; Ho, Steve; Croff, Kelsey K; Sajan, Mini P; Farese, Robert V; Cartee, Gregory D

    2011-06-01

    Calorie restriction [CR; ~65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] improves insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. We aimed to elucidate the effects of CR on 1) processes that regulate Akt phosphorylation [insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine phosphorylation, IR substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (IRS-PI3K) activity, and Akt binding to regulatory proteins (heat shock protein 90, Appl1, protein phosphatase 2A)]; 2) Akt substrate of 160-kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on key phosphorylation sites; and 3) atypical PKC (aPKC) activity. Isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from AL or CR (6 mo duration) 9-mo-old male F344BN rats were incubated with 0, 1.2, or 30 nM insulin and 2-deoxy-[(3)H]glucose. Some CR effects were independent of insulin dose or muscle type: CR caused activation of Akt (Thr(308) and Ser(473)) and GU in both muscles at both insulin doses without CR effects on IRS1-PI3K, Akt-PP2A, or Akt-Appl1. Several muscle- and insulin dose-specific CR effects were revealed. Akt-HSP90 binding was increased in the epitrochlearis; AS160 phosphorylation (Ser(588) and Thr(642)) was greater for CR epitrochlearis at 1.2 nM insulin; and IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity were greater for CR in both muscles with 30 nM insulin. On the basis of these data, our working hypothesis for improved insulin-stimulated GU with CR is as follows: 1) elevated Akt phosphorylation is fundamental, regardless of muscle or insulin dose; 2) altered Akt binding to regulatory proteins (HSP90 and unidentified Akt partners) is involved in the effects of CR on Akt phosphorylation; 3) Akt effects on GU depend on muscle- and insulin dose-specific elevation in phosphorylation of Akt substrates, including, but not limited to, AS160; and 4) greater IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity may contribute at higher insulin doses.

  6. Targeted disruption of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 promotes diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elaine; Dubois, Marie-Julie; Leung, Nelly; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Turbide, Claire; Avramoglu, Rita Kohen; DeMarte, Luisa; Elchebly, Mounib; Streichert, Thomas; Lévy, Emile; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2009-08-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CC1) is a cell adhesion molecule within the Ig superfamily. The Tyr-phosphorylated isoform of CC1 (CC1-L) plays an important metabolic role in the regulation of hepatic insulin clearance. In this report, we show that CC1-deficient (Cc1(-/-)) mice are prone to hepatic steatosis, as revealed by significantly elevated hepatic triglyceride and both total and esterified cholesterol levels compared with age-matched wild-type controls. Cc1(-/-) mice were also predisposed to lipid-induced hepatic steatosis and dysfunction as indicated by their greater susceptibility to store lipids and express elevated levels of enzymatic markers of liver damage after chronic feeding of a high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis in the Cc1(-/-) mice was linked to a significant increase in the expression of key lipogenic (fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase) and cholesterol synthetic (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) enzymes under the control of sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c and -2 transcription factors. Cc1(-/-) mice also exhibited impaired insulin clearance, glucose intolerance, liver insulin resistance, and elevated hepatic expression of the key gluconeogenic transcriptional activators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 and Forkhead box O1. Lack of CC1 also exacerbated both glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat feeding, but insulin clearance was not further deteriorated in the high-fat-fed Cc1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, our data indicate that CC1 is a key regulator of hepatic lipogenesis and that Cc1(-/-) mice are predisposed to liver steatosis, leading to hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage, particularly when chronically exposed to dietary fat.

  7. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate.

  8. miR-33a/b contribute to the regulation of fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Smibert, Peter; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Warrier, Nikhil P.; Andreo, Ursula; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Rayner, Katey; Suresh, Uthra; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Esplugues, Enric; Fisher, Edward A.; Penalva, Luiz O. F.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Lai, Eric C.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Cellular imbalances of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism result in pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Recent work from our group and others has shown that the intronic microRNAs hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b are located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and -1 genes, respectively, and regulate cholesterol homeostasis in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33a and -b also regulate genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling. miR-33a and -b target key enzymes involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation, including carnitine O-octaniltransferase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), and AMP kinase subunit-α. Moreover, miR-33a and -b also target the insulin receptor substrate 2, an essential component of the insulin-signaling pathway in the liver. Overexpression of miR-33a and -b reduces both fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in hepatic cell lines, whereas inhibition of endogenous miR-33a and -b increases these two metabolic pathways. Together, these data establish that miR-33a and -b regulate pathways controlling three of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, namely levels of HDL, triglycerides, and insulin signaling, and suggest that inhibitors of miR-33a and -b may be useful in the treatment of this growing health concern. PMID:21576456

  9. PIK3R1 Mutations Cause Syndromic Insulin Resistance with Lipoatrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Auclair, Martine; Duplomb, Laurence; Caron-Debarle, Martine; Avila, Magali; St-Onge, Judith; Le Merrer, Martine; Le Luyer, Bernard; Héron, Delphine; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Bitoun, Pierre; Petit, Jean-Michel; Odent, Sylvie; Amiel, Jeanne; Picot, Damien; Carmignac, Virginie; Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Laville, Martine; Reznik, Yves; Fagour, Cédric; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lascols, Olivier; Huet, Frédéric; Faivre, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Short stature, hyperextensibility of joints and/or inguinal hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay (SHORT) syndrome is a developmental disorder with an unknown genetic cause and hallmarks that include insulin resistance and lack of subcutaneous fat. We ascertained two unrelated individuals with SHORT syndrome, hypothesized that the observed phenotype was most likely due to de novo mutations in the same gene, and performed whole-exome sequencing in the two probands and their unaffected parents. We then confirmed our initial observations in four other subjects with SHORT syndrome from three families, as well as 14 unrelated subjects presenting with syndromic insulin resistance and/or generalized lipoatrophy associated with dysmorphic features and growth retardation. Overall, we identified in nine affected individuals from eight families de novo or inherited PIK3R1 mutations, including a mutational hotspot (c.1945C>T [p.Arg649Trp]) present in four families. PIK3R1 encodes the p85α, p55α, and p50α regulatory subunits of class IA phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases (PI3Ks), which are known to play a key role in insulin signaling. Functional data from fibroblasts derived from individuals with PIK3R1 mutations showed severe insulin resistance for both proximal and distal PI3K-dependent signaling. Our findings extend the genetic causes of severe insulin-resistance syndromes and provide important information with respect to the function of PIK3R1 in normal development and its role in human diseases, including growth delay, Rieger anomaly and other ocular affections, insulin resistance, diabetes, paucity of fat, and ovarian cysts. PMID:23810378

  10. SGK1 dependence of insulin induced hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Boini, Krishna M; Graf, Dirk; Kuhl, Dietmar; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian

    2009-02-01

    Insulin stimulates cellular K+ uptake leading to hypokalemia. Cellular K+ uptake is accomplished by parallel stimulation of Na+/H+ exchange, Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transport, and Na+/K+ ATPase and leads to cell swelling, a prerequisite for several metabolic effects of the hormone. Little is known about underlying signaling. Insulin is known to activate the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which in turn enhances the activity of all three transport proteins. The present study thus explored the contribution of SGK1 to insulin-induced hypokalemia. To this end, gene-targeted mice lacking SGK1 (sgk1-/-) and their wild-type littermates (sgk1+/+) have been infused with insulin (2 mU kg(-1) min(-1)) and glucose at rates leaving the plasma glucose concentration constant. Moreover, isolated liver perfusion experiments have been performed to determine stimulation of cellular K+ uptake by insulin (100 nM). As a result, combined glucose and insulin infusion significantly decreased plasma K+ concentration despite a significant decrease of urinary K+ excretion in sgk1+/+ but not in sgk1-/- mice. Accordingly, the plasma K+ concentration was within 60 min significantly lower in sgk1+/+ than in sgk1-/- mice. In isolated liver perfusion experiments, cellular K+ uptake was stimulated by insulin (100 nM), an effect blunted by 72% in sgk1-/- mice as compared to sgk1+/+ mice. Accordingly, insulin-induced cell hydration was 63% lower in sgk1-/- mice than in sgk1+/+ mice. Moreover, volume regulatory K+ release was 31% smaller in sgk1-/- mice than in sgk1+/+ mice. In conclusion, the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 participates in the signaling mediating the hypokalemic effect of insulin.

  11. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  12. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-08

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016.

  13. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  14. Use of insulin in diabetes: a century of treatment.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Savita; Shahani, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a key player in the control of hyperglycaemia for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. There have been many advances in insulin drug delivery from its first administration as a crude pancreatic extract till today. The traditional and most predictable method for administration of insulin is by subcutaneous injection. Currently available insulin delivery systems include insulin syringes, infusion pumps, jet injectors, and pens. The major drawback of insulin therapy is its invasive nature. Non-invasive delivery of insulin has long been a major goal for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Although there have been improvements in insulin therapy since it was first conceived, it is still far from mimicking the physiological secretion of pancreatic β-cells, and research to find new insulin formulations and new routes of administration continues. This article reviews the emerging technologies, including insulin inhalers, insulin buccal spray, insulin pill, islet cell transplant, and stem cell therapy, as treatment options for diabetes mellitus.

  15. Plasma BDNF Is Reduced among Middle-Aged and Elderly Women with Impaired Insulin Function: Evidence of a Compensatory Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arentoft, Alyssa; Sweat, Victoria; Starr, Vanessa; Oliver, Stephen; Hassenstab, Jason; Bruehl, Hannah; Tirsi, Aziz; Javier, Elizabeth; McHugh, Pauline F.; Convit, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and has been linked to glucose regulation and cognition. Associations among plasma BDNF, cognition, and insulin function were explored. Forty-one participants with impaired insulin function (IIF), ranging from insulin resistance to…

  16. Insulin signalling mechanisms for triacylglycerol storage.

    PubMed

    Czech, M P; Tencerova, M; Pedersen, D J; Aouadi, M

    2013-05-01

    Insulin signalling is uniquely required for storing energy as fat in humans. While de novo synthesis of fatty acids and triacylglycerol occurs mostly in liver, adipose tissue is the primary site for triacylglycerol storage. Insulin signalling mechanisms in adipose tissue that stimulate hydrolysis of circulating triacylglycerol, uptake of the released fatty acids and their conversion to triacylglycerol are poorly understood. New findings include (1) activation of DNA-dependent protein kinase to stimulate upstream stimulatory factor (USF)1/USF2 heterodimers, enhancing the lipogenic transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c); (2) stimulation of fatty acid synthase through AMP kinase modulation; (3) mobilisation of lipid droplet proteins to promote retention of triacylglycerol; and (4) upregulation of a novel carbohydrate response element binding protein β isoform that potently stimulates transcription of lipogenic enzymes. Additionally, insulin signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin to activate transcription and processing of SREBP1c described in liver may apply to adipose tissue. Paradoxically, insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes is associated with increased triacylglycerol synthesis in liver, while it is decreased in adipose tissue. This and other mysteries about insulin signalling and insulin resistance in adipose tissue make this topic especially fertile for future research.

  17. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have. There are three main types of diabetes: • Type 1 occurs when the pancreas stops making insulin. It ... but may occur later in life. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive. Treatment includes changes in ...

  18. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  19. Misadventures in insulin therapy: are you at risk?

    PubMed Central

    Grissinger, Matthew; Lease, Michael

    2003-01-01

    About dollar 1 out of every dollar 7 spent on health care is related to diabetes mellitus, a leading cause of blindness and kidney failure and a strong risk factor for heart disease. Prevalence of the disease has increased by a third among adults in general in the last decade, but intensive therapy has been shown to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetes-related complications. While insulin therapy remains key in the management of type 1 diabetes, many patients with type 2, or insulin-resistant, diabetes encounter insulin administration errors that compromise the quality of insulin delivery. Insulin errors are a major, but modifiable, barrier to dosing accuracy and optimal diabetes control for many patients. Future trends to combat the problem include increased use of insulin inhalers and smaller doses of rapid- or short-acting insulin to supplement longer-acting injections. PMID:12653373

  20. Misadventures in insulin therapy: are you at risk?

    PubMed

    Grissinger, Matthew; Lease, Michael

    2003-02-01

    About dollar 1 out of every dollar 7 spent on health care is related to diabetes mellitus, a leading cause of blindness and kidney failure and a strong risk factor for heart disease. Prevalence of the disease has increased by a third among adults in general in the last decade, but intensive therapy has been shown to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetes-related complications. While insulin therapy remains key in the management of type 1 diabetes, many patients with type 2, or insulin-resistant, diabetes encounter insulin administration errors that compromise the quality of insulin delivery. Insulin errors are a major, but modifiable, barrier to dosing accuracy and optimal diabetes control for many patients. Future trends to combat the problem include increased use of insulin inhalers and smaller doses of rapid- or short-acting insulin to supplement longer-acting injections.

  1. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 2 All About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No. 2: All About Insulin Resistance continued J Order the smallest ...

  2. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  3. The neuronal insulin receptor in its environment.

    PubMed

    Gralle, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Insulin is known mainly for its effects in peripheral tissues, such as the liver, skeletal muscles and adipose tissue, where the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) has both short-term and long-term effects. Insulin and the IR are also present in the brain, and since there is evidence that neuronal insulin signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and that it is impaired in disease, this pathway might be the key to protection or reversal of symptoms, especially in Alzheimer's disease. However, there are controversies about the importance of the neuronal IR, partly because biophysical data on its activation and signaling are much less complete than for the peripheral IR. This review briefly summarizes the neuronal IR signaling in health and disease, and then focuses on known differences between the neuronal and peripheral IR with regard to alternative splicing and glycosylation, and lack of data with respect to phosphorylation and membrane subdomain localization. Particularities in the neuronal IR itself and its environment may have consequences for downstream signaling and impact synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, establishing the relative importance of insulin signaling through IR or through hybrids with its homolog, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, is crucial for evaluating the consequences of brain IR activation. An improved biophysical understanding of the neuronal IR may help predict the consequences of insulin-targeted interventions.

  4. Restoring insulin production for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Bruin, Jennifer E; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Current therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes include daily administration of exogenous insulin and, less frequently, whole-pancreas or islet transplantation. Insulin injections often result in inaccurate insulin doses, exposing the patient to hypo- and/or hyperglycemic episodes that lead to long-term complications. Islet transplantation is also limited by lack of high-quality islet donors, early graft failure, and chronic post-transplant immunosuppressive treatment. These barriers could be circumvented by designing a safe and efficient strategy to restore insulin production within the patient's body. Porcine islets have been considered as a possible alternative source of transplantable insulin-producing cells to replace human cadaveric islets. More recently, embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells have also been examined for their ability to differentiate in vitro into pancreatic endocrine cells. Alternatively, it may be feasible to generate new β-cells by ectopic expression of key transcription factors in endogenous non-β-cells. Finally, engineering surrogate β-cells by in vivo delivery of the insulin gene to specific tissues is also being studied as a possible therapy for type 1 diabetes. In the present review, we discuss these different approaches to restore insulin production.

  5. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  6. Syndromic insulin resistance: Models for the therapeutic basis of the metabolic syndrome and other targets of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gorden, Phillip; Zadeh, Elika Safar; Cochran, Elaine; Brown, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance is the key feature of the “metabolic syndrome,” a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes that includes hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and hyperglycemia. Existing treatments target individual metabolic syndrome components, and act non-specifically with respect to disease pathophysiology. Our goal is to understand the link between insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome, and how to develop treatment approaches. Methods We present three cases of extreme, syndromic insulin resistance: lipodystrophy, autoantibodies to the insulin receptor, and mutations of the insulin receptor, with discussion of pathophysiology and treatment. Results In lipodystrophy, insulin resistance is a direct consequence of leptin deficiency, and thus leptin replacement reverses metabolic syndrome abnormalities, including diabetes and hypertriglyeridemia. The insulin “receptoropathies”, including autoantibodies to the insulin receptor and insulin receptor mutations, are characterized by extreme insulin resistance and ovarian hyperandrogenism, without dyslipidemia or fatty liver disease. Autoantibodies to the insulin receptor can be treated using an immunosuppressive paradigm adapted from treatment of other autoimmune and neoplastic conditions. Leptin treatment has shown some success in treating hyperglycemia in insulin receptor mutations. Treatment for this condition remains inadequate, and novel therapies that bypass insulin receptor signaling, such as enhancers of brown adipose tissue, are needed. Conclusion We presented a clinical approach to treatment of syndromic insulin resistance. The study of rare diseases that replicate the metabolic syndrome, with clear-cut pathophysiology, allows the opportunity to understand novel physiology, and develop targeted therapies that may be applicable to the broader population with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. PMID:23047930

  7. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6), Zusanli (ST36), and Sanyinjiao (SP6); in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23) was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36), needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA) apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG) was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS) and serum C peptide (C-P) were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules. PMID:27738449

  8. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  9. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID

  10. Phytic acid and myo-inositol support adipocyte differentiation and improve insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid, also known as myo-inositol hexaphosphate, has been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin sensitivity in rodents. We investigated the effects of phytic acid and myo-inositol on differentiation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipolysis of adipocytes to test the hypothesis that the antidiabetic properties of phytic acid and myo-inositol are mediated directly through adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 10, 50, or 200 μmol/L of phytic acid or myo-inositol. Oil Red O staining and an intracellular triacylglycerol assay were used to determine lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to evaluate expression of transcription factors, a target protein, and insulin signaling molecules. Phytic acid and myo-inositol exposures increased lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (P < .01). The expression of key transcription factors associated with adipocyte differentiation, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, and the expression of fatty acid synthase increased upon treatments with phytic acid and myo-inositol (P < .05). Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mature adipocytes increased with phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments (P < .01). In addition, mRNA levels of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), mRNA levels of glucose transporter 4, and phosphorylation of tyrosine in IRS1 increased upon phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments. In fully differentiated adipocytes, phytic acid and myo-inositol reduced basal lipolysis dose dependently (P < .01). These results suggest that phytic acid and myo-inositol increase insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by increasing lipid storage capacity, improving glucose uptake, and inhibiting lipolysis.

  11. Basal insulin: beyond glycemia.

    PubMed

    Niswender, Kevin D

    2011-07-01

    Insulin is a pleiotropic hormone with numerous effects at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Clinicians are familiar with physiological effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism, including stimulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and the suppression of glucose production from the liver. Other metabolic effects of insulin include inhibiting the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue and stimulating the incorporation of amino acids into proteins. Indeed, every organ in the body, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. Insulin resistance, typically defined with respect to glucose metabolism, is a condition in which normal levels of insulin do not trigger the signal for glucose disposition. The effects of insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling have profound pathophysiologic effects, such as hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage, hypertension, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular and renal disease. An integrated view of insulin action in all of these tissues may yield improved therapeutic insight and possibly even illuminate new therapeutic opportunities. With the increase in the number of patients diagnosed with prediabetes and diabetes, an updated understanding of the disease and the pharmacologic armamentarium used to treat it is needed to improve outcomes. To help expand the clinical care provider's perspective, this article will provide a provocative discussion about the pathophysiology of diabetes, the role of insulin and insulin resistance, and the clinical efficacy potential of insulin. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin and how these translate into clinical consequences beyond glycemia will assist primary care physicians in the care of their patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  12. Evidence-based clinical use of insulin premixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brazil is expected to have 19.6 million patients with diabetes by the year 2030. A key concept in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is establishing individualized glycemic goals based on each patient’s clinical characteristics, which impact the choice of antihyperglycemic therapy. Targets for glycemic control, including fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C), are often not reached solely with antihyperglycemic therapy, and insulin therapy is often required. Basal insulin is considered an initial strategy; however, premixed insulins are convenient and are equally or more effective, especially for patients who require both basal and prandial control but desire a more simplified strategy involving fewer daily injections than a basal-bolus regimen. Most physicians are reluctant to transition patients to insulin treatment due to inappropriate assumptions and insufficient information. We conducted a nonsystematic review in PubMed and identified the most relevant and recently published articles that compared the use of premixed insulin versus basal insulin analogues used alone or in combination with rapid-acting insulin analogues before meals in patients with T2DM. These studies suggest that premixed insulin analogues are equally or more effective in reducing A1C compared to basal insulin analogues alone in spite of the small increase in the risk of nonsevere hypoglycemic events and nonclinically significant weight gain. Premixed insulin analogues can be used in insulin-naïve patients, in patients already on basal insulin therapy, and those using basal-bolus therapy who are noncompliant with blood glucose self-monitoring and titration of multiple insulin doses. We additionally provide practical aspects related to titration for the specific premixed insulin analogue formulations commercially available in Brazil. PMID:24011173

  13. Insulin Resistance in Children: Consensus, Perspective, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Marchal, Claire; Arslanian, Silva; Cutfield, Wayne; Sinaiko, Alan; Druet, Celine; Marcovecchio, M. Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Emerging data indicate that insulin resistance is common among children and adolescents and is related to cardiometabolic risk, therefore requiring consideration early in life. However, there is still confusion on how to define insulin resistance, how to measure it, what its risk factors are, and whether there are effective strategies to prevent and treat it. A consensus conference was organized in order to clarify these points. Participants: The consensus was internationally supported by all the major scientific societies in pediatric endocrinology and 37 participants. Evidence: An independent and systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify key articles relating to insulin resistance in children. Consensus Process: The conference was divided into five themes and working groups: background and definition; methods of measurement and screening; risk factors and consequences; prevention; and treatment. Each group selected key issues, searched the literature, and developed a draft document. During a 3-d meeting, these papers were debated and finalized by each group before presenting them to the full forum for further discussion and agreement. Conclusions: Given the current childhood obesity epidemic, insulin resistance in children is an important issue confronting health care professionals. There are no clear criteria to define insulin resistance in children, and surrogate markers such as fasting insulin are poor measures of insulin sensitivity. Based on current screening criteria and methodology, there is no justification for screening children for insulin resistance. Lifestyle interventions including diet and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity, whereas drugs should be implemented only in selected cases. PMID:20829185

  14. Biosimilar Insulin and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The costs for insulin treatment are high, and the steady increase in the number of patients with diabetes on insulin presents a true challenge to health care systems. Therefore, all measures to lower these costs are welcomed by patients, physicians, and health care providers. The market introduction of biosimilar insulins presents an option to lower treatment costs as biosimilars are usually offered at a lower price than the originator product. However, the assumption that a drastic reduction in insulin prices will take place, as was observed with many generic drugs, is most probably not realistic. As the first biosimilar insulin has now been approved in the EU, this commentary discusses a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to the potential cost reduction we will see with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:26350722

  15. Adipokines and insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Knights, Alexander J; Funnell, Alister PW; Pearson, Richard CM; Crossley, Merlin; Bell-Anderson, Kim S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern and a strong risk factor for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease. The last two decades have seen a reconsideration of the role of white adipose tissue (WAT) in whole body metabolism and insulin action. Adipose tissue-derived cytokines and hormones, or adipokines, are likely mediators of metabolic function and dysfunction. While several adipokines have been associated with obese and insulin-resistant phenotypes, a select group has been linked with insulin sensitivity, namely leptin, adiponectin, and more recently, adipolin. What is known about these insulin-sensitizing molecules and their effects in healthy and insulin resistant states is the subject of this review. There remains a significant amount of research to do to fully elucidate the mechanisms of action of these adipokines for development of therapeutics in metabolic disease. PMID:24719781

  16. Insulin: its role in the central control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sliwowska, Joanna H; Fergani, Chrysanthi; Gawałek, Monika; Skowronska, Bogda; Fichna, Piotr; Lehman, Michael N

    2014-06-22

    Insulin has long been recognized as a key regulator of energy homeostasis via its actions at the level of the brain, but in addition, plays a role in regulating neural control of reproduction. In this review, we consider and compare evidence from animal models demonstrating a role for insulin for physiological control of reproduction by effects on GnRH/LH secretion. We also review the role that insulin plays in prenatal programming of adult reproduction, and consider specific candidate neurons in the adult hypothalamus by which insulin may act to regulate reproductive function. Finally, we review clinical evidence of the role that insulin may play in adult human fertility and reproductive disorders. Overall, while insulin appears to have a significant impact on reproductive neuroendocrine function, there are many unanswered questions regarding its precise sites and mechanisms of action, and their impact on developing and adult reproductive neuroendocrine function.

  17. Genetic variation in insulin-induced kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Isabel Xiaorong; Ramrattan, Girish; Cheung, Vivian G

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in sensitivity to insulin contribute to disease susceptibility including diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Cellular responses to insulin are well studied. However, which steps in these response pathways differ across individuals remains largely unknown. Such knowledge is needed to guide more precise therapeutic interventions. Here, we studied insulin response and found extensive individual variation in the activation of key signaling factors, including ERK whose induction differs by more than 20-fold among our subjects. This variation in kinase activity is propagated to differences in downstream gene expression response to insulin. By genetic analysis, we identified cis-acting DNA variants that influence signaling response, which in turn affects downstream changes in gene expression and cellular phenotypes, such as protein translation and cell proliferation. These findings show that polymorphic differences in signal transduction contribute to individual variation in insulin response, and suggest kinase modulators as promising therapeutics for diseases characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:26202599

  18. Insulin amyloid at injection sites of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Melanie R

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insulin amyloid can dramatically impact glycemic control in patients with diabetes, making it an important therapeutic consideration. In addition, the cost associated with the excess insulin required by patients with amyloid is estimated to be $3K per patient per year, which adds to the growing financial burden of this disease. Insulin amyloid has been observed with every mode of therapeutic insulin administration (infusion, injection and inhalation), and the number of reported cases has increased significantly since 2002. The new cases represent a much broader demographic, and include many patients who have used exclusively human insulin and human insulin analogs. The reason for the increase in case reports is unknown, but this review explores the possibility that changes in patient care, improved differential diagnosis and/or changes in insulin type and insulin delivery systems may be important factors. The goal of this review is to raise key questions that will inspire proactive measures to prevent, identify and treat insulin amyloid. Furthermore, this comprehensive examination of insulin amyloid can provide insight into important considerations for other injectable drugs that are prone to form amyloid deposits.

  19. Immunologic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J K; DeBra, D W

    1978-03-01

    The efficacy of sulfated beef insulin for plasma glucose control in 35 patients with immunologic insulin resistance was studied. Patients were on a mean dose of 550 U./day (range 200--2,000) of U-500 regular beef insulin. Mean maximum 125I-insulin-binding capacity was 191 mU./ml. serum (range 13--1,080). Mean in vivo half-life (T 1/2) of 125I-regular beef insulin was 614 minutes (range 114--1,300), as against a mean T 1/2 of 13.9 minutes (range 11.8--16.5) in normal controls. Treatment was successful in 34 patients and unsuccessful in one with lipoatrophic diabetes. The mean initial dose of sulfated insulin was 89 U./day (range 15--400) and at three months was 66 U./day (range 20--400). Twenty-eight patients who responded and survived have been on sulfated insulin for a mean of 39 months (range 2-66) and are on a mean dose of 25 U./day (range 0--100). The mean maximum binding capacity fell to 9 mU./ml. (range 0--34) during therapy (p less than 0.01). Mean 125I-insulin T 1/2 fell from 614 to 249 minutes after sulfated insulin therapy (p less than 0.001). A comparative study of 15 patients on consecutive days showed a 35 sulfated insulin T 1/2 of 60 minutes (range 15--94) and a mean 125I-regular insulin T 1/2 of 246 minutes (range 62--560, p less than 0.001). These results indicate that sulfated insulin is less antigenic than regular beef insulin and combines less avidly with human antibodies to regular beef insulin. The response to sulfated insulin therapy was significantly better than the response reported by other investigators to pork insulin or to steroid therapy in similar patients.

  20. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent findings suggest that insulin resistance and atherosclerosis could represent independent and ultimately maladaptive responses to the disruption of cellular homeostasis caused by the excess delivery of fuel. PMID:16823479

  1. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Nutrient sensing and insulin signaling in neuropeptide-expressing immortalized, hypothalamic neurons: A cellular model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fick, Laura J; Belsham, Denise D

    2010-08-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent a significant global health crisis. These two interrelated diseases are typified by perturbed insulin signaling in the hypothalamus. Using novel hypothalamic cell lines, we have begun to elucidate the molecular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis and insulin resistance. In this review, we present evidence of insulin and glucose signaling pathways that lead to changes in neuropeptide gene expression. We have identified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of de novo hypothalamic insulin mRNA expression. And finally, we have defined key mechanisms involved in the etiology of cellular insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons that may play a fundamental role in cases of high levels of insulin or saturated fatty acids, often linked to the exacerbation of obesity and diabetes.

  3. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C.; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J.; Green, Michael R.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  4. Computational modeling and analysis of insulin induced eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Lequieu, Joshua; Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Nayak, Satyaprakash; Varner, Jeffrey D

    2011-11-01

    Insulin, the primary hormone regulating the level of glucose in the bloodstream, modulates a variety of cellular and enzymatic processes in normal and diseased cells. Insulin signals are processed by a complex network of biochemical interactions which ultimately induce gene expression programs or other processes such as translation initiation. Surprisingly, despite the wealth of literature on insulin signaling, the relative importance of the components linking insulin with translation initiation remains unclear. We addressed this question by developing and interrogating a family of mathematical models of insulin induced translation initiation. The insulin network was modeled using mass-action kinetics within an ordinary differential equation (ODE) framework. A family of model parameters was estimated, starting from an initial best fit parameter set, using 24 experimental data sets taken from literature. The residual between model simulations and each of the experimental constraints were simultaneously minimized using multiobjective optimization. Interrogation of the model population, using sensitivity and robustness analysis, identified an insulin-dependent switch that controlled translation initiation. Our analysis suggested that without insulin, a balance between the pro-initiation activity of the GTP-binding protein Rheb and anti-initiation activity of PTEN controlled basal initiation. On the other hand, in the presence of insulin a combination of PI3K and Rheb activity controlled inducible initiation, where PI3K was only critical in the presence of insulin. Other well known regulatory mechanisms governing insulin action, for example IRS-1 negative feedback, modulated the relative importance of PI3K and Rheb but did not fundamentally change the signal flow.

  5. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  6. Microbial regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Charusanti, Pep; Herrgård, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2007-08-01

    Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is the foundation of large-scale microbial systems and synthetic biology. An enormous amount of information including the annotated genomic sequences and the genomic locations of DNA-binding regulatory proteins can be used to define metabolic and regulatory networks in cells. In particular, advances in experimental methods to map regulatory networks in microbial cells have allowed reliable data-driven reconstruction of these networks. Recent work on metabolic engineering and experimental evolution of microbes highlights the key role of global regulatory networks in controlling specific metabolic processes and the need to consider the integrated function of multiple types of networks for both scientific and engineering purposes.

  7. Chromium and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A

    2003-12-01

    Insulin resistance leads to the inability of insulin to control the utilization and storage of glucose. It is associated initially with elevated levels of circulating insulin followed by glucose intolerance which may progress to type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. While the causes of these diseases are multifactorial, one nutrient that is associated with all of these abnormalities is Cr. In the presence of Cr, in a biologically active form, much lower levels of insulin are required. Modern diets, which are often high in refined carbohydrates, are not only low in Cr, but lead to enhanced Cr losses. In response to the consumption of refined carbohydrates, there is a rapid rise in blood sugar leading to elevations in insulin that cause a mobilization of Cr. Once mobilized, Cr is not reabsorbed but lost via the urine leading to decreased Cr stores. Several studies involving both human subjects and experimental animals have reported improvements in insulin sensitivity, blood glucose, insulin, lipids, haemoglobin A1c, lean body mass and related variables in response to improved Cr nutrition. However, not all studies have reported beneficial effects associated with improved Cr nutrition. Well-controlled human studies are needed to document an unequivocal effect of Cr on insulin sensitivity in human subjects. Studies need to involve a significant number of subjects with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance or early stages of diabetes, who have not been taking supplements containing Cr for at least 4 months, and involve at least 400 to 600 microg supplemental Cr daily or more. Studies should be at least 4 months to document sustained effects of supplemental Cr on insulin resistance and related variables. Cr is a nutrient and not a therapeutic agent and therefore will only be of benefit to those whose problems are due to suboptimal intake of Cr.

  8. Intranasal Insulin Improves Age-Related Cognitive Deficits and Reverses Electrophysiological Correlates of Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Maimaiti, Shaniya; Anderson, Katie L.; DeMoll, Chris; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Rauh, Benjamin A.; Gant, John C.; Blalock, Eric M.; Porter, Nada M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral insulin resistance is a key component of metabolic syndrome associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. While the impact of insulin resistance is well recognized in the periphery, it is also becoming apparent in the brain. Recent studies suggest that insulin resistance may be a factor in brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) whereby intranasal insulin therapy, which delivers insulin to the brain, improves cognition and memory in AD patients. Here, we tested a clinically relevant delivery method to determine the impact of two forms of insulin, short-acting insulin lispro (Humalog) or long-acting insulin detemir (Levemir), on cognitive functions in aged F344 rats. We also explored insulin effects on the Ca2+-dependent hippocampal afterhyperpolarization (AHP), a well-characterized neurophysiological marker of aging which is increased in the aged, memory impaired animal. Low-dose intranasal insulin improved memory recall in aged animals such that their performance was similar to that seen in younger animals. Further, because ex vivo insulin also reduced the AHP, our results suggest that the AHP may be a novel cellular target of insulin in the brain, and improved cognitive performance following intranasal insulin therapy may be the result of insulin actions on the AHP. PMID:25659889

  9. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  10. Postreceptor insulin resistance contributes to human dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Robert K.; Sleigh, Alison; Murgatroyd, Peter R.; Adams, Claire A.; Bluck, Les; Jackson, Sarah; Vottero, Alessandra; Kanabar, Dipak; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Durrington, Paul; Soos, Maria A.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Lomas, David J.; Cochran, Elaine K.; Gorden, Phillip; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic dyslipidemia is characterized by high circulating triglyceride (TG) and low HDL cholesterol levels and is frequently accompanied by hepatic steatosis. Increased hepatic lipogenesis contributes to both of these problems. Because insulin fails to suppress gluconeogenesis but continues to stimulate lipogenesis in both obese and lipodystrophic insulin-resistant mice, it has been proposed that a selective postreceptor defect in hepatic insulin action is central to the pathogenesis of fatty liver and hypertriglyceridemia in these mice. Here we show that humans with generalized insulin resistance caused by either mutations in the insulin receptor gene or inhibitory antibodies specific for the insulin receptor uniformly exhibited low serum TG and normal HDL cholesterol levels. This was due at least in part to surprisingly low rates of de novo lipogenesis and was associated with low liver fat content and the production of TG-depleted VLDL cholesterol particles. In contrast, humans with a selective postreceptor defect in AKT2 manifest increased lipogenesis, elevated liver fat content, TG-enriched VLDL, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL cholesterol levels. People with lipodystrophy, a disorder characterized by particularly severe insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, demonstrated similar abnormalities. Collectively these data from humans with molecularly characterized forms of insulin resistance suggest that partial postreceptor hepatic insulin resistance is a key element in the development of metabolic dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. PMID:19164855

  11. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  12. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  13. Rho GTPases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is secreted into blood vessels from β cells of pancreatic islets in response to high blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates an array of physiological responses in target tissues, including liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, thereby reducing the blood glucose level. Insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is primarily mediated by the redistribution of the glucose transporter type 4 from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane. Evidence for the participation of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 in glucose uptake signaling in skeletal muscle has emerged from studies using cell cultures and genetically engineered mice. Herein, recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of Rac1, especially the cross-talk with the protein kinase Akt2, is highlighted. In addition, the role for another Rho family member TC10 and its regulatory mechanism in adipocyte insulin signaling are described. PMID:24613967

  14. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  15. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  16. Infliximab and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Insulin resistance is the most important pathophysiologic feature of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetic states. TNF-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated insulin resistance during the course of rheumatic diseases. Therapies aimed at neutralizing TNF-alpha, such as the monoclonal antibody infliximab, represent a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatic diseases and allow to obtain significant results in terms of control of the inflammatory process. In this article we reviewed the scientific evidence published in the literature about a potential role of TNF-alpha blockade in improving insulin resistance in non-diabetic rheumatic patients.

  17. Evidence that insulin and guanosine triphosphate regulate dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor in sarcolemma membranes isolated from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, R S; Lystad, E; Adler, A; Walaas, O

    1986-01-01

    When sarcolemma membranes isolated from rat skeletal muscle were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, a membrane protein of apparent Mr 95,000 was rapidly phosphorylated, with the 32P content reaching a maximum within 2 s. On the basis of immunoprecipitation with anti-insulin-receptor antiserum, phosphoamino acid analysis and Mr, this protein probably represents the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Similarly, on incubation of the membrane with adenosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio] triphosphate the 95 kDa protein was thiophosphorylated, indicating thiophosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor on the basis of immunoprecipitation studies. The effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of this protein in the membrane was studied. Insulin induced a 20% decrease in the 32P labelling of the protein when the membranes were phosphorylated for 10 s. This insulin effect was dose-dependent, with half-maximal effect obtained at 2-3 nM-insulin. Addition of GTP, but not GDP or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate, enhanced the effect to 35% inhibition, with half-maximal effect of GTP obtained at 0.5 microM. GTP had no effect on the phosphorylation of the protein in the absence of insulin. Analysis of this insulin effect showed that insulin increased the rate of dephosphorylation of the 95 kDa protein in the membrane. In contrast, insulin had no effect on thiophosphorylation of the 95 kDa membrane protein after incubation with adenosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate. Since thiophosphorylated proteins are less sensitive to phosphatase action, these investigations suggest that insulin stimulated a protein phosphatase activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The possibility that GTP-regulatory proteins are involved in the action of insulin on the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and other membrane proteins is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3521589

  18. Amplification and analysis of promoter region of insulin receptor gene in a patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Haruta, T; Imamura, T; Iwanishi, M; Egawa, K; Goji, K; Kobayashi, M

    1995-04-01

    A patient with leprechaunism associated with severe insulin resistance was studied to identify the molecular and genetic basis for insulin resistance. Insulin binding and surface labeling of transformed lymphocytes prepared from the patient showed a significantly decreased insulin receptor number on the cell surface. Southern blot analysis of the insulin receptor gene showed no evidence of large insertions or deletions. Furthermore, direct sequencing of all 22 exons and exon-intron junctions of the insulin receptor gene failed to show any missense mutations, nonsense mutations, or mutations at exon-intron junctions. However, Northern blot analysis indicated significantly decreased insulin receptor mRNA expression in the patient's cells. Moreover, restriction endonuclease digestion of the amplified cDNA suggested that the expression levels of one allele were less efficient than the other. These findings suggested that the regulatory region of the insulin receptor gene might have abnormalities. Therefore, we examined the 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis showed no major deletions or insertions between positions -1,823 and -2 relative to the translation initiation site. A 5' flanking region of the insulin receptor gene spanning positions -881 approximately +7 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and introduced into a reporter plasmid carrying the human growth hormone (hGH) gene. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified fragment showed two polymorphic sites at positions -603 and -500 in the patient, as well as in normal subjects. No other abnormal sequence was found in the patient. Promoter activity measured by hGH expression in transfected mouse L cells was not influenced by the polymorphism at position -603 located in a cluster of GC boxes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially sleep apnea; and cigarette smoking. Does sleep matter? Yes. Studies show that untreated sleep problems, especially ... a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of ...

  20. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  1. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes.

  2. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  3. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels.

  4. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Matilda H. C.; Lau, K. H. William

    2014-01-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed. PMID:24707466

  5. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Matilda H C; Lau, K H William; Baylink, David J

    2014-02-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed.

  6. Mouse models of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hribal, Marta Letizia; Oriente, Francesco; Accili, Domenico

    2002-05-01

    The hallmarks of type 2 diabetes are impaired insulin action in peripheral tissues and decreased pancreatic beta-cell function. Classically, the two defects have been viewed as separate entities, with insulin resistance arising primarily from impaired insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, and beta-cell dysfunction arising from impaired coupling of glucose sensing to insulin secretion. Targeted mutagenesis and transgenesis involving components of the insulin action pathway have changed our understanding of these phenomena. It appears that the role of insulin signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes has been overestimated in classic insulin target tissues, such as skeletal muscle, whereas it has been overlooked in liver, pancreatic beta-cells, and brain, which had been thought not to be primary insulin targets. We review recent progress and try to reconcile areas of apparent controversy surrounding insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and pancreatic beta-cells.

  7. II - Insulin processing in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Camberos, María Del Carmen; Pérez, Adriana A; Passicot, Gisel A; Martucci, Lucía C; Wanderley, María I; Udrisar, Daniel P; Cresto, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to know how insulin is processing in mitochondria; if IDE is the only participant in mitochondrial insulin degradation and the role of insulin degradation on IDE accumulation in mitoplasts. Mitochondria and its fractions were isolated as described by Greenwalt. IDE was purified and detected in immunoblot with specific antibodies. High insulin degradation was obtained through addition to rat's diet of 25 g/rat of apple and 10 g/rat of hard-boiled eggs, 3 days a week. Mitochondrial insulin degradation was assayed with 5 % TCA, insulin antibody or Sephadex G50 chromatography. Degradation was also assayed 60 min at 37 °C in mitochondrial fractions (IMS and Mx) with diet or not and without IDE. Degradation in fractions precipitated with ammonium sulfates (60-80 %) were studied after mitochondrial insulin incubation (1 ng. insulin during 15 min, at 30 °C) or with addition of 2.5 mM ATP. Supplementary diet increased insulin degradation. High insulin did not increase mitoplasts accumulation and did not decrease mitochondrial degradation. High insulin and inhibition of degradation evidence insulin competition for a putative transport system. Mitochondrial incubation with insulin increased IDE in matrix as observed in immunoblot. ATP decreased degradation in Mx and increased it in IMS. Chromatography of IMS demonstrated an ATP-dependent protease that degraded insulin, similar to described by Sitte et al. Mitochondria participate in insulin degradation and the diet increased it. High insulin did not accomplish mitochondrial decrease of degradation or its accumulation in mitoplasts. Mitochondrial incubation with insulin increased IDE in matrix. ATP suggested being a regulator of mitochondrial insulin degradation.

  8. Regulatory Forum.

    PubMed

    Peden, W Michael

    2016-12-01

    Revision of the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) S1 guidance for rat carcinogenicity studies to be more selective of compounds requiring a 2-year rat carcinogenicity study has been proposed following extensive evaluation of rat carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity studies by industry and drug regulatory authorities. To inform the ICH S1 expert working group in their potential revision of ICH S1, a prospective evaluation study was initiated in 2013, in which sponsors would assess the pharmacologic and toxicologic findings present in the chronic toxicity studies and predict a positive or negative carcinogenicity outcome using a weight of evidence argument (a carcinogenicity assessment document [CAD]). The Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee was asked by the Society of Toxicology Pathology (STP) executive committee to track these changes with ICH S1 and inform the STP membership of status changes. This commentary is intended to provide a brief summary of recent changes to the CAD guidance and highlight the importance of STP membership participation in the process of CAD submissions.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  10. An insulin signaling feedback loop regulates pancreas progenitor cell differentiation during islet development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lihua; Robertson, Morgan A.; Mastracci, Teresa L.; Anderson, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    As one of the key nutrient sensors, insulin signaling plays an important role in integrating environmental energy cues with organism growth. In adult organisms, relative insufficiency of insulin signaling induces compensatory expansion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta (β) cells. However, little is known about how insulin signaling feedback might influence neogenesis of β cells during embryonic development. Using genetic approaches and a unique cell transplantation system in developing zebrafish, we have uncovered a novel role for insulin signaling in the negative regulation of pancreatic progenitor cell differentiation. Blocking insulin signaling in the pancreatic progenitors hastened the expression of the essential β cell genes insulin and pdx1, and promoted β cell fate at the expense of alpha cell fate. In addition, loss of insulin signaling promoted β cell regeneration and destabilization of alpha cell character. These data indicate that insulin signaling constitutes a tunable mechanism for β cell compensatory plasticity during early development. Moreover, using a novel blastomere-to-larva transplantation strategy, we found that loss of insulin signaling in endoderm-committed blastomeres drove their differentiation into β cells. Furthermore, the extent of this differentiation was dependent on the function of the β cell mass in the host. Altogether, our results indicate that modulation of insulin signaling will be crucial for the development of β cell restoration therapies for diabetics; further clarification of the mechanisms of insulin signaling in β cell progenitors will reveal therapeutic targets for both in vivo and in vitro β cell generation. PMID:26658317

  11. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S.; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5−/−) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1−/−), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  12. Nutritional and insulin regulation of fatty acid synthetase and leptin gene expression through ADD1/SREBP1.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J B; Sarraf, P; Wright, M; Yao, K M; Mueller, E; Solanes, G; Lowell, B B; Spiegelman, B M

    1998-01-01

    The ability to regulate specific genes of energy metabolism in response to fasting and feeding is an important adaptation allowing survival of intermittent food supplies. However, little is known about transcription factors involved in such responses in higher organisms. We show here that gene expression in adipose tissue for adipocyte determination differentiation dependent factor (ADD) 1/sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) 1, a basic-helix-loop-helix protein that has a dual DNA-binding specificity, is reduced dramatically upon fasting and elevated upon refeeding; this parallels closely the regulation of two adipose cell genes that are crucial in energy homeostasis, fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and leptin. This elevation of ADD1/SREBP1, leptin, and FAS that is induced by feeding in vivo is mimicked by exposure of cultured adipocytes to insulin, the classic hormone of the fed state. We also show that the promoters for both leptin and FAS are transactivated by ADD1/SREBP1. A mutation in the basic domain of ADD1/SREBP1 that allows E-box binding but destroys sterol regulatory element-1 binding prevents leptin gene transactivation but has no effect on the increase in FAS promoter function. Molecular dissection of the FAS promoter shows that most if not all of this action of ADD1/SREBP1 is through an E-box motif at -64 to -59, contained with a sequence identified previously as the major insulin response element of this gene. These results indicate that ADD1/SREBP1 is a key transcription factor linking changes in nutritional status and insulin levels to the expression of certain genes that regulate systemic energy metabolism. PMID:9421459

  13. Insulin Aspart (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin aspart in a pump system, ...

  14. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  15. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  16. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  17. A Hazard Analysis for a Generic Insulin Infusion Pump

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jones, Paul L.; Jetley, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    Background Researchers at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Center for Device and Radiological Health/Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories have been exploring the concept of model-based engineering as a means for improving the quality of medical device software. Insulin pumps were chosen as a research subject because their design provides the desired degree of research complexity and these types of devices present an ongoing regulatory challenge. Methods Insulin pump hazards and their contributing factors are considered in the context of a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model. Hazards were identified by consulting with manufacturers, pump users, and clinicians; by reviewing national and international standards and adverse event reports collected by the FDA; and from workshops sponsored by Diabetes Technology Society. This information has been consolidated in tabular form to facilitate further community analysis and discussion. Results A generic insulin infusion pump model architecture has been established. A fairly comprehensive hazard analysis document, corresponding to the GIIP model, is presented in this article. Conclusions We believe that this work represents the genesis of an insulin pump safety reference standard upon which future insulin pump designs can be based to help ensure a basic level of safety. More interaction with the diabetes community is needed to assure the quality of this safety modeling process. PMID:20307387

  18. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  19. Glargine and detemir: Safety and efficacy profiles of the long-acting basal insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kitty; King, Allen B

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a growing public health concern in the US and worldwide. Insulin therapy is the cornerstone of diabetes therapy, and the use of basal insulins will increase as clinicians strive to help their patients reach glycemic goals. Basal insulins have been continually improved upon over the years, and the long-acting basal insulin analogs, glargine and detemir, have many pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin, namely, less variable absorption profiles, a less pronounced peak in effect, and a longer duration of action. Overall, glargine and detemir do not differ greatly in their safety and efficacy profiles. Major differences between the two include lower within-subject variability, lower risk of hypoglycemia, and a weight-sparing effect with insulin detemir. This review summarizes data from the key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, as well as clinical and observational studies to elucidate the role of each basal insulin analog in therapy. PMID:21701633

  20. Epigenetic markers to further understand insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Charlotte; Rönn, Tina

    2016-11-01

    Epigenetic variation in human adipose tissue has been linked to type 2 diabetes and its related risk factors including age and obesity. Insulin resistance, a key risk factor for type 2 diabetes, may also be associated with altered DNA methylation in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, linking epigenetic variation in target tissues to similar changes in blood cells may identify new blood-based biomarkers. In this issue of Diabetologia, Arner et al studied the transcriptome and methylome in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue of 80 obese women who were either insulin-sensitive or -resistant (DOI 10.1007/s00125-016-4074-5 ). While they found differences in gene expression between the two groups, no alterations in DNA methylation were found after correction for multiple testing. Nevertheless, based on nominal p values, their methylation data overlapped with methylation differences identified in adipose tissue of individuals with type 2 diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Differential methylation of these overlapping CpG sites may predispose to diabetes by occurring already in the insulin-resistant state. Furthermore, some methylation changes may contribute to an inflammatory process in adipose tissue since the identified CpG sites were annotated to genes encoding proteins involved in inflammation. Finally, the methylation pattern in circulating leucocytes did not mirror the adipose tissue methylome of these 80 women. Together, identifying novel molecular mechanisms contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may help advance the search for new therapeutic alternatives.

  1. [Treatment by external insulin pump].

    PubMed

    Clavel, Sylvaine

    2010-12-01

    Since the recent recommendations by the French speaking association for research on diabetes and metabolic illnesses (Alfediam), treatment by insulin pump has found itself in competition with basal-bolus, a procedure using similar injections of insulin which has become a benchmark treatment. The latest Alfediam guidelines focus on defining ways of treating diabetics with an external insulin pump.

  2. Glycoconjugate Vaccines: The Regulatory Framework.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines, including the currently available glycoconjugate vaccines, are administered to healthy infants, to prevent future disease. The safety of a prospective vaccine is a key prerequisite for approval. Undesired side effects would not only have the potential to damage the individual infant but also lead to a loss of confidence in the respective vaccine-or vaccines in general-on a population level. Thus, regulatory requirements, particularly with regard to safety, are extremely rigorous. This chapter highlights regulatory aspects on carbohydrate-based vaccines with an emphasis on analytical approaches to ensure the consistent quality of successive manufacturing lots.

  3. Role of reduced insulin-stimulated bone blood flow in the pathogenesis of metabolic insulin resistance and diabetic bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, 387 million adults live with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an additional 205 million cases are projected by 2035. Because T2D has numerous complications, there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Identification of early events in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2D might lead to more effective treatments that would mitigate health and monetary costs. Here, we present our hypothesis that impaired bone blood flow is an early event in the pathogenesis of whole-body metabolic insulin resistance that ultimately leads to T2D. Two recent developments in different fields form the basis for this hypothesis. First, reduced vascular function has been identified as an early event in the development of T2D. In particular, before the onset of tissue or whole body metabolic insulin resistance, insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired. Insulin resistance of the vascular endothelium reduces delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle, which leads to tissue and whole-body metabolic insulin resistance. Second is the paradigm-shifting discovery that the skeleton has an endocrine function that is essential for maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis. Specifically, in response to insulin signaling, osteoblasts secret osteocalcin, which stimulates pancreatic insulin production and enhances insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, adipose, and liver. Furthermore, the skeleton is not metabolically inert, but contributes to whole-body glucose utilization, consuming 20% that of skeletal muscle and 50% that of white adipose tissue. Without insulin signaling or without osteocalcin activity, experimental animals become hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Currently, it is not known if insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated blood flow to bone plays a role in the development of whole body metabolic insulin resistance. We hypothesize that it is a key, early event. Microvascular dysfunction is a

  4. Insulin resistance: Is it time for primary prevention?

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Valeria; Fazio, Serafino

    2012-01-26

    Insulin resistance is a clinical condition characterized by a decrease in sensitivity and responsiveness to the metabolic actions of insulin, so that a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed to maintain normal glucose tolerance. Hyperinsulinemia, indeed, is one of the principal characteristics of insulin resistance states. This feature is common in several pathologic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia, and it is also a prominent component of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and atherosclerosis. The presence of endothelial dysfunction, related to insulin resistance, plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in all of these disorders. Insulin resistance represents the earliest detectable abnormality in type 2 diabetes, and is one of the major underlying mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Its early detection could be of great importance, in order to set a therapeutic attack and to counteract the higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Henk S.; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F.J.; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell–deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance. PMID:22863618

  6. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Henk S; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell-deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance.

  7. Increased insulin translation from an insulin splice-variant overexpressed in diabetes, obesity, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Minn, Alexandra H; Lan, Hong; Rabaglia, Mary E; Harlan, David M; Peculis, Brenda A; Attie, Alan D; Shalev, Anath

    2005-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes occurs when pancreatic beta-cells become unable to compensate for the underlying insulin resistance. Insulin secretion requires beta-cell insulin stores to be replenished by insulin biosynthesis, which is mainly regulated at the translational level. Such translational regulation often involves the 5'-untranslated region. Recently, we identified a human insulin splice-variant (SPV) altering only the 5'-untranslated region and conferring increased translation efficiency. We now describe a mouse SPV (mSPV) that is found in the cytoplasm and exhibits increased translation efficiency resulting in more normal (prepro)insulin protein per RNA. The RNA stability of mSPV is not increased, but the predicted secondary RNA structure is altered, which may facilitate translation. To determine the role of mSPV in insulin resistance and diabetes, mSPV expression was measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in islets from three diabetic and/or insulin-resistant, obese and nonobese, mouse models (BTBRob/ob, C57BL/6ob/ob, and C57BL/6azip). Interestingly, mSPV expression was significantly higher in all diabetic/insulin-resistant mice compared with wild-type littermates and was dramatically induced in primary mouse islets incubated at high glucose. This raises the possibility that the mSPV may represent a compensatory beta-cell mechanism to enhance insulin biosynthesis when insulin requirements are elevated by hyperglycemia/insulin resistance.

  8. An update on the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analog.

    PubMed

    Raslova, Katarina

    2010-06-01

    Basal insulin analogs are used to minimize unpredictable processes of NPH insulin. Modification of the human insulin molecule results in a slower distribution to peripheral target tissues, a longer duration of action with stable concentrations and thus a lower rate of hypoglycemia. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that provides effective therapeutic options for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For glycemic control, no significant differences were found in HbA1c levels compared with NPH and insulin glargine. It is comparable with insulin glargine in significantly reducing rates of all types of hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have demonstrated that detemir is responsible for significantly lower within-subject variability and no or less weight gain than NPH insulin and glargine. Recent pharmacodynamic studies have shown that detemir can be used once daily in many patients with diabetes. Together with patient-friendly injection devices and dose adjustments, it provides a treatment option with the potential to lower the key barriers of adherence to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Recent guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes suggest starting intensive therapy of hyperglycemia at an early stage of diabetes and recommend therapeutic options that provide the possibility of reaching HbA1c goals individually, with a low risk of hypoglycemia or other adverse effects of treatment. The properties of insulin detemir match these requirements.

  9. Countering neurodegeneration by reducing the activity of the insulin/IGF signaling pathway: current knowledge and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative maladies share two common key features: a mechanistic link to the accumulation and deposition of aberrantly aggregated proteins and late onset. These similarities among otherwise unrelated disorders suggest that the aging process plays an active role in enabling the emergence of these diseases late in life. Invertebrate-based studies have shown that the manipulation of aging by the reduction of the Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects model organisms from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. Recent studies have also indicated that the counter proteotoxic effect of IIS reduction is conserved from worms to mice as reduced IGF-1 signaling protected Alzheimer's-model mice from the disease-like behavioral impairments, pathological phenotypes and premature death typical to these model animals. In this article I review the current knowledge on the protective mechanisms that are suppressed by the IIS and discuss the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Insulin secretion from beta cells within intact islets: location matters.

    PubMed

    Hoang Do, Oanh; Thorn, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The control of hormone secretion is central to body homeostasis, and its dysfunction is important in many diseases. The key cellular steps that lead to hormone secretion have been identified, and the stimulus-secretion pathway is understood in outline for many endocrine cells. In the case of insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, this pathway involves the uptake of glucose, cell depolarization, calcium entry, and the triggering of the fusion of insulin-containing granules with the cell membrane. The wealth of information on the control of insulin secretion has largely been obtained from isolated single-cell studies. However, physiologically, beta cells exist within the islets of Langerhans, with structural and functional specializations that are not preserved in single-cell cultures. This review focuses on recent work that is revealing distinct aspects of insulin secretion from beta cells within the islet.

  11. Inhibition of insulin receptor gene expression and insulin signaling by fatty acid: interplay of PKC isoforms therein.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debleena; Mukherjee, Mohua; Basu, Dipanjan; Datta, Malabika; Roy, Sib Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2005-01-01

    Fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting the loss of insulin sensitivity causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, underlying mechanism involved here is still unclear. Incubation of rat skeletal muscle cells with palmitate followed by I(125)- insulin binding to the plasma membrane receptor preparation demonstrated a two-fold decrease in receptor occupation. In searching the cause for this reduction, we found that palmitate inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene expression effecting reduced amount of IR protein in skeletal muscle cells. This was followed by the inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRbeta tyrosine phosphorylation that consequently resulted inhibition of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS 1) and IRS 1 associated phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3 Kinase), phosphoinositide dependent kinase-1 (PDK 1) phosphorylation. PDK 1 dependent phosphorylation of PKCzeta and Akt/PKB were also inhibited by palmitate. Surprisingly, although PKCepsilon phosphorylation is PDK1 dependent, palmitate effected its constitutive phosphorylation independent of PDK1. Time kinetics study showed translocation of palmitate induced phosphorylated PKCepsilon from cell membrane to nuclear region and its possible association with the inhibition of IR gene transcription. Our study suggests one of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cell.

  12. Transdermal Insulin Delivery Using Microdermabrasion

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Transdermal insulin delivery is an attractive needle-free alternative to subcutaneous injection conventionally used to treat diabetes. However, skin’s barrier properties prevent insulin permeation at useful levels. Methods We investigated whether microdermabrasion can selectively remove skin’s surface layers to increase skin permeability as a method to administer insulin to diabetic rats. We further assessed the relative roles of stratum corneum and viable epidermis as barriers to insulin delivery. Results Pretreatment of skin with microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum did not have a significant effect on insulin delivery or reduction in blood glucose level (BGL). Removal of full epidermis by microdermabrasion significantly reduced BGL, similar to the positive control involving subcutaneous injection of 0.1U insulin. Significant pharmacokinetic differences between microdermabrasion and subcutaneous injection were faster time to peak insulin concentration after injection and larger peak insulin concentration and area-under-the-curve after microdermabrasion. Conclusions Microdermabrasion can increase skin permeability to insulin at levels sufficient to reduce BGL. Viable epidermis is a barrier to insulin delivery such that removal of full epidermis enables significantly more insulin delivery than removal of stratum corneum alone. PMID:21499837

  13. Adipocyte lipolysis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Morigny, Pauline; Houssier, Marianne; Mouisel, Etienne; Langin, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Basal fat cell lipolysis (i.e., fat cell triacylglycerol breakdown into fatty acids and glycerol in the absence of stimulatory factors) is elevated during obesity and is closely associated with insulin resistance. Inhibition of adipocyte lipolysis may therefore be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating insulin resistance and preventing obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. In this review, we explore the relationship between adipose lipolysis and insulin sensitivity. After providing an overview of the components of fat cell lipolytic machinery, we describe the hypotheses that may support the causality between lipolysis and insulin resistance. Excessive circulating fatty acids may ectopically accumulate in insulin-sensitive tissues and impair insulin action. Increased basal lipolysis may also modify the secretory profile of adipose tissue, influencing whole body insulin sensitivity. Finally, excessive fatty acid release may also worsen adipose tissue inflammation, a well-known parameter contributing to insulin resistance. Partial genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of fat cell lipases in mice as well as short term clinical trials using antilipolytic drugs in humans support the benefit of fat cell lipolysis inhibition on systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, which occurs without an increase of fat mass. Modulation of fatty acid fluxes and, putatively, of fat cell secretory pattern may explain the amelioration of insulin sensitivity whereas changes in adipose tissue immune response do not seem involved.

  14. Modest dietary K+ restriction provokes insulin resistance of cellular K+ uptake and phosphorylation of renal outer medulla K+ channel without fall in plasma K+ concentration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Guzman, John P; Leong, Patrick K K; Yang, Li E; Perianayagam, Anjana; Babilonia, Elisa; Ho, Jennifer S; Youn, Jang H; Wang, Wen Hui; McDonough, Alicia A

    2006-05-01

    Extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) is closely regulated by the concerted regulatory responses of kidney and muscle. In this study, we aimed to define the responses activated when dietary K(+) was moderately reduced from a control diet (1.0% K(+)) to a 0.33% K(+) diet for 15 days. Although body weight and baseline plasma [K(+)] (4.0 mM) were not reduced in the 0.33% K(+) group, regulatory responses to conserve plasma [K(+)] were evident in both muscle and kidney. Insulin-stimulated clearance of K(+) from the plasma was estimated in vivo in conscious rats with the use of tail venous and arterial cannulas. During infusion of insulin.(50 mU.kg(-1).min(-1)), plasma [K(+)] level fell to 3.2 +/- 0.1 mM in the 1.0% K(+) diet group and to only 3.47 +/- 0.07 mM in the 0.33% K(+) diet group (P < 0.01) with no reduction in urinary K(+) excretion, which is evidence of insulin resistance to cellular K(+) uptake. Insulin-stimulated cellular K(+) uptake was quantitated by measuring the K(+) infusion rate necessary to clamp plasma K(+) at baseline (in micromol.kg(-1).min(-1)) during 5 mU of insulin.kg(-1).min(-1) infusion: 9.7 +/- 1.5 in 1% K(+) diet was blunted to 5.2 +/- 1.7 in the 0.33% K(+) diet group (P < 0.001). Muscle [K(+)] and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and abundance were unchanged during the 0.33% K(+) diet. Renal excretion, which was measured overnight in metabolic cages, was reduced by 80%, from 117.6 +/- 10.5 micromol/h/animal (1% K(+) diet) to 24.2 +/- 1.7 micromol/h/animal (0.33% K(+) diet) (P < 0.001). There was no significant change in total abundance of key renal K(+) transporters, but 50% increases in both renal PTK cSrc abundance and ROMK phosphorylation in the 0.33% K(+) vs. 1% K(+) diet group, previously established to be associated with internalization of ROMK. These results indicate that plasma [K(+)] can be maintained during modest K(+) restriction due to a decrease in insulin-stimulated cellular K(+) uptake as well as renal K(+) conservation

  15. Regulatory and quality considerations for continuous manufacturing. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Allison, Gretchen; Cain, Yanxi Tan; Cooney, Charles; Garcia, Tom; Bizjak, Tara Gooen; Holte, Oyvind; Jagota, Nirdosh; Komas, Bekki; Korakianiti, Evdokia; Kourti, Dora; Madurawe, Rapti; Morefield, Elaine; Montgomery, Frank; Nasr, Moheb; Randolph, William; Robert, Jean-Louis; Rudd, Dave; Zezza, Diane

    2015-03-01

    This paper assesses the current regulatory environment, relevant regulations and guidelines, and their impact on continuous manufacturing. It summarizes current regulatory experience and learning from both review and inspection perspectives. It outlines key regulatory aspects, including continuous manufacturing process description and control strategy in regulatory files, process validation, and key Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) requirements. In addition, the paper identifies regulatory gaps and challenges and proposes a way forward to facilitate implementation.

  16. Molecular profiling of gene copy number abnormalities in key regulatory genes in high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: frequency and their association with clinicopathological findings in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Prerana; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2017-05-01

    Genes related to key cellular pathways are frequently altered in B cell ALL and are associated with poor survival especially in high-risk (HR) subgroups. We examined gene copy number abnormalities (CNA) in 101 Indian HR B cell ALL patients and their correlation with clinicopathological features by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, CNA were detected in 59 (59%) cases, with 26, 10 and 23% of cases harboring 1, 2 or +3 CNA. CNA were more prevalent in BCR-ABL1 (60%), pediatric (64%) and high WCC (WBC count) (63%) patients. Frequent genes deletions included CDNK2A/B (26%), IKZF1 (25%), PAX5 (14%), JAK2 (7%), BTG1 (6%), RB1 (5%), EBF1 (4%), ETV6 (4%), while PAR1 region genes were predominantly duplicated (20%). EBF1 deletions selectively associated with adults, IKZF1 deletions occurred frequently in high WCC and BCR-ABL1 cases, while PAR1 region gains significantly associated with MLL-AF4 cases. IKZF1 haploinsufficiency group was predominant, especially in adults (65%), high WCC (60%) patients and BCR-ABL1-negative (78%) patients. Most cases harbored multiple concurrent CNA, with IKZF1 concomitantly occurring with CDNK2A/B, PAX5 and BTG1, while JAK2 occurred with CDNK2A/B and PAX5. Mutually exclusive CNA included ETV6 and IKZF1/RB1, and EBF1 and JAK2. Our results corroborate with global reports, aggregating molecular markers in Indian HR B-ALL cases. Integration of CNA data from rapid methods like MLPA, onto background of existing gold-standard methods detecting significant chromosomal abnormalities, provides a comprehensive genetic profile in B-ALL.

  17. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  18. Leptin, Insulin, and Cinnamon Polyphenols Attenuate Glial Swelling and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Ischemic Injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a major risk factor for stroke, and tissue injury following a stroke may be more severe in the obese. A key feature of obesity is increased serum levels of obesity-related hormones including leptin and insulin, indicating a state of resistance to these hormones. Insulin resistance is gen...

  19. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/GLP-2) are coproduced and highlighted as key modulators to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity after bariatric surgery. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays any physiological role in the control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. We sho...

  20. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Li, Pingping; Le Moan, Natacha; Sachs, Benjamin D.; Schachtrup, Christian; Davalos, Dimitrios; Vagena, Eirini; Bridges, Dave; Kim, Choel; Saltiel, Alan R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is mediated by the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), which is expressed mainly in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 from its intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane is regulated by small guanosine triphosphate hydrolases (GTPases) and is essential for the maintenance of normal glucose homeostasis. Here we show that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a regulator of glucose uptake and insulin resistance. p75NTR knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity on normal chow diet, independent of changes in body weight. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that deletion of the p75NTR gene increases the insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate and suppression of hepatic glucose production. Genetic depletion or shRNA knockdown of p75NTR in adipocytes or myoblasts increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation. Conversely, overexpression of p75NTR in adipocytes decreases insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In adipocytes, p75NTR forms a complex with the Rab5 family GTPases Rab5 and Rab31 that regulate GLUT4 trafficking. Rab5 and Rab31 directly interact with p75NTR primarily via helix 4 of the p75NTR death domain. Adipocytes from p75NTR knockout mice show increased Rab5 and decreased Rab31 activities, and dominant negative Rab5 rescues the increase in glucose uptake seen in p75NTR knockout adipocytes. Our results identify p75NTR as a unique player in glucose metabolism and suggest that signaling from p75NTR to Rab5 family GTPases may represent a unique therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:22460790

  1. Melatonin-insulin interactions in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robeva, R; Kirilov, G; Tomova, A; Kumanov, Ph

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) as a group of risk factors is strongly associated with diabetes type 2 and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of MS. Recent studies have shown that melatonin may influence insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. Therefore, the present study analyzed the relationships between the melatonin and the insulin in patients with MS and controls. The melatonin rhythm, insulin and lipid levels were studied in 40 subjects (21 patients and 19 controls) in reproductive age. The night melatonin-insulin ratio was correlated negatively with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.370, p = 0.024) and total cholesterol (r = -0.348, p = 0.030), and positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r = +0.414, p = 0.010). Night-time melatonin levels were related to night-time insulin concentrations (r = +0.313, p = 0.049). The correlation was pronounced in patients with MS (r = +0.640, p = 0.002), but did not reach statistical significance in controls (P > 0.05). In the patients with MS unlike the controls the night-day melatonin difference (%) correlated negatively with the fasting glucose (r = -0.494, p = 0.023) and positively to daily insulin (r = +0.536, p = 0.012). Our results show that melatonin-insulin interactions may exist in patients with MS, as well as relationships between melatonin-insulin ratio and the lipid profile. Pineal disturbances could influence the pathogenesis and the phenotype variations of the MS. Larger studies are needed to confirm or reject this hypothesis and to clarify the role of the melatonin in the metabolic disturbances.

  2. Protein kinase C-alpha regulates insulin action and degradation by interacting with insulin receptor substrate-1 and 14-3-3 epsilon.

    PubMed

    Oriente, Francesco; Andreozzi, Francesco; Romano, Chiara; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Perfetti, Anna; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2005-12-09

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha exerts a regulatory function on insulin action. We showed by overlay blot that PKCalpha directly binds a 180-kDa protein, corresponding to IRS-1, and a 30-kDa molecular species, identified as 14-3-3epsilon. In intact NIH-3T3 cells overexpressing insulin receptors (3T3-hIR), insulin selectively increased PKCalpha co-precipitation with IRS-1, but not with IRS-2, and with 14-3-3epsilon, but not with other 14-3-3 isoforms. Overexpression of 14-3-3epsilon in 3T3-hIR cells significantly reduced IRS-1-bound PKCalpha activity, without altering IRS-1/PKCalpha co-precipitation. 14-3-3epsilon overexpression also increased insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, followed by increased activation of Raf1, ERK1/2, and Akt/protein kinase B. Insulin-induced glycogen synthase activity and thymidine incorporation were also augmented. Consistently, selective depletion of 14-3-3epsilon by antisense oligonucleotides caused a 3-fold increase of IRS-1-bound PKCalpha activity and a similarly sized reduction of insulin receptor and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and signaling. In turn, selective inhibition of PKCalpha expression by antisense oligonucleotides reverted the negative effect of 14-3-3epsilon depletion on insulin signaling. Moreover, PKCalpha inhibition was accompanied by a >2-fold decrease of insulin degradation. Similar results were also obtained by overexpressing 14-3-3epsilon. Thus, in NIH-3T3 cells, insulin induces the formation of multimolecular complexes, including IRS-1, PKCalpha, and 14-3-3epsilon. The presence of 14-3-3epsilon in the complex is not necessary for IRS-1/PKCalpha interaction but modulates PKCalpha activity, thereby regulating insulin signaling and degradation.

  3. Increased P85alpha is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle insulin signaling and induces in vivo insulin resistance associated with growth hormone excess.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Linda A; Mizanoor Rahman, Shaikh; Gurevich, Inga; Leitner, J Wayne; Fischer, Stephanie J; Roper, Michael D; Knotts, Trina A; Vo, Yen; McCurdy, Carrie E; Yakar, Shoshana; Leroith, Derek; Kahn, C Ronald; Cantley, Lewis C; Friedman, Jacob E; Draznin, Boris

    2005-11-11

    Insulin resistance is a cardinal feature of normal pregnancy and excess growth hormone (GH) states, but its underlying mechanism remains enigmatic. We previously found a significant increase in the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI 3-kinase) and striking decrease in IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity in the skeletal muscle of transgenic animals overexpressing human placental growth hormone. Herein, using transgenic mice bearing deletions in p85alpha, p85beta, or insulin-like growth factor-1, we provide novel evidence suggesting that overexpression of p85alpha is a primary mechanism for skeletal muscle insulin resistance in response to GH. We found that the excess in total p85 was entirely accounted for by an increase in the free p85alpha-specific isoform. In mice with a liver-specific deletion in insulin-like growth factor-1, excess GH caused insulin resistance and an increase in skeletal muscle p85alpha, which was completely reversible using a GH-releasing hormone antagonist. To understand the role of p85alpha in GH-induced insulin resistance, we used mice bearing deletions of the genes coding for p85alpha or p85beta, respectively (p85alpha (+/-) and p85beta(-/-)). Wild type and p85beta(-/-) mice developed in vivo insulin resistance and demonstrated overexpression of p85alpha and reduced insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity in skeletal muscle in response to GH. In contrast, p85alpha(+/-)mice retained global insulin sensitivity and PI 3-kinase activity associated with reduced p85alpha expression. These findings demonstrated the importance of increased p85alpha in mediating skeletal muscle insulin resistance in response to GH and suggested a potential role for reducing p85alpha as a therapeutic strategy for enhancing insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  4. Comparison of the physiological relevance of systemic vs. portal insulin delivery to evaluate whole body glucose flux during an insulin clamp

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany D.; Jenkins, Erin C.; O'Brien, Tracy P.; McCoy, Gregory A.; Havlik, Allison E.; Nass, Erik R.; Nicholson, Wendell E.; Printz, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the underlying pathology of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, an accurate determination of whole body glucose flux needs to be made by a method that maintains key physiological features. One such feature is a positive differential in insulin concentration between the portal venous and systemic arterial circulation (P/S-IG). P/S-IG during the determination of the relative contribution of liver and extra-liver tissues/organs to whole body glucose flux during an insulin clamp with either systemic (SID) or portal (PID) insulin delivery was examined with insulin infusion rates of 1, 2, and 5 mU·kg−1·min−1 under either euglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions in 6-h-fasted conscious normal rats. A P/S-IG was initially determined with endogenous insulin secretion to exist with a value of 2.07. During an insulin clamp, while inhibiting endogenous insulin secretion by somatostatin, P/S-IG remained at 2.2 with PID, whereas, P/S-IG disappeared completely with SID, which exhibited higher arterial and lower portal insulin levels compared with PID. Consequently, glucose disappearance rates and muscle glycogen synthetic rates were higher, but suppression of endogenous glucose production and liver glycogen synthetic rates were lower with SID compared with PID. When the insulin clamp was performed with SID at 2 and 5 mU·kg−1·min−1 without managing endogenous insulin secretion under euglycemic but not hyperglycemic conditions, endogenous insulin secretion was completely suppressed with SID, and the P/S-IG disappeared. Thus, compared with PID, an insulin clamp with SID underestimates the contribution of liver in response to insulin to whole body glucose flux. PMID:25516552

  5. Insulin treatment of type 2 diabetes: considerations when converting from human insulin to insulin analogs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Stacy

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and diminished pancreatic β-cell function. Conventional insulin products used to manage this disease include regular human insulin and intermediate-acting human insulin. However, due to several limitations imposed by human insulins, such as onset and duration of action that do not coincide with physiologic needs and increased risk of hypoglycemia, insulin analogs were developed. Because they more closely mimic the physiologic action of endogenous insulin, insulin analogs are associated with more effective glucose control, a lower risk of hypoglycemia, greater convenience, and, in some instances, less weight gain. Switching from human insulin to insulin analogs is easily accomplished. Several studies have demonstrated a high rate of success with patient-initiated, self-adjusted dosing algorithms compared to investigator/clinician-initiated dose adjustments. These studies and several other published guidelines on insulin analogs provide patients and clinicians with information pertaining to better treatment options and can help increase overall patient satisfaction.

  6. Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire; Powrie, Fiona

    2004-08-01

    Regulatory T (TR) cells are a subset of T cells that function to control immune responses. Different populations of TR cells have been described, including thymically derived CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells and Tr1 cells induced in the periphery through exposure to antigen. A transcription factor, Foxp3, has been identified that is essential for CD4(+)CD25+ TR cell development and function. There is now evidence that transforming growth factor-beta might play a role in this pathway. CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells proliferate extensively in vivo in an antigen-specific manner, and can respond to both self and foreign peptides. By suppressing excessive immune responses, TR cells play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, thus preventing autoimmune disease, as well as inhibiting harmful inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  8. Variability of NPH insulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, M M; Colle, E; DeBelle, R; Murthy, D Y

    1971-01-23

    In 1968-69 certain juvenile diabetics receiving NPH insulin began having pre-breakfast glucosuria and mid-morning hypoglycemic reactions. A mail survey of our clinic population and a study done at the Quebec camp for diabetic children in 1969 revealed that certain lot numbers were associated with poor control and that a change to new lot numbers or alternate insulin preparations resulted in better control. "Suspect" insulin preparations and non-suspect insulins were given to newly diagnosed diabetics, and plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured over a 24-hour period. The data confirmed that the "suspect" insulins were causing early hypoglycemia and failing to control hyperglycemia during the latter hours of the 24-hour period. The lower glucose levels were associated with higher plasma insulin levels. The "suspect" insulins were further found to have elevated levels of free insulin in the supernatant fluid.The requirements for quality control of modified insulin preparations are reviewed and suggestions are offered for their improvement.

  9. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  10. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  11. The Regulatory Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] #7; #7; The Regulatory Plan #7; #7; ] OPEN GOVERNMENT AND EVIDENCE-BASED REGULATION There is a close connection, even an inextricable relationship, between open government and evidence- based regulation. If regulatory choices are based on careful analysis of...

  12. Insulin analog with additional disulfide bond has increased stability and preserved activity

    PubMed Central

    Vinther, Tine N; Norrman, Mathias; Ribel, Ulla; Huus, Kasper; Schlein, Morten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Pettersson, Ingrid; Ludvigsen, Svend; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Jensen, Knud J; Hubálek, František

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone controlling glucose homeostasis. All known vertebrate insulin analogs have a classical structure with three 100% conserved disulfide bonds that are essential for structural stability and thus the function of insulin. It might be hypothesized that an additional disulfide bond may enhance insulin structural stability which would be highly desirable in a pharmaceutical use. To address this hypothesis, we designed insulin with an additional interchain disulfide bond in positions A10/B4 based on Cα-Cα distances, solvent exposure, and side-chain orientation in human insulin (HI) structure. This insulin analog had increased affinity for the insulin receptor and apparently augmented glucodynamic potency in a normal rat model compared with HI. Addition of the disulfide bond also resulted in a 34.6°C increase in melting temperature and prevented insulin fibril formation under high physical stress even though the C-terminus of the B-chain thought to be directly involved in fibril formation was not modified. Importantly, this analog was capable of forming hexamer upon Zn addition as typical for wild-type insulin and its crystal structure showed only minor deviations from the classical insulin structure. Furthermore, the additional disulfide bond prevented this insulin analog from adopting the R-state conformation and thus showing that the R-state conformation is not a prerequisite for binding to insulin receptor as previously suggested. In summary, this is the first example of an insulin analog featuring a fourth disulfide bond with increased structural stability and retained function. PMID:23281053

  13. Zinc, insulin, and the liver: a ménage à trois.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Thomas V; Kebede, Melkam; Philips, Steven J; Attie, Alan D

    2013-10-01

    Insulin and Zn2+ enjoy a multivalent relationship. Zn2+ binds insulin in pancreatic β cells to form crystalline aggregates in dense core vesicles (DCVs), which are released in response to physiological signals such as increased blood glucose. This transition metal is an essential cofactor in insulin-degrading enzyme and several key Zn2+ finger transcription factors that are required for β cell development and insulin gene expression. Studies are increasingly revealing that fluctuations in Zn2+ concentration can mediate signaling events, including dynamic roles that extend beyond that of a static structural or catalytic cofactor. In this issue of the JCI, Tamaki et al. propose an additional function for Zn2+ in relation to insulin: regulation of insulin clearance from the bloodstream.

  14. The association of phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A with hepatic insulin receptor enhances its kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Bun; Liu, Xia; He, Kunyan; Qi, Qi; Jung, Dae Y; Kim, Jason K; Ye, Keqiang

    2011-07-01

    Dysfunction of hepatic insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) causes the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism regulating IRTK activity in the liver remains poorly understood. Here, we show that phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer A (PIKE-A) is a new insulin-dependent enhancer of hepatic IRTK. Liver-specific Pike-knockout (LPKO) mice display glucose intolerance with impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity. Specifically, insulin-provoked phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signalling is diminished in the liver of LPKO mice, leading to the failure of insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and hyperglycaemia. Thus, hepatic PIKE-A has a key role in mediating insulin signal transduction and regulating glucose homeostasis in the liver.

  15. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  16. Exercise rescues obese mothers’ insulin sensitivity, placental hypoxia and male offspring insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Gascoin, Geraldine; Musial, Barbara; Carr, Sarah; Duque-Guimaraes, Daniella; Blackmore, Heather L.; Alfaradhi, Maria Z.; Loche, Elena; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Fowden, Abigail L.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity during pregnancy continues to increase at alarming rates. This is concerning as in addition to immediate impacts on maternal wellbeing, obesity during pregnancy has detrimental effects on the long-term health of the offspring through non-genetic mechanisms. A major knowledge gap limiting our capacity to develop intervention strategies is the lack of understanding of the factors in the obese mother that mediate these epigenetic effects on the offspring. We used a mouse model of maternal-diet induced obesity to define predictive correlations between maternal factors and offspring insulin resistance. Maternal hyperinsulinemia (independent of maternal body weight and composition) strongly associated with offspring insulin resistance. To test causality, we implemented an exercise intervention that improved maternal insulin sensitivity without changing maternal body weight or composition. This maternal intervention prevented excess placental lipid deposition and hypoxia (independent of sex) and insulin resistance in male offspring. We conclude that hyperinsulinemia is a key programming factor and therefore an important interventional target during obese pregnancy, and propose moderate exercise as a promising strategy to improve metabolic outcome in both the obese mother and her offspring. PMID:28291256

  17. Developmental programming of obesity and insulin resistance: does mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes play a role?

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Robker, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key defect associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases. While a number of factors have been suggested to cause defects in insulin action, there is a very strong association between inappropriate lipid deposition in insulin target tissues and the development of insulin resistance. In recent times, a large number of studies have reported changes in markers of mitochondrial metabolism in insulin-resistant individuals, leading to the theory that defects in mitochondrial substrate oxidation are responsible for the buildup of lipid intermediates and the development of insulin resistance. The primary support for the mitochondrial theory of insulin resistance comes from studies in skeletal muscle; however, there is recent evidence in murine models that mitochondrial dysfunction in oocytes may also play a role. Oocytes from obese or insulin-resistant mice have been shown to exhibit abnormalities in many different mitochondrial parameters, including mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential. Here we review the findings regarding the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and propose that abnormalities in mitochondrial metabolism in oocytes may predispose to the development of obesity and insulin resistance and thus contribute to the inter-generational programming of metabolic disease.

  18. Insulin signal transduction pathways and insulin-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Amsler, Maggie O; Venable, Derwei Y; Messina, Joseph L

    2002-12-13

    Insulin regulates metabolic activity, gene transcription, and cell growth by modulating the activity of several intracellular signaling pathways. Insulin activation of one mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, the MEK/ERK kinase cascade, is well described. However, the effect of insulin on the parallel p38 pathway is less well understood. The present work examines the effect of inhibiting the p38 signaling pathway by use of specific inhibitors, either alone or in combination with insulin, on the activation of ERK1/2 and on the regulation of gene transcription in rat hepatoma cells. Activation of ERK1/2 was induced by insulin and was dependent on the activation of MEK1, the kinase upstream of ERK in this pathway. Treatment of cells with p38 inhibitors also induced ERK1/2 activation/phosphorylation. The addition of p38 inhibitors followed by insulin addition resulted in a greater than additive activation of ERK1/2. The two genes studied, c-Fos and Pip92, are immediate-early genes that are dependent on the ERK1/2 pathway for insulin-regulated induction because the insulin effect was inhibited by pretreatment with a MEK1 inhibitor. The addition of p38 inhibitors induced transcription of both genes in a dose-dependent manner, and insulin stimulation of both genes was enhanced by prior treatment with p38 inhibitors. The ability of the p38 inhibitors to induce ERK1/2 and gene transcription, both alone and in combination with insulin, was abolished by prior inhibition of MEK1. These data suggest possible cross-talk between the p38 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and a potential role of p38 in insulin signaling.

  19. Lipid mediators of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Knotts, Trina A; Chavez, Jose A; Wang, Li-Ping; Hoehn, Kyle L; Summers, Scott A

    2007-06-01

    Lipid abnormalities such as obesity, increased circulating free fatty acid levels, and excess intramyocellular lipid accumulation are frequently associated with insulin resistance. These observations have prompted investigators to speculate that the accumulation of lipids in tissues not suited for fat storage (e.g., skeletal muscle and liver) is an underlying component of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. We review the metabolic fates of lipids in insulin-responsive tissues and discuss the roles of specific lipid metabolites (e.g., ceramides, GM3 ganglioside, and diacylglycerol) as antagonists of insulin signaling and action.

  20. Salt, aldosterone, and insulin resistance: impact on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Dhuper, Sonal; Johnson, Megan S; Sowers, James R

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), both of which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of CVD and CKD risk factors has identified salt sensitivity and insulin resistance as key elements underlying the relationship between hypertension and T2DM. Excess dietary salt and caloric intake, as commonly found in westernized diets, is linked not only to increased blood pressure, but also to defective insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose homeostasis. In this setting, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), as well as increased signaling through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), result in increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, which in turn contribute to insulin resistance and impaired vascular function. In addition, insulin resistance is not limited to classic insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle, but it also affects the cardiovascular system, where it participates in the development of CVD and CKD. Current clinical knowledge points towards an impact of salt restriction, RAAS blockade, and MR antagonism on cardiovascular and renal protection, but also on improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  1. Leptin selectively decreases visceral adiposity and enhances insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    Barzilai, N; Wang, J; Massilon, D; Vuguin, P; Hawkins, M; Rossetti, L

    1997-01-01

    Intraabdominal adiposity and insulin resistance are risk factors for diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and mortality. Leptin, a fat-derived protein encoded by the ob gene, has been postulated to be a sensor of energy storage in adipose tissue capable of mediating a feedback signal to sites involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence for specific effects of leptin on fat distribution and in vivo insulin action. Leptin (LEP) or vehicle (CON) was administered by osmotic minipumps for 8 d to pair-fed adult rats. During the 8 d of the study, body weight and total fat mass decreased similarly in LEP and in CON. However, while moderate calorie restriction (CON) resulted in similar decreases in whole body (by 20%) and visceral (by 21%) fat, leptin administration led to a specific and marked decrease (by 62%) in visceral adiposity. During physiologic hyperinsulinemia (insulin clamp), leptin markedly enhanced insulin action on both inhibition of hepatic glucose production and stimulation of glucose uptake. Finally, leptin exerted complex effects on the hepatic gene expression of key metabolic enzymes and on the intrahepatic partitioning of metabolic fluxes, which are likely to represent a defense against excessive storage of energy in adipose depots. These studies demonstrate novel actions of circulating leptin in the regulation of fat distribution, insulin action, and hepatic gene expression and suggest that it may play a role in the pathophysiology of abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:9399957

  2. Insulin secretion in health and disease: nutrients dictate the pace.

    PubMed

    Regazzi, Romano; Rodriguez-Trejo, Adriana; Jacovetti, Cécile

    2016-02-01

    Insulin is a key hormone controlling metabolic homeostasis. Loss or dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells lead to the release of insufficient insulin to cover the organism needs, promoting diabetes development. Since dietary nutrients influence the activity of β-cells, their inadequate intake, absorption and/or utilisation can be detrimental. This review will highlight the physiological and pathological effects of nutrients on insulin secretion and discuss the underlying mechanisms. Glucose uptake and metabolism in β-cells trigger insulin secretion. This effect of glucose is potentiated by amino acids and fatty acids, as well as by entero-endocrine hormones and neuropeptides released by the digestive tract in response to nutrients. Glucose controls also basal and compensatory β-cell proliferation and, along with fatty acids, regulates insulin biosynthesis. If in the short-term nutrients promote β-cell activities, chronic exposure to nutrients can be detrimental to β-cells and causes reduced insulin transcription, increased basal secretion and impaired insulin release in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations, with a consequent increase in diabetes risk. Likewise, suboptimal early-life nutrition (e.g. parental high-fat or low-protein diet) causes altered β-cell mass and function in adulthood. The mechanisms mediating nutrient-induced β-cell dysfunction include transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational modifications of genes involved in insulin biosynthesis and secretion, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. Altered expression of these genes is partly caused by changes in non-coding RNA transcripts induced by unbalanced nutrient uptake. A better understanding of the mechanisms leading to β-cell dysfunction will be critical to improve treatment and find a cure for diabetes.

  3. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin therapy can help you achieve desired blood sugar control and what intensive insulin therapy requires of ... aggressive treatment approach designed to control your blood sugar levels. Intensive insulin therapy requires close monitoring of ...

  4. Scope and Limitations of Fmoc Chemistry SPPS-Based Approaches to the Total Synthesis of Insulin Lispro via Ester Insulin.

    PubMed

    Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Rege, Nischay; Weiss, Michael A; Eitel, Simon H; Meier, Thomas; Schoenleber, Ralph O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2017-01-31

    We have systematically explored three approaches based on 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) for the total chemical synthesis of the key depsipeptide intermediate for the efficient total chemical synthesis of insulin. The approaches used were: stepwise Fmoc chemistry SPPS; the "hybrid method", in which maximally protected peptide segments made by Fmoc chemistry SPPS are condensed in solution; and, native chemical ligation using peptide-thioester segments generated by Fmoc chemistry SPPS. A key building block in all three approaches was a Glu[O-β-(Thr)] ester-linked dipeptide equipped with a set of orthogonal protecting groups compatible with Fmoc chemistry SPPS. The most effective method for the preparation of the 51 residue ester-linked polypeptide chain of ester insulin was the use of unprotected peptide-thioester segments, prepared from peptide-hydrazides synthesized by Fmoc chemistry SPPS, and condensed by native chemical ligation. High-resolution X-ray crystallography confirmed the disulfide pairings and three-dimensional structure of synthetic insulin lispro prepared from ester insulin lispro by this route. Further optimization of these pilot studies could yield an efficient total chemical synthesis of insulin lispro (Humalog) based on peptide synthesis by Fmoc chemistry SPPS.

  5. Insulin pumps: Beyond basal-bolus.

    PubMed

    Millstein, Richard; Becerra, Nancy Mora; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pumps are a major advance in diabetes management, making insulin dosing easier and more accurate and providing great flexibility, safety, and efficacy for people who need basal-bolus insulin therapy. They are the preferred treatment for people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes who require insulin. This article reviews the basics of how insulin pumps work, who benefits from a pump, and how to manage inpatients and outpatients on insulin pumps.

  6. Variability control: key to regulatory compliance and sustainability goals.

    PubMed

    Englande, A J; Eckenfelder, W W; Jin, G

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on variability concerns in wastewater treatment and approaches to control unacceptable fluctuations in effluent quality. Areas considered include: factors contributing to variability in both waste loads and process technology performance; variability assessment; control of variability employing the process best management practice (BMP); design/operation of biological waste treatment technologies for variability reduction; and modelling to enhance process control.

  7. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  8. Aβ-Induced Insulin Resistance and the Effects of Insulin on the Cholesterol Synthesis Pathway and Aβ Secretion in Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Najem, Dema; Bamji-Mirza, Michelle; Yang, Ze; Zhang, Wandong

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity, tau pathology, insulin resistance, neuroinflammation, and dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis, all of which play roles in neurodegeneration. Insulin has polytrophic effects on neurons and may be at the center of these pathophysiological changes. In this study, we investigated possible relationships among insulin signaling and cholesterol biosynthesis, along with the effects of Aβ42 on these pathways in vitro. We found that neuroblastoma 2a (N2a) cells transfected with the human gene encoding amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) (N2a-AβPP) produced Aβ and exhibited insulin resistance by reduced p-Akt and a suppressed cholesterol-synthesis pathway following insulin treatment, and by increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor subunit-1 at serine 612 (p-IRS-S612) as compared to parental N2a cells. Treatment of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with Aβ42 also increased p-IRS-S612, suggesting that Aβ42 is responsible for insulin resistance. The insulin resistance was alleviated when N2a-AβPP cells were treated with higher insulin concentrations. Insulin increased Aβ release from N2a-AβPP cells, by which it may promote Aβ clearance. Insulin increased cholesterol-synthesis gene expression in SH-SY5Y and N2a cells, including 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) through sterol-regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2). While Aβ42-treated SH-SY5Y cells exhibited increased HMGCR expression and c-Jun phosphorylation as pro-inflammatory responses, they also showed down-regulation of neuro-protective/anti-inflammatory DHCR24. These results suggest that Aβ42 may cause insulin resistance, activate JNK for c-Jun phosphorylation, and lead to dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis, and that enhancing insulin signaling may relieve the insulin-resistant phenotype and the dysregulated cholesterol-synthesis pathway to promote A

  9. Perspectives in regulatory science: translational and clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Joseph A; Huang, Shiew Mei

    This paper focuses on the role of clinical and translational pharmacology in the drug development and the regulatory process. Contemporary regulatory issues faced by FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology (OCP) in fulfilling its mission to advance the science of drug response and translate patient diversity into optimal drug therapy are discussed. Specifically current focus of the following key aspects of the drug development and regulatory science processes are discussed: the OCP vision and mission, two key OCP initiatives (i.e. guidance modernization, labeling and health communications), and translational and clinical pharmacology related regulatory science issues in (i.e. uncertainty, breakthrough therapies, individualization).

  10. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  11. Insulin and the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    glucose utili- zation in muscle. J Clin Invest 1984; 74: 888–897 10. Watson RT, Pessin JE: Intracellular organi- zation of insulin signaling and GLUT4 ...regulated fusion of GLUT4 -containing vesicles with the plasma membrane. Mol Membr Biol 2001; 18:237–245 15. Nystrom FH, Quon MJ: Insulin signalling

  12. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  13. Impact of patient attitudes and beliefs to insulin therapy upon initiation, and their attitudinal changes after initiation: the DAWN Japan study.

    PubMed

    Odawara, Masato; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective As a part of the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Japan study, a multi-center, questionnaire-based survey conducted between 2004 and 2005, this analysis aimed to (1) explore patients' attitudes and beliefs contributing to their decision to start insulin therapy, and (2) assess the changes in their attitudes and beliefs after actual initiation. Methods Insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes who were recommended to start insulin therapy (n = 149) were invited to answer a 21-item questionnaire consisting of five clusters assessing their attitudes and beliefs toward insulin therapy. The questionnaire was administered twice: first upon insulin recommendation, and then 1 month after insulin initiation for those who started and 4 months after for those who did not. Results Of 130 patients included in the analysis, 74 patients (56.9%) started insulin therapy. 'Negative image of injections' and 'Positive image toward insulin therapy' were significantly associated with patient decision to start insulin therapy (odds ratios [95% CI]: 0.49 [0.32-0.76] and 2.58 [1.51-4.42], respectively). After insulin initiation, 'Negative image of injections', 'Positive image toward insulin therapy', 'Feelings of guilt regarding diabetes self-management', and 'Negative image toward insulin therapy' decreased significantly (P < 0.001 for all). 'Social/interpersonal effects' did not change after insulin initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrated that patients who started insulin therapy were less likely to have negative images of injections and more likely to have positive images toward insulin therapy. Starting insulin therapy did not deteriorate the patient's overall impression of therapy. The key limitation is the relatively small sample size (n = 130). The results suggest that education about the benefits of insulin therapy may help patients who are not ready to initiate insulin overcome their barrier to early insulin initiation and practical

  14. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat.

  15. 10 CFR 95.18 - Key personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.18 Key personnel. The senior management official and the Facility Security Officer must always be cleared to a level commensurate with the...

  16. Nox2 mediates skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Souto Padron de Figueiredo, Alvaro; Salmon, Adam B; Bruno, Francesca; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Herman G; Halade, Ganesh V; Ahuja, Seema S; Clark, Robert A; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; El Jamali, Amina

    2015-05-22

    Inflammation and oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are consistently associated with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes. Although the role of Nox2, a major ROS-generating enzyme, is well described in host defense and inflammation, little is known about its potential role in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet was mitigated in Nox2-null mice compared with wild-type mice after 3 or 9 months on the diet. High fat feeding increased Nox2 expression, superoxide production, and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle tissue of wild-type mice but not in Nox2-null mice. Exposure of C2C12 cultured myotubes to either high glucose concentration, palmitate, or H2O2 decreases insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Pretreatment with catalase abrogated these effects, indicating a key role for H2O2 in mediating insulin resistance. Down-regulation of Nox2 in C2C12 cells by shRNA prevented insulin resistance induced by high glucose or palmitate but not H2O2. These data indicate that increased production of ROS in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in skeletal muscle cells is a consequence of Nox2 activation. This is the first report to show that Nox2 is a key mediator of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  17. The Novel Endocrine Disruptor Tolylfluanid Impairs Insulin Signaling in Primary Rodent and Human Adipocytes through a Reduction in Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M.; Neel, Brian A.; Brock, Clifton O.; Lin, Yuxi; Hickey, Allison T.; Carlton, Daniel A.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes. In prior work, the phenylsulfamide fungicide tolylfluanid (TF) was shown to augment adipocyte differentiation, yet its effects on mature adipocyte metabolism remain unknown. Because of the central role of adipose tissue in global energy regulation, the present study tested the hypothesis that TF modulates insulin action in primary rodent and human adipocytes. Alterations in insulin signaling in primary mammalian adipocytes were determined by the phosphorylation of Akt, a critical insulin signaling intermediate. Treatment of primary murine adipose tissue in vitro with 100 nM TF for 48 h markedly attenuated acute insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a strain- and species-independent fashion. Perigonadal, perirenal, and mesenteric fat were all sensitive to TF-induced insulin resistance. A similar TF-induced reduction in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was observed in primary human subcutaneous adipose tissue. TF-treatment led to a potent and specific reduction in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA and protein levels, a key upstream mediator of insulin’s diverse metabolic effects. In contrast, insulin receptor-β, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Akt expression were unchanged, indicating a specific abrogation of insulin signaling. Additionally, TF-treated adipocytes exhibited altered endocrine function with a reduction in both basal and insulin-stimulated leptin secretion. These studies demonstrate that TF induces cellular insulin resistance in primary murine and human adipocytes through a reduction of IRS-1 expression and protein stability, raising concern about the potential for this fungicide to disrupt metabolism and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:22387882

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Insulin: Elucidating the Conformational Changes that Enable Its Binding

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Anastasios; Kuyucak, Serdar; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    A sequence of complex conformational changes is required for insulin to bind to the insulin receptor. Recent experimental evidence points to the B chain C-terminal (BC-CT) as the location of these changes in insulin. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations of insulin that reveal new insights into the structural changes occurring in the BC-CT. We find three key results: 1) The opening of the BC-CT is inherently stochastic and progresses through an open and then a “wide-open” conformation—the wide-open conformation is essential for receptor binding, but occurs only rarely. 2) The BC-CT opens with a zipper-like mechanism, with a hinge at the Phe24 residue, and is maintained in the dominant closed/inactive state by hydrophobic interactions of the neighboring Tyr26, the critical residue where opening of the BC-CT (activation of insulin) is initiated. 3) The mutation Y26N is a potential candidate as a therapeutic insulin analogue. Overall, our results suggest that the binding of insulin to its receptor is a highly dynamic and stochastic process, where initial docking occurs in an open conformation and full binding is facilitated through interactions of insulin receptor residues with insulin in its wide-open conformation. PMID:26629689

  19. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E.; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. PMID:26511317

  20. Evidence That the Sympathetic Nervous System Elicits Rapid, Coordinated, and Reciprocal Adjustments of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity During Cold Exposure.

    PubMed

    Morton, Gregory J; Muta, Kenjiro; Kaiyala, Karl J; Rojas, Jennifer M; Scarlett, Jarrad M; Matsen, Miles E; Nelson, Jarrell T; Acharya, Nikhil K; Piccinini, Francesca; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N; Taborsky, Gerald J; Kahn, Steven E; Schwartz, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic adjustment of insulin secretion to compensate for changes of insulin sensitivity that result from alteration of nutritional or metabolic status is a fundamental aspect of glucose homeostasis. To investigate the role of the brain in this coupling process, we used cold exposure as an experimental paradigm because the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) helps to coordinate the major shifts of tissue glucose utilization needed to ensure that increased thermogenic needs are met. We found that glucose-induced insulin secretion declined by 50% in rats housed at 5°C for 28 h, and yet, glucose tolerance did not change, owing to a doubling of insulin sensitivity. These potent effects on insulin secretion and sensitivity were fully reversed by returning animals to room temperature (22°C) for 4 h or by intravenous infusion of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine for only 30 min. By comparison, insulin clearance was not affected by cold exposure or phentolamine infusion. These findings offer direct evidence of a key role for the brain, acting via the SNS, in the rapid, highly coordinated, and reciprocal changes of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity that preserve glucose homeostasis in the setting of cold exposure.

  1. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-Song; Wei, Gui-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties.

  2. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  3. A Small Amount of Dietary Carbohydrate Can Promote the HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance to a Maximal Level

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huailan; Gu, Haihua; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Bennett, Brian J.; He, Ling; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-01-01

    Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs) may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD) or HFD containing 0.1–25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1%) induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level. PMID:25055153

  4. Cell factories for insulin production.

    PubMed

    Baeshen, Nabih A; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Sheikh, Abdullah; Bora, Roop S; Ahmed, Mohamed Morsi M; Ramadan, Hassan A I; Saini, Kulvinder Singh; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2014-10-02

    The rapid increase in the number of diabetic patients globally and exploration of alternate insulin delivery methods such as inhalation or oral route that rely on higher doses, is bound to escalate the demand for recombinant insulin in near future. Current manufacturing technologies would be unable to meet the growing demand of affordable insulin due to limitation in production capacity and high production cost. Manufacturing of therapeutic recombinant proteins require an appropriate host organism with efficient machinery for posttranslational modifications and protein refolding. Recombinant human insulin has been produced predominantly using E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for therapeutic use in human. We would focus in this review, on various approaches that can be exploited to increase the production of a biologically active insulin and its analogues in E. coli and yeast. Transgenic plants are also very attractive expression system, which can be exploited to produce insulin in large quantities for therapeutic use in human. Plant-based expression system hold tremendous potential for high-capacity production of insulin in very cost-effective manner. Very high level of expression of biologically active proinsulin in seeds or leaves with long-term stability, offers a low-cost technology for both injectable as well as oral delivery of proinsulin.

  5. Insulin sensitization of human preadipocytes through glucocorticoid hormone induction of forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Julianna J; Boudreau, Adèle; Wu, Dongmei; Abdou Salem, Houssein; Carrigan, Amanda; Gagnon, AnneMarie; Mears, Alan J; Sorisky, Alexander; Atlas, Ella; Haché, Robert J G

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are synthesized locally in adipose tissue and contribute to metabolic disease through the facilitation of adipose tissue expansion. Here we report that exposure of human primary preadipocytes to glucocorticoids increases their sensitivity to insulin and enhances their subsequent response to stimuli that promote differentiation. This effect was observed in primary human preadipocytes but not in immortalized 3T3-L1 murine preadipocytes or in fully differentiated primary human adipocytes. Stimulation of insulin signaling was mediated through induction of insulin receptor (IR), IR substrate protein 1 (IRS1), IRS2, and the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-3-kinase, which led to enhanced insulin-mediated activation of Akt. Although induction of IRS2 was direct, induction of IR and IRS1 by glucocorticoids occurred subsequent to primary induction of the forkhead family transcription factors FoxO1A and FoxO3A. These results reveal a new role for glucocorticoids in preparing preadipocytes for differentiation.

  6. Modelling the regulatory system for diabetes mellitus with a threshold window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    Piecewise (or non-smooth) glucose-insulin models with threshold windows for type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are proposed and analyzed with a view to improving understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. For glucose-insulin models with a single threshold, the existence and stability of regular, virtual, pseudo-equilibria and tangent points are addressed. Then the relations between regular equilibria and a pseudo-equilibrium are studied. Furthermore, the sufficient and necessary conditions for the global stability of regular equilibria and the pseudo-equilibrium are provided by using qualitative analysis techniques of non-smooth Filippov dynamic systems. Sliding bifurcations related to boundary node bifurcations were investigated with theoretical and numerical techniques, and insulin clinical therapies are discussed. For glucose-insulin models with a threshold window, the effects of glucose thresholds or the widths of threshold windows on the durations of insulin therapy and glucose infusion were addressed. The duration of the effects of an insulin injection is sensitive to the variation of thresholds. Our results indicate that blood glucose level can be maintained within a normal range using piecewise glucose-insulin models with a single threshold or a threshold window. Moreover, our findings suggest that it is critical to individualise insulin therapy for each patient separately, based on initial blood glucose levels.

  7. Insulin resistance in penile arteries from a rat model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Cristina; Sánchez, Ana; Martínez, Pilar; Raposo, Rafaela; Climent, Belén; García-Sacristán, Albino; Benedito, Sara; Prieto, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities accompanying metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension, are all associated with endothelial dysfunction and are independent risk factors for erectile dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the vascular effects of insulin in penile arteries and whether these effects are impaired in a rat model of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZR) and their counterpart, lean Zucker rats (LZR), were mounted on microvascular myographs and the effects of insulin were assessed in the absence and presence of endothelium and of specific inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Insulin-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i were also examined. KEY RESULTS OZR exhibited mild hyperglycaemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertryglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin induced endothelium- and NO-dependent relaxations in LZR that were impaired in OZR. Inhibition of PI3K reduced relaxation induced by insulin and by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline, mainly in arteries from LZR. Antagonism of endothelin 1 (ET-1) receptors did not alter insulin-induced relaxation in either LZR or OZR, but MAPK blockade increased the responses in OZR. Insulin decreased [Ca2+]i, a response impaired in OZR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Insulin-induced relaxation was impaired in penile arteries of OZR due to altered NO release through the PI3K pathway and unmasking of a MAPK-mediated vasoconstriction. This vascular insulin resistance is likely to contribute to the endothelial dysfunction and erectile dysfunction associated with insulin resistant states. PMID:20735420

  8. Urinary Arsenic and Insulin Resistance in US Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qing; Harlow, Siobán D.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.1 PMID:25845984

  9. Urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; Harlow, Siobán D; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.

  10. Insulin Receptor Signaling in Normal and Insulin-Resistant States

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jérémie; Kleinridders, André; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the worldwide increase in type-2 diabetes, a major focus of research is understanding the signaling pathways impacting this disease. Insulin signaling regulates glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, predominantly via action on liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. Precise modulation of this pathway is vital for adaption as the individual moves from the fed to the fasted state. The positive and negative modulators acting on different steps of the signaling pathway, as well as the diversity of protein isoform interaction, ensure a proper and coordinated biological response to insulin in different tissues. Whereas genetic mutations are causes of rare and severe insulin resistance, obesity can lead to insulin resistance through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding these pathways is essential for development of new drugs to treat diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their complications. PMID:24384568

  11. New ways of insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  12. Adipose proteome analysis: focus on mediators of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoli; Hess, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    As is well known, adipose tissue is an important site for lipid metabolism and insulin-responsive glucose uptake. The recent discovery of the endocrine function of adipose tissue and the association of obesity with chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue has reinforced the concept of the central role of adipose tissue in mediating obesity-linked insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation. The study of adipose cells has provided new insights into the mechanism underlying insulin resistance as well as the therapeutic strategies for diabetes. Numerous efforts have been made in identifying key molecular regulators of insulin action and metabolism, including the utilization of advanced proteomics technology. Various proteomic approaches have been applied to identify the adipose secretome, protein-expression profiling and post-translational modifications in adipose cells in the pathological state. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the proteomics of adipose tissue, and discuss the identified proteins that potentially play important roles in insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:19086862

  13. Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Altered Gluconeogenic Pathway in Premature Baboons.

    PubMed

    McGill-Vargas, Lisa; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Liang, Hanyu; Anzueto Guerra, Diana; Johnson-Pais, Teresa; Seidner, Steven; McCurnin, Donald; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; DeFronzo, Ralph; Musi, Nicolas; Blanco, Cynthia

    2017-01-17

    Premature infants have altered glucose regulation early in life and increased risk for diabetes in adulthood. Although prematurity leads to an increased risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome in adult life, the role of hepatic glucose regulation and adaptation to an early extra-uterine environment in preterm infants remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate developmental differences in glucose metabolism, hepatic protein content and gene expression of key insulin signaling/gluconeogenic molecules. Fetal baboons were delivered at 67%, 75%, and term gestational age and sacrificed at birth. Neonatal baboons were delivered prematurely (67% gestation) and survived for 2 weeks, and compared to similar postnatal term animals and underwent serial hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. Premature baboons had decreased endogenous glucose production compared to term animals. Consistent with these results, the gluconeogenic molecule, PEPCK mRNA, was decreased in preterm baboons compared to terms. Hepatic insulin signaling was altered by preterm birth as evidenced by decreased insulin receptor (IR)-β, p85 subunit of PI3K, phosphorylated IRS-1, and Akt-1 under insulin stimulated conditions. Furthermore, preterm baboons failed to have the normal increase in GSK-3 from fetal to postnatal life. The blunted responses in hepatic insulin signaling may contribute to the hyperglycemia of prematurity, while impaired endogenous glucose production leads to hypoglycemia of prematurity.

  14. Caveolin-2 regulation of the cell cycle in response to insulin in Hirc-B fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sangmin; Pak, Yunbae . E-mail: ybpak@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr

    2005-04-29

    The regulatory function of caveolin-2 in cell cycle regulation by insulin was investigated in human insulin receptor-overexpressed rat 1 fibroblast (Hirc-B) cells. Insulin increased induction of the caveolin-2 gene in a time-dependent manner. Direct interaction between ERK and caveolin-2 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and phosphorylated ERK increased the specific interaction in response to insulin. That insulin induced their nuclear co-localization over time was demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Insulin increased the S phase in the cell cycle by 6-fold. When recombinant caveolin-1 was transiently expressed, a decrease in the S phase was detected by flow-cytometry. The results indicate that the up-regulation of caveolin-2 in response to insulin activates the downstream signal cascades in the cell cycle, chiefly the increased phosphorylation of ERK, the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated ERK, and the subsequent activation of G0/G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. The results also suggest that DNA synthesis and the activation of the cell cycle by insulin are achieved concomitantly with an increase in the interaction between caveolin-2 and phosphorylated ERK, and the nuclear translocation of that complex. Taken together, we conclude that caveolin-2 positively regulates the insulin-induced cell cycle through activation of and direct interaction with ERK in Hirc-B cells.

  15. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, andMetSrisk and whether plasma fatty acids,...

  16. Dual-mode of insulin action controls GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingke; Rubin, Bradley R; Orme, Charisse M; Karpikov, Alexander; Yu, Chenfei; Bogan, Jonathan S; Toomre, Derek K

    2011-05-16

    Insulin stimulates translocation of GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) to the surface of adipocytes, but precisely where insulin acts is controversial. Here we quantify the size, dynamics, and frequency of single vesicle exocytosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We use a new GSV reporter, VAMP2-pHluorin, and bypass insulin signaling by disrupting the GLUT4-retention protein TUG. Remarkably, in unstimulated TUG-depleted cells, the exocytic rate is similar to that in insulin-stimulated control cells. In TUG-depleted cells, insulin triggers a transient, twofold burst of exocytosis. Surprisingly, insulin promotes fusion pore expansion, blocked by acute perturbation of phospholipase D, which reflects both properties intrinsic to the mobilized vesicles and a novel regulatory site at the fusion pore itself. Prolonged stimulation causes cargo to switch from approximately 60 nm GSVs to larger exocytic vesicles characteristic of endosomes. Our results support a model whereby insulin promotes exocytic flux primarily by releasing an intracellular brake, but also by accelerating plasma membrane fusion and switching vesicle traffic between two distinct circuits.

  17. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-05-28

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice.

  18. Intentional overdose with insulin glargine and insulin aspart.

    PubMed

    Tofade, Toyin S; Liles, E Allen

    2004-10-01

    Reports of intentional massive overdoses of insulin are infrequent. A review of the literature revealed no reports of overdose attempts with either insulin glargine or insulin aspart. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman without diabetes mellitus who intentionally injected herself with an overdose of both products, which belonged to her husband. She arrived at the emergency department 15 hours after her suicide attempt, which took place the night before. Her husband had checked her blood glucose level throughout the night and had given her high-carbohydrate drinks and foods. The patient had a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and numerous suicide attempts. She recovered from the resulting hypoglycemia after 40 hours of dextrose infusion and was transferred to a mental health facility. The main danger associated with insulin overdose is the resultant hypoglycemia and its effects on the central nervous system; hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia also can develop with excess insulin administration. Dextrose infusion, with liberal oral intake when possible, and monitoring for electrolyte changes, making adjustments as needed, are recommended for the treatment of intentional insulin overdose.

  19. Maternal Overweight Programs Insulin and Adiponectin Signaling in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Kartik; Kang, Ping; Harrell, Amanda; Zhong, Ying; Marecki, John C.; Ronis, Martin J. J.; Badger, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Gestational exposure to maternal overweight (OW) influences the risk of obesity in adult life. Male offspring from OW dams gain greater body weight and fat mass and develop insulin resistance when fed high-fat diets (45% fat). In this report, we identify molecular targets of maternal OW-induced programming at postnatal d 21 before challenge with the high-fat diet. We conducted global transcriptome profiling, gene/protein expression analyses, and characterization of downstream signaling of insulin and adiponectin pathways in conjunction with endocrine and biochemical characterization. Offspring born to OW dams displayed increased serum insulin, leptin, and resistin levels (P < 0.05) at postnatal d 21 preceding changes in body composition. A lipogenic transcriptome signature in the liver, before development of obesity, was evident in OW-dam offspring. A coordinated locus of 20 sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1-regulated target genes was induced by maternal OW. Increased nuclear levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and recruitment to the fatty acid synthase promoter were confirmed via ELISA and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. Higher fatty acid synthase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase protein and pAKT (Thr308) and phospho-insulin receptor-β were confirmed via immunoblotting. Maternal OW also attenuated AMP kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α signaling in the offspring liver, including transcriptional down-regulation of several peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-regulated genes. Hepatic mRNA and circulating fibroblast growth factor-21 levels were significantly lower in OW-dam offspring. Furthermore, serum levels of high-molecular-weight adiponectin (P < 0.05) were decreased in OW-dam offspring. Phosphorylation of hepatic AMP-kinase (Thr172) was significantly decreased in OW-dam offspring, along with lower AdipoR1 mRNA. Our results strongly suggest that gestational exposure to maternal

  20. Insulin and TOR signal in parallel through FOXO and S6K to promote epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Kakanj, Parisa; Moussian, Bernard; Grönke, Sebastian; Bustos, Victor; Eming, Sabine A.; Partridge, Linda; Leptin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The TOR and Insulin/IGF signalling (IIS) network controls growth, metabolism and ageing. Although reducing TOR or insulin signalling can be beneficial for ageing, it can be detrimental for wound healing, but the reasons for this difference are unknown. Here we show that IIS is activated in the cells surrounding an epidermal wound in Drosophila melanogaster larvae, resulting in PI3K activation and redistribution of the transcription factor FOXO. Insulin and TOR signalling are independently necessary for normal wound healing, with FOXO and S6K as their respective effectors. IIS is specifically required in cells surrounding the wound, and the effect is independent of glycogen metabolism. Insulin signalling is needed for the efficient assembly of an actomyosin cable around the wound, and constitutively active myosin II regulatory light chain suppresses the effects of reduced IIS. These findings may have implications for the role of insulin signalling and FOXO activation in diabetic wound healing. PMID:27713427

  1. The regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function by insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Andrew; Divall, Sara; Wu, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian reproductive hormone axis regulates gonadal steroid hormone levels and gonadal function essential for reproduction. The neuroendocrine control of the axis integrates signals from a wide array of inputs. The regulatory pathways important for mediating these inputs have been the subject of numerous studies. One class of proteins that have been shown to mediate metabolic and growth signals to the CNS includes Insulin and IGF-1. These proteins are structurally related and can exert endocrine and growth factor like action via related receptor tyrosine kinases. The role that insulin and IGF-1 play in controlling the hypothalamus and pituitary and their role in regulating puberty and nutritional control of reproduction has been studied extensively. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo models that have been used to study these neuroendocrine structures and the influence of these growth factors on neuroendocrine control of reproduction. PMID:24929098

  2. Insulin resistance and hypertension: new insights.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manoocher

    2015-03-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with hypertension. Nakamura et al. demonstrate in rodents and humans with insulin resistance that while the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake in adipocytes, mediated via insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), was severely diminished, its effect on salt reabsorption in the kidney proximal tubule, mediated via IRS2, was preserved. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in individuals with insulin resistance may enhance salt absorption in the proximal tubule, resulting in a state of salt overload and hypertension.

  3. Extreme hypertriglyceridemia managed with insulin.

    PubMed

    Thuzar, Moe; Shenoy, Vasant V; Malabu, Usman H; Schrale, Ryan; Sangla, Kunwarjit S

    2014-01-01

    Extreme hypertriglyceridemia can lead to acute pancreatitis and rapid lowering of serum triglycerides (TG) is necessary for preventing such life-threatening complications. However, there is no established consensus on the acute management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia. We retrospectively reviewed 10 cases of extreme hypertriglyceridemia with mean serum TG on presentation of 101.5 ± 23.4 mmol/L (8982 ± 2070 mg/dL) managed with insulin. Serum TG decreased by 87 ± 4% in 24 hours in those patients managed with intravenous insulin and fasting and 40 ± 8.4% in those managed with intravenous insulin alone (P = .0003). The clinical course was uncomplicated in all except 1 patient who subsequently developed a pancreatic pseudocyst. Thus, combination of intravenous insulin with fasting appears to be an effective, simple, and safe treatment strategy in immediate management of extreme hypertriglyceridemia.

  4. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... level may be normal if you have not eaten recently. Your blood sugar and insulin levels would ... having blood drawn are slight but may include: Bleeding Fainting or feeling lightheaded Hematoma (blood buildup under ...

  5. Insulin delivery methods: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rima B.; Patel, Manhar; Maahs, David M.; Shah, Viral N.

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and all patients with T1DM require insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the target range. The most common route of insulin administration is subcutaneous insulin injections. There are many ways to deliver insulin subcutaneously such as vials and syringes, insulin pens, and insulin pumps. Though subcutaneous insulin delivery is the standard route of insulin administration, it is associated with injection pain, needle phobia, lipodystrophy, noncompliance and peripheral hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, the need exists for delivering insulin in a minimally invasive or noninvasive and in most physiological way. Inhaled insulin was the first approved noninvasive and alternative way to deliver insulin, but it has been withdrawn from the market. Technologies are being explored to make the noninvasive delivery of insulin possible. Some of the routes of insulin administration that are under investigation are oral, buccal, nasal, peritoneal and transdermal. This review article focuses on the past, present and future of various insulin delivery techniques. This article has focused on different possible routes of insulin administration with its advantages and limitation and possible scope for the new drug development. PMID:27014614

  6. Protein acetylation mechanisms in the regulation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Pirola, Luciano; Zerzaihi, Ouafa; Vidal, Hubert; Solari, Florence

    2012-10-15

    Lysine acetylation is a protein post-translational modification (PTM) initially discovered in abundant proteins such as tubulin, whose acetylated form confers microtubule stability, and histones, where it promotes the transcriptionally active chromatin state. Other individual reports identified lysine acetylation as a PTM regulating transcription factors and co-activators including p53, c-Myc, PGC1α and Ku70. The subsequent employment of proteomics-based approaches revealed that lysine acetylation is a widespread PTM, contributing to cellular regulation as much as protein-phosphorylation based mechanisms. In particular, most of the enzymes of central metabolic processes - glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles, fatty acid and glycogen metabolism - have been shown to be regulated by lysine acetylation, through the opposite actions of protein acetyltransferases and deacetylases, making protein acetylation a PTM that connects the cell's energetic state and its consequent metabolic response. In multicellular organisms, insulin/insulin-like signalling (IIS) is a major hormonal regulator of metabolism and cell growth, and very recent research indicates that most of the enzymes participating in IIS are likewise subjected to acetylation-based regulatory mechanisms, that integrate the classical phosphorylation mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on acetylation/deacetylation regulatory phenomena within the IIS cascade, with emphasis on the enzymatic machinery linking the acetylation/deacetylation switch to the metabolic state. We cover this recent area of investigation because pharmacological modulation of protein acetylation/deacetylation has been shown to be a promising target for the amelioration of the metabolic abnormalities occurring in the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Understanding genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    2003-04-01

    Random Boolean networks (RBM) were introduced about 35 years ago as first crude models of genetic regulatory networks. RBNs are comprised of N on-off genes, connected by a randomly assigned regulatory wiring diagram where each gene has K inputs, and each gene is controlled by a randomly assigned Boolean function. This procedure samples at random from the ensemble of all possible NK Boolean networks. The central ideas are to study the typical, or generic properties of this ensemble, and see 1) whether characteristic differences appear as K and biases in Boolean functions are introducted, and 2) whether a subclass of this ensemble has properties matching real cells. Such networks behave in an ordered or a chaotic regime, with a phase transition, "the edge of chaos" between the two regimes. Networks with continuous variables exhibit the same two regimes. Substantial evidence suggests that real cells are in the ordered regime. A key concept is that of an attractor. This is a reentrant trajectory of states of the network, called a state cycle. The central biological interpretation is that cell types are attractors. A number of properties differentiate the ordered and chaotic regimes. These include the size and number of attractors, the existence in the ordered regime of a percolating "sea" of genes frozen in the on or off state, with a remainder of isolated twinkling islands of genes, a power law distribution of avalanches of gene activity changes following perturbation to a single gene in the ordered regime versus a similar power law distribution plus a spike of enormous avalanches of gene changes in the chaotic regime, and the existence of branching pathway of "differentiation" between attractors induced by perturbations in the ordered regime. Noise is serious issue, since noise disrupts attractors. But numerical evidence suggests that attractors can be made very stable to noise, and meanwhile, metaplasias may be a biological manifestation of noise. As we learn more

  8. Regulatory RNAs in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Pawlicka, Kamila; Perrigue, Patrick M; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The full scope of regulatory RNA evolution and function in epigenetic processes is still not well understood. The development of planarian flatworms to be used as a simple model organism for research has shown a great potential to address gaps in the knowledge in this field of study. The genomes of planarians encode a wide array of regulatory RNAs that function in gene regulation. Here, we review planarians as a suitable model organism for the identification and function of regulatory RNAs.

  9. [Chromium and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Kleefstra, N; Bilo, H J; Bakker, S J; Houweling, S T

    2004-01-31

    Since as early as the 50s of the last century, it has been known that chromium is essential for normal glucose metabolism. Too little chromium in the diet may lead to insulin resistance. However, there is still no standard against which chromium deficiency can be established. Nevertheless, chromium supplements are becoming increasingly popular. Various systematic reviews have been unable to demonstrate any effects of chromium on glycaemic regulation (possibly due partly to the low dosages used), but there is a slight reduction in body weight averaging 1 kg. In a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial in a Chinese population with type-2 diabetes mellitus, supplementation with 1000 micrograms of chromium led to a fall in the glycosylated haemoglobin level (HbA1c) by 2%. Toxic effects of chromium are seldom seen; recently, however, the safety of one of the dosage forms of chromium, chromium picolinate, has been questioned. One should be aware that individual patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus may have an increased risk of hypoglycaemic episodes when taking chromium supplements as self-medication.

  10. Regulatory Information By Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory, compliance, & enforcement information for various business, industry and government sectors, listed by NAICS code. Sectors include agriculture, automotive, petroleum manufacturing, oil & gas extraction & other manufacturing

  11. Amyloid-β induces hepatic insulin resistance in vivo via JAK2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Yuangao; Le, Yingying; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-04-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ), a natural product of cell metabolism, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate patients with AD have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Aβ can induce insulin resistance in cultured hepatocytes by activating the JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling pathway. Amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 double-transgenic AD mouse models with increased circulating Aβ level show impaired glucose/insulin tolerance and hepatic insulin resistance. However, whether Aβ induces hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is still unclear. Here we show C57BL/6J mice intraperitoneally injected with Aβ42 exhibit increased fasting blood glucose level, impaired insulin tolerance, and hepatic insulin signaling. Moreover, the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 AD model mice intraperitoneally injected with anti-Aβ neutralizing antibodies show decreased fasting blood glucose level and improved insulin sensitivity. Injection of Aβ42 activates hepatic JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling, and neutralization of Aβ in APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice inhibits liver JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling. Furthermore, knockdown of hepatic JAK2 by tail vein injection of adenovirus inhibits JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling and improves glucose/insulin tolerance and hepatic insulin sensitivity in APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Our results demonstrate that Aβ induces hepatic insulin resistance in vivo via JAK2, suggesting that inhibition of Aβ signaling is a new strategy toward resolving insulin resistance and T2DM.

  12. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  13. Insulin resistance uncoupled from dyslipidemia due to C-terminal PIK3R1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Huang-Doran, Isabel; Tomlinson, Patsy; Payne, Felicity; Gast, Alexandra; Sleigh, Alison; Bottomley, William; Harris, Julie; Daly, Allan; Rocha, Nuno; Rudge, Simon; Clark, Jonathan; Kwok, Albert; Romeo, Stefano; McCann, Emma; Müksch, Barbara; Dattani, Mehul; Zucchini, Stefano; Wakelam, Michael; Foukas, Lazaros C.; Savage, David B.; Murphy, Rinki; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and low plasma adiponectin. Insulin resistance due to insulin receptor (INSR) dysfunction is associated with none of these, but when due to dysfunction of the downstream kinase AKT2 phenocopies obesity-related insulin resistance. We report 5 patients with SHORT syndrome and C-terminal mutations in PIK3R1, encoding the p85α/p55α/p50α subunits of PI3K, which act between INSR and AKT in insulin signaling. Four of 5 patients had extreme insulin resistance without dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis. In 3 of these 4, plasma adiponectin was preserved, as in insulin receptor dysfunction. The fourth patient and her healthy mother had low plasma adiponectin associated with a potentially novel mutation, p.Asp231Ala, in adiponectin itself. Cells studied from one patient with the p.Tyr657X PIK3R1 mutation expressed abundant truncated PIK3R1 products and showed severely reduced insulin-stimulated association of mutant but not WT p85α with IRS1, but normal downstream signaling. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, mutant p85α overexpression attenuated insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation and adipocyte differentiation. Thus, PIK3R1 C-terminal mutations impair insulin signaling only in some cellular contexts and produce a subphenotype of insulin resistance resembling INSR dysfunction but unlike AKT2 dysfunction, implicating PI3K in the pathogenesis of key components of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27766312

  14. Cross-sectional association of dietary patterns with insulin resistance phenotypes among adults without diabets in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have linked dietary patterns which derived by cluster analysis with metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are key metabolic abnormalities which drive the metabolic syndrome. However, whether dietary patterns identified by cluster analysis are also associated wi...

  15. Human insulin prepared by recombinant DNA techniques and native human insulin interact identically with insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, L M; Piron, M A; De Meyts, P

    1981-01-01

    Human insulin synthesized from A and B chains separately produced in Escherichia coli from cloned synthetic genes (prepared by the Eli Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN) was characterized by examining its interaction with human cultured lymphocytes, human circulating erythrocytes in vitro, and isolated rat fat cells. The binding behavior of the biosynthetic insulin with human cells was indistinguishable from that of native human or porcine insulins, with respect to affinity, association and dissociation kinetics, negative cooperativity, and the down-regulation of lymphocyte receptors. Similarly, the biosynthetic insulin was as potent as the native insulins in stimulating lipogenesis in isolated rat fat cells. We also examined the receptor binding characteristics of 125I-labeled human and porcine insulins monoiodinated solely at Tyr-A14, which were obtained by means of high-performance liquid chromatography of the iodination reaction mixture (this material was prepared by B. Frank, Eli Lilly Research Laboratories). In all aspects studied, the pure [TyrA14-125I]iodoinsulins were superior as tracers to the monoiodoinsulin purified by the more conventional method of gel filtration. PMID:7015337

  16. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a physiologically relevant inhibitor of insulin signaling. GRK2 abundanceis increased in humans with metabolic syndrome and in different murine models of insulin resistance. To support GRK2 as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes and obesity, we investigated whether lowering GRK2 abundance reversed an ongoing systemic insulin-resistant phenotype, using a mouse model of tamoxifen-induced GRK2 ablation after high fat diet-dependent obesity and insulin resistance. Tamoxifen-triggered GRK2 deletion impeded further body weight gain, normalized fa sting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance and was associated with preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, thereby maintaining whole body glucose homeostasis. Moreover, when continued to be fed a high fat diet, these animals displayed reduced fat mass and smaller adipocytes, were resistant to the development of liver steatosis, and showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory markers in the liver. Our results indicate that GRK2 acts as a hub to control metabolic functions in different tissues, which is key to controlling insulin resistance development in vivo. These data suggest that inhibiting GRK2 could reverse an established insulin-resistant and obese phenotype, thereby putting forward this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target linking glucose homeostasis and regulation of adiposity. PMID:26198359

  17. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  18. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  19. Insulin therapy--role beyond glucose control.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip

    2004-10-01

    Larger studies had shown improved patient outcome and lower probability of coronary artery disease in insulin treated groups. The classical lipid abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes are low HDL-cholesterol concentration and high triglyceride concentration. Insulin usage leads to a decrease in triglyceride concentration, primarily by its effect on the enzyme adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase. Insulin suppresses the enzyme, thereby controlling lipolysis in uncontrolled diabetes. Insulins therapy also improves the endothelial dysfunction especially in people with evident macrovascular complications. Though insulin is noted to increase adrenergic tone and may cause elevation of blood pressure, still patients with insulinoma do not have high blood pressure. Some studies suggest weight gain with insulin therapy, others contradict it. One study suggests that insulin does not affect treatment satisfaction. Insulin is known to improve the glycaemic scenario and also the insulin secretory pattern by reducing the glucotoxicity.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Soumaya, Kouidhi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular components of impaired insulin signaling pathway have emerged with growing interest to understand how the environment and genetic susceptibility combine to cause defects in this fundamental pathway that lead to insulin resistance. When insulin resistance is combined with beta-cell defects in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperglycemia, or Type 2 diabetes can result. The most common underlying cause is obesity, although primary insulin resistance in normal-weight individuals is also possible. The adipose tissue releases free fatty acids that contribute to insulin resistance and also acts as a relevant endocrine organ producing mediators (adipokines) that can modulate insulin signalling. This chapter deals with the core elements promoting, insulin resistance, associated with impaired insulin signalling pathway and adipocyte dysfunction. A detailed understanding of these basic pathophysiological mechanisms is critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat diabetes.

  1. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-W; Biggar, K K; Storey, K B

    2013-01-01

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans.

  2. Immunological demonstration of the accumulation of insulin, but not insulin receptors, in nuclei of insulin-treated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, A.P.; Thompson, K.A.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate nuclear-related processes, such as cell growth and gene transcription, the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Previous studies suggested that translocation of insulin or its receptor to cell nuclei might be involved in some of these processes. The present investigation demonstrated that intact insulin, but not the insulin receptor, accumulated in nuclei of insulin-treated cells. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that the nuclear accumulation of {sup 125}I-labeled insulin was time-, temperature-, and insulin-concentration-dependent. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the insulin that accumulated in the nucleus was immunologically intact and associated with the heterochromatin. Only 1% of the {sup 125}I-labeled insulin extracted from isolated nuclei was eluted from a Sephadex G-50 column as {sup 125}I-labeled tyrosine. Plasma membrane insulin receptors were not detected in the nucleus by immuno electron microscopy or when wheat germ agglutinin-purified extracts of the nuclei were subjected to PAGE, electrotransfer, and immunoblotting with anti-insulin receptor antibodies. These results suggested that internalized insulin dissociated from its receptor and accumulated in the nucleus without its membrane receptor. The authors propose that some of insulin's effects on nuclear function may be caused by the translocation of the intact and biologically active hormone to the nucleus and its binding to nuclear components in the heterochromatin.

  3. Dietary nitrite improves insulin signaling through GLUT4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Potts, Amy; Pierini, Dan; Aranke, Mayank; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a syndrome of disordered metabolism with inappropriate hyperglycemia owing to a reduction in the biological effectiveness of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is associated with an impaired nitric oxide (NO) pathway that probably serves as the key link between metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Insulin-mediated translocation of GLUT4 involves the PI3K/Akt kinase signal cascade that results in activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). eNOS is dysfunctional during diabetes. We hypothesize that loss of eNOS-derived NO terminates the signaling cascade and therefore cannot activate GLUT4 translocation and that dietary nitrite may repair this pathway. In this study, we administered 50mg/L sodium nitrite to db/db diabetic mice for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks treatment, the db/db mice experienced less weight gain, improved fasting glucose levels, and reduced insulin levels. Cell culture experiments using CHO-HIRc-myc-GLUT4eGFP cell lines stably expressing insulin receptor and myc-GLUT4eGFP protein, as well as L6 skeletal muscle cells stably expressing rat GLUT4 with a Myc epitope (L6-GLUT4myc), showed that NO, nitrite, and GSNO stimulate GLUT4 translocation independent of insulin, which is inhibited by NEM. Collectively our data suggest that nitrite improves insulin signaling through restoration of NO-dependent nitrosation of GLUT4 signaling translocation. These data suggest that NO-mediated nitrosation of GLUT4 by nitrite or other nitrosating agents is necessary and sufficient for GLUT4 translocation in target tissue. Description of this pathway may justify a high-nitrate/nitrite diet along with the glycemic index to provide a safe and nutritional regimen for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  4. Insulin analogues: action profiles beyond glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    A variety of studies have documented significant improvements in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes after the introduction of artificial insulins. This review gives an overview of insulin analogues which are currently approved for therapeutical use. Clinical data regarding the efficiency to control blood glucose level as well as improving HbA1c level in comparison to conventional insulin preparations in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients are summarized. Furthermore, special features of insulin analogues regarding their signalling properties are discussed with focus on the proliferative effects of insulin glargine as well as some recent data of insulin detemir.

  5. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP gene expression, and we summarize the findings of transcription factor activity in the IGFBP promoter region. PMID:28116872

  6. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  7. Protamine-containing insulin but not analog insulin and duration of insulin use are risk factors for the production of insulin autoantibodies in insulin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hidenao; Iizuka, Katsumi; Takeda, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoantibodies can be produced by insulin injections but rarely cause severe side effects such as glucose instability and insulin allergy. We study the characteristics of insulin autoantibody-positive diabetic patients with a medical history of insulin therapy using single and multiple (adjusted for age, sex, type of diabetes) logistic regression analyses. Associations between insulin autoantibodies and age, sex, type of diabetes, HbA1c, and serum creatinine were not significant, but the association between insulin autoantibodies and duration of insulin use was significant. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were 1.08 (1.02-1.14) and 1.07 (1.01-1.14), respectively. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios for protamine-containing insulin were 3.08 (1.49-6.34) and 4.27 (1.90-9.58), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for premixed biphasic insulin and intermediate-acting insulin were 2.21 (1.03-4.73) and 2.35 (1.01-5.49), respectively. Associations between insulin autoantibodies and any insulin analog were not significant. These results suggest that protamine-containing insulin and duration of insulin use are risk factors for the production of insulin autoantibodies. If patients with poorly controlled diabetes have a history of protamine-containing insulin therapy over a long time, the appearance of insulin autoantibodies should be monitored.

  8. 78 FR 44279 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. sections 601 to 612 (1988). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert... mandated for the regulatory flexibility agendas required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 602... regulatory flexibility agenda, in accordance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act, because they are likely...

  9. Quantum key management

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  10. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Summary Insulin antibodies (IA) associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA) found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%), high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL) and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly. Learning points: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) or IAS-like situation should be one of the differential diagnosis in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Although less reported, insulin antibodies (IA) caused by exogenous insulin analog should be considered as the cause of hypoglycemia. Patients with suspected insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) should be screened for drugs related to autoimmunity to endogenous insulin. PMID:27933175

  12. Regulatory and technical reports compilation for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Oliu, W.E.; McKenzi, L.

    1981-04-01

    This compilation lists formal regulatory and technical reports and conference proceedings issued in 1980 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The compilation is divided into four major sections. The first major section consists of a sequential listing of all NRC reports in report-number order. The second major section of this compilation consists of a key-word index to report titles. The third major section contains an alphabetically arranged listing of contractor report numbers cross-referenced to their corresponding NRC report numbers. Finally, the fourth section is an errata supplement.

  13. Modular Connector Keying Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishman, Scott; Dukes, Scott; Warnica, Gary; Conrad, Guy; Senigla, Steven

    2013-01-01

    For panel-mount-type connectors, keying is usually "built-in" to the connector body, necessitating different part numbers for each key arrangement. This is costly for jobs that require small quantities. This invention was driven to provide a cost savings and to reduce documentation of individual parts. The keys are removable and configurable in up to 16 combinations. Since the key parts are separate from the connector body, a common design can be used for the plug, receptacle, and key parts. The keying can then be set at the next higher assembly.

  14. Group key management

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  15. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens.

  16. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  17. Transplacental passage of insulin complexed to antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, W A; Yalow, R S

    1981-01-01

    The passage of plasma proteins across the placental barrier in humans is known to be highly selective. Thus, free maternal insulin has been reported not to cross the normal maternofetal barrier, although insulin-binding antibodies have been detected in newborn infants whose diabetic mothers received insulin therapy. In this report we demonstrate, with the use of a human antiserum that permits distinction between human and animal insulins, that insulin in the cord blood of each of two neonates of insulin-treated diabetic mothers was, in part, animal insulin. The higher the antibody titer of the mother the greater was the total insulin in the cord plasma and the greater was the fraction that was animal insulin. In case 1 cord plasma insulin was 0.7 unit/liter, of which 10% was animal insulin; in case 2 cord plasma insulin was 3.5 units/liter, of which 25% was animal insulin. The demonstration that antigen restricted from transplacental passage can be transferred while complexed to antibody raises the question whether such fetal exposure would induce partial or total immunologic unresponsiveness subsequently if the fetus were rechallenged with the same antigen. PMID:7027265

  18. Insulin enhances RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis via ERK1/2 activation and induction of NFATc1 and Atp6v0d2.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ju Hee; Lee, Jae Yoon; Joung, Seung Hee; Oh, Yoon Taek; Kim, Hong Sung; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is one of the main factors affecting bone and energy metabolism, however, the direct effect of insulin on osteoclast differentiation remains unclear. Thus, in order to help elucidate that puzzle, the authors investigated the roles and regulatory mechanisms of insulin on osteoclasts differentiation. Co-stimulation with insulin and RANKL significantly enhanced the number of larger (>100 μm) osteoclastic cells and of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells compared with treatment by RANKL alone. Conversely, the insulin receptor shRNA markedly decreased osteoclast differentiation induced by insulin and RANKL. Insulin treatment significantly activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase as well as markedly induced the expression of NFATc1, an osteoclast marker gene, and Atp6v0d2, an osteoclast fusion-related gene. The pretreatment of PD98059, an ERK1/2 inhibitor, or insulin receptor shRNA effectively suppressed osteoclast differentiation and, in addition, blocked the expression of NFATc1 and Atp6vod2 induced by insulin stimulation. These data reveal insights into the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and fusion through ERK1/2 activation and the induction of NFATc1 and Atp6v0d2 by insulin.

  19. Insulin signaling controls neurotransmission via the 4eBP-dependent modification of the exocytotic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Rebekah Elizabeth; Azpurua, Jorge; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Altered insulin signaling has been linked to widespread nervous system dysfunction including cognitive dysfunction, neuropathy and susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. However, knowledge of the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on neuronal function is incomplete. Here, we show that cell autonomous insulin signaling within the Drosophila CM9 motor neuron regulates the release of neurotransmitter via alteration of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. This effect of insulin utilizes the FOXO-dependent regulation of the thor gene, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the eif-4e binding protein (4eBP). A critical target of this regulatory mechanism is Complexin, a synaptic protein known to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We find that the amounts of Complexin protein observed at the synapse is regulated by insulin and genetic manipulations of Complexin levels support the model that increased synaptic Complexin reduces neurotransmission in response to insulin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16807.001 PMID:27525480

  20. Insulin induction of SREBP-1c in rodent liver requires LXRα-C/EBPβ complex

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin increases lipid synthesis in liver by activating transcription of the gene encoding sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). SREBP-1c activates the transcription of all genes necessary for fatty acid synthesis. Insulin induction of SREBP-1c requires LXRα, a nuclear receptor. Transcription of SREBP-1c also requires transcription factor C/EBPβ, but a connection between LXRα and C/EBPβ has not been made. Here we show that LXRα and C/EBPβ form a complex that can be immunoprecipitated from rat liver nuclei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the LXRα-C/EBPβ complex binds to the SREBP-1c promoter in a region that contains two binding sites for LXRα and is known to be required for insulin induction. Knockdown of C/EBPβ in fresh rat hepatocytes or mouse livers in vivo reduces the ability of insulin to increase SREBP-1c mRNA. The LXRα-C/EBPβ complex is bound to the SREBP-1c promoter in the absence or presence of insulin, indicating that insulin acts not by increasing the formation of this complex, but rather by activating it. PMID:27382175

  1. Deepure Tea Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Na; Li, Juan; Mu, Hong-Na; Liu, Yu-Ying; Wang, Ming-Xia; Pan, Chun-Shui; Fan, Jing-Yu; Ye, Fei; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the protective effects of Deepure tea against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and elucidate the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks to induce the metabolic syndrome. In the Deepure tea group, HFD mice were administrated with Deepure tea at 160 mg/kg/day by gavage for 14 days. The mice in HFD group received water in the same way over the same period. The age-matched C57BL/6 mice fed with standard chow were used as normal control. Compared to the mice in HFD group, mice that received Deepure tea showed significantly reduced plasma insulin and improved insulin sensitivity. Deepure tea increased the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2), which plays an important role in hepatic insulin signaling pathway. Deepure tea also led to a decrease in hepatic fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation, which were mediated by the downregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthesis (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins that are involved in liver lipogenesis. These results suggest that Deepure tea may be effective for protecting against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis via modulating IRS-2 and downstream signaling SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC. PMID:26504484

  2. Attributes Influencing Insulin Pen Preference Among Caregivers and Patients With Diabetes Who Require Greater Than 20 Units of Mealtime Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Conrad, Kenneth A.; van Brunt, Kate; Rees, Tina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study compared patient preference for Humalog® KwikPen™ 200 units/mL (insulin lispro; hereafter, IL 200 pen; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) versus the Humalog KwikPen 100 units/mL (insulin lispro; hereafter, IL 100 pen; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) in patients with diabetes requiring >20 units of mealtime insulin and diabetes caregivers. This study also determined which attributes had the greatest influence on pen preference selection. Methods: In this 2-period, crossover, simulated-use study, 106 participants were randomized to 1 of 8 sequences that varied the pen order (IL 100 pen or IL 200 pen) and dosing order (15 units = low dose or 50 units = high dose) for a total of 4 simulated injections. Participants then completed a self-administered questionnaire to select their overall preference between the 2 pens and then rated the importance of 11 pen attributes in contributing to their overall preference. Results: Of the 90 participants expressing an overall preference, significantly more preferred the IL 200 pen to the IL 100 pen (IL 200 pen: 80 respondents; IL 100 pen: 10 respondents; 95% confidence interval [0.81, 0.94], P < .0001). The total amount of insulin in the pen, the ease in pressing the injection button, and the amount of fluid injected were key attributes influencing IL 200 pen preference. Conclusions: Based on these key attributes, the IL 200 pen was significantly preferred over the IL 100 pen by patients with diabetes who require >20 daily mealtime insulin units or diabetes caregivers and may improve the injection experience for these patients. PMID:26920640

  3. The Key to Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Provides tips on using low-tech, traditional key and lock systems for effectively securing university and college facilities. Discusses providing keys with utility patents as well as the need to design doors that offer greater deterrence to vandalism. (GR)

  4. Treatment Approach to Patients With Severe Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Church, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    In Brief Patients with severe insulin resistance require >2 units/kg of body weight or 200 units/day of insulin. Yet, many patients do not achieve glycemic targets despite using very high doses of insulin. Insulin can cause weight gain, which further contributes to worsening insulin resistance. This article describes the pharmacological options for managing patients with severe insulin resistance, including the use of U-500 insulin and newer agents in combination with insulin. PMID:27092020

  5. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  6. Emerging Trends in Noninvasive Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Arun; Kumar, Nitin; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with various aspects of oral insulin delivery system. Insulin is used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by the elevated glucose level (above the normal range) in the blood stream, that is, hyperglycemia. Oral route of administration of any drug is the most convenient route. Development of oral insulin is still under research. Oral insulin will cause the avoidance of pain during the injection (in subcutaneous administration), anxiety due to needle, and infections which can be developed. Different types of enzyme inhibitors, like sodium cholate, camostat, mesilate, bacitracin, leupeptin, and so forth, have been used to prevent insulin from enzymatic degradation. Subcutaneous route has been used for administration of insulin, but pain and itching at the site of administration can occur. That is why various alternative routes of insulin administration like oral route are under investigation. In this paper authors summarized advancement in insulin delivery with their formulation aspects. PMID:26556194

  7. Insulin Detemir (rDNA Origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to ... normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control ...

  8. Insulin signaling meets mitochondria in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Tseng, Yolanda; White, Morris F

    2010-10-01

    Insulin controls nutrient and metabolic homeostasis via the IRS-PI3K-AKT signaling cascade that targets FOXO1 and mTOR. Mitochondria, as the prime metabolic platform, malfunction during insulin resistance in metabolic diseases. However, the molecular link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction remains undefined. Here we review recent studies on insulin action and the mechanistic association with mitochondrial metabolism. These studies suggest that insulin signaling underpins mitochondrial electron transport chain integrity and activity by suppressing FOXO1/HMOX1 and maintaining the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the mediator of the SIRT1/PGC1α pathway for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Mitochondria generate moderately reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhance insulin sensitivity upon redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase and insulin receptor. However, chronic exposure to high ROS levels could alter mitochondrial function and thereby cause insulin resistance.

  9. Ultra-structural study of insulin granules in pancreatic β-cells of db/db mouse by scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanhong; Zhao, Wei; Du, Wen; Zhang, Xiang; Ji, Gang; Ying, Wang; Xu, Tao

    2012-07-01

    Insulin granule trafficking is a key step in the secretion of glucose-stimulated insulin from pancreatic β-cells. The main feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the failure of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient amounts of insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. In this work, we developed and applied tomography based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image intact insulin granules in the β-cells of mouse pancreatic islets. Using three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, we found decreases in both the number and the grey level of insulin granules in db/db mouse pancreatic β-cells. Moreover, insulin granules were closer to the plasma membrane in diabetic β-cells than in control cells. Thus, 3D ultra-structural tomography may provide new insights into the pathology of insulin secretion in T2D.

  10. Keys to Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Terri

    2011-01-01

    Up ahead, a foreboding wooden door showing wear from passage of earlier travelers is spotted. As the old porch light emits a pale yellow glow, a key ring emerges from deep inside the coat pocket. Searching for just the right key, the voyager settles on one that also shows age. As the key enters its receptacle and begins to turn, a clicking noise…

  11. Work Keys USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Keys USA, 1998

    1998-01-01

    "Work Keys" is a comprehensive program for assessing and teaching workplace skills. This serial "special issue" features 18 first-hand reports on Work Keys projects in action in states across North America. They show how the Work Keys is helping businesses and educators solve the challenge of building a world-class work force.…

  12. Regulation of the pituitary tumor transforming gene by insulin-like-growth factor-I and insulin differs between malignant and non-neoplastic astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chamaon, Kathrin; Kirches, Elmar; Kanakis, Dimitrios; Braeuninger, Stefan; Dietzmann, Knut; Mawrin, Christian . E-mail: christian.mawrin@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de

    2005-05-27

    The reasons for overexpression of the oncogene pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) in tumors are still not fully understood. A possible influence of the insulin-like growth factor I (Igf-I) may be of interest, since enhanced Igf-I signalling was reported in various human tumors. We examined the influence of Igf-I and insulin on PTTG expression in human astrocytoma cells in comparison to proliferating non-neoplastic rat embryonal astrocytes. PTTG mRNA expression and protein levels were increased in malignant astrocytes treated with Igf-I or insulin, whereas in rat embryonic astrocytes PTTG expression and protein levels increased only when cells were exposed to Igf-I. Enhanced transcription did not occur after treatment with inhibitors of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), blocking the two basic signalling pathways of Igf-I and insulin. In addition to this transcriptional regulation, both kinases directly bind to PTTG, suggesting a second regulatory route by phosphorylation. However, the interaction of endogenous PTTG with MAPK and PI3K, as well as PTTG phosphorylation were independent from Igf-I or insulin. The latter results were also found in human testis, which contains high PTTG levels as well as in nonneoplastic astrocytes. This suggest, that PI3K and MAPK signalling is involved in PTTG regulation not only in malignant astrocytomas but also in non-tumorous cells.

  13. [A21-Asparaginimide] insulin. Saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester, I.

    PubMed

    Gattner, H G; Schmitt, E W

    1977-01-01

    [Asn A21]Insulin is formed as the main product during alkaline saponification of insulin hexamethyl ester. Purification was achieved by gel chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose at pH 4 or by preparative isoelectric focusing in a granulated gel over a narrow pH range. Two main products could be isolated. One of them showed the electrophoretic behaviour of insulin (A), whilst the other corresponded to insulin with a blocked carboxyl function (B). Incubation of this product B with carboxypeptidase A liberated only the C-terminal alanine of the B-chain, but not the asparagine of the C-terminus of the A-chain. Chymotryptic digestion of the isolated S-sulfonate A-chain derivative (C) followed by high-voltage electrophoresis confirmed that the carboxyl function of asparagine A21 was blocked. In order to determine the free carboxyl functions of the A-chain derivative C, it was coupled with glycine methyl ester yielding D. Amino acid analysis of the chymotryptic peptides of D showed that the carboxyl functions of glutamic acid A4 and A17 had been free prior to coupling. The amino acid analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysate (subtilisin, aminopeptidase M) of the A-chain derivative C showed an additional peak with an elution position identical to the model compound aminosuccinimide. The biological activity of the [Asm A21[insulin was found to be about 40% in the fat cell test and 13.2 units/mg measured by the mouse convulsion method.

  14. Nitrosative stress and pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaneki, Masao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Daisuke; Chang, Kyungho

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a major causative factor for type 2 diabetes and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Despite intense investigation for a number of years, molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance remain to be determined. Recently, chronic inflammation has been highlighted as a culprit for obesity-induced insulin resistance. Nonetheless, upstream regulators and downstream effectors of chronic inflammation in insulin resistance remain unclarified. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a mediator of inflammation, has emerged as an important player in insulin resistance. Obesity is associated with increased iNOS expression in insulin-sensitive tissues in rodents and humans. Inhibition of iNOS ameliorates obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, molecular mechanisms by which iNOS mediates insulin resistance remain largely unknown. Protein S-nitrosylation, a covalent attachment of NO moiety to thiol sulfhydryls, has emerged as a major mediator of a broad array of NO actions. S-nitrosylation is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes, and increased S-nitrosylation of insulin signaling molecules, including insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and Akt/PKB, has been shown in skeletal muscle of obese, diabetic mice. Akt/PKB is reversibly inactivated by S-nitrosylation. Based on these findings, S-nitrosylation has recently been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  15. Insulin pump safety meeting: summary report.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Reyes, Juliet S

    2009-03-01

    Diabetes Technology Society convened a panel of insulin pump experts in Bethesda, Maryland, on November 12, 2008, at the request of the Food and Drug Administration. The group consisted of physicians, nurses, diabetes educators, and engineers from across the United States. The panel members (1) discussed safety features of insulin pump therapy and (2) recommended adjustments to current insulin pump design and use to enhance overall safety. Software and hardware features of insulin pumps were analyzed from engineering, medical, nursing, and pump-user perspectives. The meeting was divided into four sections: (1) Engineering Safety-Designing Software and Hardware for Insulin Pump Therapy; (2) Patient Safety-Selecting Patients and Clinical Settings for Insulin Pump Use; (3) Clinical Safety-Determining and Delivering Insulin Dosages Using Insulin Pump Therapy; and (4) Personal Experiences-A Panel Discussion about Insulin Pump Safety. Six aspects of insulin pump technology were noted to present potential safety problems: (1) software, (2) wireless communication, (3) hardware, (4) alarms, (5) human factors, and (6) bolus-dose calculation. There was consensus among meeting participants that insulin pump therapy is beneficial in patients of all ages and that insulin pump safety must be assured through careful regulation.

  16. Regulatory considerations in oncologic biosimilar drug development.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Judith C; Hartman, Helen; Jacobs, Ira A

    2015-01-01

    Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are being developed globally for patients with different types of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Applications for proposed biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are being submitted to the regulatory authorities around the world and may increase patient access to key treatment options upon approval. An understanding among stakeholders (e.g., physicians, patients and their caregivers, pharmacists, payers) of the approval criteria, as well as the similarities and differences in regulatory pathways involved in biosimilar approval in different countries, as presented in this review, will facilitate identification of high-quality, safe, monoclonal antibodies that have been developed according to strict, biosimilar regulatory standards. Further guidance and resolution of the ongoing discussions on biosimilar labeling, naming, automatic substitution, and indication extrapolation may ensure, in the future, an effective and appropriate use of biosimilar monoclonal antibodies by oncologists and other stakeholders in daily clinical practice.

  17. Select Biosolids Regulatory Processes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historical Regulatory Development and activities EPA has undertaken to respond to statutory obligations, respond to the National Academy of Sciences, understand pollutants that may occur in sewage sludge, and address dioxins in sewage sludge.

  18. 3 CFR - Regulatory Compliance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... protecting the air we breathe and the water we drink. Consistent regulatory enforcement also levels the... can lead the Government to hold itself more accountable, encouraging agencies to identify and...

  19. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in general—should be revisited. I therefore direct the Director of OMB, in consultation with... delay; clarify the role of the behavioral sciences in formulating regulatory policy; and identify...

  20. Assessing the regulatory picture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses the safety of the nation's drinking water supply and discusses compliance of the Clean Water Act. Right now, the shape of the regulatory future is uncertain. The results of the D-DBP regulatory negotiation are imminent. Congress is ready to begin debating reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and utilities are trying to comply with the regulations while trying not to price water out of the reach of some of their customers.

  1. NRC regulatory initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.C.

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is addressing several low-level waste disposal issues that will be important to waste generators and to States and Compacts developing new disposal capacity. These issues include Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed waste, below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, and the low-level waste data base. This paper discusses these issues and their current status.

  2. Nutritional Modulation of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for the development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM). Chronic oversupply of energy from food, together with inadequate physical activity, have been recognized as the most relevant factors leading to overweight, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and finally T2DM. Conversely, energy reduced diets almost invariably to facilitate weight loss and reduce abdominal fat mass and insulin resistance. However, sustained weight loss is generally difficult to achieve, and distinct metabolic characteristics in patients with T2DM further compromise success. Therefore, investigating the effects of modulating the macronutrient composition of isoenergetic diets is an interesting concept that may lead to additional important insights. Metabolic effects of various different dietary concepts and strategies have been claimed, but results from randomized controlled studies and particularly from longer-term-controlled interventions in humans are often lacking. However, some of these concepts are supported by recent research, at least in animal models and short-term studies in humans. This paper provides an update of the current literature regarding the role of nutrition in the modulation of insulin resistance, which includes the discussion of weight-loss-independent metabolic effects of commonly used dietary concepts. PMID:24278690

  3. High fasting serum insulin level due to autoantibody interference in insulin immunoassay discloses autoimmune insulin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Sault, Corinne; Renard, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Insulin-antibodies are a cause of misleading results in insulin immunoassays. They may also mediate deleterious blood glucose variations. A patient presented with overtiredness, recurrent episodes of sweating, dizziness and fainting fits. A fasting serum insulin assay performed on a Modular platform (Modular analytic E170, Roche Diagnostic, Meylan, France) showed a highly elevated value of 194.7 mIU/L, whereas on the same sample glucose and C-peptide levels were normal. Other immunometric insulin assays were performed, as well as antibodies anti-insulin radiobinding assay (RBA) and gel filtration chromatography (GFC). While complementary insulin assays yielded closer to normal fasting levels, the free insulin concentration assessed after PEG precipitation was 14.0 mIU/L and the RBA was positive. GFC revealed that most of the insulin was complexed with a 150 kDa molecule, corresponding to an immunoglobulin G (IgG). A high fasting serum insulin level in a patient with neuroglucopenic symptoms was related to a high insulin-antibody level, suggesting an insulin autoimmune syndrome.

  4. Dietary and pharmacological modification of the insulin/IGF-1 system: exploiting the full repertoire against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klement, R J; Fink, M K

    2016-01-01

    As more and more links between cancer and metabolism are discovered, new approaches to treat cancer using these mechanisms are considered. Dietary restriction of either calories or macronutrients has shown great potential in animal studies to both reduce the incidence and growth of cancer, and to act synergistically with other treatment strategies. These studies have also shown that dietary restriction simultaneously targets many of the molecular pathways that are targeted individually by anticancer drugs. The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) system has thereby emerged as a key regulator of cancer growth pathways. Although lowering of insulin levels with diet or drugs such as metformin and diazoxide seems generally beneficial, some practitioners also utilize strategic elevations of insulin levels in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs. This indicates a broad spectrum of possibilities for modulating the insulin/IGF-1 system in cancer treatment. With a specific focus on dietary restriction, insulin administration and the insulin-lowering drug diazoxide, such modifications of the insulin/IGF-1 system are the topic of this review. Although preclinical data are promising, we point out that insulin regulation and the metabolic response to a certain diet often differ between mice and humans. Thus, the need for collecting more human data has to be emphasized. PMID:26878387

  5. MondoA coordinately regulates skeletal myocyte lipid homeostasis and insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Byungyong; Soundarapandian, Mangala M.; Sessions, Hampton; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Roth, Gregory P.; Sugarman, Eliot; Koo, Ada; Malany, Siobhan; Wang, Miao; Yea, Kyungmoo; Brooks, Jeanne; Leone, Teresa C.; Han, Xianlin; Vega, Rick B.

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular lipid accumulation is a common manifestation of chronic caloric excess and obesity that is strongly associated with insulin resistance. The mechanistic links between lipid accumulation in myocytes and insulin resistance are not completely understood. In this work, we used a high-throughput chemical biology screen to identify a small-molecule probe, SBI-477, that coordinately inhibited triacylglyceride (TAG) synthesis and enhanced basal glucose uptake in human skeletal myocytes. We then determined that SBI-477 stimulated insulin signaling by deactivating the transcription factor MondoA, leading to reduced expression of the insulin pathway suppressors thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and arrestin domain–containing 4 (ARRDC4). Depleting MondoA in myocytes reproduced the effects of SBI-477 on glucose uptake and myocyte lipid accumulation. Furthermore, an analog of SBI-477 suppressed TXNIP expression, reduced muscle and liver TAG levels, enhanced insulin signaling, and improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. These results identify a key role for MondoA-directed programs in the coordinated control of myocyte lipid balance and insulin signaling and suggest that this pathway may have potential as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and lipotoxicity. PMID:27500491

  6. Beyond the hormone: insulin as an autoimmune target in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Carel, Jean-Claude; Boitard, Christian; Mallone, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Insulin is not only the hormone produced by pancreatic β-cells but also a key target antigen of the autoimmune islet destruction leading to type 1 diabetes. Despite cultural biases between the fields of endocrinology and immunology, these two facets should not be regarded separately, but rather harmonized in a unifying picture of diabetes pathogenesis. There is increasing evidence suggesting that metabolic factors (β-cell dysfunction, insulin resistance) and immunological components (inflammation and β-cell-directed adaptive immune responses) may synergize toward islet destruction, with insulin standing at the crossroad of these pathways. This concept further calls for a revision of the classical dichotomy between type 1 and type 2 diabetes because metabolic and immune mechanisms may both contribute to different extents to the development of different forms of diabetes. After providing a background on the mechanisms of β-cell autoimmunity, we will explain the role of insulin and its precursors as target antigens expressed not only by β-cells but also in the thymus. Available knowledge on the autoimmune antibody and T-cell responses against insulin will be summarized. A unifying scheme will be proposed to show how different aspects of insulin biology may lead to β-cell destruction and may be therapeutically exploited. We will argue about possible reasons why insulin remains the mainstay of metabolic control in type 1 diabetes but has so far failed to prevent or halt β-cell autoimmunity as an immune modulatory reagent.

  7. Isocitrate-to-SENP1 signaling amplifies insulin secretion and rescues dysfunctional β cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Dai, Xiaoqing; Jensen, Mette V.; Wang, Runsheng; Peterson, Brett S.; Huang, Chao; Ilkayeva, Olga; Smith, Nancy; Miller, Nathanael; Hajmrle, Catherine; Spigelman, Aliya F.; Wright, Robert C.; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Mackay, James P.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ryan, Terence E.; Norquay, Lisa D.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E.; Colmers, William F.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Yeh, Edward T.H.; Newgard, Christopher B.; MacDonald, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion from β cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans controls metabolic homeostasis and is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Increases in blood glucose trigger insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels, depolarizing β cells, and opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels to elicit insulin exocytosis. However, one or more additional pathway(s) amplify the secretory response, likely at the distal exocytotic site. The mitochondrial export of isocitrate and engagement with cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDc) may be one key pathway, but the mechanism linking this to insulin secretion and its role in T2D have not been defined. Here, we show that the ICDc-dependent generation of NADPH and subsequent glutathione (GSH) reduction contribute to the amplification of insulin exocytosis via sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). In human T2D and an in vitro model of human islet dysfunction, the glucose-dependent amplification of exocytosis was impaired and could be rescued by introduction of signaling intermediates from this pathway. Moreover, islet-specific Senp1 deletion in mice caused impaired glucose tolerance by reducing the amplification of insulin exocytosis. Together, our results identify a pathway that links glucose metabolism to the amplification of insulin secretion and demonstrate that restoration of this axis rescues β cell function in T2D. PMID:26389676

  8. Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified the Interdigitated Chain Electrode for an Insulin Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Park, Jinsoo; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-01-15

    Insulin is a key regulator in glucose homeostasis and its deficiency or alternations in the human body causes various types of diabetic disorders. In this paper, we present the development of a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified interdigitated chain electrode (ICE) for direct capacitive detection of insulin. The impedance properties of rGO-ICE were characterized by equivalent circuit modeling. After an electrochemical deposition of rGO on ICE, the electrode was modified with self-assembled monolayers and insulin antibodies in order to achieve insulin binding reactions. The impedance spectra and capacitances were measured with respect to the concentrations of insulin and the capacitance change (ΔC) was analyzed to quantify insulin concentration. The antibody immobilized electrode showed an increment of ΔC according to the insulin concentration in human serum ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL. The proposed sensor is feasible for label-free and real-time measuring of the biomarker and for point-of-care diagnosis.

  9. Interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenjing; Kang, Zhengzhong; Li, Youzhao; Sun, Tianyang; Wang, Lipei; Liang, Lijun; Lai, Maode; Wu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) can bind to insulin with high affinity which inhibits the early steps of insulin action. Lack of recognition mechanism impairs our understanding of insulin regulation before it binds to insulin receptor. Here we combine computational simulations with experimental methods to investigate the interaction between IGFBP7 and insulin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that His200 and Arg198 in IGFBP7 were key residues. Verified by experimental data, the interaction remained strong in single mutation systems R198E and H200F but became weak in double mutation system R198E-H200F relative to that in wild-type IGFBP7. The results and methods in present study could be adopted in future research of discovery of drugs by disrupting protein–protein interactions in insulin signaling. Nevertheless, the accuracy, reproducibility, and costs of free-energy calculation are still problems that need to be addressed before computational methods can become standard binding prediction tools in discovery pipelines.

  10. A Simplified and Efficient Process for Insulin Production in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Polez, Sulena; Origi, Domenico; Zahariev, Sotir; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Tisminetzky, Sergio G.; Skoko, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    A significant barrier to insulin is affordability. In this manuscript we describe improvements to key steps in the insulin production process in Pichia pastoris that reduce cost and time. The strategy for recovery and processing of human insulin precursor has been streamlined to two steps from bioreactor to the transpeptidation reaction. In the first step the insulin precursor secreted during the methanol induction phase is recovered directly from the culture broth using Tangential Flow Filtration with a Prostak™ module eliminating the laborious and time-consuming multi-step clarification, including centrifugation. In the second step the protein is applied at very high loadings on a cation exchange resin and eluted in a mixture of water and ethanol to obtain a concentrated insulin precursor, suitable for use directly in the transpeptidation reaction. Overall the yield from insulin precursor to human insulin was 51% and consisted of three purification chromatography steps. In addition we describe a method for recovery of the excess of H-Thr(tBu)-OtBu from the transpeptidation reaction mixture, one of the more costly reagents in the process, along with its successful reuse. PMID:27907132

  11. Glucosamine induces REDD1 to suppress insulin action in retinal Müller cells.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joshua A; Miller, William P; Dennis, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to insulin action is a key cause of diabetic complications, yet much remains unknown about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the defect. Glucose-induced insulin resistance in peripheral tissues such as the retina is mediated in part by the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). Glucosamine (GAM), a leading dietary supplement marketed to relieve the discomfort of osteoarthritis, is metabolized by the HBP, and in doing so bypasses the rate-limiting enzyme of the pathway. Thus, exogenous GAM consumption potentially exacerbates the resistance to insulin action observed with diabetes-induced hyperglycemia. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of GAM on insulin action in retinal Müller cells in culture. Addition of GAM to Müller cell culture repressed insulin-induced activation of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway. However, the effect was not recapitulated by chemical inhibition to promote protein O-GlcNAcylation, nor was blockade of O-GlcNAcylation sufficient to prevent the effects of GAM. Instead, GAM induced ER stress and subsequent expression of the protein Regulated in DNA Damage and Development (REDD1), which was necessary for GAM to repress insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt on Thr308. Overall, the findings support a model whereby GAM promotes ER stress in retinal Müller cells, resulting in elevated REDD1 expression and thus resistance to insulin action.

  12. Vitamin E induces regular structure and stability of human insulin, more intense than vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Soleymani, Hossein; Saboury, Ali A; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Rahmani, Fatemeh; Maleki, Javad; Yousefinejad, Saeid; Maghami, Parvaneh

    2016-12-01

    Changes in human environment and lifestyle over the last century have caused a dramatic increase in the occurrence of diabetes. Research of past decades illustrated that vitamin D and E have a key role in the improvement of diabetes by reducing oxidative stress, protein glycosylation, insulin resistance and also improving beta cell function. Binding properties and conformational changes of human insulin upon interaction with vitamins D3 and E (α-tocopherol) were investigated by spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamic simulation. Tyrosine fluorescence quenching studies indicates changes in the human insulin conformation in the presence of vitamins. Binding constants of vitamins D3 and E for human insulin were determined to be 2.7 and 1.5 (×10(-5)M(-1)) and the corresponding average numbers of binding sites were determined to be 1.3 and 1.2, respectively. Far- and near-UV circular dichroism studies showed that vitamin E can significantly change the secondary and tertiary structures of human insulin via an increase in the content of α-helix structure. Results of DSC showed that both vitamins D3 and E stabilize the structure of human insulin. Molecular dynamic simulation results indicated that vitamin D3 decreases the helical and strand structural contents of human insulin, but vitamin E stabilizes more regular secondary structures such as helical and strand structural contents as shown by experimental results.

  13. Molecular Events Linking Oxidative Stress and Inflammation to Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Kevin Noel; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing worldwide, a consequence of the alarming rise in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Oxidative stress and inflammation are key physiological and pathological events linking obesity, insulin resistance, and the progression of type 2 DM (T2DM). Unresolved inflammation alongside a “glucolipotoxic” environment of the pancreatic islets, in insulin resistant pathologies, enhances the infiltration of immune cells which through secretory activity cause dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells and ultimately cell death. Recent molecular investigations have revealed that mechanisms responsible for insulin resistance associated with T2DM are detected in conditions such as obesity and MetS, including impaired insulin receptor (IR) signalling in insulin responsive tissues, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The aim of the present review is to describe the evidence linking oxidative stress and inflammation with impairment of insulin secretion and action, which result in the progression of T2DM and other conditions associated with metabolic dysregulation. PMID:26257839

  14. Fluctuation of insulin resistance in a leprechaun with a primary defect in insulin binding.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Takata, Y; Sasaoka, T; Shigeta, Y; Goji, K

    1988-05-01

    A 3-month-old female leprechaun demonstrated extreme insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia (330 mumol/L) and resistance to exogenous insulin. Insulin binding to erythrocytes, cultured lymphocytes, and fibroblasts from the patient were decreased to less than 20% of normal, whereas insulin-like growth factor I binding to fibroblasts was normal. Antiinsulin receptor antibody binding to cultured lymphocytes was also decreased to 20% of normal, indicating a decreased concentration of insulin receptors on the cell surface. The ability of insulin to stimulate D-[14C]glucose uptake was decreased to 35% of normal in the patient's fibroblasts, and the dose-response curve was shifted to the right. With time, the insulin resistance fluctuated from near normal (fasting insulin, 244.0 pmol/L) to severe resistance (fasting insulin, 5740-9328 pmol/L), and an insulin tolerance test revealed amelioration of insulin resistance during remission. However, insulin binding to erythrocytes and adipocytes was decreased persistently to 20% of normal. These results indicate that the patient had a primary defect in her insulin receptors, i.e. decreased insulin receptor concentration. The variable degree of insulin resistance was possibly due to variable receptor function in the signal transmission process.

  15. TCF2 attenuates FFA-induced damage in islet β-cells by regulating production of insulin and ROS.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yingna; Liang, Chunlian

    2014-07-30

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are cytotoxic to pancreatic islet β-cells and play a crucial role in the diabetes disease process. A recent study revealed a down-regulation of transcription factor 2 (TCF2) levels during FFA-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells. However, its function during this process and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, treatment with palmitic acid (PA) at high levels (400 and 800 μM) decreased β-cell viability and TCF2 protein expression, along with the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Western and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the positive regulatory effect of TCF2 on GSIS through promotion of the key regulators pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in β-cells. In addition, both PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK showed decreased expression in PA (800 μM)-treated β-cells. Overexpression of TCF2 could effectively restore the inhibitory effect of PA on the activation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK as well as β-cell viability, simultaneously, inhibited PA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. After blocking the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signals with their specific inhibitor, the effect of overexpressed TCF2 on β-cell viability and ROS production was obviously attenuated. Furthermore, a protective effect of TCF2 on GSIS by positive modulation of JNK-PDX1/GLUT2 signaling was also confirmed. Accordingly, our study has confirmed that TCF2 positively modulates insulin secretion and further inhibits ROS generation via the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Our work may provide a new therapeutic target to achieve prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  16. Steroids and insulin resistance in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vejrazkova, Daniela; Vcelak, Josef; Vankova, Marketa; Lukasova, Petra; Bradnova, Olga; Halkova, Tereza; Kancheva, Radmila; Bendlova, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glucose during pregnancy reflects the equilibrium between lactogenic hormones stimulating insulin production and counterregulatory hormones inducing insulin resistance. In physiological pregnancies, insulin-mediated glucose uptake is substantially decreased and insulin secretion increased to maintain euglycemia. This common state of peripheral insulin resistance arises also due to steroid spectra changes. In this review article, we have focused on the role of steroid hormones (androgens, estrogens, gestagens, mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, as well as secosteroid vitamin D) in the impairment of glucose tolerance in pregnancy and in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  17. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by small guanosine triphosphatases in skeletal muscle and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-10-16

    Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood glucose level by stimulating various physiological responses in its target tissues. In skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, insulin promotes membrane trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from GLUT4 storage vesicles to the plasma membrane, thereby facilitating the uptake of glucose from the circulation. Detailed mechanisms underlying insulin-dependent intracellular signal transduction for glucose uptake remain largely unknown. In this article, I give an overview on the recently identified signaling network involving Rab, Ras, and Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) that regulates glucose uptake in insulin-responsive tissues. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms for these small GTPases and the cross-talk between protein kinase and small GTPase cascades are highlighted.

  18. Downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shujuan; Huang, Suling; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Qingli; Liu, Jia; Leng, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Mutations in lipin-1, a key lipid metabolism regulator leads to significant systemic insulin resistance in fld mice. However, the function of lipin-1 on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle is still unclear. Herein we demonstrated that downregulation of lipin-1 in C2C12 myotubes by siRNA transfection suppressed insulin action, characterized by reduced insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Correspondingly, decreased lipin-1 expression was observed in palmitate-induced insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes, suggested that lipin-1 might play a role in the etiology of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. The insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 downregulation was related to the disturbance of lipid homeostasis. Lipin-1 silencing reduced intracellular DAG and TAG levels, but elevated ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, the impaired insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake caused by lipin-1 silencing could be blocked by the pretreatment with SPT inhibitor myriocin, ceramide synthase inhibitor FB1, or PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, suggested that the increased ceramide accumulation might be responsible for the development of insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 silencing in C2C12 myotubes. Meanwhile, decreased lipin-1 expression also impaired mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, our study suggests that lipin-1 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. These results offer a molecular insight into the role of lipin-1 in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  19. Downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shujuan; Huang, Suling; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Qingli; Liu, Jia; Leng, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Mutations in lipin-1, a key lipid metabolism regulator leads to significant systemic insulin resistance in fld mice. However, the function of lipin-1 on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle is still unclear. Herein we demonstrated that downregulation of lipin-1 in C2C12 myotubes by siRNA transfection suppressed insulin action, characterized by reduced insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Correspondingly, decreased lipin-1 expression was observed in palmitate-induced insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes, suggested that lipin-1 might play a role in the etiology of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. The insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 downregulation was related to the disturbance of lipid homeostasis. Lipin-1 silencing reduced intracellular DAG and TAG levels, but elevated ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, the impaired insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake caused by lipin-1 silencing could be blocked by the pretreatment with SPT inhibitor myriocin, ceramide synthase inhibitor FB1, or PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, suggested that the increased ceramide accumulation might be responsible for the development of insulin resistance induced by lipin-1 silencing in C2C12 myotubes. Meanwhile, decreased lipin-1 expression also impaired mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, our study suggests that lipin-1 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and downregulation of lipin-1 induces insulin resistance by increasing intracellular ceramide accumulation in C2C12 myotubes. These results offer a molecular insight into the role of lipin-1 in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:28123341

  20. The blood-brain barrier as a regulatory interface in the gut-brain axes.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2006-11-30

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the unrestricted movement of peptides and proteins between the brain and blood. However, some peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the BBB by saturable and non-saturable mechanisms. Leptin and insulin each cross the BBB by their own transporters. Impaired transport of leptin occurs in obesity and accounts for peripheral resistance; that is, the condition wherein an obese animal loses weight when given leptin directly into the brain but not when given leptin peripherally. Leptin transport is also inhibited in starvation and by hypertriglyceridemia. Since hypertriglyceridemia occurs in both starvation and obesity, we have postulated that the peripheral resistance induced by hypertriglyceridemia may have evolved as an adaptive mechanism in response to starvation. Insulin transport is also regulated. For example, treatment of mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases insulin transport across the BBB by about threefold. Since many of the actions of CNS insulin oppose those of peripheral insulin and since LPS releases proinflammatory cytokines, enhanced transport of insulin across the BBB could be a mechanism which promotes insulin resistance in sepsis. The brain endothelial cells which comprise the BBB secrete many substances including cytokines. Such secretion can be stimulated from one side of the BBB with release into the other side. For example, it appears that adiponectin can inhibit release of interleukin-6 from brain endothelial cells. Overall, the BBB represents an important interface in mediating gut-brain axes.

  1. Proportional Insulin Infusion in Closed-Loop Control of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grasman, Johan

    2017-01-01

    A differential equation model is formulated that describes the dynamics of glucose concentration in blood circulation. The model accounts for the intake of food, expenditure of calories and the control of glucose levels by insulin and glucagon. These and other hormones affect the blood glucose level in various ways. In this study only main effects are taken into consideration. Moreover, by making a quasi-steady state approximation the model is reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation of which parameters are fit to data from healthy subjects. Feedback provided by insulin plays a key role in the control of the blood glucose level. Reduced β-cell function and insulin resistance may hamper this process. With the present model it is shown how by closed-loop control these defects, in an organic way, can be compensated with continuous infusion of exogenous insulin. PMID:28060898

  2. Important role of heparan sulfate in postnatal islet growth and insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Iwao; Noguchi, Naoya; Nata, Koji; Yamada, Shuhei; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikeda, Takayuki; Sugihara, Kazushi; Asano, Masahide; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yamauchi, Akiyo; Shervani, Nausheen Jamal; Uruno, Akira; Kato, Ichiro; Unno, Michiaki; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Takasawa, Shin; and others

    2009-05-22

    Heparan sulfate (HS) binds with several signaling molecules and regulates ligand-receptor interactions, playing an essential role in embryonic development. Here we showed that HS was intensively expressed in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells after 1 week of age in mice. The enzymatic removal of HS in isolated islets resulted in attenuated glucose-induced insulin secretion with a concomitant reduction in gene expression of several key components in the insulin secretion machinery. We further depleted islet HS by inactivating the exostosin tumor-like 3 gene specifically in {beta}-cells. These mice exhibited abnormal islet morphology with reduced {beta}-cell proliferation after 1 week of age and glucose intolerance due to defective insulin secretion. These results demonstrate that islet HS is involved in the regulation of postnatal islet maturation and required to ensure normal insulin secretion.

  3. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  4. Temporal relationship between diet-induced steatosis and onset of insulin/leptin resistance in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Song, Haiyan; Ge, Yingli; Ji, Guang; Yao, Zemin

    2015-01-01

    Rats fed with high-fat-high-sucrose (HFHS) diet are known to manifest metabolic syndrome including hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, hyperglycemia, diabetic dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. The aim of the current study is to determine the temporal relationships between the development of hepatic steatosis and the onset of insulin and leptin resistance in hypothalamus and liver in male Wistar rats (six weeks of age) fed chow or HFHS diet for up to 8 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose, lipids/lipoproteins, insulin and leptin levels were quantified, histopathologic score of hepatic steatosis and inflammation were assessed, and the responses of common checkpoints of insulin and leptin signalling responsible for lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis were analyzed. In addition, acute insulin or leptin administration was performed at different stages of HFHS dieting to determine the responsiveness of the respective signalling pathways. Hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and increased homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance occurred 1-week after HFHS dieting, coinciding with upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 in both hypothalamus and liver. However, hepatosteatosis, accompanied with increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, did not manifest until 4- to 8-week after HFHS dieting. Lowered insulin sensitivity (shown by decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 and protein kinase B phosphorylation) occurred approximately 2 weeks prior to leptin resistance (shown by impaired signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation) in both the liver and hypothalamus. Acute insulin/leptin administration also demonstrated the impaired insulin or leptin signalling transduction. These data suggest that lowered insulin sensitivity and leptin resistance occurred at least 2-3 weeks earlier than the manifestation of hepatosteatosis in rats fed HFHS diet.

  5. Insulin effects on honeybee appetitive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mengoni Goñalons, Carolina; Guiraud, Marie; de Brito Sanchez, María Gabriela; Farina, Walter M

    2016-10-01

    Worker honeybees (Apis mellifera) carry out multiple tasks throughout their adult lifespan. It has been suggested that the insulin/insulin-like signalling pathway participates in regulating behavioural maturation in eusocial insects. Insulin signalling increases as the honeybee worker transitions from nurse to food processor to forager. As behavioural shifts require differential usage of sensory modalities, our aim was to assess insulin effects on olfactory and gustatory responsiveness as well as on olfactory learning in preforaging honeybee workers of different ages. Adults were reared in the laboratory or in the hive. Immediately after being injected with insulin or vehicle (control), and focusing on the proboscis extension response, bees were tested for their spontaneous response to odours, sucrose responsiveness and ability to discriminate odours through olfactory conditioning. Bees injected with insulin have higher spontaneous odour responses. Sucrose responsiveness and odour discrimination are differentially affected by treatment according to age: whereas insulin increases gustatory responsiveness and diminishes learning abilities of younger workers, it has the opposite effect on older bees. In summary, insulin can improve chemosensory responsiveness in young workers, but also worsens their learning abilities to discriminate odours. The insulin signalling pathway is responsive in young workers, although they are not yet initiating outdoor activities. Our results show strong age-dependent effects of insulin on appetitive behaviour, which uncover differences in insulin signalling regulation throughout the honeybee worker's adulthood.

  6. Selective Insulin Resistance in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been characterized as attenuation of insulin sensitivity at target organs and tissues, such as muscle and fat tissues and the liver. The insulin signaling cascade is divided into major pathways such as the PI3K/Akt pathway and the MAPK/MEK pathway. In insulin resistance, however, these pathways are not equally impaired. For example, in the liver, inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 2 pathway is impaired, while lipogenesis by the IRS1 pathway is preserved, thus causing hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It has been recently suggested that selective impairment of insulin signaling cascades in insulin resistance also occurs in the kidney. In the renal proximal tubule, insulin signaling via IRS1 is inhibited, while insulin signaling via IRS2 is preserved. Insulin signaling via IRS2 continues to stimulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule and causes sodium retention, edema, and hypertension. IRS1 signaling deficiency in the proximal tubule may impair IRS1-mediated inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which could induce hyperglycemia by preserving glucose production. In the glomerulus, the impairment of IRS1 signaling deteriorates the structure and function of podocyte and endothelial cells, possibly causing diabetic nephropathy. This paper mainly describes selective insulin resistance in the kidney, focusing on the proximal tubule. PMID:27247938

  7. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in obesity.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes through induction of insulin resistance. Treatment of type 2 diabetes has been limited by little translational knowledge of insulin resistance although there have been several well-documented hypotheses for insulin resistance. In those hypotheses, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia and lipotoxicity have been the major concepts and have received a lot of attention. Oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, genetic background, aging, fatty liver, hypoxia and lipodystrophy are active subjects in the study of these concepts. However, none of those concepts or views has led to an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. The reason is that there has been no consensus for a unifying mechanism of insulin resistance. In this review article, literature is critically analyzed and reinterpreted for a new energy-based concept of insulin resistance, in which insulin resistance is a result of energy surplus in cells. The energy surplus signal is mediated by ATP and sensed by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Decreasing ATP level by suppression of production or stimulation of utilization is a promising approach in the treatment of insulin resistance. In support, many of existing insulin sensitizing medicines inhibit ATP production in mitochondria. The effective therapies such as weight loss, exercise, and caloric restriction all reduce ATP in insulin sensitive cells. This new concept provides a unifying cellular and molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, which may apply to insulin resistance in aging and lipodystrophy.

  8. A Role for Insulin in Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Caleb W.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system is one of several organ systems that are profoundly affected in diabetes. The longstanding view is that insulin does not have a major role in modulating neuronal function in both central and peripheral nervous systems is now being challenged. In the setting of insulin deficiency or excess insulin, it is logical to propose that insulin dysregulation can contribute to neuropathic changes in sensory neurons. This is particularly important as sensory nerve damage associated with prediabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes is so prevalent. Here, we discuss the current experimental literature related to insulin's role as a potential neurotrophic factor in peripheral nerve function, as well as the possibility that insulin deficiency plays a role in diabetic neuropathy. In addition, we discuss how sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system respond to insulin similar to other insulin-sensitive tissues. Moreover, studies now suggest that sensory neurons can also become insulin resistant like other tissues. Collectively, emerging studies are revealing that insulin signaling pathways are active contributors to sensory nerve modulation, and this review highlights this novel activity and should provide new insight into insulin's role in both peripheral and central nervous system diseases. PMID:28066166

  9. Insulin pumps and their use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wollitzer, Adrienne D; Zisser, Howard; Jovanovic, Lois

    2010-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy has continued to increase, both as obesity drives up the rate of glucose intolerance itself and as improvements in diabetes and infertility treatments allow more women with diabetes to become and remain pregnant into the third trimester. With this increase has come a concomitant increase in the number of pregnant women using insulin to control their blood glucose in pregnancy. This review seeks to identify advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in pregnancy, as compared to a more traditional multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin regimen. Insulin pumps have not yet been shown to offer superior glucose control compared to MDI insulin, and thus many healthcare practitioners and health insurance companies are hesitant to adopt such a practice; however, insulin pumps often facilitate ease of usage of insulin and promote postpartum insulin use when indicated. Although only a small percentage of pregnant women with diabetes in the United States currently use insulin pumps, we believe that insulin pumps may represent a superior mode of insulin delivery for many women with diabetes in pregnancy.

  10. Insulin degludec and insulin degludec/insulin aspart in Ramadan: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to document the utility and safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) and insulin degludec aspart (IDegAsp) in persons with type 2 diabetes, observing the Ramadan fast. An observational study was conducted at a single center, in the real world setting, on six persons who either switched to IDeg or IDegAsp a month before Ramadan or changed time of administration of IDegAsp at the onset of Ramadan, to keep the fast in a safe manner. Subjects were kept under regular monitoring and surveillance before, during, and after Ramadan, and counseled in an opposite manner. Four persons, who shifted from premixed insulin to IDegAsp, experienced a 12–18% dose reduction after 14 days. At the onset of Ramadan, the Suhur dose was reduced by 30%, and this remained unchanged during the fasting month. The Iftar dose had to be increased by 4 units. One person who shifted from neutral protamine hagedorn to IDeg demonstrated a 25% dose reduction at 20 days, without any further change in insulin requirement during Ramadan. One person who changed time of injection of IDegAsp from morning to night reported no change in dosage. No episode of major hypoglycemia was reported. IDeg and IDegAsp are effective, safe, and well-tolerated means of achieving glycemic control in persons with type 2 diabetes who wish to fast. PMID:27366727

  11. The Hygiene Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Increased Frequency of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2012-01-01

    The steadily increasing frequency of insulin-dependent diabetes in several countries is best explained today by the decline of infections. Epidemiologic and animal data support this conclusion, which, however, requires confirmation by intervention trials in man. The mechanisms of the protective effect of infections on diabetes onset are diverse including competition for homeostatic factors and stimulation of regulatory T cells and of Toll-like receptors. These considerations might have interesting therapeutic applications for the prevention of the disease. PMID:22355800

  12. Designing the modern pump: engineering aspects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion software.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John B; Vargas, Steven; Williams, Gary; Moberg, Sheldon

    2010-06-01

    Insulin delivery systems attracted the efforts of biological, mechanical, electrical, and software engineers well before they were commercially viable. The introduction of the first commercial insulin pump in 1983 represents an enduring milestone in the history of diabetes management. Since then, pumps have become much more than motorized syringes and have assumed a central role in diabetes management by housing data on insulin delivery and glucose readings, assisting in bolus estimation, and interfacing smoothly with humans and compatible devices. Ensuring the integrity of the embedded software that controls these devices is critical to patient safety and regulatory compliance. As pumps and related devices evolve, software engineers will face challenges and opportunities in designing pumps that are safe, reliable, and feature-rich. The pumps and related systems must also satisfy end users, healthcare providers, and regulatory authorities. In particular, pumps that are combined with glucose sensors and appropriate algorithms will provide the basis for increasingly safe and precise automated insulin delivery-essential steps to developing a fully closed-loop system.

  13. Identification and evolution of two insulin receptor genes involved in Tribolium castaneum development and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sang, Ming; Li, Chengjun; Wu, Wei; Li, Bin

    2016-07-10

    The insulin and insulin-like signaling (IIS) pathway exists in a wide range of organisms from mammals to invertebrates and regulates several vital physiological functions. A phylogenetic analysis have indicated that insulin receptors have been duplicated at least twice among vertebrates, whereas only one duplication occurred in insects before the differentiation of Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera. Thus, we cloned two putative insulin receptor genes, T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2, from T. castaneum and determined that T.cas-ir1 is most strongly expressed during the late adult and early pupal stages, whereas T.cas-ir2 is most strongly expressed during the late larval stage. We found that larval RNAi against T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2 causes 100% and 42.0% insect death, respectively, and that parental RNAi against T.cas-ir1 and T.cas-ir2 leads to 100% and 33.3% reductions in beetle fecundity, respectively. The hatching rate of ds-ir2 insects was 66.2%. Moreover, RNAi against these two genes increased the expression of the pkc, foxo, jnk, cdc42, ikk, and mekk genes but decreased erk gene expression. Despite these similarities, these two genes act via distinct regulatory pathways. These results indicate that these two receptors have functionally diverged with respect to the development and reproduction of T. castaneum, even though they retain some common regulatory signaling pathways.

  14. Characterization of the insulin sensitivity of ghrelin receptor KO mice using glycemic clamps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    improvements of glucose disposal in both normal and metabolically challenged states, relative to WT controls. GhrR KO mice have an intact 1st phase insulin response but require significantly less insulin for glucose disposal. Our experiments reveal that the insulin sensitivity of GhrR KO mice is due to both BW independent and dependent factors. We also provide several lines of evidence that a key feature of the GhrR KO mouse is maintenance of hepatic insulin sensitivity during metabolic challenge. PMID:21211044

  15. Induction of the SHARP-2 mRNA level by insulin is mediated by multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yukiko; Asano, Kosuke; Komatsu, Yoshiko; Takagi, Katsuhiro; Ono, Moe; Tanaka, Takashi; Tomita, Koji; Haneishi, Ayumi; Tsukada, Akiko; Yamada, Kazuya

    2017-02-01

    The rat enhancer of split- and hairy-related protein-2 (SHARP-2) is an insulin-inducible transcription factor which represses transcription of the rat phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene. In this study, a regulatory mechanism of the SHARP-2 mRNA level by insulin was analyzed. Insulin rapidly induced the level of SHARP-2 mRNA. This induction was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase C (PKC), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), actinomycin D, and cycloheximide. Whereas an adenovirus infection expressing a dominant negative form of atypical PKC lambda (aPKCλ) blocked the insulin-induction of the SHARP-2 mRNA level, insulin rapidly activated the mTOR. Insulin did not enhance transcriptional activity from a 3.7 kb upstream region of the rat SHARP-2 gene. Thus, we conclude that insulin induces the expression of the rat SHARP-2 gene at the transcription level via both a PI 3-K/aPKCλ- and a PI 3-K/mTOR- pathways and that protein synthesis is required for this induction.

  16. Class III PI3K regulates organismal glucose homeostasis by providing negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Montagnac, Guillaume; Russell, Ryan C.; Morzyglod, Lucille; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Guan, Kun-Liang; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Defective hepatic insulin receptor (IR) signalling is a pathogenic manifestation of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. The endo/lysosomal trafficking system may coordinate insulin action and nutrient homeostasis by endocytosis of IR and the autophagic control of intracellular nutrient levels. Here we show that class III PI3K—a master regulator of endocytosis, endosomal sorting and autophagy—provides negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling. The ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene protein (UVRAG)-associated class III PI3K complex interacts with IR and is stimulated by insulin treatment. Acute and chronic depletion of hepatic Vps15, the regulatory subunit of class III PI3K, increases insulin sensitivity and Akt signalling, an effect that requires functional IR. This is reflected by FoxO1-dependent transcriptional defects and blunted gluconeogenesis in Vps15 mutant cells. On depletion of Vps15, the metabolic syndrome in genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance and diabetes is alleviated. Thus, feedback regulation of IR trafficking and function by class III PI3K may be a therapeutic target in metabolic conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:26387534

  17. The ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) attenuates insulin resistance through suppressing GLUT-2 in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Maha H; El-Awady, Mohammed S; Megahed, Nirmeen; Gameil, Nariman M

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of the ergogenic supplement β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) on insulin resistance induced by high-fructose diet (HFD) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed 60% HFD for 12 weeks and HMB (320 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), orally) for 4 weeks. HFD significantly increased fasting insulin, fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1C), liver glycogen content, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, while it decreased glucose and insulin tolerance. Furthermore, HFD significantly increased serum triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) levels, while it significantly decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Moreover, HFD significantly increased mRNA expression of glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2), the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) but decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) in liver. Aortic relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired and histopathology showed severe hepatic steatosis. HMB significantly increased insulin tolerance and decreased fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HBA1C, hepatic glycogen content, serum TG, LDL-C, and VLDL-C. Additionally, HMB enhanced ACh-induced relaxation, ameliorated hepatic steatosis, and decreased mRNA expression of GLUT-2. In conclusion, HMB may attenuate insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis through inhibiting GLUT-2 in liver.

  18. No improvement of pancreas transplant endocrine function by exogenous insulin infusion (islet rest) in the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, D C; Campbell, D A; Rosenberg, L; Merion, R M; Ucros, I; Vinik, A I; Klandorf, H; Turcotte, J G

    1989-07-01

    The concept of islet exhaustion maintains that exposure of pancreatic islets to hyperglycemia and other stresses leads to islet dysfunction and irreparable damage. The process of pancreatic transplantation places many stresses on islets (e.g., counter-regulatory hormones, steroids, cyclosporine toxicity). As practiced by some centers, it may be important to administer exogenous insulin in the postoperative period to provide islet rest. Using a porcine pancreas transplant model that simulates clinical transplantation, we studied 2 groups: 1 group (n = 8) received constant insulin infusion for 7 days after transplantation; the control group (n = 5) received vehicle only. The islets in the insulin infusion group were rested as evidenced by a significantly decreased mean C-peptide level (0.27 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) as compared to the control group (0.66 +/- 0.08 ng/ml) (P less than 0.05). After insulin infusion was discontinued, intravenous glucose tolerance testing found insulin, C-peptide and glucagon responses were not different between groups. Glucose clearance was also comparable; K values were -1.79 and -1.60 in the insulin infusion and control groups, respectively. In conclusion, islet rest by insulin infusion for 7 postoperative days did not improve subsequent pancreas transplant endocrine function.

  19. Altered gene expression and repressed markers of autophagy in skeletal muscle of insulin resistant patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Kampmann, Ulla; Hedegaard, Jakob; Thorsen, Kasper; Nordentoft, Iver; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the gene expression profile in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to determine associated signaling pathways. Gene expression profiles were examined by whole transcriptome, strand-specific RNA-sequencing and associated signaling was determined by western blot. We identified 117 differentially expressed gene transcripts. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis related these differences to abnormal muscle morphology and mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite a ~5-fold difference in plasma insulin, we did not observe any difference in phosphorylation of AKT or AS160, although other insulin-sensitive cascades, as mTOR/4EBP1, had retained their sensitivity. Autophagy-related gene (ATG14, RB1CC1/FIP200, GABARAPL1, SQSTM1/p62, and WIPI1) and protein (LC3BII, SQSTM1/p62 and ATG5) expression were decreased in skeletal muscle from the patients, and this was associated with a trend to increased phosphorylation of the insulin-sensitive regulatory transcription factor FOXO3a. These data show that gene expression is highly altered and related to mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal morphology in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with T2D, and that this is associated with decreased expression of autophagy-related genes and proteins. We speculate that prolonged treatment with high doses of insulin may suppress autophagy thereby generating a vicious cycle maintaining insulin resistance. PMID:28252104

  20. Effect of insulin and glucose on the activity of insulin-degrading enzymes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jurcovicová, J; Németh, S; Vigas, M

    1977-09-01

    The degradation of insulin by insulin protease and glutathion-insulin transhydrogenase (glutathioneproteindisulphide oxidoreductase--EC 1.8.4.2, GIT) was measured in rat liver either after replacing food and water by 15% glucose solution, or after daily insulin administration 8 U daily for 3 days or after fasting. The breakdown of radioiodinated insulin was followed by measuring the increase of TCA soluble radioactivity during incubation of cell fractions with 125I insulin at 37 degrees C. The highest GIT activity was observed in liver microsomes of rats after glucose feeding and after insulin administration, whereas enzyme activity of fasted animals did not essentially differ from corresponding values of normally fed controls. The insulin protease in cytosol of liver cells remained unchanged after these procedures. The important role of GIT in insulin degradation seems to be conclusively demonstrated.

  1. Uncoupling Proteins: Role in Insulin Resistance and Insulin Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine B.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are modulators of mitochondrial metabolism that have been implicated in the development of both insulin resistance and insulin insufficiency, the two major pathophysiological events associated with type 2 diabetes. UCP2 mRNA is expressed in a wide range of tissues; however UCP2 protein expression is restricted to fewer tissues, including the endocrine pancreas, spleen, stomach, brain and the lung. To date, its role in the pathophysiology of diabetes has been most strongly associated with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the β-cell, particularly after its induction by free fatty acids. The physiological role of UCP2 remains controversial, but it may act as a downstream signal transducer of superoxide. UCP3 mRNA and protein are expressed in relatively few tissues, predominately skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue and heart. Increased expression of UCP3 in skeletal muscle is associated with protection from diet-induced insulin resistance in mice. In patients with type 2 diabetes UCP3 protein in muscle is reduced by 50% compared to healthy controls. The primary physiological role of the novel UCPs does not appear to be protection against positive energy balance and obesity; this is based largely on findings from studies of UCP2 and UCP3 knockout mice and from observed increases in UCP3 expression with fasting. The mechanism(s) of action of UCP2 and UCP3 are poorly understood. However, findings support roles for UCP2 and UCP3 as modifiers of fatty acid metabolism and in mitigating damage from reactive oxygen species. PMID:18220632

  2. Actions of insulin beyond glycemic control: a perspective on insulin detemir.

    PubMed

    Tibaldi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The physiologic effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism in health in general and in diabetes are well known. Less understood, but far more intriguing, are the extrapancreatic effects of insulin that go beyond glycemic control to help sense, integrate, and maintain energy balance. Virtually every organ, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. When exogenous insulin is administered directly into the brains of experimental animals, the net effect is anorectic; however, patients with type 2 diabetes who transition to insulin therapy often gain weight--a tendency that opposes good glycemic control and overall therapeutic goals. After the brief review of extrapancreatic insulin--signaling pathways presented here, the physiologic impact of developing insulin resistance in relation to body weight is considered. Attention is then focused on insulin detemir, a longacting insulin analog that has consistently been associated with less weight gain than conventional formulations such as neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. Mechanisms offered to explain this effect include the lower incidence of hypoglycemia and less within-patient variability associated with insulin detemir; however, recent observations and considerations of insulin-signaling pathways have shed light on other important properties of insulin detemir that may impart these weight-neutral effects. Namely, albumin binding, faster transport across the bloodbrain barrier, and preferential activity in brain and liver are characteristics of insulin detemir that potentially explain the observed weight benefit seen in clinical trials, as well as in the real-world practice setting.

  3. New forms of insulin and insulin therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cahn, Avivit; Miccoli, Roberto; Dardano, Angela; Del Prato, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Insulin is a common treatment option for many patients with type 2 diabetes, and is generally used late in the natural history of the disease. Its injectable delivery mode, propensity for weight gain and hypoglycaemia, and the paucity of trials assessing the risk-to-safety ratio of early insulin use are major shortcomings associated with its use in patients with type 2 diabetes. Development of new insulins-such as insulin analogues, including long-acting and short-acting insulins-now provide alternative treatment options to human insulin. These novel insulin formulations and innovative insulin delivery methods, such as oral or inhaled insulin, have been developed with the aim to reduce insulin-associated hypoglycaemia, lower intraindividual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability, and improve imitation of physiological insulin release. Availability of newer glucose-lowering drugs (such as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors) also offers the opportunity for combination treatment; the results of the first trials in this area of research suggest that such treatment might lead to use of reduced insulin doses, less weight gain, and fewer hypoglycaemic episodes than insulin treatment alone. These and future developments will hopefully offer better opportunities for individualisation of insulin treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. 75 FR 61530 - Issuance of Regulatory Guides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Issuance of Regulatory Guides AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  5. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    PubMed Central

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  6. An Improved PID Algorithm Based on Insulin-on-Board Estimate for Blood Glucose Control with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqiang; Li, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Automated closed-loop insulin infusion therapy has been studied for many years. In closed-loop system, the control algorithm is the key technique of precise insulin infusion. The control algorithm needs to be designed and validated. In this paper, an improved PID algorithm based on insulin-on-board estimate is proposed and computer simulations are done using a combinational mathematical model of the dynamics of blood glucose-insulin regulation in the blood system. The simulation results demonstrate that the improved PID algorithm can perform well in different carbohydrate ingestion and different insulin sensitivity situations. Compared with the traditional PID algorithm, the control performance is improved obviously and hypoglycemia can be avoided. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm, in silico testing is done using the UVa/Padova virtual patient software.

  7. A systems biology approach for understanding the collagen regulatory network in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Natalia

    2012-02-01

    Among the pathogenesis and risk factors of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) are the source of dietary fat, obesity, insulin resistance, adipokines and acetaldehyde. Translocation of Gram-negative bacteria from the gut, the subsequent effects mediated by endotoxin, and the increased production of matricellular proteins, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, actively participate in the progression of liver injury. In addition, generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and the activation of non-parenchymal cells also contribute to the pathophysiology of ALD. A key event leading to liver damage is the transition of quiescent hepatic stellate cells into activated myofibroblasts, with the consequent deposition of fibrillar collagen I resulting in significant scarring. Thus, it is becoming clearer that matricellular proteins are critical players in the pathophysiology of liver disease; however, additional mechanistic insight is needed to understand the signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of collagen I protein. At present, systems biology approaches are helping to answer the many unresolved questions in this field and are allowing to more comprehensively identify protein networks regulating pathological collagen I deposition in hopes of determining how to prevent the onset of liver fibrosis and/or to slow disease progression. Thus, this review article provides a snapshot on current efforts for identifying pathological protein regulatory networks in the liver using systems biology tools. These approaches hold great promise for future research in liver disease.

  8. Insulin availability from mucoadhesive tablets.

    PubMed

    Pluta, J; Haznar, D; Suszka-Switek, A; Ryszka, F

    2008-09-01

    The widespread implementation of peptides as drugs encounters numerous obstacles, the main being invasive and inconvenient parenteral administration. Oral transmucosal administration is one of the possible alternatives, valuable for its noninvasiveness and easy accessibility. The aim of our study was to determine the implementation possibilities of mucoadhesive tablets prepared on a methylcellulose and sodium alginate basis with an addition of absorption-modifying hyaluronic acid, as carriers for peptides destined for oral transmucosal administration. Two series of 50 mg tablets containing 5mg of insulin were prepared for the study. The first series contained methylcellulose, hyaluronic acid and mannitol, while the second series' formulation included sodium alginate, hyaluronic acid and mannitol. Carried out study confirmed that insulin administration in the form of mucoadhesive tablets lowers blood glucose levels in rabbits. Better effects were reached in vivo in the case of MC-based tablets, for which stronger and longer glycemia lowering was achieved.

  9. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Megna, Matteo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient's overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism. PMID:25977937

  10. Structural and functional changes in human insulin induced by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuming; Olson, Douglas J H; Ross, Andrew R S; Wu, Lingyun

    2006-07-01

    Elevated methylglyoxal (MG) levels have been reported in insulin-resistance syndrome. The present study investigated whether MG, a highly reactive metabolite of glucose, induced structural and functional changes of insulin. Incubation of human insulin with MG in vitro yielded MG-insulin adducts, as evidenced by additional peaks observed on mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of the incubates. Tandem MS analysis of insulin B-chain adducts confirmed attachment of MG at an arginine residue. [3H]-2-deoxyglucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes was significantly and concentration-dependently decreased after the treatment with MG-insulin adducts, in comparison with the effect of native insulin at the same concentrations. A significant decrease of glucose uptake induced by MG-insulin adducts was also observed in L8 skeletal muscle cells. MG alone had no effect on glucose uptake or the transcriptional expression of insulin receptor. Unlike native insulin, MG-insulin adducts did not inhibit insulin release from pancreatic beta-cells. The degradation of MG-insulin through liver cells was also decreased. In conclusion, MG modifies insulin by attaching to internal arginine residue in beta-chain of insulin. The formation of this MG-insulin adduct decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake, impairs autocrine control of insulin secretion, and decreases insulin clearance. These structural and functional abnormalities of insulin molecule may contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  11. PKC-mediated modulation of L-type calcium channels may contribute to fat-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    Increased intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i has been noted in adipocytes, platelets, and leukocytes of subjects with insulin resistance syndrome or allied disorders. In rodent studies, measures which increase [Ca2+]i in adipocytes and skeletal muscle are associated with impaired insulin signaling, attributable at least in part to diminished ability of insulin to activate phosphoserine phosphatase-1 (PP-1). In fat-fed insulin resistant rats, pre-treatment with a drug that selectively chelates intracellular calcium eliminates about half of the decrement in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake induced by fat feeding; since this chelator does not influence the insulin sensitivity of chow-fed rats, it is reasonable to suspect that fat feeding boosts [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, and that this effect is partially responsible for the associated reduction in insulin sensitivity. Clinical insulin resistance is associated with increased levels of triglycerides and other fatty acid metabolites in muscle fibers; this can give rise to diacylglycerol-mediated activation of PKC, which in turn compromises insulin signaling by triggering kinase cascades that phosphorylate IRS-1 on key serine residues. Yet there is also evidence that, in skeletal muscle, PKC activity up-regulates the function of L-type calcium channels, increasing their maximal conductance while left-shifting their voltage dependence. Thus, the PKC activation associated with fat overexposure might be expected to boost basal [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, potentially impeding insulin-mediated activation of PP-1. This hypothesis is consistent with several clinical studies demonstrating that long-acting inhibitors of L-type calcium channels can improve insulin sensitivity in overweight hypertensives; it should be readily testable in rodent models of fat-induced insulin resistance. Since parathyroid hormone can act on adipocytes and muscle to boost [Ca2+]i, mild secondary hyperparathyroidism associated with low calcium intakes

  12. Insulin management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Petznick, Allison

    2011-07-15

    Insulin therapy is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an initial A1C level greater than 9 percent, or if diabetes is uncontrolled despite optimal oral glycemic therapy. Insulin therapy may be initiated as augmentation, starting at 0.3 unit per kg, or as replacement, starting at 0.6 to 1.0 unit per kg. When using replacement therapy, 50 percent of the total daily insulin dose is given as basal, and 50 percent as bolus, divided up before breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Augmentation therapy can include basal or bolus insulin. Replacement therapy includes basal-bolus insulin and correction or premixed insulin. Glucose control, adverse effects, cost, adherence, and quality of life need to be considered when choosing therapy. Metformin should be continued if possible because it is proven to reduce all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in overweight patients with diabetes. In a study comparing premixed, bolus, and basal insulin, hypoglycemia was more common with premixed and bolus insulin, and weight gain was more common with bolus insulin. Titration of insulin over time is critical to improving glycemic control and preventing diabetes-related complications.

  13. The quest for physiologic insulin replacement.

    PubMed

    Owens, David R

    2004-11-01

    Historically, the objective of insulin replacement has been to simulate the 2 major components of insulin secretion in individuals without diabetes mellitus: the low-level basal secretion during the night and periods of fasting, and the prandial secretion in response to food intake. The variable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of conventional insulin preparations have made mimicking these physiologic profiles virtually impossible. Balancing the effects of diet, exercise, and the numerous factors contributing to intra- and inter-individual variations in insulin absorption and action, such as type, site of injection, and dosage of insulin, while avoiding the very serious side effect of hypoglycemia in seeking normoglycemia, presents a further challenge. Recently, these limitations have been addressed by recombinant DNA-mediated development of insulin analogues, such as rapid-acting insulin lispro, aspart and glulisine, and the long-acting insulin preparations, insulin glargine and detemir. The molecular structures of these analogues have produced time-action profiles that better approach prandial and basal insulin secretion, thus allowing for easier, safer, and more flexible treatment regimens.

  14. Nuclear SREBP-1a causes loss of pancreatic {beta}-cells and impaired insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kato, Toyonori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yahagi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2009-01-16

    Transgenic mice expressing nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a under the control of the insulin promoter were generated to determine the role of SREBP-1a in pancreatic {beta}-cells. Only low expressors could be established, which exhibited mild hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced plasma insulin levels compared to C57BL/6 controls. The islets isolated from the transgenic mice were fewer and smaller, and had decreased insulin content and unaltered glucagon staining. Both glucose- and potassium-stimulated insulin secretions were decreased. The transgenic islets consistently expressed genes for fatty acids and cholesterol synthesis, resulting in accumulation of triglycerides but not cholesterol. PDX-1, {beta}{epsilon}{tau}{alpha}2, MafA, and IRS-2 were suppressed, partially explaining the loss and dysfunction of {beta}-cell mass. The transgenic mice on a high fat/high sucrose diet still exhibited impaired insulin secretion and continuous {beta}-cell growth defect. Therefore, nuclear SREBP-1a, even at a low level, strongly disrupts {beta}-cell mass and function.

  15. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  16. Regulatory perspective for prevention of groundwater pollution. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper attempts to establish a regulatory perspective for preventing groundwater pollution, which is a serious problem in many regions of the country. Historically, pollution-control regulations have been haphazard and uncoordinated. Few have been designed to consider the problems unique to this source. The paper outlines important hydrologic factors to establish a basis for an improved regulatory program for groundwater quality protection. Significant factors include the hydrologic role of ground water, the uses and regional importance of groundwater, and groundwater contamination pathways. A review of past and present trends in regulatory protection includes two regulatory approaches that are generally superior and a listing of key factors that planners should consider when designing land-use regulations. The paper concludes with a discussion of some possible problems of implementing an improved regulatory program, such as limits on our technical or enforcement capabilities. 52 references, 7 figures.

  17. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  18. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

    2000-04-25

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  19. Diabetes reduces basal retinal insulin receptor signaling: reversal with systemic and local insulin.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Chad E N; Wu, Xiaohua; Sandirasegarane, Lakshman; Nakamura, Makoto; Gilbert, Kirk A; Singh, Ravi S J; Fort, Patrice E; Antonetti, David A; Gardner, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by early onset of neuronal cell death. We previously showed that insulin mediates a prosurvival pathway in retinal neurons and that normal retina expresses a highly active basal insulin receptor/Akt signaling pathway that is stable throughout feeding and fasting. Using the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, we tested the hypothesis that diabetes diminishes basal retinal insulin receptor signaling concomitantly with increased diabetes-induced retinal apoptosis. The expression, phosphorylation status, and/or kinase activity of the insulin receptor and downstream signaling proteins were investigated in retinas of age-matched control, diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic rats. Four weeks of diabetes reduced basal insulin receptor kinase, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1/2-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Akt kinase activity without altering insulin receptor or IRS-1/2 expression or tyrosine phosphorylation. After 12 weeks of diabetes, constitutive insulin receptor autophosphorylation and IRS-2 expression were reduced, without changes in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase or IRS-1. Sustained systemic insulin treatment of diabetic rats prevented loss of insulin receptor and Akt kinase activity, and acute intravitreal insulin administration restored insulin receptor kinase activity. Insulin treatment restored insulin receptor-beta autophosphorylation in rat retinas maintained ex vivo, demonstrating functional receptors and suggesting loss of ligand as a cause for reduced retinal insulin receptor/Akt pathway activity. These results demonstrate that diabetes progressively impairs the constitutive retinal insulin receptor signaling pathway through Akt and suggests that loss of this survival pathway may contribute to the initial stages of diabetic retinopathy.

  20. S-nitrosylation of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatases in endothelial insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming-Fo; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Chang, Fan-Yu; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Urlaub, Henning; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chang, Geen-Dong; Haj, Fawaz G; Meng, Tzu-Ching

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts its biological function through S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Due to the labile nature of this modification under physiological condition, identification of S-nitrosylated residue in enzymes involved in signaling regulation remains technically challenging. The present study investigated whether intrinsic NO produced in endothelium-derived MS-1 cells response to insulin stimulation might target endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). For this, we have developed an approach using a synthetic reagent that introduces a phenylacetamidyl moiety on S-nitrosylated Cys, followed by detection with anti-phenylacetamidyl Cys (PAC) antibody. Coupling with sequential blocking of free thiols with multiple iodoacetyl-based Cys-reactive chemicals, we employed this PAC-switch method to show that endogenous SHP-2 and PTP1B were S-nitrosylated in MS-1 cells exposed to insulin. The mass spectrometry detected a phenylacetamidyl moiety specifically present on the active-site Cys463 of SHP-2. Focusing on the regulatory role of PTP1B, we showed S-nitrosylation to be the principal Cys reversible redox modification in endothelial insulin signaling. The PAC-switch method in an imaging format illustrated that a pool of S-nitrosylated PTP1B was colocalized with activated insulin receptor to the cell periphery, and that such event was endothelial NO synthase (eNOS)-dependent. Moreover, ectopic expression of the C215S mutant of PTP1B that mimics the active-site Cys215 S-nitrosylated form restored insulin responsiveness in eNOS-ablated cells, which was otherwise insensitive to insulin stimulation. This work not only introduces a new method that explores the role of physiological NO in regulating signal transduction, but also highlights a positive NO effect on promoting insulin responsiveness through S-nitrosylation of PTP1B's active-site Cys215.

  1. Determinants of High Fasting Insulin and Insulin Resistance Among Overweight/Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jerri Chiu Yun; Mohamed, Mohd Nahar Azmi; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Rampal, Sanjay; Zaharan, Nur Lisa; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is the earliest subclinical metabolic abnormality, which precedes insulin resistance in obese children. An investigation was conducted on the potential predictors of fasting insulin and insulin resistance among overweight/obese adolescents in a developing Asian country. A total of 173 overweight/obese (BMI > 85th percentile) multi-ethnic Malaysian adolescents aged 13 were recruited from 23 randomly selected schools in this cross-sectional study. Waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%), physical fitness score (PFS), fasting glucose and fasting insulin were measured. Insulin resistance was calculated using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Adjusted stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to predict fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. Covariates included pubertal stage, socioeconomic status, nutritional and physical activity scores. One-third of our adolescents were insulin resistant, with girls having significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR than boys. Gender, pubertal stage, BMI, WC and BF% had significant, positive moderate correlations with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR while PFS was inversely correlated (p < 0.05). Fasting insulin was primarily predicted by gender-girls (Beta = 0.305, p < 0.0001), higher BMI (Beta = −0.254, p = 0.02) and greater WC (Beta = 0.242, p = 0.03). This study demonstrated that gender, BMI and WC are simple predictors of fasting insulin and insulin resistance in overweight/obese adolescents. PMID:27824069

  2. [A case of leprechaunism with extreme insulin resistance due to a primary defect in insulin receptors].

    PubMed

    Goji, K; Takata, Y; Kobayashi, M

    1985-09-20

    This report describes a 3-month-old female infant with the typical physical features of leprechaunism. The patient demonstrated glucose intolerance and marked hyperinsulinemia (4600 microU/ml). Since an intravenous insulin injection (actrapid insulin: 0.15 U/kg) caused no significant decrease in the blood glucose level, the presence of insulin resistance was suggested. Neither insulin antibodies nor insulin receptor antibodies were were found in the patient's plasma, and other circulating insulin antagonists such as glucagon, growth hormone, and cortisol were within normal limits. [125I]Insulin binding to the erythrocytes from the patient was as low as 1.02% (control infants: 4.89 +/- 1.08% [mean +/- SD]). [125I]Insulin binding to the cultured transformed lymphocytes from the patient was similarly reduced to 3.58% (control: 20.9 +/- 2.71% [mean +/- SD]). From these findings we concluded that the insulin resistance was due to a primary defect in insulin receptors. Interestingly, transient remissions of the patient's glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia were observed during a year of follow-up study. The insulin tolerance test which was performed at the remission period showed an improvement in insulin resistance. However, the insulin binding defect to erythrocytes remained unchanged even at the remission period. The exact cause of these remissions was not clear and remained to be elucidated.

  3. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J.; Arner, P.

    1982-10-01

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono-/sup 125/I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis.

  4. A novel insulin sensitizer (S15511) enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Jessen, N; Selmer Buhl, E; Pold, R; Schmitz, O; Lund, S

    2008-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is preceded by the presence of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and drugs that increase insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle prevent the disease. S15511 is an original compound with demonstrated effects on insulin sensitivity in animal models of insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms behind the insulin-sensitizing effect of S15511 are unknown. The aim of our study was to explore whether S15511 improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscles. Insulin sensitivity was assessed in skeletal muscles from S15511-treated rats by measuring intracellular insulin-signaling activity and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in isolated muscles. In addition, GLUT4 expression and glycogen levels were assessed after treatment. S15511 treatment was associated with an increase in insulin-stimulated glucose transport in type IIb fibers, while type I fibers were unaffected. The enhanced glucose transport was mirrored by a fiber type-specific increase in GLUT4 expression, while no improvement in insulin-signaling activity was observed. S15511 is a novel insulin sensitizer that is capable of improving glucose homeostasis in nondiabetic rats. The compound enhances skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and specifically targets type IIb muscle fibers by increasing GLUT4 expression. Together these data show S15511 to be a potentially promising new drug in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Portrait of Candida Species Biofilm Regulatory Network Genes.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniela; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, but Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis, designated as non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC), have been identified as frequent human pathogens. Moreover, Candida biofilms are an escalating clinical problem associated with significant rates of mortality. Biofilms have distinct developmental phases, including adhesion/colonisation, maturation and dispersal, controlled by complex regulatory networks. This review discusses recent advances regarding Candida species biofilm regulatory network genes, which are key components for candidiasis.

  6. Molecular mechanism of induction of key enzymes related to lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Iritani, N; Tanaka, T

    1992-06-01

    Key enzymes related to lipogenesis in the liver are induced by a high glucose diet or insulin and suppressed by starvation, diabetes, or glucagon. Most of these enzymes are also induced by dietary fructose, even in diabetic liver. This regulation occurs at the posttranscriptional level as well as at the transcriptional level. We studied extensively the molecular mechanism of induction of L-type pyruvate kinase (LPK). The transcription of the LPK gene in the liver was stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon. This insulin action required ongoing protein synthesis and metabolism of glucose and was enhanced by glucocorticoid. On the other hand, the mechanism of induction of the LPK by dietary fructose depended on plasma insulin levels. Dietary fructose stimulated transcription of the LPK gene in normal rats, whereas it acted mainly at the posttranscriptional level in diabetic rats. These fructose effects were attributable to a common metabolite of fructose and glycerol. The induction of LPK mRNA by dietary glucose was impaired in the liver of Wistar fatty rats, a model of obese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, but fructose-induced accumulation of the mRNA was not. Studies on transgenic mice indicated that the 5'-flanking region up to -3 kb of the LPK gene contained all cis-acting elements necessary for tissue-specific expression of LPK and its stimulation by diets and insulin. Further analysis using a transient expression assay revealed the presence of three cis-acting elements necessary for expression of LPK in hepatocytes in the region up to -170 kb. However, these elements alone were not sufficient for dietary and hormonal regulation of this enzyme when analyzed in transgenic mice.

  7. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-09-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle microvascular recruitment. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but globular adiponectin administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin's metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. This suggests that globular adiponectin might have a therapeutic potential for improving insulin resistance and preventing cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes via modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by

  8. FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is mediated by PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Park, Edward; Mori, Yusaku; Haber, C Andrew; Han, Ping; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Stavar, Laura; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Ivovic, Alexander; Yu, Zhiwen; Li, Deling; Bowman, Thomas A; Dewald, Jay; El-Benna, Jamel; Brindley, David N; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K T; Najjar, Sonia M; McKay, Robert A; Bhanot, Sanjay; Fantus, I George; Giacca, Adria

    2014-07-01

    Fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although PKC and inflammatory pathways have been implicated in fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance, the sequence of events leading to impaired insulin signaling is unknown. We used Wistar rats to investigate whether PKCδ and oxidative stress play causal roles in this process and whether this occurs via IKKβ- and JNK-dependent pathways. Rats received a 7-h infusion of Intralipid plus heparin (IH) to elevate circulating free fatty acids (FFA). During the last 2 h of the infusion, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tracer was performed to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), prevented IH-induced hepatic insulin resistance in parallel with prevention of decreased IκBα content, increased JNK phosphorylation (markers of IKKβ and JNK activation, respectively), increased serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, and impaired insulin signaling in the liver without affecting IH-induced hepatic PKCδ activation. Furthermore, an antisense oligonucleotide against PKCδ prevented IH-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) (marker of NADPH oxidase activation) and hepatic insulin resistance. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevented IH-induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance similarly to NAC. These results demonstrate that PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress play a causal role in FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo and suggest that the pathway of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is FFA → PKCδ → NADPH oxidase and oxidative stress → IKKβ/JNK → impaired hepatic insulin signaling.

  9. Methylated trivalent arsenicals are potent inhibitors of glucose stimulated insulin secretion by murine pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Douillet, Christelle; Currier, Jenna; Saunders, Jesse; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2013-02-15

    Epidemiologic evidence has linked chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) with an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Laboratory studies have identified several mechanisms by which iAs can impair glucose homeostasis. We have previously shown that micromolar concentrations of arsenite (iAs{sup III}) or its methylated trivalent metabolites, methylarsonite (MAs{sup III}) and dimethylarsinite (DMAs{sup III}), inhibit the insulin-activated signal transduction pathway, resulting in insulin resistance in adipocytes. Our present study examined effects of the trivalent arsenicals on insulin secretion by intact pancreatic islets isolated from C57BL/6 mice. We found that 48-hour exposures to low subtoxic concentrations of iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but not basal insulin secretion. MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} were more potent than iAs{sup III} as GSIS inhibitors with estimated IC{sub 50} ≤ 0.1 μM. The exposures had little or no effects on insulin content of the islets or on insulin expression, suggesting that trivalent arsenicals interfere with mechanisms regulating packaging of the insulin transport vesicles or with translocation of these vesicles to the plasma membrane. Notably, the inhibition of GSIS by iAs{sup III}, MAs{sup III} or DMAs{sup III} could be reversed by a 24-hour incubation of the islets in arsenic-free medium. These results suggest that the insulin producing pancreatic β-cells are among the targets for iAs exposure and that the inhibition of GSIS by low concentrations of the methylated metabolites of iAs may be the key mechanism of iAs-induced diabetes. - Highlights: ► Trivalent arsenicals inhibit glucose stimulated insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. ► MAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup III} are more potent inhibitors than arsenite with IC{sub 50} ∼ 0.1 μM. ► The arsenicals have little or no effects on insulin expression in pancreatic islets. ► The inhibition of

  10. An Alternative to Keys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagan, James

    1977-01-01

    For the secondary school, the author discourages the use of dichotomous keys in favor of a punch-card system. The system is readily constructed by students for use in plant and animal classification. (CP)

  11. [Beyond immunopathogenesis. Insulin resistance and "epidermal dysfunction"].

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W-H; Boehncke, S; Buerger, C

    2012-03-01

    Insulin is a central player in the regulation of metabolic as well as non-metabolic cells: inefficient signal transduction (insulin resistance) not only represents the cornerstone in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also drives atherosclerosis through inducing endothelial dysfunction. Last but not least epidermal homeostasis depends on insulin. We summarize the effects of insulin on proliferation and differentiation of human keratinocytes as well as the relevance of cytokine-induced insulin resistance for alterations in epidermal homeostasis characteristic for psoriasis. Kinases involved in both insulin- as well as cytokine-receptor signaling represent potential targets for innovative therapeutics. Such small molecules would primarily normalize "epidermal dysfunction", thus complementing the immunomodulatory strategies of today's biologics.

  12. The regulatory horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, ED

    1987-01-01

    The author briefly discusses the FAA's position as it relates to cockpit resource management. For example, if Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is a positive concept, why isn't everyone required to implement it? The regulatory practice of the FAA is discussed and questions and answers are presented.

  13. Toxicogenomics in Regulatory Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions, and as with any new technology, there is a wide range of opinion. The purpose of this feature article is to consider roles of toxicogenomic...

  14. Public Key FPGA Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hymel, Ross

    2013-07-25

    The Public Key (PK) FPGA software performs asymmetric authentication using the 163-bit Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) on an embedded FPGA platform. A digital signature is created on user-supplied data, and communication with a host system is performed via a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) bus. Software includes all components necessary for signing, including custom random number generator for key creation and SHA-256 for data hashing.

  15. The Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory is a global network of robotic telescopes specializing in time domain astronomy. It currently has nine 1m telescopes, two 2m telescopes, and seven 0.4m telescopes. The Supernova Key Project is a 3 year program to obtain light curves and spectra of 500 supernovae with Las Cumbres Observatory. Here we show recent results, detail plans for the next Supernova Key Project, and explain how the US community can get involved.

  16. Effects of high glucose on caveolin-1 and insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Varela-Guruceaga, Maider; Martínez, J. Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos; Milagro, Fermín I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipocytes exposed to high glucose concentrations exhibit impaired metabolic function, including an increase of oxidative and proinflammatory factors that might favor the development of insulin resistance. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key mediator of the insulin transduction pathway whose expression is significantly enhanced during adipocyte differentiation. In this work, we studied the effects of high glucose concentration on the regulation of Cav-1 expression and activation and its relation to the insulin signaling pathway during the adipogenic process and in long-term differentiated adipocytes. Both, long-term high glucose exposure during adipogenesis and short-term glucose incubation of mature adipocytes, promoted triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. The short-term exposure of mature adipocytes to high glucose significantly reduced the sensitivity to insulin of Cav-1, insulin receptor (IR) and potein kinase B (AKT-2) phosphorylation, as well as insulin-induced deoxyglucose uptake. Adipocytes differentiated in the presence of high glucose lost Cav-1 and IR response to insulin-stimulated phosphorylation, but maintained the insulin sensitivity of AKT-2 phosphorylation and deoxyglucose uptake. Although long-term high glucose exposure increased DNA methylation in Cav-1 promoter, Cav-1 expression was not affected. Moreover, these cells showed an increase of Cav-1, IR and AKT-2 protein content, pointing to an adaptive response induced by the long-term high glucose exposure. PMID:27144098

  17. Effects of high glucose on caveolin-1 and insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Varela-Guruceaga, Maider; Martínez, J Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos; Milagro, Fermín I

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes exposed to high glucose concentrations exhibit impaired metabolic function, including an increase of oxidative and proinflammatory factors that might favor the development of insulin resistance. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key mediator of the insulin transduction pathway whose expression is significantly enhanced during adipocyte differentiation. In this work, we studied the effects of high glucose concentration on the regulation of Cav-1 expression and activation and its relation to the insulin signaling pathway during the adipogenic process and in long-term differentiated adipocytes. Both, long-term high glucose exposure during adipogenesis and short-term glucose incubation of mature adipocytes, promoted triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. The short-term exposure of mature adipocytes to high glucose significantly reduced the sensitivity to insulin of Cav-1, insulin receptor (IR) and potein kinase B (AKT-2) phosphorylation, as well as insulin-induced deoxyglucose uptake. Adipocytes differentiated in the presence of high glucose lost Cav-1 and IR response to insulin-stimulated phosphorylation, but maintained the insulin sensitivity of AKT-2 phosphorylation and deoxyglucose uptake. Although long-term high glucose exposure increased DNA methylation in Cav-1 promoter, Cav-1 expression was not affected. Moreover, these cells showed an increase of Cav-1, IR and AKT-2 protein content, pointing to an adaptive response induced by the long-term high glucose exposure.

  18. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    PubMed

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory.

  19. Effect of fensuccinal on experimental insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, N I; Poltorak, V V; Gladkikh, A I; Ivanova, O V

    2000-07-01

    The effects of new antioxidant fensuccinal on dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance in rats were studied. Oral administration of fensuccinal in a dose of 25 mg/kg for 2 weeks prevented basal hyperinsulinemia and insulin insensitivity of peripheral tissues. Fensuccinal also attenuated oxidative stress by decreasing the concentrations of primary and secondary lipid peroxidation products in liver homogenates. The ability of fensuccinal to prevent dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance is probably due to its antioxidant properties.

  20. Kinome Screen Identifies PFKFB3 and Glucose Metabolism as Important Regulators of the Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-1 Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Trefely, Sophie; Khoo, Poh-Sim; Krycer, James R.; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Sultani, Ghazal; Lee, James; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Torres, Eric; Jung, Kenneth; Kuijl, Coenraad; James, David E.; Junutula, Jagath R.; Stöckli, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling pathway (ISP) plays a fundamental role in long term health in a range of organisms. Protein kinases including Akt and ERK are intimately involved in the ISP. To identify other kinases that may participate in this pathway or intersect with it in a regulatory manner, we performed a whole kinome (779 kinases) siRNA screen for positive or negative regulators of the ISP, using GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface as an output for pathway activity. We identified PFKFB3, a positive regulator of glycolysis that is highly expressed in cancer cells and adipocytes, as a positive ISP regulator. Pharmacological inhibition of PFKFB3 suppressed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, and Akt signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In contrast, overexpression of PFKFB3 in HEK293 cells potentiated insulin-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and Akt substrates. Furthermore, pharmacological modulation of glycolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes affected Akt phosphorylation. These data add to an emerging body of evidence that metabolism plays a central role in regulating numerous biological processes including the ISP. Our findings have important implications for diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cancer that are characterized by marked disruption of both metabolism and growth factor signaling. PMID:26342081

  1. Food Purchase Decision-Making Typologies of Women with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla; Warland, Rex; Achterberg, Cheryl

    1997-01-01

    Food selection is a key factor in the nutritional management of diabetes. Criteria that influence point-of-purchase decision making in women with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were identified. Four types of shoppers were distinguished from interviews; cluster analysis was used to confirm the analysis. Usefulness in patient education is…

  2. Insulin resistance in porphyria cutanea tarda.

    PubMed

    Calcinaro, F; Basta, G; Lisi, P; Cruciani, C; Pietropaolo, M; Santeusanio, F; Falorni, A; Calafiore, R

    1989-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) develop carbohydrate (CHO) intolerance and manifest diabetes melitus (DM) more frequently than the normal population. In order to verify whether this is due to insulin resistance we studied 5 patients with PCT and 5 normal subjects matched for age, sex and weight. In all the patients an evaluation consisted of the glycemic curve and insulin response to an iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT: 0.33 g/kg) as well as of an evaluation of the circulating monocyte insulin receptors. Blood samples were drawn in the basal state to measure plasma levels of NEFA, glycerol, and intermediate metabolites. The patients with PCT showed normal glucose tolerance which was obtained, however, at the expense of the elevated insulin levels: therefore a condition of insulin resistance was demonstrated in these subjects. An involvement of the lipid metabolism, observed by the raised levels of plasma NEFA and glycerol, was also evident. The insulin binding to circulating monocytes was reduced but not enough to justify the degree of insulin resistance observed. Therefore, it could be hypothesized, in agreement with similar studies, that a postreceptor defect is responsible for the insulin-resistance observed in patients with PCT and that the reduction of insulin receptors is determined by the down regulation in response to elevated insulinemic levels. An alteration of the porphyrin metabolism might be responsible for this disorder.

  3. How many oral antidiabetic drugs before insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Kelwade, Jayant; Parekh, Harsh; Dukle, Vaibhav; Sethi, Bipin Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Worsening of glycemic control in type 2 Diabetes mellitus occur on account of declining beta cell function. This calls for up titration of the chosen drug, addition of another agent with complementary action and eventually insulin usually after 2 or three OADs. Introduction of insulin has many issues which include parenteral route of administration, cost and enhancement of hypoglycemic tendency. We propose the addition of another OAD in lieu of insulin in whom glycemic control can be achieved equally well without insulin PMID:28217528

  4. Angiotensin and insulin resistance: conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin is a contender for the short list of major cardiovascular risk factors. Since the elements of the syndrome of insulin resistance were first articulated together in 1988, numerous epidemiologic investigations and treatment endeavors have established a relationship between the metabolic disarray of impaired insulin action and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II, the primary effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has also achieved a place in the chronicles of cardiovascular risk factors. Conspiracy mechanisms by which angiotensin II and insulin resistance interact in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease are reviewed, with particular attention to recent developments in this engaging area of human research.

  5. Paradoxical Acceleration of Dithiothreitol-Induced Aggregation of Insulin in the Presence of a Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bumagina, Zoya; Gurvits, Bella; Artemova, Natalya; Muranov, Konstantin; Kurganov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of human recombinant insulin and the effect of α-crystallin, a representative of the family of small heat shock proteins, on the aggregation process have been studied using dynamic light scattering technique. Analysis of the distribution of the particles by size measured in the course of aggregation showed that the initial stage of the aggregation process was the stage of formation of the start aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of about 90 nm. When studying the effect of α-crystallin on the rate of DTT-induced aggregation of insulin, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of α-crystallin dramatically accelerated the aggregation process, whereas high concentrations of α-crystallin suppressed insulin aggregation. In the present study, at the molar stoichiometric ratio (insulin:α-crystallin) less than 1:0.5, a pronounced accelerating effect of α-crystallin was observed; whereas a ratio exceeding the value of 1:0.6 caused suppression of insulin aggregation. The mechanisms underlying the dual effect of α-crystallin have been proposed. It is assumed that heterogeneous nucleation occurring on the surface of the α-crystallin particle plays the key role in the paradoxical acceleration of insulin aggregation by α-crystallin that may provide an alternative biologically significant pathway of the aggregation process. PMID:21151456

  6. Liver-specific deletion of Ppp2cα enhances glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Xian, Li; Hou, Siyuan; Huang, Zan; Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Wang, Qinghua; Song, Anying; Jiang, Shujun; Lin, Zhaoyu; Guo, Shiying; Gao, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a key negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Previous study showed that, in the liver, the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac) is closely associated with insulin resistance syndrome, which is characterized by glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. Here we studied the role of liver PP2Ac in glucose metabolism and evaluated whether PP2Ac is a suitable therapeutic target for treating insulin resistance syndrome. Liver-specific Ppp2cα knockout mice (Ppp2cα(loxp/loxp): Alb) exhibited improved glucose homeostasis compared with littermate controls in both normal and high-fat diet conditions, despite no significant changes in body weight and liver weight under chow diet. Ppp2cα(loxp/loxp): Alb mice showed enhanced glycogen deposition, serum triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein, activated insulin signaling, decreased expressions of gluconeogenic genes G6P and PEPCK, and lower liver triglyceride. Liver-specific Ppp2cα knockout mice showed enhanced glucose homeostasis and increased insulin sensitivity by activation of insulin signaling through Akt. These findings suggest that inhibition of hepatic Ppp2cα may be a useful strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance syndrome.

  7. Integrative genomic analysis implicates limited peripheral adipose storage capacity in the pathogenesis of human insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lotta, Luca A; Gulati, Pawan; Day, Felix R; Payne, Felicity; Ongen, Halit; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gaulton, Kyle J; Eicher, John D; Sharp, Stephen J; Luan, Jian'an; De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Stewart, Isobel D; Wheeler, Eleanor; Willems, Sara M; Adams, Claire; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Forouhi, Nita G; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Johnson, Andrew D; Semple, Robert K; Frayling, Timothy; Perry, John R B; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; McCarthy, Mark I; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J; Savage, David B; Langenberg, Claudia; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Scott, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key mediator of obesity-related cardiometabolic disease, yet the mechanisms underlying this link remain obscure. Using an integrative genomic approach, we identify 53 genomic regions associated with insulin resistance phenotypes (higher fasting insulin levels adjusted for BMI, lower HDL cholesterol levels and higher triglyceride levels) and provide evidence that their link with higher cardiometabolic risk is underpinned by an association with lower adipose mass in peripheral compartments. Using these 53 loci, we show a polygenic contribution to familial partial lipodystrophy type 1, a severe form of insulin resistance, and highlight shared molecular mechanisms in common/mild and rare/severe insulin resistance. Population-level genetic analyses combined with experiments in cellular models implicate CCDC92, DNAH10 and L3MBTL3 as previously unrecognized molecules influencing adipocyte differentiation. Our findings support the notion that limited storage capacity of peripheral adipose tissue is an important etiological component in insulin-resistant cardiometabolic disease and highlight genes and mechanisms underpinning this link.

  8. Effects of insulin on the skin: possible healing benefits for diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Emanuelli, T; Burgeiro, A; Carvalho, E

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15-20 % of all diabetic patients and remain an important challenge since the available therapies have limited efficacy and some of the novel therapeutic approaches, which include growth factors and stem cells, are highly expensive and their safety remains to be evaluated. Despite its low cost and safety, the interest for topical insulin as a healing agent has increased only in the last 20 years. The molecular mechanisms of insulin signaling and its metabolic effects have been well studied in its classical target tissues. However, little is known about the specific effects of insulin in healthy or even diabetic skin. In addition, the mechanisms involved in the effects of insulin on wound healing have been virtually unknown until about 10 years ago. This paper will review the most recent advances in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of insulin on skin wound healing in diabetes. Emerging evidence that links dysfunction of key cellular organelles, namely the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, to changes in the autophagy response, as well as the impaired wound healing in diabetic patients will also be discussed along with the putative mechanisms whereby insulin could regulate/modulate these alterations.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulates inflammation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Liong, Stella; Lappas, Martha

    2016-04-15

    Sterile inflammation and infection are key mediators of inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies have shown endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to induce inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, however is paucity of studies investigating the effects of ER stress in skeletal muscle on inflammation and insulin resistance associated with GDM. ER stress proteins IRE1α, GRP78 and XBP-1s were upregulated in skeletal muscle of obese pregnant women, whereas IRE1α was increased in GDM women. Suppression of ER stress, using ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) or siRNA knockdown of IRE1α and GRP78, significantly downregulated LPS-, poly(I:C)- or IL-1β-induced production of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and MCP-1. Furthermore, LPS-, poly(I:C)- or TNF-α-induced insulin resistance was improved following suppression of ER stress, by increasing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IR-β, IRS-1, GLUT-4 expression and glucose uptake. In summary, our inducible obesity and GDM-like models suggests that the development of GDM may be involved in activating ER stress-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle.

  10. G protein–coupled receptor 21 deletion improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Olivia; Oh, Da Young; McNelis, Joanne; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Talukdar, Saswata; Lu, Min; Li, PingPing; Thiede, Lucinda; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Kim, Jane J.; Heinrichsdorff, Jan; Nalbandian, Sarah; Ofrecio, Jachelle M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Schenk, Simon; Hadcock, John; Bartfai, Tamas; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation is a key component of systemic insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. A major driver of this inflammation/insulin resistance syndrome is the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue and liver. We found that the orphan GPCR Gpr21 was highly expressed in the hypothalamus and macrophages of mice and that whole-body KO of this receptor led to a robust improvement in glucose tolerance and systemic insulin sensitivity and a modest lean phenotype. The improvement in insulin sensitivity in the high-fat diet–fed (HFD-fed) Gpr21 KO mouse was traced to a marked reduction in tissue inflammation caused by decreased chemotaxis of Gpr21 KO macrophages into adipose tissue and liver. Furthermore, mice lacking macrophage expression of Gpr21 were protected from HFD-induced inflammation and displayed improved insulin sensitivity. Results of in vitro chemotaxis studies in human monocytes suggested that the defect in chemotaxis observed ex vivo and in vivo in mice is also translatable to humans. Cumulatively, our data indicate that GPR21 has a critical function in coordinating macrophage proinflammatory activity in the context of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:22653059

  11. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22–B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26–B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity. PMID:26792393

  12. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nabilatul Hani; Ismail, W. I. W.; Adam, Zainah; Jaapar, Siti Safura; Adam, Aishah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNFα and PPARγ and serine kinases like JNK and IKKβ, asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities) were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24324517

  13. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nabilatul Hani; Ismail, W I W; Adam, Zainah; Jaapar, Siti Safura; Adam, Aishah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNF α and PPAR γ and serine kinases like JNK and IKK β , asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities) were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22–B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26–B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  15. Hepatic cyclooxygenase-2 expression protects against diet-induced steatosis, obesity, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Francés, Daniel E; Motiño, Omar; Agrá, Noelia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Fernández-Álvarez, Ana; Cucarella, Carme; Mayoral, Rafael; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Boscá, Lisardo; Carnovale, Cristina E; Casado, Marta; Valverde, Ángela M; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation evidence links obesity-induced inflammation as an important contributor to the development of insulin resistance, which plays a key role in the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 catalyze the first step in prostanoid biosynthesis. Because adult hepatocytes fail to induce COX-2 expression regardless of the proinflammatory stimuli used, we have evaluated whether this lack of expression under mild proinflammatory conditions might constitute a permissive condition for the onset of insulin resistance. Our results show that constitutive expression of human COX-2 (hCOX-2) in hepatocytes protects against adiposity, inflammation, and, hence, insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet, as demonstrated by decreased hepatic steatosis, adiposity, plasmatic and hepatic triglycerides and free fatty acids, increased adiponectin-to-leptin ratio, and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, together with an enhancement of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Furthermore, hCOX-2 transgenic mice exhibited increased whole-body energy expenditure due in part by induction of thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. The analysis of hepatic insulin signaling revealed an increase in insulin receptor-mediated Akt phosphorylation in hCOX-2 transgenic mice. In conclusion, our results point to COX-2 as a potential therapeutic target against obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction.

  16. Changes of insulin effect on lipogenesis and insulin binding receptors during hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Fickova, M.; Zorad, S.

    The effect of hypokinesia on insulin action and insulin binding to specific receptors in fat cells was studied. Male Wistar rats were exposed to hypokinesia in special adjustable plastic cages for 1, 7, 21 and 60 days, and the stimulatory effect of insulin (10 and 100 mU) on the incorporation of radiocarbon labelled glucose into lipids of fat tissue and the binding of insulin to receptors of isolated adipocytes was estimated. The stimulation of lipogenesis by insulin was slightly diminished after hypokinesia for 1 day, however, an important increase of insulin action was found in rats exposed to hypokinesia for 60 days. The decrease of insulin binding capacity of the number of binding sites per cell and of the insulin receptor density was found after 1 day of hypokinesia. In rats exposed to hypokinesia for 60 days, in agreement with the higher stimulatory affect of insulin, an increase of insulin receptor density was observed. These results showed that hypokinesia has an important influence on stimulatory action of insulin and on insulin receptors in adipocytes.

  17. Controlled release of insulin from folic acid-insulin complex nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajat; Mohanty, Sanat

    2017-03-03

    Associative interactions between folic acid and proteins are well known. This work leverages these interactions to engineer folic acid nanoparticles for controlled release of insulin during diabetes therapy. The insulin-loaded folic acid nanoformulation is synthesized during this study to achieve better insulin loading and encapsulation than previous strategies. The maximum insulin loading in the FA particles was kept at 6mg with less than 10% insulin loss during the synthesis process which is significantly better compare to previous strategies. The folic acid nanoparticles of 50-150nm size are further characterized in the present study. The release behaviour of insulin from the nanoparticles has been studied to quantify released insulin and folic acid with time using high performance liquid chromatography. Insulin release results suggest that more than 90% of the insulin is encapsulated and released within 24h from folic acid nanoparticles. The analysis of folic acid release along with insulin release indicates that the particles are formed by folic acid-insulin complexation at the molecular level. The release of insulin from nanoparticles is controllable with the change in the crosslinking salt concentration as well as the amount of folic acid loaded during particle synthesis. These results prove that folic acid nanocarriers are capable to control the release of therapeutic proteins.

  18. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M. )

    1988-08-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5{prime}-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5{prime}-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable ({sup 14}C)sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Adventures with Insulin in the Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin is a small but beautifully organized protein with a unique two-chain structure, the first protein to be sequenced. The mechanism of its biosynthesis invited much initial speculation but was finally clarified by the discovery of proinsulin, its single-chain precursor. The rich present-day field of protein precursor processing via post-translational proteolysis within the secretory pathway arose in the early 1970s as an offshoot of studies on insulin biosynthesis, which provided a novel paradigm for the generation of many other small neuroendocrine peptides. Before long, this mechanism was also found to play a role in the production of a much wider spectrum of proteins traversing the secretory pathway (receptors, growth factors, blood-clotting components, and even many viral envelope proteins) occurring in almost all eukaryotic cells. Indeed, yeast provided a key clue in the search for the proprotein convertases, the endoproteases that work along with carboxypeptidases and other modifying enzymes, such as the amidating enzyme complex (PAM), in converting inactive or less active precursor proteins into their fully active peptide products. In this “Reflections” article, I have tried to recount the people and events in my life that led to my involvement first in basic biochemical research and then on to insulin, proinsulin, and many relevant related areas that continue to fascinate and challenge my colleagues and me, as well as many other biomedical scientists today, as diabetes mellitus increasingly threatens human health throughout our contemporary world. PMID:21454641

  20. Hippocampal Insulin Resistance Impairs Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Piroli, Gerardo G.; Lawrence, Robert C.; Wrighten, Shayna A.; Green, Adrienne J.; Wilson, Steven P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Kelly, Sandra J.; Wilson, Marlene A.; Mott, David D.; Reagan, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin receptors (IRs) are expressed in discrete neuronal populations in the central nervous system, including the hippocampus. To elucidate the functional role of hippocampal IRs independent of metabolic function, we generated a model of hippocampal-specific insulin resistance using a lentiviral vector expressing an IR antisense sequence (LV-IRAS). LV-IRAS effectively downregulates IR expression in the rat hippocampus without affecting body weight, adiposity, or peripheral glucose homeostasis. Nevertheless, hippocampal neuroplasticity was impaired in LV-IRAS–treated rats. High-frequency stimulation, which evoked robust long-term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from LV control rats, failed to evoke LTP in LV-IRAS–treated rats. GluN2B subunit levels, as well as the basal level of phosphorylation of GluA1, were reduced in the hippocampus of LV-IRAS rats. Moreover, these deficits in synaptic transmission were associated with impairments in spatial learning. We suggest that alterations in the expression and phosphorylation of glutamate receptor subunits underlie the alterations in LTP and that these changes are responsible for the impairment in hippocampal-dependent learning. Importantly, these learning deficits are strikingly similar to the impairments in complex task performance observed in patients with diabetes, which strengthens the hypothesis that hippocampal insulin resistance is a key mediator of cognitive deficits independent of glycemic control. PMID:26216852

  1. Use of a small peptide fragment as an inhibitor of insulin fibrillation process: a study by high and low resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Victor; Kar, Rajiv K; Datta, Aritreyee; Parthasarathi, Krupakar; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Das, Kali P; Bhunia, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    A non-toxic, nine residue peptide, NIVNVSLVK is shown to interfere with insulin fibrillation by various biophysical methods. Insulin undergoes conformational changes under certain stress conditions leading to amyloid fibrils. Fibrillation of insulin poses a problem in its long-term storage, reducing its efficacy in treating type II diabetes. The dissociation of insulin oligomer to monomer is the key step for the onset of fibrillation. The time course of insulin fibrillation at 62°C using Thioflavin T fluorescence shows an increase in the lag time from 120 min without peptide to 236 min with peptide. Transmission electron micrographs show branched insulin fibrils in its absence and less inter-fibril association in its presence. Upon incubation at 62°C and pH 2.6, insulin lost some α-helical structure as seen by Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), but if the peptide is added, secondary structure is almost fully maintained for 3 h, though lost partially at 4 h. FT-IR spectroscopy also shows that insulin forms the cross beta structure indicative of fibrils beyond 2 h, but in the presence of the peptide, α-helix retention is seen till 4 h. Both size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show that insulin primarily exists as trimer, whose conversion to a monomer is resisted by the peptide. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance confirms that the hydrophobic residues in the peptide are in close contact with an insulin hydrophobic groove. Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with principal component analyses reveal how the peptide interrupts insulin fibrillation. In vitro hemolytic activity of the peptide showed insignificant cytotoxicity against HT1080 cells. The insulin aggregation is probed due to the inter play of two key residues, Phe(B24) and Tyr(B26) monitored from molecular dynamics simulations studies. Further new peptide based leads may be developed from this nine residue peptide.

  2. High fructose-mediated attenuation of insulin receptor signaling does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Osman, Islam; Poulose, Ninu; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Segar, Lakshman

    2016-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Although high fructose is known to induce insulin resistance, it remains unclear as to how fructose regulates insulin receptor signaling and proliferative phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which play a major role in atherosclerosis. Using human aortic VSMCs, we investigated the effects of high fructose treatment on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serine phosphorylation, insulin versus platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phosphorylation of Akt, S6 ribosomal protein, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cell cycle proteins. In comparison with PDGF (a potent mitogen), neither fructose nor insulin enhanced VSMC proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. d-[(14)C(U)]fructose uptake studies revealed a progressive increase in fructose uptake in a time-dependent manner. Concentration-dependent studies with high fructose (5-25mM) showed marked increases in IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, a key adapter protein in insulin receptor signaling. Accordingly, high fructose treatment led to significant diminutions in insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream signaling components including Akt and S6. In addition, high fructose significantly diminished insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation. Nevertheless, high fructose did not affect PDGF-induced key proliferative signaling events including phosphorylation of Akt, S6, and ERK and expression of cyclin D1 protein. Together, high fructose dysregulates IRS-1 phosphorylation state and proximal insulin receptor signaling in VSMCs, but does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling. These findings suggest that systemic insulin resistance rather than VSMC-specific dysregulation of insulin receptor signaling by high fructose may play a major role in enhancing atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia.

  3. The role of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in insulin regulation of food intake, body weight, and sympathetic nerve activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Muta, Kenjiro; Morgan, Donald A; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Insulin action in the brain particularly the hypothalamus is critically involved in the regulation of several physiological processes, including energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve activity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is implicated in the control of diverse cellular functions, including sensing nutrients and energy status. Here, we examined the role of hypothalamic mTORC1 in mediating the anorectic, weight-reducing, and sympathetic effects of central insulin action. In a mouse hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7), insulin treatment increased mTORC1 activity in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin to mice activated mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a key site of central action of insulin. Interestingly, inhibition of hypothalamic mTORC1 with rapamycin reversed the food intake- and body weight-lowering effects of ICV insulin. Rapamycin also abolished the ability of ICV insulin to cause lumbar sympathetic nerve activation. In GT1-7 cells, we found that insulin activation of mTORC1 pathway requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Consistent with this, genetic disruption of PI3K in mice abolished insulin stimulation of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling as well as the lumbar sympathetic nerve activation evoked by insulin. These results demonstrate the importance of mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamus in mediating the action of insulin to regulate energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve traffic. Our data also highlight the key role of PI3K as a link between insulin receptor and mTORC1 signaling in the hypothalamus.

  4. Canadian regulatory perspectives on genome engineered crops.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Stuart J

    2017-01-02

    New breeding techniques in plant agriculture exploded upon the scene about two years ago, in 2014. While these innovative plant breeding techniques, soon to be led by CRISPR/Cas9, initially appear to hold tremendous promise for plant breeding, if not a revolution for the industry, the question of how the products of these technologies will be regulated is rapidly becoming a key aspect of the technology's future potential. Regulation of innovative technologies and products has always lagged that of the science, but in the past decade, regulatory systems in many jurisdictions have become gridlocked as they try to regulate genetically modified (GM) crops. This regulatory incapability to efficiently assess and approve innovative new agricultural products is particularly important for new plant breeding techniques as if these techniques are classified as genetically modified breeding techniques, then their acceptance and future will diminish considerably as they will be rejected by the European Union. Conversely, if the techniques are accepted as conventional plant breeding, then the future is blindingly bright. This article examines the international debate about the regulation of new plant breeding techniques and then assesses how the Canadian regulatory system has approached the regulation of these technologies through two more public product approvals, GM apples and GM potatoes, then discusses other crop variety approval and those in the regulatory pipeline.

  5. Regulatory guidelines for biosimilars in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abas, Arpah

    2011-09-01

    The biosimilars sector continues to attract huge interest and controversy. Biosimilars are new biopharmaceuticals that are "similar" but not identical to the innovator product. Characteristics of biopharmaceuticals are closely related to the manufacturing process, which implies that the products cannot be exactly duplicated. Minuscule differences in the product's structure and manufacturing process can result in different clinical outcome. This raises concerns over the safety, efficacy and even pharmacovigilance of biosimilars. Thus, biosimilars are unique - they are not a true chemical generic and are regulated via a distinct regulatory framework. This report discusses the features of Malaysian regulatory oversight of biosimilars and experience acquired in the evaluation of some products from various countries. Ensuring regulatory position adequately reflects scientific advancement, expertise/resources is key. The regulatory situation is an evolving process. Various guidance documents are being prepared with the aim of developing a uniform global framework towards assuring the dual goal of lower costs and patient safety while expediting the availability of important biosimilar products.

  6. Toxicogenomics and the Regulatory Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomics presents regulatory agencies with the opportunity to revolutionize their analyses by enabling the collection of information on a broader range of responses than currently considered in traditional regulatory decision making. Analyses of genomic responses are expec...

  7. Are obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sue; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Revelo, Xavier S; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and associated insulin resistance predispose individuals to develop chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these disorders affect a significant proportion of the global population, the underlying mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. The discovery of elevated tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue as an inducer of obesity-associated insulin resistance marked a new era of understanding that a subclinical inflammatory process underlies the insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction that precedes type 2 diabetes. Advances in the field identified components of both the innate and adaptive immune response as key players in regulating such inflammatory processes. As antigen specificity is a hallmark of an adaptive immune response, its role in modulating the chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes begs the question of whether insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes can have autoimmune components. In this Perspective, we summarize current data that pertain to the activation and perpetuation of adaptive immune responses during obesity and discuss key missing links and potential mechanisms for obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to be considered as potential autoimmune diseases.

  8. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly.

  9. Algorithms for intravenous insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Susan S; Clement, Stephen

    2008-08-01

    This review aims to classify algorithms for intravenous insulin infusion according to design. Essential input data include the current blood glucose (BG(current)), the previous blood glucose (BG(previous)), the test time of BG(current) (test time(current)), the test time of BG(previous) (test time(previous)), and the previous insulin infusion rate (IR(previous)). Output data consist of the next insulin infusion rate (IR(next)) and next test time. The classification differentiates between "IR" and "MR" algorithm types, both defined as a rule for assigning an insulin infusion rate (IR), having a glycemic target. Both types are capable of assigning the IR for the next iteration of the algorithm (IR(next)) as an increasing function of BG(current), IR(previous), and rate-of-change of BG with respect to time, each treated as an independent variable. Algorithms of the IR type directly seek to define IR(next) as an incremental adjustment to IR(previous). At test time(current), under an IR algorithm the differences in values of IR(next) that might be assigned depending upon the value of BG(current) are not necessarily continuously dependent upon, proportionate to, or commensurate with either the IR(previous) or the rate-of-change of BG. Algorithms of the MR type create a family of IR functions of BG differing according to maintenance rate (MR), each being an iso-MR curve. The change of IR(next) with respect to BG(current) is a strictly increasing function of MR. At test time(current), algorithms of the MR type use IR(previous) and the rate-of-change of BG to define the MR, multiplier, or column assignment, which will be used for patient assignment to the right iso-MR curve and as precedent for IR(next). Bolus insulin therapy is especially effective when used in proportion to carbohydrate load to cover anticipated incremental transitory enteral or parenteral carbohydrate exposure. Specific distinguishing algorithm design features and choice of parameters may be important to

  10. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance as a precursor to Diabetes: Beyond glucoregulation.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas P; Brown, Jacob L; Rosa-Caldwell, Megan E; Lee, David E; Blackwell, Thomas A; Washington, Tyrone A

    2016-11-22

    Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) has reached pandemic levels in Western societies. T2DM begins with the development of peripheral insulin resistance which prior research suggests may commonly originate within skeletal muscle. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for the development of muscle insulin resistance including those of classical glucose handling, but also other cellular derangements observed in this disease which include mitochondrial degeneration, alterations in muscle protein turnover and early evidences for dysregulation of microRNAs. The purpose of the current review is to examine current findings on these latter aspects of mitochondrial maintenance, protein turnover and microRNA dysregulation along with the potential implications for these derangements in the development of insulin resistance and hence T2DM. We summarize multiple evidences for the degeneration of mitochondria and known elements of the processes regulating mitochondrial quality. Subsequently, we examine current findings of alterations in muscle protein synthesis and autophagic protein degradation in T2DM and potential feedback of these systems onto canonical insulin signaling. Finally, evidences are emerging for the dysregulation of microRNAs in muscle insulin resistance. Of note early data point to several microRNAs altered by the insulin resistant state which exhibit relations to classic insulin signaling and the other processes discussed here. Considering that T2DM may be initiated with muscle insulin resistance, improved understanding of the dysregulation of these metabolic parameters of skeletal muscle in the pathogenesis of T2DM may be key to develop efficacious therapeutic modalities to prevent and treat this condition.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of insulin glargine vs. neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin in type 2 diabetes: a focus on health economics.

    PubMed

    Levin, P

    2008-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem, in particular because of long-term complications affecting essential organs, such as the eyes and kidneys, which can lead to a reduction in life expectancy and high healthcare costs. The number of individuals with diabetes mellitus is projected to rise worldwide from 171 million people in 2000 to 366 million people in 2030. With the number of patients with diabetes continually growing, the burden of pressure on worldwide health systems is huge. Accordingly, regulatory and marketing approvals of new medicines are beginning to incorporate economic evaluation techniques to determine their cost-effectiveness. Overall, the studies included in this review show that the initiation of insulin glargine is cost-effective and is expected to lead to substantial improvements in both life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted LYs compared with neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin.

  12. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuan-Yue; Hinkley, Sarah J.; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, L.; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R.; O'Neill, Colleen M.; Song, Alex H.; Mich, Andrea; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E.; Holmes, Michael C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe a facile approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function. PMID:26322838

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  14. Insulin and Weight Gain: Keep the Pounds Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications would be appropriate as part of your diabetes treatment plan. Take your insulin only as directed. Don' ... Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/medication/insulin/insulin-basics.html. Accessed ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: type A insulin resistance syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin resistance syndrome , insulin resistance impairs blood sugar regulation and ultimately leads to a condition called diabetes ... to the effects of insulin impairs blood sugar regulation and leads to diabetes mellitus. In females with ...

  16. Mediated semiquantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawec, Walter O.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we design a quantum key distribution protocol, allowing two limited semiquantum or "classical" users to establish a shared secret key with the help of a fully quantum server. A semiquantum user can prepare and measure qubits only in the computational basis and so must rely on this quantum server to produce qubits in alternative bases and also to perform alternative measurements. However, we assume that the server is untrusted and we prove the unconditional security of our protocol even in the worst case: when this quantum server is an all-powerful adversary. We also compute a lower bound of the key rate of our protocol, in the asymptotic scenario, as a function of the observed error rate in the channel, allowing us to compute the maximally tolerated error of our protocol. Our results show that a semiquantum protocol may hold similar security to a fully quantum one.

  17. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, N; Barros, S P; Zhang, S; Moss, K L; Phillips, S T; Offenbacher, S

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  18. Insulin Response Genes in Different Stages of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N.; Barros, S.P.; Zhang, S.; Moss, K.L.; Phillips, S.T.; Offenbacher, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are known to alter glucose metabolism within tissues via mechanisms of inflammation. We conducted this study to examine whether insulin response genes are differentially expressed in gingival tissues, comparing samples from experimental gingivitis and periodontitis subjects to those from healthy individuals. Total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsies from 26 participants: 8 periodontally healthy, 9 experimental gingivitis, and 9 periodontitis subjects. Gene expression patterns were evaluated with a polymerase chain reaction array panel to examine 84 candidate genes involved with glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and obesity. Array data were evaluated with a t test adjusted by the false discover rate (P < 0.05), and ingenuity pathway analysis was performed for statistical testing of pathways. Although tissue samples were not sufficient to enable protein quantification, we confirmed the upregulation of the key gene using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary gingival epithelial cells by Western blot. The mRNA expression patterns of genes that are associated with insulin response and glucose metabolism are markedly different in experimental gingivitis subjects compared with healthy controls. Thirty-two genes are upregulated significantly by at least 2-fold, adjusted for false discover rate (P < 0.05). Periodontitis subjects show similar but attenuated changes in gene expression patterns, and no genes meet the significance criteria. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrates significant activation of the carbohydrate metabolism network in experimental gingivitis but not in periodontitis. G6PD protein increases in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation in primary gingival epithelial cells, which is in the same direction as upregulated mRNA in tissues. Acute gingival inflammation may be associated with tissue metabolism changes, but these changes are not evident in chronic periodontitis. This study suggests that acute gingival inflammation

  19. Exogenous thyroxine improves glucose intolerance in insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Anaya, Guillermo; Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2017-03-01

    Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are associated with glucose intolerance, calling into question the contribution of thyroid hormones (TH) on glucose regulation. TH analogues and derivatives may be effective treatment options for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR), but their potential glucoregulatory effects during conditions of impaired metabolism are not well described. To assess the effects of thyroxine (T4) on glucose intolerance in a model of insulin resistance, an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed on three groups of rats (n = 8): (1) lean, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO), (2) obese, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and (3) OLETF + T4 (8.0 µg/100 g BM/day × 5 weeks). T4 attenuated glucose intolerance by 15% and decreased IR index (IRI) by 34% in T4-treated OLETF compared to untreated OLETF despite a 31% decrease in muscle Glut4 mRNA expression. T4 increased the mRNA expressions of muscle monocarboxylate transporter 10 (Mct10), deiodinase type 2 (Di2), sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2) by 1.8-, 2.2-, 2.7- and 1.4-fold, respectively, compared to OLETF. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor were not significantly altered suggesting that the improvements in glucose intolerance and IR were independent of enhanced insulin-mediated signaling. The results suggest that T4 treatment increased the influx of T4 in skeletal muscle and, with an increase of DI2, increased the availability of the biologically active T3 to upregulate key factors such SIRT1 and UCP2 involved in cellular metabolism and glucose homeostasis.

  20. Zinc in Pancreatic Islet Biology, Insulin Sensitivity, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    About 20 chemical elements are nutritionally essential for humans with defined molecular functions. Several essential and nonessential biometals are either functional nutrients with antidiabetic actions or can be diabetogenic. A key question remains whether changes in the metabolism of biometals and biominerals are a consequence of diabetes or are involved in its etiology. Exploration of the roles of zinc (Zn) in this regard is most revealing because 80 years of scientific discoveries link zinc and diabetes. In pancreatic β- and α-cells, zinc has specific functions in the biochemistry of insulin and glucagon. When zinc ions are secreted during vesicular exocytosis, they have autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine roles. The membrane protein ZnT8 transports zinc ions into the insulin and glucagon granules. ZnT8 has a risk allele that predisposes the majority of humans to developing diabetes. In target tissues, increased availability of zinc enhances the insulin response by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which controls the phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and hence downstream signalling. Inherited diseases of zinc metabolism, environmental exposures that interfere with the control of cellular zinc homeostasis, and nutritional or conditioned zinc deficiency influence the patho-biochemistry of diabetes. Accepting the view that zinc is one of the many factors in multiple gene-environment interactions that cause the functional demise of β-cells generates an immense potential for treating and perhaps preventing diabetes. Personalized nutrition, bioactive food, and pharmaceuticals targeting the control of cellular zinc in precision medicine are among the possible interventions.

  1. [Experimental models of diabetes mellitus of the 1st and 2nd types in rats: regulation of activity of glycogen synthase by peptides of the insulin superfamily and by epidermal growth factor in skeletal muscles].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory effect of peptides of the insulin hyperfamily--insulin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and relaxin, as well as of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on activity of glycogen synthase (GS) in rat skeletal muscles was studied in norm and in experimental diabetes mellitus of the 1st and 2nd types (DM1, DM2). In norm, peptides in vitro stimulated maximally the GS activity at a concentration of 10-8 M. The row of efficiency of the peptide action was as follows: insulin > IGF-1 > relaxin. In DM1 the basal GS activity did not change, while effect of insulin in vitro was decreased more sharply as compared with action of IGF-1 and relaxin at the 30th day of development of diabetes, i. e., the efficiency row was as follows: IGF-1 = relaxin > insulin. Administration of insulin in vivo did not restore sensitivity of the enzyme to the action of hormone in DM1. In DM2, the GS activity (both the total and active form) decreased. while the stimulatory effect ofpeptides and EGF on the enzyme was absent. Insulin introduced in vitro did not lead to restoration of the enzyme reaction. The conclusion has been made that the insulin resistance affects the basal GS activity in rat skeletal muscles as well as the regulation of the enzyme by peptides of the insulin nature and by EGF, which is more obvious in DM2, than in DM1.