Science.gov

Sample records for kidney disease clinical

  1. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Clinical approach to kidney disease in kidney recipients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Josep M; Gutiérrez-Dalmau, Alex; Crespo, Josep; Saval, Núria; Grinyó, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, clinical criteria used by Spanish nephrologists when approaching chronic kidney disease (CKD) in kidney recipients, as well as their level of maintenance and control of renal function, were evaluated. An epidemiological, observational, multicenter, nation-wide, prospective study was carried out, with a 6-month follow-up period. Three hundred and sixty-eight adult patients with stage3 kidney disease after a 24-month or longer post-transplantation follow-up period were included. Visits schedule included a retrospective visit, a baseline visit, an optional mid-term visit, and a final visit at month6. Mean time since kidney transplantation was 8.2±5.4years. Most common pre-transplant cardiovascular risk factors were high blood pressure (80.2%), followed by high cholesterol levels (61.7%). Serum creatinine levels showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline visit to 6-month visit (0.06±0.22; P<.0001), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction was -1.03±6.14 (P=0.0014). Significant independent prognostic factors for GFR worsening were: higher 24-hour proteinuria (OR=1.001 per mg; P=.020), longer time since transplantation (OR=1.009 per month; P=.017), and lower hemoglobin levels (OR=1.261 per g/dl; P=.038). Donor age also had some negative influence (OR=1.021 per year; P=.106). Biopsies were obtained in only 8% of kidney transplant recipients with stage 3 CKD with an intervention being carried out in 25.4% of cases. Secondary markers and factors resulting in CKD progression, particularly anemia, are still frequently uncontrolled after kidney transplantation. Only about 2% of patients benefit from a therapeutic intervention based on a biopsy. Clinical perception differs from objective measures, which results in an obvious clinical inertia regarding risk factor control in such patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease A A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  5. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  6. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously.

  7. Clinical Trials in Pediatric Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease and is associated with concerning long-term implications for kidney function and cardiovascular health. Early intervention is needed in order to mitigate these long-term complications. Herein, we review important findings from recent clinical trials in ADPKD and their relevance to affected children and young adults and consider future directions for intervention. Recent clinical trials support aggressive control of blood pressure with blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system as well as potential benefit of pravastatin therapy in children and young adults with ADPKD. There are several other candidate therapies, some of which have shown benefit in adult ADPKD, which require further investigation in affected children. PMID:28386535

  8. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  9. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and ... to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove ...

  10. Enhancing clinical trial development for pediatric kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnaper, H William; Flynn, Joseph T; Gross, Coleman; Cropp, Anne B; Dehmel, Bastian; Patel, Leah B; Greenbaum, Larry A; Houtsmuller, Elisabeth; Kaskel, Frederick; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Nowak, Karen; Silverstein, Douglas; Thompson, Aliza; Yao, Lynne; Darsey, Edress; Smoyer, William E

    2017-08-30

    The conduct of clinical trials in small pediatric subspecialties such as pediatric nephrology is hampered by both clinical demands on the pediatric nephrologist and the small number of appropriate patients available for such studies. The American Society of Pediatric Nephrology Therapeutics Development Committee (TDC) was established to (1) identify the various stakeholders with interests and/or expertise related to clinical trials in children with kidney disease and (2) develop more effective partnerships among all parties regarding strategies for successful clinical trial development and execution. This article discusses the rationale, structure, and function of the TDC, the status of progress toward its goals, and the insights gained to date that may be useful for other subspecialties that face similar challenges.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 30 August 2017; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.180.

  11. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 1.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In diabetes, kidneys' morphological changes are non-specific at ultrasound (US) and they vary according to disease stage. In the earlier stages, kidneys are enlarged and diffusely hypoechoic due to hyperfiltration. Kidneys size decreases only in advanced stages whereas renal cortical echogenicity progressively increases due to glomerulosclerosis. Nephromegaly, as well as discrepancy between size and renal function, are typical features of diabetic nephropathy either in early or in advanced stages of the disease. Resistive indexes progressively increase together with serum creatinine levels and macro/microcirculation damage. Chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) is the third leading cause of chronic kidney disease and it represents the clinical evolution of a variety of primary or secondary glomerular diseases. Kidneys in CGN are gradually reduced in volume, but remain symmetric, easily recognizable in renal space until the disease's later stages. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Among Individuals with Clinical Markers of Kidney Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Jordan, Regina; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Yee, Jerry; Saran, Rajiv; Powe, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among providers and patients is low. Whether clinical cues prompt recognition of CKD is unknown. We examined whether markers of kidney disease that should trigger CKD recognition among providers are associated with higher individual CKD awareness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements CKD awareness was assessed in 1852 adults with an estimated GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 using 1999 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. CKD awareness was a “yes” answer to “Have you ever been told you have weak or failing kidneys?” Participants were grouped by distribution of the following abnormal markers of CKD: hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, albuminuria, and uncontrolled hypertension. Odds of CKD awareness associated with each abnormal marker and groupings of markers were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Among individuals with kidney disease, only those with albuminuria had greater odds of CKD awareness (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0, P < 0.01) than those without. Odds of CKD awareness increased with each additional manifested clinical marker of CKD (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3, P = 0.05). Nonetheless, 90% of individuals with two to four markers of CKD and 84% of individuals with ≥5 markers of CKD were unaware of their disease. Conclusions Although individuals who manifest many markers of kidney dysfunction are more likely to be aware of their CKD, their CKD awareness remains low. A better understanding of mechanisms of awareness is required to facilitate earlier detection of CKD and implement therapy to minimize associated complications. PMID:21784832

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  15. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques.

  16. Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: an integrated clinical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kimmel, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    The previous conventional wisdom that survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI) tend to do well and fully recover renal function appears to be flawed. AKI can cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) directly, and increase the risk of developing incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsening of underlying CKD. In addition, severity, duration, and frequency of AKI appear to be important predictors of poor patient outcomes. CKD is an important risk factor for the development and ascertainment of AKI. Experimental data support the clinical observations and the bidirectional nature of the relationships between AKI and CKD. Reductions in renal mass and nephron number, vascular insufficiency, cell cycle disruption, and maladaptive repair mechanisms appear to be important modulators of progression in patients with and without coexistent CKD. Distinction between AKI and CKD may be artificial. Consideration should be given to the integrated clinical syndrome of diminished GFR, with acute and chronic stages, where spectrum of disease state and outcome is determined by host factors, including the balance of adaptive and maladaptive repair mechanisms over time. Physicians must provide long-term follow-up to patients with first episodes of AKI, even if they presented with normal renal function.

  17. Metabolomics for clinical use and research in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hocher, Berthold; Adamski, Jerzy

    2017-03-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high prevalence in the general population and is associated with high mortality; a need therefore exists for better biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and therapy stratification. Moreover, very sensitive biomarkers are needed in drug development and clinical research to increase understanding of the efficacy and safety of potential and existing therapies. Metabolomics analyses can identify and quantify all metabolites present in a given sample, covering hundreds to thousands of metabolites. Sample preparation for metabolomics requires a very fast arrest of biochemical processes. Present key technologies for metabolomics are mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which require sophisticated biostatistic and bioinformatic data analyses. The use of metabolomics has been instrumental in identifying new biomarkers of CKD such as acylcarnitines, glycerolipids, dimethylarginines and metabolites of tryptophan, the citric acid cycle and the urea cycle. Biomarkers such as c-mannosyl tryptophan and pseudouridine have better performance in CKD stratification than does creatinine. Future challenges in metabolomics analyses are prospective studies and deconvolution of CKD biomarkers from those of other diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, inflammatory conditions, stress and cancer.

  18. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed.

  19. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Vascular Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Vascular chronic diseases represent one of the leading causes of end-stage renal disease in incident dialysis patients. B-Mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler (CD) have a high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of vascular chronic diseases. US and CD should be used to identify subjects in the high risk population who are affected by main renal artery stenosis (RAS) and to identify and characterize patients without RAS who have chronic ischemic nephropathy caused by nephroangiosclerosis and/or atheroembolic disease. The most important CD parameters in the work-up of suspected RAS are increased peak systolic velocity and diastolic velocity, spectral broadening, high renal:aortic ratio and lateralization of renal resistive indexes (RIs). In the absence of direct or indirect signs of RAS, increases in intraparenchymal RIs, associated with systemic atherosclerotic disease, are indicative of microcirculation damage related to nephroangiosclerosis or atheroembolic disease. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Ghiggeri, G M; Turco, A E

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disease caused by at least three different genes. The renal and extrarenal clinical manifestations, and the systemic complications due to cystic and non-cystic abnormalities in ADPKD patients have been widely investigated. Cellular and molecular aspects of cystogenetic mechanisms concern epithelial tubular cell proliferation, remodelling of extracellular matrix, fluid secretion and accumulation, and relations between cell proliferation and apoptosis. In vitro studies on cystogenesis suggest a key role of cell-to-cell or cell-to-matrix interactions. Surface proteins mediating cell-to-cell contact, such as E-cadherin (polycystin?), integrin interactions, growth factors, receptor expression, are involved in the process of differentiation of the cellular condition and of the extracellular matrix. Blocking any one of these complex mechanisms should influence the orientation and polarization of epithelial tubular cells and should mediate the inversion of fluid secretion which ends in renal cystogenesis. ADPKD comprises at least three phenotypically indistinguishable but genetically distinct entities, caused by mutations in three autosomal genes: PKD1 (chromosome 16p13.3) is present in about 85% of patients; PKD2 (chromosome 4q13q23) in 10%; PKD3 (unknown chromosome) in a few families. PCR-based mutation detection methods, automated DNA sequencing, and other "functional" methods are used to screen and analyse ADPKD patients. It is not yet known whether the mutations identified so far in PKD1 and PKD2 inactivate the genes or generate an aberrant product. The products of PKD1 and PKD2 genes have been called polycystin 1 and 2. Polycystins are members of a family of interactive proteins involved in complex adhesive cell-cell, cell-matrix, protein-protein, and protein-carbohydrate interactions in the extracellular compartment, and are involved in the same pathway (ion channel regulator? ion channel

  3. Chronic kidney disease: a clinical model of premature aging.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Larsson, Tobias E

    2013-08-01

    Premature aging is a process associated with a progressive accumulation of deleterious changes over time, an impairment of physiologic functions, and an increase in the risk of disease and death. Regardless of genetic background, aging can be accelerated by the lifestyle choices and environmental conditions to which our genes are exposed. Chronic kidney disease is a common condition that promotes cellular senescence and premature aging through toxic alterations in the internal milieu. This occurs through several mechanisms, including DNA and mitochondria damage, increased reactive oxygen species generation, persistent inflammation, stem cell exhaustion, phosphate toxicity, decreased klotho expression, and telomere attrition. Because recent evidence suggests that both increased local signaling of growth factors (through the nutrient-sensing mammalian target of rapamycin) and decreased klotho expression are important modulators of aging, interventions that target these should be tested in this prematurely aged population. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  5. Kidney: polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paul, Binu M; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cysts primarily in the kidneys. PKD can be inherited as autosomal recessive (ARPKD) or autosomal dominant (ADPKD) traits. Mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin 1 and polycystin 2, are the underlying cause of ADPKD. Progressive cyst formation and renal enlargement lead to renal insufficiency in these patients, which need to be managed by lifelong dialysis or renal transplantation. While characteristic features of PKD are abnormalities in epithelial cell proliferation, fluid secretion, extracellular matrix and differentiation, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not understood. Here we review the progress that has been made in defining the function of the polycystins, and how disruption of these functions may be involved in cystogenesis.

  6. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) View or Print All Sections What ... Simple Kidney Cysts Kidney Stones Urinary Tract Infections Kidney Failure What to Expect Choosing a Treatment Hemodialysis ...

  7. Protein Carbamylation in Kidney Disease: Pathogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kalim, Sahir; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Berg, Anders H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbamylation describes a non-enzymatic, posttranslational protein modification mediated by cyanate, a dissociation product of urea. When kidney function declines and urea accumulates, the burden of carbamylation naturally rises. Free amino acids may protect proteins from carbamylation, and protein carbamylation has been shown to increase in uremic patients with amino acid deficiencies. Carbamylation reactions are capable of altering the structure and functional properties of certain proteins, and have been directly implicated in the underlying mechanisms of various disease conditions. A broad range of studies has demonstrated how the irreversible binding of urea-derived cyanate to proteins in the human body causes inappropriate cellular responses leading to adverse outcomes such as accelerated atherosclerosis and inflammation. Given carbamylation’s relationship to urea and the evidence that it contributes to disease pathogenesis, measurements of carbamylated proteins may serve as useful quantitative biomarkers of time-averaged urea concentrations while also offering risk assessment in patients with kidney disease. Moreover, the link between carbamylated proteins and disease pathophysiology creates an enticing therapeutic target for reducing the rate of carbamylation. This article reviews the biochemistry of the carbamylation reaction, its role in specific diseases, and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings based on recent advances. PMID:25037561

  8. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  9. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  10. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  11. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A

    2009-03-01

    Vascular calcification, which is associated with arterial stiffness, is now known to be an important predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with renal disease. This calcification starts developing in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is present in over 50% of patients at the time of dialysis commencement. Once calcification is present it continues to progress, though some medications have been shown to slow this progression. Vascular calcification and bone abnormalities are now both encompassed by the term of CKD-mineral bone disorder and are thought to be part of the same disease process in CKD. Vascular calcification and arterial stiffness have been extensively researched in the renal population and many factors are known to be associated with their presence and progression. This calcification is an important factor to be considered in the management of the renal patient but there are different methods available for its measurement. These details will be discussed further in this review along with evidence available for management of this important complication of renal disease.

  12. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-04-06

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression.

  13. Update on Medical Management of Clinical Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of normal kidney functions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to several pathophysiologic abnormalities that have the potential to significantly clinically affect the CKD patient. This article discusses the clinical impact of hypertension, hypokalemia, anemia, dysrexia, nausea/vomiting, and constipation in the CKD patient and therapies for these conditions. These clinical manifestations of disease may not occur in every patient and may also develop later during the progression of disease. Therefore, monitoring for, identifying, and addressing these factors is considered an important part of the medical management of CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabetic kidney disease: from epidemiology to clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Whee

    2014-08-01

    With worldwide epidemic of diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy which is one of the major causes of microvascular complication has become a serious concern in Korea as well as the rest of the world. In view of its significance, there is an urgent and paramount need for proper managements that could either deter or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Despite advances in care, ever increasing number of patients suffering from diabetic kidney disease and from end-stage renal disease implies that the current management is not adequate in many aspects. The reasons for these inadequacies compromise lack of early diagnosis, failure to intervene with timely and aggressive manner, and lack of understanding on the kind of interventions required. Another issue equally important for the adequate care of patients with diabetic nephropathy is an understanding of past, present and future epidemiology of diabetic nephropathy which serves, especially in Korea, as a material determining standard diagnosis and treatment and a national health-policy decision.

  15. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  16. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression. PMID:24175241

  17. Clinical outcomes of kidney transplants on patients with end-stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Builes-Rodriguez, Sheila Alexandra; Restrepo-Correa, Ricardo Cesar; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Serna-Campuzano, Angélica; Cardona-Díaz, Natalia; Giraldo-Ramirez, Nelson Darío; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with lupus nephritis could progress to end-stage renal disease (10-22%); hence, kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for these patients. Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcomes after kidney transplants in patients with chronic kidney diseases secondary to lupus nephritis, polycystic kidney disease and diabetes nephropathy at Pablo Tobon Uribe Hospital. Methods: A descriptive and retrospective study performed at one kidney transplant center between 2005 and 2013. Results: A total of 136 patients, 27 with lupus nephritis (19.9%), 31 with polycystic kidney disease (22.8%) and 78 with diabetes nephropathy (57.4%), were included in the study. The graft survivals after one, three and five years were 96.3%, 82.5% and 82.5% for lupus nephritis; 90%, 86% and 76.5% for polycystic kidney disease and 91.7%, 80.3% and 67.9% for diabetes nephropathy, respectively, with no significant differences (p= 0.488); the rate of lupus nephritis recurrence was 0.94%/person-year. The etiology of lupus vs diabetes vs polycystic disease was not a risk factor for a decreased time of graft survival (Hazard ratio: 1.43; 95% CI: 0.52-3.93). Conclusion: Kidney transplant patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis has similar graft and patient survival success rates to patients with other kidney diseases. The complication rate and risk of recurrence for lupus nephritis are low. Kidney transplants should be considered as the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease secondary to lupus nephritis. PMID:27226665

  18. [Aldosterone and kidney diseases: an emergent paradigm with important clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Slowing the progression of chronic kidney diseases needs new efficient treatments. Aldosterone classically acts on the distal nephron: it allows sodium reabsorption, potassium secretion and participates to blood volume control. Recently, new targets of aldosterone have been described including the heart and the vasculature but also non-epithelial kidney cells such as mesangial cells, podocytes and renal fibroblasts. The pathophysiological implication of aldosterone and its receptor, the mineralocorticoid receptor has been demonstrated ex vivo in cell culture and in vivo in experimental animal models with kidney damages such as diabetic and hypertensive kidney nephropathies, chronic kidney disease and glomerulopathies. The beneficial effects of the pharmacological antagonists of the mineralocorticoid receptor are independent of the hypertensive effect of aldosterone, indicating that blocking the activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor in these non-classical renal targets may be of clinical importance. Several clinical studies now report benefit and safety when using spironolactone or eplerenone, the currently available mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, in patients with kidney diseases. In this review, we discuss the recent results reported in experimental and clinical research in this domain.

  19. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, S.; Nasir, K.; Drohlia, M. F.; Salman, B.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  20. Orphan kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Neveen A

    2012-01-01

    Rare kidney diseases are a unique subset of renal disorders that are often termed 'orphan' as a result of a multitude of reasons: the small number of patients with the consequent lack of well-defined natural history and course of many of these diseases, limited awareness among the medical community, and finally the significant cost of developing novel therapeutics which makes many of these diseases unattractive targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Nevertheless, in the last decade the study and clinical management of rare kidney disease patients has been the focus of many investigative efforts. In recent years we have witnessed an enormous expansion in our knowledge of the genetic nature of a number of rare kidney diseases. Moreover, the investigation of the role of genetic disruption aiming at elucidating the pathogenesis of different and complex renal diseases has helped not only in understanding the disease states, but has also given us fundamental insights into a number of kidney developmental and physiological functions. This article will give an overview of orphan renal diseases with particular emphasis on monogenic kidney diseases. It will also focus on the classification of these diseases while highlighting a prominent example in each category.

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the changing face of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd

    2015-05-16

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood despite much study. During the past 40 years, however, remarkable advances have transformed our understanding of how the disease develops and have led to rapid changes in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, especially during the past decade. This Review will summarise the key findings, highlight recent developments, and look ahead to the changes in clinical practice that will likely arise from the adoption of a new management framework for this major kidney disease.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells form a population of self-renewing, multipotent cells that can be isolated from several tissues. Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated that the administration of exogenous MSC could prevent renal injury and could promote renal recovery through a series of complex mechanisms, in particular via immunomodulation of the immune system and release of paracrine factors and microvesicles. Due to their therapeutic potentials, MSC are being evaluated as a possible player in treatment of human kidney disease, and an increasing number of clinical trials to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in various kidney diseases have been proposed. In the present review, we will summarize the current knowledge on MSC infusion to treat acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and kidney transplantation. The data obtained from these clinical trials will provide further insight into safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in renal pathologies and allow the design of consensus protocol for clinical purpose. PMID:27721835

  3. Clinical relevance of epigenetic dysregulation in chronic kidney disease-associated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Heine, Gunnar H

    2013-07-01

    Across the spectrum of clinical medicine, the field of epigenetics has gained substantial scientific interest in recent years. Epigenetics refers to modifications in gene expression which are not explained by changes in DNA sequence. Classical components of epigenetic regulation comprise DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA interference. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), several features of uraemia, such as hyperhomocysteinemia and inflammation, may contribute to changes in epigenetic gene regulation. It has been suggested that these changes may affect genes related to cardiovascular disease. Thereby, a uraemia-associated disturbance in epigenetic regulation may contribute to the substantial increase in cardiovascular morbidity in CKD patients. The present review aims to summarize current knowledge of epigenetic dysregulation in cardiovascular disease from a nephrological perspective, with a special focus on DNA methylation. We first describe the impact of altered epigenetic regulation in non-CKD-associated arteriosclerosis, and next characterize uraemic features which may affect epigenetic gene regulation in the context of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we conclude that substantial additional work is needed before epigenetic regulatory mechanisms may become therapeutic targets in CKD-associated cardiovascular disease.

  4. Kidney Stones as an Under-Recognized Clinical Sign in Pediatric Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sara H.; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Keil, Margaret F.; Faucz, Fabio R.; Lodish, Maya B.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of kidney stones in a population of children with Cushing disease (CD) and to compare this prevalence with that of healthy children. Study design Clinical and biochemical data from 139 pediatric patients with CD (68 female, 71 male) were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed for kidney stones. Results Of 139 patients, 27 children with CD (19.4%) had either radiographic evidence and/or a history of kidney stones. Those with kidney stones had higher urine free cortisol (p-value = 0.008) and a transsphenoidal surgery at an older age (p-value = 0.007). Average urinary calcium creatinine ratio was elevated in patients with CD (0.22 ± 0.11). The prevalence of kidney stones in children with CD was higher than in normal children (19.42% vs 1.0%, p-value <0.001). Conclusion Our results illustrate that kidney stones are an under-estimated complication of pediatric CD, especially when compared with the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in the general pediatric population. Long term consequences for kidney function are not known and need to be studied. PMID:26703870

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  6. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  7. Peripheral Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Synergy to Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Hirsch, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at a higher risk of developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) and its adverse health outcomes than individuals in the general population who have normal renal function. Classic atherosclerosis risk factors care (e.g., age, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia) are common in CKD patients, but CKD also imposes additional unique risk factors that promote arterial disease (e.g., chronic inflammation, hypoalbuminemia and a pro-calcific state). Current nephrology clinical practice is adversely impacted by PAD diagnostic challenges, the complexities of managing two serious comorbid diseases, delayed vascular specialist referral, and slow PAD treatment initiation in CKD patients. Persons with CKD are less likely to be provided recommended ‘optimal’ PAD care. The knowledge that both limb and mortality outcomes are significantly worse in CKD patients, especially those on dialysis, is not a biologic fact, but can serve as a care delivery call to action. Nephrologists can facilitate positive change. This manuscript proposes that patients with PAD and CKD be strategically co-managed by care teams that encompass the skills to create and use evidence-based care pathways. This proposed collaborative multidisciplinary approach will include vascular medicine specialists, nephrologists, wound specialists and mid-level providers. Just as clinical care quality metrics have served as the base for ESRD and acute MI quality improvement, it is time that such quality outcomes metrics be initiated for the large PAD-CKD population. This new system will identify and resolve key gaps in the current care model so that clinical outcomes improve within a cost-effective care frame for this vulnerable population. PMID:25443571

  8. Clinical predictors of neurocognitive deficits in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Peter; Hooper, Stephen; Gipson, Debbie

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore associations between neurocognitive function and chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related clinical characteristics. Twenty-nine children, ages 7 to 19 years, with an estimated creatinine clearance (eCrCl) of 4–89 ml/min per 1.73 m2 body surface area were enrolled. Intellectual function (IQ), memory, and attention were measured and expressed as age-based standard scores. Clinical data were obtained by physical examination, laboratory testing, parental questionnaires and medical chart review. Pearson correlations and standard Student’s t-tests were used to identify significant (P < 0.05) relationships between targeted clinical variables and neurocognitive scores. Increased CKD severity correlated with lower IQ (P = 0.001) and memory function (P = 0.02). Memory function was lower in children with longer duration of disease (P = 0.03). Similarly, IQ scores were lowest when kidney disease had started at a younger age (P = 0.03) and with a greater percent of life with CKD (P = 0.04). Our findings provide preliminary evidence that increased disease severity, longer duration of disease, and younger age of onset of kidney disease potentially place children with CKD at increased risk of neurocognitive deficits. Additional investigation is required to better quantify these risk factors, particularly regarding how much variability is accounted for by these specific risk factors. PMID:17180361

  9. [Treatment of bone disease in chronic kidney disease and in renal transplant recipients under K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Tadahiko; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) provides evidence based clinical practice guidelines developed for all phases of kidney disease and related complications, from diagnosis to monitoring and management. Bone disease sets in during the early stages of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Bone disease is observed in almost patients with chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease in patients with chronic renal failure is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turn over bone disease, and osteomalasia. Ninety to one hundred percent of kidney transplant patients have histological evidence of osteodystrophy and osteopenia (reduction of bone mass) following renal transplantation. Furthermore, osteoporosis is also appeared in many renal transplant recipients. After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but bone mineral density (BMD) often worsens. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and carefully effective therapies might be reduced the morbidity associated with these common problems.

  10. [Gender and kidney diseases: the clinical importance and mechanisms of modifying effects].

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Katarzyna; Krajewska, Magdalena; Weyde, Wacław; Jakuszko, Katarzyna; Gniewek, Andrzej; Klinger, Marian

    2011-12-29

    This review focuses on the underlying pathways of gender-dependent renal diseases and presents specific examples of diseases influenced by gender. In the literature it has been shown, in many clinical and experimental observations, that the incidence and the rate of progression of renal disease are influenced by many gender-dependent factors, such as kidney and glomerular size, differences in glomerular hemodynamics, and direct effects of sex hormones on renal tissue and signal pathways such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and signal molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, cytokines and growth factors). It has been shown that the main female hormone, 17 β estradiol, is capable of inhibiting inflammatory and pro apoptotic processes and protects the renal tissue. In contrast, the male hormones, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone, have the opposite effect. Hormonal manipulation by male or female castration changes the course of renal disease progression and confirms the influence of the sex hormones. Female gender is therefore considered a protective factor in many kidney diseases, such as primary glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and hypertensive nephropathy. Similarly, women are more predisposed to autoimmune diseases with secondary glomerulonephritis, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus, as the female sex hormones have the ability of autoimmune process activation. After menopause the protective effect of female gender is not observed, which confirms the role of the female sex hormones.

  11. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  12. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and Cardiovascular Diseases: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Medić, Branislava; Rovčanin, Branislav; Basta Jovanović, Gordana; Radojević-Škodrić, Sanja; Prostran, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent findings concerning pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies, cardiovascular disease (CVD) still stays the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal dysfunction, especially acute kidney injury (AKI). Early detection of patients with impaired renal function with cardiovascular risk may help ensure more aggressive treatment and improve clinical outcome. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a new, promising marker of kidney damage which is currently the focus of countless studies worldwide. Some recent animal and human studies established KIM-1 as an important marker of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and reliable predictor of development and prognosis of AKI. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in USA acclaimed KIM-1 as an AKI biomarker for preclinical drug development. Recent data suggest the importance of monitoring of KIM-1 for early diagnosis and clinical course not only in patients with various forms of AKI and other renal diseases but also in patients with cardiorenal syndrome, heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiothoracic surgical interventions in the pediatric emergency setting, and so forth. The aim of this review article is to summarize the literature data concerning KIM-1 as a potential novel marker in the early diagnosis and prediction of clinical outcome of certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26697493

  13. Proteomics in chronic kidney disease: The issues clinical nephrologists need an answer for.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Ortiz, Alberto; Vanholder, Raymond; El Nahas, Meguid

    2011-06-01

    A growing number of patients are recognised to have chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, only a minority will progress to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis or transplantation. Currently available diagnostic and staging tools frequently fail to identify those at higher risk of progression or death. Furthermore within specific disease entities there are shortcomings in the prediction of the need for therapeutic interventions or the response to different forms of therapy. Kidney and urine proteomic biomarkers are considered as promising diagnostic tools to predict CKD progression early in diabetic nephropathy, facilitating timely and selective intervention that may reduce the related health-care expenditures. However, independent groups have not validated these findings and the technique is not currently available for routine clinical care. Furthermore, there are gaps in our understanding of predictors of progression or need for therapy in non-diabetic CKD. Presumably, a combination of tissue and urine biomarkers will be more informative than individual markers. This review identifies clinical questions in need of an answer, summarises current information on proteomic biomarkers and CKD, and describes the European Kidney and Urine Proteomics initiative that has been launched to carry out a clinical study aimed at identifying urinary proteomic biomarkers distinguishing between fast and slow progressors among patients with biopsy-proven primary glomerulopathies.

  14. [Kidney diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kolesárova, Eva; Sirotiaková, Jana; Kozárová, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of important morphological, functional and hemodynamic changes occurring in the kidneys during physiological pregnancy is a prerequisite for proper diagnostics and therapy of renal diseases in pregnancy. Kidney diseases may be kidney diseases complicating pregnancy in previously healthy women, or pre-existing or superposed kidney diseases. Knowledge of renal insufficiency management in pregnancy, including haemodialysis treatment and management of pregnancy in patients who have undergone transplantation, is also important.

  15. Kidney disease health literacy among new patients referred to a nephrology outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Burke, M T; Kapojos, J; Sammartino, C; Gray, N A

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge about kidney disease among the general population is poor but has not been assessed in the population selected for referral to nephrology care. This study aimed to determine patients' understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) when first presenting to a nephrology clinic. Newly referred patients to a nephrology clinic were surveyed with open-ended questions about their understanding of CKD causes, symptoms and management. Two hundred and ten patients were surveyed. Median age was 66.5 years (interquartile range 52-77), 50.5% female and mean body mass index 29.7 ± 6.8 kg/m(2) . Prevalence of risk factors for CKD included 31% diabetic, 62% hypertension, 19% family history of CKD and 2% Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. CKD stage prevalence was 0 (8%), 1 (24%), 2 (11%), 3 (38.5%), 4 (18%) and 5 (0.5%). Eighty-two per cent were referred by their primary care physician and 29% had seen a nephrologist previously. Kidney Health Australia was mentioned by 2.4%. Sixteen per cent were unsure why they had been referred. CKD causes identified by patients were unsure (40%), alcohol (29%), hypertension (16%) and diabetes (14%). Symptoms identified included asymptomatic (16%), kidney pain (17%) and other (42%). Management suggested by patients was uncertain (51%), dialysis (32%) and anti-hypertensive medication (16%). Eighty-two per cent reported unsatisfactory education from their primary care physician. New patients referred to a renal outpatient department had poor knowledge about kidney disease. Education of patients should begin in primary care prior to referral. For most patients, education programmes need to be targeted at a simplistic level. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney disease if you have diabetes high blood pressure heart disease a family history of kidney failure If you have diabetes, ... checked every year. If you have high blood pressure, heart disease, or a family history of kidney failure, talk with your health ...

  17. Randomized Clinical Trial of Long-Acting Somatostatin for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masyuk, Tetyana V.; Page, Linda J.; Kubly, Vickie J.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Li, Xujian; Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F.; Glockner, James; Holmes, David R.; Rossetti, Sandro; Harris, Peter C.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2010-01-01

    There are no proven, effective therapies for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) or polycystic liver disease (PLD). We enrolled 42 patients with severe PLD resulting from autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD) or autosomal dominant PLD (ADPLD) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analogue. We randomly assigned 42 patients in a 2:1 ratio to octreotide LAR depot (up to 40 mg every 28 ± 5 days) or placebo for 1 year. The primary end point was percent change in liver volume from baseline to 1 year, measured by MRI. Secondary end points were changes in total kidney volume, GFR, quality of life, safety, vital signs, and clinical laboratory tests. Thirty-four patients had ADPKD, and eight had ADPLD. Liver volume decreased by 4.95% ± 6.77% in the octreotide group but remained practically unchanged (+0.92% ± 8.33%) in the placebo group (P = 0.048). Among patients with ADPKD, total kidney volume remained practically unchanged (+0.25% ± 7.53%) in the octreotide group but increased by 8.61% ± 10.07% in the placebo group (P = 0.045). Changes in GFR were similar in both groups. Octreotide was well tolerated; treated individuals reported an improved perception of bodily pain and physical activity. In summary, octreotide slowed the progressive increase in liver volume and total kidney volume, improved health perception among patients with PLD, and had an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:20431041

  18. [Pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Noël, Natacha; Rieu, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the leading genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Its prevalence is evaluated according to studies and population between 1/1000 and 1/4000 live births and it accounts for 6 to 8% of incident ESRD patients in developed countries. ADPKD is characterized by numerous cysts in both kidneys and various extrarenal manifestations that are detailed in this review. Clinico-radiological and genetic diagnosis are also discussed. Mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 codifying for polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2) are responsible for the 85 and 15% of ADPKD cases, respectively. In primary cilia of normal kidney epithelial cells, PC-1 and PC-2 interact forming a complex involved in flow- and cilia-dependant signalling pathways where intracellular calcium and cAMP play a central role. Alteration of these multiple signal transduction pathways leads to cystogenesis accompanied by dysregulated planar cell polarity, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, and pathogenic interactions of epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix. The mass effect of expanding cyst is responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs late in the course of the disease. For many decades, the treatment for ADPKD aims to lessen the condition's symptoms, limit kidney damage, and prevent complications. Recently, the development of promising specific treatment raises the hope to slow the growth of cysts and delay the disease. Treatment strategies targeting cAMP signalling such as vasopressin receptor antagonists or somatostatin analogs have been tested successfully in clinical trials with relative safety. Newer treatments supported by preclinical trials will become available in the next future. Recognizing early markers of renal progression (clinical, imaging, and genetic markers) to identify high-risk patients and multidrug approaches with synergistic effects may provide new opportunities

  19. Acupuncture and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Ma, Sheng-Xing; Feng, Lili

    2005-07-01

    Acupuncture as a complex therapeutic system has been used to treat a variety of diseases and pathological conditions. Although the exact mechanism(s) of acupuncture remains unknown, some evidence suggests a mechanism initially involving signal transduction through connective tissue, with secondary involvement of other systems including the nervous system. Acupuncture has become increasingly popular in the Western countries as a therapy for pain and several chronic disorders difficult to manage with conventional treatments. Acupuncture and acupuncture-like somatic nerve stimulation have been used in different kidney diseases and several complications related to them. The effect of acupuncture techniques in some kidney diseases is reviewed on the basis of clinical reports as well as mechanisms that may possibly explain the beneficial effects mediated by acupressure/acupuncture. The potential effect of acupressure techniques in renal inflammation and whether these effects could be mediated through the newly identified cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are discussed.

  20. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-03-13

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  1. Medullary cystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decreased alertness Easy bruising or bleeding Fatigue Frequent hiccups Headache Increased skin color (skin may appear yellow ... Kidney biopsy Kidney ultrasound Treatment There is no cure for this disease. At first, treatment focuses on ...

  2. Empagliflozin and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes, Established Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Lachin, John M; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Fitchett, David; Mattheus, Michaela; George, Jyothis T; Woerle, Hans-Juergen; Broedl, Uli C; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Zinman, Bernard

    2017-09-13

    Background -Empagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME(®) trial. Urinary glucose excretion with empagliflozin decreases with declining renal function, resulting in less potency for glucose lowering in patients with kidney disease. We investigated the effects of empagliflozin on clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes, established cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Methods -Patients with type 2 diabetes, established cardiovascular disease and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥30 mL/min/1.73m(2) at screening were randomized to receive empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo once daily in addition to standard of care. We analyzed cardiovascular death, hospitalization for heart failure, all-cause hospitalization and all-cause mortality in patients with prevalent kidney disease (defined as eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m(2) and/or urine albumin-creatinine ratio [UACR] >300 mg/g) at baseline. Additional analyses were performed in subgroups by baseline eGFR (<45, 45 to <60, 60 to <90, ≥90 mL/min/1.73m2) and baseline UACR (>300, 30 to ≤300, <30 mg/g). Results -Of 7020 patients treated, 2250 patients had prevalent kidney disease at baseline, of whom 67% had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for >10 years, 58% were receiving insulin and 84% were taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. In patients with prevalent kidney disease at baseline, empagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death by 29% compared with placebo (hazard ratio [HR] 0.71 [95% CI 0.52, 0.98]), the risk of all-cause mortality by 24% (HR 0.76 [95% CI 0.59, 0.99]), the risk of hospitalization for heart failure by 39% (HR 0.61 [95% CI 0.42, 0.87]) and the risk of all-cause hospitalization by 19% (HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.72, 0.92]). Effects of empagliflozin on these

  3. Health literacy in kidney disease: Review of the literature and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie Alton

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is the capacity of an individual to understand information related to a disease in order to make an informed decision. In patients with kidney diseases, studies have reported increasing impact of limited health literacy on health outcomes. Our paper discusses current literature on health literacy in kidney diseases. PMID:26981438

  4. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not available in most hospitals and some clinicians have felt deception at unfulfilled promises. However, there are indications that clinical proteomics may be entering the disruptive phase, where, once refined, technologies disrupt established industries or procedures. In this regard, recent manuscripts in CKJ illustrate how proteomics is entering the clinical realm, with applications ranging from the identification of amyloid proteins in the pathology lab, to a new generation of urinary biomarkers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) assessment and outcome prediction. Indeed, one such panel of urinary peptidomics biomarkers, CKD273, recently received a Food and Drug Administration letter of support, the first ever in the CKD field. In addition, a must-read resource providing information on kidney disease-related proteomics and systems biology databases and how to access and use them in clinical decision-making was also recently published in CKJ.

  5. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B.; Ramos, Adrian M.; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not available in most hospitals and some clinicians have felt deception at unfulfilled promises. However, there are indications that clinical proteomics may be entering the disruptive phase, where, once refined, technologies disrupt established industries or procedures. In this regard, recent manuscripts in CKJ illustrate how proteomics is entering the clinical realm, with applications ranging from the identification of amyloid proteins in the pathology lab, to a new generation of urinary biomarkers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) assessment and outcome prediction. Indeed, one such panel of urinary peptidomics biomarkers, CKD273, recently received a Food and Drug Administration letter of support, the first ever in the CKD field. In addition, a must-read resource providing information on kidney disease-related proteomics and systems biology databases and how to access and use them in clinical decision-making was also recently published in CKJ. PMID:28396735

  6. Endemic chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka: Correlation of pathology with clinical stages.

    PubMed

    Wijetunge, S; Ratnatunga, N V I; Abeysekera, T D J; Wazil, A W M; Selvarajah, M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDU) is endemic among the rural farming communities in several localities in and around the North Central region of Sri Lanka. This is an interstitial type renal disease and typically has an insidious onset and slow progression. This study was conducted to identify the pathological features in the different clinical stages of CKDU. This is a retrospective study of 251 renal biopsies identified to have a primary interstitial disease from regions endemic for CKDU. Pathological features were assessed and graded in relation to the clinical stage. The mean age of those affected by endemic CKDU was 37.3 ± 12.5 years and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The predominant feature of stage I disease was mild and moderate interstitial fibrosis; most did not have interstitial inflammation. The typical stage II disease had moderate interstitial fibrosis with or without mild interstitial inflammation. Stage III disease had moderate and severe interstitial fibrosis, moderate interstitial inflammation, tubular atrophy and some glomerulosclerosis. Stage IV disease typically had severe interstitial fibrosis and inflammation, tubular atrophy and glomerulosclerosis. The mean age of patients with stage I disease (27 ± 10.8 years) was significantly lower than those of the other stages. About 79.2%, 55%, 49.1% and 50% in stage I, II, III and IV disease respectively were asymptomatic at the time of biopsy.

  7. Identifying and integrating consumer perspectives in clinical practice guidelines on autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Tunnicliffe, David J; Lopez-Vargas, Pamela; Mallett, Andrew; Patel, Chirag; Savige, Judy; Campbell, Katrina; Patel, Manish; Tchan, Michel C; Alexander, Stephen I; Lee, Vincent; Craig, Jonathan C; Fassett, Robert; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to identify consumer perspectives on topics and outcomes to integrate in the Kidney Health Australia Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment (KHA-CARI) clinical practice guidelines on autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A workshop involving three concurrent focus groups with 18 consumers (patients with ADPKD (n = 15), caregivers (n = 3)) was convened. Guideline topics, interventions and outcomes were identified, and integrated into guideline development. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the reasons for their choices. Twenty-two priority topics were identified, with most focussed on non-pharmacological management (diet, fluid intake, physical activity, complementary medicine), pain management and psychosocial care (mental health, counselling, cognitive and behavioural training, education, support groups). They also identified 26 outcomes including quality of life (QoL), progression of kidney disease, kidney function, cyst growth and nephrotoxity. Almost all topics and outcomes suggested were identified by health professionals with the exception of five topics/outcomes. Six themes reflected reasons for their choices: clarifying ambiguities, resolving debilitating pain, concern for family, preparedness for the future, taking control and significance of impact. Although there was considerable concordance between the priority topics and outcomes of health professionals and consumers for guidelines of ADPKD, there was also important discordance with consumers focused on fewer issues, but particularly on lifestyle, psychosocial support, pain, and QoL and renal outcomes. Active consumer engagement in guidelines development can help to ensure the inclusion of patient-centred recommendations, which may lead to better management of disease progression, symptoms, complications, and psychosocial impact. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Renin Angiotensin System and cytokines in chronic kidney disease: Clinical and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariadna Andrade Saldanha; Finotti, Beranardo Bahia; Lauar, Amanda Oliveira; Prestes, Thiago Ruiz Rodrigues; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões E

    2017-08-18

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major public health problem in Brazil and worldwide. There are many causes of CKD, being the congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and the glomerular diseases very common in pediatric patients, while diabetic nephropathy, CKD due to chronic arterial hypertension and glomerular diseases are predominant in adult patients. Many endogenous mediators have been related to the pathophysiology of CKD, being relevant the effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the immune-inflammatory mediators including cytokines. Several experimental and clinical studies have shown the role of the cytokines and RAS peptides in the pathophysiology of CKD. The blockade of the classical RAS axis, comprising angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), the octapeptide Angiotensin II and the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor, delays the development of CKD through multiple mechanisms, including the control of inflammatory response mediated by cytokines. On the other hand, the counterregulatory RAS axis, formed by the enzyme homologue to ACE named ACE2, the heptapeptide Angiotensin-(1-7) and its G-protein coupled receptor, the receptor Mas, exerts several renoprotective actions, mostly related to the inhibition of renal tissue inflammation and fibrosis. This review aims to report clinical and experimental evidence of the interaction between both RAS axes and cytokines in the pathophysiology of CKD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. [Advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Alcázar Arroyo, R; Orte Martínez, L; Otero González, A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), like other chronic diseases, is a serious public health problem because of both its high incidence and prevalence and its significant morbidity and mortality and socioeconomic cost. Advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) includes stages 4 and 5 of the CKD classification. It is defined as chronic kidney disease in which there is a severe reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 30 ml/min). The treatment goals are to reduce and treat the complications associated with chronic kidney failure and to prepare the patient adequately and sufficiently in advance for kidney replacement therapy. The prevalence of ACKD is 0.2-0.6% of the adult population. This prevalence increases with age and in Spain is 1.6% in persons older than 64 years. - CKD is easily detected in clinical practice with simple tests (GFR estimated by equations based on serum creatinine, albuminuria and urine sediment) (Strength of Recommendation B). - It is recommended to detect the presence of CKD in all persons older than 60 years or with hypertension, diabetes or cardiovascular disease (Strength of Recommendation B). - Early detection and appropriate referral to the nephrology of patients with ACKD improves long-term morbidity and reduces costs for both the patient and the health care system (Strength of Recommendation B). Adequate communication and coordination between the primary care and nephrology is essential for this early detection: - Referral to nephrology should be made based on the stage of CKD, age of the patient, rate of progression of kidney failure, degree of albuminuria and presence or appearance of early warning signs.All patients with CKD stages 4-5 should be referred to nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - A protocol should be established in each health area for joint follow-up between primary care and nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - The creation of multidisciplinary ACKD units including a nephrologist, nephrology nurse

  10. PKD2-Related Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, Mutation Spectrum, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Emilie Cornec-Le; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Renaudineau, Eric; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Charasse, Christophe; Michez, Eric; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Dantal, Jacques; Siohan, Pascale; Longuet, Hélène; Gatault, Philippe; Ecotière, Laure; Bridoux, Frank; Mandart, Lise; Hanrotel-Saliou, Catherine; Stanescu, Corina; Depraetre, Pascale; Gie, Sophie; Massad, Michiel; Kersalé, Aude; Séret, Guillaume; Augusto, Jean-François; Saliou, Philippe; Maestri, Sandrine; Chen, Jian-Min; Harris, Peter C.; Férec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick

    2017-01-01

    Background PKD2-related autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is widely acknowledged to be of milder severity than PKD1-related disease, but population-based studies depicting the exact burden of the disease are lacking. We aimed to revisit PKD2 prevalence, clinical presentation, mutation spectrum, and prognosis through the Genkyst cohort. Study Design Case series, January 2010 to March 2016. Settings & Participants Genkyst study participants are individuals older than 18 years from 22 nephrology centers from western France with a diagnosis of ADPKD based on Pei criteria or at least 10 bilateral kidney cysts in the absence of a familial history. Publicly available whole-exome sequencing data from the ExAC database were used to provide an estimate of the genetic prevalence of the disease. Outcomes Molecular analysis of PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Renal survival, age- and sex-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results The Genkyst cohort included 293 patients with PKD2 mutations (203 pedigrees). PKD2 patients with a nephrology follow-up corresponded to 0.63 (95% CI, 0.54–0.72)/10,000 in Brittany, while PKD2 genetic prevalence was calculated at 1.64 (95% CI, 1.10–3.51)/10,000 inhabitants in the European population. Median age at diagnosis was 42 years. Flank pain was reported in 38.9%; macroscopic hematuria, in 31.1%; and cyst infections, in 15.3% of patients. At age 60 years, the cumulative probability of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was 9.8% (95% CI, 5.2%–14.4%), whereas the probability of hypertension was 75.2% (95% CI, 68.5%–81.9%). Although there was no sex influence on renal survival, men had lower kidney function than women. Nontruncating mutations (n = 36) were associated with higher age-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rates. Among the 18 patients with more severe outcomes (ESRD before age 60), 44% had associated conditions or nephropathies likely to account for the early progression to ESRD. Limitations Younger patients

  11. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of HIV-associated immune complex kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Booth, John W; Hamzah, Lisa; Jose, Sophie; Horsfield, Catherine; O'Donnell, Patrick; McAdoo, Stephen; Kumar, Emil A; Turner-Stokes, Tabitha; Khatib, Nadia; Das, Partha; Naftalin, Claire; Mackie, Nicola; Kingdon, Ed; Williams, Debbie; Hendry, Bruce M; Sabin, Caroline; Jones, Rachael; Levy, Jeremy; Hilton, Rachel; Connolly, John; Post, Frank A

    2016-12-01

    The pathogenesis and natural history of HIV-associated immune complex kidney disease (HIVICK) is not well understood. Key questions remain unanswered, including the role of HIV infection and replication in disease development and the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the prevention and treatment of disease. In this multicentre study, we describe the renal pathology of HIVICK and compare the clinical characteristics of patients with HIVICK with those with IgA nephropathy and HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Poisson regression models were used to identify risk factors for each of these pathologies. Between 1998 and 2012, 65 patients were diagnosed with HIVICK, 27 with IgA nephropathy and 70 with HIVAN. Black ethnicity and HIV RNA were associated with HIVICK, receipt of ART with IgA nephropathy and black ethnicity and CD4 cell count with HIVAN. HIVICK was associated with lower rates of progression to end-stage kidney disease compared with HIVAN and IgA nephropathy (P < 0.0001). Patients with HIVICK who initiated ART and achieved suppression of HIV RNA experienced improvements in estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria. These findings suggest a pathogenic role for HIV replication in the development of HIVICK and that ART may improve kidney function in patients who have detectable HIV RNA at the time of HIVICK diagnosis. Our data also suggest that IgA nephropathy should be viewed as a separate entity and not included in the HIVICK spectrum. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. “Mass-effect” complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ≤ htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ≥ 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management. PMID:26641645

  13. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. "Mass-effect" complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ≤ htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ≥ 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management.

  14. Clinical Manifestations of Kidney Disease Among US Adults With Diabetes, 1988-2014.

    PubMed

    Afkarian, Maryam; Zelnick, Leila R; Hall, Yoshio N; Heagerty, Patrick J; Tuttle, Katherine; Weiss, Noel S; de Boer, Ian H

    2016-08-09

    Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of chronic and end-stage kidney disease in the United States and worldwide. Changes in demographics and treatments may affect the prevalence and clinical manifestations of diabetic kidney disease. To characterize the clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes over time. Serial cross-sectional studies of adults aged 20 years or older with diabetes mellitus participating in National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1988 through 2014. Diabetes was defined as hemoglobin A1c greater than 6.5% or use of glucose-lowering medications. Albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g), macroalbuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥300 mg/g), reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2), and severely reduced eGFR (<30 mL/min/1.73 m2), incorporating data on biological variability to estimate the prevalence of persistent abnormalities. There were 6251 adults with diabetes included (1431 from 1988-1994, 1443 from 1999-2004, 1280 from 2005-2008, and 2097 from 2009-2014). The prevalence of any diabetic kidney disease, defined as persistent albuminuria, persistent reduced eGFR, or both, did not significantly change over time from 28.4% (95% CI, 23.8%-32.9%) in 1988-1994 to 26.2% (95% CI, 22.6%-29.9%) in 2009-2014 (prevalence ratio, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.86-1.06] adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity; P = .39 for trend). However, the prevalence of albuminuria decreased progressively over time from 20.8% (95% CI, 16.3%-25.3%) in 1988-1994 to 15.9% (95% CI, 12.7%-19.0%) in 2009-2014 (adjusted prevalence ratio, 0.76 [95% CI, 0.65-0.89]; P < .001 for trend). In contrast, the prevalence of reduced eGFR increased from 9.2% (95% CI, 6.2%-12.2%) in 1988-1994 to 14.1% (95% CI, 11.3%-17.0%) in 2009-2014 (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.33-1.95] comparing 2009-2014 with 1988-1994; P < .001 for trend), with a similar pattern for severely

  15. Systems biology of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    He, John Cijiang; Chuang, Peter Y; Ma'ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Kidney diseases manifest in progressive loss of renal function, which ultimately leads to complete kidney failure. The mechanisms underlying the origins and progression of kidney diseases are not fully understood. Multiple factors involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases have made the traditional candidate gene approach of limited value toward full understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. A systems biology approach that integrates computational modeling with large-scale data gathering of the molecular changes could be useful in identifying the multiple interacting genes and their products that drive kidney diseases. Advances in biotechnology now make it possible to gather large data sets to characterize the role of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in kidney diseases. When combined with computational analyses, these experimental approaches will provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological processes. Multiscale analysis that connects the molecular interactions and cell biology of different kidney cells to renal physiology and pathology can be utilized to identify modules of biological and clinical importance that are perturbed in disease processes. This integration of experimental approaches and computational modeling is expected to generate new knowledge that can help to identify marker sets to guide the diagnosis, monitor disease progression, and identify new therapeutic targets.

  16. Systems biology of kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, John Cijiang; Chuang, Peter Y.; Ma'ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Kidney diseases manifest in progressive loss of renal function, which ultimately leads to complete kidney failure. The mechanisms underlying the origins and progression of kidney diseases are not fully understood. Multiple factors involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases have made the traditional candidate gene approach of limited value toward full understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. A systems biology approach that integrates computational modeling with large-scale data gathering of the molecular changes could be useful in identifying the multiple interacting genes and their products that drive kidney diseases. Advances in biotechnology now make it possible to gather large data sets to characterize the role of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in kidney diseases. When combined with computational analyses, these experimental approaches will provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological processes. Multiscale analysis that connects the molecular interactions and cell biology of different kidney cells to renal physiology and pathology can be utilized to identify modules of biological and clinical importance that are perturbed in disease processes. This integration of experimental approaches and computational modeling is expected to generate new knowledge that can help to identify marker sets to guide the diagnosis, monitor disease progression, and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:21881558

  17. Influence of Birth Weight on the Renal Development and Kidney Diseases in Adulthood: Experimental and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Maria C. P.; Oliveira, Vanessa; Ponzio, Beatriz; Rangel, Marina; Palomino, Zaira; Gil, Frida Zaladek

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies support the hypothesis that foetal programming is an important determinant of nephropathy, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes during adulthood. In this paper, the renal repercussions of foetal programming are emphasised, and the physiopathological mechanisms are discussed. The programming of renal diseases is detailed based on the findings of kidney development and functional parameters. PMID:22778952

  18. Building Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the openEHR Guideline Definition Language.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Heng; Lo, Ying-Chih; Hung, Pei-Yuan; Liou, Der-Ming

    2016-12-07

    As a result of the disease's high prevalence, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. A clinical decision support system that integrates with computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) should improve clinical outcomes and help to ensure patient safety. The openEHR guideline definition language (GDL) is a formal language used to represent CIGs. This study explores the feasibility of using a GDL approach for CKD; it also attempts to identify any potential gaps between the ideal concept and reality. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) anemia guideline as material, we designed a development workflow in order to establish a series of GDL guidelines. Focus group discussions were conducted in order to identify important issues related to GDL implementation. Ten GDL guidelines and 37 archetypes were established using the KDIGO guideline document. For the focus group discussions, 16 clinicians and 22 IT experts were recruited and their perceptions, opinions and attitudes towards the GDL approach were explored. Both groups provided positive feedback regarding the GDL approach, but raised various concerns about GDL implementation. Based on the findings of this study, we identified some potential gaps that might exist during implementation between the GDL concept and reality. Three directions remain to be investigated in the future. Two of them are related to the openEHR GDL approach. Firstly, there is a need for the editing tool to be made more sophisticated. Secondly, there needs to be integration of the present approach into non openEHR-based hospital information systems. The last direction focuses on the applicability of guidelines and involves developing a method to resolve any conflicts that occur with insurance payment regulations.

  19. Pruritus in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Combs, Sara A; Teixeira, J Pedro; Germain, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Pruritus is a common and distressing symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease. The most recent epidemiologic data have suggested that approximately 40% of patients with end-stage renal disease experience moderate to severe pruritus and that uremic pruritus (UP) has a major clinical impact, being associated strongly with poor quality of life, impaired sleep, depression, and increased mortality. The pathogenesis of UP remains largely unclear, although several theories on etiologic or contributing factors have been proposed including increased systemic inflammation; abnormal serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus levels; an imbalance in opiate receptors; and a neuropathic process. UP can present somewhat variably, although it tends to affect large, discontinuous, but symmetric, areas of skin and to be most symptomatic at night. A variety of alternative systemic or dermatologic conditions should be considered, especially in patients with asymmetric pruritus or other atypical features. Treatment initially should focus on aggressive skin hydration, patient education on minimizing scratching, and optimization of the aspects of chronic kidney disease care that are most relevant to pruritus, including dialysis adequacy and serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus management. Data for therapy specifically for UP remain limited, although topical therapies, gabapentin, type B ultraviolet light phototherapy, acupuncture, and opioid-receptor modulators all may play a role.

  20. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  1. [The Process of Developing Clinical Practice Guidelines: Example of the "2015 Taiwan Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Guidelines"].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), representing the current best-practice guidelines and recommendations for care, are supported by systematic review and evidence-based research. CPGs provide an effective and efficient approach to caring for patients and improving quality of care. Recently, the National Health Insurance Administration and National Institutes of Health developed CPGs for major diseases in Taiwan. This paper introduces the process that was used to develop one of these CPGs, the Taiwan Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Guidelines, which was published in 2015. Further, we introduce the general development of published nursing guidelines in Taiwan. These CPGs are expected to initiate various renal-care guidelines and to promote the quality of renal care in the country.

  2. Mitochondria Damage and Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is a vital organ that demands an extraordinary amount of energy to actively maintain the body's metabolism, plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis, nutrients reabsorption, and hormone secretion. Kidney is only second to the heart in mitochondrial count and oxygen consumption. As such, the health and status of the energy power house, the mitochondria, is pivotal to the health and proper function of the kidney. Mitochondria are heterogeneous and highly dynamic organelles and their functions are subject to complex regulations through modulation of its biogenesis, bioenergetics, dynamics and clearance within cell. Kidney diseases, either acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD), are important clinical issues and global public health concerns with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapeutic strategies to cure or retard the progression of the diseases. Mitochondria-targeted therapeutics has become a major focus for modern research with the belief that maintaining mitochondria homeostasis can prevent kidney pathogenesis and disease progression. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular events that govern mitochondria functions in health and disease will potentially lead to improved therapeutics development.

  3. Periostin in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Prakoura, Niki; Chatziantoniou, Christos

    2017-09-07

    Chronic kidney disease is an incurable to date pathology, with renal replacement therapy through dialysis or transplantation being the only available option for end-stage patients. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the progression of kidney diseases will permit the identification of unknown mediators and potential novel markers or targets of therapy which promise more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Over the last years, periostin was established by several studies as a novel key player in the progression of renal disease. Periostin is de novo expressed focally by the injured kidney cells during the development of renal disease. In diverse cohorts of renal disease patients, the expression levels of periostin in the kidney and urine were highly correlated with the stage of the pathology and the decline of renal function. Subsequent studies in animal models demonstrated that periostin is centrally involved in mediating renal inflammation and fibrosis, contributing to the deterioration of renal structure and function. Genetic or pharmaco-genetic inhibition of periostin in animal models of renal disease was efficient in arresting the progression of the pathology. This review will summarize the recent advances on periostin in the field of kidney diseases and will discuss its utility of as a novel target of therapy for chronic kidney disease.

  4. Translating research findings of chronic kidney disease management to clinical practice: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lesley Ann; Levin, Adeera

    2004-01-01

    Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) has been identified as a public health epidemic, fueled in part by improved outcomes of both diabetic and cardiac patient populations, as well as by the increasing recognition that it is possible to identify CKD at earlier stages. The estimated 8 to 10 million Americans that have CKD, with its concomitant morbidity and mortality, have the potential to overwhelm the current system of specialty practice medicine and health care resources. How can clinicians, clinician scientists, and health care administrators translate research findings into clinical practice in an effective manner to improve the care of this burgeoning patient group? The challenge of translating research into clinical care requires identification of that which we do and do not know, communication of knowledge between those who do and do not know, and efficient collection of information for systematic evaluation. This article will describe the challenges of translating current research findings into clinical practice. There is a need to identify the complexity of CKD disease processes and issues associated with delivery of care and to describe the difficulties in the dissemination of new knowledge to physicians. Because of the propensity of CKD to affect identifiable groups of patients, we will discuss the potential challenges of these strategies given the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity in North America. A potential solution to these challenges is a new paradigm of "process-based medicine" that integrates clinical and basic science research findings with multidisciplinary and shared care models of health care delivery. In this context, attention to advances in information technology, the cognitive processes that underlie physician learning, and the findings of outcome research may ensure true integration of clinical research and clinical practice.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed submit close x MENU Financial Assistance Grants Management System Login Information for patients Help Line Kidney Disease About your ... its grant application process through the online Grants Management System (GMS) Information for patients Information for patients If you are ...

  6. Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease: State of Current Research and Clinical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    D'Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease (CKD) warrants an accurate evaluation of risk aimed at reducing the burden of disease and its consequences. The use of biomarkers to identify patients at high risk has been in use in the general population for several decades and has received mixed reactions in the medical community. Some practitioners have become staunch supporters and users while others doubt the utility of biomarkers and rarely measure them. In CKD patients numerous markers similar to those used in the general population and others more specific to the uremic population have emerged; however their utility for routine clinical application remains to be fully elucidated. The reproducibility and standardization of the serum assays are serious limitations to the broad implementation of these tests. The lack of focused research and validation in randomized trials rather than ad hoc measurement of multiple serum markers in observational studies is also cause for concern related to the clinical applicability of these markers. We review the current literature on biomarkers that may have a relevant role in field of nephrology. PMID:25944976

  7. Osteoprotegerin and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Montañez-Barragán, Alejandra; Gómez-Barrera, Isaias; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Ucero, Alvaro C; González-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is associated to increased mortality. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily receptor that inhibits the actions of the cytokines receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by preventing their binding to signaling receptors in the cell membrane. OPG-deficient mice display vascular calcification while OPG prevented calcification of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and protected kidney cells from TRAIL-induced death. OPG may be a biomarker in patients with kidney disease. Circulating OPG is increased in predialysis, dialysis and transplant CKD patients and may predict vascular calcification progression and patient survival. By contrast, circulating OPG is decreased in nephrotic syndrome. In addition, free and exosome-bound urinary OPG is increased in human kidney disease. Increased urinary OPG has been associated with lupus nephritis activity. Despite the association of high OPG levels with disease, experimental functional information available suggests that OPG might be protective in kidney disease and in vascular injury in the context of uremia. Thus, tissue injury results in increased OPG, while OPG may protect from tissue injury. Recombinant OPG was safe in phase I randomized controlled trials. Further research is needed to fully define the therapeutic and biomarker potential of OPG in patients with kidney disease.

  8. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  9. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in University Clinic of Nephrology and Haemodialysis of Cotonou: clinical and genetical findings.

    PubMed

    Laleye, A; Awede, B; Agboton, B; Azonbakin, S; Biaou, O; Sagbo, G; Adjagba, M; Audrezet, M P; Ferec, C; Darboux, R

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease, but poorly studied in Africa. Its frequency in the University Clinic of Nephrology and Hemodialysis of Cotonou during the ten last years was 7 cases per year with a hospital prevalence estimated at 18 per 1000. The mean age of patients was 47.2 years extending from 29 to 70 years. Males were predominant with a sex ratio of 1.13. Family history was found in 47% of patients. The most common manifestations were lumbar pain (62%), high blood pressure (59%) urinary tract infections (53%), hematuria (46%), and abdominal masses (43%). Hepatic cysts were the most extra renal manifestations, found in 34% of cases. Renal failure was observed in 72% of patients of our series, six of them were under dialysis. Direct sequencing of polycystin 1 gene enabled us to identify some new mutations: 4 nonsense mutations (p.Q2824X exon 23, p.Q1651X exon 15, p.W1666X exon 15, p.R966W exon 12), a duplication (c_1761.1745 dup exon 9), a deletion (c.9397 + 1_9397 + 8del intron 26) and a deletion-insertion (c.7290_7291delins CTGCA exon 18).

  10. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction with their clinical experience to optimally manage patients with anemia. PMID:17245602

  11. Clinical determinants and prognostic significance of the electrocardiographic strain pattern in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Antonio C; Moraes, Aline A I; Cerutti, Virginia; França, Faustino; Quiroga, Borja; Amodeo, Celso; Picotti, Juliano C; Dutra, Lucas V; Rodrigues, Gabriel D; Amparo, Fernanda C; Lindholm, Bengt; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2014-05-01

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) strain pattern (Strain) is a marker of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) severity that provides additional prognostic information beyond echocardiography (ECHO) in the community level. We sought to evaluate its clinical determinants and prognostic usefulness in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We evaluated 284 non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (mean age, 61 years [interquartile range, 53-67 years]; 62% men). Patients were followed for 23 months (range, 13-32 months) for cardiovascular (CV) events and/or death. Strain patients (n = 37; 13%) were using more antihypertensive drugs, had higher prevalence of peripheral vascular disease and smoking, and higher levels of C-reactive protein, cardiac troponin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The independent predictors of Strain were: left ventricular mass index (LVMI), BNP, and smoking. During follow-up, there were 44 cardiovascular events (fatal and non-fatal) and 22 non-CV deaths; and Strain was associated with a worse prognosis independently of LVMI. Adding Strain to a prognostic model of LVMI improved in 15% the risk discrimination for the composite endpoint and in 12% for the CV events. Strain associates with CV risk factors and adds prognostic information over and above that of ECHO-assessed LVMI. Its routine screening may allow early identification of high risk CKD patients.

  12. User Requirements for a Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Decision Support Tool to Promote Timely Referral.

    PubMed

    Gulla, Joy; Neri, Pamela M; Bates, David W; Samal, Lipika

    2017-05-01

    Timely referral of patients with CKD has been associated with cost and mortality benefits, but referrals are often done too late in the course of the disease. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution, but interventions have failed because they were not designed to support the physician workflow. We sought to identify user requirements for a chronic kidney disease (CKD) CDS system to promote timely referral. We interviewed primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify data needs for a CKD CDS system that would encourage timely referral and also gathered information about workflow to assess risk factors for progression of CKD. Interviewees were general internists recruited from a network of 14 primary care clinics affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). We then performed a qualitative analysis to identify user requirements and system attributes for a CKD CDS system. Of the 12 participants, 25% were women, the mean age was 53 (range 37-82), mean years in clinical practice was 27 (range 11-58). We identified 21 user requirements. Seven of these user requirements were related to support for the referral process workflow, including access to pertinent information and support for longitudinal co-management. Six user requirements were relevant to PCP management of CKD, including management of risk factors for progression, interpretation of biomarkers of CKD severity, and diagnosis of the cause of CKD. Finally, eight user requirements addressed user-centered design of CDS, including the need for actionable information, links to guidelines and reference materials, and visualization of trends. These 21 user requirements can be used to design an intuitive and usable CDS system with the attributes necessary to promote timely referral. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sheri J; Osborne, Carl A; Kirk, Claudia A; Lowry, Stephen R; Koehler, Lori A; Polzin, David J

    2006-09-15

    Objective-To determine whether a renal diet modified in protein, phosphorus, sodium, and lipid content was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and mortality rate in cats with stage 2 or 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design-Double-masked, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Animals-45 client-owned cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD. Procedures-Cats were randomly assigned to an adult maintenance diet (n = 23 cats) or a renal diet (22) and evaluated trimonthly for up to 24 months. Efficacy of the renal diet, compared with the maintenance diet, in minimizing uremia, renal-related deaths, and all causes of death was evaluated. Results-Serum urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly lower and blood bicarbonate concentrations were significantly higher in the renal diet group at baseline and during the 12- and 24-month intervals. Significant differences were not detected in body weight; Hct; urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; and serum creatinine, potassium, calcium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations. A significantly greater percentage of cats fed the maintenance diet had uremic episodes (26%), compared with cats fed the renal diet (0%). A significant reduction in renal-related deaths but not all causes of death was detected in cats fed the renal diet. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The renal diet evaluated in this study was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and renalrelated deaths in cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD.

  14. [Pregnancy and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Siekierka-Harreis, M; Rump, L C

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease in women of childbearing age reaches approximately 0.2%. Under physiological conditions pregnancy results in important hemodynamic changes on the maternal organism. In the case of chronic kidney disease these adaptations often are only partial. Physiological changes of immune response during pregnancy may contribute to the progress of renal disease. Regardless of the underlying kidney disease, one can assume that the better the glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure are the more favorable the course of pregnancy will be with the chance for a healthy child and stable renal function. To achieve this goal, a close interaction is required between gynecologist, nephrologist, and other specialists in a center with appropriate experience.

  15. Elderly patients with chronic kidney disease: do they really need referral to the nephrology clinic?

    PubMed

    McClure, Mark; Jorna, Thomas; Wilkinson, Laura; Taylor, Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly common, especially in the elderly. In the UK, there has been a marked increase in the awareness and detection of CKD over the last decade. This is largely attributable to the introduction of automated estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) reporting and renal indicators in the primary care Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) initiative, both of which were introduced in 2006. These two initiatives have had a significant impact on referral patterns to renal services. Across the UK there has been a sustained increase in patients referred to nephrology clinics. The increased referrals have led to an older patient cohort, for whom specialist nephrology input is of questionable clinical benefit. This study aims to assess the outcomes of such patients referred to nephrology clinics in Dorset. Retrospective data were collected on all new referrals to the nephrology outpatient clinic at Dorset County Hospital between April 2006 and March 2007. We specifically examined all patients >80 years of age who had CKD Stage 4 or 5. Outcomes of interest included the rate of decline in eGFR, renal-specific management implemented by the clinic, need for renal replacement therapy and death. These outcomes were used to compare the difference between those patients kept under regular follow-up in the nephrology clinic and those discharged back to primary care. Patients were followed up until March 2014. In all, 124 patients who were ≥80 years of age had CKD Stage 4 (115 patients) or 5 (9 patients). The mean age was 84.4 (range 80-95) years. In all, 66 patients were kept under regular follow-up in the clinic and 58 patients were discharged back to primary care. Patients kept under follow-up tended to have a lower median eGFR at referral (22 mL/min/1.73 m(2) versus 26 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P = 0.051) and had a significantly more rapid decline in mean eGFR over the next 7 years (1.58 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/yr versus 0.357

  16. Diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-07-30

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg.

  17. Doppler ultrasound in kidney diseases: a key parameter in clinical long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Spatola, Leonardo; Andrulli, Simeone

    2016-12-01

    Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used in detecting reno-vascular diseases, showing to be a non-invasive, safe, low cost and repeatable tool. The Renal Resistive Index (RRI) [(peak systolic velocity - end diastolic velocity)/peak systolic velocity] is a semi-quantitative index derived by Doppler evaluation of renal vascular bed. Normally RRI is in the range of 0.47-0.70, it increases with aging and, usually, it shows a difference between the two kidneys less than 5-8 %. RRI is an important prognostic marker in chronic kidney diseases (CKD), both in diabetic and non-diabetic kidney diseases, because, in longitudinal prospective studies, it significantly correlated with hemodynamic (ABPM, SBP, DBP, pulse pressure) and histopathological parameters (glomerular sclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, interstitial infiltration). In acute kidney injury (AKI) RI is a valid tool in differentiating between pre-renal and renal failure and in predicting renal response to vaso-active agents. In addition a RRI >0.74 can predict the onset of AKI in septic patients. Renal Resistive Index is a useful marker in allograft diseases because it has been widely showed a correlation with histological lesions during worsening of renal function, both in acute rejection and in chronic allograft nephropathy. Recent studies suggest its role in the risk of new onset diabetes after transplantation and it could be one of the parameters to evaluate to shift or withdrawal immunological and/or hypertensive therapy.

  18. Kidney injury molecule-1 in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Caixia; Wang, Ningning

    2016-11-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1(KIM-1) is a type I membrane protein, comprising an extracellular portion and a cytoplasmic portion, which is expressed at very low levels in the normal kidney. The extracellular portion can cleave and rapidly enter tubule lumens after kidney injury, and can then be detected in the urine. It has been confirmed that the urine KIM-1 level is closely related to tissue KIM-1 level and correlated with kidney tissue damage. Not only is KIM-1 proven to be an early biomarker of acute kidney injury but it also has a potential role in predicting long-term renal outcome. This review summarizes the relationships between KIM-1 and kidney injury, especially in chronic kidney disease.

  19. Clinical outcomes of erythropoietin use in heart failure patients with anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Fan, Cindy Shutieng; Warner, Alberta

    2014-05-01

    Anemia and chronic kidney disease are common disorders in heart failure (HF) patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study assessed clinical outcomes associated with erythropoietin (EPO) treatment in this cardiorenal anemia syndrome (CRAS) population. This was a retrospective cohort study of Veterans Affairs patients with CRAS from January 2003 to December 2006. The primary outcome was a composite of death, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), HF, and stroke. Multiple Cox regression modeling was used to evaluate the outcome in patients prescribed (n = 213) and not prescribed EPO (n = 1845). Adjusted incidence of mortality was statistically significantly higher in EPO than in non-EPO users (33.8% vs 19.7%; hazard ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.85; P = .02). The unadjusted composite of cardiovascular events/death was higher in the EPO group, but not statistically significant when adjusted for confounders (P = .12). Crude ACS events were documented in 18.8% and 10.8% patients (P = .001), and stroke events occurred in 22.5% and 18.3% patients (P = .14) in EPO and non-EPO groups, respectively. We found that in CRAS patients, EPO use was associated with increased risk of mortality and a trend toward increased cardiovascular events. Therefore, clinicians considering EPO use in CRAS patients should assess whether any potential benefits outweigh the risks of use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease in Kidney Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.; Lieske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent population studies have found symptomatic kidney stone formers to be at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although kidney stones are not commonly identified as the primary cause of ESRD, they still may be important contributing factors. Paradoxically, CKD can be protective against forming kidney stones because of the substantial reduction in urine calcium excretion. Among stone formers, those with rare hereditary diseases (cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, Dent disease, and 2,8 dihydroxyadenine stones), recurrent urinary tract infections, struvite stones, hypertension, and diabetes seem to be at highest risk for CKD. The primary mechanism for CKD from kidney stones is usually attributed to an obstructive uropathy or pyelonephritis, but crystal plugs at the ducts of Bellini and parenchymal injury from shockwave lithotripsy may also contribute. The historical shift to less invasive surgical management of kidney stones has likely had a beneficial impact on the risk for CKD. Among potential kidney donors, past symptomatic kidney stones but not radiographic stones found on computed tomography scans were associated with albuminuria. Kidney stones detected by ultrasound screening have also been associated with CKD in the general population. Further studies that better classify CKD, better characterize stone formers, more thoroughly address potential confounding by comorbidities, and have active instead of passive follow-up to avoid detection bias are needed. PMID:21784825

  1. Exhaled volatile substances mirror clinical conditions in pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Juliane; Trefz, Phillip; Happ, Josephine; Schubert, Jochen K.; Staude, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring metabolic adaptation to chronic kidney disease (CKD) early in the time course of the disease is challenging. As a non-invasive technique, analysis of exhaled breath profiles is especially attractive in children. Up to now, no reports on breath profiles in this patient cohort are available. 116 pediatric subjects suffering from mild-to-moderate CKD (n = 48) or having a functional renal transplant KTx (n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 60) matched for age and sex were investigated. Non-invasive quantitative analysis of exhaled breath profiles by means of a highly sensitive online mass spectrometric technique (PTR-ToF) was used. CKD stage, the underlying renal disease (HUS; glomerular diseases; abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract or polycystic kidney disease) and the presence of a functional renal transplant were considered as classifiers. Exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns differed between CKD/ KTx patients and healthy children. Amounts of ammonia, ethanol, isoprene, pentanal and heptanal were higher in patients compared to healthy controls (556, 146, 70.5, 9.3, and 5.4 ppbV vs. 284, 82.4, 49.6, 5.30, and 2.78 ppbV). Methylamine concentrations were lower in the patient group (6.5 vs 10.1 ppbV). These concentration differences were most pronounced in HUS and kidney transplanted patients. When patients were grouped with respect to degree of renal failure these differences could still be detected. Ammonia accumulated already in CKD stage 1, whereas alterations of isoprene (linked to cholesterol metabolism), pentanal and heptanal (linked to oxidative stress) concentrations were detectable in the breath of patients with CKD stage 2 to 4. Only weak associations between serum creatinine and exhaled VOCs were noted. Non-invasive breath testing may help to understand basic mechanisms and metabolic adaptation accompanying progression of CKD. Our results support the current notion that metabolic adaptation occurs early during the time course of CKD

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2), or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. It is important to diagnose CKD early. Diagnosis & TestsHow can my doctor tell if I have CKD?There are three simple tests that your doctor might do if he or she suspects you might have chronic kidney disease:Blood pressure testUrine albumin (a test to see ...

  4. Dietary phosphorus and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime

    2013-10-01

    High serum phosphate is linked to poor health outcome and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before or after the initiation of dialysis. Therefore, maintenance of normal serum phosphate levels is a major concern in the clinical care of this population with dietary phosphorus restriction and/or use of oral phosphate binders considered to be the best corrective care. This review discusses (1) evidence for an association between serum phosphate levels and bone and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CKD patients as well as progression of kidney disease itself; (2) the relationship between serum phosphate and dietary phosphorus intake; and (3) implications from these data for future research. Increasing our understanding of the relationship between altered phosphorus metabolism and disease in CKD patients may clarify the potential role of excess dietary phosphorus as a risk factor for disease in the general population.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH Record For the Press Radio Podcast Videocast Multimedia News in Health Newsletter Research Matters Weekly Research ... several genetic studies of kidney disease. Researchers are learning how to identify genetic markers that might predict ...

  6. Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghata, Joseph; Cowley, Benjamin D

    2017-06-18

    Renal cysts, which arise from renal tubules, can be seen in a variety of hereditary and nonhereditary entities. Common mechanisms associated with renal cyst formation include increased cell proliferation, epithelial fluid secretion, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is seen as a component of numerous diseases. Autosomal dominant (AD) PKD is the most common potentially fatal hereditary disease in humans, causes renal failure in approximately 50% of affected individuals, and accounts for approximately 5% of end stage renal disease cases in the United States. ADPKD is caused by mutation in one of two genes-85% of cases are caused by mutation in PKD1 on chromosome 16 and 15% of cases are caused by mutation in PKD2 on chromosome 4. Polycystin-1, encoded by PKD1, is a large protein, has multiple transmembrane spanning domains, has extracellular regions suggesting a role in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions, has intracellular domains suggesting a role in signal transduction, and can physically interact with Polycystin-2. Polycystin-2 is smaller, has transmembrane domains, can act as a cation channel with calcium permeability, and may be regulated by Polycystin-1. These proteins, and many others associated with cystic kidney disease, localize to primary cilia, which may act as flow sensors in the kidney; cystic kidney diseases have also been termed ciliopathies. An increasing number of intracellular mechanisms, which are abnormally regulated in PKD, have been described and are potential targets for therapy, which is lacking in this common hereditary disease. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:945-975, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Necroinflammation in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Linkermann, Andreas; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional causality between kidney injury and inflammation remains an area of unexpected discoveries. The last decade unraveled the molecular mechanisms of sterile inflammation, which established danger signaling via pattern recognition receptors as a new concept of kidney injury-related inflammation. In contrast, renal cell necrosis remained considered a passive process executed either by the complement-related membrane attack complex, exotoxins, or cytotoxic T cells. Accumulating data now suggest that renal cell necrosis is a genetically determined and regulated process involving specific outside-in signaling pathways. These findings support a unifying theory in which kidney injury and inflammation are reciprocally enhanced in an autoamplification loop, referred to here as necroinflammation. This integrated concept is of potential clinical importance because it offers numerous innovative molecular targets for limiting kidney injury by blocking cell death, inflammation, or both. Here, the contribution of necroinflammation to AKI is discussed in thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing and crescentic GN, acute tubular necrosis, and infective pyelonephritis or sepsis. Potential new avenues are further discussed for abrogating necroinflammation-related kidney injury, and questions and strategies are listed for further exploration in this evolving field.

  8. FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells in chronic kidney disease: molecular pathways and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    CD4+/FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and Tregs deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmunity in both mice and humans. The forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression is required for both survival of Tregs precursors as well as their function. This suggests that Tregs may use multiple mechanisms to limit autoimmunity and may reflect functional heterogeneity among Tregs subsets that localize to distinct tissue environments. Both cell contact- and cytokine-based immunosuppressive mechanisms would require that Tregs be in close proximity to their targets. The fundamental regulatory activity that can be consistently demonstrated by Tregs in vivo and in vitro has stimulated great interest in developing novel strategies for treating ongoing inflammatory conditions. Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) are known to display a cellular immune dysfunction. Uremic solutes that accumulate during ESKD may be involved in these processes. In these patients, oxidative stress induced by oxLDL may increase Tregs sensitivity to Fas-mediated apoptosis in part as a consequence of 26S proteasome activation. The 26S proteasome, an ATP-dependent multisubunit protease complex found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of all eukaryotic cells, constitutes the central proteolytic machinery of the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Considering the effect of uremia and oxLDL, Tregs from patients with ESKD exhibit early cell-cycle arrest and become apoptotic. These phenomena are the consequence of the oxLDL inhibited proteasome proteolytic activity of p27(Kipl) and Bax proteins in Tregs. This may be one mechanistic explanation of the cellular immune dysfunction in patients with ESKD and may have important implications in clinics, since this response could contribute to the micro-inflammation and atherogenesis encountered in this population.

  9. [A specialized and integrated outpatient clinic for the care of children with chronic kidney disease: experience of CHU Sainte-Justine].

    PubMed

    Abderrahmane, Maroua; Desmarais, Diane; Robitaille, Pierre; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Mérouani, Aicha

    2009-12-01

    The management and optimal care for the pediatric patient with chronic kidney disease requires attention not only to medical management, but also special focus on the psychosocial and developmental factors of children which is complicated by the presence of other disease-related complications. In recent years, specialized chronic kidney disease and predialysis clinics have been set up to facilitate and improve the quality of care of these patients with a multidisciplinary organisation and coordinated management approaches of a renal team. We present our experience in establishing such a renal management clinic named "Prévoir" for children with chronic kidney disease at Sainte-Justine Hospital.

  10. microRNAs in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Arthur C K

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and diabetic kidney diseases have continually exerted a great burden on our society. Although the recent advances in medical research have led to a much better understanding of diabetic kidney diseases, there is still no successful strategy for effective treatments for diabetic kidney diseases. Recently, treatment of diabetic kidney diseases relies either on drugs that reduce the progression of renal injury or on renal replacement therapies, such as dialysis and kidney transplantation. On the other hand, searching for biomarkers for early diagnosis and effective therapy is also urgent. Discovery of microRNAs has opened to a novel field for posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Results from cell culture experiments, experimental animal models, and patients under diabetic conditions reveal the critical role of microRNAs during the progression of diabetic kidney diseases. Functional studies demonstrate not only the capability of microRNAs to regulate expression of target genes, but also their therapeutic potential to diabetic kidney diseases. The existence of microRNAs in plasma, serum, and urine suggests their possibility to be biomarkers in diabetic kidney diseases. Thus, identification of the functional role of microRNAs provides an essentially clinical impact in terms of prevention and treatment of progression in diabetic kidney diseases as it enables us to develop novel, specific therapies and diagnostic tools for diabetic kidney diseases.

  11. [Recent developments in genetic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Liebau, M C; Benzing, T

    2011-05-01

    The improved understanding of genetic kidney diseases has given rise to a more detailed understanding of kidney function within the last decade. Insights into the pathophysiological principles of frequent kidney diseases - partly inherited, partly acquired - have been obtained by the investigation of rare genetic disorders and can now serve as a starting point for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this way various clinical multicenter trials, which are based on the observations made in basic science have been established for the very common autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, the influence of genetic aspects on frequent kidney diseases, e. g. diabetic nephropathy, is becoming more obvious. This article aims to give an overview over essential recent development in the field of genetic kidney diseases.

  12. Clinical Application of Human Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Kidney and Urologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giuseppe; Sallustio, Fabio; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been isolated in different body fluids, including urine. The cargo of urinary EVs is composed of nucleic acids and proteins reflecting the physiological and possibly pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron and the urinary tract. Urinary EVs have been confirmed to contain low amounts of various types of RNA that play a role in intercellular communication by transferring genetic information. This communication through EV RNAs includes both continuation of normal physiological processes and conditioning in disease mechanisms. Although proteins included in urinary EVs represent only 3% of the whole-urine proteome, urinary EVs can influence cells in the renal epithelia not only by delivering RNA cargo, but also by delivering a wide range of proteins. Since urine is a readily available biofluid, the discovery of EVs has opened a new field of biomarker research. The potential use of urinary EV RNAs and proteins as diagnostic biomarkers for various kidney and urologic diseases is currently being explored. Here, we review recent studies that deal in identifying biomarker candidates for human kidney and urologic diseases using urinary EVs and might help to understand the pathophysiology. PMID:27376269

  13. Vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease: types, clinical impact and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Román-García, Pablo; Rodríguez-García, Minerva; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Iván; López-Ongil, Susana; Díaz-López, Bernardino; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcification plays a major role in cardiovascular disease, which is one of the main causes of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Vascular calcification is determined by prevalent traditional and uraemia-related (non-traditional) risk factors. It occurs mainly in the arteries, which are classified into three types according to their size and structural characteristics. In addition, vascular calcification has been associated with bone loss and fractures in chronic kidney disease patients and the general population, stressing the fact that both disorders can share pathogenetic pathways. The strategies to control vascular calcification involve several measures, chief among them the control of hyperphosphataemia. Furthermore, it has been recently described that strategies that reduce bone resorption and increase bone mineralization may decrease the risk of vascular calcifications; however, this approach still remains controversial. The mechanisms involved in vascular calcification are complex and not yet fully understood. Phosphorus plays a major role, while other factors related to bone formation have been recently identified. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Whole kidney engineering for clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ick-Hee; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2015-04-01

    Renal transplantation is currently the only definitive treatment for end-stage renal disease; however, this treatment is severely limited by the shortage of implantable kidneys. To address this shortcoming, development of an engineered, transplantable kidney has been proposed. Although current advances in engineering kidneys based on decellularization and recellularization techniques have offered great promises for the generation of functional kidney constructs, most studies have been conducted using rodent kidney constructs and short-term in-vivo evaluation. Toward clinical translations of this technique, several limitations need to be addressed. Human-sized renal scaffolds are desirable for clinical application, and the fabrication is currently feasible using native porcine and discarded human kidneys. Current progress in stem cell biology and cell culture methods have demonstrated feasibility of the use of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and primary renal cells as clinically relevant cell sources for the recellularization of renal scaffolds. Finally, approaches to long-term implantation of engineered kidneys are under investigation using antithrombogenic strategies such as functional reendothelialization of acellular kidney matrices. In the field of bioengineering, whole kidneys have taken a number of important initial steps toward clinical translations, but many challenges must be addressed to achieve a successful treatment for the patient with end-stage renal disease.

  15. E-Learning Model in Chronic Kidney Disease Management: a Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barahimi, Hamid; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Abolhassani, Farid; Rahimi Foroushani, Abass; Mohammadi, Aeen; Rajaee, Farahnaz

    2017-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a challenging health problem. The present study examined impact of self-care education through e-learning on improving kidney function among individuals with CKD. The studied population consisted of CKD patients receiving care at 10 centers for treating noncommunicable diseases in Tehran. Three centers were randomly selected and 39 patients with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, minimum education of grade 9, minimum of 2 years of referrals, and computer literacy of the individual or a first-degree relative were included in the study, while 92 patients were assigned into the control group. Changes in GFR were compared after 6 months following an e-learning program for the patients in the intervention group. The mean change in GFR was 7.5 ± 8.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 for the intervention group after the e-learning intervention, while this was -2.3 ± 8.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. The two groups were also significantly different in terms of age, marital status, education level, mean arterial pressure, and serum high-density lipoprotein level, and therefore, multivariable comparison of GFR was made incorporating these factor into the analysis and showed a significant improvement of GFR in the intervention group. According to the results of this study, effects of the e-learning educational intervention on improvement in kidney function and CKD treatment were established.

  16. Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Diabetic Kidney Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Potential.

    PubMed

    Zha, Dongqing; Wu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a major complication for diabetic patients. Adiponectin is an insulin sensitizer and anti-inflammatory adipokine and is mainly secreted by adipocytes. Two types of adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, have been identified. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients with DKD, elevated adiponectin serum levels have been observed, and adiponectin serum level is a prognostic factor of end-stage renal disease. Renal insufficiency and tubular injury possibly play a contributory role in increases in serum and urinary adiponectin levels in diabetic nephropathy by either increasing biodegradation or elimination of adiponectin in the kidneys, or enhancing production of adiponectin in adipose tissue. Increases in adiponectin levels resulted in amelioration of albuminuria, glomerular hypertrophy, and reduction of inflammatory response in kidney tissue. The renoprotection of adiponectin is associated with improvement of the endothelial dysfunction, reduction of oxidative stress, and upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression through activation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase by AdipoR1 and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α signaling pathway by AdipoR2. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the AdipoQ gene, including the promoter, are associated with increased risk of the development of T2D and DKD. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers, adiponectin receptor agonists, and PPAR agonists (e.g., tesaglitazar, thiazolidinediones, fenofibrate), which increase plasma adiponectin levels and adiponectin receptors expression, may be potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of DKD.

  17. Hepatitis C and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Coccoli, P; Esposito, P; Cianciaruso, B; Pota, A; Visciano, B; Annecchini, R; Parrilli, G

    2007-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often associated with kidney diseases such as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), with and without cryoglobulinemia, membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) or glomerulosclerosis (FSGN). The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of HCV with or without hypertransaminasemia in patients with chronic nephropathy in the predialytic phase. We tested 340 subjects with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) from our hospital's nephrology outpatient clinic for anti-HCV antibodies. In positive subjects we tested for HCV RNA by PCR method, monitoring, for at least 4 months, common biohumoral parameters including transaminases (AST, ALT). Of the 340 subjects, 46 (13.5%) were positive for HCV RNA, and 8 of these (17%) showed constant alteration of transaminases. HBsAg was found in 8 of the total study population (2.3%), and none of these showed altered transaminases. Type II diabetes mellitus was found in 26% (12/46) of the HCV-RNA positive patients, and in only 12.5% (37/294) of the negative ones. The kidney diseases we found in the 46 HCV-RNA positive patients were: diabetic nephropathy in 11 (23.9%), MPGN in 7 (15.2%), MPGN + cryoglobulinemia in 2 (4.3%), interstitial nephropathy in 4 (8.7%), IgA mesangial GN in 3 (6.5%), hypertensive nephropathy in 2 (4.3%), focal and segmental GN in 1 (2.2%), urologic disease in 4 (8.7%), other (hematological, genetic, iatrogenic) in 3 (6.6%), unknown in 9 (19.6%). Our data show that the most frequent kidney diseases associated with HCV infection were diabetic related nephropathy and MPGN with and without cryoglobulinemia. HCV infection had a positive association with diabetes. It is interesting to note that in this study population the hepatitis C concomitant to kidney disease was unusually mild: only 4 of the 46 subjects (9%) showed clinical, biohumoral and ultrasound evidence of cirrhosis.

  18. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  19. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23802624

  20. [Kidney diseases: new issues].

    PubMed

    Ronco, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects two to four million people in France and most of them are not aware of their disease. CKD is a major, independent risk factor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; the cardiovascular risk increases with the severity of renal failure. Evaluation of renal function (GFR) relies on MDRD and CKD-EPI equations. The French CKD-REIN cohort with more than 3000 patients followed for 5 years, will hopefully provide substantial advances in the knowledge of CKD epidemiology, of risk factors and mechanisms of CKD progression and medical practices. Improving CKD screening based on blood pressure, proteinuria (microalbuminuria in diabetic patients) and serum creatinine, is a national duty in high risk patients (with diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases). A major research goal is to identify new therapeutic targets and biomarkers, in order to treat kidney diseases before the occurrence of renal insufficiency, to halt their progression and to decrease cardiovascular risk. Careful therapeutic education of patients is required to successfully implement established guidelines, appropriate diets and new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koratala, Abhilash; Bhattacharya, Deepti; Kazory, Amir

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide, the number of pregnant women with various degrees of renal dysfunction is expected to increase. There is a bidirectional relation between CKD and pregnancy in which renal dysfunction negatively affects pregnancy outcomes, and the pregnancy can have a deleterious impact on various aspects of kidney disease. It has been shown that even mild renal dysfunction can increase considerably the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, data suggest that a history of recovery from acute kidney injury is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition to kidney dysfunction, maternal hypertension and proteinuria predispose women to negative outcomes and are important factors to consider in preconception counseling and the process of risk stratification. In this review, we provide an overview of the physiologic renal changes during pregnancy as well as available data regarding CKD and pregnancy outcomes. We also highlight the important management strategies in women with certain selected renal conditions that are seen commonly during the childbearing years. We call for future research on underexplored areas such as the concept of renal functional reserve to develop a potential clinical tool for prognostication and risk stratification of women at higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

  2. PKD2-Related Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, Mutation Spectrum, and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Renaudineau, Eric; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Charasse, Christophe; Michez, Eric; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Dantal, Jacques; Siohan, Pascale; Longuet, Hélène; Gatault, Philippe; Ecotière, Laure; Bridoux, Frank; Mandart, Lise; Hanrotel-Saliou, Catherine; Stanescu, Corina; Depraetre, Pascale; Gie, Sophie; Massad, Michiel; Kersalé, Aude; Séret, Guillaume; Augusto, Jean-François; Saliou, Philippe; Maestri, Sandrine; Chen, Jian-Min; Harris, Peter C; Férec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick

    2017-10-01

    PKD2-related autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is widely acknowledged to be of milder severity than PKD1-related disease, but population-based studies depicting the exact burden of the disease are lacking. We aimed to revisit PKD2 prevalence, clinical presentation, mutation spectrum, and prognosis through the Genkyst cohort. Case series, January 2010 to March 2016. Genkyst study participants are individuals older than 18 years from 22 nephrology centers from western France with a diagnosis of ADPKD based on Pei criteria or at least 10 bilateral kidney cysts in the absence of a familial history. Publicly available whole-exome sequencing data from the ExAC database were used to provide an estimate of the genetic prevalence of the disease. Molecular analysis of PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Renal survival, age- and sex-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rate. The Genkyst cohort included 293 patients with PKD2 mutations (203 pedigrees). PKD2 patients with a nephrology follow-up corresponded to 0.63 (95% CI, 0.54-0.72)/10,000 in Brittany, while PKD2 genetic prevalence was calculated at 1.64 (95% CI, 1.10-3.51)/10,000 inhabitants in the European population. Median age at diagnosis was 42 years. Flank pain was reported in 38.9%; macroscopic hematuria, in 31.1%; and cyst infections, in 15.3% of patients. At age 60 years, the cumulative probability of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was 9.8% (95% CI, 5.2%-14.4%), whereas the probability of hypertension was 75.2% (95% CI, 68.5%-81.9%). Although there was no sex influence on renal survival, men had lower kidney function than women. Nontruncating mutations (n=36) were associated with higher age-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rates. Among the 18 patients with more severe outcomes (ESRD before age 60), 44% had associated conditions or nephropathies likely to account for the early progression to ESRD. Younger patients and patients presenting with milder forms of PKD2-related disease may not be diagnosed

  3. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease - from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Jurk, Kerstin

    2016-12-05

    Progressive impairment of renal function can lead to uremia, which is associated with thus increasing the risk of bleeding as well as thrombosis. Furthermore, many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an indication for an anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy due to atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, thromboembolic disease, or peripheral artery disease. The treatment usually includes vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) and/or platelet aggregation inhibitors. The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) inhibiting factor Xa or thrombin activity represent an alternative for heparins and VKAs. However, DOACs can further aggravate the bleeding risk in CKD patients. This is related to a combination of an accumulation of the substance due to the reduced renal clearance, an inhibition of thrombin-mediated platelet activation, and uremia associated factors such as impaired coagulation, platelet function, and platelet-vessel wall. Furthermore, platelet aggregation inhibitors can also influence the bleeding risk, particularly if they are administered in combination with anticoagulants in patients with advanced CKD. In this review we discuss the different mechanisms leading to the increased risk of bleeding and thrombosis as well as the different options and problems related to an antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy in CKD patients.

  4. Kidney Disease Progression in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Katherine M; Matheson, Matthew; Hartung, Erum A.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline, hypertension (HTN) and proteinuria in subjects with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and compare with two congenital kidney disease control groups in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) cohort. Study design GFR decline (iohexol clearance), rates of HTN (ambulatory/casual blood pressures (BPs)), antihypertensive medication usage, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and proteinuria were analyzed in subjects with ARPKD (n=22) and two control groups: aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic (n=44) and obstructive uropathies (n=44). Differences between study groups were examined by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results Annualized GFR change in subjects with ARPKD was −1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 (−6%), with higher decline in subjects age >10 years (−11.5%). However, overall rates of GFR decline did not differ significantly in subjects with ARPKD vs. controls. There were no significant differences in HTN or LVH rates, but subjects with ARPKD had a higher percent on ≥3 BP medications (32% vs.0%, p<0.0001), more ACE inhibitor use (82% vs. 27% vs. 36%, p<0.0005), and less proteinuria (urine protein: creatinine=0.1 vs.0.6, p<0.005). Conclusions This study reports rates of GFR decline, HTN and proteinuria in a small but well-phenotyped ARPKD cohort. The relatively slow rate of GFR decline in subjects with ARPKD and absence of significant proteinuria suggest that these standard clinical measures may have limited utility in assessing therapeutic interventions and highlight the need for other ARPKD kidney disease progression biomarkers. PMID:26831744

  5. Kidney Disease Progression in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Dell, Katherine M; Matheson, Matthew; Hartung, Erum A; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    To define glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline, hypertension (HTN), and proteinuria in subjects with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and compare with 2 congenital kidney disease control groups in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort. GFR decline (iohexol clearance), rates of HTN (ambulatory/casual blood pressures), antihypertensive medication usage, left ventricular hypertrophy, and proteinuria were analyzed in subjects with ARPKD (n = 22) and 2 control groups: aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic disorders (n = 44) and obstructive uropathies (n = 44). Differences between study groups were examined with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Annualized GFR change in subjects with ARPKD was -1.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (-6%), with greater decline in subjects age ≥ 10 years (-11.5%). However, overall rates of GFR decline did not differ significantly in subjects with ARPKD vs controls. There were no significant differences in rates of HTN or left ventricular hypertrophy, but subjects with ARPKD had a greater percent on ≥ 3 blood pressure medications (32% vs 0%, P < .0001), more angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use (82% vs 27% vs 36%, P < .0005), and less proteinuria (urine protein: creatinine = 0.1 vs 0.6, P < .005). This study reports rates of GFR decline, HTN, and proteinuria in a small but well-phenotyped ARPKD cohort. The relatively slow rate of GFR decline in subjects with ARPKD and absence of significant proteinuria suggest that these standard clinical measures may have limited utility in assessing therapeutic interventions and highlight the need for other ARPKD kidney disease progression biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical testing patterns and cost implications of variation in the evaluation of chronic kidney disease among U.S. physicians

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Raquel F.; Powe, Neil R.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Troll, Misty U.; Parekh, Rulan S.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines were established to improve the diagnosis and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the extent, determinants, and cost implications of guideline adherence and variation in adherence have not been evaluated. Study Design Cross-sectional survey Settings & Participants Nationally representative sample of 301 U.S. primary care physicians and nephrologists Predictor Provider and patient characteristics Outcomes & Measurements Guideline adherence was assessed as present if physicians recommended at least 5 of 6 clinical tests prescribed by the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes and Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines for a hypothetical patient with newly identified CKD. We also assessed patterns and cost of additional non-recommended tests for the initial clinical evaluation of CKD. Results Most of the 86 family medicine, 89 internal medicine, and 126 nephrology physicians practiced greater than 10 years (54%), were in non-academic practices (76%), spent greater than 80% of their time performing clinical duties (78%), and correctly estimated kidney function (73%). Overall, 35% of participants were guideline adherent. Compared to nephrologists, internal medicine and family physicians had lower odds of adherence for all recommended testing (Odds Ratio (OR) [95% CI]:0.6[0.3–1.1] and 0.3[0.1–0.6], respectively). Participants practicing greater than 10 years had lower odds of ordering all recommended testing compared to participants practicing less than 10 years (OR[95% CI]: 0.5[0.3–0.9]). Eighty-five percent of participants recommended additional tests, which resulted in a 23% increased total per patient cost of the clinical evaluation. Limitations Recommendations for a hypothetical case scenario may differ from that of actual patients. Conclusions Adherence to the recommended clinical testing for the diagnosis and management of CKD was poor and additional testing was associated with substantially

  7. The Spectrum of Infectious Diseases in Kidney Transplantation: A Review of the Classification, Pathogens and Clinical Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos-Andreas; Duni, Anila; Peschos, Dimitrios; Agnantis, Niki; Dounousi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment-of-choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) benefit from a longer life expectancy, with a better quality of life. Despite, recent accomplishments in the field of kidney transplantation, both short- and long-term, surgical and medical complications still exist. Among these complications, cardiovascular disease, carcinogenesis and infections are the most important. Infectious diseases constitute the most common complications after renal transplantation and the second most common cause of death among RTRs with a functioning graft. Theoretically, all infectious pathogens could cause disease in immunocompromised RTRs, yet among these, one could identify more important ones, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, causing urinary tract infections; pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii; Candida species which cause invasive fungal infections; herpes viruses; hepatitis viruses and parasites. Early diagnosis and effective treatment are key elements in salvaging both the allograft and the patient. However, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of such infectious diseases are not easily identified due to the altered state of immune response of the RTR. Thus, apart from possessing a deep knowledge of the etiology and the treatment options in each case, transplant physicians should also always remain alert when dealing with RTRs.

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Patients with Kidney Diseases: an Overview of the Technical Aspects and Clinical Indications

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pramod; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Ota, Shinichi; De Lin, Ming; Liapi, Eleni; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic embolization is defined as the voluntary occlusion of one or several vessels, and this is achieved by inserting material into the lumen to obtain transient or permanent thrombosis in the downstream vascular bed. There are a number of indications for this approach in urological practice, in particular for the patients with parenchymatous or vascular kidney disease. In this review, we present the different embolization techniques and the principally employed occluding agents, and then we present the principal clinical indications and we discuss other pathologies that may benefit from this non-invasive therapy. The complications, side effects and main precautions associated with this approach are also described. PMID:20461179

  9. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  10. Liver cysts in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Cook, L.T.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    Hepatic CT findings were analyzed in 44 patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease and were correlated with liver and renal function tests and liver, splenic, and renal CT volume measurements. CT showed many large liver cysts in 31.8% of patients, small liver cysts in 25%, and no liver cysts in 43.2%. Patients with many large cysts often showed increased liver volumes. There was no correlation between severity of liver involvement and extent of renal cystic disease as determined from urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and renal volumes. Liver function tests were normal except in two patients, one with a cholangiocarcinoma, which may have arisen from a cyst, and the other with an infected liver cyst and chronic active hepatitis. Accordingly, if liver function tests are abnormal, an attempt should be made to identify complications of polycystic liver disease such as tumor cyst infection, and biliary obstruction. CT is a useful method for detecting liver cysts and identifying patients at risk for these complications.

  11. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented.

  12. [The use of diuretics in kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Heramb, Lene; Hallan, Stein; Aasarød, Knut

    2014-04-29

    Diuretics are an important part of the therapy for a number of medical conditions such as heart, liver and kidney failure and hypertension. This article presents updated knowledge on the use of diuretics in kidney disease. The article is based on a literature search in PubMed, information obtained from textbooks on neurophysiology and kidney disease and on the authors' clinical experience. Kidney disease affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diuretics, and this must be taken into account when selecting a drug and determining the dosage. This applies particularly to nephrotic syndrome and severe chronic renal disease (GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m²). Knowledge of the pharmacology of diuretics is crucial to the rational use of diuretics in renal disease. Dose titration under close clinical monitoring and an optimal dosage interval make it possible to find the lowest possible effective dose and reduce the occurrence of side effects.

  13. Imaging Classification of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Simple Model for Selecting Patients for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Irazabal, María V.; Rangel, Laureano J.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Osborn, Sara L.; Harmon, Amber J.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Hogan, Marie C.; El-Zoghby, Ziad M.; Harris, Peter C.; Erickson, Bradley J.; King, Bernard F.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of renal disease progression varies widely among patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), necessitating optimal patient selection for enrollment into clinical trials. Patients from the Mayo Clinic Translational PKD Center with ADPKD (n=590) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images and three or more eGFR measurements over ≥6 months were classified radiologically as typical (n=538) or atypical (n=52). Total kidney volume (TKV) was measured using stereology (TKVs) and ellipsoid equation (TKVe). Typical patients were randomly partitioned into development and internal validation sets and subclassified according to height-adjusted TKV (HtTKV) ranges for age (1A–1E, in increasing order). Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Study of PKD (CRISP) participants (n=173) were used for external validation. TKVe correlated strongly with TKVs, without systematic underestimation or overestimation. A longitudinal mixed regression model to predict eGFR decline showed that log2HtTKV and age significantly interacted with time in typical patients, but not in atypical patients. When 1A–1E classifications were used instead of log2HtTKV, eGFR slopes were significantly different among subclasses and, except for 1A, different from those in healthy kidney donors. The equation derived from the development set predicted eGFR in both validation sets. The frequency of ESRD at 10 years increased from subclass 1A (2.4%) to 1E (66.9%) in the Mayo cohort and from 1C (2.2%) to 1E (22.3%) in the younger CRISP cohort. Class and subclass designations were stable. An easily applied classification of ADPKD based on HtTKV and age should optimize patient selection for enrollment into clinical trials and for treatment when one becomes available. PMID:24904092

  14. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  15. Markers of kidney disease and risk of subclinical and clinical heart failure in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; Katz, Ronit; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Afkarian, Maryam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; de Boer, Ian H; Young, Bessie

    2016-12-01

    African Americans and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for clinical heart failure (HF). In this study, we aimed to determine the association of markers of kidney disease with subclinical HF (by echocardiogram) and risk of clinical HF among a large, well-characterized community-based cohort of African American patients. We also examined whether the association of markers of kidney disease with HF was attenuated with adjustment for echocardiographic measures. We studied participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large community-based cohort of African Americans. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured at baseline. We tested the association of eGFR and urine ACR with left ventricular mass (LVM), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and physician-adjudicated incident HF. Among the 3332 participants in the study, 166 (5%) had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 405 (12%) had urine ACR ≥30 mg/g. In models adjusted for demographics, comorbidity and the alternative measure of kidney disease, lower eGFR and higher urine ACR were associated with higher LVM {β-coefficient 1.54 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.31] per 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) decrease in eGFR and 2.87 (95% CI 1.85-3.88) per doubling of urine ACR}. There was no association of eGFR and urine ACR with LVEF [β-coefficient -0.12 (95% CI -0.28-0.04) and -0.11 (95% CI -0.35-0.12), respectively]. There was no association of eGFR with the risk of incident HF [HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.91-1.14) per 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) decrease], while there was a significant association of urine ACR [HR 2.22 (95% CI 1.29-3.84) per doubling of urine ACR]. This association was only modestly attenuated with adjustment for LVM [HR 1.95 (95% CI 1.09-3.49)]. Among a community-based cohort of African Americans, lower eGFR and higher ACR were associated with higher LVM. Furthermore, higher urine ACR was associated with incident HF, which was not entirely explained

  16. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration.

  17. Addressing the Global Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease Through Clinical and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Akinlolu

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, an estimated 200 million people have chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the United States, African Americans (AAs) have a four-fold excess risk of CKD compared to non-Hispanic white people and globally, people in the low-to-middle income countries of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa have the highest rates of CKD. Annually, more than 500,000 individuals develop end-stage renal disease (or CKD stage 5) in Sub-Saharan Africa alone and the vast majority of these patients suffer premature mortality. The health care costs and economic burden of CKD are huge and not sustainable even in advanced Western countries. A recent discovery on the role of Apolipoprotein 1 (APOL1) G1 and G2 renal risk variants in AAs has a huge potential to unravel the etiology of CKD in both AA and other black populations. Under the National Institutes of Health (NIH)−sponsored Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative, a large prospective genetic study of CKD is being conducted in 8000 participants in four African countries (Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, and Nigeria; for a total population of 320 million). This and other basic research studies in the United States could potentially shed great insight into the genetics and biologic mechanisms involved in the excess predilection of Africans and AAs to CKD. PMID:25125737

  18. Oral and salivary changes in patients with chronic kidney disease: A clinical and biochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, Beela Ram; Katta, Sudheer; Kode, Venkata Satyanarayana; Praveena, Channamsetty; Sathe, Naresh; Sandeep, Nalla; Penumarty, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its treatment can affect a wide range of tissues and systems. It directly or indirectly affects flow, concentrations and composition of saliva. Hemodialysis can effectively minimize most of these complications to some extent. Aims: The main aim of this study was to know the salivary content of sodium, potassium, calcium, urea, bicarbonate and oral manifestations in patients with CKD. Materials and Methods: For this study, 50 patients diagnosed with CKD and 50 systemically and periodontally healthy individuals were subjected to a detailed general and intraoral examination. Whole un-stimulated saliva samples of all the selected subjects were collected and subjected to calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), sodium (Na), potassium (K), bicarbonate and urea analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test, Mann–Whitney test. Results: Among 50 study subjects, 26 subjects had reduced salivary flow in the range of 0.1–0.4 ml/min. Intraoral examination of the study subjects revealed pallor, increased deposition of calculus, bleeding gums, metallic taste, hypoplasia of teeth and fissured tongue. There was a significant difference between healthy and prehemodialysis patients in the salivary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, urea levels and the difference was insignificant in relation to bicarbonate levels. Conclusions: Alterations in salivary calcium, phosphorous, urea, sodium, potassium levels were significantly higher in the study groups when compared to control groups and the difference was insignificant in relation to bicarbonate level. The increased levels in dialysis patients correlated with renal disease severity. PMID:26229271

  19. A nationwide survey of clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) - patients with and without preexisting chronic kidney disease have different prognoses.

    PubMed

    Pan, Heng-Chih; Wu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Ya-Fei; Huang, Tao-Min; Shiao, Chih-Chung; Chen, Te-Chuan; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Wei-Shun; Sun, Chiao-Yin; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Mai-Szu; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in hospitalized patients. The International Society of Nephrology implemented the "0 by 25" initiative aimed at preventing deaths from treatable AKI worldwide by 2025 and conducted a global snapshot survey in 2014. We joined in the project and conducted this study to compare the epidemiology, risk factors, and prognosis between patients with pure AKI and those with acute-on-chronic kidney disease (ACKD). In this study, we prospectively collected demographic parameters and data on clinical characteristics, baseline comorbidities, management, and outcomes of 201 AKI patients in 18 hospitals in Taiwan from September 2014 to November 2014. The in-hospital mortality rate was 16%. AKI was mostly attributed to sepsis (52%). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that oliguria was a positive independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, whereas preexisting CKD and exposure to nephrotoxic agents were negative independent predictors. The prevalence of vasopressor use, intensive care unit care, and mortality were significantly higher in pure AKI patients than in ACKD patients. Moreover, serum creatinine (SCr) levels significantly increased within 7 days after AKI diagnosis in nonsurvivors but not in survivors in the pure AKI group. By contrast, SCr levels were persistently lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the ACKD group during the same period. We thus determined that the prognosis of ACKD patients differed from that of pure AKI patients. Considering the CKD history in the future AKI staging system may improve prognosis prediction.

  20. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  1. Macrophage polarization in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaojiang; Chen, Shi-You

    Macrophage accumulation associates closely with the degree of renal structural injury and renal dysfunction in human kidney diseases. Depletion of macrophages reduces while adoptive transfer of macrophages worsens inflammation in animal models of the renal injury. However, emerging evidence support that macrophage polarization plays a critical role in the progression of a number of kidney diseases including obstructive nephropathy, ischemia-reperfusion injury, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other kidney diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the macrophage infiltration and polarization in these inflammatory and fibrotic kidney diseases, discussing the results mostly from studies in animal models. In view of the critical role of macrophage in the progression of these diseases, manipulating macrophage phenotype may be a potential effective strategy to treat various kidney diseases.

  2. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p < 0.05), and working status (23.5% vs. 50% working full time, p < 0.01). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups. Xerostomia, however, was frequently observed among the predialysis patients investigated (41.7% in diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  3. Microscopic Haematuria and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Stage 3-5 Nondiabetic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    You-Hsien Lin, Hugo; Yen, Chun-Yu; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-10-16

    Microscopic haematuria is proposed as a prognostic factor for renal outcomes in patients with glomerulonephritis. However, the role of haematuria in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or heavy proteinuria has not been investigated. We divided 1799 patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD into 3 groups according to the results from 3 urinalyses: no haematuria (0-2 red blood cells [RBCs]/hpf ≥2 times), mild haematuria (2-5 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times) and moderate haematuria (≥5-10 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times). The estimated glomerular filtration rate was 25.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with a urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR) of 881 mg/g. The hazard ratios (HRs) of mild and moderate haematuria for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.56, P = 0.024) and 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74, P = 0.030), respectively. The HR of moderate haematuria for mortality was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.11-2.20, P = 0.011). According to subgroup analysis, the HR of moderate haematuria for ESRD in patients with a UPCR of <500 mg/g was more prominent than that in patients with a UPCR of ≥500 mg/g. Microscopic haematuria in patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD is associated with increased risks of ESRD and mortality.

  4. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Polycystic kidney disease, adult type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Recessive ...

  6. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in women of agricultural communities in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Herrera Valdés, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer López, Miguel; López Marín, Laura; Arévalo, Pedro Alfonso; Smith González, Magaly J; Morales, Fabrizio E; Bacallao, Raymed; Bayarre, Héctor D; Vela Parada, Xavier F

    2015-01-01

    A chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes (CKDu) has emerged in Central America and elsewhere, predominantly affecting male farmworkers. In El Salvador (2009), it was the second cause of death in men > 18 years old. Causality has not been determined. Most available research focused on men and there is scarce data on women. Describe the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of CKDu in women of agricultural communities in El Salvador. A descriptive study was carried out in 10 women with CKDu stages 2, 3a, and 3b. Researchers studied demographics, clinical examination; hematological and biochemical analyses, urine sediment, renal injury markers, and assessed renal, cardiac, and peripheral arteries, liver, pancreas, and lung anatomy and functions. Kidney biopsy was performed in all. Data was collected on the Lime Survey platform and exported to SPSS 19.0. Patient distribution by stages: 2 (70%), 3a (10%), 3b (20%). Occupation: agricultural 7; non-agricultural 3. agrochemical exposure 100%; farmworkers 70%; incidental malaria 50%, NSAIDs use 40%; hypertension 40%. nocturia 50%; dysuria 50%; arthralgia 70%; asthenia 50%; cramps 30%, profuse sweating 20%. Renal markers: albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) > 300 mg/g 90%; β microglobulin and neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin (NGAL) presence in 40%. Kidney function: hypermagnesuria 100%; hyperphosphaturia 50%, hypercalciuria 40%; hypernatriuria 30%; hyponatremia 60%, hypocalcemia 50%. Doppler: tibial artery damage 40%. Neurological: reflex abnormalities 30%; Babinski and myoclonus 20%. Neurosensorial hypoacusis 70%. Histopathology: damage restricted mostly to the tubulo-interstitium, urine was essentially bland. CKDu in women is a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy with varied extrarenal symptoms.

  7. [Clinical experience with ferric carboxymaltose in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Minutolo, Roberto; Liberti, Maria Elena; Garofalo, Carlo; Pacilio, Mario; Sagliocchi, Alessandra; Sguazzo, Azzurra; Scarpati, Luisa; Sagliocca, Adelia; Santangelo, Sara; Provenzano, Michele; Savino, Manuela; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often show anemia and iron deficiency despite oral iron supplementation caused by poor iron absorption, intolerance and non-compliance. We prospectively followed seven adult patients with ND-CKD (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2), anemia (Hb<11 g/dl or treatment with ESA), iron deficiency (TSAT<20% and/or ferritin<100 ng/mL) and intolerant or non-responders to oral iron supplementation. Patients received ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) (single dose of 500 mg iv) eventually followed by further doses if iron deficiency persisted. Hemoglobin, ferritin, TSAT and ESA doses were recorded at baseline and after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks. After 2 weeks of FCM, ferritin increased from 5348 to 222154 ng/mL (P<0.05) and remained steady thereafter. The increase of TSAT from baseline (115%) was more gradual being significant from week 4 (198%) up to week 24 (2412%). During the study, patients received on average 2.31.0 injections of FCM, to the amount of 1143440 mg. Hb levels remained stable throughout the study, despite a significant reduction of ESA dosage (from 3426 g/week at baseline to 1116 and 1710 g/week, after 4 and 24 weeks, respectively). On average, the ESA dose saving was 2024 g/week. Even considering the higher cost of FCM, ESA dose reduction allowed shortening overall costs by 673/patient during the 24 weeks of study. In ND-CKD patients, FCM is effective in correcting iron deficiency and associated with stable Hb levels and significant decrease of ESA dosage. This allows a marked reduction of costs for anemia correction.

  8. Protein-energy wasting syndrome in advanced chronic kidney disease: prevalence and specific clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torres, Almudena; González Garcia, M Elena; San José-Valiente, Belén; Bajo Rubio, M Auxiliadora; Celadilla Diez, Olga; López-Sobaler, Ana M; Selgas, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is associated with increased mortality and differs depending on the chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage and the dialysis technique. The prevalence in non-dialysis patients is understudied and ranges from 0 to 40.8%. To evaluate the nutritional status of a group of Spanish advanced CKD patients by PEW criteria and subjective global assessment (SGA). Cross-sectional study of 186 patients (101 men) with a mean age of 66.1±16 years. The nutritional assessment consisted of: SGA, PEW criteria, 3-day dietary records, anthropometric parameters and bioelectrical impedance vector analysis. The prevalence of PEW was 30.1%, with significant differences between men and women (22.8 vs. 33.8%, p < 0.005), while 27.9% of SGA values were within the range of malnutrition. No differences were found between the 2methods. Men had higher proteinuria, percentage of muscle mass and nutrient intake. Women had higher levels of total cholesterol, HDL and a higher body fat percentage. The characteristics of patients with PEW were low albumin levels and a low total lymphocyte count, high proteinuria, low fat and muscle mass and a high Na/K ratio. The multivariate analysis found PEW to be associated with: proteinuria (OR: 1.257; 95% CI: 1.084-1.457, p=0.002), percentage of fat intake (OR: 0.903; 95% CI: 0.893-0.983, p=0.008), total lymphocyte count (OR: 0.999; 95% CI: 0.998-0.999, p=0.001) and cell mass index (OR: 0.995; 95% CI: 0.992-0.998). Malnutrition was identified in Spanish advanced CKD patients measured by different tools. We consider it appropriate to adapt new diagnostic elements to PEW criteria. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  10. Rationale and design of the DIPAK 1 study: a randomized controlled clinical trial assessing the efficacy of lanreotide to Halt disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Esther; Drenth, Joost P H; d'Agnolo, Hedwig; Casteleijn, Niek F; de Fijter, Johan W; Gevers, Tom J; Kappert, Peter; Peters, Dorien J M; Salih, Mahdi; Soonawala, Darius; Spithoven, Edwin M; Torres, Vicente E; Visser, Folkert W; Wetzels, Jack F M; Zietse, Robert; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-03-01

    There are limited therapeutic options to slow the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent clinical studies indicate that somatostatin analogues are promising for treating polycystic liver disease and potentially also for the kidney phenotype. We report on the design of the DIPAK 1 (Developing Interventions to Halt Progression of ADPKD 1) Study, which will examine the efficacy of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide on preservation of kidney function in ADPKD. The DIPAK 1 Study is an investigator-driven, randomized, multicenter, controlled, clinical trial. We plan to enroll 300 individuals with ADPKD and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) who are aged 18-60 years. Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or lanreotide, 120 mg, subcutaneously every 28 days for 120 weeks, in addition to standard care. Main study outcome is the slope through serial eGFR measurements starting at week 12 until end of treatment for lanreotide versus standard care. Secondary outcome parameters include change in eGFR from pretreatment versus 12 weeks after treatment cessation, change in kidney volume, change in liver volume, and change in quality of life. Blood and urine will be collected and questionnaires will be filled in following a fixed scheme. Magnetic resonance imaging will be performed for assessment of kidney and liver volume. Assuming an average change in eGFR of 5.2 ± 4.3 (SD) mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year in untreated patients, 150 patients are needed in each group to detect a 30% reduction in the rate of kidney function loss between treatment groups with 80% power, 2-sided α = 0.05, and 20% protocol violators and/or dropouts. The design is an open randomized controlled trial and measurement of our primary end point does not begin at randomization. The DIPAK 1 Study will show whether subcutaneous administration of lanreotide every 4 weeks attenuates disease progression in patients with ADPKD

  11. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD stages II-V (end stage renal disease)]. Plasma MPO was assayed by a spectrophotometric method. Serum urea and creatinine were estimated on a clinical chemistry analyzer using standard laboratory procedures. The mean plasma MPO levels were significantly lower with advancing stages of renal failure (P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPO and GFR (r = +0.89, P < 0.001) and a negative correlation with urea (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) and creatinine (r = -0.82, P < 0.001). While an inverse association was observed between plasma MPO and urea in CKD patients, such an association was not observed in control subjects (P = 0.43). In conclusion, the decline in plasma MPO levels may be due to the inhibitory effect of uraemic toxins on the enzyme.

  12. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition.

  13. Clinical Predictors of Diagnostic Testing Utility in the Initial Evaluation of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mendu, Mallika L.; Lundquist, Andrew; Aizer, Ayal A.; Leaf, David E.; Robinson, Emily; Steele, David J.R.; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim No evidence-based approach to the evaluation of CKD has been established. We sought to identify clinical criteria to guide a rational diagnostic approach for the initial evaluation of CKD. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,487 patients presenting for initial evaluation of CKD over three years (1/2010–1/2013) to academic nephrology clinics. We utilized the electronic medical record to determine tests ordered, abnormal results, and testing that affected diagnosis and/or management. Diagnostic and management yield of testing was defined as the percentage of tests that affected diagnosis and/or management. High yield for a given test was defined as an increased likelihood of the test affecting diagnosis and/or management. Results We identified clinical criteria predictive of high yield for paraprotein-related testing (one of the following: history of monoclonal disease, high risk of CKD progression, hypercalcemia or hemoglobin <10.6), and clinical criteria predictive of high yield for glomerulonephritis testing (one of the following: abnormal urine sediment, 3+ or greater hematuria or proteinuria >500mg/gm). A prior history of hydronephrosis and renal artery stenosis was predictive of high yield of abnormal renal ultrasound. Higher yield of testing was associated with higher risk progression categories for ANA, SPEP, urine sediment, calcium, PTH, hemoglobin, iron, and ferritin. We estimate that initial CKD evaluation costs range from $28 to $109 million/year in US-Medicare expenditure. Conclusion Numerous tests without significant clinical utility are obtained in initial CKD evaluation. Identifying criteria that can guide diagnostic testing may lead to a more informed and cost-effective approach to evaluation. PMID:26610178

  14. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  15. Kidney biomimicry--a rediscovered scientific field that could provide hope to patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Most studies on kidney disease have relied on classic experimental studies in mice and rats or clinical studies in humans. From such studies much understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease has been obtained. However, breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of kidney diseases have been relatively few, and new approaches to fight kidney disease are needed. Here we discuss kidney biomimicry as a new approach to understand kidney disease. Examples are given of how various animals have developed ways to prevent or respond to kidney failure, how to protect themselves from hypoxia or oxidative stress and from the scourge of hyperglycemia. We suggest that investigation of evolutionary biology and comparative physiology might provide new insights for the prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

  16. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Wu, Jun; Downton, Katherine; Ludeman, Emilie; Noxon, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L) or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L). This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. PMID:24790409

  17. Baclofen Toxicity in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Erin; Kothari, Niraj R; Roberts, John K; Sparks, Matthew A

    2017-09-09

    Baclofen, a commonly prescribed muscle relaxant, is primarily excreted via the kidneys; toxicity is a potentially serious adverse outcome in patients with decreased kidney function. We describe a patient with end-stage kidney disease receiving hemodialysis who developed neurotoxicity and hemodynamic instability after receiving baclofen for muscle spasms. In this case, prompt recognition of baclofen toxicity and urgent hemodialysis were effective in reversing this toxicity. This case is used to examine the pharmacokinetics and pathophysiology of baclofen toxicity and discuss appropriate diagnosis and management of baclofen toxicity. We recommend reducing the baclofen dose in patients who have moderately reduced kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 30-60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and avoiding use in patients with severely reduced kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30mL/min/1.73m(2)) or on renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient's perceptions of chronic kidney disease and their association with psychosocial and clinical outcomes: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy L.; Yates, Thomas; Smith, Alice C.; Chilcot, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) form organized beliefs regarding their illness and treatment. These perceptions influence the coping strategies employed by an individual to manage his/her illness and may act as a predictor for his/her willingness to engage in self-management behaviours. While illness perceptions have been identified as predictors of non-adherence, depression and mortality in dialysis patients, there is a paucity of research in CKD patients not requiring renal replacement therapy. This narrative review synthesizes the existing literature regarding the role of illness perceptions and associated clinical and psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Studies were identified following database searches of AMED, BNI, CINAHL, EMBASE, Health Business Elite, HMIC, Medline, PsycINFO and Google Scholar in January 2016. Despite the small evidence base, existing studies indicate that negative illness perceptions are associated with disease progression and a number of psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Evidence from other clinical populations suggests that illness perceptions are modifiable through psychological intervention, which may be most effective if delivered early before beliefs have the chance to become more established. Therefore, targeting illness perceptions in the earlier stages of CKD may be optimal. Further studies are now required to ascertain the mechanisms through which illness perceptions predict psychosocial and clinical outcomes in CKD patients and to ultimately test the efficacy of illness perception–based interventions. PMID:27274839

  19. Case definition for clinical and subclinical bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) in New Brunswick, Canada.

    PubMed

    Boerlage, A S; Stryhn, H; Sanchez, J; Hammell, K L

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) is considered an important cause of loss in salmon aquaculture in Atlantic Canada. Causative agent of BKD is the Gram-positive bacteria Renibacterium salmoninarum. Infected salmon are often asymptomatic (subclinical infection), and the disease is considered chronic. One of the challenges in quantifying information from farm production and health records is the application of a standardized case definition. Case definitions for farm-level and cage-level clinical and subclinical BKD were developed using retrospective longitudinal data from aquaculture practices in New Brunswick, Canada, combining (i) industry records of weekly production data including mortalities, (ii) field observations for BKD using reports of veterinarians and/or fish health technicians, (iii) diagnostic submissions and test results and (iv) treatments used to control BKD. Case definitions were evaluated using veterinarians' expert judgements as reference standard. Eighty-nine and 66% of sites and fish groups, respectively, were associated with BKD at least once. For BKD present (subclinical or clinical), sensitivity and specificity of the case definition were 75-100% varying between event, fish group, site cycle and level (site pen). For clinical BKD, sensitivities were 29-64% and specificities 91-100%. Industry data can be used to develop sensitive case definitions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Clinical Use of SGLT2 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. SGLT2 cotransporters are responsible for reabsorption of 90 % of the glucose filtered by the kidney. The glucuretic effect resulting from SGLT2 inhibition contributes to reduce hyperglycaemia and also assists weight loss and blood pressure reduction. Several SGLT2 inhibitors are already available in many countries (dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin) and in Japan (ipragliflozin, tofogliflozin). These SGLT2 inhibitors share similar pharmacokinetic characteristics with a rapid oral absorption, a long elimination half-life allowing once-daily administration, an extensive hepatic metabolism mainly via glucuronidation to inactive metabolites and a low renal elimination as a parent drug. Pharmacokinetic parameters are slightly altered in the case of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While no dose adjustment is required in the case of mild CKD, SGLT2 inhibitors may not be used or only at a lower daily dose in patients with moderate CKD. Furthermore, the pharmacodynamic response to SGLT2 inhibitors as assessed by urinary glucose excretion declines with increasing severity of renal impairment as assessed by a reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, the glucose-lowering efficacy and safety of SGLT2 inhibitors are almost comparable in patients with mild CKD as in patients with normal kidney function. In patients with moderate CKD, the efficacy tends to be dampened and safety concerns may occur. In patients with severe CKD, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors is contraindicated. Thus, prescribing information should be consulted regarding dosage adjustments or restrictions in the case of renal dysfunction for each SGLT2 inhibitor. The clinical impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on renal function and their potential to influence the course of diabetic nephropathy deserve attention because of preliminary favourable results

  1. Horizon 2020 in Diabetic Kidney Disease: The Clinical Trial Pipeline for Add-On Therapies on Top of Renin Angiotensin System Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Navarro-González, Juan F.; Ortiz, Alberto; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. This implies failure of current therapeutic approaches based on renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade. Recent phase 3 clinical trials of paricalcitol in early diabetic kidney disease and bardoxolone methyl in advanced diabetic kidney disease failed to meet the primary endpoint or terminated on safety concerns, respectively. However, various novel strategies are undergoing phase 2 and 3 randomized controlled trials targeting inflammation, fibrosis and signaling pathways. Among agents currently undergoing trials that may modify the clinical practice on top of RAS blockade in a 5-year horizon, anti-inflammatory agents currently hold the most promise while anti-fibrotic agents have so far disappointed. Pentoxifylline, an anti-inflammatory agent already in clinical use, was recently reported to delay estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) loss in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3–4 diabetic kidney disease when associated with RAS blockade and promising phase 2 data are available for the pentoxifylline derivative CTP-499. Among agents targeting chemokines or chemokine receptors, the oral small molecule C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) inhibitor CCX140 decreased albuminuria and eGFR loss in phase 2 trials. A dose-finding trial of the anti-IL-1β antibody gevokizumab in diabetic kidney disease will start in 2015. However, clinical development is most advanced for the endothelin receptor A blocker atrasentan, which is undergoing a phase 3 trial with a primary outcome of preserving eGFR. The potential for success of these approaches and other pipeline agents is discussed in detail. PMID:26239562

  2. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  3. Rationale and Design of the DIPAK 1 Study: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Assessing the Efficacy of Lanreotide to Halt Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Esther; Drenth, Joost P.H.; d’Agnolo, Hedwig; Casteleijn, Niek F.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Gevers, Tom J.; Kappert, Peter; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Salih, Mahdi; Soonawala, Darius; Spithoven, Edwin M.; Torres, Vicente E.; Visser, Folkert W.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.; Zietse, Robert; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited therapeutic options to slow the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent clinical studies indicate that somatostatin analogues are promising for treating polycystic liver disease and potentially also for the kidney phenotype. We report on the design of the DIPAK 1 (Developing Interventions to Halt Progression of ADPKD 1) Study, which will examine the efficacy of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide on preservation of kidney function in ADPKD. Study Design The DIPAK 1 Study is an investigator-driven, randomized, multicenter, controlled, clinical trial. Setting & Participants We plan to enroll 300 individuals with ADPKD and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m2 who are aged 18-60 years. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or lanreotide, 120 mg, subcutaneously every 28 days for 120 weeks, in addition to standard care. Outcomes Main study outcome is the slope through serial eGFR measurements starting at week 12 until end of treatment for lanreotide versus standard care. Secondary outcome parameters include change in eGFR from pretreatment versus 12 weeks after treatment cessation, change in kidney volume, change in liver volume, and change in quality of life. Measurements Blood and urine will be collected and questionnaires will be filled in following a fixed scheme. Magnetic resonance imaging will be performed for assessment of kidney and liver volume. Results Assuming an average change in eGFR of 5.2 ± 4.3 (SD) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in untreated patients, 150 patients are needed in each group to detect a 30% reduction in the rate of kidney function loss between treatment groups with 80% power, 2-sided α = 0.05, and 20% protocol violators and/or dropouts. Limitations The design is an open randomized controlled trial and measurement of our primary end point does not begin at randomization. Conclusions The DIPAK 1 Study will show whether

  4. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amyloid proteins in blood may indicate amyloidosis. Kidney Biopsy Only a biopsy can show the amyloid protein ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  5. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities.

  6. Magnesium in chronic kidney disease: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David M

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium ion is critical for life and is integrally involved in cellular function and a key component of normal bone mineral. In health, the kidneys, gastrointestinal tract and bone are responsible for maintaining serum magnesium concentrations in the normal range and magnesium balance. Most clinical disorders involving magnesium, other than chronic kidney disease (CKD), result in hypomagnesemia, either from gastrointestinal or kidney losses. CKD and particularly end-stage kidney disease is the only clinical condition where sustained hypermagnesemia may occur and net magnesium balance may be positive. This review will focus on normal magnesium homeostasis and review the literature in CKD with a particular focus on end-stage kidney disease and the potential role of magnesium as a phosphate binder and in cardiovascular and bone health. A number of small to medium-size interventional trials have shown that magnesium-based compounds can serve as effective phosphate binders. Observational studies suggest that higher serum magnesium concentrations in dialysis patients may improve survival and may slow the progression of vascular calcification. While a few small prospective trials support these findings, no large or long-term studies are available. Magnesium balance remains poorly understood in patients with end-stage kidney disease. While observational and small randomized trials suggest that exogenous administration may be useful as a phosphate binder and may have protective cardiovascular effects in terms of both arrhythmias and vascular calcification, large randomized trials are needed to test these hypotheses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Fadem, Stephen Z.; Kant, Kotagal S.; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B.; Negoi, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  8. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  9. Development and implementation of an online clinical pathway for adult chronic kidney disease in primary care: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Donald, Maoliosa; McBrien, Kerry; Jackson, Wes; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello; King-Shier, Kathryn; Jindal, Kailash; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Braun, Ted; Straus, Sharon E; Naugler, Christopher; Elliott, Meghan J; Jun, Min; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2016-08-17

    Primary care physicians and other primary health care professionals from Alberta, Canada identified a clinical pathway as a potential tool to facilitate uptake of clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management and referral of adults with chronic kidney disease. We describe the development and implementation of a chronic kidney disease clinical pathway (CKD-CP; www.ckdpathway.ca ). The CKD-CP was developed and implemented based on the principles of the Knowledge-To-Action Cycle framework. We used a mixed methods approach to identify the usability and feasibility of the CKD-CP. This included individual interviews, an online survey and website analytics, to gather data on barriers and facilitators to use, perceived usefulness and characteristics of users. Results are reported using conventional qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics. Eighteen individual interviews were conducted with primary care physicians, nephrologists, pharmacists and nurse practitioners to identify themes reflecting both barriers and facilitators to integrating the CKD-CP into clinical practice. Themes identified included: communication, work efficiency and confidence. Of the 159 participants that completed the online survey, the majority (52 %) were first time CKD-CP users. Among those who had previously used the CKD-CP, 94 % agreed or strongly agreed that the pathway was user friendly, provided useful information and increased their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with CKD. Between November 2014 and July 2015, the CKD-CP website had 10,710 visits, 67 % of which were new visitors. The 3 most frequently visited web pages were home, diagnose and medical management. Canada, Indonesia and the United States were the top 3 countries accessing the website during the 9 month period. An interactive, online, point-of-care tool for primary care providers can be developed and implemented to assist in the care of patients with CKD. Our findings are important

  10. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  11. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  12. Kidney Disease and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rennke, Helmut G.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kidney injury is a common complication of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias, and it is associated with increased mortality. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms can contribute to kidney injury in the patient with myeloma, some of which are the result of nephrotoxic monoclonal Ig and some of which are independent of paraprotein deposition. The pathogenic mechanisms that underlie paraprotein-related kidney disease are increasingly well understood. A novel assay allowing the quantification of free light chains in the serum has aided the diagnosis of new onset disease and allowed for the earlier detection of relapse. Novel myeloma agents have shown considerable promise in reversing renal failure in some patients and improving outcomes. Stem cell transplantation remains a mainstay of management for younger patients with myeloma who are suitable candidates for intensive therapy, whereas the role of new drugs, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation continues to evolve. PMID:23868898

  13. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored.

  14. The role of urinary peptidomics in kidney disease research.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-03-01

    Urinary peptidomics focuses on endogenous urinary peptide content. Many studies now show the usefulness of this approach for the discovery and validation of biomarkers in kidney diseases that are as varied as chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, congenital anomalies of the kidney and the urinary tract, and polycystic kidney disease. Most studies focus on chronic kidney disease and demonstrate that urinary peptidome analysis can substantially contribute to early detection and stratification of patients with chronic kidney disease. A number of multicenter studies are ongoing that aim further validation in a clinical setting and broaden the applicability of urinary peptides. The association of urinary peptides with kidney disease also starts to deliver information on the pathophysiology of kidney disease with emphasis on extracellular matrix remodeling. Bioinformatic peptide centric tools have been developed that allow to model the changes in protease activity involved in kidney disease, based on the urinary peptidome content. A novel application of urinary peptidome analysis is the back-translation of results obtained in humans to animals for animal model validation and improvement of readout in these preclinical models. In conclusion, urinary peptidomics not only contribute to detection and stratification of kidney disease in the clinic, but might also create a new impulse in drug discovery through better insight in the pathophysiology of disease and optimized translatability of animal models.

  15. Glomerulocystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Brian J.; Yin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulocystic disease is a rare renal cystic disease with a long descriptive history. Findings from recent studies have significantly advanced the pathophysiological understanding of the disease processes leading to this peculiar phenotype. Many genetic syndromes associated with glomerulocystic disease have had their respective proteins localized to primary cilia or centrosomes. Transcriptional control of renal developmental pathways is dysregulated in obstructive diseases that also lead to glomerulocystic disease, emphasizing the importance of transcriptional choreography between renal development and renal cystic disease. PMID:20091054

  16. Clinical characteristics and prevalence of complications of chronic kidney disease in children: the Taiwan Pediatric Renal Collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Tain, You-Lin; Wang, Yi-Fan; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Chiou, Yuan-Yow

    2016-07-01

    Little information is available regarding the clinical characteristics and prevalence of complications in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in early disease stages. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and prevalence of complications in children with predialytic CKD. This multicenter, cross-sectional study enrolled children at all stages of predialytic CKD. Children who were between the ages of 1 year and 18 years and who fulfilled the clinical criteria of CKD were included in the study. Baseline demographic data, previous history, clinical characteristics, and laboratory data were collected. A total of 757 children were included in the study. The median age at the time of enrollment was 10.6 years; 397 patients (52.4 %) were males. A total of 39.0 % of the patients were in CKD stage 1, 37.6 % were in stage 2, 14.8 % were in stage 3, 3.0 % were in stage 4, and 5.5 % were in stage 5. Nonglomerular renal diseases were the primary cause of CKD, comprising 51.9 % of the patients with CKD. The age at disease onset, gender, CKD stage distribution, and proportion of co-morbidities varied between the glomerular and nonglomerular CKD cases. Anemia, hyperlipidemia, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia were more prevalent in patients with glomerular CKD. The overall prevalence of complications was as follows: uncontrolled blood pressure, 44.1 %; anemia, 34.2 %; hyperlipidemia, 44.9 %; short stature, 10.3 %; and failure to thrive, 8.2 %. Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP), anemia, and hyperlipidemia were common, even in the early CKD stages. The prevalence of CKD complications generally increased with the worsening stage of CKD. This study reveals differences in CKD etiology and prevalence of specific complications according to the stage of CKD. Early recognition and awareness of complications are mandatory for clinicians during the follow-up visits of children with CKD.

  17. A perspective on chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianyong; Yang, Hai-Chun; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) will progress to end stage without treatment, but the decline of renal function may not be linear. Compared with glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria, new surrogate markers, such as kidney injury molecule-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated protein, apolipoprotein A-IV, and soluble urokinase receptor, may allow potential intervention and treatment in the earlier stages of CKD, which could be useful for clinical trials. New omic-based technologies reveal potential new genomic and epigenomic mechanisms that appear different from those causing the initial disease. Various clinical studies also suggest that acute kidney injury is a major risk for progressive CKD. To ameliorate the progression of CKD, the first step is optimizing renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade. New drugs targeting endothelin, transforming growth factor-β, oxidative stress, and inflammatory- and cell-based regenerative therapy may have add-on benefit. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): part II: programme management and clinical information management.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    This is the second part of a document describing a voluntary certification process based on Joint Commission International (JCI) criteria developed by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) and JCI representatives. In the first part we discussed standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to chronic kidney disease care. Herein (Part II), we complete the description of Performace measurements and CKD care by describing issues related the management and clinical information management.

  19. Regenerative medicine in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Little, Melissa H; Kairath, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of renal failure has changed little in decades. Organ transplantation and dialysis continue to represent the only therapeutic options available. However, decades of fundamental research into the response of the kidney to acute injury and the processes driving progression to chronic kidney disease are beginning to open doors to new options. Similarly, continued investigations into the cellular and molecular basis of normal kidney development, together with major advances in stem cell biology, are now delivering options in regenerative medicine not possible as recently as a decade ago. In this review, we will discuss advances in regenerative medicine as it may be applied to the kidney. This will cover cellular therapies focused on ameliorating injury and improving repair as well as advancements in the generation of new renal tissue from stem/progenitor cells. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  1. Sirtuin 1: A Target for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lili; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhua; Luo, Manyu; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase that is necessary for caloric restriction–related lifespan extension. SIRT1, as an intracellular energy sensor, detects the concentration of intracellular NAD+ and uses this information to adapt cellular energy output to cellular energy requirements. Previous studies on SIRT1 have confirmed its beneficial effects on cellular immunity to oxidative stress, reduction of fibrosis, suppression of inflammation, inhibition of apoptosis, regulation of metabolism, induction of autophagy and regulation of blood pressure. All of the above biological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Therefore, the activation of SIRT1 may become a therapeutic target to improve the clinical outcome of kidney diseases. In this review, we give an overview of SIRT1 and its molecular targets as well as SIRT1-modulated biological processes, with a particular focus on the role of SIRT1 in kidney diseases. PMID:25587857

  2. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'.

  3. Sirtuin 1: A Target for Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lili; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhua; Luo, Manyu; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-12

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an evolutionarily conserved NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that is necessary for caloric restriction-related lifespan extension. SIRT1, as an intracellular energy sensor, detects the concentration of intracellular NAD(+) and uses this information to adapt cellular energy output to cellular energy requirements. Previous studies on SIRT1 have confirmed its beneficial effects on cellular immunity to oxidative stress, reduction of fibrosis, suppression of inflammation, inhibition of apoptosis, regulation of metabolism, induction of autophagy and regulation of blood pressure. All of the above biological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Therefore, the activation of SIRT1 may become a therapeutic target to improve the clinical outcome of kidney diseases. In this review, we give an overview of SIRT1 and its molecular targets as well as SIRT1-modulated biological processes, with a particular focus on the role of SIRT1 in kidney diseases.

  4. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  5. Adding Specialized Clinics for Remote-Dwellers with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cost-Utility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Natasha; Klarenbach, Scott W.; Chui, Betty; Ayyalasomayajula, Bharati; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jindal, Kailash; Manns, Braden; Tonelli, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives This study aimed to determine whether opening a new clinic in a remote region would be a cost-effective means of improving care for remote-dwellers with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study is a cost-utility analysis from a public payer’s perspective over a lifetime horizon, using administrative data from a large cohort of adults with stage 3b-4 CKD in Alberta, Canada. The association between the distance from each simulated patient’s residence and the practice location of the closest nephrologist and clinical outcomes (quality of care, hospitalization, dialysis, and death) were examined. A Markov 6-month cycle economic decision model was analyzed; estimates of the effect of a new clinic were based on the association between residence location, resource use, and outcomes. Costs are reported in 2009 Canadian dollars. Results The costs for equipping and operating a clinic for 321 remote-dwelling patients were estimated at $25,000 and $250,000/yr, respectively. The incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs) ranged from $4000 to $8000/quality-adjusted life-year under most scenarios. However, if reducing distance to nephrologist care does not alter mortality or hospitalization among remote-dwellers, the cost-effectiveness becomes less attractive. All other one-way sensitivity analyses had negligible effects on the ICUR. Conclusions Given the low costs of equipping and operating new clinics, and the very attractive ICUR relative to other currently funded interventions, establishing new clinics for remote-dwellers could play an important role in efficiently improving outcomes for patients with CKD. High-quality controlled studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22076876

  6. [Membranous kidney diseases in adults].

    PubMed

    Sobarzo Toro, Martín; Vilches, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy is the most common histologic phenotype associated with the primary nephrotic syndrome in adults and the second most common etiological diagnosis in over sixteen hundred renal biopsies on native kidneys processed at our institution over a 30 year period. Renal survival at 10 years is about 70%, but the course of the disease is related to a series of factors which have constituted the basis for mathematical models developed to predict the natural history in a given individual. These factors are gender, age, renal function at the time of diagnosis, presence of the nephrotic syndrome, high blood pressure and the degree of structural damage. Although in low risk patients a period of observation and the use of ACE inhibitors is a reasonable option, most nephrologists would elect to use pharmacological treatment to induce remissions of proteinuria and preserve renal function. The use of steroids and cytotoxic agents in alternating monthly cycles over six months is firmly supported by controlled, randomized clinical trials. If patients are resistant to this regimen or clinical considerations indicate it may be inappropriately toxic, the use of cyclosporin over 6 to 12 months is also a good choice, and it has been shown to be useful even in the context of deteriorating renal function. Mycophenolate mofetil and possibly rituximab may be options of last resort before considering the patient resistant to therapy. At all times, treatment of hypertension, non-specific antiproteinuric measures, and preventing complications of the nephrotic state should be top priorities in the overall therapeutic strategy.

  7. Comparison of myocardial damage among dogs at different stages of clinical leishmaniasis and dogs with idiopathic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, L; Casamian-Sorrosal, D; Barrera-Chacón, R; Cuesta-Gerveno, J M; Belinchón-Lorenzo, S; Gómez Nieto, L C; Duque-Carrasco, F J

    2017-03-01

    Canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is a systemic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum. Myocarditis in CanL has been described previously in CanL by histopathological analysis of post-mortem specimens and by evaluation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels. However, the degree of myocardial damage at different stages of CanL and the role that concurrent azotaemia plays in this myocardial injury are unknown. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and compare the presence of myocardial injury in dogs at different stages of clinical CanL and in dogs with severe idiopathic chronic kidney disease (CKD) by measuring cTnI. Forty-eight dogs were included in the study, divided into four groups: (1) group A (10 healthy dogs); (2) group B (17 dogs with CanL without renal azotaemia, classified as mild to severe in the LeishVet scheme); (3) group C (11 dogs with CanL and renal azotaemia, classified as very severe in the LeishVet scheme); and (4) group D (10 dogs with idiopathic CKD). Dogs in group C had significantly higher cTnI than dogs in groups B and D, although cTnI was also elevated in these groups. Dogs in group A had normal cTnI values. Dogs in groups D and C had similar renal IRIS classification scorers. Severe lymphoplasmocytic myocarditis and a positive real time PCR of L. infantum DNA were observed in all dogs in group C. Dogs with very severe CanL exhibit more myocardial injury than dogs with milder CanL or dogs with idiopathic CKD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Epidemiology of low-proteinuric chronic kidney disease in renal clinics

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Russo, Luigi; Bellasi, Antonio; Santoro, Domenico; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    CKD patients with low-grade proteinuria (LP) are common in nephrology clinics. However, prevalence, characteristics, and the competing risks of ESRD and death as the specific determinants, are still unknown. We analyzed epidemiological features of LP status in a prospective cohort of 2,340 patients with CKD stage III-V referred from ≥6 months in 40 nephrology clinics in Italy. LP status was defined as proteinuria <0.5 g/24h according to current KDIGO guidelines. Patients with higher proteinuria constituted the control group (CON). LP patients were 54.5% of the whole cohort. As compared to CON, LP were older (70.0±12.1 vs 65.4±14.1 y), and less likely to be male (55.8 vs 62.0%) and diabetic (27.6 vs 34.1%), and had hypertension as the most common cause of CKD (39.8%). They had higher eGFR (34.8±13.5 vs 26.8±13.2 mL/min/1.73m2) and hemoglobin (12.7±1.7 vs 12.3±1.7 g/dL), while systolic blood pressure (137±18 vs 140±18 mmHg) and serum phosphorus (3.7±0.8 vs 3.9±0.8 mg/dL) were lower [P<0.001 for all comparisons]. Over a median follow-up of 48 months, an inverse relative risk of ESRD and death was observed in LP (death>>ESRD; P = 0.002) versus CON (ESRD>>death; P<0.0001). Modifiable risk factors were also different in LP, with smoking, lower hemoglobin, and proteinuria being associated with higher mortality risk while lower BMI and higher phosphorus predicting ESRD at multivariable Cox analyses [P<0.05 for all]. Therefore, in nephrology clinics, LP patients are the majority and show distinctive basal features. More important, they are more exposed to death than ESRD and do present specific modifiable determinants of either outcome; indeed, in LP, while smoking plays a role for mortality, lower BMI and higher phosphorus levels -even if in the normal range- are predictors of ESRD. These data support the need to further study the low proteinuric CKD population to guide management. PMID:28212407

  9. Epidemiology of low-proteinuric chronic kidney disease in renal clinics.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Provenzano, Michele; Chiodini, Paolo; Borrelli, Silvio; Russo, Luigi; Bellasi, Antonio; Santoro, Domenico; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    CKD patients with low-grade proteinuria (LP) are common in nephrology clinics. However, prevalence, characteristics, and the competing risks of ESRD and death as the specific determinants, are still unknown. We analyzed epidemiological features of LP status in a prospective cohort of 2,340 patients with CKD stage III-V referred from ≥6 months in 40 nephrology clinics in Italy. LP status was defined as proteinuria <0.5 g/24h according to current KDIGO guidelines. Patients with higher proteinuria constituted the control group (CON). LP patients were 54.5% of the whole cohort. As compared to CON, LP were older (70.0±12.1 vs 65.4±14.1 y), and less likely to be male (55.8 vs 62.0%) and diabetic (27.6 vs 34.1%), and had hypertension as the most common cause of CKD (39.8%). They had higher eGFR (34.8±13.5 vs 26.8±13.2 mL/min/1.73m2) and hemoglobin (12.7±1.7 vs 12.3±1.7 g/dL), while systolic blood pressure (137±18 vs 140±18 mmHg) and serum phosphorus (3.7±0.8 vs 3.9±0.8 mg/dL) were lower [P<0.001 for all comparisons]. Over a median follow-up of 48 months, an inverse relative risk of ESRD and death was observed in LP (death>ESRD; P = 0.002) versus CON (ESRD>death; P<0.0001). Modifiable risk factors were also different in LP, with smoking, lower hemoglobin, and proteinuria being associated with higher mortality risk while lower BMI and higher phosphorus predicting ESRD at multivariable Cox analyses [P<0.05 for all]. Therefore, in nephrology clinics, LP patients are the majority and show distinctive basal features. More important, they are more exposed to death than ESRD and do present specific modifiable determinants of either outcome; indeed, in LP, while smoking plays a role for mortality, lower BMI and higher phosphorus levels -even if in the normal range- are predictors of ESRD. These data support the need to further study the low proteinuric CKD population to guide management.

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ng) per milliliter may mean a person has iron deficiency that requires treatment. 2 The transferrin saturation score ... with kidney disease who have anemia caused by iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid deficiencies to include sources of these nutrients in their ...

  11. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease pathways and help design new drug treatment strategies. The studies also may yield clues about how to intervene ... cause of death in kidney patients. Other ongoing studies supported by NIH will ... strategies. If detected sufficiently early, it may be possible ...

  12. Autosomal recessive and dominant polycystic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Righetti, M; Battini, G

    2004-12-01

    It is possible to identify renal cysts in several subjects by ultrasonography imaging techniques. Among the inherited polycystic kidney diseases we include autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and autosomal dominant polycystic diseases such as von Hippel-Lindau disease, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1 and TSC2), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ARPKD is a rare disease, related to PKHD1 gene, located on chromosome 6p21, that encodes a protein named polyductin/fibrocystin. Pathoanatomical features are bilateral kidney involvement with multiple microcysts, and invariably liver involvement with portal and interlobular fibrosis. A single genetic defect leads to different degrees of renal and hepatic involvement with very different phenotypes and different clinical outcome, in the same family too. ARPKD clinically may show 4 different forms: perinatal, neonatal, infantile, and juvenile. ADPKD is much more frequent (1: 400-1000 live births), and can arise from mutations in 2 different genes, named PKD1 located on chromosome 16p13.3, and PKD2 located on chromosome 4q21-23. The proteins encoded by the PKD1 and PKD2 genes are named polycystins which play crucial roles in several biologic processes. To explain the focal lesions that affected different organs and tissues the "double hit" theory has been proposed (germinal mutation plus somatic mutation on PKD1 or PKD2). Recently, biologic evidence documented the crucial role of the renal primary cilia on the formation of polycystins to induce cystogenesis. ADPKD may be clinically characterized by abdominal pain, hypertension, episodes of gross hematuria, headache, renal stones, aortic and cerebral aneurysms, mitral valve prolapse, and polycystic liver disease. ADPKD is slowly progressive disease responsible for up 10% of end stage renal failure (ESRF) in every country of the world. Male sex, PKD1 gene, episodes of gross hematuria, and the precocity and severity of hypertension play an

  13. Effects of RAAS Inhibitors in Patients with Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Hong; Liu, Di; Liu, Yexin; Li, Huiqiong; Tan, Xia; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Zhang, Hongqing

    2017-08-08

    Proteinuria and decline of renal function are associated with progression of kidney disease. The Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation, fluid volume, and sodium balance. Overactivity of RAAS contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of clinical conditions including progress of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review summarizes the use of RAAS inhibitors as dual therapy or monotherapy in different stages of kidney disease. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated RAAS inhibitors prevent proteinuria, kidney fibrosis and slow decline of renal function and thus play a protective role in both early and end stages of kidney disease. While combination use of RAAS inhibitors showed higher efficiency compared with monotherapy, it is also associated with higher incidence of adverse events. Besides ACEI/ARBs, more mechanism research of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in kidney disease should be performed.

  14. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. Recent findings It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. Summary This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition. PMID:25635587

  15. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children.

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition.

  16. Obesity in kidney disease: A heavyweight opponent

    PubMed Central

    Felizardo, Raphael Jose Ferreira; da Silva, Marina Burgos; Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important worldwide challenge that must be faced in most developed and developing countries because of unhealthy nutritional habits. The consequences of obesity and being overweight are observed in different organs, but the kidney is one of the most affected. Excess adipose tissue causes hemodynamic alterations in the kidney that can result in renal disease. However, obesity is also commonly associated with other comorbidities such as chronic inflammation, hypertension and diabetes. This association of several aggravating factors is still a matter of concern in clinical and basic research because the pathophysiologic mechanisms surrounding chronic kidney disease development in obese patients remain unclear. This review will discuss the consequences of obesity in the context of renal injury. PMID:25332896

  17. Kidney stones diseases and glycaemic statuses: focus on the latest clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Spatola, Leonardo; Angelini, Claudio; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Maringhini, Silvio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2016-12-05

    Diabetes and obesity are already recognized as potential risk factors for nephrolithiasis, especially for uric acid stones. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia actively contribute to impaired ability to excrete an acid load and altered ammonium production, leading to a lower urinary pH compared to non-diabetic controls. All these electrolytic disorders play an important role in stone formation and aggregation, especially in uric acid stones. There are still missing points in scientific evidence if the increased risk in stone formation is already existing even in the prediabetic statuses (isolated impaired glucose tolerance, isolated impaired fasting glucose, and associated impaired glucose tolerance/impaired fasting glucose) as well as it is worth to consider the same level of risk. Urolithiasis is the most frequent urological cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients and its cost is usually higher compared to non-diabetic patients, but less is known in others altered glycaemic diseases. The aim of this review article is to focus on the association between stone formation and altered glycaemic statuses, beyond the already known link between nephrolithiasis and diabetes mellitus.

  18. Recommendations for a Clinical Decision Support for the Management of Individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Meenal B.; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David; Patel, Uptal D.; Matchar, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Care for advanced CKD patients is suboptimal. CKD practice guidelines aim to close gaps in care, but making providers aware of guidelines is an ineffective implementation strategy. The Institute of Medicine has endorsed the use of clinical decision support (CDS) for implementing guidelines. The authors’ objective was to identify the requirements of an optimal CDS system for CKD management. Design, setting, participants, and measurements: The aims of this study expanded on those of previous work that used the facilitated process improvement (FPI) methodology. In FPI, an expert workgroup develops a set of quality improvement tools that can subsequently be utilized by practicing physicians. The authors conducted a discussion with a group of multidisciplinary experts to identify requirements for an optimal CDS system. Results: The panel considered the process of patient identification and management, associated barriers, and elements by which CDS could address these barriers. The panel also discussed specific knowledge needs in the context of a typical scenario in which CDS would be used. Finally, the group developed a set of core requirements that will likely facilitate the implementation of a CDS system aimed at improving the management of any chronic medical condition. Conclusions: Considering the growing burden of CKD and the potential healthcare and resource impact of guideline implementation through CDS, the relevance of this systematic process, consistent with Institute of Medicine recommendations, cannot be understated. The requirements described in this report could serve as a basis for the design of a CKD-specific CDS. PMID:19176797

  19. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  20. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... 26696680 . Tong LL, Adler S. Prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. ...

  1. Clinical considerations and practical recommendations for the primary care practitioner in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan N

    2007-12-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a risk factor for poor disease outcome. Anemia acts as a risk multiplier, significantly increasing the risk of death in anemic versus nonanemic CKD patients with similar comorbidities. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are a mainstay for the treatment of anemia in renal patients on dialysis, but recent data suggests that earlier treatment of anemia in CKD may delay the onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and decrease mortality. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is under-recognized and undertreated during the period before initiation of dialysis, when anemia correction may have the greatest impact on disease outcome. This report describes anemia in CKD and its association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and poor disease outcome, and offers suggestions for the recognition and treatment of anemia of CKD in the primary care setting.

  2. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical feasibility to large multi-center studies Funding Process Tips for applicants; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for ...

  3. Medicines and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical feasibility to large multi-center studies Funding Process Tips for applicants; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for ...

  4. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  5. Disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anjay; Linden, Ariel; Nissenson, Allen R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing health problem of epidemic proportions both in the United States and worldwide. The care of CKD patients, before and after starting dialysis, remains highly fragmented resulting in suboptimal clinical outcomes and high costs, creating a high burden of disease on patients and the health care system. Disease management (DM) is an approach to coordinating care for this complex population of patients that has the promise of improving outcomes and constraining costs. For CKD patients not yet on dialysis, the major goals of a DM program are (1) early identification of CKD patients and therapy to slow the progression of CKD, (2) identification and management of the complications of CKD per se, (3) identification and management of the complications of comorbid conditions, and (4) smooth transition to renal replacement therapy. For those CKD patients on dialysis, focused attention on avoidable hospitalizations is a key to a successful DM program. Multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (nephrologist, primary care physician, cardiologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeons, and transplant physicians) and participating caregivers (nurse, pharmacist, social worker, and dietician) is critical as well. There are several potential barriers to the successful implementation of a CKD/end-stage renal disease DM program, including lack of awareness of the disease state among patients and health care providers, late identification and referrals to a nephrologist, complex fragmented care delivered by multiple providers in many different sites of care, and reimbursement that does not align incentives for all involved. Recent experience suggests that these barriers can be overcome, with DM becoming a promising approach for improving outcomes for this vulnerable population.

  6. Carbonated beverages and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saldana, Tina M; Basso, Olga; Darden, Rebecca; Sandler, Dale P

    2007-07-01

    Carbonated beverage consumption has been linked with diabetes, hypertension, and kidney stones, all risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Cola beverages, in particular, contain phosphoric acid and have been associated with urinary changes that promote kidney stones. We examined the relationship between carbonated beverages (including cola) and chronic kidney disease, using data from 465 patients with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease and 467 community controls recruited in North Carolina between 1980 and 1982. Drinking 2 or more colas per day was associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-3.7). Results were the same for regular colas (2.1; 1.3-3.4) and artificially sweetened colas (2.1; 0.7-2.5). Noncola carbonated beverages were not associated with chronic kidney disease (0.94; 0.4-2.2). These preliminary results suggest that cola consumption may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease.

  7. Metabolomics in the study of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert H; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2011-10-25

    Metabolomics--the nontargeted measurement of all metabolites produced by the body--is beginning to show promise in both biomarker discovery and, in the form of pharmacometabolomics, in aiding the choice of therapy for patients with specific diseases. In its two basic forms (pattern recognition and metabolite identification), this developing field has been used to discover potential biomarkers in several renal diseases, including acute kidney injury (attributable to a variety of causes), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and kidney cancer. NMR and gas chromatography or liquid chromatography, together with mass spectrometry, are generally used to separate and identify metabolites. Many hurdles need to be overcome in this field, such as achieving consistency in collection of biofluid samples, controlling for batch effects during the analysis and applying the most appropriate statistical analysis to extract the maximum amount of biological information from the data obtained. Pathway and network analyses have both been applied to metabolomic analysis, which vastly extends its clinical relevance and effects. In addition, pharmacometabolomics analyses, in which a metabolomic signature can be associated with a given therapeutic effect, are beginning to appear in the literature, which will lead to personalized therapies. Thus, metabolomics holds promise for early diagnosis, increased choice of therapy and the identification of new metabolic pathways that could potentially be targeted in kidney disease.

  8. Pain management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Z H; Gupta, S; Warfield, C A; Steinman, T I

    2001-11-01

    Pain is a common complaint in patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and a systematic approach is needed to differentiate the etiology of the pain and define an approach to management. A thorough history is the best clue to the multifactorial causes of the pain, superimposed upon an understanding of the complex innervation network that supplies the kidneys. The appropriate use of diagnostic radiology (especially MRI) will assist in differentiating the mechanical low back pain caused by cyst enlargement, cyst rupture and cyst infection. Also, the increased incidence of uric acid nephrolithiasis as a factor in producing renal colic must be considered when evaluating acute pain in the population at risk. MRI is not a good technique to detect renal calculi, a frequent cause of pain in polycystic kidney disease. If stone disease is a possibility, then abdominal CT scan and/or ultrasound should be the method of radiologic investigation. Pain management is generally not approached in a systematic way in clinical practice because most physicians lack training in the principles of pain management. The first impulse to give narcotics for pain relief must be avoided. Since chronic pain cannot be "cured," an approach must include techniques that allow the patient to adapt to chronic pain so as to limit interference with their life style. A detailed stepwise approach for acute and chronic pain strategies for the patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is outlined.

  9. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  10. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Joel M

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by normal metabolic adaptation or injury has been clarified over the past decade. Mitochondrial biogenesis and its attendant processes enhance metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation and increase antioxidant defense mechanisms that ameliorate injury from aging, tissue hypoxia, and glucose or fatty acid overload, all of which contribute to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic kidney disease. There has been considerable interest in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in the kidney, which affect multiple processes in addition to mitochondrial biogenesis. As yet there is relatively little information focused specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis and its regulation by PPARγ coactivators and their modulators such as SIRT1. The available data indicate that these pathways will be fruitful areas for study in the modification of renal disease.

  12. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  13. Kidney abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    López Revuelta, K; Ricard Andrés, M P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease exhibits numerous kidney structural and functional abnormalities, changes that are seen along the entire length of the nephron. Changes are most marked in patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia, but are also seen in those with compound heterozygous states and the sickle cell trait. The renal features of sickle cell disease include some of the most common reasons for referral to nephrologists, such as hematuria, proteinuria, tubular disturbances and chronic kidney disease. Therapy of these conditions requires specialized knowledge of their distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Spanish Haemathology and Hemotherapy Association has recently publicated their Clinical Practice Guidelines of SCD management. Renal chapter is reproduced in this article for Nefrología difussion.

  14. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results Statistically significant correlation between the estimated creatinine clearance values and the average of the calculated values of kidney volume was found (p<0.01). Average value of the kidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  15. Rationale and Design of a Clinical Trial Investigating Tolvaptan Safety and Efficacy in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Devuyst, Olivier; Chapman, Arlene B.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Ouyang, John; Blais, Jaime D.; Czerwiec, Frank S.; Sergeyeva, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Background In TEMPO 3:4, the vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist tolvaptan slowed kidney growth and resulted in function decline in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients with relatively preserved kidney function. Methods Prospective, phase 3b, multi-center, randomized-withdrawal, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of tolvaptan in ADPKD patients with late stage 2 to early stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD). The primary endpoint was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change from pre-treatment baseline to post-treatment follow-up. Secondary endpoints included annualized eGFR slope, incidence of ADPKD complications, and overall and hepatic safety profiles. Participants were 18–55 year-old ADPKD patients with baseline eGFR ≥25 and ≤65 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or 56–65 year-old with eGFR ≥25 and ≤44 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and evidence of eGFR decline >2.0 mL/min/1.73 m 2 per year. Daily split doses of tolvaptan were titrated to tolerance (30/15, 45/15, 60/30, or 90/30 mg) and maintained for 12 months, after an 8-week pre-randomization period to screen out subjects unable to tolerate at least 60/30 mg for 3 weeks. Results Of 1,495 subjects who entered the tolvaptan titration period, 125 (8.4%) discontinued the study before randomization. One thousand three hundred seventy subjects (684 tolvaptan, 686 placebo) from 213 centers across 21 countries were randomized. Baseline demographics were well balanced across treatment arms. Information collected during the study included eGFR, survey scores (PKD history and outcome), adverse events, vital signs, hematology, urinalysis, and serum chemistry tests. Conclusion Replicating Evidence of Preserved Renal Function: An Investigation of Tolvaptan Safety and Efficacy (REPRISE) determines whether tolvaptan administered over 1 year exhibits disease-modifying properties in ADPKD patients with late stage 2 to early stage 4 CKD, which provides an important therapeutic advancement for this difficult

  16. Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease: the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system and its clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik R.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other catabolic diseases (e.g. sepsis, diabetes, cancer) can occur despite adequate nutritional intake. It is now known that complications of these various disorders, including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased glucocorticoid and angiotensin II production, all activate the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) to degrade muscle proteins. The initial step in this process is activation of caspase-3 to cleave the myofibril into its components (actin, myosin, troponin, and tropomyosin). Caspase-3 is required because the UPS minimally degrades the myofibril but rapidly degrades its component proteins. Caspase-3 activity is easily detected because it leaves a characteristic 14kD actin fragment in muscle samples. Preliminary evidence from several experimental models of catabolic diseases, as well as from studies in patients, indicates that this fragment could be a useful biomarker because it correlates well with the degree of muscle degradation in dialysis patients and in other catabolic conditions. PMID:17987322

  17. Chronic kidney disease in small animals.

    PubMed

    Polzin, David J

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects multiple body systems and presents with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Proper application of conservative medical management can profoundly affect the clinical course of CKD. Diagnosis and management is facilitated by staging CKD and applying therapies that are appropriate for the patient's stage of CKD. Therapy and follow-up of CKD are described, with emphasis on stage-based therapy to ameliorate clinical signs and slow progression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD-MBD) in adults.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Ambrosoni, Pablo; Carlini, Raúl G; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso; Jara, Aquiles; Jorgetti, Vanda; Negri, Armando L; Negri, Armando; Olaizola, Inés; Salusky, Isidro; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Weisinger, José R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-BMD) in adults, of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) comprise a set of recommendations developed to support the doctor in the management of these abnormalities in adult patients with stages 3-5 kidney disease. This excludes changes associated with renal transplantation. The topics covered in the guidelines are divided into four chapters: 1) Evaluation of biochemical changes, 2) Evaluation of bone changes, 3) Evaluation of vascular calcifications, and 4) Treatment of CKD-MBD. The guidelines are based on the recommendations proposed and published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of CKD-MBD (KDIGO Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, evaluation, prevention and treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder [CKD-MBD]), adapted to the conditions of patients, institutions and resources available in Latin America, with the support of KDIGO. In some cases, the guidelines correspond to management recommendations directly defined by the working group for their implementation in our region, based on the evidence available in the literature. Each chapter contains guidelines and their rationale, supported by numerous updated references. Unfortunately, there are few controlled studies with statistically sufficient weight in Latin America to support specific recommendations for the region, and as such, most of the references used correspond to studies carried out in other regions. This highlights the need to plan research studies designed to establish the current status of mineral and bone metabolism disorders in Latin America as well as defining the best treatment options for our population.

  19. Aging and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kosaku; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Yanai, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    A recent report has dealt with geriatric nephrology, including epidemiology and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD), attempting to get nephrologists to pay more attention to elderly CKD patients. The aims of this article are to summarize the morphological and functional properties of the aging kidney, and to better understand nephrology care for elderly CKD patients. The kidneys are affected by the aging process, which results in numerous effects on the renal system. In addition, the elderly population is hetereogenous - some have a decline in GFR explained by diseases that complicate aging such as arteriosclerosis with hypertension, whereas in the most of healthy adults the decline in GFR is much more modest and not inevitable. The values for normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in aging population have important implications for the diagnosis of CKD in the elderly. However, the MDRD equation underestimates mean eGFR by 25% and the CKD-EPI equation underestimates mean GFR by 16%. This bias may lead to misclassifying healthy older persons as having CKD. It is also still unknown whether and how age influences the predictive role of other risk factors for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in referred as well as unreferred patients. The risk of ESRD was reported to be higher than the risk of death without ESRD for ages <60 years, and independent of eGFR. Proteinuria significantly increased the risk of ESRD with advancing age. In older patients on nephrology care, the risk of ESRD prevailed over mortality even when eGFR was not severely impaired. Proteinuria increases the risk of ESRD, while the predictive role of other modifiable risk factors was unchanged compared with younger patients. The decision to initiate renal replacement therapy in the elderly is complicated by more challenges than in younger patients. Calorie restriction and Klotho deficiency may be a candidate therapeutic target for attenuating kidney aging. © 2014 S

  20. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients.

  1. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giorgina B.; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M.; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M.; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients. PMID:26676663

  2. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mak, Robert H; Ikizler, Alp T; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Raj, Dominic S; Stenvinkel, Peter; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-03-01

    Wasting/cachexia is prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is to be distinguished from malnutrition, which is defined as the consequence of insufficient food intake or an improper diet. Malnutrition is characterized by hunger, which is an adaptive response, whereas anorexia is prevalent in patients with wasting/cachexia. Energy expenditure decreases as a protective mechanism in malnutrition whereas it remains inappropriately high in cachexia/wasting. In malnutrition, fat mass is preferentially lost and lean body mass and muscle mass is preserved. In cachexia/wasting, muscle is wasted and fat is relatively underutilized. Restoring adequate food intake or altering the composition of the diet reverses malnutrition. Nutrition supplementation does not totally reverse cachexia/wasting. The diagnostic criteria of cachexia/protein-energy wasting in CKD are considered. The association of wasting surrogates, such as serum albumin and prealbumin, with mortality is strong making them robust outcome predictors. At the patient level, longevity has consistently been observed in patients with CKD who have more muscle and/or fat, who report better appetite and who eat more. Although inadequate nutritional intake may contribute to wasting or cachexia, recent evidence indicates that other factors, including systemic inflammation, perturbations of appetite-controlling hormones from reduced renal clearance, aberrant neuropeptide signaling, insulin and insulin-like growth factor resistance, and metabolic acidosis, may be important in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated wasting. A number of novel therapeutic approaches, such as ghrelin agonists and melanocortin receptor antagonists are currently at the experimental level and await confirmation by randomized controlled clinical trials in patients with CKD-associated cachexia/wasting syndrome.

  4. [Carnosine, carnosinase and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiliś-Pstrusińska, Katarzyna

    2012-04-20

     Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is an endogenously synthesized dipeptide which is present in different human tissues, including the kidney. Carnosine is hydrolyzed by the enzyme carnosinase. There are two carnosinase homologues: serum secreted carnosinase and non-specific cytosolic dipeptidase, encoded by the genes CNDP1 and CNDP2 respectively and located on chromosome 18q22.3. Carnosine functions as a radical oxygen species scavenger and as a natural angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Carnosine inhibits advanced glycation end product formation and reduces the synthesis of matrix proteins such as fibronectin and collagen type VI of podocytes and mesangial cells. In experimental studies it was shown that carnosine reduces the level of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. It is suggested that carnosine is a naturally occurring anti-aging substance in human organisms with a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular system. This paper reports the results of studies concerning carnosine's role in kidney diseases, particularly in ischemia/reperfusion induced acute renal failure, diabetic nephropathy, gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and also in blood pressure regulation. The correlations between serum carnosine and serum carnosinase activity and polymorphism in the CNDP1 gene are analyzed. The role of CNDP1 gene polymorphism in the development of diabetic nephropathy and non-diabetic chronic kidney disease is discussed. Carnosine is engaged in different metabolic pathways. It has nephroprotective features. Further studies of carnosine metabolism and its biological properties, particularly those concerning the human organism, are required.

  5. Diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in cats with mild chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, J; Moore, K; Elliott, J; Syme, H

    2008-06-01

    In cats with concurrent hyperthyroidism and non-thyroidal illnesses such as chronic kidney disease, total thyroxine concentrations are often within the laboratory reference range (19 to 55 nmol/l). The objective of the study was to determine total thyroxine, free thyroxine and/or thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations in cats with mild chronic kidney disease. Total thyroxine, free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone were measured in three groups. The hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease group (n=16) had chronic kidney disease and clinical signs compatible with hyperthyroidism but a plasma total thyroxine concentration within the reference range. These cats were subsequently confirmed to be hyperthyroid at a later date. The chronic kidney disease-only group (n=20) had chronic kidney disease but no signs of hyperthyroidism. The normal group (n=20) comprised clinically healthy senior (>8 years) cats. In 4 of 20 euthyroid chronic kidney disease cats, free thyroxine concentrations were borderline or high (> or =40 pmol/l). In the hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease group, free thyroxine was high in 15 of 16 cats, while thyroid-stimulating hormone was low in 16 of 16 cats. Most hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease cats (14 of 16) had total thyroxine greater than 30 nmol/l, whereas all the chronic kidney disease-only cats had total thyroxine less than 30 nmol/l. The combined measurement of free thyroxine with total thyroxine or thyroid-stimulating hormone may be of merit in the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in cats with chronic kidney disease.

  6. Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases: Conclusions from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Aymé, Ségolène; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Day, Simon; Devuyst, Olivier; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Klein, Jon B; Knoers, Nine V A M; Perrone, Ronald D; Roberts, Julia; Schaefer, Franz; Torres, Vicente E; Cheung, Michael; Wheeler, David C; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-10-01

    Rare kidney diseases encompass at least 150 different conditions, most of which are inherited. Although individual rare kidney diseases raise specific issues, as a group these rare diseases can have overlapping challenges in diagnosis and treatment. These challenges include small numbers of affected patients, unidentified causes of disease, lack of biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, and need for complex care. To address common clinical and patient issues among rare kidney diseases, the KDIGO Controversies Conference entitled, Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases, brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical providers and patient advocates to address five central issues for rare kidney diseases. These issues encompassed diagnostic challenges, management of kidney functional decline and progression of chronic kidney disease, challenges in clinical study design, translation of advances in research to clinical care, and provision of practical and integrated patient support. Thus, by a process of consensus, guidance for addressing these challenges was developed and is presented here. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypertension in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting 1 in 1000 individuals. Previously termed "adult polycystic kidney disease", ADPKD is now known to have important clinical manifestations beginning early in life and even in utero. Hypertension is an important risk factor for progressive renal and cardiovascular disease in children with ADPKD and may signify irremediable organ injury. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and treatment strategies in hypertension associated with pediatric ADPKD.

  8. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  9. C-peptide and diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    2017-01-01

    Kidney disease is a serious development in diabetes mellitus and poses an increasing clinical problem. Despite increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, there have been no new therapies for this condition in the last 20 years. Mounting evidence supports a biological role for C-peptide, and findings from multiple studies now suggest that C-peptide may beneficially affect the disturbed metabolic and pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies of C-peptide in animal models and in humans with type 1 diabetes all suggest a renoprotective effect for this peptide. In diabetic rodents, C-peptide reduces glomerular hyperfiltration and albuminuria. Cohort studies of diabetic patients with combined islet and kidney transplants suggest that maintained C-peptide secretion is protective of renal graft function. Further, in short-term studies of patients with type 1 diabetes, administration of C-peptide is also associated with a lowered hyperfiltration rate and reduced microalbuminuria. Thus, the available information suggests that type 1 diabetes should be regarded as a dual hormone deficiency disease and that clinical trials of C-peptide in diabetic nephropathy are both justified and urgently required.

  10. Regulatory T cells in kidney disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan Min; Wang, Yiping; Zhang, Geoff Y; Zheng, Guoping; Yi, Shounan; O'Connell, Philip J; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important in maintaining immune homeostasis and preventing autoimmune disease, including autoimmune kidney disease. It is also likely that they play a role in limiting kidney transplant rejection and potentially in promoting transplant tolerance. Although other subsets of Tregs exist, the most potent and well-defined Tregs are the Foxp3 expressing CD4(+) Tregs derived from the thymus or generated peripherally. These CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs limit autoimmune renal disease in animal models, especially chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. Furthermore, other subsets of Tregs, including CD8 Tregs, may play a role in immunosuppression in kidney disease. The development and protective mechanisms of Tregs in kidney disease and kidney transplantation involve multiple mechanisms of suppression. Here we review the development and function of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs. We discuss the specific application of Tregs as a therapeutic strategy to prevent kidney disease and to limit kidney transplant rejection and detail clinical trials in this area of transplantation.

  11. Hereditary kidney diseases: highlighting the importance of classical Mendelian phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Heidet, Laurence; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    A Mendelian inheritance underlies a nonnegligible proportion of hereditary kidney diseases, suggesting that the encoded proteins are essential for maintenance of the renal function. The identification of genes involved in congenital anomalies of the kidney and in familial forms of nephrotic syndrome significantly increased our understanding of the renal development and kidney filtration barrier physiology. This review will focus on the classical phenotype and clinical heterogeneity observed in the monogenic forms of these disorders. In addition, the role of susceptibility genes in kidney diseases with a complex inheritance will also be discussed.

  12. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  13. Diagnosing kidney disease in the genetic era.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sindhuri; Gharavi, Ali G

    2015-07-01

    Recent technological improvements have increased the use of genetic testing in the clinic. This review serves to summarize the many practical benefits of genetic testing, discusses various methodologies that can be used clinically, and exemplifies ways in which genetics is propelling the field forward in nephrology. The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies has heralded an unprecedented number of discoveries in the field of nephrology, providing many opportunities for incorporating genomic diagnostics into clinical care. The use of genetic testing, particularly in pediatrics, can provide accurate diagnoses in puzzling cases, resolve misclassification of disease, and identify subsets of individuals with treatable conditions. Genetic testing may have broad benefits for patients and their families. Knowing the precise molecular etiology of disease can help clinicians determine the exact therapeutic course, and counsel patients and their families about prognosis. Genetic discoveries can also improve the classification of kidney disease and identify new targets for therapy.

  14. [Chronic kidney disease and dyslipidaemia].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Vicente; Serrano, Adalberto; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Ascaso, Juan; Barrios, Vivencio; Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Cases, Aleix

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has to be considered as a high, or even very high risk cardiovascular risk condition, since it leads to an increase in cardiovascular mortality that continues to increase as the disease progresses. An early diagnosis of CKD is required, together with an adequate identification of the risk factors, in order to slow down its progression to more severe states, prevent complications, and to delay, whenever possible, the need for renal replacement therapy. Dyslipidaemia is a factor of the progression of CKD that increases the risk in developing atherosclerosis and its complications. Its proper control contributes to reducing the elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality presented by these patients. In this review, an assessment is made of the lipid-lowering therapeutic measures required to achieve to recommended objectives, by adjusting the treatment to the progression of the disease and to the characteristics of the patient. In CKD, it seems that an early and intensive intervention of the dyslipidaemia is a priority before there is a significant decrease in kidney function. Treatment with statins has been shown to be safe and effective in decreasing LDL-Cholesterol, and in the reduction of cardiovascular events in individuals with CKD, or after renal transplant, although there is less evidence in the case of dialysed patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chinnappa, V; Ankichetty, S; Angle, P; Halpern, S H

    2013-07-01

    Parturients with renal insufficiency or failure present a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist. Impaired renal function compromises fertility and increases both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Close communication amongst medical specialists, including nephrologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anesthesiologists is required to ensure the safety of mother and child. Pre-existing diseases should be optimized and close surveillance of maternal and fetal condition is required. Kidney function may deteriorate during pregnancy, necessitating early intervention. The goal is to maintain hemodynamic and physiologic stability while the demands of the pregnancy change. Drugs that may adversely affect the fetus, are nephrotoxic or are dependent on renal elimination should be avoided.

  16. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kristin M.; Adams, Michael A.; Holden, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population. PMID:24212088

  17. 77 FR 62520 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Ancillary Studies to Major Ongoing Clinical Research Studies..., Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research;...

  18. A computer-aided diagnostic system for kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jahantigh, Farzad Firouzi; Malmir, Behnam; Avilaq, Behzad Aslani

    2017-01-01

    Background Disease diagnosis is complicated since patients may demonstrate similar symptoms but physician may diagnose different diseases. There are a few number of investigations aimed to create a fuzzy expert system, as a computer aided system for disease diagnosis. Methods In this research, a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in a kidney clinic in Tehran, Iran in 2012. Medical diagnosis fuzzy rules applied, and a set of symptoms related to the set of considered diseases defined. The input case to be diagnosed defined by assigning a fuzzy value to each symptom and then three physicians asked about each suspected diseases. Then comments of those three physicians summarized for each disease. The fuzzy inference applied to obtain a decision fuzzy set for each disease, and crisp decision values attained to determine the certainty of existence for each disease. Results Results indicated that, in the diagnosis of seven cases of kidney disease by examining 21 indicators using fuzzy expert system, kidney stone disease with 63% certainty was the most probable, renal tubular was at the lowest level with 15%, and other kidney diseases were at the other levels. The most remarkable finding of this study was that results of kidney disease diagnosis (e.g., kidney stone) via fuzzy expert system were fully compatible with those of kidney physicians. Conclusion The proposed fuzzy expert system is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to diagnose several typical input cases. The developed system decreases the effort of initial physical checking and manual feeding of input symptoms. PMID:28392995

  19. Therapeutic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Czopek, Alicja; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Webb, David J; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-03-01

    Our growing understanding of the role of the endothelin (ET) system in renal physiology and pathophysiology is from emerging studies of renal disease in animal models and humans. ET receptor antagonists reduce blood pressure and proteinuria in chronic kidney disease and cause regression of renal injury in animals. However, the therapeutic potential of ET receptor antagonism has not been fully explored and clinical studies have been largely limited to patients with diabetic nephropathy. There remains a need for more work in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease (patients requiring maintenance dialysis and those with a functioning kidney transplant), ischemia reperfusion injury, and sickle cell disease. The current review summarizes the most recent advances in both preclinical and clinical studies of ET receptor antagonists in the field of kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    PubMed

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P <0.0001). There was no significant effect on RI value in either kidney in terms of age or sex. RI could be considered a valuable diagnostic tool in cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  1. Therapeutic targets for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia D

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a common genetic disease in which renal enlargement and loss of function is caused by progressive expansion of tubular cysts. To reverse the detrimental effects of PKD gene mutation(s) and to slow cystic expansion, new drug therapies are required. The underlying cell biology leading to identification of molecular targets for PKD is reviewed. Specific focus is on studies published at the early pre-clinical level. These include genetic and epigenetic modulators, and drugs to slow cystic expansion and disease progression. Discussion of specific drugs and clinical trials is not within the scope of this article. Literature research methods included EndNote and PubMed online searches using keyword combinations: polycystic kidneys disease, pre-clinical, molecular targets, signal transduction, genetic modulators, epigenetic, therapeutic, receptors, kinases. Where possible, the most recent citations concerning a given target are referenced. It is suggested that the most promising targets for future therapeutic development are those that target upstream signaling events at cell membranes, such as the vasopressin-2 receptor (AVPR2), EGFR/ErbB2, and the β-1-integrin receptor, as well as the intracellular integrator kinase, c-Src.

  2. Stem cells in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soler, María José; José Tomas, Ortiz-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Circulating bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seem to play a crucial role in both vasculogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Chronic kidney disease is a state of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated progression of atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular risk. As a consequence, cardiovascular disorders are the main cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It has been shown that patients with advanced renal failure have decreased number of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and impaired EPCs function. Moreover, in kidney transplant patients, renal graft function significantly correlated with EPC number. The reduced number of EPCs in patients with ESRD has been ascribed to the uremia. Therefore, therapies that improve the uremic status in dialysis patients such as nocturnal hemodialysis are associated with restoration of impaired EPCs number and migratory function. In fact, some of the common treatments for patients with chronic kidney disease such as erythropoietin, statins and angiotensin II receptor antagonist increase the number of EPCs. Nowadays, there is growing evidence indicating that, under pathophysiological conditions, stem cells (SCs) derived from bone marrow are able to migrate in the injured kidney, and they seem to play a role in glomerular and tubular regeneration. After acute tubular renal injury, surviving tubular epithelial cells and putative renal stem cells proliferate and differentiate into tubular epithelial cells to promote structural and functional repair. Moreover, bone marrow stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells can also participate in the repair process by proliferation and differentiation into renal lineages. For instance, mesenchymal SCs have been shown to decrease inflammation and enhance renal regeneration. The administration of ex vivo expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SCs have been proved to be beneficial in various experimental models of acute

  3. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high– or low–turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  4. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease; CVD, cardiovascular disease; DM, diabetes mellitus CKD Awareness CKD often has no symptoms in its early ... aware of their kidney disease, 2001-2012 Patient awareness is less than 10 percent for those with ...

  5. Sexual function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Priya; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2007-04-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and lead to sexual dysfunction, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and altered mineral metabolism. Common clinical problems include disturbances in menstruation in women, erectile dysfunction in men, and decreased libido and infertility in both sexes. Organic factors tend to be prominent and are related to uremia and other comorbid illnesses. Psychological factors and depression may exacerbate the primary problem. Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are seen early in CKD and tend to worsen after patients start dialysis. Hypogonadism plays a dominant role in male sexual function, whereas changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function predominate in female sexual dysfunction. In patients on dialysis, treatment strategies include optimizing dose of dialysis, correction of anemia with erythropoietin, and correction of hyperparathyroidism. Successful kidney transplantation may restore normal sexual function, especially in younger patients.

  6. Do Kidney Stone Formers Have A Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent disorder affecting approximately one in eleven people and is associated with multiple complications including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Significant epidemiologic associations with chronic kidney disease and ESRD have been noted and are reviewed herein, but debate persists in the literature as to whether kidney stone formation is a pathogenic process contributing to kidney disease. Corroborating evidence supporting the presence of kidney disease in stone formers includes the variability of renal function by stone type, the positive association of stone size with renal dysfunction, the presence of markers of renal injury in the urine of even asymptomatic stone formers, and direct evidence of renal tissue injury on histopathology. Proposed pathogenic mechanisms include recurrent obstruction and comorbid conditions such as recurrent urinary tract infections and structural abnormalities. Recent work evaluating the renal histopathology of different groups of stone formers adds further granularity, suggesting variability in mechanisms of renal injury by stone type and confirming the pathogenic effects of crystal formation. Genetic abnormalities leading to stone formation including cystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria, among others, contribute to the burden of disease in the stone-forming population. PMID:26376133

  7. Diagnostic challenges of kidney diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Robin; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Frésard, Anne; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Lucht, Frédéric; Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent comorbidity in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) associated with an increase in cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis of CKD is difficult in PLWH. Areas covered: We reviewed the main diagnostic tools for CKD in PLWH, and discussed their strengths and limits. We performed a literature search on PubMed to identify reviews and clinical trials dealing with attractive kidney biomarkers of CKD in PLWH, with the following key words: 'HIV AND kidney', 'HIV AND Kidney biomarkers', 'CKD AND Kidney biomarkers'. Expert commentary: Currently, CKD diagnosis is based on the estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR), and measurement of proteinuria by urine protein/creatinine ratio (uPCR). These parameters are independent and complementary predictors of outcomes. GFR estimates are lacking in accuracy in PLWH. The best GFR estimate is CKD-EPI study equation. Moreover, low-grade proteinuria is associated with an increased risk of kidney disease progression in PLWH, and guidelines derived from the general population may lack sensitivity. Different biomarkers of kidney diseases like N-acetyl beta glucosaminidase (NAG), Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1), and Alpha-1-microglobulin may predict kidney disease progression and mortality in PLWH. Others may help clinicians detect antiretroviral-induced tubulopathy, or predict cardiovascular events. More studies are needed to validate the routine use of these types of biomarkers.

  8. Rho kinase inhibition in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko

    2013-10-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family and their down-stream effectors Rho associated kinases (ROCKs) are the molecules that converge a spectrum of pathophysiological signals triggered by the diabetic milieu and represent promising molecular targets for nephroprotective treatment in diabetes. The review discusses recent studies exploring the consequences of diabetes-induced Rho-ROCK activation in the kidney and the effects of ROCK inhibition (ROCKi) in experimental diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Studies in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes have indicated blood pressure-independent nephroprotective actions of ROCKi in DKD. The underlying mechanisms include attenuation of diabetes-induced increases in renal expression of prosclerotic cytokines and extracellular matrix, anti-oxidant effects and protection of mitochondrial function, resulting in slower development of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The studies have also shown antiproteinuric effects of ROCKi that could be related to reductions in permeability of the glomerular barrier and beneficial effects on podocytes. Glomerular haemodynamic mechanisms might also be involved. Despite remaining questions in this field, such as the effects in podocytes later in the course of DKD, specificity of currently available ROCKi, or the roles of individual ROCK isoforms, recent evidence in experimental diabetes suggests that ROCKi might in future broaden the spectrum of treatments available for patients with DKD. This is supported by the evidence generated in models of non-diabetic kidney disease and in clinical studies in patients with various cardiovascular disorders.

  9. Cyclodextrin Protects Podocytes in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Guzman, Johanna; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Lehto, Markku; Aguillon-Prada, Robier; Mendez, Armando; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Yoo, TaeHyun; Villarreal, Rodrigo; Maiguel, Dony; Johnson, Kevin; Goldberg, Ronald; Nair, Viji; Randolph, Ann; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G.; Burke, George W.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fornoni, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease despite multifactorial intervention. We demonstrated that increased cholesterol in association with downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1 occurs in normal human podocytes exposed to the sera of patients with type 1 diabetes and albuminuria (DKD+) when compared with diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (DKD−) and similar duration of diabetes and lipid profile. Glomerular downregulation of ABCA1 was confirmed in biopsies from patients with early DKD (n = 70) when compared with normal living donors (n = 32). Induction of cholesterol efflux with cyclodextrin (CD) but not inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin prevented podocyte injury observed in vitro after exposure to patient sera. Subcutaneous administration of CD to diabetic BTBR (black and tan, brachiuric) ob/ob mice was safe and reduced albuminuria, mesangial expansion, kidney weight, and cortical cholesterol content. This was followed by an improvement of fasting insulin, blood glucose, body weight, and glucose tolerance in vivo and improved glucose-stimulated insulin release in human islets in vitro. Our data suggest that impaired reverse cholesterol transport characterizes clinical and experimental DKD and negatively influences podocyte function. Treatment with CD is safe and effective in preserving podocyte function in vitro and in vivo and may improve the metabolic control of diabetes. PMID:23835338

  10. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  11. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Influences on clinical reasoning in family and psychosocial interventions in nursing practice with patients and their families living with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thirsk, Lorraine M; Moore, Sarah G; Keyko, Kacey

    2014-09-01

    To explore how Registered Nurses address psychosocial issues for patients and their families living with chronic kidney disease. It is in the scope of registered nursing practice to address the emotional, psychological and relational implications of living with chronic disease through psychosocial and family interventions. Patients living with chronic kidney disease frequently report poor quality of life and numerous psychosocial issues; however, they do not find that these issues are always adequately addressed. This research was hermeneutic inquiry as guided by Gadamer's philosophy of understanding. Family/psychosocial nursing practices are examined from the perspective of self-reports of Registered Nurses working in acute care nephrology units. Interviews with nurses were conducted throughout 2012. Nurses attribute, or explain, patient and family member behaviour in a variety of ways. These explanations may or may not align with actual patient/family reasons for behaviour. Nurses' explanations influence subsequent nursing practice. While there is some evidence of practices that overcome biased attributions of patient behaviour, the cognitive processes by which nurses develop these explanations are more complex than previously reported in nursing literature. Clinical reasoning and subsequent nursing practice are influenced by how nurses explain patients'/families' behaviour. Exploration of this issue with the support of social cognition literature suggests a need for further research with significant implications for nursing education and practice to improve family/psychosocial interventions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Building the chronic kidney disease management team.

    PubMed

    Spry, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The need to be efficient and the demands for performance-based service are changing how nephrologists deliver care. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in patients with complex medical and social problems. CKD management requires that multidisciplinary professionals provide patient education, disease management, and psychosocial support. To remain cost-efficient, many physicians are training and supervising midlevel practitioners in the delivery of specialized health care. Specialized care that meets present CKD patient needs is best delivered in a CKD clinic. Three models of CKD clinic are identified: (1) anemia management CKD clinic, (2) the basic CKD clinic, and (3) the comprehensive CKD clinic. Each clinic model is based on critical elements of staffing, billable services, and patient-focused health care. Billable services are anemia-management services, physician services that may be provided by midlevel practitioners, and medical nutrition therapy. In some cases, social worker services may be billable. Building a patient-focused clinic that offers CKD management requires planning, familiarity with federal regulations and statutes, and skillful practitioners. Making services cost-efficient and outcome oriented requires careful physician leadership, talented midlevel practitioners, and billing professionals who understand the goals of the CKD clinic. As Medicare payment reforms evolve, a well-organized CKD program can be well poised to meet the requirements of payers and congressional mandates for performance-based purchasing.

  14. Usefulness of serum interleukin-18 in predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease--systems and clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Formanowicz, Dorota; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to check if serum interleukin-18 (IL-18) predicts 2-year cardiovascular mortality in patients at various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within the previous year. Diabetes mellitus was one of the key factors of exclusion. It was found that an increase in serum concentration of IL-18 above the cut-off point (1584.5 pg/mL) was characterized by 20.63-fold higher risk of cardiovascular deaths among studied patients. IL-18 serum concentration was found to be superior to the well-known cardiovascular risk parameters, like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), glomerular filtration rate, albumins, ferritin, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in prognosis of cardiovascular mortality. The best predictive for IL-18 were 4 variables, such as CIMT, NT-proBNP, albumins and hsCRP, as they predicted its concentration at 89.5%. Concluding, IL-18 seems to be important indicator and predictor of cardiovascular death in two-year follow-up among non-diabetic patients suffering from CKD, with history of AMI in the previous year. The importance of IL-18 in the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation has been confirmed by systems analysis based on a formal model expressed in the language of Petri nets theory.

  15. Usefulness of serum interleukin-18 in predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease – systems and clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Formanowicz, Dorota; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to check if serum interleukin-18 (IL-18) predicts 2-year cardiovascular mortality in patients at various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within the previous year. Diabetes mellitus was one of the key factors of exclusion. It was found that an increase in serum concentration of IL-18 above the cut-off point (1584.5 pg/mL) was characterized by 20.63-fold higher risk of cardiovascular deaths among studied patients. IL-18 serum concentration was found to be superior to the well-known cardiovascular risk parameters, like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), glomerular filtration rate, albumins, ferritin, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in prognosis of cardiovascular mortality. The best predictive for IL-18 were 4 variables, such as CIMT, NT-proBNP, albumins and hsCRP, as they predicted its concentration at 89.5%. Concluding, IL-18 seems to be important indicator and predictor of cardiovascular death in two-year follow-up among non-diabetic patients suffering from CKD, with history of AMI in the previous year. The importance of IL-18 in the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation has been confirmed by systems analysis based on a formal model expressed in the language of Petri nets theory. PMID:26669254

  16. The effectiveness of intradialytic leg ergometry exercise for improving sedentary life style and fatigue among patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuanmay; Cheng, Sue-Yueh; Lin, Meeiliang; Gau, Fung-Yi; Chao, Yann-Fen C

    2010-11-01

    Over the past three decades, research has been carried out on the effects of exercise on chronic kidney disease patients for improving their physical potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of intradialytic leg ergometry exercise for improving fatigue and daily physical activity levels among chronic kidney disease patients. A quasi-experimental clinical trial. Two hemodialysis units in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The leg ergometry exercise was performed within the first hour of each hemodialysis session for 30 min for 8 weeks. There were 36 subjects in the experimental group and 35 subjects in the control group who completed the study. Measurement on a fatigue scale and a physical activity log were done at the time of enrollment, and again on the fourth and eighth weeks. Active subjects demonstrated significantly less fatigue and higher physical activity levels than those with a sedentary lifestyle at baseline. During the 8 weeks of intervention, subjects in both the active and sedentary groups reduced their fatigue levels significantly, with the exception of sedentary subjects in the control group. Only active subjects in the experimental group demonstrated an increase in activity levels. The 36 subjects performed 3456 leg ergometry exercise sessions with three early terminations (<.01%) among the sedentary subjects. Intradialytic leg ergometry is a safe exercise that is effective to reduce fatigue and improve physical fitness in already active chronic kidney disease patients and it also reduces fatigue in sedentary patients. Interventions to motivate sedentary patients to become active require further investigation. Exercise during hemodialysis does not cost patients extra time and is effective in reducing fatigue and increasing physical activity potential as demonstrated by our study; 30 min of intradialytic leg ergometer exercise can be considered as routine care while delivering hemodialysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. 76 FR 1444 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; U34 Clinical Study Planning Grants. Date: February 2, 2011. Time... and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases...

  18. 75 FR 45133 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special, Emphasis Panel. Clinical Trial Planning Grant Review Meeting. Date: August 19...; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and...

  19. The spectrum of polycystic kidney disease in children.

    PubMed

    Dell, Katherine MacRae

    2011-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are important inherited kidney diseases with distinct clinical features and genetics. Although these diseases have classically been considered "adult" (ADPKD) or "infantile/pediatric" (ARPKD), it is now clear that both diseases can present in children and adults. ADPKD and ARPKD also share important pathophysiologic features, including cilia dysfunction. ADPKD is a systemic disease involving cysts in the kidneys and abdominal organs as well as abnormalities in the heart and vasculature. Although it typically presents in adults, ADPKD has been diagnosed in fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents. The majority of children diagnosed with ADPKD are asymptomatic. Those with symptoms typically present with hypertension or gross hematuria. Routine screening for renal cysts in asymptomatic children who have a parent with ADPKD is generally not recommended. ARPKD is a disorder confined to the kidneys (polycystic kidneys) and liver (a developmental biliary lesion called congenital hepatic fibrosis). Although most children with ARPKD present in infancy with large, echogenic kidneys, a subset present later in childhood and even adulthood, primarily with complications related to the liver disease. As more patients with ARPKD survive to adulthood, these liver complications are likely to become more prevalent.

  20. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  1. IgG4-related kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    IgG4-related kidney disease is a term that refers to any form of renal involvement by IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), a recently recognized systemic immune-mediated disease. The most common renal manifestation is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN), which presents as acute or chronic renal insufficiency, renal mass lesions, or both. On biopsy, IgG4-TIN shows a plasma cell-rich interstitial inflammatory infiltrate with increased IgG4+ plasma cells, along with expansile interstitial fibrosis; tubular basement membrane immune complex deposits are common. IgG4-TIN usually shows a brisk response to immunosuppressive therapy. Glomeruli may be affected by IgG4-RD, usually in the form of membranous glomerulonephritis. Other patterns of glomerular disease include IgA nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and endocapillary or mesangioproliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis. IgG4-related plasma cell arteritis has also been observed in the kidney. This review describes the histopathologic and immunophenotypic patterns of renal involvement by IgG4-RD, with associated clinical, radiographic, and serologic features.

  2. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): Part I: clinical care delivery and performance measurements and improvement.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) has now emerged as a public health priority, and there is an increasing demand by patients and health care organisations that the quality of care delivered by renal units to CKD patients be systematically monitored and evaluated. The Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) has started an initiative aimed at promoting a quality certification process specifically focused on CKD. To this end, SIN started a collaboration with an independent Italian company which is a partner of Joint Commission International (JCI), a nonprofit international organisation dedicated to the promotion of quality improvement and safety of health services. As a result of this collaboration, a document describing a voluntary certification process developed based on JCI criteria was produced by SIN. This document comprises 2 parts. Herein (Part I) we deal with standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to CKD care. Programme management and clinical information management will be presented in a separate manuscript (Part II).

  3. Carbonated Beverages and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saldana, Tina M.; Basso, Olga; Darden, Rebecca; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonated beverage consumption has been linked with diabetes, hypertension, and kidney stones, all risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Cola beverages, in particular, contain phosphoric acid and have been associated with urinary changes that promote kidney stones. Methods We examined the relationship between carbonated beverages (including cola) and chronic kidney disease, using data from 465 patients with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease and 467 community controls recruited in North Carolina between 1980 and 1982. Results Drinking 2 or more colas per day was associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.4 –3.7). Results were the same for regular colas (2.1; 1.3–3.4) and artificially sweetened colas (2.1; 0.7–2.5). Noncola carbonated beverages were not associated with chronic kidney disease (0.94; 0.4 –2.2). Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that cola consumption may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease. PMID:17525693

  4. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hartleb, Marek; Gutkowski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL, occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state, reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia, hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis. Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development, natriuresis, urine osmolality, response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion, and rarely on renal biopsy. Chronic glomerulonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients. AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease, therefore, such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension, and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections, nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions, excessive diuresis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents. Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy. The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion, which is effective in about 50% of patients. The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support. PMID:22791939

  5. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  6. Using Xenopus to study genetic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Soeren S

    2016-03-01

    Modern sequencing technology is revolutionizing our knowledge of inherited kidney disease. However, the molecular role of genes affected by the rapidly rising number of identified mutations is lagging behind. Xenopus is a highly useful, but underutilized model organism with unique properties excellently suited to decipher the molecular mechanisms of kidney development and disease. The embryonic kidney (pronephros) can be manipulated on only one side of the animal and its formation observed directly through the translucent skin. The moderate evolutionary distance between Xenopus and humans is a huge advantage for studying basic principles of kidney development, but still allows us to analyze the function of disease related genes. Optogenetic manipulations and genome editing by CRISPR/Cas are exciting additions to the toolbox for disease modelling and will facilitate the use of Xenopus in translational research. Therefore, the future of Xenopus in kidney research is bright.

  7. Diabetic kidney disease: from physiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; de Fuentes, Mercedes Muros; Górriz, José L; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) defines the functional, structural and clinical abnormalities of the kidneys that are caused by diabetes. This complication has become the single most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. The pathophysiology of DKD comprises the interaction of both genetic and environmental determinants that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, which leads to the damage of the glomerular filtration barrier, a highly specialized structure formed by the fenestrated endothelium, the glomerular basement membrane and the epithelial podocytes, that permits a highly selective ultrafiltration of the blood plasma. DKD evolves gradually over years through five progressive stages. Briefly they are: reversible glomerular hyperfiltration, normal glomerular filtration and normoalbuminuria, normal glomerular filtration and microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and renal failure. Approximately 20–40% of diabetic patients develop microalbuminuria within 10–15 years of the diagnosis of diabetes, and about 80–90% of those with microalbuminuria progress to more advanced stages. Thus, after 15–20 years, macroalbuminuria occurs approximately in 20–40% of patients, and around half of them will present renal insufficiency within 5 years. The screening and early diagnosis of DKD is based on the measurement of urinary albumin excretion and the detection of microalbuminuria, the first clinical sign of DKD. The management of DKD is based on the general recommendations in the treatment of patients with diabetes, including optimal glycaemic and blood pressure control, adequate lipid management and abolishing smoking, in addition to the lowering of albuminuria. PMID:24907306

  8. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Low T3 Syndrome in Non-Dialysis Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingxian; Yan, Peng; Wang, Yingdeng; Shen, Bo; Ding, Feng; Liu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few data on the prevalence of low T3 (triiodothyronine) syndrome in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) and it is unclear whether low T3 can be used to predict the progression of CKD. Material/Methods We retrospectively studied 279 patients who had been definitively diagnosed with CKD, without needing maintenance dialysis. Thyroid function was analyzed in all enrolled subjects and the incidence of thyroid dysfunction (low T3 syndrome, low T4 syndrome, and subclinical hypothyroidism) in patients at different stages of CKD was determined. Results Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of CKD patients was estimated as follows: 145 subjects (52%) had GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2; 47 subjects (16.8%) had GFR between 30 and 59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 98 subjects (35.1%) had GFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Among all enrolled subjects, 4.7% (n=13) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 5.4% (n=15) had low T4 syndrome, and 47% (n=131) had low T3 syndrome. In 114 CKD patients in stages 3–5, serum T3 was positively related to protein metabolism (STP, PA, and ALB) and anemia indicators (Hb and RBC), and negatively related to inflammatory status (CRP and IL-6). Conclusions A high prevalence of low T3 syndrome was observed in CKD patients without dialysis, even in early stages (1 and 2). The increasing prevalence of low T3 as CKD progresses indicates its value as a predictor of worsening CKD. Furthermore, low T3 syndrome is closely associated with both malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS) and anemia. PMID:27056188

  9. Is chronic kidney disease an adverse factor in lung cancer clinical outcome? A propensity score matching study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming‐Shian; Chen, Miao‐Fen; Lin, Chien‐Chao; Tseng, Yuan‐Hsi; Huang, Yao‐Kuang; Liu, Hui‐Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background Comorbidity has a great impact on lung cancer survival. Renal function status may affect treatment decisions and drug toxicity. The survival outcome in lung cancer patients with coexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been fully evaluated. We hypothesized that CKD is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with lung cancer. Methods A retrospective, propensity‐matched study of 434 patients diagnosed between June 2004 and May 2012 was conducted. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/minute. Lung cancer and coexisting CKD patients were matched 1:1 to patients with lung cancer without CKD. Results Age, gender, smoking status, histology, and lung cancer stage were not statistically significantly different between the CKD and non‐CKD groups. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated a median survival of 7.26 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.06–8.46) in the CKD group compared with 7.82 months (95% CI 6.33–9.30) in the non‐CKD group (P = 0.41). Lung cancer stage‐specific survival is not affected by CKD. Although lung cancer patients with CKD presented with an increased risk of death of 6%, this result was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 0.93–1.22; P = 0.41). Conclusion According to our limited experience, CKD is not an independent risk factor for survival in lung cancer patients. Clinicians should not be discouraged to treat lung cancer patients with CKD. PMID:28207203

  10. Clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome: predicting new-onset diabetes, coronary heart disease, and allograft failure late after kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Israni, Ajay K; Snyder, Jon J; Skeans, Melissa A; Kasiske, Bertram L

    2012-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and new-onset diabetes after kidney transplant (NODAT). Using data collected from transplant centers worldwide for the Patient Outcomes in Renal Transplantation study, we examined associations of metabolic syndrome (n = 2253 excluding recipients with diabetes pretransplant), CHD (n = 2253), and NODAT (n = 1840 further excluding recipients with diabetes in the first year post-transplant), with the primary outcome of allograft failure. We assessed risk factors associated with secondary outcomes of metabolic syndrome, NODAT, and CHD after adjusting for type of baseline immunosuppression and transplant center effects. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was 39.8% at 12-24 months post-transplant and 35.4% at 36-48 months. Metabolic syndrome was independently associated with NODAT (hazard ratio 3.46, 95% confidence interval 2.40-4.98, P < 0.0001), CHD (2.03, 1.16-3.52, P = 0.013), and allograft failure (1.36, 1.03-1.79, P = 0.028). Allograft failure occurred in 218 patients (14.6%). After adjustment for metabolic syndrome, NODAT (1.63, 1.18-2.24, P = 0.003) and CHD (5.48, 3.27-9.20, P < 0.0001) remained strongly associated with increased risk of allograft failure. Metabolic syndrome, NODAT, and CHD are risk factors for allograft failure. NODAT and CHD are risk factors for allograft failure, independent of metabolic syndrome. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  11. A combined clinical phenotype and lipidomic analysis reveals the impact of chronic kidney disease on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Liu, Dan; Chen, Dan-Qian; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li; Su, Wei; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2017-03-13

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in significant dyslipidemia and profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The associated dyslipidemia, in turn, contributes to progression of CKD and its cardiovascular complications. To gain an in-depth insight into the disorders of lipid metabolism in advanced CKD, we applied UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomics to measure serum lipid metabolites in 180 patients with advanced CKD and 120 age-matched healthy controls. We found significant increases in the levels of total free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids in patients with CKD. The levels of free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids directly correlated with the level of serum triglyceride, and inversely correlated with the levels of total cholesterol and eGFR. A total of 126 lipid species were identified from positive and negative ion modes. 113 out of 126 identified lipid species were significantly altered in patients with CKD based on the adjusted FDR method. These results point to profound disturbance of fatty acid and triglyceride metabolisms in patients with CKD. Logistic regression analysis showed strong correlations between serum methyl hexadecanoic acid, LPC(24:1), 3-oxooctadecanoic acid and PC(20:2/24:1) levels with eGFR and serum creatinine levels (R>0.8758). In conclusion application of UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomic technique revealed profound changes in lipid metabolites in patients with CKD. The observed increases in serum total fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids levels directly correlated with increased serum triglyceride level, and inversely correlated with the eGFR and triglyceride levels.

  12. Is chronic kidney disease an adverse factor in lung cancer clinical outcome? A propensity score matching study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lin, Chien-Chao; Tseng, Yuan-Hsi; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Hui-Ping; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2017-03-01

    Comorbidity has a great impact on lung cancer survival. Renal function status may affect treatment decisions and drug toxicity. The survival outcome in lung cancer patients with coexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been fully evaluated. We hypothesized that CKD is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with lung cancer. A retrospective, propensity-matched study of 434 patients diagnosed between June 2004 and May 2012 was conducted. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/minute. Lung cancer and coexisting CKD patients were matched 1:1 to patients with lung cancer without CKD. Age, gender, smoking status, histology, and lung cancer stage were not statistically significantly different between the CKD and non-CKD groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a median survival of 7.26 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.06-8.46) in the CKD group compared with 7.82 months (95% CI 6.33-9.30) in the non-CKD group (P = 0.41). Lung cancer stage-specific survival is not affected by CKD. Although lung cancer patients with CKD presented with an increased risk of death of 6%, this result was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 0.93-1.22; P = 0.41). According to our limited experience, CKD is not an independent risk factor for survival in lung cancer patients. Clinicians should not be discouraged to treat lung cancer patients with CKD. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Economic and Clinical Outcomes Resulting From the Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease Case Management Quality Improvement Initiative.

    PubMed

    Everett, Beverly; Castel, Liana D; McGinnis, Matthew; Beresky, Amy; Cane, Rudolph C; Cooper, Tasha; Davda, Rajesh K; Farmer, Donna; John, Stella M; Sollars, Denise L; Rausch, John F

    2017-09-11

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a costly and burdensome public health concern. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact on outcomes and utilization of a pilot program to identify and engage beneficiaries with CKD at risk for progression from Stage 4 to Stage 5. A quality improvement initiative was conducted to assess the impact of case management on costs and outcomes among 7,720 Cigna commercial medical beneficiaries with Stage 4 CKD enrolled in the United States between January 2012 and October 2012. Claims data were analyzed to compare 3,861 beneficiaries randomized to receive condition-focused case management with 3,859 controls, with follow-up through July 2013. After using an algorithm to identify beneficiaries at highest risk of progression, a case management team implemented, among those assigned to the intervention, an evidence-based assessment tool, provided education and follow-up, engaged nephrologists and other providers, and conducted weekly rounds. Primary outcome measures were hospital admissions, emergency department visits, nephrologist visits, dialysis, arteriovenous (AV) fistula creation, and total medical costs. Analysis of variance techniques were used to test group differences. As compared with controls, intervention beneficiaries were 12% more likely to have fistula creation (p = .004). Intervention beneficiaries were observed to have savings of $199 per member per month (PMPM), F = 23.05, p = .04. This difference equated to 6% lower total medical costs in the intervention group. Savings observed were derived half from improved in-network utilization and half from reduced hospital costs. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  14. The effect of lactulose supplementation on fecal microflora of patients with chronic kidney disease; a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tayebi-Khosroshahi, Hamid; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Niknafs, Bahram; Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh Sefidan, Fatemeh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Moghaddaszadeh, Majid; Parkhide, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lactulose is a prebiotic with bifidogenic and urea reduction effects. It can improve Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli counts in healthy humans and it may possibly have similar effects in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objectives: To investigate the effect of lactulose on fecal microflora of patients with CKD. Patients and Methods: Thirty-two patients with stages 3 and 4 of CKD (43.8% male with mean age of 58.09±12.75 years) were randomly assigned to intervention (n=16) and control (n=16) groups. Patients in intervention group received 30 mm lactulose syrup three times a day for an 8-week period. Control group received placebo 30 mm three times a day. A fecal sample was obtained from all patients at the beginning and at the end of the study and Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli was counted. Results: Creatinine (Cr) significantly decreased in intervention group (3.90±1.43 to 3.60±1.44, P=0.003) and increased in control group (3.87±2.08 to 4.11±1.99, P=0.03). Although Bifidobacterial and Lactobacilli counts were similar before intervention, they were significantly higher at the end of the study in lactulose group (P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively). Lactulose led to significant increase in fecal Bifidobacterial counts (3.61±0.54 to 4.90±0.96, P<0.001) and Lactobacilli counts (2.79±1.00 to 3.87±1.13, P<0.001), while the change in placebo group was not significant. Conclusion: Lactulose administration will increase Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus counts in patients with CKD. PMID:27689115

  15. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Low T3 Syndrome in Non-Dialysis Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingxian; Yan, Peng; Wang, Yingdeng; Shen, Bo; Ding, Feng; Liu, Yingli

    2016-04-08

    BACKGROUND There are few data on the prevalence of low T3 (triiodothyronine) syndrome in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) and it is unclear whether low T3 can be used to predict the progression of CKD. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively studied 279 patients who had been definitively diagnosed with CKD, without needing maintenance dialysis. Thyroid function was analyzed in all enrolled subjects and the incidence of thyroid dysfunction (low T3 syndrome, low T4 syndrome, and subclinical hypothyroidism) in patients at different stages of CKD was determined. RESULTS Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of CKD patients was estimated as follows: 145 subjects (52%) had GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2; 47 subjects (16.8%) had GFR between 30 and 59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 98 subjects (35.1%) had GFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Among all enrolled subjects, 4.7% (n=13) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 5.4% (n=15) had low T4 syndrome, and 47% (n=131) had low T3 syndrome. In 114 CKD patients in stages 3-5, serum T3 was positively related to protein metabolism (STP, PA, and ALB) and anemia indicators (Hb and RBC), and negatively related to inflammatory status (CRP and IL-6). CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of low T3 syndrome was observed in CKD patients without dialysis, even in early stages (1 and 2). The increasing prevalence of low T3 as CKD progresses indicates its value as a predictor of worsening CKD. Furthermore, low T3 syndrome is closely associated with both malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS) and anemia.

  16. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor activation in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Palm, Fredrik

    2017-09-01

    Tissue hypoxia is present in kidneys from diabetic patients and constitutes a central pathway to diabetic kidney disease (DKD). This review summarizes regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and interventions towards the same for treatment of DKD. In the hypoxic diabetic kidney, HIF activity and the effects of HIF signaling seem to be cell-specific. In mesangial cells, elevated glucose levels induce HIF activity by a hypoxia-independent mechanism. Elevated HIF activity in glomerular cells promotes glomerulosclerosis and albuminuria, and inhibition of HIF protects glomerular integrity. However, tubular HIF activity is suppressed and HIF activation protects mitochondrial function and prevents development of diabetes-induced tissue hypoxia, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and proteinuria. No clinical treatment targeting kidney hypoxia is currently available, but development of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors to promote HIF activity to treat renal anemia could potentially also target diabetes-induced kidney hypoxia. Increasing HIF activity in the diabetic kidney may possess a novel target for treatment of DKD by improving kidney oxygen homeostasis. However, HIF-mediated glomerulosclerosis may be a concern. The kidney outcomes from the ongoing clinical trials using prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors may provide additional insights into the complex role of HIF signaling in the diabetic kidney.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 in Kidney Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lever, Jeremie M; Boddu, Ravindra; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-07-20

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a considerable burden in healthcare. The heme oxygenase (HO) system plays an important role in regulating oxidative stress and is protective in a variety of human and animal models of kidney disease. Preclinical studies of the HO system have led to the development of several clinical trials targeting the enzyme or its products. Connection of HO, ferritin, and other proteins involved in iron regulation has provided important insight into mechanisms of damage in AKI. Also, HO-1 expression is important in the pathogenesis of hypertension, diabetic kidney disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease. Despite intriguing discoveries, no drugs targeting the HO system have been translated to the clinic. Meanwhile, treatments for AKI and CKD are urgently needed. Many factors have likely contributed to challenges in clinical translation, including variation in animal models, difficulties in obtaining human tissue, and complexity of the disease processes being studied. The HO system represents a promising avenue of investigation that may lead to targeted therapeutics. Tissue-specific gene modulation, widening the scope of animal studies, and continued clinical research will provide valuable insight into the role HO plays in kidney homeostasis and disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 165-183.

  19. An approach to cystic kidney diseases: the clinician's view.

    PubMed

    Kurschat, Christine E; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Franke, Mareike; Maintz, David; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of more than 70 different genes involved in the development of cystic kidney diseases. Most of these diseases are rare, and interpreting the resultant plethora of disease-causing mutations requires a methodical and meticulous approach to differential diagnosis. In this Review we discuss a clinical approach to the diagnosis of cystic kidney diseases in adults, for use by nephrologists. This approach is based upon a thorough clinical evaluation, which considers both kidney phenotype and extrarenal manifestations of the underlying disorder, in combination with genetic testing in selected patients. In our view, cystic kidney disease can (in the majority of patients) be reliably classified on the basis of clinical findings. We therefore propose that defining clinical situations to precipitate the initiation of genetic testing is mandatory and cost-effective. New techniques such as next-generation sequencing will facilitate the diagnosis of cystic kidney diseases in the future, increasing diagnostic safety in a subset of patients. In renal tumour syndromes, genetic testing is warranted.

  20. Acute kidney injury induces hallmarks of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Trudel, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are considered separate entities that both frequently cause renal failure. Since ADPKD appears to depend on a polycystin-1 (Pc1) or Pc2 dosage mechanism, we investigated whether slow progression of cystogenesis in two Pkd1 transgenic mouse models can be accelerated with moderate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Transient unilateral left ischemic kidneys in both nontransgenic and transgenic mice reproducibly develop tubular dilatations, cysts, and typical PKD cellular defects within 3 mo post-IRI. Similar onset and severity of IRI induced-cystogenesis independently of genotype revealed that IRI is sufficient to promote renal cyst formation; however, this response was not further amplified by the transgene in Pkd1 mouse models. The IRI nontransgenic and transgenic kidneys showed from 16 days post-IRI strikingly increased and sustained Pkd1/Pc1 (>3-fold) and Pc2 (>8-fold) expression that can individually be cystogenic in mice. In parallel, long-term and important stimulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression was induced as in polycystic kidney disease. While mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is activated, stimulation of the Wnt pathway, with markedly increased active β-catenin and c-Myc expression in IRI renal epithelium, uncovered a similar regulatory cystogenic response shared by IRI and ADPKD. Our study demonstrates that long-term AKI induces cystogenesis and cross talk with ADPKD Pc1/Pc2 pathogenic signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Wnt signaling in kidney tubulointerstitium during disease.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, Omar H; Ikeda, Yoichiro; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    The evolutionary conserved Wnt signaling transduction pathway plays essential roles in a wide array of biologic processes including embryonic development, branching morphogenesis, proliferation and carcinogenesis. Over the past ten years it has become increasingly clear that Wnt signaling also regulates the response of adult organs to disease processes, including kidney disease. This review will focus on the growing literature implicating important roles for Wnt signaling during disease in two separate kidney compartments: the tubular epithelium and the interstitium.

  2. Total Kidney Volume in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Biomarker of Disease Progression and Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Alam, Ahsan; Dahl, Neera K; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Rossetti, Sandro; Smith, Patricia; Sapir, Daniel; Weinstein, Jordan; McFarlane, Philip; Bichet, Daniel G

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common potentially life-threatening monogenic disorder in humans, characterized by progressive development and expansion of fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Ongoing cyst growth leads to progressive kidney enlargement, whereas kidney function remains stable for decades as a result of hyperfiltration and compensation by unaffected nephrons. Kidney function irreversibly declines only in the late stages of the disease, when most of the parenchyma is lost to cystic and fibrotic tissue and the remaining compensatory capacity is overwhelmed. Hence, conventional kidney function measures, such as glomerular filtration rate, do not adequately assess disease progression in ADPKD, especially in its early stages. Given the recent development of potential targeted therapies in ADPKD, it has become critically important to identify relevant biomarkers that can be used to determine the degree of disease progression and evaluate the effects of therapeutic interventions on the course of the disease. We review the current evidence to provide an informed perspective on whether total kidney volume (TKV) is a suitable biomarker for disease progression and whether TKV can be used as an efficacy end point in clinical trials. We conclude that because cystogenesis is the central factor leading to kidney enlargement, TKV appears to be an appropriate biomarker and is gaining wider acceptance. Several studies have identified TKV as a relevant imaging biomarker for monitoring and predicting disease progression and support its use as a prognostic end point in clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients. PMID:25692105

  4. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-08-23

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  5. Sirtuin and metabolic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wakino, Shu; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Sirtuin is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase. One of its isoforms, Sirt1, is a key molecule in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism. The renal protective effects of Sirt1 are found in various models of renal disorders with metabolic impairment, such as diabetic nephropathy. Protective effects include the maintenance of glomerular barrier function, anti-fibrosis effects, anti-oxidative stress effects, and regulation of mitochondria function and energy metabolism. Various target molecules subject to direct deacetylation or epigenetic gene regulation have been identified as effectors of the renal protective function of sirtuin. Recently, it was demonstrated that Sirt1 expression decreases in proximal tubules before albuminuria in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy, and that albuminuria is suppressed in proximal tubule-specific mice overexpressing Sirt1. These findings suggest that decreased Sirt1 expression in proximal tubular cells causes abnormal nicotine metabolism and reduces the supply of nicotinamide mononucleotide from renal tubules to glomeruli. This further decreases expression of Sirt1 in glomerular podocytes and increases expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-1, which results in albuminuria. Activators of the sirtuin family of proteins, including resveratrol, may be important in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating metabolic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Nutrition and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fouque, Denis; Pelletier, Solenne; Mafra, Denise; Chauveau, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    The incidence of malnutrition disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD) appears unchanged over time, whereas patient-care and dialysis techniques continue to progress. Despite some evidence for cost-effective treatments, there are numerous caveats to applying these research findings on a daily care basis. There is a sustained generation of data confirming metabolic improvement when patients control their protein intake, even at early stages of CKD. A recent protein-energy wasting nomenclature allows a simpler approach to the diagnosis and causes of malnutrition. During maintenance dialysis, optimal protein and energy intakes have been recently challenged, and there is no longer an indication to control hyperphosphatemia through diet restriction. Recent measurements of energy expenditure in dialysis patients confirm very low physical activity, which affects energy requirements. Finally, inflammation, a common state during CKD, acts on both nutrient intake and catabolism, but is not a contraindication to a nutritional intervention, as patients do respond and improve their survival as well as do noninflamed patients.

  7. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney disease is diagnosed with urine and blood tests. Health care providers measure blood pressure with a blood pressure ... the sample to a lab for analysis. A health care provider may order a blood test to estimate how much blood the kidneys filter ...

  8. Con: Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate binders are prescribed to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients based on associations of serum phosphate concentrations with mortality and calcification, experimental evidence for direct calcifying effects of phosphate on vascular smooth muscle tissue and the central importance of phosphate retention in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Current knowledge regarding phosphate metabolism in CKD provides important insight into disease mechanisms and supports future clinical trials of phosphate binders in CKD patients to determine the impact of these medications on clinically relevant outcomes. The risks and benefits of phosphate binders cannot be inferred from association studies of serum phosphate concentrations, which are inconsistent and subject to confounding, animal-experimental data, which are based on conditions that differ from human disease, or physiological arguments, which are limited to known regulatory factors. Many interventions that targeted biochemical pathways suggested by association studies and suspected biological importance have yielded null or harmful results. Clinical trials of phosphate binders are of high clinical and scientific importance to nephrology. Demonstration of reduced rates of clinical disease in such trials could lead to important health benefits for CKD patients, whereas negative results would refocus efforts to understand and treat CKD-MBD. Clinical trials that employ highly practical or ‘pragmatic’ designs represent an optimal approach for determining the safety and effectiveness of phosphate binders in real-world settings. Absent clinical trial data, observational studies of phosphate binders in large CKD populations could provide important information regarding the benefits, risks and/or unintended side effects of these medications. PMID:26681747

  9. Con: Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate binders are prescribed to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients based on associations of serum phosphate concentrations with mortality and calcification, experimental evidence for direct calcifying effects of phosphate on vascular smooth muscle tissue and the central importance of phosphate retention in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Current knowledge regarding phosphate metabolism in CKD provides important insight into disease mechanisms and supports future clinical trials of phosphate binders in CKD patients to determine the impact of these medications on clinically relevant outcomes. The risks and benefits of phosphate binders cannot be inferred from association studies of serum phosphate concentrations, which are inconsistent and subject to confounding, animal-experimental data, which are based on conditions that differ from human disease, or physiological arguments, which are limited to known regulatory factors. Many interventions that targeted biochemical pathways suggested by association studies and suspected biological importance have yielded null or harmful results. Clinical trials of phosphate binders are of high clinical and scientific importance to nephrology. Demonstration of reduced rates of clinical disease in such trials could lead to important health benefits for CKD patients, whereas negative results would refocus efforts to understand and treat CKD-MBD. Clinical trials that employ highly practical or 'pragmatic' designs represent an optimal approach for determining the safety and effectiveness of phosphate binders in real-world settings. Absent clinical trial data, observational studies of phosphate binders in large CKD populations could provide important information regarding the benefits, risks and/or unintended side effects of these medications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency.

  11. Obesity and kidney disease: Beyond the hyperfiltration.

    PubMed

    Mascali, A; Franzese, O; Nisticò, S; Campia, U; Lauro, D; Cardillo, C; Di Daniele, N; Tesauro, M

    2016-09-01

    In industrialized countries, overweight and obesity account for approximately 13.8% and 24.9% of the kidney disease observed in men and women, respectively. Moreover, obesity-associated glomerulopathy is now considered as "an emerging epidemic." Kidney function can be negatively impacted by obesity through several mechanisms, either direct or indirect. While it is well established that obesity represents the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, awareness that obesity is associated with direct kidney damage independently of hypertension and diabetes is still not widespread. In this paper we will discuss the emerging role of adipose tissue, particularly in the visceral depot, in obesity-induced chronic kidney damage.

  12. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  13. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  14. Translational science in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-07-15

    The KDIGO definition of chronic kidney disease (CKD) allowed a more detailed characterization of CKD causes, epidemiology and consequences. The picture that has emerged is worrisome from the point of view of translation. CKD was among the fastest growing causes of death in the past 20 years in age-adjusted terms. The gap between recent advances and the growing worldwide mortality appears to result from sequential roadblocks that limit the flow from basic research to clinical development (translational research type 1, T1), from clinical development to clinical practice (translational research T2) and result in deficient widespread worldwide implementation of already available medical advances (translational research T3). We now review recent advances and novel concepts that have the potential to change the practice of nephrology in order to improve the outcomes of the maximal number of individuals in the shortest possible interval. These include: (i) updating the CKD concept, shifting the emphasis to the identification, risk stratification and care of early CKD and redefining the concept of aging-associated 'physiological' decline of renal function; (ii) advances in the characterization of aetiological factors, including challenging the concept of hypertensive nephropathy, the better definition of the genetic contribution to CKD progression, assessing the role of the liquid biopsy in aetiological diagnosis and characterizing the role of drugs that may be applied to the earliest stages of injury, such as SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic kidney disease (DKD); (iii) embracing the complexity of CKD as a network disease and (iv) exploring ways to optimize implementation of existing knowledge. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Dietary protein intake and kidney disease in Western diet.

    PubMed

    Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Components of the diet related to changes in eating habits that characterize the modern Western world are important factors in the increasingly high prevalence of chronic disease, including obesity, diabetes, hypertension and as a consequence, chronic kidney disease. The healthy diets recommended for the general population to promote longevity (such as the Mediterranean diet), are defined based on epidemiological and intervention studies and are usually characterized by a relatively higher amount of protein than the usual Western diet. Unfortunately, very few clinical studies focused on diet-based strategies of prevention of kidney disorders. Furthermore, this review will propose that the concept that protein restricted diets decrease the risk of developing kidney disease in the general population is not supported by the scientific literature. Indeed, preliminary studies showing a positive effect of relatively high protein diets on risk factors for chronic kidney disease (particularly on obesity, hypertension and diabetes) point to the need for future studies addressing diets that could prevent the increasingly high prevalence of kidney disease in the Western world. On the other hand, there is a potential role for protein restriction in patients with established kidney disease, particularly in patients with significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The exact protective action of protein restriction in patients with established renal disease needs further analysis, taking into account the more broad effects of protein restriction (lower phosphate, acidosis, uric acid) and a more current definition of malnutrition.

  16. Pregnancy across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle A; Melamad, Nir; Bramham, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Management of the pregnant woman with chronic kidney disease is difficult for both nephrologists and obstetricians. Prepregnancy counselling with respect to risk stratification, optimization of maternal health prior to pregnancy, as well as management of the many potential pregnancy-associated complications in this complex patient population remains challenging due to the paucity of large, well-designed clinical studies. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of disease and the relative infrequency of pregnancy, particularly in more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, leaves many clinicians feeling ill prepared to manage these pregnancies. As such, counselling is imprecise and management varies substantially across centers. All pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease can benefit from a collaborative multidisciplinary approach with a team that consists of nephrologists experienced in the management of kidney disease in pregnancy, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, high-risk pregnancy nursing staff, dieticians, and pharmacists. Further access to skilled neonatologists and neonatal intensive care unit support is essential given the risks for preterm delivery in this patient population. The goal of this paper is to highlight some of the data that currently exist in the literature, provide management strategies for the practicing nephrologist at all stages of chronic kidney disease, and explore some of the knowledge gaps where future multinational collaborative research efforts should concentrate to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with kidney disease across the globe.

  17. Clinical Value of Natriuretic Peptides in Predicting Time to Dialysis in Stage 4 and 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Sofia; Larson, Thomas; Cauliez, Bruno; Bauer, Fabrice; Dumont, Audrey; Le Roy, Frank; Hanoy, Mélanie; Fréguin-Bouilland, Caroline; Godin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticipating the time to renal replacement therapy (RRT) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is an important but challenging issue. Natriuretic peptides are biomarkers of ventricular dysfunction related to poor outcome in CKD. We comparatively investigated the value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as prognostic markers for the risk of RRT in stage 4 and 5 CKD patients, and in foretelling all-cause mortality and major cardiovascular events within a 5-year follow-up period. Methods Baseline plasma BNP (Triage, Biosite) and NT-proBNP (Elecsys, Roche) were measured at inclusion. Forty-three patients were followed-up during 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis, with log-rank testing and hazard ratios (HR), were calculated to evaluate survival without RRT, cardiovascular events or mortality. The independent prognostic value of the biomarkers was estimated in separate Cox multivariate analysis, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), creatininemia and comorbidities. Results During the first 12-month follow-up period, 16 patients started RRT. NT-proBNP concentration was higher in patients who reached endpoint (3221 ng/L vs 777 ng/L, p = 0.02). NT-proBNP concentration > 1345 ng/L proved significant predictive value on survival analysis for cardiovascular events (p = 0.04) and dialysis within 60 months follow-up (p = 0.008). BNP concentration > 140 ng/L was an independent predictor of RRT after 12 months follow-up (p<0.005), and of significant predictive value for initiation of dialysis within 60 months follow-up. Conclusions Our results indicate a prognostic value for BNP and NT-proBNP in predicting RRT in stage 4 and 5 CKD patients, regarding both short- and long-term periods. NT-proBNP also proved a value in predicting cardiovascular events. Natriuretic peptides could be useful predictive biomarkers for therapeutic guidance in CKD. PMID:27548064

  18. COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Iurillo, Annalisa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Murgo, Angelo M; Loy, Clement; van Zwieten, Anita; Wong, Germaine; Tortelli, Rosanna; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing for executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, learning and memory, and complex attention) in patients on haemodialysis and association with clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of 750 adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with long-term haemodialysis has been recruited within haemodialysis centres in Italy (July 2013 to April 2014). Testing for neurocognitive function was carried out by a trained psychologist at baseline to assess cognitive functioning. The primary study factor is cognitive impairment and secondary study factors will be specific domains of cognitive function. The primary outcome will be total mortality. Secondary outcomes will be cause-specific mortality, major cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke, institutionalisation, and withdrawal from treatment at 12 months. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved before study conduct by the following responsible ethics committees: Catania (approval reference 186/BE; 26/09/2013), Agrigento (protocol numbers 61–62; 28/6/2013), USL Roma C (CE 39217; 24/6/2013), USL Roma F (protocol number 0041708; 23/7/2013), USL Latina (protocol number 20090/A001/2011; 12/7/2013), Trapani (protocol number 3413; 16/7/2013) and Brindisi (protocol number 40259; 6/6/2013). All participants

  19. COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Iurillo, Annalisa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Murgo, Angelo M; Loy, Clement; van Zwieten, Anita; Wong, Germaine; Tortelli, Rosanna; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-12-09

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing for executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, learning and memory, and complex attention) in patients on haemodialysis and association with clinical outcomes. A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of 750 adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with long-term haemodialysis has been recruited within haemodialysis centres in Italy (July 2013 to April 2014). Testing for neurocognitive function was carried out by a trained psychologist at baseline to assess cognitive functioning. The primary study factor is cognitive impairment and secondary study factors will be specific domains of cognitive function. The primary outcome will be total mortality. Secondary outcomes will be cause-specific mortality, major cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke, institutionalisation, and withdrawal from treatment at 12 months. This protocol was approved before study conduct by the following responsible ethics committees: Catania (approval reference 186/BE; 26/09/2013), Agrigento (protocol numbers 61-62; 28/6/2013), USL Roma C (CE 39217; 24/6/2013), USL Roma F (protocol number 0041708; 23/7/2013), USL Latina (protocol number 20090/A001/2011; 12/7/2013), Trapani (protocol number 3413; 16/7/2013) and Brindisi (protocol number 40259; 6/6/2013). All participants have provided written and informed consent and can withdraw from

  20. Kidney Disease Profile of Syrian Refugee Children.

    PubMed

    Akbalik Kara, Mehtap; Demircioglu Kilic, Beltinge; Col, Nilgun; Ozcelik, Ayse Aysima; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Balat, Ayse

    2017-03-01

    Although preventative nephrology is the effective management of childhood kidney diseases, it is hard to provide it in this undesirable conditions. In this study, we aimed to document the kidney disease profile of Syrian refugee children admitted to our hospital. One hundred and thirty Syrian refugee children were admitted to the Pediatric Nephrology Department of the University of Gaziantep from September 2012 to January 2015. Demographic data, history, symptoms, physical examination findings, laboratory investigations, diagnosis, disease outcome, and therapeutic procedures such as peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis were obtained from patient files. Of the 130 admitted children, 74 were girls (59.6%). The average age was 6.97 ± 4.2 years (range, 1 month to 17 years). Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract were found in 34 children (26.2%). Other morbidities were chronic kidney disease in 30 (23.1%), nephrotic syndrome in 24 (18.5%), urolithiasis in 9 (6.9%), acute kidney injury in 4 (3.1%), glomerulonephritis in 5 (3.8%), enuresis in 12 (9.2%), and others in 12 (9.2%). Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease were highly prevalent in Syrian refugee children. Although free health care have been provided to all of these children, the continuation of political crisis and instability would increase the number of admissions and affect the quality of life of those children in a different environment from the home country.

  1. Sex hormones in women with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sofia B; Ramesh, Sharanya

    2016-11-01

    Menstrual disorders, infertility and premature menopause are common but often underrecognized phenomena among women with chronic kidney disease. Hypothalamic, rather than ovarian dysfunction, may be the cause of the abnormal reproductive milieu, which can be at least partially reversed by kidney transplantation and increased intensity of hemodialysis. Endogenous sex hormones, and specifically estradiol, appear to be renoprotective in women, although the effects of exogenous estradiol (as an oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone therapy) on kidney function are more controversial. Treatment with postmenopausal hormone therapy in women with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) has been associated with improved quality of life, bone health and markers of cardiovascular risk, as well as an increased risk of arteriovenous access thrombosis. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene has been associated with both a decreased fracture risk as well as renoprotection in women with kidney disease. Young women with ESKD are more likely to die from infection or develop malignancy, suggesting an immunomodulatory role of estrogen. Whether the premature menopause commonly observed in female patients with kidney disease results in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is unknown, although preliminary studies have suggested a possible therapeutic role for manipulation of the sex hormone milieu to mitigate risk in this population. Large, prospective, randomized studies examining the role of sex hormones in women with kidney disease are required to address the question.

  2. 76 FR 14672 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR09-247 Ancillary Clinical Studies: Nephropathy and Urinary...: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PAR09-247...

  3. 76 FR 63933 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK Multi-Center Clinical Study Cooperative Agreement (U01...; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated...

  4. 76 FR 39113 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Study on Energy Balance and Adiposity. Date: July 26... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Planning Grants for Better CKD Outcomes. Date: July 27...

  5. 75 FR 64317 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies of Interest to the NIDDK. Date... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, The NIDDK Conflict Telephone SEP. Date: December 1...

  6. 77 FR 25488 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Studies to major ongoing Clinical Research to advance... Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of...

  7. 78 FR 11212 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science (R24). Date: March... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; R01 Clinical Ancillary Studies. Date: March 29, 2013. Time:...

  8. 76 FR 25700 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, PAR-09-247: NIDDK Ancillary Studies to Major Ongoing Clinical... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Periodontitis and Glycemic Control....

  9. Chronic kidney disease in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kondo, Kazuoki

    2012-02-01

    Menopause is derived from the Greek words men (month) and pauses (cessation) and means permanent cessation of menstruation after the loss of ovarian activity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has recently been associated with cardiovascular events in several studies. CKD patients have a heavy burden of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in addition to a range of nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation and abnormal metabolism of calcium and phosphate. In this review, the association of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is discussed. CKD mineral and bone disorder, characterized by disturbances of calcium/phosphate/parathyroid hormone, bone abnormalities and vascular and soft tissue calcification, is highly prevalent in CKD and is a strong, independent predictor of bone fracture, CVD and death. Estrogen has been shown to: (a) decrease the expression of angiotensin type 1 receptors in vasculature and kidneys; (b) reduce the expression and activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and (c) cause the release of angiotensinogen substrate from the liver. However, the degree of activation or suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by estrogen has not been clearly established. Clinical data on the effects of estrogen therapy on bone mineral densities are extremely limited in the ESRD population. CVD is the most common cause of death in postmenopausal women with CKD and many contributing factors have been explored. Future research for prevention of CVD in postmenopausal women with CKD would focus on the biology of vascular calcification as well as bone loss.

  10. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  11. Pharmacological management of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in neonates.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Sorenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are seen more frequently in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as advances in supportive care improve the survival of critically ill infants as well as those with severe, congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Many aspects of the infant's care, including fluid balance, electrolyte and mineral homeostasis, acid-base balance, and growth and nutrition require close monitoring by and collaboration among neonatologists, nephrologists, dieticians, and pharmacologists. This educational review summarizes the therapies widely used for neonates with AKI and CKD. Use of these therapies is extrapolated from data in older children and adults or based on clinical experience and case series. There is a critical need for more research on the use of therapies in infants with kidney disease as well as for the development of drug delivery systems and preparations scaled more appropriately for these small patients.

  12. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD.

  13. Systematic kidney disease management in a population with diabetes mellitus: turning the tide of kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Hugh C; Hollingworth, Lee; Higgins, Robert; Dodds, Simon

    2011-10-01

    A significant proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus do not get the benefit of treatment that would reduce their risk of progressive kidney disease and reach a nephrologist once significant loss of kidney function has already occurred. Systematic disease management of patients with diabetes and kidney disease. Diverse population (approximately 800,000) in and around Birmingham, West Midlands, UK. Number of outpatient appointments, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at first contact with nephrologist, number of patients starting kidney replacement therapy (KRT) and mode of KRT at start. Identification of patients with low or deteriorating trend in eGFR from weekly database review, specialist diabetes-kidney clinic, self-management of blood pressure and transfer to multidisciplinary clinic >12 months before end-stage kidney disease. New patients increased from 62 in 2003 to 132 in 2010; follow-ups fell from 251 to 174. Median eGFR at first clinic visit increased from 28.8 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (range 6.1-67.0) in 2000/2001 to 35.0 (11.1-147.5) in 2010 (p<0.006). In 2010, the number of patients starting KRT fell 30% below the projected activity using 1993-2003 data as baseline (p<0.003). The proportion starting KRT with either a kidney transplant, peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis via an arteriovenous fistula increased from 26% in 2000 to 55% in 2010. Systematic disease management across a large population significantly improves patient outcomes, increases the productivity of a specialist service and could reduce healthcare costs compared with the current model of care.

  14. JAK INHIBITION AND PROGRESSIVE KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Frank C.; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the role of JAK-STAT signaling in the progression of chronic kidney diseases. Recent findings The JAK-STAT pathway transmits signals from extracellular ligands, including many cytokines and chemokines. While these responses are best characterized in lymphoid cells, they also occur in kidney cells such as podocytes, mesangial cells, and tubular cells. JAK-STAT expression and signaling abnormalities occur in humans and animal models of different chronic kidney diseases. Enhanced expression and augmented activity of JAK1, JAK2 and STAT3 promote diabetic nephropathy and their inhibition appears to reduce disease. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may play an important role in cyst growth. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling promotes HIV-associated nephropathy and may also participate in the tubular responses to chronic obstructive uropathy. Based on data from experimental models, inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling, via increased expression of the suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins or pharmacologic inhibition of JAK and STAT proteins, could play a therapeutic role in multiple chronic kidney diseases. Summary Activation of the JAK-STAT pathway appears to play a role in the progression of some chronic kidney diseases. More work is needed to determine the specific role the pathway plays in individual diseases. PMID:25415616

  15. ACE2 alterations in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7). ACE2 is highly expressed within the kidneys, it is largely localized in tubular epithelial cells and less prominently in glomerular epithelial cells and in the renal vasculature. ACE2 activity has been shown to be altered in diabetic kidney disease, hypertensive renal disease and in different models of kidney injury. There is often a dissociation between tubular and glomerular ACE2 expression, particularly in diabetic kidney disease where ACE2 expression is increased at the tubular level but decreased at the glomerular level. In this review, we will discuss alterations in circulating and renal ACE2 recently described in different renal pathologies and disease models as well as their possible significance. PMID:23956234

  16. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  17. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  18. Confirmed clinical case of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in agricultural communities in Central America: a case definition for surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Alejandro; Álvarez-Estévez, Guillermo; Cerdas-Calderón, Manuel; Cruz-Trujillo, Zulma; Mena, Elio; Reyes, Marina; Sandoval-Diaz, Mabel; Sánchez-Polo, Vicente; Valdés, Régulo; Ordúnez, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Over the last 20 years, many reports have described an excess of cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the Pacific coastal area of Central America, mainly affecting male farmworkers and signaling a serious public health problem. Most of these cases are not associated with traditional risk factors for CKD, such as aging, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. This CKD of nontraditional causes (CKDnT) might be linked to environmental and/or occupational exposure or working conditions, limited access to health services, and poverty. In response to a resolution approved by the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in 2013, PAHO, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) organized a consultation process in order to expand knowledge on the epidemic of CKDnT and to develop appropriate surveillance instruments. The Clinical Working Group from SLANH was put in charge of finding a consensus definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT. The resulting definition establishes mandatory criteria and exclusion criteria necessary for classifying a case of CKDnT. The definition includes a combination of universally accepted definitions of CKD and the main clinical manifestations of CKDnT. Based on the best available evidence, the Clinical Working Group also formulated general recommendations about clinical management that apply to any patient with CKDnT. Adhering to the definition of a confirmed clinical case of CKDnT and implementing it appropriately is expected to be a powerful instrument for understanding the prevalence of the epidemic, evaluating the results of interventions, and promoting appropriate advocacy and planning efforts.

  19. Prevalence and prognosis of mild anemia in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease: a prospective cohort study in outpatient renal clinics.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Luca; Minutolo, Roberto; Chiodini, Paolo; Zamboli, Pasquale; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Nappi, Felice; Signoriello, Simona; Conte, Giuseppe; Zoccali, Carmine; SIN-TABLE CDK Study Group

    2010-01-01

    we evaluated prevalence and prognosis of mild anemia, defined as Hb (g/dl) 11-13.5 in males and 11-12 in females, in a prospective cohort of stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. we enrolled 668 consecutive patients in 25 renal clinics during 2003. Patients with frank anemia (Hb <11 or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents) at enrolment were excluded. Mild anemia was evaluated at two visits planned with an interval of 18 ± 6 months to identify four categories: no anemia at both visits, mild anemia at visit 1 resolving at visit 2 (RES), mild anemia persisting at both visits (PER), and progression from no anemia or mild anemia at visit 1 to mild or frank anemia at visit 2 (PRO). mild anemia was present in 41.3% at visit 1 and 34.1% at visit 2. We identified PER in 22% patients, RES in 10%, and PRO in 26%. In the subsequent 40 months, 125 patients developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 94 died. At competing risk model, PER predicted ESRD (hazard ratio, HR, 1.82, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.01-3.29) while PRO predicted both ESRD (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.02-3.23) and death (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.04-3.37). in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease, mild anemia is prevalent and it is a marker of risk excess when persistent or progressive over time. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Integrative Biology of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Jennifer L.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the US is diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Despite significant efforts to improve outcomes in DKD, the impact on disease progression has been disappointing. This has prompted clinicians and researchers to search for alternative approaches to identify persons at risk, and to search for more effective therapies to halt progression of DKD. The identification of novel therapies is critically dependent on a more comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of DKD, specifically at the molecular level. A more expansive and exploratory view of DKD is needed to complement more traditional research approaches that have focused on single molecules. Summary In recent years, sophisticated research methodologies have emerged within systems biology that should allow for a more comprehensive disease definition of DKD. Systems biology provides an interdisciplinary approach to describe complex interactions within biological systems, including how these interactions influence systems' functions and behaviors. Computational modeling of large, system-wide, quantitative data sets is used to generate molecular interaction pathways, such as metabolic and cell signaling networks. Key Messages Importantly, the interpretation of data generated by systems biology tools requires integration with enhanced clinical research data and validation using model systems. Such an integrative biological approach has already generated novel insights into pathways and molecules involved in DKD. In this review, we highlight recent examples of how combining systems biology with traditional clinical and model research efforts results in an integrative biology approach that significantly adds to the understanding of the complex pathophysiology of DKD. PMID:26929927

  1. Therapeutic Area Data Standards for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report From the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Neville, Jon; Chapman, Arlene B; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Miskulin, Dana C; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Dennis, Eslie; Kisler, Bron; Kopko, Steve; Krasa, Holly B; LeRoy, Elizabeth; Castedo, Juliana; Schrier, Robert W; Broadbent, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Data standards provide a structure for consistent understanding and exchange of data and enable the integration of data across studies for integrated analysis. There is no data standard applicable to kidney disease. We describe the process for development of the first-ever Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) data standard for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC). Definition of common data elements and creation of ADPKD-specific data standards from case report forms used in long-term ADPKD registries, an observational cohort (Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease [CRISP] 1 and 2), and a randomized clinical trial (Halt Progression of Polycystic Kidney Disease [HALT-PKD]) are described in detail. This data standard underwent extensive review, including a global public comment period, and is now available online as the first PKD-specific data standard (www.cdisc.org/therapeutic). Submission of clinical trial data that use standard data structures and terminology will be required for new electronic submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration for all disease areas by the end of 2016. This data standard will allow for the mapping and pooling of available data into a common data set in addition to providing a foundation for future studies, data sharing, and long-term registries in ADPKD. This data set will also be used to support the regulatory qualification of total kidney volume as a prognostic biomarker for use in clinical trials. The availability of consensus data standards for ADPKD has the potential to facilitate clinical trial initiation and increase sharing and aggregation of data across observational studies and among completed clinical trials, thereby improving our understanding of disease progression and treatment.

  2. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  3. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD.

  4. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. Conclusions: The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25093157

  5. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise.

  6. Use of stress tests in evaluating kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koyner, Jay L; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2017-01-01

    The kidney, like most other organs, has a reserve capacity that can be utilized in times of increased physiologic demand. The ability to quantify this renal reserve function across various parts of the nephron (glomerular and tubular) has been an area of increased investigation over the past several years. In this review, we discuss several techniques that have been developed to interrogate the maximal physiologic capacity of the injured kidney. Although protein loading has been established as an ideal method to investigate glomerular filtration capacity in healthy kidneys, other methods such as the antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have demonstrated promise as a method to determine underlying glomerular disease in those with acute kidney injury and other comorbidities (e.g., congestive heart failure and chronic kidney disease). The furosemide stress test has been demonstrated to be a useful clinical tool to ascertain tubular integrity in the setting of acute kidney injury. Although various methods to interrogate the reserve capacity of the several nephron segments (glomerulus and tubules) have been investigated, none of these techniques have had wide-spread clinical implementation. Further research into acute kidney injury stress testing is warranted.

  7. Consequences of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease and Clinical Usefulness of Their Assessment Using a Non-invasive Technique - Skin Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Oleniuc, Mihaela; Secara, Irina; Onofriescu, Mihai; Hogas, Simona; Voroneanu, Luminita; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Accelerated formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products occur under circumstances of increased supply of substrates such as hyperglycaemic or oxidative stress and in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, neurodegenerative diseases, osteoarthritis and also non-diabetic atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure. Advanced glycation end-products accumulation occurs especially on long-lived proteins such as collagen in the skin and in vascular basement membranes leading to vascular damage. Adequate renal clearance capacity is an important factor in the effective removal of advanced glycation end-products. The Autofluorescence Reader was developed as a marker, representative for tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation, easily applicable in a clinical setting, initially for predicting diabetes related complications. Studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as well as its predictive value for total and cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. Moreover skin autofluorescence was demonstrated to be superior to Haemoglobin A1c and other conventional risk factors. Advanced glycation end-products have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure. Assessment of advanced glycation end-products accumulation in end-stage renal disease and undergoing renal replacement therapies patients has become of great importance. Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products is significantly increased in these patients. Mortality is markedly increased in patients with decreased kidney function, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. Skin advanced glycation end-products levels are strong predictors of survival in haemodialysis patients independent of other established risk factors

  8. External validation and clinical utility of a prediction model for 6-month mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis for end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Forzley, Brian; Er, Lee; Chiu, Helen Hl; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Martinusen, Dan; Carson, Rachel C; Hargrove, Gaylene; Levin, Adeera; Karim, Mohamud

    2017-07-01

    End-stage kidney disease is associated with poor prognosis. Health care professionals must be prepared to address end-of-life issues and identify those at high risk for dying. A 6-month mortality prediction model for patients on dialysis derived in the United States is used but has not been externally validated. We aimed to assess the external validity and clinical utility in an independent cohort in Canada. We examined the performance of the published 6-month mortality prediction model, using discrimination, calibration, and decision curve analyses. Data were derived from a cohort of 374 prevalent dialysis patients in two regions of British Columbia, Canada, which included serum albumin, age, peripheral vascular disease, dementia, and answers to the "the surprise question" ("Would I be surprised if this patient died within the next year?"). The observed mortality in the validation cohort was 11.5% at 6 months. The prediction model had reasonable discrimination (c-stat = 0.70) but poor calibration (calibration-in-the-large = -0.53 (95% confidence interval: -0.88, -0.18); calibration slope = 0.57 (95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.83)) in our data. Decision curve analysis showed the model only has added value in guiding clinical decision in a small range of threshold probabilities: 8%-20%. Despite reasonable discrimination, the prediction model has poor calibration in this external study cohort; thus, it may have limited clinical utility in settings outside of where it was derived. Decision curve analysis clarifies limitations in clinical utility not apparent by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. This study highlights the importance of external validation of prediction models prior to routine use in clinical practice.

  9. Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): executive summary from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Harris, Tess; Horie, Shigeo; Kasiske, Bertram L; Odland, Dwight; Pei, York; Perrone, Ronald D; Pirson, Yves; Schrier, Robert W; Torra, Roser; Torres, Vicente E; Watnick, Terry; Wheeler, David C

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review.

  10. [Chronic kidney diseases, metformin and lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus represent a worldwide public health problem. The incidence of these diseases is gradually growing into epidemic proportions. In many cases they occur simultaneously, what leads to increased morbidity and mortality among the affected patients. The majority of the patients treated for diabetes mellitus are unaware of the presence of renal insufficiency. Vascular hypertrophy and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of kidney failure in countries with advanced healthcare systems. Metformin is a basic drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is excreted in an unchanged form by the kidneys. When administered to patients with renal insufficiency, sepsis, dehydration or after the parenteral administration of iodinated contrast agents, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, which is also associated with an increased mortality rate.

  11. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Portilla Franco, Maria Eugenia; Tornero Molina, Fernando; Gil Gregorio, Pedro

    In recent years, the concept of frailty as a "state of pre-disability" has been widely accepted by those involved in the care of the elderly. Its importance lies not only in its high prevalence - more than 25% in people over 85 years of age - but it is also considered an independent risk factor of disability, institutionalisation and mortality amongst the elderly. The study of renal function is relevant in patients with major comorbidities. Studies have shown a significant association between chronic kidney disease and the development of adverse clinical outcomes such as heart disease, heart failure, end-stage renal disease, increased susceptibility to infections and greater functional impairment. Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  12. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  13. Kidney disease in pregnancy: (Women's Health Series).

    PubMed

    Gyamlani, Geeta; Geraci, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    Kidney disease and pregnancy may exist in two general settings: acute kidney injury that develops during pregnancy, and chronic kidney disease that predates conception. In the first trimester of pregnancy, acute kidney injury is most often the result of hyperemesis gravidarum, ectopic pregnancy, or miscarriage. In the second and third trimesters, the common causes of acute kidney injury are severe preeclampsia, hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelets syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and thrombotic microangiopathies, which may pose diagnostic challenges to the clinician. Cortical necrosis and obstructive uropathy are other conditions that may lead to acute kidney injury in these trimesters. Early recognition of these disorders is essential to timely treatment that can improve both maternal and fetal outcomes. In women with preexisting kidney disease, pregnancy-related outcomes depend upon the degree of renal impairment, the amount of proteinuria, and the severity of hypertension. Neonatal and maternal outcomes in pregnancies among renal transplant patients are generally good if the mother has normal baseline allograft function. Common renally active drugs and immunosuppressant medications must be prescribed, with special considerations in pregnant patients.

  14. The association of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio with clinical outcomes in geriatric patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Erhan; Mirili, Cem; Isikyakar, Tolgay; Yaprak, Mustafa; Guvercin, Guray; Ozay, Emine; Asci, Gulay

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio with the clinical outcomes in geriatric patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 165 patients over the age of 65, with stage 3-5 CKD, were enrolled in the study. The primary endpoints were all-cause of deaths and requirement of renal replacement therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to delta neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio such as increased (group 1) and decreased or stable (group 2) groups. The mean age was 73.8 ± 6.1 years and the mean follow-up was 30 ± 13 months. Thirty-one (18.7%) patients died during the follow-up period and 21 (13.4%) patients required renal replacement therapy. The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased in 95 (57.5%) patients. The mortality rate (24.2%, 11.4%; p = 0.03) and requirement of renal replacement therapy (19.1%, 5.7%; p = 0.01) were higher in group 1 compared to group 2. In the Cox regression analysis, the basal neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio was the independent predictor of death (HR: 1.23 (95% CI 1.02-1.47), p = 0.02), and the basal eGFR was the independent predictor of requirement of renal replacement therapy (HR:0.938, 95% CI: 0.888-0.991, p = 0.02). However, platelet/lymphocyte ratio was not associated with death and requirement of renal replacement therapy independently. The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio predicts all-cause of mortality in geriatric patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. THE NEXT GENERATION OF THERAPEUTICS FOR CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Matthew D.; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a leading cause of death in the United States. There is no cure for the disease, with current treatment strategies relying on blood pressure control through blockade of the renin angiotensin system and glycemic control. Such approaches only delay end stage kidney disease development, and can be associated with significant side effects. Recent identification of several novel mechanisms contributing to CKD development - including vascular changes, loss of podocytes and renal epithelial cells, matrix deposition, inflammation and metabolic dysregulation – has revealed new potential therapeutic approaches for CKD. This review will assess emerging strategies and agents for CKD treatment, highlighting associated challenges in their clinical development. PMID:27230798

  16. Enzyme replacement therapy in a patient of heterozygous Fabry disease: clinical and pathological evaluations by repeat kidney biopsy and a successful pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Maruyama, Hiroki; Morioka, Tetsuo; Noda, Seiko; Nagata, Hiroshi; Oyama, Yuko; Narita, Ichiei

    2017-10-10

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase alpha-galactosidase A (ɑ-Gal A). A 20-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of proteinuria and persistent macroscopic hematuria. Based on the typical renal pathological findings, deficient activity of the ɑ-Gal A, and heterozygous mutation in the ɑ-Gal A gene, she was diagnosed with Fabry disease. After 1 year of enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg every other week, the patient's proteinuria and hematuria were disappeared. In our patient, enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase alfa was observed to be safe and well-tolerated during her pregnancy, with no significant negative effects on her or her child. Here, we report clinical and pathological evaluations of a patient through repeat kidney biopsy after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy. Furthermore, we discussed the appropriate enzyme replacement therapy and its safety in pregnant women with Fabry disease.

  17. Total Kidney Volume as a Biomarker of Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tangri, Navdeep; Hougen, Ingrid; Alam, Ahsan; Perrone, Ronald; McFarlane, Phil; Pei, York

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of kidney cysts and kidney enlargement, which progresses to kidney failure by the fifth to seventh decade of life in a majority of patients. Disease progression is evaluated primarily through serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measurements; however, it is known that serum creatinine and eGFR values typically do not change until the fourth or fifth decade of life. Until recently, therapy only existed to target complications of ADPKD. As therapeutic agents continue to be investigated for use in ADPKD, a suitable biomarker of disease progression in place of serum creatinine is needed. Sources of information: This review summarizes recent research regarding the use of total kidney volume as a biomarker in ADPKD, as presented at the Canadian Society of Nephrology symposium held in April 2015. Findings: Measurement of patients’ total kidney volume made using ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown by the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) study to be directly correlated with both increases in cyst volume and change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Additional studies have shown total kidney volume to have an association with complications of ADPKD as well. Limitations: Areas for further study continue to exist in comparison of methods of measuring total kidney volume. Implications: We believe that the evidence suggests that total kidney volume may be an appropriate surrogate marker for ADPKD disease progression. PMID:28321323

  18. Liver and Kidney Disease in Ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    GUNAY-AYGUN, MERAL

    2010-01-01

    Hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases (HRFCDs) are among the most common inherited human disorders. The discovery that proteins defective in the autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD and ARPKD) localize to the primary cilia and the recognition of the role these organelles play in the pathogenesis of HRFCDs led to the term “ciliopathies.” While ADPKD and ARPKD are the most common ciliopathies associated with both liver and kidney disease, variable degrees of renal and/or hepatic involvement occur in many other ciliopathies, including Joubert, Bardet–Biedl, Meckel–Gruber, and oral–facial–digital syndromes. The ductal plate malformation (DPM), a developmental abnormality of the portobiliary system, is the basis of the liver disease in ciliopathies that manifest congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF), Caroli syndrome (CS), and polycystic liver disease (PLD). Hepatocellular function remains relatively preserved in ciliopathy-associated liver diseases. The major morbidity associated with CHF is portal hypertension (PH), often leading to esophageal varices and hypersplenism. In addition, CD predisposes to recurrent cholangitis. PLD is not typically associated with PH, but may result in complications due to mass effects. The kidney pathology in ciliopathies ranges from non-functional cystic dysplastic kidneys to an isolated urinary concentration defect; the disorders contributing to this pathology, in addition to ADPKD and ARPKD, include nephronophithisis (NPHP), glomerulocystic kidney disease and medullary sponge kidneys. Decreased urinary concentration ability, resulting in polyuria and polydypsia, is the first and most common renal symptom in ciliopathies. While the majority of ADPKD, ARPKD, and NPHP patients require renal transplantation, the frequency and rate of progression to renal failure varies considerably in other ciliopathies. This review focuses on the kidney and liver disease found in the different ciliopathies. PMID:19876928

  19. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Wadi N.; Moore, Linda W.

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors—such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D—on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances. PMID:28298956

  20. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Suki, Wadi N; Moore, Linda W

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors-such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D-on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances.

  1. Patients, populations and policy: patient outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Powe, N R

    2001-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease represents an interesting illustration for evaluating an epidemic of chronic illness, the impact of care processes and technology on health outcomes, the impact of financial incentives and cost containment on health outcomes, and the choices society must consider in responding to a chronic illness. The evidence suggests that strong economic pressures exist in the care of chronic kidney disease and that cost containment is important. The results in large part reflect the impact of economic pressures on clinical decision making in the absence of good evidence on outcomes. To improve clinical decision making we need valid evidence linking specific processes of care to patient outcomes. Specific processes amenable to study include the provision of preventive services, physician and nurse technical and interpersonal care and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The ESRD Quality Study (EQUAL) currently underway and supported by the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, may help to guide physicians and centers in caring for their patients with chronic kidney disease. This investigation examines the relation between process of care and outcomes and expands outcomes measure to include disease-specific quality-of-life measures and patient satisfaction and accounts for case mix using the Index of Co-Existent Disease, a measure of the extent of different comorbid diseases as well as their severity (18,19,20). Better data on how processes of care are linked to health outcomes can inform decision making and allow educated cost cutting and quality maintenance.

  2. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients.

  3. Diabetic kidney disease: from physiology to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; de Fuentes, Mercedes Muros; Górriz, José L; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-09-15

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) defines the functional, structural and clinical abnormalities of the kidneys that are caused by diabetes. This complication has become the single most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. The pathophysiology of DKD comprises the interaction of both genetic and environmental determinants that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, which leads to the damage of the glomerular filtration barrier, a highly specialized structure formed by the fenestrated endothelium, the glomerular basement membrane and the epithelial podocytes, that permits a highly selective ultrafiltration of the blood plasma. DKD evolves gradually over years through five progressive stages. Briefly they are: reversible glomerular hyperfiltration, normal glomerular filtration and normoalbuminuria, normal glomerular filtration and microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and renal failure. Approximately 20-40% of diabetic patients develop microalbuminuria within 10-15 years of the diagnosis of diabetes, and about 80-90% of those with microalbuminuria progress to more advanced stages. Thus, after 15-20 years, macroalbuminuria occurs approximately in 20-40% of patients, and around half of them will present renal insufficiency within 5 years. The screening and early diagnosis of DKD is based on the measurement of urinary albumin excretion and the detection of microalbuminuria, the first clinical sign of DKD. The management of DKD is based on the general recommendations in the treatment of patients with diabetes, including optimal glycaemic and blood pressure control, adequate lipid management and abolishing smoking, in addition to the lowering of albuminuria. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  4. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  5. T cells and autoimmune kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Bradley, Sean J; Klatzmann, David; Tsokos, George C

    2017-03-13

    Glomerulonephritis is traditionally considered to result from the invasion of the kidney by autoantibodies and immune complexes from the circulation or following their formation in situ, and by cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The inflammatory response leads to the proliferation and dysfunction of cells of the glomerulus, and invasion of the interstitial space with immune cells, resulting in tubular cell malfunction and fibrosis. T cells are critical drivers of autoimmunity and related organ damage, by supporting B-cell differentiation and antibody production or by directly promoting inflammation and cytotoxicity against kidney resident cells. T cells might become activated by autoantigens in the periphery and become polarized to secrete inflammatory cytokines before entering the kidney where they have the opportunity to expand owing to the presence of costimulatory molecules and activating cytokines. Alternatively, naive T cells could enter the kidney where they become activated after encountering autoantigen and expand locally. As not all individuals with a peripheral autoimmune response to kidney antigens develop glomerulonephritis, the contribution of local kidney factors expressed or produced by kidney cells is probably of crucial importance. Improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of T cells in patients with glomerulonephritis offers unique opportunities for the recognition of treatment targets for autoimmune kidney disease.

  6. A randomized clinical trial to determine the effect of angiotensin inhibitors reduction on creatinine clearance and haemoglobin in heart failure patients with chronic kidney disease and anaemia.

    PubMed

    Pita-Fernández, S; Chouciño-Fernández, T; Juega-Puig, J; Seoane-Pillado, T; López-Calviño, B; Pértega-Díaz, S; Pedreira-Andrade, J-D; Gil-Guillén, V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common comorbidity in elderly patients with heart failure. Evidence supports the use of angiotensin inhibitors for patients with heart failure. However, there is little evidence with which to assess the risk and benefits of this treatment in elderly patients with renal dysfunction. To determine the efficacy and safety of angiotensin inhibitor reduction in patients with heart failure, chronic kidney disease and anaemia. Open randomized controlled clinical trial. Complexo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña (Spain). Patients ≥ 50 years old, with heart failure, haemoglobin (Hb) < 12 mg/dl and creatinine clearance <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) admitted to hospital, in treatment with angiotensin inhibitors. Informed consent and Ethical Review Board approval were obtained. A 50% reduction of angiotensin inhibitor dose of the basal treatment on admission (n = 30) in the intervention group. Control group (n = 16) with the standard basal dose. Primary outcome was difference in Hb (gr/dl), creatinine clearance (ml/min/1.73 m(2) ) and protein C (mg/dl) between admission and 1-3 months after discharge. Secondary outcome was survival at 6-12 months after discharge. Patients in the intervention group experienced an improvement in Hb (10.62-11.47 g/dl), creatinine clearance (32.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) to 42.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2) ), and a decrease in creatinine levels (1.98-1.68 mg/dl) and protein C (3.23 mg/dl to 1.37 mg/dl). There were no significant differences in these variables in the control group. Survival at 6 and 12 months in the intervention and control group was 86.7% vs. 75% and 69.3% vs. 50%, respectively. The reduction of the dose of angiotensin inhibitors in the intervention group resulted in an improvement in anaemia and kidney function, decreased protein C and an increased survival rate. EudraCT: 2008-008480-10. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The clinical and cost-effectiveness of the BRinging Information and Guided Help Together (BRIGHT) intervention for the self-management support of people with stage 3 chronic kidney disease in primary care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of care for people with vascular disease is a key priority. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has recently been included as a target condition for general practices to add to registers of chronic conditions as part of the Quality and Outcome Framework. This paper outlines the implementation and evaluation of a self-management intervention involving an information guidebook, tailored access to local resources and telephone support for people with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Methods/Design The study involves a multi-site, longitudinal patient-level randomized controlled trial. The study will evaluate the clinical use and cost-effectiveness of a complex self-management intervention for people with stage 3 chronic kidney disease in terms of self-management capacity, health-related quality of life and blood pressure control compared to care as usual. We describe the methods of the patient-level randomized controlled trial. Discussion The management of chronic kidney disease is a developing area of research. The BRinging Information and Guided Help Together (BRIGHT) trial aims to provide evidence that a complementary package of support for people with vascular disease that targets both clinical and social need broadens the opportunities of self-management support by addressing problems related to social disadvantage. Trial registration Trial registration reference: ISRCTN45433299 PMID:23356861

  8. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  9. Bartonellosis in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Unrecognized and Unsuspected Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi Amiri, Fateme

    2017-10-01

    Systemic cat scratch disease or bartonellosis is a clinical entity caused by Bartonella henselae, which manifests with necrotizing granulomas in visceral organs. The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is the vector responsible for horizontal transmission of the disease from cat to cat, and its bite can also infect humans. In immunocompromised patients including chronic kidney disease and renal transplant recipients, it can cause persistent and disseminated cat scratch disease. The aim of this paper is to perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the diagnostic methods of cat scratch disease in chronic kidney disease and renal transplant recipients. This review was searched via electronic PubMed and Google scholar databases. Few qualitative full-text original articles in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplant were extracted. At this paper, 19 articles identified including six articles in chronic kidney disease and 13 articles in renal transplant recipients. Of these six identified case reports in chronic kidney disease, serology via immunofluorescence antibody test was led to diagnosis of cat scratch disease in five patients and a one patient showed nonreactive serologic test. Polymerase chain reaction usage to detect deoxyribonucleic acid in tissue biopsy and bone marrow biopsy was led to diagnosis. Cat scratch disease diagnosis in 13 renal transplant recipients was attained more by combining serology and polymerase chain reaction to detect deoxyribonucleic acid in tissue specimens. These selected studies demonstrate that serology and polymerase chain reaction via deoxyribonucleic acid extraction of tissue specimens yield the best outcome in diagnostic field of bartonellosis. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  10. [Nutritional management of kidney diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Borovik, T E; Kutafina, E K; Tsygin, A N; Sergeeva, T V; Baranov, A A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Voznesenskaya, T S; Zakharova, I N; Semenova, N N; Zvonkova, N G; Yatsyk, S P

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of various kidney diseases in children remains high in recent decades. Adequate nutrition management can enhance the effectiveness of drug treatment, slow the frequency of relapses andprevent the progression of the disease. The article is devoted to modern approaches to diet therapy in various kidney diseases in children with the defeat of tubular and glomerular appa ratus. For the first time the therapeutic diets for children with various kidney diseases are presented. Particular attention is paid to diet therapy in nephrotic syndrome (steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory). Dietary approaches with modern formulas for enteral nutrition in cases of steroid therapy complications in children with renal insufficiency (in predialysis stage and on dialysis) are described. Differentiated nutritional approaches for patients with different types of crystalluria are separately presented.

  11. Kidney Disease and Psoriasis. A New Comorbidity?

    PubMed

    González-Parra, E; Daudén, E; Carrascosa, J M; Olveira, A; Botella, R; Bonanad, C; Rivera, R

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities, particularly in young patients and patients with more severe forms of the disease. Recent studies have also linked psoriasis to kidney disease, and this would seem only logical, as the kidney is both a target of classic cardiovascular risk factors and susceptible to the toxic effects of some of the traditional drugs used to control psoriasis. In this article, we would like to draw readers' attention to this recently described comorbidity and stress the importance of early detection, as once chronic kidney disease develops, it cannot be reversed. When evaluating patients with psoriasis, particularly when they are candidates for systemic therapy, we believe it is important to order laboratory tests including glomerular filtration rate and a simple urine test to screen for albuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio).

  12. Growth Retardation in Children with Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Maria Jose; Mericq, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Growth failure is almost inextricably linked with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Growth failure in CKD has been associated with both increased morbidity and mortality. Growth failure in the setting of kidney disease is multifactorial and is related to poor nutritional status as well as comorbidities, such as anemia, bone and mineral disorders, and alterations in hormonal responses, as well as to aspects of treatment such as steroid exposure. This review covers updated management of growth failure in these children including adequate nutrition, treatment of metabolic alterations, and early administration of recombinant human growth hormone (GH). PMID:24187550

  13. Applications of external cavity diode laser-based technique to noninvasive clinical diagnosis using expired breath ammonia analysis: chronic kidney disease, epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Turkmen, Aysenur; Akman, Hatice; Sezer, M. Tugrul; Kutluhan, Suleyman

    2016-08-01

    An external cavity laser (ECL)-based off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy was applied to noninvasive clinical diagnosis using expired breath ammonia analysis: (1) the correlation between breath ammonia levels and blood parameters related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) was investigated and (2) the relationship between breath ammonia levels and blood concentrations of valproic acid (VAP) was studied. The concentrations of breath ammonia in 15 healthy volunteers, 10 epilepsy patients (before and after taking VAP), and 27 patients with different stages of CKD were examined. The range of breath ammonia levels was 120 to 530 ppb for healthy subjects and 710 to 10,400 ppb for patients with CKD. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between breath ammonia concentrations and urea, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, or estimated glomerular filtration rate in 27 patients. It was demonstrated that taking VAP gave rise to increasing breath ammonia levels. A statistically significant difference was found between the levels of exhaled ammonia (NH3) in healthy subjects and in patients with epilepsy before and after taking VAP. The results suggest that our breath ammonia measurement system has great potential as an easy, noninvasive, real-time, and continuous monitor of the clinical parameters related to epilepsy and CKD.

  14. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Issar, Tushar; Krishnan, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages. PMID:27867500

  15. KDOQI US Commentary on the 2017 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline Update for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, Prevention, and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD).

    PubMed

    Isakova, Tamara; Nickolas, Thomas L; Denburg, Michelle; Yarlagadda, Sri; Weiner, Daniel E; Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Bansal, Vinod; Rosas, Sylvia E; Nigwekar, Sagar; Yee, Jerry; Kramer, Holly

    2017-09-20

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) encompasses laboratory and bone abnormalities and vascular calcification and has deleterious effects on clinical outcomes. KDOQI (Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative), an initiative of the National Kidney Foundation, addressed this issue with the publication of a clinical practice guideline for bone metabolism and disease in CKD in 2003, and 2 years later, a new definition and classification scheme for CKD-MBD was developed following a KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) Controversies Conference. The initial KDIGO guideline on CKD-MBD was then published in 2009. New evidence was subsequently reviewed at the 2013 KDIGO Controversies Conference, and in 2017, KDIGO issued a clinical practice guideline update for the diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment of CKD-MBD. This commentary presents the views of the KDOQI CKD-MBD work group convened by the National Kidney Foundation. The KDOQI work group agrees with most of the KDIGO guideline update recommendations, particularly the suggestions regarding bone mineral density testing, joint assessments of longitudinal trends in mineral metabolism markers, and dietary phosphate counseling focused on phosphate additives. However, the KDOQI work group has some concerns about the suggestions related to hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia, phosphate-binder choice, and treatment of abnormal parathyroid hormone concentrations. The overall goal of this commentary is to provide a broad discussion for the US nephrology community regarding CKD-MBD and its diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The podocyte in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stitt-Cavanagh, Erin; MacLeod, Laura; Kennedy, Chris

    2009-10-14

    Approaching epidemic levels, diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is now the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Microalbuminuria is an early clinical marker of DKD that results from damage to the glomerular filtration barrier at the level of the highly differentiated glomerular podocyte cells. Injury to these epithelial cells, podocytopathies, includes cellular hypertrophy, foot process effacement, detachment from the glomerular basement membrane, and apoptosis. Here we review the role of a number of recently identified factors that contribute to podocytopathies in DKD. These factors include members of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) types 1 and 2, prorenin and its receptor, reactive oxygen species (ROS), prostanoids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and their receptors (RAGE), adiponectin, and microRNAs. As the number of therapeutic options that slow, but do not halt, the progression of DKD to ESRD remains limited, a more comprehensive understanding of the signaling events that contribute to this increasingly prevalent disease may identify novel avenues for treatment and prevention.

  17. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of phosphate in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, Marc G; Sezer, Siren; Massy, Ziad A; Johansson, Lina; Cozzolino, Mario; Fouque, Denis

    2017-01-01

    The importance of phosphate homeostasis in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been recognized for decades, but novel insights - which are frequently relevant to everyday clinical practice - continue to emerge. Epidemiological data consistently indicate an association between hyperphosphataemia and poor clinical outcomes. Moreover, compelling evidence suggests direct toxicity of increased phosphate concentrations. Importantly, serum phosphate concentration has a circadian rhythm that must be considered when interpreting patient phosphate levels. Detailed understanding of dietary sources of phosphate, including food additives, can enable phosphate restriction without risking protein malnutrition. Dietary counselling provides an often underestimated opportunity to target the increasing exposure to dietary phosphate of both the general population and patients with CKD. In patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone can be an important source of serum phosphate, and adequate appreciation of this fact should impact treatment. Dietary and pharmotherapeutic interventions are efficacious strategies to lower phosphate intake and serum concentration. However, strong evidence that targeting serum phosphate improves patient outcomes is currently lacking. Future studies are, therefore, required to investigate the effects of modern dietary and pharmacological interventions on clinically meaningful end points.

  19. Tolvaptan in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Grantham, Jared J.; Higashihara, Eiji; Perrone, Ronald D.; Krasa, Holly B.; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is often associated with pain, hypertension, and kidney failure. Preclinical studies indicated that vasopressin V2-receptor antagonists inhibit cyst growth and slow the decline of kidney function. METHODS In this phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-year trial, we randomly assigned 1445 patients, 18 to 50 years of age, who had ADPKD with a total kidney volume of 750 ml or more and an estimated creatinine clearance of 60 ml per minute or more, in a 2:1 ratio to receive tolvaptan, a V2-receptor antagonist, at the highest of three twice-daily dose regimens that the patient found tolerable, or placebo. The primary outcome was the annual rate of change in the total kidney volume. Sequential secondary end points included a composite of time to clinical progression (defined as worsening kidney function, kidney pain, hypertension, and albuminuria) and rate of kidney-function decline. RESULTS Over a 3-year period, the increase in total kidney volume in the tolvaptan group was 2.8% per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5 to 3.1), versus 5.5% per year in the placebo group (95% CI, 5.1 to 6.0; P<0.001). The composite end point favored tolvaptan over placebo (44 vs. 50 events per 100 follow-up-years, P = 0.01), with lower rates of worsening kidney function (2 vs. 5 events per 100 person-years of follow-up, P<0.001) and kidney pain (5 vs. 7 events per 100 person-years of follow-up, P = 0.007). Tolvaptan was associated with a slower decline in kidney function (reciprocal of the serum creatinine level, −2.61 [mg per milliliter]−1 per year vs. −3.81 [mg per milliliter]−1 per year; P<0.001). There were fewer ADPKD-related adverse events in the tolvaptan group but more events related to aquaresis (excretion of electrolyte-free water) and hepatic adverse events unrelated to ADPKD, contributing to a higher discontinuation rate (23%, vs. 14% in the placebo group). CONCLUSIONS

  20. Tolvaptan in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E; Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Gansevoort, Ron T; Grantham, Jared J; Higashihara, Eiji; Perrone, Ronald D; Krasa, Holly B; Ouyang, John; Czerwiec, Frank S

    2012-12-20

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is often associated with pain, hypertension, and kidney failure. Preclinical studies indicated that vasopressin V(2)-receptor antagonists inhibit cyst growth and slow the decline of kidney function. In this phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-year trial, we randomly assigned 1445 patients, 18 to 50 years of age, who had ADPKD with a total kidney volume of 750 ml or more and an estimated creatinine clearance of 60 ml per minute or more, in a 2:1 ratio to receive tolvaptan, a V(2)-receptor antagonist, at the highest of three twice-daily dose regimens that the patient found tolerable, or placebo. The primary outcome was the annual rate of change in the total kidney volume. Sequential secondary end points included a composite of time to clinical progression (defined as worsening kidney function, kidney pain, hypertension, and albuminuria) and rate of kidney-function decline. Over a 3-year period, the increase in total kidney volume in the tolvaptan group was 2.8% per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5 to 3.1), versus 5.5% per year in the placebo group (95% CI, 5.1 to 6.0; P<0.001). The composite end point favored tolvaptan over placebo (44 vs. 50 events per 100 follow-up-years, P=0.01), with lower rates of worsening kidney function (2 vs. 5 events per 100 person-years of follow-up, P<0.001) and kidney pain (5 vs. 7 events per 100 person-years of follow-up, P=0.007). Tolvaptan was associated with a slower decline in kidney function (reciprocal of the serum creatinine level, -2.61 [mg per milliliter](-1) per year vs. -3.81 [mg per milliliter](-1) per year; P<0.001). There were fewer ADPKD-related adverse events in the tolvaptan group but more events related to aquaresis (excretion of electrolyte-free water) and hepatic adverse events unrelated to ADPKD, contributing to a higher discontinuation rate (23%, vs. 14% in the placebo group). Tolvaptan, as compared with placebo, slowed

  1. Chronic kidney disease, frailty, and unsuccessful aging: a review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon R; Wagner, Martin; Tangri, Navdeep

    2014-11-01

    The global prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is rising, particularly among the elderly population. Defining aging as successful or unsuccessful has become clinically relevant in the last 15 years, with an increased recognition of the frail phenotype. Frailty has been shown to be associated with CKD and poorer outcomes, such as death or dialysis. It is likely that the mechanisms of disease in CKD such as altered protein metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and anemia accelerate normal aging and lead to worsening frailty in elderly patients with CKD. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 78 FR 36554 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials in Type 1 Diabetes (UC4) Meeting A. Date: July 17... and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials in Type 1 Diabetes (UC4... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  3. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Dysplasia What is kidney dysplasia? Kidney dysplasia is a condition in which ... Kidney dysplasia in one kidney What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  4. Pregnancy and contraceptive counseling of women with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    Women with kidney disease of childbearing age should expect proactive counseling regarding pregnancy and contraception. Discussions should include the impact of pregnancy on their kidney disease and the impact of kidney disease on maternal and fetal outcomes. However, nephrologists rarely discuss sexual dysfunction, infertility, menstrual irregularities, and contraception with their premenopausal women patients. This review will consider pregnancy-related issues to discuss when counseling women with all stages of chronic kidney disease. Issues related to contraception in women on dialysis, women with functioning kidney transplants, and those with chronic kidney disease will also be reviewed.

  5. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Jared J.

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after being elbowed in the flank during a pickup basketball game, a 35-year-old healthy man has severe, colicky abdominal pain followed by gross hematuria. He is hospitalized, and a renal ultrasound scan reveals bilateral polycystic kidneys and liver cysts, previously unknown to the patient. The blood pressure is 160/100 mm Hg. The serum creatinine concentration is 0.9 mg per deciliter (80 μmol per liter). The pain subsides in 2 days with analgesics, rest, and fluids; the gross hematuria resolves in 4 days, although microscopic hematuria persists. How should his case be further evaluated and managed? PMID:20009161

  6. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  7. Bidirectional Relationship between Chronic Kidney Disease & Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wahid, Arsalan; Chaudhry, Saima; Ehsan, Afifa; Butt, Sidra; Ali Khan, Ayyaz

    2013-01-01

    Non communicable diseases (NCDs) affect the life of an individual in terms of mortality, morbidity and financial crises. Main NCDs are diabetes mellitus (DM), cardiovascular diseases (CVD), pulmonary diseases, osteoporosis and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). About 40% of the total deaths can be controlled by eliminating the risk factors for NCDs. Periodontitis have recently been labeled as an important potential risk factor for NCDs. CKD affect the oral health status of patients by inducing gingival hyperplasia, xerostomia, calcification of root canals and delayed eruption of teeth. Periodontitis increases systemic inflammatory burden leading to worsening of CKD which in turn has been has been found to negatively affect CKD of patients on hemodialysis therapy by altering their serum albumin and C-reactive protein levels. As hypoalbuminemia leads to increased mortality in CKD patients, it needs to be avoided by reducing systemic inflammatory burden in patients receiving HD therapy. Treating periodontal disease could be one factor that might decrease the systemic inflammatory burden and thereby improve quality of life of these patients. Sources of Data: Data from descriptive, cross sectional and longitudinal studies published between 2000 and 2012 were included. Data searches based on human studies only. Data Extraction: The key words, periodontitis, chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis, on MEDLINE, approximately 120 studies were identified. 35 of them were relevant to all three keywords. Most of them were cross sectional studies and total 7 clinical trials were identified regarding checking of serum levels after periodontal therapy with variable results. Conclusion: Patients with CKD have higher prevalence of periodontal disease while non-surgical periodontal therapy has been indicated to decrease the systemic inflammatory burden in patients with CKD specially those undergoing HD therapy. PMID:24353542

  8. [Vitamin D and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Étienne; Thervet, Éric; Courbebaisse, Marie

    2013-10-01

    Calcitriol and analogs inhibit renin-angiotensin system, which has a pivotal role in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial damages and proteinuria, and inhibit NF-κB activation which is known to play an important role in renal diseases by promoting inflammation and fibrogenesis. Vitamin D presents interesting pleiotropic effects for the CKD patient (reduction of mortality, antiproteinuric effect and anti-inflammatory properties). "Native" vitamin D (cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol) administration in these patients also decrease parathyroid hormone levels. Native vitamin D administration in CKD patients is safe and does not lead to increased risk of vascular calcification, despite the known hypercalcemic and hyperphosphoremic properties of the molecule in its active form. Native vitamin D administration is not associated with an increased risk of renal stones, at pharmacological doses and without important concomitant administration of calcium salts. In the field of renal transplantation, experimental studies show that vitamin D analogs have a protective role against acute rejection but clinical studies remain mainly observational.

  9. Dermatoglyphics in kidney diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Salgado, Sujatha S; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases are becoming a major cause of global burden with high mortality and morbidity. The origins of most kidney diseases are known, but for some the exact aetiology is not yet understood. Dermatoglyphics is the scientific study of epidermal ridge patterns and it has been used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to detect or predict different medical conditions that have foetal origin. However, there have been a limited number of studies that have evaluated a dermatoglyphic relationship in different kidney diseases. The aim of this review was to systematically identify, review and appraise available literature that evaluated an association of different dermatoglyphic variables with kidney diseases. This review is reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. The PubMed(®) (Medline), POPLINE, Cochrane Library and Trip Database and grey literature sources such as OpenGrey, Google Scholar, and Google were searched to earliest date to 17 April 2014. Of the 36 relevant publications, 15 were included in the review. Of these studies, there are five case reports, seven case series and three comparative studies. Possible association of dermatoglyphics with Wilms tumor (WT) had been evaluated in two comparative studies and one case series that found fewer whorls and a lower mean total ridge count (TRC). Another study evaluated adult polycystic kidney disease (APCD) type III that revealed lower TRC means in all cases. All other case series and case reports describe dermatoglyphics in various kidney disease such as acro-renal-ocular syndrome, potter syndrome, kabuki makeup syndrome, neurofaciodigitorenal syndrome, syndactyly type V, ring chromosome 13 syndrome, trisomy 13 syndrome and sirenomelia. It is evident that whorl pattern frequency and TRC have been used widely to investigate the uncertainty related to the origin of several kidney diseases such as WT and APCD type III. However, small sample sizes

  10. Parasitic kidney disease: milestones in the evolution of our knowledge.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2013-03-01

    Of the 342 parasites that infect humans, 20 are associated with kidney disease, yet of these, only schistosomes, plasmodia, filariae, and leishmanias are held responsible for significant clinical or epidemiologic impact. Reviewing the evolution of human knowledge for these parasites discloses a lot of similarities regarding their discovery, patterns of kidney injury, and pathogenic mechanisms. From a historical perspective, our relevant information may be classified into 4 phases: (1) disease documentation in ancient and medieval scripts as far back as 2000-3000 bce; (2) discovery of the parasites, their life cycles, and clinical correlates by European clinicians working in African and Asian colonies during the second half of the 19th century; (3) discovery and characterization of the renal manifestations of monoparasitic infections during the second half of the 20th century; and (4) recognition of the confounding effects of coinfection with bacteria, viruses, or other parasites. The spectrum of respective kidney diseases extends all the way from acute kidney injury to glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, urologic disorders, and malignancy. Discovery of the common immunopathogenetic host response to parasitic infections has provided a knowledge core that explains the similarities, diversities, and interactions with regard to kidney injury.

  11. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Kidney Disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a ...

  12. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Agustsdottir, Inger M; Indridason, Olafur S; Edvardsson, Vidar O

    2016-03-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. An observational cohort study. All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD, end-stage renal disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and changes in eGFR. Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were females and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6-67.9) years. Median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0-31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 (55%) patients and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3 to 5, including 11 (21%) patients with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 (62%) patients had experienced kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stages 3 to 5. Of 14 (26%) patients with stage 5 CKD, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 (55%) patients. The median eGFR slope was -0.38 (range, -21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73m(2) per year in patients receiving treatment with an xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and -5.74 (range, -75.8 to -0.10) mL/min/1.73m(2) per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (P=0.001). Use of observational registry data. Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, whereas nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without a history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of intravenous adipose-derived allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of feline chronic kidney disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in eight cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Webb, Tracy L; Randall, Elissa; Marolf, Angela; Valdes-Martinez, Alex; Dow, Steve W

    2016-02-01

    Feline chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, and inflammation contributes to the progression of renal fibrosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in rodent CKD models. However, few randomized trials evaluating the effectiveness of MSC therapy for diseases in companion animals have been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of allogeneic MSCs for the treatment of feline CKD using a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. MSCs were isolated from the cryopreserved adipose tissues of specific pathogen-free research cats and culture expanded. CKD cats were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded one-way crossover clinical study. Four CKD cats were randomized to receive 2 × 10(6) MSCs/kg intravenously at 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Four CKD cats were randomized to receive placebo, with two cats crossing over to the MSC treatment group and one cat failing to complete the trial. Complete blood counts, chemistry and urinalysis were performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) via nuclear scintigraphy and urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC) were determined at weeks 0 and 8. Six cats received three doses of allogeneic MSC culture expanded from cryopreserved adipose without adverse effects. No significant change in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, GFR by nuclear scintigraphy, UPC or packed cell volume was seen in cats treated with MSCs. Individual changes in GFR were 12%, 8%, 8%, 2%, -13% and -67% in treated cats compared with 16%, 36% and 0% in placebo-treated cats. While administration of MSC culture expanded from cryopreserved adipose was not associated with adverse effects, significant improvement in renal function was not observed immediately after administration. Long-term follow-up is necessary to determine whether MSC administration affects disease progression in cats with CKD

  14. Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on Clinical Outcomes in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in the Era of Newer-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Min; Tripathy, Dipti Ranjan; Park, Sang Wook; Park, Bonil; Son, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jun-Won; Ahn, Sung-Gyun; Ahn, Min Soo; Kim, Jang-Young; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to be a major adverse predictor in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). It is expected that the use of newer-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) would improve clinical outcomes in these patients. We evaluated the impact of CKD on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing PCI using newer-generation DES in a real-world setting. Subjects and Methods A total of 887 patients who underwent PCI with newer-generation DES and who had a history of DM or HbA1c >6.5% at the time of hospitalization were analyzed. These patients were divided into groups without CKD (n=549) and with CKD (n=338). Among survivors at discharge, a patient-oriented composite outcome (POCO) including all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and revascularization was evaluated, together with a device-oriented composite outcome (DOCO) including cardiac death, target vessel-related MI, and target lesion revascularization at a follow-up period of one year. Results The incidence of POCO (5.4% vs. 14.0%, log-rank p<0.001) and DOCO (1.1% vs. 4.1%, log-rank p<0.001) was higher in patients with CKD. According to multivariate analysis, which was adjusted for baseline differences in demographic, clinical, and angiographic factors, the presence of CKD was an independent predictor of POCO (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07 to 3.12), but not of DOCO (HR 2.08, 95% CI: 0.69-6.28). Conclusion In DM patients, CKD is an independent and powerful predictor of patient-related outcomes, but not of device-related outcomes in the era of newer-generation DES. PMID:28382078

  15. Clinical impact of the ERBP Working Group 2010 Recommendations for the anemia management in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis: ACERCA study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Cases, Aleix; Carballada, Alberto Torre; Iranzo, Javier Torralba; Bronsoms, Josep; Vallès-Prats, Martí; Monserrat, Daniel Torán; Jimenez, Elisabet Masso

    2015-01-01

    The Anemia Working Group of ERBP in 2010 recommended a target hemoglobin (Hb) level in the range of 11-12 g/dL, without intentionally exceeding 13 g/dL during the treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). This study evaluated if there was a clinical impact of this statement in the anemia management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients treated with ESAs not on dialysis in routine clinical practice in Spain. This was an observational and cross-sectional study carried out in CKD patients not on dialysis in Spain who initiated ESA treatment (naïve), or were shifted from a previous ESA to another ESAs (converted) since January 2011. Of 441 patients evaluated, 67.6% were naïve and 32.4% were converted. At the study visit, 42.5% of naïve patients achieved the Hb target of 11-12 g/dL, with a mean Hb of 11.3±1.3 g/dL (vs 10.1±0.9 g/dL at the start of ESA therapy). Only 35.3% of converted patients maintained Hb levels within the recommended target at the study visit. Yet, 8.2% of naïve patients and 7.9% of those converted had Hb levels >13 g/dL. Hb levels were similar across subgroups of patients, regardless of the presence of significant comorbidities. Anemia management in CKD patients treated with ESAs by Spanish nephrologists seems to be aimed at preventing Hb levels <11 g/dL, while <50% of patients were within the narrow recommended Hb target range. This, together with the lack of individualization in Hb targets according to patients' comorbidities show that there is still room for improvement in renal anemia management in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Obesity and Kidney Disease: Hidden Consequences of the Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Furth, Susan L; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obesity is one of the strongest risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease, and also for nephrolithiasis and for kidney cancer. This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

  17. Obesity and kidney disease: hidden consequences of the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Furth, Susan L; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obesity is one of the strongest risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease, and also for nephrolithiasis and for kidney cancer. This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

  18. Kidney disease and aging: A reciprocal relation.

    PubMed

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are overrepresented in elderly patients. This provides specific challenges for the treatment, as the start of dialysis in vulnerable elderly patients may be associated with a rapid decline in functional performance. However, prognosis in elderly patients with ESRD is quite variable and related to the presence of comorbidity and geriatric impairments. The decision to start dialysis in elderly patients should always be based on shared decision making, which may be aided by the use of prediction models which should however not be used to withhold dialysis treatment. The treatment of ESRD in elderly patients should be based on a multidimensional treatment plan with a role for active rehabilitation. Moreover, there also appears to be a reciprocal relationship between aging and CKD, as the presence of geriatric complications is also high in younger patients with ESRD. This has led to the hypothesis of a premature aging process associated with CKD, resulting in different phenotypes such as premature vascular aging, muscle wasting, bone disease, cognitive dysfunction and frailty. Prevention and treatment of this phenotype is based on optimal treatment of CKD, associated comorbidities, and lifestyle factors by established treatments. For the future, interventions, which are developed to combat the aging process in general, might also have relevance for the treatment of patients with CKD, but their role should always be investigated in adequately powered clinical trials, as results obtained in experimental trials may not be directly translatable to the clinical situation of elderly patients. In the meantime, physical exercise is a very important intervention, by improving both physical capacity and functional performance, as well as by a direct effect on the aging process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    López Gómez, J M

    2008-01-01

    1. All patients with anemia secondary to CKD should be treated and evaluated for possible treatment, irrespective of underlying disease, associated comorbidity or possibility of kidney replacement therapy. 2. In patients treated with ESAs, Hb concentrations should be monitored at least monthly. 3. Hb targets: In all patients with CKD, Hb concentration should be > 11 g/dl and there is no evidence to justify total correction of anemia on a routine basis. Normalization of Hb levels in CKD is associated with an improvement in health-related quality of life, but without differences in mortality or the rate of loss of kidney function (Strength of Recommendation A). 4. Indications for iron therapy: Iron therapy is required in the large majority of patients with CKD treated with ESAs to achieve a Hb equal to or greater than 11 g/dl (Strength of Recommendation B). The recommended serum concentration of ferritin is > 100 mg/dl, which should be associated with a TSI > 20% (Strength of Recommendation C). Iron therapy in patients with CKD can be given orally or intravenously, although the IV route is more effective (Strength of Recommendation A). 5. The initial dose of ESA and its adjustments will depend on the patients clinical condition, baseline Hb levels, the Hb target and the rate of increase in Hb levels observed (Strength of Recommendation C). 6. In all cases and for all ESAs, the subcutaneous route is the recommended route of administration for patients with CKD (Strength of Recommendation C). 7. Resistance to ESAs: A hyporesponse to ESAs is considered to be present when an Hb level of 11 g/dl is not achieved with a dose of epoetin > 300 IU/kg/week or a dose of darbepoetin alpha > 1.5 microg/kg/week (Strength of Recommendation B). 8. There is insufficient evidence in patients with CKD to justify routine use of coadjuvant treatments.

  20. Hepatitis C and kidney disease: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S; William, Emad A; Khalil, Soha S

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis-C (HCV) infection can induce kidney injury, mostly due to formation of immune-complexes and cryoglobulins, and possibly to a direct cytopathic effect. It may cause acute kidney injury (AKI) as a part of systemic vasculitis, and augments the risk of AKI due to other etiologies. It is responsible for mesangiocapillary or membranous glomerulonephritis, and accelerates the progression of chronic kidney disease due to other causes. HCV infection increases cardiovascular and liver-related mortality in patients on regular dialysis. HCV-infected patients are at increased risk of acute post-transplant complications. Long-term graft survival is compromised by recurrent or de novo glomerulonephritis, or chronic transplant glomerulopathy. Patient survival is challenged by increased incidence of diabetes, sepsis, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and liver failure. Effective and safe directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are currently available for treatment at different stages of kidney disease. However, the relative shortage of DAAs in countries where HCV is highly endemic imposes a need for treatment-prioritization, for which a scoring system is proposed in this review. It is concluded that the thoughtful use of DAAs, will result in a significant change in the epidemiology and clinical profiles of kidney disease, as well as improvement of dialysis and transplant outcomes, in endemic areas.

  1. [Infectious complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Pirson, Yves; Kanaan, Nada

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease over the past two decades, infection of liver and kidney cysts remains a serious and potentially threatening complication. Kidney cyst infection is the most frequent complication. It is differentiated from hemorrhage by the clinical presentation (mainly the severity and duration of fever), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells levels, and the density of the suspected cyst on computed tomography. Liver cyst infection occurs more frequently in patients with large cysts volumes. It can be life threatening and has a tendency to recur. In both infections, the best radiological imaging technique is positron emission tomography after intravenous injection of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography. Treatment with a fluoroquinolone should be continued for 6 weeks. Cyst aspiration is necessary only when cysts are very large and/or when infection is resistant to antibiotic treatment. In patients who are candidates to kidney transplantation, a history of recurrent kidney cyst infection justifies pre-transplant nephrectomy, while a past history of recurrent liver cyst infection or angiocholitis leads to consider liver transplantation. Among extrarenal and extrahepatic complications of polycystic disease, colic diverticulosis is reported to be associated with increased risk of infection in patients on hemodialysis and after kidney transplantation. However, this observation needs to be confirmed.

  2. Indoxyl sulphate and kidney disease: Causes, consequences and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Small, David M; Vesey, David A; Johnson, David W; Francis, Ross; Vitetta, Luis; Gobe, Glenda C; Morais, Christudas

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) and/or evidence of kidney damage (typically manifested as albuminuria) for at least 3 months, has become one of the fastest-growing public health concerns worldwide. CKD is characterized by reduced clearance and increased serum accumulation of metabolic waste products (uremic retention solutes). At least 152 uremic retention solutes have been reported. This review focuses on indoxyl sulphate (IS), a protein-bound, tryptophan-derived metabolite that is generated by intestinal micro-organisms (microbiota). Animal studies have demonstrated an association between IS accumulation and increased fibrosis, and oxidative stress. This has been mirrored by in vitro studies, many of which report cytotoxic effects in kidney proximal tubular cells following IS exposure. Clinical studies have associated IS accumulation with deleterious effects, such as kidney functional decline and adverse cardiovascular events, although causality has not been conclusively established. The aims of this review are to: (i) establish factors associated with increased serum accumulation of IS; (ii) report effects of IS accumulation in clinical studies; (iii) critique the reported effects of IS in the kidney, when administered both in vivo and in vitro; and (iv) summarize both established and hypothetical therapeutic options for reducing serum IS or antagonizing its reported downstream effects in the kidney.

  3. [CKD-MBD (Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder). Effect of vitamin D on kidney and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hideki

    2010-07-01

    Recently, many investigators have reported that treatment with vitamin D improves outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease. Though the detailed mechanisms have remained unclear, it has been speculated that such a treatment may prevent progression of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that Vitamin D may attenuate renal injury and ameliorate renal function and proteinuria. In addition, several studies have shown that vitamin D may prevent progression of atherosclerosis, vascular calcification and left ventricular hypertrophy. The emerging experimental and clinical evidence has suggested that vitamin D may protect kidney and cardiovascular system.

  4. Cardiovascular disease and its relationship with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Li, X-C; Lu, L; Cao, Y; Sun, R-R; Chen, S; Zhang, P-Y

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death, is mostly precipitated by cardiometabolic risk and chronic kidney disease (CKD). CVD and kidney disease are closely interrelated and disease of one organ cause dysfunction of the other, ultimately leading to the failure of both organs. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at much higher risk of mortality due to CVD. Traditional CVD risk factors viz., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes do not account for the high cardiovascular risk in CKD patients and also standard clinical interventions for managing CVD that are successful in the general population, are ineffective to lower the death rate in CKD patients. Nontraditional factors, related to disturbed mineral and vitamin D metabolism were able to provide some explanation in terms of vascular calcification, for the increased risk of CVD in CKD. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23, a bone-derived hormone that regulates vitamin D synthesis in renal proximal tubules and renal phosphate reabsorption, has been suggested to be the missing link between CKD and CVD. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is strongly related to the progress of CVD and its early diagnosis and treatment has significant positive effect on the outcomes of CVD in the affected patients. Besides this, non-dialysable protein-bound uraemic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, produced by colonic microbes from dietary amino acids, appear to cause renal dysfunction. Thus, therapeutic approaches targeting colonic microbiota, have led to new prospects in early intervention for CKD patients. Intervention targets for preventing CVD events in CKD patients ideally should include control of blood pressure and dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, lowering proteinuria, correction of anemia, management of mineral metabolism abnormalities and life style changes including smoking cessation, decreased consumption of salt, and achievement of normal body mass index. Use of β-blockers, renin

  5. [Chronic kidney diseases do not always pass unnoticed].

    PubMed

    Alves, Cyrielle; Pruijma, Menno; Rotman, Samuel; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-02-24

    Kidney diseases are frequent, but most of the time, they develop unnoticed. This paucity of symptoms may lead to delayed diagnosis with important consequences on their outcome. Nevertheless, specific systemic signs such as skin lesions, joint pain or electrolytes disturbances may sometimes alert the clinician and direct the diagnosis to an underlying nephropathy. A high awareness of clinicians is warranted to recognize these red flags and diagnose these diseases early, as illustrated by two clinical cases discussed in this article.

  6. Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofang; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2013-01-01

    Increased levels of 3’–5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) stimulate cell proliferation and fluid secretion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Since hydrolytic capacity of phosphodiesterases (PDE) far exceeds maximum rate of synthesis by adenylyl cyclases (AC), cellular levels of cAMP are more sensitive to PDE inhibition than to AC activity changes. We have used enzymatic, western blot, immunohistochemistry, PCR and biochemical assays to study activity and expression of PDE families and isoforms and expression of downstream effectors of cAMP signaling in wildtype and PKD rat and mouse kidneys. The results indicate: 1) Species specific differences in PDE expression; higher PDE activity in kidneys from mice compared to rats; higher contribution of PDE1, relative to PDE4 and PDE3, to total PDE activity of kidney lysate and lower PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 activities in murine cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. 2) Reduced levels of several PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 proteins despite mRNA upregulation, possibly due to increased protein degradation. 3) Increased cGMP levels in polycystic kidneys, suggesting in vivo downregulation of PDE1 activity. 4) Additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and cGMP on cystogenesis in vitro. 5) Upregulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) subunits Iα and IIβ, PKare, CREB-1 mRNA, and CREM, ATF-1 and ICER proteins in cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. In summary, the results of this study suggest that alterations in cyclic nucleotide catabolism may render the cystic epithelium particularly susceptible to factors acting on Gs coupled receptors, account at least in part for the upregulation of cyclic nucleotide signaling in PKD, and contribute substantially to the progression of this disease. PMID:19924104

  7. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Sch. Agustsdottir, Inger M.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Edvardsson, Vidar O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. Study Design An observational cohort study. Setting & Participants All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Outcomes Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD and kidney failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in eGFR. Measurements Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Results Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were female and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6–67.9) years. The median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0–31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 patients (55%) and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3–5, including 11 patients (21%) with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 patients (62%) had had kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stage 3–5. Of the 14 (26%) patients with CKD stage 5, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 patients (55%). The median eGFR slope was −0.38 (range, −21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in patients receiving treatment with xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and −5.74 (range, −75.8 to −0.10) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (p=0.001). Limitations Use of observational registry data. Conclusions Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, while nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. PMID:26724837

  8. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  9. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  10. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  11. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  12. Clinical outcomes of chronic kidney disease patients treated with everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES).

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Lisa; Shimohama, Takao; Ikeda, Yuki; Namba, Sayaka; Hashikata, Takehiro; Kameda, Ryo; Sato, Nobuhiro; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Tojo, Taiki; Ako, Junya

    2015-05-01

    The target lesion revascularization of paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) has been reported to be lower than that of sirolimus-eluting stents in patients on hemodialysis (HD). However, the comparison of PES and second generation drug-eluting stents in CKD patients has not been fully investigated. We compared clinical outcomes of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and PES in CKD patients. Hundred and forty seven CKD patients (eGFR<60mLmin(-1)1.73m(-2)) treated with PES (n=74, from May 2007 to December 2009) and EES (n=73, from January 2010 to January 2013) were enrolled in the study. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) were defined as death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and ischemia driven target lesion revascularization. The incidence of 36-month MACE was significantly lower in EES, non-HD group compared to PES, non HD group (0% in EES group and 13.5% in PES group, respectively, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in MACE between EES and PES in HD patients (5.4% in PES group and 5.5% in EES group, P=0.98). In multivariate analysis, PES group and PES ISR were independent factors for worse incidence of MACE. In CKD patients, PES was associated with worse clinical outcomes in non-HD patients as compared with EES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  14. Women, kidney disease, and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrew; Radovic, Milan; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-09-01

    Several glomerular diseases may occur in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in such patients should be planned when the disease has been in remission for a minimum of 6 months to minimize maternal and fetal complications. Immunosuppressive agents should be optimized before conception to include those that are safe for pregnancy. The complexity of medical management when caring for these patients calls for a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of a nephrologist, rheumatologist, obstetrician, and pharmacist. This review will address the physiological changes of pregnancy that may affect glomerular disease presentation, activity, and diagnosis; specific glomerular diseases primary and secondary to systemic diseases in the context of pregnancy; fetal and maternal complications and long-term effects; diagnosis and differential diagnosis; and treatment strategies that are considered relatively safe with respect to fetal intrauterine exposure.

  15. Barriers to successful care for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Oliver; Mekala, Durga P; Patel, Daniel V; Fornoni, Alessia; Metz, David; Roth, David

    2005-01-01

    Background The National Kidney Foundation has formulated clinical practice guidelines for patients with chronic kidney disease (K/DOQI). However, little is know about how many patients actually achieve these goals in a dedicated clinic for chronic kidney disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 198 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and determined whether K/DOQI goals were met for calcium, phosphate, calcium-phosphate product, parathyroid hormone, albumin, bicarbonate, hemoglobin, lipids, and blood pressure. Results We found that only a small number of patients achieved K/DOQI targets. Recent referral to the nephrologist, failure to attend scheduled clinic appointments, African American ethnicity, diabetes, and advanced renal failure were significant predictors of low achievement of K/DOQI goals. Conclusion We conclude that raising awareness of chronic kidney disease and K/DOQI goals among primary care providers, early referral to a nephrologist, the exploration of socioeconomic barriers and cultural differences, and both patient and physician education are critical to improve CKD care in patients with Stage 4 and 5 CKD. PMID:16250919

  16. Chronic kidney disease in children with unilateral renal tumor.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Denis A; Ceccanti, Silvia; Frediani, Simone; Schiavetti, Amalia; Cozzi, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    In patients who have undergone nephrectomy lower stage chronic kidney disease may develop, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. We investigated whether the prevalence of lower stage chronic kidney disease is related to the amount of renal parenchyma excised in children with unilateral renal tumor. A total of 15 patients treated with nephrectomy and 10 treated with nephron sparing surgery were enrolled at a single academic center. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines were used to classify patients by chronic kidney disease stage based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation and Schwartz equation were used in patients older and younger than 17 years, respectively. At a mean followup of more than 12 years 8 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and 1 treated with bilateral nephron sparing surgery presented with stage II chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Sequential measurements from diagnosis to 12 to 17 years postoperatively showed that stage II chronic kidney disease in patients who had undergone nephrectomy manifested as a negligible postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.7 ± 25.5 vs 79.4 ± 3.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.6). Five of the 8 patients presented with stage II chronic kidney disease even before nephrectomy. The other 7 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and those treated with nephron sparing surgery presented with a significant postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (81.1 ± 24 vs 102.3 ± 3 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.02, and 88.7 ± 2 vs 107.4 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.005, respectively). A subset of children with unilateral renal tumor presents before and/or after nephrectomy, and not after nephron sparing surgery, with stage II chronic kidney disease, probably due to a reduced renal

  17. Clinical utility of PKD2 mutation testing in a polycystic kidney disease cohort attending a specialist nephrology out-patient clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ADPKD affects approximately 1:1000 of the worldwide population. It is caused by mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Although allelic variation has some influence on disease severity, genic effects are strong, with PKD2 mutations predicting later onset of ESRF by up to 20 years. We therefore screened a cohort of ADPKD patients attending a nephrology out-patient clinic for PKD2 mutations, to identify factors that can be used to offer targeted gene testing and to provide patients with improved prognostic information. Methods 142 consecutive individuals presenting to a hospital nephrology out-patient service with a diagnosis of ADPKD and CKD stage 4 or less were screened for mutations in PKD2, following clinical evaluation and provision of a detailed family history (FH). Results PKD2 mutations were identified in one fifth of cases. 12% of non-PKD2 patients progressed to ESRF during this study whilst none with a PKD2 mutation did (median 38.5 months of follow-up, range 16–88 months, p < 0.03). A significant difference was found in age at ESRF of affected family members (non-PKD2 vs. PKD2, 54 yrs vs. 65 yrs; p < 0.0001). No PKD2 mutations were identified in patients with a FH of ESRF occurring before age 50 yrs, whereas a PKD2 mutation was predicted by a positive FH without ESRF. Conclusions PKD2 testing has a clinically significant detection rate in the pre-ESRF population. It did not accurately distinguish those individuals with milder renal disease defined by stage of CKD but did identify a group less likely to progress to ESRF. When used with detailed FH, it offers useful prognostic information for individuals and their families. It can therefore be offered to all but those whose relatives have developed ESRF before age 50. PMID:22863349

  18. Averting the legacy of kidney disease--focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of chronic kidney disease later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced chronic kidney disease in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplant, whereas only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  19. Chronic kidney Disease and the Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Marcello; Riellae, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing. George Bernard Shaw The proportion of older people in the general population is steadily increasing worldwide, with the most rapid growth in low-and middle-income countries [1]. This demographic change is to be celebrated, because it is the consequence of socioeconomic development and better life expectancy. However, population aging also has important implications for society - in diverse areas including health systems, labor markets, public policy, social programs, and family dynamics [2]. A successful response to the aging population will require capitalizing on the opportunities that this transition offers, as well as effectively addressing its challenges. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem that is characterized by poor health outcomes and very high health care costs. CKD is a major risk multiplier in patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke - all of which are key causes of death and disability in older people [3]. Since the prevalence of CKD is higher in older people, the health impact of population aging will depend in part on how the kidney community responds. March 13, 2014 will mark the celebration of the 9th World Kidney Day (WKD), an annual event jointly sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. The topic for WKD 2014 is "CKD in older people". This article reviews the key links between kidney function, age, health and illness - and discusses the implications of the aging population for the care of people with CKD.

  20. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  1. Dengue-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Nayer, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A mosquito-borne viral illness highly prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, dengue is considered a major global health threat by the World Health Organization. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. An RNA virus from the genus Flavivirus, dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes aegypti,the yellow fever mosquito. Dengue is asymptomatic in as many as one half of infected individuals. Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness accompanied by constitutional symptoms. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are the severe forms of dengue infection.Dengue infection has been associated with a variety of renal disorders. Acute renal failure is a potential complication of severe dengue infection and is typically associated with hypotension, rhabdomyolysis, or hemolysis. Acute renal failure complicates severe dengue infection in 2-5% of the cases and carries a high mortality rate. Proteinuria has been detected in as high as 74% of patients with severe dengue infection. Hematuria has been reported in up to 12.5% of patients. Various types of glomerulonephritis have been reported during or shortly after dengue infection in humans and mouse models of dengue infection. Mesangial proliferation and immune complex deposition are the dominant histologic features of dengue-associated glomerulonephritis. On a rare occasion, dengue infection is associated with systemic autoimmune disorders involving the kidneys. In the vast majority of cases, dengue infection and associated renal disorders are self-limited.

  2. Recurrent Cholangitis in a Patient with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) and Caroli's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Hoshino, Junichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sekine, Akinari; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Imafuku, Aya; Kawada, Masahiro; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Tsunao; Takaichi, Kenmei

    We herein present a rare case of an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patient with Caroli's disease, a congenital embryonic biliary tree ductal plate abnormality often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. A 76-year-old woman with ADPKD on hemodialysis was admitted to our hospital with recurrent cholangitis and hepatobiliary stones. Caroli's disease was diagnosed according to typical imaging findings of cystic intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and the central dot sign. Hepatobiliary system abnormalities such as Caroli's disease should be considered in febrile ADPKD patients, even in the absence of typical clinical signs or symptoms.

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical feasibility to large multi-center studies Funding Process Tips for applicants; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for ...

  4. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical feasibility to large multi-center studies Funding Process Tips for applicants; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for ...

  5. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... clinical feasibility to large multi-center studies Funding Process Tips for applicants; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for ...

  6. Determining the Optimal Protocol for Measuring an Albuminuria Class Transition in Clinical Trials in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kröpelin, Tobias F; de Zeeuw, Dick; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Bilous, Rudy; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Heerspink, Hiddo J L

    2016-11-01

    Albuminuria class transition (normo- to micro- to macroalbuminuria) is used as an intermediate end point to assess renoprotective drug efficacy. However, definitions of such class transition vary between trials. To determine the most optimal protocol, we evaluated the approaches used in four clinical trials testing the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system intervention on albuminuria class transition in patients with diabetes: the BENEDICT, the DIRECT, the ALTITUDE, and the IRMA-2 Trial. The definition of albuminuria class transition used in each trial differed from the definitions used in the other trials by the number (one, two, or three) of consecutively collected urine samples at each study visit, the time interval between study visits, the requirement of an additional visit to confirm the class transition, and the requirement of a percentage increase in albuminuria from baseline in addition to the class transition. In Cox regression analysis, neither increasing the number of urine samples collected at a single study visit nor differences in the other variables used to define albuminuria class transition altered the average drug effect. However, the SEM of the treatment effect increased (decreased precision) with stricter end point definitions, resulting in a loss of statistical significance. In conclusion, the optimal albuminuria transition end point for use in drug intervention trials can be determined with a single urine collection for albuminuria assessment per study visit. A confirmation of the end point or a requirement of a minimal percentage change in albuminuria from baseline seems unnecessary. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Has ... and what parents can do to help. Treating Kidney Diseases Treatment begins with dietary changes and medicines. ...

  8. Kidney Disease and Diabetes - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease and Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Winter ... family are at risk for kidney disease or diabetes—conditions that affect millions of Americans. Photo courtesy ...

  9. Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167715.html Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat And, the ... abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests. Chronic kidney disease can as much as double a patient's risk ...

  10. 1 in 7 Americans Has Kidney Disease: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_166431.html 1 in 7 Americans Has Kidney Disease: CDC Statistics should serve as a 'warning bell,' ... HealthDay News) -- Thirty million American adults have chronic kidney disease -- but many don't know it. That rate -- ...

  11. [Treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Torra, Roser

    2014-01-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent hereditary kidney disease. However it lacks a specific treatment. Its prevalence is 1/800 and causes the need for renal replacement therapy in 8-10% of patients on dialysis or kidney transplant. It is caused by mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 genes, which cause a series of alterations in the polycystic cells, which have become therapeutic targets. There are many molecules that are being tested to counteract the alterations of these therapeutic targets. There are studies in all phases of research, from phase i to phase iv. Some of the molecules being tested are tolvaptan, mTOR inhibitors and, among many other, somatostatin analogues. These drugs are extensively reviewed in this article. Based on the accumulated experience the primary objective of the trials is the slowing of the increase in renal volume. Yet other renal end points such as renal function and hypertension are necessary. It is expected that in the coming years we can have specific, well tolerated, effective and affordable drugs for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  12. Dengue-associated kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    J Lizarraga, Karlo; Nayer, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: A mosquito-borne viral illness highly prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, dengue is considered a major global health threat by the World Health Organization. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results: An RNA virus from the genus Flavivirus, dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes aegypti,the yellow fever mosquito. Dengue is asymptomatic in as many as one half of infected individuals. Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness accompanied by constitutional symptoms. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are the severe forms of dengue infection.Dengue infection has been associated with a variety of renal disorders. Acute renal failure is a potential complication of severe dengue infection and is typically associated with hypotension, rhabdomyolysis, or hemolysis. Acute renal failure complicates severe dengue infection in 2-5% of the cases and carries a high mortality rate. Proteinuria has been detected in as high as 74% of patients with severe dengue infection. Hematuria has been reported in up to 12.5% of patients. Various types of glomerulonephritis have been reported during or shortly after dengue infection in humans and mouse models of dengue infection. Mesangial proliferation and immune complex deposition are the dominant histologic features of dengue-associated glomerulonephritis. On a rare occasion, dengue infection is associated with systemic autoimmune disorders involving the kidneys. Conclusions: In the vast majority of cases, dengue infection and associated renal disorders are self-limited. PMID:24772398

  13. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  14. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  15. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  16. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  17. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Transplant Recipients After Kidney Transplantation: A Single-center Experience.

    PubMed

    Illesy, L; Kovács, D Á; Szabó, R P; Asztalos, A B L; Nemes, B

    2017-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is indicated for end-stage renal disease. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) causes structural degeneration of the kidney and eventually becomes end-stage renal disease. ADPKD patients usually have several renal and nonrenal complications. We analyzed our kidney transplantation activities between 1991 and 2010 regarding ADPKD. We followed up with patients to December 31, 2016. Data were collected as patient and graft survival rates, the prevalence of polycystic manifestation of the gastrointestinal tract and other organs, and the attendance of urinary tract infection. Among the 734 kidney transplantations, 10.9% (n = 80) had an ADPKD. Four patients (5%) had diverticulum perforation. The prevalence of post-transplantation urinary tract infection was higher in ADPKD patients (55.9%) compared to non-ADPKD patients (44.1%). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates in ADPKD recipients versus non-ADPKD patients are 77.5%, 70.0%, and 67.5% versus 86.4%, 83.0%, and 80.1%, respectively. Patients with ADPKD were transplanted at an elder age compared to others (median: 47.5 years vs. 39.9 years). Female patients had longer graft survival times than males. ADPKD implies multiple cystic degeneration of the kidneys; however, it can cause structural degeneration in other organs. It is typical for ADPKD patients to have an acute abdominal-like syndrome. Immunosuppressive drugs can hide the clinical picture, which makes early diagnosis difficult. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiple kidney cysts in thin basement membrane disease with proteinuria and kidney function impairment

    PubMed Central

    Sevillano, Angel M.; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Hernandez, Eduardo; Molina, Maria; Gonzalez, Ester; Praga, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Some patients with thin basement membrane disease (TBMD) develop proteinuria, hypertension and different degrees of CKD, besides the persistent microhaematuria characteristic of the disease. Little is known about factors associated with this unfavourable outcome. Methods We reviewed clinical, pathological and radiological features of 32 patients with biopsy-proven TBMD. Patients were divided in two groups: those with persistent normal kidney function and negative or minimal proteinuria (n = 16) and those with persistent proteinuria >0.5 g/day (n = 16). Results Patients with proteinuria had a worse kidney function at baseline than those with negative proteinuria. Global or segmental glomerulosclerosis, together with interstitial fibrosis, was found in 37% of patients with proteinuria. All proteinuric patients were treated with renin–angiotensin system blockers. At the end of follow-up (198 months in proteinuric patients and 210 months in patients with negative proteinuria) the prevalence of hypertension was 68% in proteinuric patients (12% at baseline), compared with 12 and 6%, respectively, in non-proteinuric patients. A slow decline of renal function was observed in proteinuric patients, although no patient developed end-stage kidney disease. Ultrasound studies showed bilateral kidney cysts in nine patients (56%) with proteinuria. Cysts were bilateral and countless in six patients, and bilateral but with a limited number of cysts in the three remaining patients. No cysts were found in patients with negative proteinuria. Conclusions Some patients with TBMD develop hypertension, proteinuria and CKD. Multiple bilateral kidney cysts were found in a majority (56%) of these patients. Further studies are needed to investigate the pathogenesis and the influence on long-term outcome of this TBMD-associated multiple kidney cysts. PMID:25852885

  19. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD.

  20. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  1. [Diabetic nephropathy/diabetic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Boucek, P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which belongs to the triad of diabetic microvascular complications, is currently the main cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. DKD usually simultaneously leads to a deteriorated long-term control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure, and to the development of diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and atherosclerotic complications, which are the main causes of patients' mortality. Screening of the initial stages of DKD is to be based on the detection of increased albumin leak into the urine, microalbuminuria, and the reduction of renal function by means of estimates of glomerular filtration rate based on the serum creatinine level. The main objective of the prophylactic and treatment measures is to prevent the onset of DKD, or at least to stop its transition into an irreversible, progressive stage characterised by a permanent, often nephrotic proteinuria. The basic procedures in the prevention and treatment of DKD are maintaining the optimal metabolic control of diabetes and intensive hypertension treatment based on the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Reaching the stage of progressive renal insufficiency (serum creatinine level approximately > or = 200 micromol/l) is an indication for further follow-up in the nephrology department, which will then take the necessary preparatory measures for dialysis treatment. The optimal method of kidney function replacement for patients with DKD is kidney transplantation, or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  2. Fournier’s gangrene associated with chronic kidney disease in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Park, Hye-Mi; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A dog was diagnosed with Fournier’s gangrene associated with chronic kidney disease. Clinical features included crepitant scrotal inflammation that spread to the penis; the lesion exhibited liquefactive necrosis or purulent moist gangrene. This is the first description of Fournier’s gangrene associated with chronic kidney disease in a dog. PMID:27708443

  3. 75 FR 47309 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies Review Meeting. Date: September 1... Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases...

  4. Effect of pegloticase on renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease: a post hoc subgroup analysis of 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yood, Robert A; Ottery, Faith D; Irish, William; Wolfson, Marsha

    2014-01-21

    Pegloticase is approved in the US for treatment of refractory chronic gout. Since chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in these patients, we conducted a post-hoc analysis of 2 replicate phase 3 trials and the subsequent open-label extension study to determine the effects of pegloticase on renal function in patients with CKD stages 3 and 4, as well as the effects of renal dysfunction on pegloticase efficacy and safety. Patients with renal insufficiency were randomized to pegloticase 8 mg every 2 weeks (n = 42), pegloticase 8 mg every 4 weeks (n = 41), or placebo (n = 20) for 6 months as defined by the study protocols. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). All patients completing the randomized trials could participate in an open-label extension study for a further 2.5 years. Uric acid response, the primary end point in the trials, was plasma uric acid <6.0 mg/dl for 80% of months 3 and 6.Mean eGFR in both pegloticase dosing cohorts remained constant over the randomized treatment phase and long-term open-label extension study. The number of patients achieving uric acid response was similar across CKD stages (32% stage 1, 23% stage 2, 35% stage 3, and 39% stage 4, respectively, P = 0.3). There was no difference in the pegloticase safety profile based on CKD stage. Pegloticase treatment does not impact eGFR in CKD patients and response to pegloticase is independent of CKD stage. Clinical trial identifier: NCT00325195.

  5. Effect of pegloticase on renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease: a post hoc subgroup analysis of 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pegloticase is approved in the US for treatment of refractory chronic gout. Since chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in these patients, we conducted a post-hoc analysis of 2 replicate phase 3 trials and the subsequent open-label extension study to determine the effects of pegloticase on renal function in patients with CKD stages 3 and 4, as well as the effects of renal dysfunction on pegloticase efficacy and safety. Findings Patients with renal insufficiency were randomized to pegloticase 8 mg every 2 weeks (n = 42), pegloticase 8 mg every 4 weeks (n = 41), or placebo (n = 20) for 6 months as defined by the study protocols. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). All patients completing the randomized trials could participate in an open-label extension study for a further 2.5 years. Uric acid response, the primary end point in the trials, was plasma uric acid <6.0 mg/dl for 80% of months 3 and 6. Mean eGFR in both pegloticase dosing cohorts remained constant over the randomized treatment phase and long-term open-label extension study. The number of patients achieving uric acid response was similar across CKD stages (32% stage 1, 23% stage 2, 35% stage 3, and 39% stage 4, respectively, P = 0.3). There was no difference in the pegloticase safety profile based on CKD stage. Conclusions Pegloticase treatment does not impact eGFR in CKD patients and response to pegloticase is independent of CKD stage. Trial registration Clinical trial identifier: NCT00325195 PMID:24447425

  6. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton.

  7. Tear drops of kidney: a historical overview of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Balat, Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Polycystic kidneydisease (PKD) is one of the most common inheritedkidneydiseases causing end stage renal disease. Although it has been in existence with humanity, it was defined in 18th century. The most detailed observations on PKD have been written after the disease of Stephen Bathory, the King of Poland. He had fatigue and chest pain accompanied by unconsciousness within a few days after a hunting trip, and died within 9 days, at the age of 53 years in 1586. Surgeon Jan Zigulitz described the cysts in his kidneys as large like those of a bull, with an uneven and bumpy surface during the mummification. Based on available information, 347 years later, a group of physicians and historians in Krakow concluded that the probable cause of Kings death was PKD and uremia. Unfortunately, PKD did not attracted the interest of physicians until the 18th century. In late 18th century, Matthew Baillie noted that these vesicular cysts in kidney were different from hydatid cysts, and described them as "false hydatids of kidney". In 1888, Flix Lejars used the term of "polycystic kidney" for the first time, and stressed that these cysts were bilateral, and causing clinically identifiable symptoms. At the end of 19th century, the basic clinical signs, and genetic basis of the disease have been better defined. However, the inheritance pattern could only be understood long years later. In this study, the history of PKD, i.e., the tear drops (cysts) of kidney will try to be explained by the light of old and current knowledge.

  8. Chronic kidney disease and premature ageing.

    PubMed

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Kotanko, Peter; Schols, Annemie M W J; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) shares many phenotypic similarities with other chronic diseases, including heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis. The most apparent similarity is premature ageing, involving accelerated vascular disease and muscle wasting. We propose that in addition to a sedentary lifestyle and psychosocial and socioeconomic determinants, four major disease-induced mechanisms underlie premature ageing in CKD: an increase in allostatic load, activation of the 'stress resistance response', activation of age-promoting mechanisms and impairment of anti-ageing pathways. The most effective current interventions to modulate premature ageing-treatment of the underlying disease, optimal nutrition, correction of the internal environment and exercise training-reduce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress and induce muscle anabolism. Deeper mechanistic insight into the phenomena of premature ageing as well as early diagnosis of CKD might improve the application and efficacy of these interventions and provide novel leads to combat muscle wasting and vascular impairment in chronic diseases.

  9. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Simon DS; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury – a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context. PMID:27822135

  10. New treatments for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Yang; Ong, Albert C M

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disease and results from mutations in PKD1 or PKD2. Cyst initiation and expansion arise from a combination of abnormal cell proliferation, fluid secretion and extracellular matrix defects and results in kidney enlargement and interstitial fibrosis. Since its first description over 200 years ago, ADPKD has been considered an untreatable condition and its management is limited to blood pressure reduction and symptomatic treatment of disease complications. Results of the recently reported TEMPO 3/4 trial thus represent a paradigm shift in demonstrating for the first time that cystic disease and loss of renal function can be slowed in humans. In this paper, we review the major therapeutic strategies currently being explored in ADPKD including a range of novel approaches in preclinical models. It is anticipated that the clinical management of ADPKD will undergo a revolution in the next decade with the translation of new treatments into routine clinical use. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Histopathology of kidney disease in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1956-01-01

    Kidney disease is one of the most puzzling fish diseases known to exist in the United States. In less than Io years it has invaded the Pacific Northwest, exacting a heavy toll of hatchery salmon. Its first appearance apparently was in Massachusetts where Belding and Merrill' described a disease similar to that now seen on the Pacific Coast. In I946 it was diagnosed in Washington2 and since that time has been observed in an ever increasing number of hatcheries. There are unpublished reports of the same or similar diseases in both California and Washington in the early I93o's.3 The latest outbreaks occurred in the Federal hatcheries at Berlin, New Hampshire, and Cortland, New York, in brook, brown, and rainbow trout.4 There is evidence to indicate that the disease may be much more widely spread in New York State.5 The disease is especially dangerous since little is known of the origin or source of the causative agent. Indeed, the classification of the diplobacillus associated with kidney disease is still uncertain. Thus, with our present knowledge, it is difficult or impossible to eradicate the malady from an infected hatchery. Histopathologic studies were undertaken to clarify the pathology of the disease and to compare the eastern form with the western form.

  12. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  13. Phosphate Additive Avoidance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    St-Jules, David E; Goldfarb, David S; Pompeii, Mary Lou; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2017-05-01

    IN BRIEF Dietary guidelines for patients with diabetes extend beyond glycemic management to include recommendations for mitigating chronic disease risk. This review summarizes the literature suggesting that excess dietary phosphorus intake may increase the risk of skeletal and cardiovascular disease in patients who are in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) despite having normal serum phosphorus concentrations. It explores strategies for limiting dietary phosphorus, emphasizing that food additives, as a major source of highly bioavailable dietary phosphorus, may be a suitable target. Although the evidence for restricting phosphorus-based food additives in early CKD is limited, diabetes clinicians should monitor ongoing research aimed at assessing its efficacy.

  14. Modeling Kidney Disease with iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells that have been transcriptionally reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state. iPSCs are a renewable source of diverse somatic cell types and tissues matching the original patient, including nephron-like kidney organoids. iPSCs have been derived representing several kidney disorders, such as ADPKD, ARPKD, Alport syndrome, and lupus nephritis, with the goals of generating replacement tissue and 'disease in a dish' laboratory models. Cellular defects in iPSCs and derived kidney organoids provide functional, personalized biomarkers, which can be correlated with genetic and clinical information. In proof of principle, disease-specific phenotypes have been described in iPSCs and ESCs with mutations linked to polycystic kidney disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In addition, these cells can be used to model nephrotoxic chemical injury. Recent advances in directed differentiation and CRISPR genome editing enable more specific iPSC models and present new possibilities for diagnostics, disease modeling, therapeutic screens, and tissue regeneration using human cells. This review outlines growth opportunities and design strategies for this rapidly expanding and evolving field.

  15. Modeling Kidney Disease with iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells that have been transcriptionally reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state. iPSCs are a renewable source of diverse somatic cell types and tissues matching the original patient, including nephron-like kidney organoids. iPSCs have been derived representing several kidney disorders, such as ADPKD, ARPKD, Alport syndrome, and lupus nephritis, with the goals of generating replacement tissue and ‘disease in a dish’ laboratory models. Cellular defects in iPSCs and derived kidney organoids provide functional, personalized biomarkers, which can be correlated with genetic and clinical information. In proof of principle, disease-specific phenotypes have been described in iPSCs and ESCs with mutations linked to polycystic kidney disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In addition, these cells can be used to model nephrotoxic chemical injury. Recent advances in directed differentiation and CRISPR genome editing enable more specific iPSC models and present new possibilities for diagnostics, disease modeling, therapeutic screens, and tissue regeneration using human cells. This review outlines growth opportunities and design strategies for this rapidly expanding and evolving field. PMID:26740740

  16. Antiphospholipid syndrome and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Canaud, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is a common autoimmune disease caused by pathogenic antiphospholipid antibodies, leading to recurrent thrombosis and/or obstetrical complications. Importantly for nephrologists, antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with various renal manifestations including large renal vessel thrombosis, renal artery stenosis, and a constellation of intrarenal lesions that has been termed antiphospholipid nephropathy. This last condition associates various degrees of acute thrombotic microangiopathy, proliferative and fibrotic lesions of the intrarenal vessels, and ischemic modifications of the renal parenchyma. The course of the disease can range from indolent nephropathy to devastating acute renal failure. The pejorative impact of antiphospholipid antibody-related renal complication is well established in the context of systemic lupus erythematous or after renal transplantation. In contrast, the exact significance of isolated antiphospholipid nephropathy remains uncertain. The evidence to guide management of the renal complications of antiphospholipid syndrome is limited. However, the recent recognition of the heterogeneous molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of intrarenal vascular lesions in antiphospholipid syndrome have opened promising tracks for patient monitoring and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  17. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Huber, Tobias B; Edelstein, Charles L; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy.

  18. Ghrelin and cachexia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Nakamura, Norifumi; Inui, Akio

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue and a potent orexigenic factor that stimulates feeding by interacting with hypothalamic feeding-regulatory nuclei. Its multifaceted effects are potentially beneficial as a treatment in human disease states. In both adult and pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, decreased appetite plays a major role in wasting, which in turn is linked to morbidity and mortality; wasting has also been linked to high levels of leptin and proinflammatory cytokines. The beneficial effects of ghrelin treatment in CKD are potentially mediated by multiple concurrent actions, including the stimulation of appetite-regulating centers, anti-inflammatory effects, and direct kidney effects. Further evaluation of this appetite-regulating hormone in CKD is needed to confirm previous findings and to determine the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Polycystic kidney disease in a Chartreux cat.

    PubMed

    Volta, Antonella; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Gelati, Aldo; Bertoni, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in cats. It has been widely described in Persians and Persian-related cats and sporadically in other breeds. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the first reported case of PKD in a 12-year-old female Chartreux cat. The cat was referred with polyuria and polydipsia and enlarged and irregular kidneys at palpation. Multiple renal cysts and a single liver cyst were identified by ultrasound and the inherited pattern was confirmed by genetic test (polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP) assay). Chartreux cats should be included in the screening programme of PKD, and PKD should be always considered as a possible cause of chronic renal failure in this breed.

  20. Stroke in adult polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M.; Gonzalo, A.; Gobernado, J. M.; Orte, L.; Quereda, C.; Ortuño, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence of acute cerebrovascular events, 142 patients with adult polycystic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients (9.8%) had 19 cerebral attacks. Six patients (4.2%) had intracranial haemorrhage attacks (three ruptured intracranial aneurysms and three cerebral haemorrhages). Ischaemic events occurred in nine patients (five cerebral infarctions and four transient ischaemic attacks). Patients with ischaemic attacks had a better outcome than patients with haemorrhagic events even when transient ischaemic attacks were excluded. Patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were younger. Cerebral complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with adult polycystic kidney disease. They can prove disabling prior to or after dialysis and transplantation. PMID:1480536

  1. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury - pathophysiological basis and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, E V; Barasch, J; Budde, K; Westhoff, T; Schmidt-Ott, K M

    2017-03-01

    Various biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been discovered and characterized in the recent past. These molecules can be detected in urine or blood and signify structural damage to the kidney. Clinically, they are proposed as adjunct diagnostics to serum creatinine and urinary output to improve the early detection, differential diagnosis and prognostic assessment of AKI. The most obvious requirements for a biomarker include its reflection of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. Hence, a biomarker of AKI should derive from the injured kidney and reflect a molecular process intimately connected with tissue injury. Here, we provide an overview of the basic pathophysiology, the cellular sources and the clinical performance of the most important currently proposed biomarkers of AKI: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), interleukin-18 (IL-18), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) and calprotectin (S100A8/9). We also acknowledge each biomarker's advantages and disadvantages as well as important knowledge gaps and perspectives for future studies.

  2. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: is the treatment for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent Mendelian inherited disorder. It covers 6.1% of incident ESRD patients in France in 2011. Long left untreated, this disease will soon benefit from targeted therapies currently under evaluation. Several molecules have already reached the stage of clinical trials: the evaluation of mTOR inhibitors yielded deceiving results and, more recently, 2 different molecules demonstrated a slight impact on the progression of total kidney volume (TKV): tolvaptan, vasopressin receptor-V2 inhibitor and somatostatin analogues; both of these molecules acting throughout the decrease of intracellular AMPc. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the signaling pathways involved, then to present both the published and ongoing clinical trials and the promising molecules evaluated in murine models.

  3. Fatigue in chronic kidney disease: Definition, assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zalai, Dora; Bohra, Miqdad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue--an overwhelming subjective feeling of mental or physical exhaustion--impacts patients' everyday functioning and quality of life, delays recovery after hemodialysis, and increases mortality. There are a number of factors that may perpetuate clinically significant fatigue among individuals with chronic kidney disease, including sleep disorders, depression, sedentary lifestyle, anemia, and chronic inflammation. Some of these factors (i.e., anemia and inflammation) are in the forefront of clinical attention, whereas the other contributing factors often remain unrecognized. This article provides a pragmatic overview of the definition, assessment, maintaining factors, and management of fatigue in chronic kidney disease. Given that chronic fatigue is a major determinant of patients' quality of life, nurses can bring about a fundamental improvement in patients' well-being if they recognize the most common fatigue-perpetuating factors and facilitate fatigue management interventions.

  4. [Pathophysiology of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Magdalena; Jędras, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is both an important cause and consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is present in 80-85% of the patients. The article summarizes the main pathogenetic factors of hypertension in CKD such as: sodium retention, increased activity the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis and endothelium-mediated vasodilatation, oxidative stress, disorders of calcium metabolism and parathyroid hormone secretion, vascular calcification and increased arterial stiffness.

  5. Chronic kidney disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Prabir Kumar; Bradley, John R

    2007-01-01

    It has been estimated that chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects about one in 200 of the population in the UK. There is an increased awareness of the need to identify patients in primary care with CKD at an earlier stage, so that treatments can be initiated to delay progression and prevent complications and appropriate nephrological referral can be made. In this article we will review how measures to identify patients with CKD can improve its management. PMID:17197687

  6. Effect of Patiromer on Serum Potassium Level in Patients With Hyperkalemia and Diabetic Kidney Disease: The AMETHYST-DN Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bakris, George L; Pitt, Bertram; Weir, Matthew R; Freeman, Mason W; Mayo, Martha R; Garza, Dahlia; Stasiv, Yuri; Zawadzki, Rezi; Berman, Lance; Bushinsky, David A

    2015-07-14

    Hyperkalemia is a potentially life-threatening condition predominantly seen in patients treated with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease (CKD) who may also have diabetes, heart failure, or both. To select starting doses for a phase 3 study and to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of a potassium-binding polymer, patiromer, in outpatients with hyperkalemia. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label, dose-ranging, randomized clinical trial (AMETHYST-DN), conducted at 48 sites in Europe from June 2011 to June 2013 evaluating patiromer in 306 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 15 to <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and serum potassium level >5.0 mEq/L). All patients received RAAS inhibitors prior to and during study treatment. Patients were stratified by baseline serum potassium level into mild or moderate hyperkalemia groups and received 1 of 3 randomized starting doses of patiromer (4.2 g [n = 74], 8.4 g [n = 74], or 12.6 g [n = 74] twice daily [mild hyperkalemia] or 8.4 g [n = 26], 12.6 g [n = 28], or 16.8 g [n = 30] twice daily [moderate hyperkalemia]). Patiromer was titrated to achieve and maintain serum potassium level 5.0 mEq/L or lower. The primary efficacy end point was mean change in serum potassium level from baseline to week 4 or prior to initiation of dose titration. The primary safety end point was adverse events through 52 weeks. Secondary efficacy end points included mean change in serum potassium level through 52 weeks. A total of 306 patients were randomized. The least squares mean reduction from baseline in serum potassium level at week 4 or time of first dose titration in patients with mild hyperkalemia was 0.35 (95% CI, 0.22-0.48) mEq/L for the 4.2 g twice daily starting-dose group, 0.51 (95% CI, 0.38-0.64) mEq/L for the 8.4 g twice daily starting-dose group, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.42-0.68) mEq/L for the 12.6 g twice daily starting

  7. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ... Albumin in the Urine Managing CKD Eating Right Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Preventing ...

  8. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1, 2017 | Bethesda, MD Workshop on Immune System Engineering for Targeted Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) ... Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  9. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  10. Kidney disease in children and adolescents with perinatal HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bhimma, Rajendra; Purswani, Murli Udharam; Kala, Udai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Involvement of the kidney in children and adolescents with perinatal (HIV-1) infection can occur at any stage during the child's life with diverse diagnoses, ranging from acute kidney injury, childhood urinary tract infections (UTIs), electrolyte imbalances and drug-induced nephrotoxicity, to diseases of the glomerulus. The latter include various immune-mediated chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Discussion The introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has dramatically reduced the incidence of HIVAN, once the commonest form of CKD in children of African descent living with HIV, and also altered its prognosis from eventual progression to end-stage kidney disease to one that is compatible with long-term survival. The impact of HAART on the outcome of other forms of kidney diseases seen in this population has not been as impressive. Increasingly important is nephrotoxicity secondary to the prolonged use of anti-retroviral agents, and the occurrence of co-morbid kidney disease unrelated to HIV infection or its treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and genetics of kidney diseases associated with HIV will result in better screening, prevention and treatment efforts, as HIV specialists and nephrologists coordinate clinical care of these patients. Both haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) are effective as renal replacement therapy in HIV-infected patients with end-stage kidney disease, with PD being preferred in resource-limited settings. Kidney transplantation, once contraindicated in this population, has now become the most effective renal replacement therapy, provided rigorous criteria are met. Given the attendant morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children and adolescents with kidney disease, routine screening for kidney disease is recommended where resources permit. Conclusions This review focuses on the pathogenesis and genetics, clinical presentation and

  11. Pathophysiology of resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Campese, Vito M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension associated with chronic kidney diseases often is resistant to drug treatment. This review deals with two main aspects of the management of CKD patients with hypertension: the role of sodium/volume and the need for dietary salt restriction, as well as appropriate use of diuretics and what currently is called sequential nephron blockade; the second aspect that is addressed extensively in this review is the role of the sympathetic nervous system and the possible clinical use of renal denervation.

  12. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed. PMID:26300611

  13. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed.

  14. [Pregnancy, CKD and solitary kidney: kidney donation between clinical logic and taboos].

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    On the occasion of the Congress of the American Society of Nephrology, the yearly issue of the NEJM introduces a selection of articles of interest for Nephrology, drawing attention to the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in kidney donors. The article reconsiders this issue five years after two studies that described an increase in risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes after kidney donation. It disproves a previous assumption of "non-interference" between kidney donation and pregnancy outcomes. Meanwhile,CKD has been recognized as a risk factor for pregnancy, regardless of the presence of reduced renal function, hypertension and proteinuria, although these factors modulate the risk. In the discussion, the authors help to dispel the taboos that donor women are substantially different from women born with a solitary kidney or were so as an effect of a disease. Beside the issue of transplantation,the study indicates that we have to pay attention to all patients with CKD in pregnancy, giving us a very interesting clue for counselling. The risk of complications is greater in the donor population compared to a "low risk" population, but it is roughly equal to that of the general population, if the latter is not subject to a careful clinical work-up. Control and follow-up offset the risk: in a time when economic cuts to health care are almost killing the prevention programs, this is probably the most important message.

  15. Impact of chronic kidney disease on 2-year clinical outcomes in patients treated with 6-month or 24-month DAPT duration: An analysis from the PRODIGY trial.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Santucci, Andrea; Piccolo, Raffaele; Franzone, Anna; Ariotti, Sara; Baldo, Andrea; Esposito, Giovanni; Moschovitis, Aris; Windecker, Stephan; Valgimigli, Marco

    2017-10-01

    To assess whether moderate-to-severe CKD is a treatment modifier for benefit or harm in patients randomly allocated to 24-month versus 6-month DAPT. It is still unclear whether chronic kidney disease CKD should impact on the decision-making on optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PRODIGY trial randomized 1970 all-comer patients at 24-month versus 6-month DAPT after PCI. Patients with moderate-to-severe CKD (n = 604; 30.7%) were older, more likely to be women, to have hypertension, diabetes, prior MI or PCI, with higher severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), but were less frequently smokers or presenting with stable CAD. After adjustment, the 2-year rates of primary endpoint (composite of death, myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident), as well as bleeding and net adverse clinical events were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. DAPT prolongation at 24-month did not reduce the primary endpoint in both CKD (adj. HR: 0.957; 95% CI 0.652-1.407; P = 0.825) and no-CKD (adj. HR: 1.341; 95% CI 0.861-2.086; P = 0.194) groups (Pint = 0.249), but increased bleeding in both groups (CKD: adj. HR: 1.999; 95% CI 1.100-3.632; P = 0.023; no-CKD: adj. HR: 2.880; 95% CI 1.558-5.326; P = 0.001; Pint = 0.407). Moderate-to-severe CKD did not modify the effect of a prolonged or shortened DAPT duration in largely unselected patients undergoing stent implantation. Our analysis suggests that CKD should not be a major driver in the decision-making on the duration of DAPT after stent implantation. This exploratory study is underpowered and should be considered hypothesis-generating only. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. World Kidney Day 2016: averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  17. What happens to the heart in chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, E; Mark, P B

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease seen in this population is attributable to both traditional and novel vascular risk factors. Risk of sudden cardiac or arrhythmogenic death is greatly exaggerated in chronic kidney disease, particularly in patients with end stage renal disease where the risk is roughly 20 times that of the general population. The reasons for this increased risk are not entirely understood and while atherosclerosis is accelerated in the presence of chronic kidney disease, premature myocardial infarction does not solely account for the excess risk. Recent work demonstrates that the structure and function of the heart starts to alter early in chronic kidney disease, independent of other risk factors. The implications of cardiac remodelling and hypertrophy may predispose chronic kidney disease patients to heart failure, arrhythmia and myocardial ischaemia. Further research is needed to minimise cardiovascular risk associated with structural and functional heart disease associated with chronic kidney disease.

  18. [Wasting in chronic kidney disease: Refeeding techniques and artificial nutrition practices].

    PubMed

    Pasian, Céline; Azar, Raymond; Fouque, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is an independent factor associated with morbi-mortality in chronic kidney disease. Wasting is particularly common in chronic diseases of organs such as kidney disease with a major impact at the stage of dialysis. It covers 20 to 70% of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease according to the degree of evolution of the disease and the diagnostic method used patients. Mechanisms of PEW are based mainly on anorexia and metabolic abnormalities caused by kidney disease. Nutritional treatment differs depending on the stage of the kidney disease acute or chronic treated whether or not by dialysis. Nutritional monitoring should be regular, individualized and collaborative to detect a risk of PEW or treat installed PEW. Refeeding techniques should allow all the nutritional needs. Their indications depend on the clinic, biochemical assessment and nutrient intake.

  19. Cell therapy in kidney disease: cautious optimism... but optimism nonetheless.

    PubMed

    Zenovich, Andrey G; Taylor, Doris A

    2007-06-01

    The recently discovered therapeutic potential of stem or progenitor cells has initiated development of novel treatments in a number of diseases-treatments that could not only improve patients' quality of life, but also halt or even prevent disease progression. Hypertension; fluctuations in glycemia, electrolytes, nutrient levels, and circulating volume; and frequent infections and the associated inflammation all greatly impair the endothelium in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. As our understanding of the regulatory function of the endothelium advances, focus is increasingly being placed on endothelial repair in acute and chronic renal failure and after renal transplantation. The potential of progenitor cells to repair damaged endothelium and to reduce inflammation in patients with renal failure remains unexamined; however, a successful cell therapy could reduce morbidity and mortality in kidney disease. Important contributions have been made in identifying progenitor cell populations in the kidney, and further investigations into the relationships of these cells with the pathophysiology of the disease are underway. As the kidney disease field prepares for the first human trials of progenitor cell therapies, we deemed it important to review representative original research, and to share our perspectives and lessons learned from clinical trials of progenitor cell-based therapies that have commenced in patients with cardiovascular disease.

  20. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Path Forward.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Gopala K; Lopez-Vargas, Pamela; Nankivell, Brian J; Tchan, Michel; Tong, Allison; Tunnicliffe, David J; Savige, Judy

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the commonest inherited cause of renal failure in adults, and is due to loss-of-function mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, respectively. These proteins have an essential role in maintaining the geometric structure of the distal collecting duct in the kidney in adult life, and their dysfunction predisposes to renal cyst formation. The typical renal phenotype of ADPKD is the insidious development of hundreds of renal cysts, which form in childhood and grow progressively through life, causing end-stage kidney failure in the fifth decade in about half affected by the mutation. Over the past 2 decades, major advances in genetics and disease pathogenesis have led to well-conducted randomized controlled trials, and observational studies that have resulted in an accumulation of evidence-based data, and raise hope that the lifetime risk of kidney failure due to ADPKD will be progressively curtailed during this century. This review will provide a contemporary summary of the current state of the field in disease pathogenesis and therapeutics, and also briefly highlights the importance of clinical practice guidelines, patient perspectives, patient-reported outcomes, uniform trial reporting, and health-economics in ADPKD.

  1. Association of Body Mass Index with Clinical Outcomes in Non-Dialysis-Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Zahmatkesh, Golara; Ahmadi, Emad; Streja, Elani; Rhee, Connie M.; Gillen, Daniel L.; De Nicola, Luca; Minutolo, Roberto; Ricardo, Ana C.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have not shown a consistent link between body mass index (BMI) and outcomes such as mortality and kidney disease progression in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Therefore, we aimed to complete a systematic review and meta-analysis study on this subject. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and screened 7,123 retrieved studies for inclusion. Two investigators independently selected the studies using predefined criteria and assessed each study's quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale. We meta-analyzed the results based on the BMI classification system by the WHO. Results We included 10 studies (with a total sample size of 484,906) in the systematic review and 4 studies in the meta-analyses. The study results were generally heterogeneous. However, following reanalysis of the largest reported study and our meta-analyses, we observed that in stage 3-5 CKD, being underweight was associated with a higher risk of death while being overweight or obese class I was associated with a lower risk of death; however, obesity classes II and III were not associated with risk of death. In addition, reanalysis of the largest available study showed that a higher BMI was associated with an incrementally higher risk of kidney disease progression; however, this association was attenuated in our pooled results. For earlier stages of CKD, we could not complete meta-analyses as the studies were sparse and had heterogeneous BMI classifications and/or referent BMI groups. Conclusion Among the group of patients with stage 3-5 CKD, we found a differential association between obesity classes I-III and mortality compared to the general population, indicating an obesity paradox in the CKD population. PMID:27194995

  2. Chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bartges, Joseph W

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs commonly in older dogs and cats. Advances in diagnostics, staging, and treatment are associated with increased quality and quantity of life. Dietary modification has been shown to increase survival and quality of life and involves more than protein restriction as diets modified for use with CKD are lower in phosphorous and sodium, potassium and B-vitamin replete, and alkalinizing, and they contain n3-fatty acids. Additionally, recognition and management of CKD-associated diseases such as systemic arterial hypertension, proteinuria, and anemia benefit patients. This article summarizes staging and management of CKD in dogs and cats.

  3. Drug discovery for polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Bao-xue

    2011-01-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a most common human genetic diseases, fluid-filled cysts displace normal renal tubules and cause end-stage renal failure. PKD is a serious and costly disorder. There is no available therapy that prevents or slows down the cystogenesis and cyst expansion in PKD. Numerous efforts have been made to find drug targets and the candidate drugs to treat PKD. Recent studies have defined the mechanisms underlying PKD and new therapies directed toward them. In this review article, we summarize the pathogenesis of PKD, possible drug targets, available PKD models for screening and evaluating new drugs as well as candidate drugs that are being developed. PMID:21642949

  4. Using Zebrafish to Study Kidney Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Jerman, Stephanie; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2017-01-01

    The kidneys are a crucial pair of organs that are responsible for filtering the blood to remove waste, maintain electrolyte and water homeostasis, and regulate blood pressure. There are a number of factors, both genetic and environmental, that can impair the function of the kidneys resulting in significant morbidity and mortality for millions of people affected by kidney disease worldwide. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has emerged as an attractive vertebrate model in the study of kidney development and disease and has proven to be a powerful tool in the advancement of how kidney development occurs in vertebrates and how the kidney repairs itself after injury. Zebrafish share significant similarities in kidney development and composition of nephrons, the functional unit of the kidney. This makes the zebrafish a very promising model to study the mechanisms by which renal developmental defects occur. Furthermore, zebrafish are ideally suited for the study of how vertebrate kidneys respond to injury and have provided researchers with invaluable information on repair processes after kidney injury. Importantly, zebrafish have profound potential for discovering treatment modalities and, in fact, studies in zebrafish models have provided leads for therapeutics for human patients suffering from kidney disease and kidney injury. Here, we discuss the similarities and differences in zebrafish and mammalian kidney models, and highlight some of the major contributions the zebrafish has made in the understanding of kidney development and disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Polycystic kidney disease in a patient using lithium chronically].

    PubMed

    Atagün, Murat Ilhan; Oral, Esad Timuçin; Sevinç, Can

    2013-01-01

    Lithium remains to be the gold standard in the treatment of mood disorders. This study presents a case treated with lithium for an extended period with a good response. Following an increase in creatinine levels, further investigation of renal dysfunction revealed polycystic kidney disease. Lithium was used prior to the diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease, resulting in the unique opportunity to examine the effects of lithium on kidneys with polycystic kidney disease. Within this context, this study also discusses the pharmacokinetics of lithium, and its possible relation to cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease.

  6. Sodium: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Canned beans, chicken, fish and meat l Canned tomato products, including juice l Canned and pickled vegetables, ... KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  7. Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Mayo, Helen; Bailey, Clifford J.; McGuire, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Metformin is widely viewed as the best initial pharmacological option to lower glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the drug is contraindicated in many individuals with impaired kidney function because of concerns of lactic acidosis. OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin use in individuals with impaired kidney function. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION In July 2014, we searched the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for English-language articles pertaining to metformin, kidney disease, and lactic acidosis in humans between 1950 and June 2014. We excluded reviews, letters, editorials, case reports, small case series, and manuscripts that did not directly pertain to the topic area or that met other exclusion criteria. Of an original 818 articles, 65 were included in this review, including pharmacokinetic/metabolic studies, large case series, retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and a clinical trial. RESULTS Although metformin is renally cleared, drug levels generally remain within the therapeutic range and lactate concentrations are not substantially increased when used in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rates, 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The overall incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users varies across studies from approximately 3 per 100 000 person-years to 10 per 100 000 person-years and is generally indistinguishable from the background rate in the overall population with diabetes. Data suggesting an increased risk of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients with chronic kidney disease are limited, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to test the safety of metformin in patients with significantly impaired kidney function. Population-based studies demonstrate that metformin may be prescribed counter to prevailing guidelines suggesting a renal risk in up to 1 in 4 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woroniecka, Karolina I.; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Mohtat, Davoud; Thomas, David B.; Pullman, James M.; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the single leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., for which a cure has not yet been found. The aim of our study was to provide an unbiased catalog of gene-expression changes in human diabetic kidney biopsy samples. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Affymetrix expression arrays were used to identify differentially regulated transcripts in 44 microdissected human kidney samples. DKD samples were significant for their racial diversity and decreased glomerular filtration rate (~25–35 mL/min). Stringent statistical analysis, using the Benjamini-Hochberg corrected two-tailed t test, was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in control and diseased glomeruli and tubuli. Two different web-based algorithms were used to define differentially regulated pathways. RESULTS We identified 1,700 differentially expressed probesets in DKD glomeruli and 1,831 in diabetic tubuli, and 330 probesets were commonly differentially expressed in both compartments. Pathway analysis highlighted the regulation of Ras homolog gene family member A, Cdc42, integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in DKD glomeruli. The tubulointerstitial compartment showed strong enrichment for inflammation-related pathways. The canonical complement signaling pathway was determined to be statistically differentially regulated in both DKD glomeruli and tubuli and was associated with increased glomerulosclerosis even in a different set of DKD samples. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have cataloged gene-expression regulation and identified multiple novel genes and pathways that may play a role in the pathogenesis of DKD or could serve as biomarkers. PMID:21752957

  9. Hypertension in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Arlene B.; Stepniakowski, Konrad; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is common and occurs in a majority of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients prior to loss of kidney function. Hypertension relates to progressive kidney enlargement, and is a significant independent risk factor for progression to end stage renal disease. The pathogenesis of hypertension in ADPKD is complex and dependent on many factors that influence each other. Pkd1 and Pkd2 expression levels are highest in the major vessels and are present in the cilia of endothelial cells and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Decreased or absent polycystin 1 or 2 expression is associated with abnormal vascular structure and function. Pkd1/Pkd2 deficiency results in reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels, altered endothelial response to shear stress with attenuation in vascular relaxation. 10–20% of ADPKD children demonstrate hypertension and the majority of adults are hypertensive before any loss of kidney function. Cardiac abnormalities such as left ventricular hypertrophy and carotid intimal wall thickening are present prior to the development of hypertension in ADPKD. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs in ADPKD due to decreased NO production as well as bilateral cyst expansion and intra-renal ischemia. With increasing cyst size, further activation of the RAAS occurs, blood pressure increases and a vicious cycle ensues with enhanced cyst growth and hypertension ultimately leading to ESRD. Inhibition of the angiotensin aldosterone system is possible with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. However, interventional studies have not yet demonstrated benefit in slowing progression to renal failure in ADPKD. Currently, large multicenter studies are being performed to determine the beneficial effects of RAAS inhibition both early and late in ADPKD. PMID:20219618

  10. 78 FR 28859 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases B... Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney...

  11. Lessons from the profile of kidney diseases among Afghan refugees.

    PubMed

    Otoukesh, Salman; Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Cooper, Chad J; Tolouian, Ramin; Said, Sarmad; Ortega, Lauro; Didia, S Claudia; Behazin, Arash; Sherzai, Dean; Blandon, Pedro

    2014-09-11

    Due to a paucity of research on the profile of kidney diseases among refugee populations, specifically Afghan refugees in Iran, this study aimed to illustrate the pattern of kidney disease among Afghan refugees in Iran and create a database for evaluating the performance of future health services. This was a retrospective cross sectional study, in which we collected the demographics and profile of kidney diseases among Afghan refugees between 2005 and 2010 from referrals to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) offices in Iran. The total number of referrals in this group of diseases was 3193 out of 23 152 with 41.5% female and 58.5% male. Regarding age distribution, 10.5% were 0-14 years of age, 78% were 15-59, and 11.5% were ≥60. The mos