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Sample records for kidney disease rat

  1. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease A A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  2. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  3. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  4. Uric acid metabolism of kidney and intestine in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nagura, Michito; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Kumagai, Takanori; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a potential risk factor of the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recently, we reported that intestinal UA excretion might be enhanced via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (Abcg2) in a 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) rat model. In the present study, we examined the mRNA and protein expressions of UA transporters, URAT1, GLUT9/URATv1, ABCG2 and NPT4 in the kidney and ileum in the same rat model. Additionally, we investigated the Abcg2 mRNA expression of ileum in hyperuricemic rat model by orally administering oxonic acid. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of Nx group, oxonic acid-treated (Ox) group and sham-operated control group, and sacrificed at 8 weeks. Creatinine and UA were measured and the mRNA expressions of UA transporters in the kidney and intestine were evaluated by a real time PCR. UA transporters in the kidney sections were also examined by immunohistochemistry. Serum creatinine elevated in the Nx group whereas serum UA increased in the Ox group. Both the mRNA expression and the immunohistochemistry of the UA transporters were decreased in the Nx group, suggesting a marginal role in UA elevation in decreased kidney function. In contrast, the mRNA expression of Abcg2 in the ileum significantly increased in the Ox group. These results suggest that the upregulation of Abcg2 mRNA in the ileum triggered by an elevation of serum UA may play a compensatory role in increasing intestinal UA excretion.

  5. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and ... to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove ...

  6. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  7. Curative effect of sesame oil in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-Teng; Chien, Se-Ping; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes a progressive and irreversible loss of renal function. We investigated the curative effect of sesame oil, a natural, nutrient-rich, potent antioxidant, in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease was induced by subcutaneously injecting uni-nephrectomized rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) and 1% NaCl [DOCA/salt] in drinking water. Four weeks later, the rats were gavaged with sesame oil (0.5 or 1 mL/kg per day) for 7 days. Renal injury, histopathological changes, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation, Nrf2, osteopontin expression, and collagen were assessed 24 h after the last dose of sesame oil. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, urine volume, and albuminuria were significantly higher in the DOCA/salt treated rats than in control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased these four tested parameters in DOCA/salt treated rats. In addition, creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression were significantly decreased in the DOCA/salt treated rats compared to control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite level, lipid peroxidation, osteopontin, and renal collagen deposition, but increased creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression in DOCA/salt treated rats. We conclude that supplementation of sesame oil mitigates DOCA/salt induced chronic kidney disease in rats by activating Nrf2 and attenuating osteopontin expression and inhibiting renal fibrosis in rats. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Dietary phosphate restriction ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Van, Tan Vu; Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Shiota, Asuka; Tanaka, Terumi; Tanimura, Ayako; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia causes endothelial dysfunction as well as vascular calcification. Management of serum phosphate level by dietary phosphate restriction or phosphate binders is considered to be beneficial to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from cardiovascular disease, but it has been unclear whether keeping lower serum phosphate level can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction. In this study we investigated whether low-phosphate diet can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats, one of useful animal model of chronic kidney disease. Administration of 0.75% adenine-containing diet for 21 days induced renal failure with hyperphosphatemia, and impaired acetylcholine-dependent vasodilation of thoracic aortic ring in rats. Then adenine-induced kidney disease rats were treated with either control diet (1% phosphate) or low-phosphate diet (0.2% phosphate) for 16 days. Low-phosphate diet ameliorated not only hyperphosphatemia but also the impaired vasodilation of aorta. In addition, the activatory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1177 and Akt at serine 473 in the aorta were inhibited by in adenine-induced kidney disease rats. The inhibited phosphorylations were improved by the low-phosphate diet treatment. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction can improve aortic endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease with hyperphosphatemia by increase in the activatory phosphorylations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt. PMID:22798709

  9. Feeding flaxseed oil but not secoisolariciresinol diglucoside results in higher bone mass in healthy rats and rats with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weiler, H A; Kovacs, H; Nitschmann, E; Bankovic-Calic, N; Aukema, H; Ogborn, M

    2007-05-01

    Flaxseed's oil and lignan, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), are implicated in attainment of health and treatment of renal injury and osteoporosis. To test for these benefits, weanling Han:SPRD-cy rats (n=171) with or without kidney disease were randomized to diets made with either corn oil or flaxseed oil and with or without SDG for 12 weeks. In females, weight was lower with the SDG diet. In males fed flaxseed oil, lean mass was higher and fat % was lower. In both sexes, fat % was lower in diseased rats. Bone mineral content (BMC) and density were higher in rats fed flaxseed oil and lower in diseased rats, additionally; BMC was lower in SDG-supplemented females. The benefit of flaxseed oil on body composition is sex specific but the effect on bone mass is not. Lastly, reduced weight due to early rat kidney disease is not due to loss of lean body mass.

  10. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  11. A rat model of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Moe, Sharon M; Chen, Neal X; Seifert, Mark F; Sinders, Rachel M; Duan, Dana; Chen, Xianming; Liang, Yun; Radcliff, J Scott; White, Kenneth E; Gattone, Vincent H

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) is a newly defined syndrome encompassing patients with chronic kidney disease that have a triad of biochemical alterations in calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone, vascular calcification, and bone abnormalities. Here we describe a novel Cy/+ rat model of slowly progressive kidney disease spontaneously developing the three components of CKD-MBD when fed a normal phosphorus diet. Since the renal disorder progressed 'naturally' we studied the effect of dietary manipulation during the course of the disease. Animals with early, but established, chronic kidney disease were fed a casein-based or a grain-based protein diet both of which had equivalent total phosphorus contents. The two different sources of dietary protein had profound effects on the progression of CKD-MBD, likely due to differences in intestinal bioavailability of phosphorus. Although both dietary treatments resulted in the same serum phosphorous levels, the casein-fed animals had increased urinary phosphorus excretion and elevated serum FGF23 compared to the grain-fed rats. This model should help identify early changes in the course of chronic kidney disease that may lead to CKD-MBD.

  12. Kidney: polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paul, Binu M; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cysts primarily in the kidneys. PKD can be inherited as autosomal recessive (ARPKD) or autosomal dominant (ADPKD) traits. Mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin 1 and polycystin 2, are the underlying cause of ADPKD. Progressive cyst formation and renal enlargement lead to renal insufficiency in these patients, which need to be managed by lifelong dialysis or renal transplantation. While characteristic features of PKD are abnormalities in epithelial cell proliferation, fluid secretion, extracellular matrix and differentiation, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not understood. Here we review the progress that has been made in defining the function of the polycystins, and how disruption of these functions may be involved in cystogenesis.

  13. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) View or Print All Sections What ... Simple Kidney Cysts Kidney Stones Urinary Tract Infections Kidney Failure What to Expect Choosing a Treatment Hemodialysis ...

  14. Acute graft-versus-host disease of the kidney in allogeneic rat bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Higo, Seiichiro; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Nagasaka, Shinya; Kajimoto, Yusuke; Kanzaki, Go; Fukui, Megumi; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Mii, Akiko; Kaneko, Tomohiro; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) causes graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). However, the involvement of the kidney in acute GVHD is not well-understood. Acute GVHD was induced in Lewis rats (RT1l) by transplantation of Dark Agouti (DA) rat (RT1(a)) bone marrow cells (6.0 × 10(7) cells) without immunosuppression after lethal irradiation (10 Gy). We examined the impact of acute GVHD on the kidney in allogeneic BMT rats and compared them with those in Lewis-to-Lewis syngeneic BMT control and non-BMT control rats. In syngeneic BMT and non-BMT control rats, acute GVHD did not develop by day 28. In allogeneic BMT rats, severe acute GVHD developed at 21-28 days after BMT in the skin, intestine, and liver with decreased body weight (>20%), skin rush, diarrhea, and liver dysfunction. In the kidney, infiltration of donor-type leukocytes was by day 28. Mild inflammation characterized by infiltration of CD3(+) T-cells, including CD8(+) T-cells and CD4(+) T-cells, and CD68(+) macrophages to the interstitium around the small arteries was noted. During moderate to severe inflammation, these infiltrating cells expanded into the peritubular interstitium with peritubular capillaritis, tubulitis, acute glomerulitis, and endarteritis. Renal dysfunction also developed, and the serum blood urea nitrogen (33.9 ± 4.7 mg/dL) and urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG: 31.5 ± 15.5 U/L) levels increased. No immunoglobulin and complement deposition was detected in the kidney. In conclusion, the kidney was a primary target organ of acute GVHD after BMT. Acute GVHD of the kidney was characterized by increased levels of urinary NAG and cell-mediated injury to the renal microvasculature and renal tubules.

  15. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  16. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  17. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium rescues kidney function in rats with established chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Joles, Jaap A; van Balkom, Bas W M; Lim, Sai Kiang; de Kleijn, Dominique; Giles, Rachel H; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health care problem, affecting more than 35% of the elderly population worldwide. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been described, however it is unclear whether the MSCs themselves or their secretome is required. We hypothesized that MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) reduces progression of CKD and studied functional and structural effects in a rat model of established CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (SNX) combined with L-NNA and 6% NaCl diet in Lewis rats. Six weeks after SNX, CKD rats received either 50 µg CM or 50 µg non-CM (NCM) twice daily intravenously for four consecutive days. Six weeks after treatment CM administration was functionally effective: glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance) and effective renal plasma flow (PAH clearance) were significantly higher in CM vs. NCM-treatment. Systolic blood pressure was lower in CM compared to NCM. Proteinuria tended to be lower after CM. Tubular and glomerular damage were reduced and more glomerular endothelial cells were found after CM. DNA damage repair was increased after CM. MSC-CM derived exosomes, tested in the same experimental setting, showed no protective effect on the kidney. In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that administration of MSC-CM has a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function shown by decreased progression of CKD and reduced hypertension and glomerular injury.

  18. Dietary flax oil during pregnancy and lactation retards disease progression in rat offspring with inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Deepa; Bankovic-Calic, Neda; Peng, Claudia Yu-Chen; Ogborn, Malcolm R; Aukema, Harold M

    2006-12-01

    Dietary flax oil (FO) retards disease progression in growing or adult animal models of kidney disease. To determine whether dietary flax oil during the perinatal period would alter renal disease progression in offspring, Han-SPRD-cy rats with inherited cystic kidney disease were given diets with either 7% FO or corn oil (CO), throughout pregnancy and lactation. At 3 wk of age, offspring were then given either the same or the alternate diet for 7 wk. Rats given FO during the maternal period had 15% less renal cyst growth compared with rats given FO only in the postweaning period. Dietary FO, compared with CO, in the maternal period also resulted in 12% lower cell proliferation and 15% less oxidant injury in diseased kidneys of offspring. Including FO in both the maternal and postweaning period resulted in 29-34% less renal interstitial fibrosis and 22-23% lower glomerular hypertrophy. Along with improved histology, these rats exhibited 13% less proteinuria and 30% lower creatinine clearance when dietary FO was given in the maternal period. The potential for dietary FO during pregnancy and lactation to positively modulate adult renal disease has significant implications for the 1 in 1000 individuals with congenital cystic kidney disease.

  19. Telmisartan ameliorates fibrocystic liver disease in an orthologous rat model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  20. Telmisartan Ameliorates Fibrocystic Liver Disease in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M.; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  1. Constitutive renal Rel/nuclear factor-κB expression in Lewis polycystic kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Liuwantara, David; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the temporal expression and pattern of Rel/nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins in renal tissue in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). METHODS: The renal expression of Rel/NF-κB proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats (LPK, a genetic ortholog of human nephronopthsis-9) from postnatal weeks 3 to 20. At each timepoint, renal disease progression and the mRNA expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (TNFα and CCL2) were determined. NF-κB was also histologically assessed in human PKD tissue. RESULTS: Progressive kidney enlargement in LPK rats was accompanied by increased renal cell proliferation and interstitial monocyte accumulation (peaking at weeks 3 and 10 respectively), and progressive interstitial fibrosis (with α smooth muscle actin and Sirius Red deposition significantly increased compared to Lewis kidneys from weeks 3 to 6 onwards). Rel/NF-κB proteins (phosphorylated-p105, p65, p50, c-Rel and RelB) were expressed in cystic epithelial cells (CECs) of LPK kidneys as early as postnatal week 3 and sustained until late-stage disease at week 20. From weeks 10 to 20, nuclear p65, p50, RelB and cytoplasmic IκBα protein levels, and TNFα and CCL2 expression, were upregulated in LPK compared to Lewis kidneys. NF-κB proteins were consistently expressed in CECs of human PKD. The DNA damage marker γ-H2AX was also identified in the CECs of LPK and human polycystic kidneys. CONCLUSION: Several NF-κB proteins are consistently expressed in CECs in human and experimental PKD. These data suggest that the upregulation of both the canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-κB signaling may be a constitutive and early pathological feature of cystic renal diseases. PMID:27458563

  2. Constitutive renal Rel/nuclear factor-κB expression in Lewis polycystic kidney disease rats.

    PubMed

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Liuwantara, David; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-07-06

    To determine the temporal expression and pattern of Rel/nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins in renal tissue in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The renal expression of Rel/NF-κB proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats (LPK, a genetic ortholog of human nephronopthsis-9) from postnatal weeks 3 to 20. At each timepoint, renal disease progression and the mRNA expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (TNFα and CCL2) were determined. NF-κB was also histologically assessed in human PKD tissue. Progressive kidney enlargement in LPK rats was accompanied by increased renal cell proliferation and interstitial monocyte accumulation (peaking at weeks 3 and 10 respectively), and progressive interstitial fibrosis (with α smooth muscle actin and Sirius Red deposition significantly increased compared to Lewis kidneys from weeks 3 to 6 onwards). Rel/NF-κB proteins (phosphorylated-p105, p65, p50, c-Rel and RelB) were expressed in cystic epithelial cells (CECs) of LPK kidneys as early as postnatal week 3 and sustained until late-stage disease at week 20. From weeks 10 to 20, nuclear p65, p50, RelB and cytoplasmic IκBα protein levels, and TNFα and CCL2 expression, were upregulated in LPK compared to Lewis kidneys. NF-κB proteins were consistently expressed in CECs of human PKD. The DNA damage marker γ-H2AX was also identified in the CECs of LPK and human polycystic kidneys. Several NF-κB proteins are consistently expressed in CECs in human and experimental PKD. These data suggest that the upregulation of both the canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-κB signaling may be a constitutive and early pathological feature of cystic renal diseases.

  3. Gender differences in adenine-induced chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications in rats.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Small, David; Kauter, Kate; Gobe, Glenda C; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Gender contributes to differences in incidence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease. To induce kidney damage in male and female Wistar rats (n = 12/group), a 0.25% adenine diet for 16 wk was used. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, proteinuria) and structure (glomerular damage, tubulointerstitial atrophy, fibrosis, inflammation); cardiovascular function (blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, vascular responses, echocardiography) and structure (cardiac fibrosis); plasma testosterone and estrogen concentrations; and protein expression for oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1, inflammation (TNF-α), fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β), ERK1/2, and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α)] were compared in males and females. Adenine-fed females had less decline in kidney function than adenine-fed males, although kidney atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis were similar. Plasma estrogen concentrations increased and plasma testosterone concentrations decreased in adenine-fed males, with smaller changes in females. CKD-associated molecular changes in kidneys were more pronounced in males than females except for expression of ER-α in the kidney, which was completely suppressed in adenine-fed males but unchanged in adenine-fed females. Both genders showed increased blood pressure, ventricular stiffness, and cardiac fibrosis with the adenine diet. Cardiovascular changes with adenine were similar in males and females, except males developed concentric, and females eccentric cardiac hypertrophy. In hearts from adenine-fed male and female rats, expression of ER-α and activation of the ERK1/2 pathway were increased, in part explaining changes in cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, adenine-induced kidney damage may be increased in males due to the suppression of ER-α.

  4. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  5. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  6. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  7. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy.

  8. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Al Mahruqi, A S; Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Ashique, M; Nemmar, A; Ali, B H

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 541-549, 2017.

  9. Untargeted plasma and tissue metabolomics in rats with chronic kidney disease given AST-120

    PubMed Central

    Velenosi, Thomas J.; Hennop, Anzel; Feere, David A.; Tieu, Alvin; Kucey, Andrew S.; Kyriacou, Polydoros; McCuaig, Laura E.; Nevison, Stephanie E.; Kerr, Michael A.; Urquhart, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in the accumulation of metabolic waste products that are normally cleared by the kidney, known as uremia. Many of these waste products are from bacteria metabolites in the gut. Accumulation of uremic toxins in plasma and tissue, as well as the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis are important for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbidities in CKD. In this study, an untargeted metabolomics approach was used to determine uremic toxin accumulation in plasma, liver, heart and kidney tissue in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Rats with CKD were also given AST-120, a spherical carbon adsorbent, to assess metabolic changes in plasma and tissues with the removal of gut-derived uremic toxins. AST-120 decreased >55% of metabolites that were increased in plasma, liver and heart tissue of rats with CKD. CKD was primarily defined by 8 gut-derived uremic toxins, which were significantly increased in plasma and all tissues. These metabolites were derived from aromatic amino acids and soy protein including: indoxyl sulfate, p-cresyl sulfate, hippuric acid, phenyl sulfate, pyrocatechol sulfate, 4-ethylphenyl sulfate, p-cresol glucuronide and equol 7-glucuronide. Our results highlight the importance of diet and gut-derived metabolites in the accumulation of uremic toxins and define the gut-plasma-tissue metabolic axis in CKD. PMID:26932318

  10. Ameliorative Effect of Chrysin on Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Adham, Sirin A.; Al Za’abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine – induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered. PMID:25909514

  11. Ameliorative effect of chrysin on adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Adham, Sirin A; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schupp, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin (5, 7- dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several pharmacological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. in this work, we investigated some effects of three graded oral doses of chrysin (10, 50 and 250 mg/kg) on kidney structure and function in rats with experimental chronic renal disease (CKD) induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 35 days), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. Using several indices in plasma, urine and kidney homogenates, adenine was found to impair kidney function as it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate, some inflammatory cytokines and urinary albumin concentration. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were all adversely affected. Most of these adenine - induced actions were moderately and dose -dependently mitigated by chrysin, especially at the highest dose. Chrysin did not cause any overt adverse effect on the treated rats. The results suggest that different doses of chrysin produce variable salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats, and that, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, its usability as a possible ameliorative agent in human CKD should be considered.

  12. Chronic caffeine consumption exacerbates hypertension in rats with polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tanner, G A; Tanner, J A

    2001-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common inherited disorder frequently associated with renal failure, hypertension, and other abnormalities. The present study determined whether chronic caffeine intake in an animal model of this disease would affect renal structure and function and blood pressure. Heterozygous male Han:Sprague-Dawley rats with ADPKD and normal littermates were provided with either tap water or solutions of caffeine to drink, starting at 1 month of age. When rats were aged 6 months, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured under Inactin (Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany) anesthesia. Caffeine intake had no effect on GFR or cyst development in rats with PKD. MAP was greater in rats with PKD than normal rats and was increased more by caffeine. The hypertensive effect of chronic caffeine intake could not be ascribed to direct pressor effects of angiotensin II. Based on our finding that caffeine exacerbates hypertension in rats with PKD, it may be prudent for patients with ADPKD to limit coffee consumption to four or fewer cups of caffeinated coffee per day, pending studies of humans.

  13. Iron-restricted pair-feeding affects renal damage in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yoshiro; Senchi, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Okuno, Keisuke; Yasumura, Seiki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that dietary iron restriction prevents the development of renal damage in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, iron deficiency is associated with appetite loss. In addition, calorie restriction is reported to prevent the development of end-stage renal pathology in CKD rats. Thus, the beneficial effect of iron restriction on renal damage may depend on calorie restriction. Here, we investigate the effect of pair-feeding iron restriction on renal damage in a rat model of CKD. Methods First, to determine the amount of food intake, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly given an ad libitum normal diet or an iron-restricted diet, and the food intake was measured. Second, CKD was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy in SD rats, and CKD rats were given either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet. Results Food intake was reduced in the iron-restricted diet group compared to the normal diet group of SD rats for 16 weeks (mean food intake; normal diet group and iron-restricted diet group: 25 and 20 g/day, respectively). Based on the initial experiments, CKD rats received either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet (20 g/day) for 16 weeks. Importantly, pair-feeding iron restriction prevented the development of proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage in CKD rats. Interestingly, pair-feeding iron restriction attenuated renal expression of nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor in CKD rats. Conclusions Pair-feeding iron restriction affected renal damage in a rat model of CKD. PMID:28196143

  14. Daily Intake of Grape Powder Prevents the Progression of Kidney Disease in Obese Type 2 Diabetic ZSF1 Rats.

    PubMed

    Almomen, Salwa M K; Guan, Qiunong; Liang, Peihe; Yang, Kaidi; Sidiqi, Ahmad M; Levin, Adeera; Du, Caigan

    2017-03-31

    Individuals living with metabolic syndrome (MetS) such as diabetes and obesity are at high risk for developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study investigated the beneficial effect of whole grape powder (WGP) diet on MetS-associated CKD. Obese diabetic ZSF1 rats, a kidney disease model with MetS, were fed WGP (5%, w/w) diet for six months. Kidney disease was determined using blood and urine chemical analyses, and histology. When compared to Vehicle controls, WGP intake did not change the rat bodyweight, but lowered their kidney, liver and spleen weight, which were in parallel with the lower serum glucose and the higher albumin or albumin/globin ratio. More importantly, WGP intake improved the renal function as urination and proteinuria decreased, or it prevented kidney tissue damage in these diabetic rats. The renal protection of WGP diet was associated with up-regulation of antioxidants (Dhcr24, Gstk1, Prdx2, Sod2, Gpx1 and Gpx4) and downregulation of Txnip (for ROS production) in the kidneys. Furthermore, addition of grape extract reduced H₂O₂-induced cell death of cultured podocytes. In conclusion, daily intake of WGP reduces the progression of kidney disease in obese diabetic rats, suggesting a protective function of antioxidant-rich grape diet against CKD in the setting of MetS.

  15. PPAR-gamma agonist ameliorates kidney and liver disease in an orthologous rat model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Miwa; Kugita, Masanori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Aukema, Harold M; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Calvet, James P; Wallace, Darren P; Nagao, Shizuko

    2011-02-01

    In autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), progressive enlargement of fluid-filled cysts is due to aberrant proliferation of tubule epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion leading to extensive nephron loss and interstitial fibrosis. Congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with biliary cysts/dilatations is the most common extrarenal manifestation in ARPKD and can lead to massive liver enlargement. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ), a member of the ligand-dependent nuclear receptor superfamily, is expressed in a variety of tissues, including the kidneys and liver, and plays important roles in cell proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation. In the current study, we determined that pioglitazone (PIO), a PPAR-γ agonist, decreases polycystic kidney and liver disease progression in the polycystic kidney rat, an orthologous model of human ARPKD. Daily treatment with 10 mg/kg PIO for 16 wk decreased kidney weight (% of body weight), renal cystic area, serum urea nitrogen, and the number of Ki67-, pERK1/2-, and pS6-positive cells in the kidney. There was also a decrease in liver weight (% of body weight), liver cystic area, fibrotic index, and the number of Ki67-, pERK1/2-, pERK5-, and TGF-β-positive cells in the liver. Taken together, these data suggest that PIO inhibits the progression of polycystic kidney and liver disease in a model of human ARPKD by inhibiting cell proliferation and fibrosis. These findings suggest that PPAR-γ agonists may have therapeutic value in the treatment of the renal and hepatic manifestations of ARPKD.

  16. Electronegative LDL-mediated cardiac electrical remodeling in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, An-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chung, Ching-Hu; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ming; Su, Ming-Jai; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD)–associated higher risks for life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias remain poorly understood. In rats subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx), we examined cardiac electrophysiological remodeling and relevant mechanisms predisposing to ventricular arrhythmias. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent UNx (n = 6) or sham (n = 6) operations. Eight weeks later, the UNx group had higher serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and a longer electrocardiographic QTc interval than did the sham group. Patch-clamp studies revealed epicardial (EPI)-predominant prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) at 50% and 90% repolarization in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes compared to sham EPI cardiomyocytes. A significant reduction of the transient outward potassium current (Ito) in EPI but not in endocardial (ENDO) cardiomyocytes of UNx rats led to a decreased transmural gradient of Ito. The reduction of Ito currents in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes was secondary to downregulation of KChIP2 but not Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Kv1.4 protein expression. Incubation of plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from UNx rats with normal EPI and ENDO cardiomyocytes recapitulated the electrophysiological phenotype of UNx rats. In conclusion, CKD disrupts the physiological transmural gradient of Ito via downregulation of KChIP2 proteins in the EPI region, which may promote susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Electronegative LDL may underlie downregulation of KChIP2 in CKD. PMID:28094801

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  18. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  19. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L; Hildreth, Cara M; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12-13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = -0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways.

  20. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  1. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  2. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  3. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  4. [Kidney diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kolesárova, Eva; Sirotiaková, Jana; Kozárová, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of important morphological, functional and hemodynamic changes occurring in the kidneys during physiological pregnancy is a prerequisite for proper diagnostics and therapy of renal diseases in pregnancy. Kidney diseases may be kidney diseases complicating pregnancy in previously healthy women, or pre-existing or superposed kidney diseases. Knowledge of renal insufficiency management in pregnancy, including haemodialysis treatment and management of pregnancy in patients who have undergone transplantation, is also important.

  5. Testing for Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney disease if you have diabetes high blood pressure heart disease a family history of kidney failure If you have diabetes, ... checked every year. If you have high blood pressure, heart disease, or a family history of kidney failure, talk with your health ...

  6. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  7. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun-Lun; Lan, Chou-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Wu, Geng-Chin; Peng, Chia-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI) is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75%) diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR)-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:28291795

  8. A link between central kynurenine metabolism and bone strength in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Krystyna; Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Znorko, Beata; Karbowska, Malgorzata; Citkowska, Aleksandra; Rogalska, Joanna; Roszczenko, Alicja; Brzoska, Malgorzata M.; Pawlak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Background Disturbances in mineral and bone metabolism represent one of the most complex complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Serotonin, a monoamine synthesized from tryptophan, may play a potential role in bone metabolism. Brain-derived serotonin exerts a positive effect on the bone structure by limiting bone resorption and enhancing bone formation. Tryptophan is the precursor not only to the serotonin but also and primarily to kynurenine metabolites. The ultimate aim of the present study was to determine the association between central kynurenine metabolism and biomechanical as well as geometrical properties of bone in the experimental model of the early stage of CKD. Methods Thirty-three Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (sham-operated and subtotal nephrectomized animals). Three months after surgery, serum samples were obtained for the determination of biochemical parameters, bone turnover biomarkers, and kynurenine pathway metabolites; tibias were collected for bone biomechanical, bone geometrical, and bone mass density analysis; brains were removed and divided into five regions for the determination of kynurenine pathway metabolites. Results Subtotal nephrectomized rats presented higher serum concentrations of creatinine, urea nitrogen, and parathyroid hormone, and developed hypocalcemia. Several biomechanical and geometrical parameters were significantly elevated in rats with experimentally induced CKD. Subtotal nephrectomized rats presented significantly higher kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio and significantly lower tryptophan levels in all studied parts of the brain. Kynurenine in the frontal cortex and tryptophan in the hypothalamus and striatum correlated positively with the main parameters of bone biomechanics and bone geometry. Discussion In addition to the complex mineral, hormone, and metabolite changes, intensified central kynurenine turnover may play an important role in the development of bone

  9. Cyclooxygenase product inhibition with acetylsalicylic acid slows disease progression in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Naser H M; Gregoire, Melanie; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinhong; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids are elevated and lipoxygenase (LOX) products are reduced in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Selective COX2 inhibition reduces kidney disease progression, but COX1 levels also are elevated in this model. Since the effect of reducing the products of both COX isoforms and the role of LOX products is not known, weanling normal and diseased Han:SPRD-cy littermates were given either low dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nordihydroguaiaretic (NDGA) or no treatment for eight weeks. Renal eicosanoids were altered in the diseased compared to normal cortex, with COX products being higher and LOX products being lower. ASA reduced COX products, cyst growth and kidney water content, while NDGA reduced LOX products without altering disease progression or kidney function. Hence, a human equivalent ASA dose equal to less than one regular strength aspirin per day slowed disease progression, while further reduction of LOX products did not worsen disease progression.

  10. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomic profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, Dorothy A.; Piccolo, Brian D.; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Liu, Shuman; Lau, Wei L.; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Moore, Mary E.; Marco, Maria L.; Martin, Roy J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xenometabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber high amylose maize-resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) has been shown to alter the gut milieu and in CKD rat models leads to markedly improved kidney function. The aim of the present study was to identify specific cecal bacteria and cecal, blood, and urinary metabolites that associate with changes in kidney function to identify potential mechanisms involved with CKD amelioration in response to dietary resistant starch. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD were fed a semipurified low-fiber diet or a high-fiber diet [59% (wt/wt) HAMRS2] for 3 wk (n = 9 rats/group). The cecal microbiome was characterized, and cecal contents, serum, and urine metabolites were analyzed. HAMRS2-fed rats displayed decreased cecal pH, decreased microbial diversity, and an increased Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio. Several uremic retention solutes were altered in the cecal contents, serum, and urine, many of which had strong correlations with specific gut bacteria abundances, i.e., serum and urine indoxyl sulfate were reduced by 36% and 66%, respectively, in HAMRS2-fed rats and urine p-cresol was reduced by 47% in HAMRS2-fed rats. Outcomes from this study were coincident with improvements in kidney function indexes and amelioration of CKD outcomes previously reported for these rats, suggesting an important role for microbial-derived factors and gut microbe metabolism in regulating host kidney function. PMID:26841824

  11. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomic profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Dorothy A; Piccolo, Brian D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Lau, Wei L; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Moore, Mary E; Marco, Maria L; Martin, Roy J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xenometabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber high amylose maize-resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) has been shown to alter the gut milieu and in CKD rat models leads to markedly improved kidney function. The aim of the present study was to identify specific cecal bacteria and cecal, blood, and urinary metabolites that associate with changes in kidney function to identify potential mechanisms involved with CKD amelioration in response to dietary resistant starch. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD were fed a semipurified low-fiber diet or a high-fiber diet [59% (wt/wt) HAMRS2] for 3 wk (n = 9 rats/group). The cecal microbiome was characterized, and cecal contents, serum, and urine metabolites were analyzed. HAMRS2-fed rats displayed decreased cecal pH, decreased microbial diversity, and an increased Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio. Several uremic retention solutes were altered in the cecal contents, serum, and urine, many of which had strong correlations with specific gut bacteria abundances, i.e., serum and urine indoxyl sulfate were reduced by 36% and 66%, respectively, in HAMRS2-fed rats and urine p-cresol was reduced by 47% in HAMRS2-fed rats. Outcomes from this study were coincident with improvements in kidney function indexes and amelioration of CKD outcomes previously reported for these rats, suggesting an important role for microbial-derived factors and gut microbe metabolism in regulating host kidney function.

  12. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-03-13

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  13. Metabolomic signatures of chronic kidney disease of diverse etiologies in the rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi -Hao; Chen, Hua; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Mao, Jia -Rong; Zhang, Li; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying -Yong

    2016-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. It frequently progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is related to very high cost and mortality. Novel biomarkers can provide insight into the novel mechanism, facilitate early detection, and monitor progression of CKD and its response to therapeutic interventions. To identify potential biomarkers, we applied an UPLC-HDMS together with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using plasma samples from patients with CKD of diverse etiologies (100 sera in discovery set and 120 sera in validation set) and two different rat models of CKD. Using comprehensive screening and validation workflow, we identified a panel of seven metabolites that were shared by all patients and animals regardless of the underlying cause of CKD. These included ricinoleic acid, stearic acid, cytosine, LPA(16:0), LPA(18:2), 3-methylhistidine, and argininic acid. The combination of these seven biomarkers enabled the discrimination of patients with CKD from healthy subjects with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 96.7%. In addition, these biomarkers accurately reflected improvements in renal function in response to the therapeutic interventions. Lastly, our results indicated that the identified biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of CKD and provide a novel tool for monitoring of the progression of disease and response to treatment in CKD patients.

  14. Metabolomic signatures of chronic kidney disease of diverse etiologies in the rats and humans

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Zhi -Hao; Chen, Hua; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; ...

    2016-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. It frequently progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is related to very high cost and mortality. Novel biomarkers can provide insight into the novel mechanism, facilitate early detection, and monitor progression of CKD and its response to therapeutic interventions. To identify potential biomarkers, we applied an UPLC-HDMS together with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using plasma samples from patients with CKD of diverse etiologies (100 sera in discovery set and 120 sera in validation set) and two different rat models of CKD. Using comprehensive screening and validationmore » workflow, we identified a panel of seven metabolites that were shared by all patients and animals regardless of the underlying cause of CKD. These included ricinoleic acid, stearic acid, cytosine, LPA(16:0), LPA(18:2), 3-methylhistidine, and argininic acid. The combination of these seven biomarkers enabled the discrimination of patients with CKD from healthy subjects with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 96.7%. In addition, these biomarkers accurately reflected improvements in renal function in response to the therapeutic interventions. Lastly, our results indicated that the identified biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of CKD and provide a novel tool for monitoring of the progression of disease and response to treatment in CKD patients.« less

  15. Metabolomic signatures of chronic kidney disease of diverse etiologies in the rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi -Hao; Chen, Hua; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Mao, Jia -Rong; Zhang, Li; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying -Yong

    2016-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. It frequently progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is related to very high cost and mortality. Novel biomarkers can provide insight into the novel mechanism, facilitate early detection, and monitor progression of CKD and its response to therapeutic interventions. To identify potential biomarkers, we applied an UPLC-HDMS together with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using plasma samples from patients with CKD of diverse etiologies (100 sera in discovery set and 120 sera in validation set) and two different rat models of CKD. Using comprehensive screening and validation workflow, we identified a panel of seven metabolites that were shared by all patients and animals regardless of the underlying cause of CKD. These included ricinoleic acid, stearic acid, cytosine, LPA(16:0), LPA(18:2), 3-methylhistidine, and argininic acid. The combination of these seven biomarkers enabled the discrimination of patients with CKD from healthy subjects with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 96.7%. In addition, these biomarkers accurately reflected improvements in renal function in response to the therapeutic interventions. Lastly, our results indicated that the identified biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of CKD and provide a novel tool for monitoring of the progression of disease and response to treatment in CKD patients.

  16. Medullary cystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Decreased alertness Easy bruising or bleeding Fatigue Frequent hiccups Headache Increased skin color (skin may appear yellow ... Kidney biopsy Kidney ultrasound Treatment There is no cure for this disease. At first, treatment focuses on ...

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells from rats with chronic kidney disease exhibit premature senescence and loss of regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer, Barbara Mara; Kramann, Rafael; Mallau, Monika; Makowska, Anna; van Roeyen, Claudia Renate; Rong, Song; Buecher, Eva Bettina; Boor, Peter; Kovacova, Katarina; Zok, Stephanie; Denecke, Bernd; Stuettgen, Esther; Otten, Simon; Floege, Juergen; Kunter, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has the potential for organ repair. Nevertheless, some factors might lessen the regenerative potential of MSCs, e.g. donor age or systemic disease. It is thus important to carefully assess the patient's suitability for autologous MSC transplantation. Here we investigated the effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on MSC function. We isolated bone marrow MSCs from remnant kidney rats (RK) with CKD (CKD-RK-MSC) and found signs of premature senescence: spontaneous adipogenesis, reduced proliferation capacity, active senescence-associated-β-galactosidase, accumulation of actin and a modulated secretion profile. The functionality of CKD-RK-MSCs in vivo was tested in rats with acute anti-Thy1.1-nephritis, where healthy MSCs have been shown to be beneficial. Rats received healthy MSCs, CKD-RK-MSC or medium by injection into the left renal artery. Kidneys receiving healthy MSCs exhibited accelerated healing of glomerular lesions, whereas CKD-RK-MSC or medium exerted no benefit. The negative influence of advanced CKD/uremia on MSCs was confirmed in a second model of CKD, adenine nephropathy (AD). MSCs from rats with adenine nephropathy (CKD-AD-MSC) also exhibited cellular modifications and functional deficits in vivo. We conclude that CKD leads to a sustained loss of in vitro and in vivo functionality in MSCs, possibly due to premature cellular senescence. Considering autologous MSC therapy in human renal disease, studies identifying uremia-associated mechanisms that account for altered MSC function are urgently needed.

  18. Effects of unfractionated heparin on renal osteodystrophy and vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease rats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yingbin; Li, Qingnan; Zuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the most widely used anticoagulant in hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Many studies have verified that UFH can induce bone loss in subjects with normal bone, but few have focused on its effect on renal osteodystrophy. We therefore investigated this issue in adenine-induced CKD rats. As CKD also impairs mineral metabolism systemically, we also studied the impacts of UFH on serum markers of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and vascular calcification. We administered low and high doses of UFH (1U/g and 2U/g body weight, respectively) to CKD rats and compared them with CKD controls. At sacrifice, the serum markers of CKD-MBD did not significantly differ among the two UFH CKD groups and the CKD control group. The mean bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the total femur and a region of interest (ROI) constituted of trabecular and cortical bone were lower in the high-dose UFH (H-UFH) CKD group than in the CKD control group (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The BMD of the femoral ROI constituted of cortical bone did not differ between the H-UFH CKD group and the CKD control group. Histomorphometrical changes in the CKD rats indicated secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the femoral trabecular bone volume, but not cortical bone volume, significantly decreased with increasing UFH dose. The same decreasing trend was found in osteoblast parameters, and an increasing trend was found in osteoclast parameters; however, most differences were not significant. Moreover, no distinct statistical differences were found in the comparison of vascular calcium or phosphorus content among the CKD control group and the two UFH CKD groups. Therefore, we concluded that UFH could induce bone loss in CKD rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism, mainly by reducing the trabecular volume and had little effect on cortical bone volume. The underlying mechanism might involve inhibition of osteoblast activity and promotion of osteoclast activity

  19. Increased Blood Pressure Variability Prior to Chronic Kidney Disease Exacerbates Renal Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Frederico F. C. T.; Araujo, Gilberto; Porto, Marcella L.; Freitas, Flavia P. S.; Graceli, Jones B.; Balarini, Camille M.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Gava, Agata L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased blood pressure variability (BPV), which can be experimentally induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD), has emerged as a new marker of the prognosis of cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Considering that increased BPV can lead to organ-damage, the goal of the present study was to evaluate the effects of SAD on renal function in an experimental model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). SAD was performed in male Wistar rats 2 weeks before 5/6 nephrectomy and the animals were evaluated 4 weeks after the induction of CKD. Our data demonstrated that BPV was increased in SAD and CKD animals and that the combination of both conditions (SAD+CKD) exacerbated BPV. The baroreflex sensitivity index was diminished in the SAD and CKD groups; this reduction was more pronounced when SAD and CKD were performed together. 5/6 nephrectomy led to hypertension, which was higher in SAD+CKD animals. Regarding renal function, the combination of SAD and CKD resulted in reduced renal plasma and blood flow, increased renal vascular resistance and augmented uraemia when compared to CKD animals. Glomerular filtration rate and BPV were negatively correlated in SAD, CKD, and SAD+CKD animals. Moreover, SAD+CKD animals presented a higher level of glomerulosclerosis when compared to all other groups. Cardiac and renal hypertrophy, as well as oxidative stress, was also further increased when SAD and CKD were combined. These results show that SAD prior to 5/6 nephrectomy exacerbates renal dysfunction, suggesting that previous augmented BPV should be considered as an important factor to the progression of renal diseases. PMID:27721797

  20. Mutant FGF23 prevents the progression of chronic kidney disease but aggravates renal osteodystrophy in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Kenichiro; Saito, Hitoshi; Segawa, Hiroko; Fukushima, Naoshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2009-04-01

    Phosphorus is one of the important factors that accelerate the progression of chronic kidney disease. Phosphorus restriction or phosphate binders have been reported to have the ability to prevent the progression of chronic kidney disease. FGF23 is a circulating factor that regulates renal phosphorus reabsorption and 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity. We focused on the phosphaturic activity of FGF23 and investigated whether a pharmacological dose of FGF23 is beneficial to the progression of renal insufficiency in uremic rats. To this end, we administered one of the mutant FGF23 expression plasmids into irreversible Thy1 rats. Chronic renal failure rats were established by intravenous injection of anti-rat CD90 (Thy1.1) monoclonal antibody to unilaterally nephrectomized Wistar rats. The rats were then intravenously injected every 2 wk with a naked DNA solution containing 10 microg of MOCK vector or a mutant FGF23 expression plasmid for 13 wk. Renal function was assessed biochemically and histopathologically. Mutant FGF23 significantly decreased serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen. The marked glomerular sclerosis observed in uremic rats receiving the MOCK vector was ameliorated in rats treated with mutant FGF23. However, mutant FGF23 not only significantly decreased serum 1,25(OH)(2)D and calcium but also aggravated high-turnover renal osteodystrophy from extremely high levels of PTH. These results might be a result of the mechanisms of FGF23 such as phosphaturic activity and lowering the level of 1,25(OH)(2)D. In conclusion, mutant FGF23 prevented the progression of chronic renal failure by regulating serum phosphorus but aggravated renal osteodystrophy from the lowered levels of 1,25(OH)(2)D.

  1. Ingestion of dug well water from an area with high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) and development of kidney and liver lesions in rats

    PubMed

    Thammitiyagodage, M G; Gunatillaka, M M; Ekanayaka, N; Rathnayake, C; Horadagoda, N U; Jayathissa, R; Gunaratne, U K; Kumara, W G; Abeynayake, P

    2017-03-31

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDu) is prevalent in the North Central Province (NCP) of Sri Lanka and ingestion of dug well water is considered a potential causative factor. Three CKDu prevalent villages were selected from the NCP based on the number of CKDu patients in the locality. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups with 10 rats each. Group No 1, 2 and 3 were given water from selected dug wells. Control group was given tap water from Colombo. Water samples were analysed for fluoride, iron, arsenic, cadmium and calcium. Histopathological examination of liver and kidney tissues were performed. Significant reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was observed in two test groups compared to the control group (p0.05). In one group hepatocellular carcinoma with elevated serum liver enzymes was observed whilst hepatitis was observed in another test group (p<0.05). But mixed lesions were common in all affected rats. Significantly high renal tubular lesion index was observed in all three experimental groups (p<0.05) and high glomerular lesion index (p=0.017) was observed in one test group. Cadmium, arsenic and iron contents were below detectable levels in the NCP water sources and tap water from Colombo. Different wells may have different concentrations of environmental toxins and depending on the severity of the toxin contents GFR and grade and type of liver and kidney lesions may vary. High fluoride and other undetected toxins in shallow dug wells may be the causative factors for renal and liver lesions in these Wistar rats.

  2. RIPK3-Mediated Necroptosis and Apoptosis Contributes to Renal Tubular Cell Progressive Loss and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjun; Cui, Hongwang; Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is caused by the progressive loss of renal tubular cells and the consequent replacement of the extracellular matrix. The progressive depletion of renal tubular cells results from apoptosis and necroptosis; however, the relative significance of each of these cell death mechanisms at different stages during the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We sought to explore the mechanisms of renal tubular cell death during the early and intermediate stages of chronic renal damage of subtotal nephrectomied (SNx) rats. The results of tissue histological assays indicated that the numbers of necrotic dying cells and apoptotic cells were significantly higher in kidney tissues derived from a rat model of CKD. In addition, there was a significant increase in necroptosis observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues from SNx rats compared with control rats, and necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) could inhibit necroptosis and reduce the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells. More importantly, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of necroptosis compared with apoptosis by TEM in vivo and in vitro and a significant increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive tubular epithelial cells that did not express caspase-3 compared with those expressing cleaved caspase-3 in vitro. Furthermore, treatment with Nec-1 and zVAD strongly reduced necroptosis- and apoptosis-mediated renal tubular cell death and decreased the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and tubular damage scores of SNx rats. These results suggest that necroptotic cell death plays a more significant role than apoptosis in mediating the loss of renal tubular cells in SNx rats and that effectively blocking both necroptosis and apoptosis improves renal function and tubular damage at early and intermediate stages of CKD. PMID:27281190

  3. Vitamin K metabolism in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have very high levels of uncarboxylated, inactive, extra-hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins measured in circulation, putting them at risk for complications of vitamin K deficiency. The major form of vitamin K found in the liver is phylloquinon...

  4. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  5. Soy Protein Alleviates Hypertension and Fish Oil Improves Diastolic Heart Function in the Han:SPRD-Cy Rat Model of Cystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Naser H M; Thandapilly, Sijo J; Jia, Yong; Netticadan, Thomas; Aukema, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in cardiac structure and function are very common among people with chronic kidney disease, in whom cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death. Dietary soy protein and fish oil reduce kidney disease progression in the Han:SPRD-Cy model of cystic renal disease. However, the effects of these dietary interventions in preventing alterations in cardiac structure and function due to kidney disease (reno-cardiac syndrome) in a cystic kidney disease model are not known. Therefore, weanling Han:SPRD-Cy diseased (Cy/+) and normal (+/+) rats were given diets containing either casein or soy protein, and either soy or fish oil in a three-way design for 8 weeks. Diseased rats had larger hearts, augmented left ventricular mass, and higher systolic and mean arterial blood pressure compared to the normal rats. Assessment of cardiac function using two-dimensional guided M-mode and pulse-wave Doppler echocardiography revealed that isovolumic relaxation time was prolonged in the diseased compared to normal rats, reflecting a diastolic heart dysfunction, and fish oil prevented this elevation. Soy protein resulted in a small improvement in systolic and mean arterial pressure but did not improve diastolic heart function, while fish oil prevented diastolic heart dysfunction in this model of cystic kidney disease.

  6. Periostin in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Prakoura, Niki; Chatziantoniou, Christos

    2017-09-07

    Chronic kidney disease is an incurable to date pathology, with renal replacement therapy through dialysis or transplantation being the only available option for end-stage patients. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the progression of kidney diseases will permit the identification of unknown mediators and potential novel markers or targets of therapy which promise more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Over the last years, periostin was established by several studies as a novel key player in the progression of renal disease. Periostin is de novo expressed focally by the injured kidney cells during the development of renal disease. In diverse cohorts of renal disease patients, the expression levels of periostin in the kidney and urine were highly correlated with the stage of the pathology and the decline of renal function. Subsequent studies in animal models demonstrated that periostin is centrally involved in mediating renal inflammation and fibrosis, contributing to the deterioration of renal structure and function. Genetic or pharmaco-genetic inhibition of periostin in animal models of renal disease was efficient in arresting the progression of the pathology. This review will summarize the recent advances on periostin in the field of kidney diseases and will discuss its utility of as a novel target of therapy for chronic kidney disease.

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed submit close x MENU Financial Assistance Grants Management System Login Information for patients Help Line Kidney Disease About your ... its grant application process through the online Grants Management System (GMS) Information for patients Information for patients If you are ...

  8. Orphan kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Neveen A

    2012-01-01

    Rare kidney diseases are a unique subset of renal disorders that are often termed 'orphan' as a result of a multitude of reasons: the small number of patients with the consequent lack of well-defined natural history and course of many of these diseases, limited awareness among the medical community, and finally the significant cost of developing novel therapeutics which makes many of these diseases unattractive targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Nevertheless, in the last decade the study and clinical management of rare kidney disease patients has been the focus of many investigative efforts. In recent years we have witnessed an enormous expansion in our knowledge of the genetic nature of a number of rare kidney diseases. Moreover, the investigation of the role of genetic disruption aiming at elucidating the pathogenesis of different and complex renal diseases has helped not only in understanding the disease states, but has also given us fundamental insights into a number of kidney developmental and physiological functions. This article will give an overview of orphan renal diseases with particular emphasis on monogenic kidney diseases. It will also focus on the classification of these diseases while highlighting a prominent example in each category.

  9. Osteoprotegerin and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Montañez-Barragán, Alejandra; Gómez-Barrera, Isaias; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Ucero, Alvaro C; González-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is associated to increased mortality. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily receptor that inhibits the actions of the cytokines receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by preventing their binding to signaling receptors in the cell membrane. OPG-deficient mice display vascular calcification while OPG prevented calcification of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and protected kidney cells from TRAIL-induced death. OPG may be a biomarker in patients with kidney disease. Circulating OPG is increased in predialysis, dialysis and transplant CKD patients and may predict vascular calcification progression and patient survival. By contrast, circulating OPG is decreased in nephrotic syndrome. In addition, free and exosome-bound urinary OPG is increased in human kidney disease. Increased urinary OPG has been associated with lupus nephritis activity. Despite the association of high OPG levels with disease, experimental functional information available suggests that OPG might be protective in kidney disease and in vascular injury in the context of uremia. Thus, tissue injury results in increased OPG, while OPG may protect from tissue injury. Recombinant OPG was safe in phase I randomized controlled trials. Further research is needed to fully define the therapeutic and biomarker potential of OPG in patients with kidney disease.

  10. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Methods: Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to 1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Results: Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Conclusion: Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:24632844

  11. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines.

  12. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition limits the progression of chronic kidney disease in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat.

    PubMed

    Yum, Victoria; Carlisle, Rachel E; Lu, Chao; Brimble, Elise; Chahal, Jasmine; Upagupta, Chandak; Ask, Kjetil; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2017-01-01

    Proteinuria is one of the primary risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and has been implicated in the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We hypothesized that the suppression of ER stress with a low molecular weight chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), would reduce the severity of CKD and proteinuria in the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) hypertensive rat. To induce hypertension and CKD, 12-wk-old male rats were placed on a high-salt (HS) diet for 4 wk with or without 4-PBA treatment. We assessed blood pressure and markers of CKD, including proteinuria, albuminuria, and renal pathology. Furthermore, we determined if HS feeding resulted in an impaired myogenic response, subsequent to ER stress. 4-PBA treatment reduced salt-induced hypertension, proteinuria, and albuminuria and preserved myogenic constriction. Furthermore, renal pathology was reduced with 4-PBA treatment, as indicated by lowered expression of profibrotic markers and fewer intratubular protein casts. In addition, ER stress in the glomerulus was reduced, and the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier was preserved. These results suggest that 4-PBA treatment protects against proteinuria in the SS rat by preserving the myogenic response and by preventing ER stress, which led to a breakdown in the glomerular filtration barrier. As such, alleviating ER stress serves as a viable therapeutic strategy to preserve kidney function and to delay the progression of CKD in the animal model under study. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. [Pregnancy and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Siekierka-Harreis, M; Rump, L C

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease in women of childbearing age reaches approximately 0.2%. Under physiological conditions pregnancy results in important hemodynamic changes on the maternal organism. In the case of chronic kidney disease these adaptations often are only partial. Physiological changes of immune response during pregnancy may contribute to the progress of renal disease. Regardless of the underlying kidney disease, one can assume that the better the glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure are the more favorable the course of pregnancy will be with the chance for a healthy child and stable renal function. To achieve this goal, a close interaction is required between gynecologist, nephrologist, and other specialists in a center with appropriate experience.

  15. Effect of paricalcitol and cinacalcet on serum phosphate, FGF-23, and bone in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Jane L.; Tokumoto, Masanori; Nakamura, Hironori; Yao, Wei; Shahnazari, Mohammad; Lane, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Calcimimetics activate the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) and reduce parathyroid hormone (PTH) by increasing the sensitivity of the parathyroid CaR to ambient calcium. The calcimimetic, cinacalcet, is effective in treating secondary hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients [chronic kidney disease (CKD 5)], but little is known about its effects on stage 3–4 CKD patients. We compared cinacalcet and paricalcitol in uremic rats with creatinine clearances “equivalent” to patients with CKD 3–4. Uremia was induced in anesthetized rats using the 5/6th nephrectomy model. Groups were 1) uremic control, 2) uremic + cinacalcet (U+Cin; 15 mg·kg−1·day−1 po for 6 wk), 3) uremic + paricalcitol (U+Par; 0.16 μg/kg, 3 × wk, ip for 6 wk), and 4) normal. Unlike U+Par animals, cinacalcet promoted hypocalcemia and marked hyperphosphatemia. The Ca × P in U+Cin rats was twice that of U+Par rats. Both compounds suppressed PTH. Serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was decreased in both U+Par and U+Cin rats. Serum FGF-23 was increased in U+Par but not in U+Cin, where it tended to decrease. Analysis of tibiae showed that U+Cin, but not U+Par, rats had reduced bone volume. U+Cin rats had similar bone formation and reduced osteoid surface, but higher bone resorption. Hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, low 1,25-(OH)2D3, and cinacalcet itself may play a role in the detrimental effects on bone seen in U+Cin rats. This requires further investigation. In conclusion, due to its effects on bone and to the hypocalcemia and severe hyperphosphatemia it induces, we believe that cinacalcet should not be used in patients with CKD without further detailed studies. PMID:20200094

  16. Diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-07-30

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg.

  17. Kidney injury molecule-1 in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yin, Caixia; Wang, Ningning

    2016-11-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1(KIM-1) is a type I membrane protein, comprising an extracellular portion and a cytoplasmic portion, which is expressed at very low levels in the normal kidney. The extracellular portion can cleave and rapidly enter tubule lumens after kidney injury, and can then be detected in the urine. It has been confirmed that the urine KIM-1 level is closely related to tissue KIM-1 level and correlated with kidney tissue damage. Not only is KIM-1 proven to be an early biomarker of acute kidney injury but it also has a potential role in predicting long-term renal outcome. This review summarizes the relationships between KIM-1 and kidney injury, especially in chronic kidney disease.

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease in Kidney Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.; Lieske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent population studies have found symptomatic kidney stone formers to be at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although kidney stones are not commonly identified as the primary cause of ESRD, they still may be important contributing factors. Paradoxically, CKD can be protective against forming kidney stones because of the substantial reduction in urine calcium excretion. Among stone formers, those with rare hereditary diseases (cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, Dent disease, and 2,8 dihydroxyadenine stones), recurrent urinary tract infections, struvite stones, hypertension, and diabetes seem to be at highest risk for CKD. The primary mechanism for CKD from kidney stones is usually attributed to an obstructive uropathy or pyelonephritis, but crystal plugs at the ducts of Bellini and parenchymal injury from shockwave lithotripsy may also contribute. The historical shift to less invasive surgical management of kidney stones has likely had a beneficial impact on the risk for CKD. Among potential kidney donors, past symptomatic kidney stones but not radiographic stones found on computed tomography scans were associated with albuminuria. Kidney stones detected by ultrasound screening have also been associated with CKD in the general population. Further studies that better classify CKD, better characterize stone formers, more thoroughly address potential confounding by comorbidities, and have active instead of passive follow-up to avoid detection bias are needed. PMID:21784825

  19. Intermedin1-53 attenuates vascular calcification in rats with chronic kidney disease by upregulation of α-Klotho.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin Rui; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yue; Hou, Yue Long; Lu, Wei Wei; Zhang, Jin Sheng; Yu, Yan Rong; Xu, Ming Jiang; Liu, Xiu Ying; Wang, Xiu Jie; Guan, You Fei; Zhu, Yi; Du, Jie; Tang, Chao Shu; Qi, Yong Fen

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency in α-Klotho is involved in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. Since intermedin (IMD)1-53 (a calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide) protects against vascular calcification, we studied whether IMD1-53 inhibits vascular calcification by upregulating α-Klotho. A rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with vascular calcification induced by the 5/6 nephrectomy plus vitamin D3 was used for study. The aortas of rats with CKD showed reduced IMD content but an increase of its receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor, and its receptor modifier, receptor activity-modifying protein 3. IMD1-53 treatment reduced vascular calcification. The expression of α-Klotho was greatly decreased in the aortas of rats with CKD but increased in the aortas of IMD1-53-treated rats with CKD. In vitro, IMD1-53 increased α-Klotho protein level in calcified vascular smooth muscle cells. α-Klotho knockdown blocked the inhibitory effect of IMD1-53 on vascular smooth muscle cell calcification and their transformation into osteoblast-like cells. The effect of IMD1-53 to upregulate α-Klotho and inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell calcification was abolished by knockdown of its receptor or its modifier protein, or treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Thus, IMD1-53 may attenuate vascular calcification by upregulating α-Klotho via the calcitonin receptor/modifying protein complex and protein kinase A signaling.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2), or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. It is important to diagnose CKD early. Diagnosis & TestsHow can my doctor tell if I have CKD?There are three simple tests that your doctor might do if he or she suspects you might have chronic kidney disease:Blood pressure testUrine albumin (a test to see ...

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH Record For the Press Radio Podcast Videocast Multimedia News in Health Newsletter Research Matters Weekly Research ... several genetic studies of kidney disease. Researchers are learning how to identify genetic markers that might predict ...

  3. Effects of lovastatin treatment on the metabolic distributions in the Han:SPRD rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Zafar, Iram; Klawitter, Jost; Pennington, Alexander T; Klepacki, Jacek; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Schrier, Robert W; Christians, Uwe; Edelstein, Charles L

    2013-07-31

    We previously demonstrated that lovastatin decreases cyst volume and improves kidney function in the Han:SPRD (Cy/+) rat model of ADPKD. Since endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory activity are evident in patients with ADPKD, we investigated whether lovastatin reduces the inflammation and vascular dysfunction and improves kidney cell energy metabolism of Cy/+ rats. Cy/+ and normal littermate control animals (+/+) were treated with either lovastatin (4 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (ethanol) from 3-8 weeks of age. 1H-NMR analysis was performed on water-soluble and lipid kidney fractions following perchloric acid extraction. Targeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to assess endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation markers in plasma and kidney tissue extracts. Cy/+ rats showed perturbations in fatty acid metabolism and increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory lipoxygenases-produced bioactive lipids was observed. Lovastatin decreased inflammatory markers, specifically 13-HODE, 12-HETE and leukotriene B4. In Cy/+ rats, lovastatin reduced the elevated homocysteine and allantoin plasma levels and increased arginine, that is known to positively affect NO production. As previously described, lovastatin was able to decrease kidney weight and cyst volume density in Cy/+ rats. The decrease in cyst volume was accompanied by a reduction in arachidonic acid-mediated inflammation markers, the normalization of metabolism of NO precursors and the improvement of kidney energy cell metabolism.

  4. Urinary Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in the Han:SPRD-cy Rat Model of Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Royal, Angela B

    2010-01-01

    The Han:SRPD-cy rat is a well-recognized model of human autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease. The disease is characterized by the development of progressive renal cysts, leading to declining renal function. Disease progression typically is monitored by measurement of plasma urea concentration. Although plasma urea may be an adequate measure of overall renal function, urinary biomarkers capable of accurately monitoring disease progression may be equally useful. The goal of this study was to assess several urinary biomarkers as potential markers of disease progression in male and female Han:SPRD-cy rats. These biomarkers were compared with changes in plasma urea concentration and morphometric changes as the disease progressed. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and concentration of α-glutathione S-transferase were measured as markers of proximal tubular dysfunction, glutathione S-transferase Yb1 as a distal tubular marker, and collagen IV as a biomarker for glomerular lesions. Urinary albumin was used as biomarker of glomerular or proximal tubular lesions. Albuminuria increased in male rats as the disease progressed, correlating with increasing plasma urea and morphologic changes. Urine concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase decreased significantly in the male heterozygotic compared with wildtype rats in the later stages of the disease. Urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferase Yb1 and collagen IV and activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase did not change during disease progression. Measurement of urinary albumin and concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase may be useful for monitoring disease progression in the male Han:SPRD-cy rat model in future experiments. PMID:21262131

  5. Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghata, Joseph; Cowley, Benjamin D

    2017-06-18

    Renal cysts, which arise from renal tubules, can be seen in a variety of hereditary and nonhereditary entities. Common mechanisms associated with renal cyst formation include increased cell proliferation, epithelial fluid secretion, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is seen as a component of numerous diseases. Autosomal dominant (AD) PKD is the most common potentially fatal hereditary disease in humans, causes renal failure in approximately 50% of affected individuals, and accounts for approximately 5% of end stage renal disease cases in the United States. ADPKD is caused by mutation in one of two genes-85% of cases are caused by mutation in PKD1 on chromosome 16 and 15% of cases are caused by mutation in PKD2 on chromosome 4. Polycystin-1, encoded by PKD1, is a large protein, has multiple transmembrane spanning domains, has extracellular regions suggesting a role in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions, has intracellular domains suggesting a role in signal transduction, and can physically interact with Polycystin-2. Polycystin-2 is smaller, has transmembrane domains, can act as a cation channel with calcium permeability, and may be regulated by Polycystin-1. These proteins, and many others associated with cystic kidney disease, localize to primary cilia, which may act as flow sensors in the kidney; cystic kidney diseases have also been termed ciliopathies. An increasing number of intracellular mechanisms, which are abnormally regulated in PKD, have been described and are potential targets for therapy, which is lacking in this common hereditary disease. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:945-975, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Impaired expression of key molecules of ammoniagenesis underlies renal acidosis in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bürki, Remy; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Bettoni, Carla; Wang, Xueqi; Serra, Andreas L; Wagner, Carsten A

    2015-05-01

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the development of renal metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis per se may represent a trigger for progression of CKD. Renal acidosis of CKD is characterized by low urinary ammonium excretion with preserved urinary acidification indicating a defect in renal ammoniagenesis, ammonia excretion or both. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, have not been addressed to date. We examined the Han:SPRD rat model and used a combination of metabolic studies, mRNA and protein analysis of renal molecules involved in acid-base handling. We demonstrate that rats with reduced kidney function as evident from lower creatinine clearance, lower haematocrit, higher plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, phosphate and potassium had metabolic acidosis that could be aggravated by HCl acid loading. Urinary ammonium excretion was highly reduced whereas urinary pH was more acidic in CKD compared with control animals. The abundance of key enzymes and transporters of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, PEPCK and SNAT3) and bicarbonate transport (NBCe1) was reduced in CKD compared with control animals. In the collecting duct, normal expression of the B1 H(+)-ATPase subunit is in agreement with low urinary pH. In contrast, the RhCG ammonia transporter, critical for the final secretion of ammonia into urine was strongly down-regulated in CKD animals. In the Han:SPRD rat model for CKD, key molecules required for renal ammoniagenesis and ammonia excretion are highly down-regulated providing a possible molecular explanation for the development and maintenance of renal acidosis in CKD patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  7. Acupuncture and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Ma, Sheng-Xing; Feng, Lili

    2005-07-01

    Acupuncture as a complex therapeutic system has been used to treat a variety of diseases and pathological conditions. Although the exact mechanism(s) of acupuncture remains unknown, some evidence suggests a mechanism initially involving signal transduction through connective tissue, with secondary involvement of other systems including the nervous system. Acupuncture has become increasingly popular in the Western countries as a therapy for pain and several chronic disorders difficult to manage with conventional treatments. Acupuncture and acupuncture-like somatic nerve stimulation have been used in different kidney diseases and several complications related to them. The effect of acupuncture techniques in some kidney diseases is reviewed on the basis of clinical reports as well as mechanisms that may possibly explain the beneficial effects mediated by acupressure/acupuncture. The potential effect of acupressure techniques in renal inflammation and whether these effects could be mediated through the newly identified cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are discussed.

  8. Efficacy and safety of osteoporosis medications in a rat model of late-stage chronic kidney disease accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Ota, M; Takahata, M; Shimizu, T; Kanehira, Y; Kimura-Suda, H; Kameda, Y; Hamano, H; Hiratsuka, S; Sato, D; Iwasaki, N

    2017-04-01

    This study showed that bisphosphonate was safe and effective for the treatment of bone disorders in stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) rats. Intermittent teriparatide therapy showed an anabolic action on bone even under secondary hyperparathyroidism conditions without having an adverse effect on mineral metabolism in late-stage CKD.

  9. First D1-like receptor PET imaging of the rat and primate kidney: implications for human disease monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Granda, Michael L.; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Borra, Ronald H. J.; Schauer, Nathan; Aisaborhale, Ehimen; Guimaraes, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    The intrarenal dopamine system is important for signaling and natriuresis, and significant dysfunction is associated with hypertension and kidney disease in ex vivo studies. Dopamine receptors also modulate and are modulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Here, we show the first in vivo measurement of D1-like receptors in the renal cortex of Sprague-Dawley rat and Papio anubis baboon using [11C]NNC 112, a positron emission tomography radioligand for D1-like receptors. In addition, we show a D1-like binding potential response to angiotensin II blockade in rats using losartan. Demonstration of self-saturable binding in the rat as well as specific and saturable binding in Papio anubis validate the use of [11C]NNC 112 in the first in vivo measurement of renal dopamine D1-like receptors. Furthermore, [11C]NNC 112 is a radioligand tool already validated for use in probing human central nervous system (CNS) D1-like receptors. Our work demonstrates specific and saturable non-CNS binding in higher animals and the ability to quantify physiological response to drug treatment and provides a clear path to extend use of [11C]NNC 112 to study renal dopamine in humans. PMID:24808534

  10. First D1-like receptor PET imaging of the rat and primate kidney: implications for human disease monitoring.

    PubMed

    Granda, Michael L; Schroeder, Frederick A; Borra, Ronald H J; Schauer, Nathan; Aisaborhale, Ehimen; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-07-01

    The intrarenal dopamine system is important for signaling and natriuresis, and significant dysfunction is associated with hypertension and kidney disease in ex vivo studies. Dopamine receptors also modulate and are modulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Here, we show the first in vivo measurement of D1-like receptors in the renal cortex of Sprague-Dawley rat and Papio anubis baboon using [(11)C]NNC 112, a positron emission tomography radioligand for D1-like receptors. In addition, we show a D1-like binding potential response to angiotensin II blockade in rats using losartan. Demonstration of self-saturable binding in the rat as well as specific and saturable binding in Papio anubis validate the use of [(11)C]NNC 112 in the first in vivo measurement of renal dopamine D1-like receptors. Furthermore, [(11)C]NNC 112 is a radioligand tool already validated for use in probing human central nervous system (CNS) D1-like receptors. Our work demonstrates specific and saturable non-CNS binding in higher animals and the ability to quantify physiological response to drug treatment and provides a clear path to extend use of [(11)C]NNC 112 to study renal dopamine in humans.

  11. [Advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Alcázar Arroyo, R; Orte Martínez, L; Otero González, A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), like other chronic diseases, is a serious public health problem because of both its high incidence and prevalence and its significant morbidity and mortality and socioeconomic cost. Advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) includes stages 4 and 5 of the CKD classification. It is defined as chronic kidney disease in which there is a severe reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 30 ml/min). The treatment goals are to reduce and treat the complications associated with chronic kidney failure and to prepare the patient adequately and sufficiently in advance for kidney replacement therapy. The prevalence of ACKD is 0.2-0.6% of the adult population. This prevalence increases with age and in Spain is 1.6% in persons older than 64 years. - CKD is easily detected in clinical practice with simple tests (GFR estimated by equations based on serum creatinine, albuminuria and urine sediment) (Strength of Recommendation B). - It is recommended to detect the presence of CKD in all persons older than 60 years or with hypertension, diabetes or cardiovascular disease (Strength of Recommendation B). - Early detection and appropriate referral to the nephrology of patients with ACKD improves long-term morbidity and reduces costs for both the patient and the health care system (Strength of Recommendation B). Adequate communication and coordination between the primary care and nephrology is essential for this early detection: - Referral to nephrology should be made based on the stage of CKD, age of the patient, rate of progression of kidney failure, degree of albuminuria and presence or appearance of early warning signs.All patients with CKD stages 4-5 should be referred to nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - A protocol should be established in each health area for joint follow-up between primary care and nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - The creation of multidisciplinary ACKD units including a nephrologist, nephrology nurse

  12. Combined effects of ghrelin and higher food intake enhance skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity and AKT phosphorylation in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Zhu, Xinxia; Deboer, Mark; Datta, Rakesh; Culler, Michael D; Zanetti, Michela; Guarnieri, Gianfranco; Marks, Daniel L

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance occur in chronic kidney disease. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone previously shown to enhance muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities and AKT-mediated insulin signaling independent of food intake in healthy rats. Here we determined the impact of ghrelin treatment on anorexia, skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity, AKT phosphorylation as a measure of insulin signaling, and lean body mass in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Ghrelin infusion promoted higher food intake and lean body mass. Further, although muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities were low in the rats with CKD (chronic kidney disease), they normalized with ghrelin treatment, a change that was consistent with the increase in the transcript levels of regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid metabolism. This was associated with a lower muscle triglyceride content and higher AKT phosphorylation. Pair-feeding showed that mitochondrial effects of ghrelin are independent of changes in food intake, whereas combined ghrelin treatment and higher food intake were needed to enhance AKT phosphorylation. Thus, ghrelin-induced muscle mitochondrial changes and lower tissue triglycerides could favor insulin action and muscle anabolism in the presence of improvement in food intake. Our study shows that combined effects of ghrelin on appetite and muscle mitochondria improve muscle metabolic and nutritional alterations in chronic kidney disease. This could have potential beneficial impact on patient morbidity and survival.

  13. Feeding soy protein isolate and n-3 PUFA affects polycystic liver disease progression in a PCK rat model of autosomal polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maditz, Kaitlin H; Benedito, Vagner A; Oldaker, Chris; Nanda, Nainika; Lateef, Sundus S; Livengood, Ryan; Tou, Janet C

    2015-04-01

    In polycystic liver disease (PCLD), multiple cysts cause liver enlargement, structural damage, and loss of function. Soy protein and dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been found to decrease cyst proliferation and inflammation in polycystic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether soy protein and n-3 PUFA supplementation attenuates PCLD. Young (age 28 days) female PCK rats were fed (n = 12 per group) either casein + corn oil (casein + CO), casein + soybean oil (casein + SO), soy protein isolate + soybean oil (SPI + SO), or SPI + 1:1 soybean/salmon oil blend (SPI + SB) diet for 12 weeks. Liver histology, gene expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and serum markers of liver injury were determined. Diet had no effect on PCLD progression as indicated by no significant differences in liver weight and hepatic proliferation gene expression between diet groups. PCK rats fed SPI + SB diet, however, had the greatest (P < 0.05) histological evidence of hepatic cyst obstruction, portal inflammation, steatosis, and upregulation (P = 0.03) of fibrosis-related genes. Rats fed SPI + SB diet also had the lowest (P < 0.001) serum cholesterol and higher (P < 0.05) serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin concentrations. Feeding young female PCK rats SPI and n-3 PUFA failed to attenuate PCLD progression. Furthermore, feeding SPI + SB diet resulted in complications of hepatic steatosis attributable to cysts obstruction of bile duct and hepatic vein. Based on the results, it was concluded that diet intervention alone was not effective at attenuating PCLD associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

  14. [Kidney diseases: new issues].

    PubMed

    Ronco, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects two to four million people in France and most of them are not aware of their disease. CKD is a major, independent risk factor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; the cardiovascular risk increases with the severity of renal failure. Evaluation of renal function (GFR) relies on MDRD and CKD-EPI equations. The French CKD-REIN cohort with more than 3000 patients followed for 5 years, will hopefully provide substantial advances in the knowledge of CKD epidemiology, of risk factors and mechanisms of CKD progression and medical practices. Improving CKD screening based on blood pressure, proteinuria (microalbuminuria in diabetic patients) and serum creatinine, is a national duty in high risk patients (with diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases). A major research goal is to identify new therapeutic targets and biomarkers, in order to treat kidney diseases before the occurrence of renal insufficiency, to halt their progression and to decrease cardiovascular risk. Careful therapeutic education of patients is required to successfully implement established guidelines, appropriate diets and new therapeutic strategies.

  15. A new apparatus for standardized rat kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P M

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney.

  16. Pruritus in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Combs, Sara A; Teixeira, J Pedro; Germain, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Pruritus is a common and distressing symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease. The most recent epidemiologic data have suggested that approximately 40% of patients with end-stage renal disease experience moderate to severe pruritus and that uremic pruritus (UP) has a major clinical impact, being associated strongly with poor quality of life, impaired sleep, depression, and increased mortality. The pathogenesis of UP remains largely unclear, although several theories on etiologic or contributing factors have been proposed including increased systemic inflammation; abnormal serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus levels; an imbalance in opiate receptors; and a neuropathic process. UP can present somewhat variably, although it tends to affect large, discontinuous, but symmetric, areas of skin and to be most symptomatic at night. A variety of alternative systemic or dermatologic conditions should be considered, especially in patients with asymmetric pruritus or other atypical features. Treatment initially should focus on aggressive skin hydration, patient education on minimizing scratching, and optimization of the aspects of chronic kidney disease care that are most relevant to pruritus, including dialysis adequacy and serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus management. Data for therapy specifically for UP remain limited, although topical therapies, gabapentin, type B ultraviolet light phototherapy, acupuncture, and opioid-receptor modulators all may play a role.

  17. Kidney biomimicry--a rediscovered scientific field that could provide hope to patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Most studies on kidney disease have relied on classic experimental studies in mice and rats or clinical studies in humans. From such studies much understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease has been obtained. However, breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of kidney diseases have been relatively few, and new approaches to fight kidney disease are needed. Here we discuss kidney biomimicry as a new approach to understand kidney disease. Examples are given of how various animals have developed ways to prevent or respond to kidney failure, how to protect themselves from hypoxia or oxidative stress and from the scourge of hyperglycemia. We suggest that investigation of evolutionary biology and comparative physiology might provide new insights for the prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

  18. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented.

  19. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Christopher R.; Kuczmarski, James M.; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J.; Brennan Harris, M.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ⅚ ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10−9-10−5 M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[3H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine. PMID:24966085

  20. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martens, Christopher R; Kuczmarski, James M; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J; Harris, M Brennan; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G

    2014-08-15

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ⅚ ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[(3)H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine.

  1. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  2. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Qun; Dai, Zhenhua; Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-04-05

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury.

  3. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury. PMID:27003359

  4. Macrophage polarization in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaojiang; Chen, Shi-You

    Macrophage accumulation associates closely with the degree of renal structural injury and renal dysfunction in human kidney diseases. Depletion of macrophages reduces while adoptive transfer of macrophages worsens inflammation in animal models of the renal injury. However, emerging evidence support that macrophage polarization plays a critical role in the progression of a number of kidney diseases including obstructive nephropathy, ischemia-reperfusion injury, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other kidney diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the macrophage infiltration and polarization in these inflammatory and fibrotic kidney diseases, discussing the results mostly from studies in animal models. In view of the critical role of macrophage in the progression of these diseases, manipulating macrophage phenotype may be a potential effective strategy to treat various kidney diseases.

  5. Inhibition of cyst growth in PCK and Wpk rat models of polycystic kidney disease with low doses of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonists

    PubMed Central

    Flaig, Stephanie M.; Gattone, Vincent H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives The studies were designed to test the efficacy of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists in two rodent models of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Materials and Methods The PCK rat is a slowly progressing cystic model while the Wpk-/- rat is a rapidly progressing model. PCK rats were fed with a pharmacological (0.4 mg/kg body weight [BW]) and a sub-pharmacological (0.04 mg/kg BW) dose of rosiglitazone (week 4–28). Wpk-/- rats were fed with pharmacological (2.0 mg/kg BW) and sub-pharmacologic (0.2 mg/kg BW) doses of pioglitazone from day 5 to 18. At termination, kidney weights of treated versus untreated cystic animals were used to determine efficacy. The current studies were also compared with previous studies containing higher doses of PPARγ agonists. The concentrations used in the animals were calculated with reference to equivalent human doses for both drugs. Results The current studies demonstrate: 1) that low, pharmacologically relevant, doses of the PPARγ agonists effectively inhibit cyst growth; 2) there is a class action of the drugs with both commercially available PPARγ agonists, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone, inhibiting cyst growth; 3) the drugs showed efficacy in two different preclinical cystic models. In the PCK rat, animals fed with a sub-pharmacological dose of rosiglitazone for 24 weeks had significantly lower kidney weights than untreated animals (3.68 ± 0.13 g vs. 4.17 ± 0. 11 g, respectively, P < 0.01) while treatment with a pharmacologic dose had no significant effect on kidney weight. The rapidly progressing Wpk-/- rats were fed with pharmacological and sub-pharmacologic doses of pioglitazone from day 5 to 18 and the kidneys were compared with non-treated, cystic animals. Kidney weights on the pharmacologic dose were not statistically lower than the untreated animals while rats fed a sub-pharmacologic dose showed a significant decrease compared with untreated animals (3

  6. Treatment with enalapril and not diltiazem ameliorated progression of chronic kidney disease in rats, and normalized renal AT1 receptor expression as measured with PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Basma; deKemp, Rob A; Croteau, Etienne; Hadizad, Tayebeh; Burns, Kevin D; Beanlands, Rob S; DaSilva, Jean N

    2017-01-01

    ACE inhibitors are considered first line of treatment in patients with many forms of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Other antihypertensives such as calcium channel blockers achieve similar therapeutic effectiveness in attenuating hypertension-related renal damage progression. Our objective was to explore the value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal AT1 receptor (AT1R) to guide therapy in the 5/6 subtotal-nephrectomy (Nx) rat model of CKD. Ten weeks after Nx, Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 10mg/kg/d enalapril (NxE), 30mg/kg/d diltiazem (NxD) or left untreated (Nx) for an additional 8-10 weeks. Kidney AT1R expression was assessed using in vivo [18F]fluoropyridine-losartan PET and in vitro autoradiography. Compared to shams, Nx rats exhibited higher systolic blood pressure that was reduced by both enalapril and diltiazem. At 18-20 weeks, plasma creatinine and albuminuria were significantly increased in Nx, reduced to sham levels in NxE, but enhanced in NxD rats. Enalapril treatment decreased kidney angiotensin II whereas diltiazem induced significant elevations in plasma and kidney levels. Reduced PET renal AT1R levels in Nx were normalized by enalapril but not diltiazem, and results were supported by autoradiography. Reduction of renal blood flow in Nx was restored by enalapril, while no difference was observed in myocardial blood flow amongst groups. Enhanced left ventricle mass in Nx was not reversed by enalapril but was augmented with diltiazem. Stroke volume was diminished in untreated Nx compared to shams and restored with both therapies. [18F]Fluoropyridine-Losartan PET allowed in vivo quantification of kidney AT1R changes associated with progression of CKD and with various pharmacotherapies.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Polycystic kidney disease, adult type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Recessive ...

  8. Systems biology of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    He, John Cijiang; Chuang, Peter Y; Ma'ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Kidney diseases manifest in progressive loss of renal function, which ultimately leads to complete kidney failure. The mechanisms underlying the origins and progression of kidney diseases are not fully understood. Multiple factors involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases have made the traditional candidate gene approach of limited value toward full understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. A systems biology approach that integrates computational modeling with large-scale data gathering of the molecular changes could be useful in identifying the multiple interacting genes and their products that drive kidney diseases. Advances in biotechnology now make it possible to gather large data sets to characterize the role of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in kidney diseases. When combined with computational analyses, these experimental approaches will provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological processes. Multiscale analysis that connects the molecular interactions and cell biology of different kidney cells to renal physiology and pathology can be utilized to identify modules of biological and clinical importance that are perturbed in disease processes. This integration of experimental approaches and computational modeling is expected to generate new knowledge that can help to identify marker sets to guide the diagnosis, monitor disease progression, and identify new therapeutic targets.

  9. Systems biology of kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, John Cijiang; Chuang, Peter Y.; Ma'ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Kidney diseases manifest in progressive loss of renal function, which ultimately leads to complete kidney failure. The mechanisms underlying the origins and progression of kidney diseases are not fully understood. Multiple factors involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases have made the traditional candidate gene approach of limited value toward full understanding of the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. A systems biology approach that integrates computational modeling with large-scale data gathering of the molecular changes could be useful in identifying the multiple interacting genes and their products that drive kidney diseases. Advances in biotechnology now make it possible to gather large data sets to characterize the role of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in kidney diseases. When combined with computational analyses, these experimental approaches will provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological processes. Multiscale analysis that connects the molecular interactions and cell biology of different kidney cells to renal physiology and pathology can be utilized to identify modules of biological and clinical importance that are perturbed in disease processes. This integration of experimental approaches and computational modeling is expected to generate new knowledge that can help to identify marker sets to guide the diagnosis, monitor disease progression, and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:21881558

  10. Age-Related Alterations in Blood Biochemical Characterization of Hepatorenal Function in the PCK Rat: A Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yuichi; Brock, William J; Ito, Yuko; Morishita, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    PCK rats develop age-related polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and liver disease and have been used to investigate pharmacotherapies to ameliorate hepatorenal lesions for patients with PKD. The PCK rat may be useful to understand the possible susceptibility to hepatotoxicity observed in the patient with PKD having hepatic polycystic lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the background blood biochemical changes that reflect the hepatorenal function of PCK rats as well as the terminal histopathology in order to determine whether this model would be suitable for extrapolating the susceptibility of hepatotoxicity in patients. The blood biochemical parameters of hepatorenal function and histopathology were investigated in PCK rats at ages 5 to 19 weeks and compared to those outcomes in the Sprague Dawley (SD) rat. There were notable blood biochemical changes possibly due to biliary dysgenesis in the PCK rat as early as 5 weeks of age. High levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bile acids persisted throughout the study compared to the SD rat. Increased aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and hyperlipidemia and a decrease in albumin were also evident at 10 to 19 weeks of age possibly due to progression of cholestatic liver dysfunction secondary to age-related liver cystic progression. Increased liver weights generally correlated with the severity of biliary and hepatic histopathological changes. In male PCK rats, age-related increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at 10 to 19 weeks of age were observed, and the cystic progression was more severe than that in females. These data indicate that the PCK rat showed notable blood biochemical changes reflecting alteration of the liver function compared to the SD rat. Also, there was a large individual variation in these parameters possibly due to variable progression rate of biliary dysgenesis and subsequent liver damages in PCK

  11. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition.

  12. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomics profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xeno-metabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber—high amylose maize...

  13. Resistant starch alters gut microbiota and reduces uremic retention solutes in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the reduced ability to void urine, leading to accumulation of waste products in the body. Recently, it has been observed that patients with CKD have an altered gut microbiome. This may in part be due to reduced fiber intake. Patients with CKD are ofte...

  14. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and diet-induced weight loss on diabetic kidney disease in the Zucker diabetic fatty rat.

    PubMed

    Neff, Karl J; Elliott, Jessie A; Corteville, Caroline; Abegg, Kathrin; Boza, Camilo; Lutz, Thomas A; Docherty, Neil G; le Roux, Carel W

    2017-01-01

    Reductions in urinary protein excretion after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in patients with diabetic kidney disease have been reported in multiple studies. To determine the weight loss dependence of the effect of RYGB on urinary protein excretion by comparing renal outcomes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats undergoing either gastric bypass surgery or a sham operation with or without weight matching. University laboratories. Zucker diabetic fatty rats underwent surgery at 18 weeks of age. A subgroup of sham operated rats were weight matched to RYGB operated rats by restricting food intake. Urinary protein excretion was assessed at baseline and at postoperative weeks 4 and 12. Renal histology and macrophage-associated inflammation were assessed at postoperative week 12. Progressive urinary protein excretion was attenuated by both RYGB and diet-induced weight loss, albeit to a lesser extent by the latter. Both weight loss interventions produced equivalent reductions in glomerulomegaly, glomerulosclerosis, and evidence of renal macrophage infiltration. Weight loss per se improves renal structure and attenuates renal inflammatory responses in an experimental animal model of diabetic kidney disease. Better glycemic control post-RYGB may in part explain the greater reductions in urinary protein excretion after gastric bypass surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Baclofen Toxicity in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Erin; Kothari, Niraj R; Roberts, John K; Sparks, Matthew A

    2017-09-09

    Baclofen, a commonly prescribed muscle relaxant, is primarily excreted via the kidneys; toxicity is a potentially serious adverse outcome in patients with decreased kidney function. We describe a patient with end-stage kidney disease receiving hemodialysis who developed neurotoxicity and hemodynamic instability after receiving baclofen for muscle spasms. In this case, prompt recognition of baclofen toxicity and urgent hemodialysis were effective in reversing this toxicity. This case is used to examine the pharmacokinetics and pathophysiology of baclofen toxicity and discuss appropriate diagnosis and management of baclofen toxicity. We recommend reducing the baclofen dose in patients who have moderately reduced kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 30-60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and avoiding use in patients with severely reduced kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30mL/min/1.73m(2)) or on renal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphometric analysis of muscle fibre types in rat locomotor and postural skeletal muscles in different stages of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Flisinski, M; Brymora, A; Elminowska-Wenda, G; Bogucka, J; Walasik, K; Stefanska, A; Strozecki, P; Manitius, J

    2014-08-01

    Muscle weakness and progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass are serious complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The pathogenesis of this condition is still poorly understood. The study investigated fibre type distribution and diameter in functionally different skeletal muscles: locomotor, gastrocnemius muscle (MG) and postural, longissimus thoracis muscle (ML) together with an evaluation of metabolic disturbances and nutritional parameters of rats with different stages of CKD. Wistar rats were randomized to a sham operation - CON, uninephrectomy - CKD1/2 or subtotal nephrectomy - CKD5/6. After 4 weeks, serum concentration haemoglobin (Hb), haptoglobin (Hp), MCP-1, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and homocysteine (Hcy) were measured. Muscle specimens were stained for myofibrillary ATPase and NADH-diaphoreses activity according to Ziegan's method. There was a significant increase in the percentage of IID/X with a concomitant decrease of IIB fibres in ML in CKD1/2 vs. CON and CKD5/6. IIB fibre diameters in ML were smaller (53.4±7.3 vs. 58.1±8.1 and 59.8±11.2; p=0.08) for CKD5/6 vs. CKD1/2 and CON, respectively. There were significant differences for CKD5/6 and CKD1/2 vs. CON in: Hb (11.4±3.1; 13.7±0.7 and 14.1±1 g/dl), Hp (1.6±0.6; 1.6±0.6 and 0.7±0.4 mg/ml), AGEs (5.1±0.6; 4.3±1.2 and 4.6±0.9 AU), Hcy (7.2±1.2; 5.1±0.5 and 4.9±0.5 M), MCP-1 (609±255; 489±265 and 292±113 pg/ml), respectively. We concluded that early stages of CKD could induce the process of compensatory fast to slow fibre transformation, while in more advanced CKD this process may be blocked and atrophy of fast-twitch fibres may occur, predominantly in non-locomotor muscles. These disturbances can be secondary to CKD-related metabolic burden and inflammation.

  17. Mitochondria Damage and Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is a vital organ that demands an extraordinary amount of energy to actively maintain the body's metabolism, plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis, nutrients reabsorption, and hormone secretion. Kidney is only second to the heart in mitochondrial count and oxygen consumption. As such, the health and status of the energy power house, the mitochondria, is pivotal to the health and proper function of the kidney. Mitochondria are heterogeneous and highly dynamic organelles and their functions are subject to complex regulations through modulation of its biogenesis, bioenergetics, dynamics and clearance within cell. Kidney diseases, either acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD), are important clinical issues and global public health concerns with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapeutic strategies to cure or retard the progression of the diseases. Mitochondria-targeted therapeutics has become a major focus for modern research with the belief that maintaining mitochondria homeostasis can prevent kidney pathogenesis and disease progression. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular events that govern mitochondria functions in health and disease will potentially lead to improved therapeutics development.

  18. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amyloid proteins in blood may indicate amyloidosis. Kidney Biopsy Only a biopsy can show the amyloid protein ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  19. Mapping genetic determinants of kidney damage in rat models.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Angela; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2012-07-01

    During the last two decades, significant progress in our understanding of the development of kidney diseases has been achieved by unravelling the mechanisms underlying rare familial forms of human kidney diseases. Due to the genetic heterogeneity in human populations and the complex multifactorial pathogenesis of the disease phenotypes, the dissection of the genetic basis of common chronic kidney diseases (CKD) remains a difficult task. In this regard, several inbred rat models provide valuable complementary tools to uncover the genetic basis of complex renal disease phenotypes that are related to common forms of CKD. In this review, data obtained in nine experimental rat models, including the Buffalo (BUF), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS), Fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH), Goto-Kakizaki (GK), Lyon hypertensive (LH), Munich Wistar Frömter (MWF), Sabra hypertension-prone (SBH), spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) inbred strains, that contributed to the genetic dissection of renal disease phenotypes are presented. In this panel of inbred strains, a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) linked to albuminuria/proteinuria and other functional or structural kidney abnormalities could be identified by QTL mapping analysis and follow-up studies including consomic and congenic rat lines. The comprehensive exploitation of the genotype-renal phenotype associations that are inherited in this panel of rat strains is suitable for making a significant contribution to the development of an integrated approach to the systems genetics of common CKD.

  20. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Biochemical and Bone Histomorphometric Alterations in a Chronic Kidney Disease Rat Model Undergoing Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hung-Wei; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lin, Hsin-Shih; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Jou, I-Ming; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphate burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to elevated serum fibroblast factor-23 (FGF-23) levels, secondary hyperparathyroidism and chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). However dissociated hyperphosphatemia and low serum FGF-23 concentrations have been observed in experimentally parathyoridectomized rats. The relationships between serum mineral, hormone, and bone metabolism may be altered in the presence of CKD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a consistent relationship existed between serum FGF-23 levels, specific serum biochemical markers, and histomorphometric parameters of bone metabolism in a parathyroidectomized CKD animal model. Results Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: parathyroidectomy (PTX) and CKD (PTX+CKD, 9 rats), CKD without PTX (CKD, 9 rats), and neither PTX nor CKD (sham-operated control, 8 rats); CKD was induced by partial nephrectomy. At 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy, serum biomarkers were measured. Bone histomorphometries of the distal femoral metaphyseal bone were analyzed. The mean serum FGF-23 levels and mean bone formation rate were the highest in the CKD group and the lowest in the PTX+CKD group. Bone volume parameters increased significantly in the PTX+CKD group. Pearson’s correlation revealed that serum FGF-23 levels associated with those of intact parathyroid hormone, phosphate, collagen type I C-telopeptide, and calcium. Univariate linear regression showed that serum FGF-23 values correlated with bone formation rate, bone volume, and osteoid parameters. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed that circulating FGF-23 values were independently associated with bone volume and thickness (β = -0.737; p < 0.001 and β = -0.526; p = 0.006, respectively). Serum parathyroid hormone levels independently correlated with bone formation rate (β = 0.714; p < 0.001) while collagen type I C-telopeptide levels correlated with osteoid parameter. Conclusion Serum FGF

  1. The effect of swimming exercise on adenine-induced kidney disease in rats, and the influence of curcumin or lisinopril thereon

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Turan; Al Suleimani, Yousuf; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Kalbani, Jamila; Ashique, Mohammed; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been reported to benefit from different types of exercises. It has also been shown that the ACE inhibitor lisinopril, and the natural product curcumin are also beneficial in different models of CKD in rats. We assessed the influence of moderate swimming exercise (SE) on rats with adenine-induced CKD, and tested the possible effects of lisinopril and/or curcumin thereon using several physiological, biochemical, histopathological and immunohistochemical parameters. Rats (either sedentary or subjected to SE) were randomly divided into several groups, and given for five weeks either normal food or food mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD. Some of these groups were also concomitantly treated orally with curcumin (75 mg/kg), or lisinopril (10 mg/kg) and were subjected to moderate SE (45 min/day three days each week). Rats fed adenine showed the typical biochemical, histopathological signs of CKD such as elevations in blood pressure, urinary albumin / creatinine ratio, and plasma urea, creatinine, indoxyl sulfate and phosphorus. SE, curcumin or lisinopril, given singly, significantly ameliorated all the adenine-induced actions. Administering curcumin or lisinopril with SE improved the histopathology of the kidneys, a salutary effect not seen with SE alone. Combining SE to the nephroprotective agents’ curcumin or lisinopril might offer additional nephroprotection. PMID:28445490

  2. Necroinflammation in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Linkermann, Andreas; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional causality between kidney injury and inflammation remains an area of unexpected discoveries. The last decade unraveled the molecular mechanisms of sterile inflammation, which established danger signaling via pattern recognition receptors as a new concept of kidney injury-related inflammation. In contrast, renal cell necrosis remained considered a passive process executed either by the complement-related membrane attack complex, exotoxins, or cytotoxic T cells. Accumulating data now suggest that renal cell necrosis is a genetically determined and regulated process involving specific outside-in signaling pathways. These findings support a unifying theory in which kidney injury and inflammation are reciprocally enhanced in an autoamplification loop, referred to here as necroinflammation. This integrated concept is of potential clinical importance because it offers numerous innovative molecular targets for limiting kidney injury by blocking cell death, inflammation, or both. Here, the contribution of necroinflammation to AKI is discussed in thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing and crescentic GN, acute tubular necrosis, and infective pyelonephritis or sepsis. Potential new avenues are further discussed for abrogating necroinflammation-related kidney injury, and questions and strategies are listed for further exploration in this evolving field.

  3. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  4. Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofang; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2013-01-01

    Increased levels of 3’–5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) stimulate cell proliferation and fluid secretion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Since hydrolytic capacity of phosphodiesterases (PDE) far exceeds maximum rate of synthesis by adenylyl cyclases (AC), cellular levels of cAMP are more sensitive to PDE inhibition than to AC activity changes. We have used enzymatic, western blot, immunohistochemistry, PCR and biochemical assays to study activity and expression of PDE families and isoforms and expression of downstream effectors of cAMP signaling in wildtype and PKD rat and mouse kidneys. The results indicate: 1) Species specific differences in PDE expression; higher PDE activity in kidneys from mice compared to rats; higher contribution of PDE1, relative to PDE4 and PDE3, to total PDE activity of kidney lysate and lower PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 activities in murine cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. 2) Reduced levels of several PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 proteins despite mRNA upregulation, possibly due to increased protein degradation. 3) Increased cGMP levels in polycystic kidneys, suggesting in vivo downregulation of PDE1 activity. 4) Additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and cGMP on cystogenesis in vitro. 5) Upregulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) subunits Iα and IIβ, PKare, CREB-1 mRNA, and CREM, ATF-1 and ICER proteins in cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. In summary, the results of this study suggest that alterations in cyclic nucleotide catabolism may render the cystic epithelium particularly susceptible to factors acting on Gs coupled receptors, account at least in part for the upregulation of cyclic nucleotide signaling in PKD, and contribute substantially to the progression of this disease. PMID:19924104

  5. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 813–636–8122 Email: info@aakp.org Internet: www.aakp.org American Kidney Fund 6110 Executive ... Fax: 301–881–0898 Email: helpline@kidneyfund.org Internet: www.kidneyfund.org Life Options Rehabilitation Resource Center ...

  6. Differential miRNA Expression in Cells and Matrix Vesicles in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Rats with Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Praneet; Chen, Neal X; O'Neill, Kalisha; McClintick, Jeanette N; Moe, Sharon M; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex process and has been associated with aging, diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although there have been several studies that examine the role of miRNAs (miRs) in bone osteogenesis, little is known about the role of miRs in vascular calcification and their role in the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities. Matrix vesicles (MV) are known to play in important role in initiating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. In the present study, we performed miRNA microarray analysis to identify the dysregulated miRs between MV and VSMC derived from CKD rats to understand the role of post-transcriptional regulatory networks governed by these miRNAs in vascular calcification and to uncover the differential miRNA content of MV. The percentage of miRNA to total RNA was increased in MV compared to VSMC. Comparison of expression profiles of miRNA by microarray demonstrated 33 miRs to be differentially expressed with the majority (~ 57%) of them down-regulated. Target genes controlled by differentially expressed miRNAs were identified utilizing two different complementary computational approaches Miranda and Targetscan to understand the functions and pathways that may be affected due to the production of MV from calcifying VSMC thereby contributing to the regulation of genes by miRs. We found several processes including vascular smooth muscle contraction, response to hypoxia and regulation of muscle cell differentiation to be enriched. Signaling pathways identified included MAP-kinase and wnt signaling that have previously been shown to be important in vascular calcification. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that miRs are concentrated in MV from calcifying VSMC, and that important functions and pathways are affected by the miRs dysregulation between calcifying VSMC and the MV they produce. This suggests that miRs may play a very important regulatory role in vascular calcification in CKD by controlling an extensive network

  7. Kidney Disease and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rennke, Helmut G.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kidney injury is a common complication of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias, and it is associated with increased mortality. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms can contribute to kidney injury in the patient with myeloma, some of which are the result of nephrotoxic monoclonal Ig and some of which are independent of paraprotein deposition. The pathogenic mechanisms that underlie paraprotein-related kidney disease are increasingly well understood. A novel assay allowing the quantification of free light chains in the serum has aided the diagnosis of new onset disease and allowed for the earlier detection of relapse. Novel myeloma agents have shown considerable promise in reversing renal failure in some patients and improving outcomes. Stem cell transplantation remains a mainstay of management for younger patients with myeloma who are suitable candidates for intensive therapy, whereas the role of new drugs, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation continues to evolve. PMID:23868898

  8. Glomerulocystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Brian J.; Yin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulocystic disease is a rare renal cystic disease with a long descriptive history. Findings from recent studies have significantly advanced the pathophysiological understanding of the disease processes leading to this peculiar phenotype. Many genetic syndromes associated with glomerulocystic disease have had their respective proteins localized to primary cilia or centrosomes. Transcriptional control of renal developmental pathways is dysregulated in obstructive diseases that also lead to glomerulocystic disease, emphasizing the importance of transcriptional choreography between renal development and renal cystic disease. PMID:20091054

  9. Regenerative medicine in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Little, Melissa H; Kairath, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of renal failure has changed little in decades. Organ transplantation and dialysis continue to represent the only therapeutic options available. However, decades of fundamental research into the response of the kidney to acute injury and the processes driving progression to chronic kidney disease are beginning to open doors to new options. Similarly, continued investigations into the cellular and molecular basis of normal kidney development, together with major advances in stem cell biology, are now delivering options in regenerative medicine not possible as recently as a decade ago. In this review, we will discuss advances in regenerative medicine as it may be applied to the kidney. This will cover cellular therapies focused on ameliorating injury and improving repair as well as advancements in the generation of new renal tissue from stem/progenitor cells. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Systemic disorders of calcium dynamics in rats with adenine-induced renal failure: implication for chronic kidney disease-related complications.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Imai, Yasuo; Maruyama, Wakako; Mizoguchi, Kazushige

    2010-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) causes the dysregulation of systemic mineral metabolism. A major issue in CKD patients is the emergence of ectopic calcification in soft tissues, presumably due to increased levels of calcium (Ca) or inorganic phosphorus (Pi); however, the precise mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate Ca dynamics in an animal model of CKD. Renal failure was produced in rats by feeding an adenine-containing diet for 4 weeks, and time-course changes in biochemical parameters, including Ca, Pi, creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), and N-telopeptide and cross-linked collagen type I (NTx), were monitored once a week during the feeding period. Intestinal absorption, tissue contents, and urinary excretion of Ca were monitored using radioisotope (RI) (45)Ca. Adenine-fed rats exhibited renal failure, ectopic calcification and altered serum parameters, including elevated levels of serum Pi, Cr, PTH and BUN. Serum Ca levels were not increased in rats with renal failure. RI-based experiments revealed that abnormal Ca dynamics including attenuated intestinal absorption, increased incorporation into soft tissues, particularly aortic tissue, in which it was increased threefold, and enhanced urinary excretion occurred in renal failure rats. Rats with renal failure induced by an adenine diet exhibited severe abnormality of Ca dynamics, including Ca shortage and ectopic accumulation of Ca. These findings would provide useful information to research CKD-related complications.

  11. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  12. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  13. Dietary phosphorus and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime

    2013-10-01

    High serum phosphate is linked to poor health outcome and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before or after the initiation of dialysis. Therefore, maintenance of normal serum phosphate levels is a major concern in the clinical care of this population with dietary phosphorus restriction and/or use of oral phosphate binders considered to be the best corrective care. This review discusses (1) evidence for an association between serum phosphate levels and bone and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CKD patients as well as progression of kidney disease itself; (2) the relationship between serum phosphate and dietary phosphorus intake; and (3) implications from these data for future research. Increasing our understanding of the relationship between altered phosphorus metabolism and disease in CKD patients may clarify the potential role of excess dietary phosphorus as a risk factor for disease in the general population.

  14. The effect of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress on lipolysis in white adipose tissue in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yu-ling; Li, Cong; Ding, Xiao-yan; Xu, Guo-yu; Hu, Li-li; Hou, Fan-fan; Zhou, Qiu-gen

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Lipolysis in fat tissue plays an important role in the development of metabolic disturbances, a characteristic feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could alleviate lipolysis in white adipose tissue in a rat model of CKD. Methods: A rat model of CKD was established by a method of reduced renal mass (RRM). Lipolysis was measured as the release of glycerol in ex vivo fat pads and cultured primary adipocytes. The activity of lipases and markers of ER stress were measured by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Results: Our data showed that lipolysis in visceral white adipose tissue was increased in RRM rats compared with control rats. In addition, increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and binding of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) to comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) protein were observed in the RRM rats. The phosphorylation of ER stress markers, including IRE1α, PERK, and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α, and the expression of ER stress marker 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) were significantly increased in RRM rats. Treatment with an inhibitor of ER stress partially but significantly alleviated lipolysis, and this alleviation was accompanied by reduced binding of ATGL to CGI-58. Conclusion: Our results showed that enhanced lipolysis and ER stress occurred in visceral white adipose tissue in a rat model of CKD. Moreover, inhibition of ER stress significantly alleviated lipolysis. These findings suggest that ER stress is a potential therapeutic target for the metabolic disturbances associated with CKD. PMID:24442147

  15. The effect of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress on lipolysis in white adipose tissue in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yu-ling; Li, Cong; Ding, Xiao-yan; Xu, Guo-yu; Hu, Li-li; Hou, Fan-fan; Zhou, Qiu-gen

    2014-03-01

    Lipolysis in fat tissue plays an important role in the development of metabolic disturbances, a characteristic feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could alleviate lipolysis in white adipose tissue in a rat model of CKD. A rat model of CKD was established by a method of reduced renal mass (RRM). Lipolysis was measured as the release of glycerol in ex vivo fat pads and cultured primary adipocytes. The activity of lipases and markers of ER stress were measured by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Our data showed that lipolysis in visceral white adipose tissue was increased in RRM rats compared with control rats. In addition, increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and binding of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) to comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) protein were observed in the RRM rats. The phosphorylation of ER stress markers, including IRE1α, PERK, and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α, and the expression of ER stress marker 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) were significantly increased in RRM rats. Treatment with an inhibitor of ER stress partially but significantly alleviated lipolysis, and this alleviation was accompanied by reduced binding of ATGL to CGI-58. Our results showed that enhanced lipolysis and ER stress occurred in visceral white adipose tissue in a rat model of CKD. Moreover, inhibition of ER stress significantly alleviated lipolysis. These findings suggest that ER stress is a potential therapeutic target for the metabolic disturbances associated with CKD.

  16. Hypermethylation of the CaSR and VDR genes in the parathyroid glands in chronic kidney disease rats with high-phosphate diet.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taketo; Tatsumi, Norifumi; Kamejima, Sahoko; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi; Okabe, Masataka

    2016-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) disrupts mineral homeostasis and its representative pathosis is defined as secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). SHPT occurs during the early course of progressive renal insufficiency, and is associated with mortality and cardiovascular events. SHPT results in reduction of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the parathyroid glands during CKD. However, the precise mechanism of CaSR and VDR reduction is largely unknown. CKD was induced through two-step 5/6 nephrectomy, and then CKD rats and sham-operated rats were maintained for 8 weeks on diets containing 0.7 % phosphorus (normal phosphate) or 1.2 % phosphorus (high phosphate). In gene expression analysis, TaqMan probes were used for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, CaSR and VDR protein expressions were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. DNA methylation analysis was performed using a restriction digestion and quantitative PCR. CaSR and VDR mRNA were reduced only in CKD rats fed the high-phosphorus diets (CKD HP), then CaSR and VDR immunohistochemical expressions were compatible with gene expression assay. SHPT was then confirmed only in CKD HP rats. Furthermore, sole CKD HP rats showed the hypermethylation in CaSR and VDR genes; however, the percentage methylation of both genes was low. Although CaSR and VDR hypermethylation was demonstrated in PTGs of CKD HP rats, the extent of hypermethylation was insufficient to support the relevance between hypermethylation and down-regulation of gene expression because of the low percentage of methylation. Consequently, our data suggest that mechanisms, other than DNA hypermethylation, were responsible for the reduction in mRNA and protein levels of CaSR and VDR in PTGs of CKD HP rats.

  17. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ng) per milliliter may mean a person has iron deficiency that requires treatment. 2 The transferrin saturation score ... with kidney disease who have anemia caused by iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid deficiencies to include sources of these nutrients in their ...

  18. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease pathways and help design new drug treatment strategies. The studies also may yield clues about how to intervene ... cause of death in kidney patients. Other ongoing studies supported by NIH will ... strategies. If detected sufficiently early, it may be possible ...

  19. Progression of hypertension and kidney disease in aging fawn-hooded rats is mediated by enhanced influence of renin-angiotensin system and suppression of nitric oxide system and epoxyeicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Doleželová, Šárka; Jíchová, Šárka; Husková, Zuzana; Vojtíšková, Alžběta; Kujal, Petr; Hošková, Lenka; Kautzner, Josef; Sadowski, Janusz; Červenka, Luděk; Kopkan, Libor

    The fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH) rat serves as a genetic model of spontaneous hypertension associated with glomerular hyperfiltration and proteinuria. However, the knowledge of the natural course of hypertension and kidney disease in FHH rats remains fragmentary and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. In this study, over the animals' lifetime, we followed the survival rate, blood pressure (telemetry), indices of kidney damage, the activity of renin-angiotensin (RAS) and nitric oxide (NO) systems, and CYP450-epoxygenase products (EETs). Compared to normotensive controls, no elevation of plasma and renal RAS was observed in prehypertensive and hypertensive FHH rats; however, RAS inhibition significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (137 ± 9 to 116 ± 8, and 159 ± 8 to 126 ± 4 mmHg, respectively) and proteinuria (62 ± 2 to 37 ± 3, and 132 ± 8 to 87 ± 5 mg/day, respectively). Moreover, pharmacological RAS inhibition reduced angiotensin (ANG) II and increased ANG 1-7 in the kidney and thereby may have delayed the progression of kidney disease. Furthermore, renal NO and EETs declined in the aging FHH rats but not in the control strain. The present results, especially the demonstration of exaggerated vascular responsiveness to ANG II, indicate that RAS may contribute to the development of hypertension and kidney disease in FHH rats. The activity of factors opposing the development of hypertension and protecting the kidney declined with age in this model. Therefore, therapeutic enhancement of this activity besides RAS inhibition could be attempted in the therapy of human hypertension associated with kidney disease.

  20. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure.

  1. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... 26696680 . Tong LL, Adler S. Prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. ...

  2. The effect of Mastin® on expression of Nrf2 in the rat heart with subtotally nephrectomy chronic Kidney disease model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathania, J.; Soetikno, V.

    2017-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in Indonesia and worldwide. One of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in CKD is the complication of cardiovascular disease. Mastin® is a supplement that is locally produced in Indonesia and is made from extract of mangosteen pericarp, which is reported to have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor properties. The present study aimed to investigate whether Mastin® could improve antioxidant responses in the rat heart during CKD by measuring the expression of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor (Nrf)2, a master regulator of antioxidant response elements. RNA was extracted from the heart tissue of three groups of rats: a normal group, a nephrectomy group, and a nephrectomy with Mastin® group. Two-step real-time RT-PCR was then conducted to calculate the relative expression of the Nrf2 gene. Nrf2 expression was markedly decreased in the nephrectomy group vs the normal group, but slightly increas ed in the nephrectomy with Mastin® group vs the nephrectomy group. CKD resulted in impaired activation of the Nrf2 pathway in the rat heart. Although the administration of Mastin® slightly increased Nrf2 expression, it was not enough to confer cardioprotective effects through the Nrf2 pathway.

  3. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  4. Radiation damage in rat kidney microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Shah-Yukich, A; Babayan, R

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a specialized polymer injection casting technique permits the analysis of radiation induced damage in rat kidney glomeruli. A lead shielding device is constructed to enable the irradiation of the living rat left kidney, while the remainder of the animal is shielded from the dose, the right kidney serves as a control. The source of radiation is 137Cs which produces 0.66 MeV gamma-rays to achieve a kidney dose of 100 rad and 5000 rad in these experiments. Radiation damage to kidney glomeruli is assessed at intervals of 0, 1, 3 and 7 days post-irradiation at the two dose levels. It is found that radiation damage to kidney glomeruli is expressed morphologically at 7 days post-irradiation at the 100 rad dose level, while glomerular damage is apparent as early as 3 days post-irradiation at the 5000 rad dose level. Moreover, by 7 days post-irradiation with a 5000 rad dose, the kidney glomerulus thoroughly degenerates to a leaky fused mass of vessels. From a morphological viewpoint, kidney glomeruli are significantly more sensitive to radiation than surrounding vasculature. The methods developed here for assessment of radiation damage are highly repeatable and could serve as a standard technique in radiobiology.

  5. Kidney Disease Progression in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Katherine M; Matheson, Matthew; Hartung, Erum A.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline, hypertension (HTN) and proteinuria in subjects with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and compare with two congenital kidney disease control groups in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) cohort. Study design GFR decline (iohexol clearance), rates of HTN (ambulatory/casual blood pressures (BPs)), antihypertensive medication usage, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and proteinuria were analyzed in subjects with ARPKD (n=22) and two control groups: aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic (n=44) and obstructive uropathies (n=44). Differences between study groups were examined by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results Annualized GFR change in subjects with ARPKD was −1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 (−6%), with higher decline in subjects age >10 years (−11.5%). However, overall rates of GFR decline did not differ significantly in subjects with ARPKD vs. controls. There were no significant differences in HTN or LVH rates, but subjects with ARPKD had a higher percent on ≥3 BP medications (32% vs.0%, p<0.0001), more ACE inhibitor use (82% vs. 27% vs. 36%, p<0.0005), and less proteinuria (urine protein: creatinine=0.1 vs.0.6, p<0.005). Conclusions This study reports rates of GFR decline, HTN and proteinuria in a small but well-phenotyped ARPKD cohort. The relatively slow rate of GFR decline in subjects with ARPKD and absence of significant proteinuria suggest that these standard clinical measures may have limited utility in assessing therapeutic interventions and highlight the need for other ARPKD kidney disease progression biomarkers. PMID:26831744

  6. Kidney Disease Progression in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Dell, Katherine M; Matheson, Matthew; Hartung, Erum A; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    To define glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline, hypertension (HTN), and proteinuria in subjects with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and compare with 2 congenital kidney disease control groups in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort. GFR decline (iohexol clearance), rates of HTN (ambulatory/casual blood pressures), antihypertensive medication usage, left ventricular hypertrophy, and proteinuria were analyzed in subjects with ARPKD (n = 22) and 2 control groups: aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic disorders (n = 44) and obstructive uropathies (n = 44). Differences between study groups were examined with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Annualized GFR change in subjects with ARPKD was -1.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (-6%), with greater decline in subjects age ≥ 10 years (-11.5%). However, overall rates of GFR decline did not differ significantly in subjects with ARPKD vs controls. There were no significant differences in rates of HTN or left ventricular hypertrophy, but subjects with ARPKD had a greater percent on ≥ 3 blood pressure medications (32% vs 0%, P < .0001), more angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use (82% vs 27% vs 36%, P < .0005), and less proteinuria (urine protein: creatinine = 0.1 vs 0.6, P < .005). This study reports rates of GFR decline, HTN, and proteinuria in a small but well-phenotyped ARPKD cohort. The relatively slow rate of GFR decline in subjects with ARPKD and absence of significant proteinuria suggest that these standard clinical measures may have limited utility in assessing therapeutic interventions and highlight the need for other ARPKD kidney disease progression biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koratala, Abhilash; Bhattacharya, Deepti; Kazory, Amir

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide, the number of pregnant women with various degrees of renal dysfunction is expected to increase. There is a bidirectional relation between CKD and pregnancy in which renal dysfunction negatively affects pregnancy outcomes, and the pregnancy can have a deleterious impact on various aspects of kidney disease. It has been shown that even mild renal dysfunction can increase considerably the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, data suggest that a history of recovery from acute kidney injury is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition to kidney dysfunction, maternal hypertension and proteinuria predispose women to negative outcomes and are important factors to consider in preconception counseling and the process of risk stratification. In this review, we provide an overview of the physiologic renal changes during pregnancy as well as available data regarding CKD and pregnancy outcomes. We also highlight the important management strategies in women with certain selected renal conditions that are seen commonly during the childbearing years. We call for future research on underexplored areas such as the concept of renal functional reserve to develop a potential clinical tool for prognostication and risk stratification of women at higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

  8. Hepatitis C and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Coccoli, P; Esposito, P; Cianciaruso, B; Pota, A; Visciano, B; Annecchini, R; Parrilli, G

    2007-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often associated with kidney diseases such as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), with and without cryoglobulinemia, membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) or glomerulosclerosis (FSGN). The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of HCV with or without hypertransaminasemia in patients with chronic nephropathy in the predialytic phase. We tested 340 subjects with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) from our hospital's nephrology outpatient clinic for anti-HCV antibodies. In positive subjects we tested for HCV RNA by PCR method, monitoring, for at least 4 months, common biohumoral parameters including transaminases (AST, ALT). Of the 340 subjects, 46 (13.5%) were positive for HCV RNA, and 8 of these (17%) showed constant alteration of transaminases. HBsAg was found in 8 of the total study population (2.3%), and none of these showed altered transaminases. Type II diabetes mellitus was found in 26% (12/46) of the HCV-RNA positive patients, and in only 12.5% (37/294) of the negative ones. The kidney diseases we found in the 46 HCV-RNA positive patients were: diabetic nephropathy in 11 (23.9%), MPGN in 7 (15.2%), MPGN + cryoglobulinemia in 2 (4.3%), interstitial nephropathy in 4 (8.7%), IgA mesangial GN in 3 (6.5%), hypertensive nephropathy in 2 (4.3%), focal and segmental GN in 1 (2.2%), urologic disease in 4 (8.7%), other (hematological, genetic, iatrogenic) in 3 (6.6%), unknown in 9 (19.6%). Our data show that the most frequent kidney diseases associated with HCV infection were diabetic related nephropathy and MPGN with and without cryoglobulinemia. HCV infection had a positive association with diabetes. It is interesting to note that in this study population the hepatitis C concomitant to kidney disease was unusually mild: only 4 of the 46 subjects (9%) showed clinical, biohumoral and ultrasound evidence of cirrhosis.

  9. Carbonated beverages and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saldana, Tina M; Basso, Olga; Darden, Rebecca; Sandler, Dale P

    2007-07-01

    Carbonated beverage consumption has been linked with diabetes, hypertension, and kidney stones, all risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Cola beverages, in particular, contain phosphoric acid and have been associated with urinary changes that promote kidney stones. We examined the relationship between carbonated beverages (including cola) and chronic kidney disease, using data from 465 patients with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease and 467 community controls recruited in North Carolina between 1980 and 1982. Drinking 2 or more colas per day was associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-3.7). Results were the same for regular colas (2.1; 1.3-3.4) and artificially sweetened colas (2.1; 0.7-2.5). Noncola carbonated beverages were not associated with chronic kidney disease (0.94; 0.4-2.2). These preliminary results suggest that cola consumption may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease.

  10. Mitochondrial biogenesis in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Joel M

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by normal metabolic adaptation or injury has been clarified over the past decade. Mitochondrial biogenesis and its attendant processes enhance metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation and increase antioxidant defense mechanisms that ameliorate injury from aging, tissue hypoxia, and glucose or fatty acid overload, all of which contribute to the pathogenesis of acute and chronic kidney disease. There has been considerable interest in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in the kidney, which affect multiple processes in addition to mitochondrial biogenesis. As yet there is relatively little information focused specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis and its regulation by PPARγ coactivators and their modulators such as SIRT1. The available data indicate that these pathways will be fruitful areas for study in the modification of renal disease.

  11. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  12. Semiautomated quantitative image analysis of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and WT-1 in acute and chronic rat kidney disease models.

    PubMed

    Funk, J; Ott, V; Herrmann, A; Rapp, W; Raab, S; Riboulet, W; Vandjour, A; Hainaut, E; Benardeau, A; Singer, T; Jacobsen, B

    2016-03-01

    Five different glomerular immunohistochemistry markers were evaluated and compared in four different acute and chronic rat kidney disease models. Progression of glomerular or podocyte damage was shown in the puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) and Zucker fatty/spontaneously hypertensive heart failure F1 hybrid (ZSF1) rat model. Progression and prevention of glomerular damage was demonstrated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl SS) rat. Immunohistochemistry was performed for desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and Wilms tumor protein-1 (WT-1), and evaluation of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers was done by semiautomated quantitative image analysis. We found desmin and WT-1 as the most sensitive markers for podocyte damage in both acute and chronic glomerular damage followed by vimentin, podocin and synaptopodin. We were able to demonstrate that early podocyte damage as shown by increased desmin and vimentin staining together with either a phenotypic podocyte change or podocyte loss (reduced numbers of WT-1-stained podocytes) drives the progression of glomerular damage. This is followed by a reduction in podocyte-specific proteins such as podocin and synaptopodin. Our report describes the different sensitivity of glomerular or podocyte markers and gives future guidance for the selection of the most sensitive markers for efficacy testing of new drugs as well as for the selection of tissue-based toxicity markers for glomerular or podocyte injury. In addition to functional clinical chemistry markers, desmin and WT-1 immunohistochemistry offers reliable and valuable data on the morphologic state of podocytes.

  13. Sleep disorders in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De Santo, R M; Perna, A; Di Iorio, B R; Cirillo, M

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. However also a well functioning renal graft does not cure the poor sleep pattern which now emerges as a problem even in early chronic kidney disease (CKD). When patients are made aware for the first time of a disease such as CKD, which may brink to dialysis or at the best to a renal transplant patients begin to experience a disordered sleep. Sleeping disorders include insomnia (I), sleep apnoea (SAS), restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), excessive daily sleeping (EDS), sleepwalking, nightmares, and narcolepsy. Disordered sleep did not meet the clinical and scientific interest it deserves, in addition and we do not have a well defined solution for sleeping complaints. However, awareness that a poor sleep is associated with poor quality of life and carries an increase in mortality risk has recently stimulated interest in the field. There are many putative causes for a disordered sleep in chronic kidney disease and in end-stage renal disease. For a unifying hypothesis demographic factors, lifestyles, disease related factors, psychological factors, treatment related factors, and social factor must be taken into consideration.

  14. Aging and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kosaku; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Yanai, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    A recent report has dealt with geriatric nephrology, including epidemiology and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD), attempting to get nephrologists to pay more attention to elderly CKD patients. The aims of this article are to summarize the morphological and functional properties of the aging kidney, and to better understand nephrology care for elderly CKD patients. The kidneys are affected by the aging process, which results in numerous effects on the renal system. In addition, the elderly population is hetereogenous - some have a decline in GFR explained by diseases that complicate aging such as arteriosclerosis with hypertension, whereas in the most of healthy adults the decline in GFR is much more modest and not inevitable. The values for normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in aging population have important implications for the diagnosis of CKD in the elderly. However, the MDRD equation underestimates mean eGFR by 25% and the CKD-EPI equation underestimates mean GFR by 16%. This bias may lead to misclassifying healthy older persons as having CKD. It is also still unknown whether and how age influences the predictive role of other risk factors for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death in referred as well as unreferred patients. The risk of ESRD was reported to be higher than the risk of death without ESRD for ages <60 years, and independent of eGFR. Proteinuria significantly increased the risk of ESRD with advancing age. In older patients on nephrology care, the risk of ESRD prevailed over mortality even when eGFR was not severely impaired. Proteinuria increases the risk of ESRD, while the predictive role of other modifiable risk factors was unchanged compared with younger patients. The decision to initiate renal replacement therapy in the elderly is complicated by more challenges than in younger patients. Calorie restriction and Klotho deficiency may be a candidate therapeutic target for attenuating kidney aging. © 2014 S

  15. [Carnosine, carnosinase and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiliś-Pstrusińska, Katarzyna

    2012-04-20

     Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is an endogenously synthesized dipeptide which is present in different human tissues, including the kidney. Carnosine is hydrolyzed by the enzyme carnosinase. There are two carnosinase homologues: serum secreted carnosinase and non-specific cytosolic dipeptidase, encoded by the genes CNDP1 and CNDP2 respectively and located on chromosome 18q22.3. Carnosine functions as a radical oxygen species scavenger and as a natural angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Carnosine inhibits advanced glycation end product formation and reduces the synthesis of matrix proteins such as fibronectin and collagen type VI of podocytes and mesangial cells. In experimental studies it was shown that carnosine reduces the level of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. It is suggested that carnosine is a naturally occurring anti-aging substance in human organisms with a beneficial effect on the cardiovascular system. This paper reports the results of studies concerning carnosine's role in kidney diseases, particularly in ischemia/reperfusion induced acute renal failure, diabetic nephropathy, gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and also in blood pressure regulation. The correlations between serum carnosine and serum carnosinase activity and polymorphism in the CNDP1 gene are analyzed. The role of CNDP1 gene polymorphism in the development of diabetic nephropathy and non-diabetic chronic kidney disease is discussed. Carnosine is engaged in different metabolic pathways. It has nephroprotective features. Further studies of carnosine metabolism and its biological properties, particularly those concerning the human organism, are required.

  16. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  17. microRNAs in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Arthur C K

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and diabetic kidney diseases have continually exerted a great burden on our society. Although the recent advances in medical research have led to a much better understanding of diabetic kidney diseases, there is still no successful strategy for effective treatments for diabetic kidney diseases. Recently, treatment of diabetic kidney diseases relies either on drugs that reduce the progression of renal injury or on renal replacement therapies, such as dialysis and kidney transplantation. On the other hand, searching for biomarkers for early diagnosis and effective therapy is also urgent. Discovery of microRNAs has opened to a novel field for posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Results from cell culture experiments, experimental animal models, and patients under diabetic conditions reveal the critical role of microRNAs during the progression of diabetic kidney diseases. Functional studies demonstrate not only the capability of microRNAs to regulate expression of target genes, but also their therapeutic potential to diabetic kidney diseases. The existence of microRNAs in plasma, serum, and urine suggests their possibility to be biomarkers in diabetic kidney diseases. Thus, identification of the functional role of microRNAs provides an essentially clinical impact in terms of prevention and treatment of progression in diabetic kidney diseases as it enables us to develop novel, specific therapies and diagnostic tools for diabetic kidney diseases.

  18. [Chronic kidney disease and dyslipidaemia].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Vicente; Serrano, Adalberto; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Ascaso, Juan; Barrios, Vivencio; Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Cases, Aleix

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has to be considered as a high, or even very high risk cardiovascular risk condition, since it leads to an increase in cardiovascular mortality that continues to increase as the disease progresses. An early diagnosis of CKD is required, together with an adequate identification of the risk factors, in order to slow down its progression to more severe states, prevent complications, and to delay, whenever possible, the need for renal replacement therapy. Dyslipidaemia is a factor of the progression of CKD that increases the risk in developing atherosclerosis and its complications. Its proper control contributes to reducing the elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality presented by these patients. In this review, an assessment is made of the lipid-lowering therapeutic measures required to achieve to recommended objectives, by adjusting the treatment to the progression of the disease and to the characteristics of the patient. In CKD, it seems that an early and intensive intervention of the dyslipidaemia is a priority before there is a significant decrease in kidney function. Treatment with statins has been shown to be safe and effective in decreasing LDL-Cholesterol, and in the reduction of cardiovascular events in individuals with CKD, or after renal transplant, although there is less evidence in the case of dialysed patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD stages II-V (end stage renal disease)]. Plasma MPO was assayed by a spectrophotometric method. Serum urea and creatinine were estimated on a clinical chemistry analyzer using standard laboratory procedures. The mean plasma MPO levels were significantly lower with advancing stages of renal failure (P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPO and GFR (r = +0.89, P < 0.001) and a negative correlation with urea (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) and creatinine (r = -0.82, P < 0.001). While an inverse association was observed between plasma MPO and urea in CKD patients, such an association was not observed in control subjects (P = 0.43). In conclusion, the decline in plasma MPO levels may be due to the inhibitory effect of uraemic toxins on the enzyme.

  20. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chinnappa, V; Ankichetty, S; Angle, P; Halpern, S H

    2013-07-01

    Parturients with renal insufficiency or failure present a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist. Impaired renal function compromises fertility and increases both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Close communication amongst medical specialists, including nephrologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anesthesiologists is required to ensure the safety of mother and child. Pre-existing diseases should be optimized and close surveillance of maternal and fetal condition is required. Kidney function may deteriorate during pregnancy, necessitating early intervention. The goal is to maintain hemodynamic and physiologic stability while the demands of the pregnancy change. Drugs that may adversely affect the fetus, are nephrotoxic or are dependent on renal elimination should be avoided.

  1. Stem cells in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Soler, María José; José Tomas, Ortiz-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Circulating bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seem to play a crucial role in both vasculogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Chronic kidney disease is a state of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated progression of atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular risk. As a consequence, cardiovascular disorders are the main cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It has been shown that patients with advanced renal failure have decreased number of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells and impaired EPCs function. Moreover, in kidney transplant patients, renal graft function significantly correlated with EPC number. The reduced number of EPCs in patients with ESRD has been ascribed to the uremia. Therefore, therapies that improve the uremic status in dialysis patients such as nocturnal hemodialysis are associated with restoration of impaired EPCs number and migratory function. In fact, some of the common treatments for patients with chronic kidney disease such as erythropoietin, statins and angiotensin II receptor antagonist increase the number of EPCs. Nowadays, there is growing evidence indicating that, under pathophysiological conditions, stem cells (SCs) derived from bone marrow are able to migrate in the injured kidney, and they seem to play a role in glomerular and tubular regeneration. After acute tubular renal injury, surviving tubular epithelial cells and putative renal stem cells proliferate and differentiate into tubular epithelial cells to promote structural and functional repair. Moreover, bone marrow stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells can also participate in the repair process by proliferation and differentiation into renal lineages. For instance, mesenchymal SCs have been shown to decrease inflammation and enhance renal regeneration. The administration of ex vivo expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SCs have been proved to be beneficial in various experimental models of acute

  2. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high– or low–turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  3. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  4. The impact of peripheral serotonin on leptin-brain serotonin axis, bone metabolism and strength in growing rats with experimental chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Dariusz; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Znorko, Beata; Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Lipowicz, Paweł; Doroszko, Michał; Karbowska, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2017-08-07

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in decreased bone strength. Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the critical regulators of bone health, fulfilling distinct functions depending on its synthesis site: brain-derived serotonin (BDS) favors osteoblast proliferation, whereas gut-derived serotonin (GDS) inhibits it. We assessed the role of BDS and peripheral leptin in the regulation of bone metabolism and strength in young rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. BDS synthesis was accelerated during CKD progression. Decreased peripheral leptin in CKD rats was inversely related to BDS content in the hypothalamus, brainstem and frontal cortex. Serotonin in these brain regions affected bone strength and metabolism in the studied animals. The direct effect of circulating leptin on bone was not shown in uremia. At the molecular level, there was an inverse association between elevated GDS and the expression of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (Creb) gene in bone of CKD animals. In contrast, increased expression of activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) was shown, which was associated with GDS-dependent transcription factor 1 (Foxo1), clock gene - Cry-1, cell cycle genes: c-Myc, cyclins, and osteoblast differentiation genes. These results identified a previously unknown molecular pathway, by which elevated GDS can shift in Foxo1 target genes from Creb to Atf4-dependent response, disrupting the leptin-BDS - dependent gene pathway in the bone of uremic rats. Thus, in the condition of CKD the effect of BDS and GDS on bone metabolism and strength can't be distinguished. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased kidney metabolism as a pathway to kidney tissue hypoxia and damage: effects of triiodothyronine and dinitrophenol in normoglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Persson, Patrik; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Nordquist, Lina; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Intrarenal tissue hypoxia is an acknowledged common pathway to end-stage renal disease in clinically common conditions associated with development of chronic kidney disease, such as diabetes and hypertension. In diabetic kidneys, increased oxygen metabolism mediated by mitochondrial uncoupling results in decreased kidney oxygen tension (PO2) and contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. The present study investigated whether increased intrarenal oxygen metabolism per se can cause intrarenal tissue hypoxia and kidney damage, independently of confounding factors such as hyperglycemia and oxidative stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were untreated or treated with either triiodothyronine (T3, 10 g/kg bw/day, subcutaneously for 10 days) or the mitochondria uncoupler dinitrophenol (DNP, 30 mg/kg bw/day, oral gavage for 14 days), after which in vivo kidney function was evaluated in terms of glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance), renal blood flow (RBF, Transonic, PAH clearance), cortical PO2 (Clark-type electrodes), kidney oxygen consumption (QO2), and proteinuria. Administration of both T3 and DNP increased kidney QO2 and decreased PO2 which resulted in proteinuria. However, GFR and RBF were unaltered by either treatment. The present study demonstrates that increased kidney metabolism per se can cause intrarenal tissue hypoxia which results in proteinuria. Increased kidney QO2 and concomitantly reduced PO2 may therefore be a mechanism for the development of chronic kidney disease and progression to end-stage renal disease.

  6. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease; CVD, cardiovascular disease; DM, diabetes mellitus CKD Awareness CKD often has no symptoms in its early ... aware of their kidney disease, 2001-2012 Patient awareness is less than 10 percent for those with ...

  7. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  8. [Recent developments in genetic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Liebau, M C; Benzing, T

    2011-05-01

    The improved understanding of genetic kidney diseases has given rise to a more detailed understanding of kidney function within the last decade. Insights into the pathophysiological principles of frequent kidney diseases - partly inherited, partly acquired - have been obtained by the investigation of rare genetic disorders and can now serve as a starting point for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this way various clinical multicenter trials, which are based on the observations made in basic science have been established for the very common autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Furthermore, the influence of genetic aspects on frequent kidney diseases, e. g. diabetic nephropathy, is becoming more obvious. This article aims to give an overview over essential recent development in the field of genetic kidney diseases.

  9. DNA vaccination as a treatment for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Alexander, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is one of the major health problems worldwide. DNA vaccination delivers plasmid DNA encoding the target gene to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we describe the methods of CD40 DNA vaccine enhanced by dendritic cell (DC) targeting on the development of Heymann nephritis (HN), a rat model of human membranous nephropathy.

  10. Do Kidney Stone Formers Have A Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent disorder affecting approximately one in eleven people and is associated with multiple complications including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Significant epidemiologic associations with chronic kidney disease and ESRD have been noted and are reviewed herein, but debate persists in the literature as to whether kidney stone formation is a pathogenic process contributing to kidney disease. Corroborating evidence supporting the presence of kidney disease in stone formers includes the variability of renal function by stone type, the positive association of stone size with renal dysfunction, the presence of markers of renal injury in the urine of even asymptomatic stone formers, and direct evidence of renal tissue injury on histopathology. Proposed pathogenic mechanisms include recurrent obstruction and comorbid conditions such as recurrent urinary tract infections and structural abnormalities. Recent work evaluating the renal histopathology of different groups of stone formers adds further granularity, suggesting variability in mechanisms of renal injury by stone type and confirming the pathogenic effects of crystal formation. Genetic abnormalities leading to stone formation including cystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria, among others, contribute to the burden of disease in the stone-forming population. PMID:26376133

  11. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction with their clinical experience to optimally manage patients with anemia. PMID:17245602

  12. Distinct oxylipin alterations in diverse models of cystic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Monirujjaman, Md; Devassy, Jessay G; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Sidhu, Nikhil; Kugita, Masanori; Gabbs, Melissa; Nagao, Shizuko; Zhou, Jing; Ravandi, Amir; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-08-18

    Cystic kidney diseases are characterized by multiple renal cysts and are the leading cause of inherited renal disease. Oxylipins are bioactive lipids derived from fatty acids formed via cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 activity, and are important regulators of renal health and disease. Oxylipins are altered in nephronophthisis, a type of cystic kidney disease. To further investigate and to determine whether other cystic renal diseases share these abnormalities, a targeted lipidomic analysis of renal oxylipins was performed in orthologous models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease 1 (Mx1Cre(+)Pkd1(flox/flox) mouse) and 2 (Pkd2(ws25/-) mouse), autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (PCK rat) and nephronophthisis (jck/jck mouse). Kidney cyclooxygenase oxylipins were consistently higher in all diseased kidneys, even in very early stage disease. On the other hand, cytochrome P450 epoxygenase derived oxylipins were lower only in the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and nephronophthisis models, while lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 hydroxylase derived oxylipins were lower only in nephronophthisis. Sex effects on renal oxylipin alterations were observed but they did not always coincide with sex effects on disease. For oxylipins with sex effects, arachidonic acid derived oxylipins formed via cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases were higher in females, while oxylipins from other fatty acids and via cytochrome P450 enzymes were higher in males. The consistent and unique patterns of oxylipin alterations in the different models indicates the importance of these bioactive lipids in cystic renal diseases, suggesting that pharmacological agents (e.g. cyclooxygenase inhibitors) may be useful in treating these disorders, for which effective treatment remains elusive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Carbonated Beverages and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saldana, Tina M.; Basso, Olga; Darden, Rebecca; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonated beverage consumption has been linked with diabetes, hypertension, and kidney stones, all risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Cola beverages, in particular, contain phosphoric acid and have been associated with urinary changes that promote kidney stones. Methods We examined the relationship between carbonated beverages (including cola) and chronic kidney disease, using data from 465 patients with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease and 467 community controls recruited in North Carolina between 1980 and 1982. Results Drinking 2 or more colas per day was associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.4 –3.7). Results were the same for regular colas (2.1; 1.3–3.4) and artificially sweetened colas (2.1; 0.7–2.5). Noncola carbonated beverages were not associated with chronic kidney disease (0.94; 0.4 –2.2). Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that cola consumption may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease. PMID:17525693

  15. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hartleb, Marek; Gutkowski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL, occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state, reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia, hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis. Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development, natriuresis, urine osmolality, response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion, and rarely on renal biopsy. Chronic glomerulonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients. AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease, therefore, such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension, and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections, nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions, excessive diuresis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents. Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy. The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion, which is effective in about 50% of patients. The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support. PMID:22791939

  16. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  17. Using Xenopus to study genetic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Soeren S

    2016-03-01

    Modern sequencing technology is revolutionizing our knowledge of inherited kidney disease. However, the molecular role of genes affected by the rapidly rising number of identified mutations is lagging behind. Xenopus is a highly useful, but underutilized model organism with unique properties excellently suited to decipher the molecular mechanisms of kidney development and disease. The embryonic kidney (pronephros) can be manipulated on only one side of the animal and its formation observed directly through the translucent skin. The moderate evolutionary distance between Xenopus and humans is a huge advantage for studying basic principles of kidney development, but still allows us to analyze the function of disease related genes. Optogenetic manipulations and genome editing by CRISPR/Cas are exciting additions to the toolbox for disease modelling and will facilitate the use of Xenopus in translational research. Therefore, the future of Xenopus in kidney research is bright.

  18. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in a triphasic rat model of adenine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gil, Amnon; Brod, Vera; Awad, Hoda; Heyman, Samuel N; Abassi, Zaid; Frajewicki, Victor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether NGAL, given its advantages over traditional biomarkers, can be used to describe the dynamic characteristics of the renal tubulointerstitial insult caused by adenine. Subsequently, it will be possible to assess NGAL as a biomarker of any acute kidney injury, on top of chronic interstitial disease, if NGAL levels are stable through the chronic phase of our adenine model. Study group rats were fed an adenine diet, and control group rats were fed a regular diet only. Blood and urine samples for urea, creatinine and NGAL were drawn from each rat at the beginning of the study and after 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 weeks. Kidney slices from these rats were stained with Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and β-actin stainings. Serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio in the study group were higher than baseline and than in the control group; these differences were statistically significant in some of the intervals. Tubulointerstitial changes and adenine crystals were evident in the study group rats. In the rats fed adenine, serum urea, creatinine and NGAL levels and urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio followed a triphasic pattern of kidney injury: an acute phase while on the adenine diet, a partial recovery phase after switching to the regular diet and a chronic kidney disease phase after stabilization of renal function. NGAL can serve a biomarker for acute kidney injury and possibly for chronic kidney disease in the tubulointerstitial rat model.

  19. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD.

  20. Acute kidney injury induces hallmarks of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Trudel, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are considered separate entities that both frequently cause renal failure. Since ADPKD appears to depend on a polycystin-1 (Pc1) or Pc2 dosage mechanism, we investigated whether slow progression of cystogenesis in two Pkd1 transgenic mouse models can be accelerated with moderate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Transient unilateral left ischemic kidneys in both nontransgenic and transgenic mice reproducibly develop tubular dilatations, cysts, and typical PKD cellular defects within 3 mo post-IRI. Similar onset and severity of IRI induced-cystogenesis independently of genotype revealed that IRI is sufficient to promote renal cyst formation; however, this response was not further amplified by the transgene in Pkd1 mouse models. The IRI nontransgenic and transgenic kidneys showed from 16 days post-IRI strikingly increased and sustained Pkd1/Pc1 (>3-fold) and Pc2 (>8-fold) expression that can individually be cystogenic in mice. In parallel, long-term and important stimulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression was induced as in polycystic kidney disease. While mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is activated, stimulation of the Wnt pathway, with markedly increased active β-catenin and c-Myc expression in IRI renal epithelium, uncovered a similar regulatory cystogenic response shared by IRI and ADPKD. Our study demonstrates that long-term AKI induces cystogenesis and cross talk with ADPKD Pc1/Pc2 pathogenic signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Wnt signaling in kidney tubulointerstitium during disease.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, Omar H; Ikeda, Yoichiro; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    The evolutionary conserved Wnt signaling transduction pathway plays essential roles in a wide array of biologic processes including embryonic development, branching morphogenesis, proliferation and carcinogenesis. Over the past ten years it has become increasingly clear that Wnt signaling also regulates the response of adult organs to disease processes, including kidney disease. This review will focus on the growing literature implicating important roles for Wnt signaling during disease in two separate kidney compartments: the tubular epithelium and the interstitium.

  2. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients. PMID:25692105

  3. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-08-23

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  4. [Membranous kidney diseases in adults].

    PubMed

    Sobarzo Toro, Martín; Vilches, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy is the most common histologic phenotype associated with the primary nephrotic syndrome in adults and the second most common etiological diagnosis in over sixteen hundred renal biopsies on native kidneys processed at our institution over a 30 year period. Renal survival at 10 years is about 70%, but the course of the disease is related to a series of factors which have constituted the basis for mathematical models developed to predict the natural history in a given individual. These factors are gender, age, renal function at the time of diagnosis, presence of the nephrotic syndrome, high blood pressure and the degree of structural damage. Although in low risk patients a period of observation and the use of ACE inhibitors is a reasonable option, most nephrologists would elect to use pharmacological treatment to induce remissions of proteinuria and preserve renal function. The use of steroids and cytotoxic agents in alternating monthly cycles over six months is firmly supported by controlled, randomized clinical trials. If patients are resistant to this regimen or clinical considerations indicate it may be inappropriately toxic, the use of cyclosporin over 6 to 12 months is also a good choice, and it has been shown to be useful even in the context of deteriorating renal function. Mycophenolate mofetil and possibly rituximab may be options of last resort before considering the patient resistant to therapy. At all times, treatment of hypertension, non-specific antiproteinuric measures, and preventing complications of the nephrotic state should be top priorities in the overall therapeutic strategy.

  5. Sirtuin and metabolic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wakino, Shu; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Sirtuin is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase. One of its isoforms, Sirt1, is a key molecule in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism. The renal protective effects of Sirt1 are found in various models of renal disorders with metabolic impairment, such as diabetic nephropathy. Protective effects include the maintenance of glomerular barrier function, anti-fibrosis effects, anti-oxidative stress effects, and regulation of mitochondria function and energy metabolism. Various target molecules subject to direct deacetylation or epigenetic gene regulation have been identified as effectors of the renal protective function of sirtuin. Recently, it was demonstrated that Sirt1 expression decreases in proximal tubules before albuminuria in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy, and that albuminuria is suppressed in proximal tubule-specific mice overexpressing Sirt1. These findings suggest that decreased Sirt1 expression in proximal tubular cells causes abnormal nicotine metabolism and reduces the supply of nicotinamide mononucleotide from renal tubules to glomeruli. This further decreases expression of Sirt1 in glomerular podocytes and increases expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-1, which results in albuminuria. Activators of the sirtuin family of proteins, including resveratrol, may be important in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating metabolic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Nutrition and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fouque, Denis; Pelletier, Solenne; Mafra, Denise; Chauveau, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    The incidence of malnutrition disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD) appears unchanged over time, whereas patient-care and dialysis techniques continue to progress. Despite some evidence for cost-effective treatments, there are numerous caveats to applying these research findings on a daily care basis. There is a sustained generation of data confirming metabolic improvement when patients control their protein intake, even at early stages of CKD. A recent protein-energy wasting nomenclature allows a simpler approach to the diagnosis and causes of malnutrition. During maintenance dialysis, optimal protein and energy intakes have been recently challenged, and there is no longer an indication to control hyperphosphatemia through diet restriction. Recent measurements of energy expenditure in dialysis patients confirm very low physical activity, which affects energy requirements. Finally, inflammation, a common state during CKD, acts on both nutrient intake and catabolism, but is not a contraindication to a nutritional intervention, as patients do respond and improve their survival as well as do noninflamed patients.

  7. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney disease is diagnosed with urine and blood tests. Health care providers measure blood pressure with a blood pressure ... the sample to a lab for analysis. A health care provider may order a blood test to estimate how much blood the kidneys filter ...

  8. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency.

  9. Obesity and kidney disease: Beyond the hyperfiltration.

    PubMed

    Mascali, A; Franzese, O; Nisticò, S; Campia, U; Lauro, D; Cardillo, C; Di Daniele, N; Tesauro, M

    2016-09-01

    In industrialized countries, overweight and obesity account for approximately 13.8% and 24.9% of the kidney disease observed in men and women, respectively. Moreover, obesity-associated glomerulopathy is now considered as "an emerging epidemic." Kidney function can be negatively impacted by obesity through several mechanisms, either direct or indirect. While it is well established that obesity represents the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, awareness that obesity is associated with direct kidney damage independently of hypertension and diabetes is still not widespread. In this paper we will discuss the emerging role of adipose tissue, particularly in the visceral depot, in obesity-induced chronic kidney damage.

  10. Indoxyl sulfate reduces klotho expression and promotes senescence in the kidneys of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Adijiang, Ayinuer; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Higuchi, Yusuke; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2011-01-01

    Administration of indoxyl sulfate, a uremic toxin, promotes progression of chronic kidney disease in rats affected by the disease. Klotho, an anti-aging gene, is expressed in the kidneys, and its renal expression is decreased in chronic kidney disease. This study aimed to clarify whether indoxyl sulfate could reduce klotho expression and contribute to cell senescence in the kidneys of hypertensive rats. The rats used for this study were segregated in to the following 4 groups: (1) Dahl salt-resistant normotensive rats (DN), (2) Dahl salt-resistant normotensive indoxyl sulfate-administered rats (DN + IS), (3) Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats (DH), and (4) Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive indoxyl sulfate-administered rats (DH + IS). After 32 weeks, their kidneys were excised for histological and immunohistochemical analysis for klotho, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, p16(INK4a), p21(WAF1/CIP1), p53, and retinoblastoma protein (Rb). DH + IS rats showed decreased expression of klotho, increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, p16(INK4a), p21(WAF1/CIP1), p53, and Rb in renal tubular cells, and increased tubulointerstitial fibrosis and mesangial expansion as compared with DH rats. Further, DN + IS rats showed decreased expression of klotho as compared with DN rats. Administration of indoxyl sulfate to hypertensive rats reduced renal expression of klotho and promoted cell senescence with expression of senescence-related proteins, such as p16(INK4a), p21(WAF1/CIP1), p53, and Rb, which was accompanied by renal fibrosis. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The use of diuretics in kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Heramb, Lene; Hallan, Stein; Aasarød, Knut

    2014-04-29

    Diuretics are an important part of the therapy for a number of medical conditions such as heart, liver and kidney failure and hypertension. This article presents updated knowledge on the use of diuretics in kidney disease. The article is based on a literature search in PubMed, information obtained from textbooks on neurophysiology and kidney disease and on the authors' clinical experience. Kidney disease affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diuretics, and this must be taken into account when selecting a drug and determining the dosage. This applies particularly to nephrotic syndrome and severe chronic renal disease (GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m²). Knowledge of the pharmacology of diuretics is crucial to the rational use of diuretics in renal disease. Dose titration under close clinical monitoring and an optimal dosage interval make it possible to find the lowest possible effective dose and reduce the occurrence of side effects.

  12. Kidney Disease Profile of Syrian Refugee Children.

    PubMed

    Akbalik Kara, Mehtap; Demircioglu Kilic, Beltinge; Col, Nilgun; Ozcelik, Ayse Aysima; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Balat, Ayse

    2017-03-01

    Although preventative nephrology is the effective management of childhood kidney diseases, it is hard to provide it in this undesirable conditions. In this study, we aimed to document the kidney disease profile of Syrian refugee children admitted to our hospital. One hundred and thirty Syrian refugee children were admitted to the Pediatric Nephrology Department of the University of Gaziantep from September 2012 to January 2015. Demographic data, history, symptoms, physical examination findings, laboratory investigations, diagnosis, disease outcome, and therapeutic procedures such as peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis were obtained from patient files. Of the 130 admitted children, 74 were girls (59.6%). The average age was 6.97 ± 4.2 years (range, 1 month to 17 years). Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract were found in 34 children (26.2%). Other morbidities were chronic kidney disease in 30 (23.1%), nephrotic syndrome in 24 (18.5%), urolithiasis in 9 (6.9%), acute kidney injury in 4 (3.1%), glomerulonephritis in 5 (3.8%), enuresis in 12 (9.2%), and others in 12 (9.2%). Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease were highly prevalent in Syrian refugee children. Although free health care have been provided to all of these children, the continuation of political crisis and instability would increase the number of admissions and affect the quality of life of those children in a different environment from the home country.

  13. Sex hormones in women with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sofia B; Ramesh, Sharanya

    2016-11-01

    Menstrual disorders, infertility and premature menopause are common but often underrecognized phenomena among women with chronic kidney disease. Hypothalamic, rather than ovarian dysfunction, may be the cause of the abnormal reproductive milieu, which can be at least partially reversed by kidney transplantation and increased intensity of hemodialysis. Endogenous sex hormones, and specifically estradiol, appear to be renoprotective in women, although the effects of exogenous estradiol (as an oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone therapy) on kidney function are more controversial. Treatment with postmenopausal hormone therapy in women with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) has been associated with improved quality of life, bone health and markers of cardiovascular risk, as well as an increased risk of arteriovenous access thrombosis. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene has been associated with both a decreased fracture risk as well as renoprotection in women with kidney disease. Young women with ESKD are more likely to die from infection or develop malignancy, suggesting an immunomodulatory role of estrogen. Whether the premature menopause commonly observed in female patients with kidney disease results in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is unknown, although preliminary studies have suggested a possible therapeutic role for manipulation of the sex hormone milieu to mitigate risk in this population. Large, prospective, randomized studies examining the role of sex hormones in women with kidney disease are required to address the question.

  14. JAK INHIBITION AND PROGRESSIVE KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Brosius, Frank C.; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the role of JAK-STAT signaling in the progression of chronic kidney diseases. Recent findings The JAK-STAT pathway transmits signals from extracellular ligands, including many cytokines and chemokines. While these responses are best characterized in lymphoid cells, they also occur in kidney cells such as podocytes, mesangial cells, and tubular cells. JAK-STAT expression and signaling abnormalities occur in humans and animal models of different chronic kidney diseases. Enhanced expression and augmented activity of JAK1, JAK2 and STAT3 promote diabetic nephropathy and their inhibition appears to reduce disease. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may play an important role in cyst growth. Activation of JAK-STAT signaling promotes HIV-associated nephropathy and may also participate in the tubular responses to chronic obstructive uropathy. Based on data from experimental models, inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling, via increased expression of the suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins or pharmacologic inhibition of JAK and STAT proteins, could play a therapeutic role in multiple chronic kidney diseases. Summary Activation of the JAK-STAT pathway appears to play a role in the progression of some chronic kidney diseases. More work is needed to determine the specific role the pathway plays in individual diseases. PMID:25415616

  15. Modifier loci in non-mutant, female Wistar Kyoto rats influence cellular pathogenesis of nephronophthisis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats.

    PubMed

    Yengkopiong, Jada Pasquale; Lako, Joseph Daniel Wani

    2015-09-01

    Genetic modifier loci influence the inheritance of diseases and lead to variability in phenotype progression. We report the influence of modifier loci in female Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats on cellular pathogenesis of nephronophthisis inherited from Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rats. The loci modified cellular expression and progression of nephronophthisis in the backcross 1 (BC1) progeny. Mating experiments to produce BC1 progeny were carried out between three male LPK and seven female WKY rats. Fifteen female rats from the F1 generation were mated with the male LPK rats to produce the BC1 progeny. The rats with cystic kidney disease were identified and histology of the kidneys was carried out. Mapping studies and linkage analysis were carried out to identify the modifier loci. The BC1 progeny were less affected than the LPK strain with respect to disease severity and progression of the kidneys to end stage renal disease. It was found that the mean values of all the disease phenotypes of the mutant BC1 progeny were significantly different from those of the LPK rats, and these segregated with the genotypes of the markers located on chromosomes 5q34-q36 and 7q11-q34, giving maximum LOD scores greater than 3 (p < 0.001).

  16. ACE2 alterations in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7). ACE2 is highly expressed within the kidneys, it is largely localized in tubular epithelial cells and less prominently in glomerular epithelial cells and in the renal vasculature. ACE2 activity has been shown to be altered in diabetic kidney disease, hypertensive renal disease and in different models of kidney injury. There is often a dissociation between tubular and glomerular ACE2 expression, particularly in diabetic kidney disease where ACE2 expression is increased at the tubular level but decreased at the glomerular level. In this review, we will discuss alterations in circulating and renal ACE2 recently described in different renal pathologies and disease models as well as their possible significance. PMID:23956234

  17. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  18. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  19. Disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anjay; Linden, Ariel; Nissenson, Allen R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing health problem of epidemic proportions both in the United States and worldwide. The care of CKD patients, before and after starting dialysis, remains highly fragmented resulting in suboptimal clinical outcomes and high costs, creating a high burden of disease on patients and the health care system. Disease management (DM) is an approach to coordinating care for this complex population of patients that has the promise of improving outcomes and constraining costs. For CKD patients not yet on dialysis, the major goals of a DM program are (1) early identification of CKD patients and therapy to slow the progression of CKD, (2) identification and management of the complications of CKD per se, (3) identification and management of the complications of comorbid conditions, and (4) smooth transition to renal replacement therapy. For those CKD patients on dialysis, focused attention on avoidable hospitalizations is a key to a successful DM program. Multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (nephrologist, primary care physician, cardiologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeons, and transplant physicians) and participating caregivers (nurse, pharmacist, social worker, and dietician) is critical as well. There are several potential barriers to the successful implementation of a CKD/end-stage renal disease DM program, including lack of awareness of the disease state among patients and health care providers, late identification and referrals to a nephrologist, complex fragmented care delivered by multiple providers in many different sites of care, and reimbursement that does not align incentives for all involved. Recent experience suggests that these barriers can be overcome, with DM becoming a promising approach for improving outcomes for this vulnerable population.

  20. Wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mak, Robert H; Ikizler, Alp T; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Raj, Dominic S; Stenvinkel, Peter; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-03-01

    Wasting/cachexia is prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is to be distinguished from malnutrition, which is defined as the consequence of insufficient food intake or an improper diet. Malnutrition is characterized by hunger, which is an adaptive response, whereas anorexia is prevalent in patients with wasting/cachexia. Energy expenditure decreases as a protective mechanism in malnutrition whereas it remains inappropriately high in cachexia/wasting. In malnutrition, fat mass is preferentially lost and lean body mass and muscle mass is preserved. In cachexia/wasting, muscle is wasted and fat is relatively underutilized. Restoring adequate food intake or altering the composition of the diet reverses malnutrition. Nutrition supplementation does not totally reverse cachexia/wasting. The diagnostic criteria of cachexia/protein-energy wasting in CKD are considered. The association of wasting surrogates, such as serum albumin and prealbumin, with mortality is strong making them robust outcome predictors. At the patient level, longevity has consistently been observed in patients with CKD who have more muscle and/or fat, who report better appetite and who eat more. Although inadequate nutritional intake may contribute to wasting or cachexia, recent evidence indicates that other factors, including systemic inflammation, perturbations of appetite-controlling hormones from reduced renal clearance, aberrant neuropeptide signaling, insulin and insulin-like growth factor resistance, and metabolic acidosis, may be important in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated wasting. A number of novel therapeutic approaches, such as ghrelin agonists and melanocortin receptor antagonists are currently at the experimental level and await confirmation by randomized controlled clinical trials in patients with CKD-associated cachexia/wasting syndrome.

  1. Dietary fructose causes tubulointerstitial injury in the normal rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Kosugi, Tomoki; Gersch, Michael; Connor, Thomas; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Roncal, Carlos; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the metabolic syndrome is associated with renal disease. We previously reported that a high-fructose diet, but not a high-glucose diet, can induce metabolic syndrome and accelerate chronic renal disease in rats. We now examined the effects of a high-fructose diet on normal rat kidneys. Three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed a special diet containing 60% fructose, 60% glucose, or control standard rat chow for 6 wk, and then histological studies were performed. The effect of fructose to induce cell proliferation in cultured proximal tubular cells was also performed. Fructose diet, but not glucose diet, significantly increased kidney weight by 6 wk. The primary finding was tubular hyperplasia and proliferation involving all segments of the proximal tubules while glomerular changes were not observed. This is the same site where the fructose transporters (GLUT2 and -5) as well as the key enzyme in fructose metabolism (ketohexokinase) were expressed. Consistently, fructose also induced proliferation of rat proximal tubular cells in culture. In vivo, tubular proliferation was also associated with focal tubular injury, with type III collagen deposition in the interstitium, an increase in α-smooth muscle actin positive myofibroblasts, and an increase in macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, a high-fructose diet induces cell proliferation and hyperplasia in proximal tubules, perhaps via a direct metabolic effect. The effect is independent of total energy intake and is associated with focal tubulointerstitial injury. These studies may provide a mechanism by which metabolic syndrome causes renal disease. PMID:20071464

  2. Dietary fructose causes tubulointerstitial injury in the normal rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Kosugi, Tomoki; Gersch, Michael; Connor, Thomas; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Roncal, Carlos; Perez-Pozo, Santos E; Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that the metabolic syndrome is associated with renal disease. We previously reported that a high-fructose diet, but not a high-glucose diet, can induce metabolic syndrome and accelerate chronic renal disease in rats. We now examined the effects of a high-fructose diet on normal rat kidneys. Three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed a special diet containing 60% fructose, 60% glucose, or control standard rat chow for 6 wk, and then histological studies were performed. The effect of fructose to induce cell proliferation in cultured proximal tubular cells was also performed. Fructose diet, but not glucose diet, significantly increased kidney weight by 6 wk. The primary finding was tubular hyperplasia and proliferation involving all segments of the proximal tubules while glomerular changes were not observed. This is the same site where the fructose transporters (GLUT2 and -5) as well as the key enzyme in fructose metabolism (ketohexokinase) were expressed. Consistently, fructose also induced proliferation of rat proximal tubular cells in culture. In vivo, tubular proliferation was also associated with focal tubular injury, with type III collagen deposition in the interstitium, an increase in alpha-smooth muscle actin positive myofibroblasts, and an increase in macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, a high-fructose diet induces cell proliferation and hyperplasia in proximal tubules, perhaps via a direct metabolic effect. The effect is independent of total energy intake and is associated with focal tubulointerstitial injury. These studies may provide a mechanism by which metabolic syndrome causes renal disease.

  3. Defining Kidney Biology to Understand Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, Melissa H.; Brown, Dennis; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Sands, Jeff M.; Weisz, Ora A.; Mullins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Research National Dialogue represents a novel effort by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to solicit and prioritize research objectives from the renal research and clinical communities. The present commentary highlights selected scientific opportunities specific to the study of renal development, physiology, and cell biology. Describing such fundamental kidney biology serves as a necessary foundation for translational and clinical studies that will advance disease care and prevention. It is intended that these objectives foster and focus scientific efforts in these areas in the coming decade and beyond. PMID:24370769

  4. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Developmental Origins for Kidney Disease Due to Shroom3 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Hadiseh; Sull, Alexandra; Sarin, Sanjay; Boivin, Felix J; Halabi, Rami; Svajger, Bruno; Li, Aihua; Cui, Valerie Wenche; Drysdale, Thomas; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-10-01

    CKD is a significant health concern with an underlying genetic component. Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWASs) strongly associated CKD with the shroom family member 3 (SHROOM3) gene, which encodes an actin-associated protein important in epithelial morphogenesis. However, the role of SHROOM3 in kidney development and function is virtually unknown. Studies in zebrafish and rat showed that alterations in Shroom3 can result in glomerular dysfunction. Furthermore, human SHROOM3 variants can induce impaired kidney function in animal models. Here, we examined the temporal and spatial expression of Shroom3 in the mammalian kidney. We detected Shroom3 expression in the condensing mesenchyme, Bowman's capsule, and developing and mature podocytes in mice. Shroom3 null (Shroom3(Gt/Gt)) mice showed marked glomerular abnormalities, including cystic and collapsing/degenerating glomeruli, and marked disruptions in podocyte arrangement and morphology. These podocyte-specific abnormalities are associated with altered Rho-kinase/myosin II signaling and loss of apically distributed actin. Additionally, Shroom3 heterozygous (Shroom3(Gt/+)) mice showed developmental irregularities that manifested as adult-onset glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria. Taken together, our results establish the significance of Shroom3 in mammalian kidney development and progression of kidney disease. Specifically, Shroom3 maintains normal podocyte architecture in mice via modulation of the actomyosin network, which is essential for podocyte function. Furthermore, our findings strongly support the GWASs that suggest a role for SHROOM3 in human kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. [Chronic kidney diseases, metformin and lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus represent a worldwide public health problem. The incidence of these diseases is gradually growing into epidemic proportions. In many cases they occur simultaneously, what leads to increased morbidity and mortality among the affected patients. The majority of the patients treated for diabetes mellitus are unaware of the presence of renal insufficiency. Vascular hypertrophy and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of kidney failure in countries with advanced healthcare systems. Metformin is a basic drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is excreted in an unchanged form by the kidneys. When administered to patients with renal insufficiency, sepsis, dehydration or after the parenteral administration of iodinated contrast agents, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, which is also associated with an increased mortality rate.

  8. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  9. Kidney disease in pregnancy: (Women's Health Series).

    PubMed

    Gyamlani, Geeta; Geraci, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    Kidney disease and pregnancy may exist in two general settings: acute kidney injury that develops during pregnancy, and chronic kidney disease that predates conception. In the first trimester of pregnancy, acute kidney injury is most often the result of hyperemesis gravidarum, ectopic pregnancy, or miscarriage. In the second and third trimesters, the common causes of acute kidney injury are severe preeclampsia, hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelets syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and thrombotic microangiopathies, which may pose diagnostic challenges to the clinician. Cortical necrosis and obstructive uropathy are other conditions that may lead to acute kidney injury in these trimesters. Early recognition of these disorders is essential to timely treatment that can improve both maternal and fetal outcomes. In women with preexisting kidney disease, pregnancy-related outcomes depend upon the degree of renal impairment, the amount of proteinuria, and the severity of hypertension. Neonatal and maternal outcomes in pregnancies among renal transplant patients are generally good if the mother has normal baseline allograft function. Common renally active drugs and immunosuppressant medications must be prescribed, with special considerations in pregnant patients.

  10. Total Kidney Volume as a Biomarker of Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tangri, Navdeep; Hougen, Ingrid; Alam, Ahsan; Perrone, Ronald; McFarlane, Phil; Pei, York

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of kidney cysts and kidney enlargement, which progresses to kidney failure by the fifth to seventh decade of life in a majority of patients. Disease progression is evaluated primarily through serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measurements; however, it is known that serum creatinine and eGFR values typically do not change until the fourth or fifth decade of life. Until recently, therapy only existed to target complications of ADPKD. As therapeutic agents continue to be investigated for use in ADPKD, a suitable biomarker of disease progression in place of serum creatinine is needed. Sources of information: This review summarizes recent research regarding the use of total kidney volume as a biomarker in ADPKD, as presented at the Canadian Society of Nephrology symposium held in April 2015. Findings: Measurement of patients’ total kidney volume made using ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown by the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) study to be directly correlated with both increases in cyst volume and change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Additional studies have shown total kidney volume to have an association with complications of ADPKD as well. Limitations: Areas for further study continue to exist in comparison of methods of measuring total kidney volume. Implications: We believe that the evidence suggests that total kidney volume may be an appropriate surrogate marker for ADPKD disease progression. PMID:28321323

  11. Liver and Kidney Disease in Ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    GUNAY-AYGUN, MERAL

    2010-01-01

    Hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases (HRFCDs) are among the most common inherited human disorders. The discovery that proteins defective in the autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD and ARPKD) localize to the primary cilia and the recognition of the role these organelles play in the pathogenesis of HRFCDs led to the term “ciliopathies.” While ADPKD and ARPKD are the most common ciliopathies associated with both liver and kidney disease, variable degrees of renal and/or hepatic involvement occur in many other ciliopathies, including Joubert, Bardet–Biedl, Meckel–Gruber, and oral–facial–digital syndromes. The ductal plate malformation (DPM), a developmental abnormality of the portobiliary system, is the basis of the liver disease in ciliopathies that manifest congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF), Caroli syndrome (CS), and polycystic liver disease (PLD). Hepatocellular function remains relatively preserved in ciliopathy-associated liver diseases. The major morbidity associated with CHF is portal hypertension (PH), often leading to esophageal varices and hypersplenism. In addition, CD predisposes to recurrent cholangitis. PLD is not typically associated with PH, but may result in complications due to mass effects. The kidney pathology in ciliopathies ranges from non-functional cystic dysplastic kidneys to an isolated urinary concentration defect; the disorders contributing to this pathology, in addition to ADPKD and ARPKD, include nephronophithisis (NPHP), glomerulocystic kidney disease and medullary sponge kidneys. Decreased urinary concentration ability, resulting in polyuria and polydypsia, is the first and most common renal symptom in ciliopathies. While the majority of ADPKD, ARPKD, and NPHP patients require renal transplantation, the frequency and rate of progression to renal failure varies considerably in other ciliopathies. This review focuses on the kidney and liver disease found in the different ciliopathies. PMID:19876928

  12. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Wadi N.; Moore, Linda W.

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors—such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D—on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances. PMID:28298956

  13. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Suki, Wadi N; Moore, Linda W

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors-such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D-on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances.

  14. T cells and autoimmune kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Bradley, Sean J; Klatzmann, David; Tsokos, George C

    2017-03-13

    Glomerulonephritis is traditionally considered to result from the invasion of the kidney by autoantibodies and immune complexes from the circulation or following their formation in situ, and by cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The inflammatory response leads to the proliferation and dysfunction of cells of the glomerulus, and invasion of the interstitial space with immune cells, resulting in tubular cell malfunction and fibrosis. T cells are critical drivers of autoimmunity and related organ damage, by supporting B-cell differentiation and antibody production or by directly promoting inflammation and cytotoxicity against kidney resident cells. T cells might become activated by autoantigens in the periphery and become polarized to secrete inflammatory cytokines before entering the kidney where they have the opportunity to expand owing to the presence of costimulatory molecules and activating cytokines. Alternatively, naive T cells could enter the kidney where they become activated after encountering autoantigen and expand locally. As not all individuals with a peripheral autoimmune response to kidney antigens develop glomerulonephritis, the contribution of local kidney factors expressed or produced by kidney cells is probably of crucial importance. Improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of T cells in patients with glomerulonephritis offers unique opportunities for the recognition of treatment targets for autoimmune kidney disease.

  15. Magnesium in chronic kidney disease: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David M

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium ion is critical for life and is integrally involved in cellular function and a key component of normal bone mineral. In health, the kidneys, gastrointestinal tract and bone are responsible for maintaining serum magnesium concentrations in the normal range and magnesium balance. Most clinical disorders involving magnesium, other than chronic kidney disease (CKD), result in hypomagnesemia, either from gastrointestinal or kidney losses. CKD and particularly end-stage kidney disease is the only clinical condition where sustained hypermagnesemia may occur and net magnesium balance may be positive. This review will focus on normal magnesium homeostasis and review the literature in CKD with a particular focus on end-stage kidney disease and the potential role of magnesium as a phosphate binder and in cardiovascular and bone health. A number of small to medium-size interventional trials have shown that magnesium-based compounds can serve as effective phosphate binders. Observational studies suggest that higher serum magnesium concentrations in dialysis patients may improve survival and may slow the progression of vascular calcification. While a few small prospective trials support these findings, no large or long-term studies are available. Magnesium balance remains poorly understood in patients with end-stage kidney disease. While observational and small randomized trials suggest that exogenous administration may be useful as a phosphate binder and may have protective cardiovascular effects in terms of both arrhythmias and vascular calcification, large randomized trials are needed to test these hypotheses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The relationship between chemical-induced kidney weight increases and kidney histopathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Craig, Evisabel A; Yan, Zhongyu; Zhao, Q Jay

    2015-07-01

    The kidney is a major site of chemical excretion, which results in its propensity to exhibit chemically-induced toxicological effects at a higher rate than most other organs. Although the kidneys are often weighed in animal toxicity studies, the manner in which these kidney weight measurements are interpreted and the value of this information in predicting renal damage remains controversial. In this study we sought to determine whether a relationship exists between chemically-induced kidney weight changes and renal histopathological alterations. We also examined the relative utility of absolute and relative (kidney-to-body weight ratio) kidney weight in the prediction of renal toxicity. For this, data extracted from oral chemical exposure studies in rats performed by the National Toxicology Program were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. Our analysis showed a statistically significant correlation between absolute, but not relative, kidney weight and renal histopathology in chemically-treated rats. This positive correlation between absolute kidney weight and histopathology was observed even with compounds that statistically decreased terminal body weight. Also, changes in absolute kidney weight, which occurred at subchronic exposures, were able to predict the presence or absence of kidney histopathology at both subchronic and chronic exposures. Furthermore, most increases in absolute kidney weight reaching statistical significance (irrespective of the magnitude of change) were found to be relevant for the prediction of histopathological changes. Hence, our findings demonstrate that the evaluation of absolute kidney weight is a useful method for identifying potential renal toxicants. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Nutritional management of kidney diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Borovik, T E; Kutafina, E K; Tsygin, A N; Sergeeva, T V; Baranov, A A; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Voznesenskaya, T S; Zakharova, I N; Semenova, N N; Zvonkova, N G; Yatsyk, S P

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of various kidney diseases in children remains high in recent decades. Adequate nutrition management can enhance the effectiveness of drug treatment, slow the frequency of relapses andprevent the progression of the disease. The article is devoted to modern approaches to diet therapy in various kidney diseases in children with the defeat of tubular and glomerular appa ratus. For the first time the therapeutic diets for children with various kidney diseases are presented. Particular attention is paid to diet therapy in nephrotic syndrome (steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory). Dietary approaches with modern formulas for enteral nutrition in cases of steroid therapy complications in children with renal insufficiency (in predialysis stage and on dialysis) are described. Differentiated nutritional approaches for patients with different types of crystalluria are separately presented.

  18. Kidney Disease and Psoriasis. A New Comorbidity?

    PubMed

    González-Parra, E; Daudén, E; Carrascosa, J M; Olveira, A; Botella, R; Bonanad, C; Rivera, R

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities, particularly in young patients and patients with more severe forms of the disease. Recent studies have also linked psoriasis to kidney disease, and this would seem only logical, as the kidney is both a target of classic cardiovascular risk factors and susceptible to the toxic effects of some of the traditional drugs used to control psoriasis. In this article, we would like to draw readers' attention to this recently described comorbidity and stress the importance of early detection, as once chronic kidney disease develops, it cannot be reversed. When evaluating patients with psoriasis, particularly when they are candidates for systemic therapy, we believe it is important to order laboratory tests including glomerular filtration rate and a simple urine test to screen for albuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio).

  19. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  20. Growth Retardation in Children with Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Maria Jose; Mericq, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Growth failure is almost inextricably linked with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Growth failure in CKD has been associated with both increased morbidity and mortality. Growth failure in the setting of kidney disease is multifactorial and is related to poor nutritional status as well as comorbidities, such as anemia, bone and mineral disorders, and alterations in hormonal responses, as well as to aspects of treatment such as steroid exposure. This review covers updated management of growth failure in these children including adequate nutrition, treatment of metabolic alterations, and early administration of recombinant human growth hormone (GH). PMID:24187550

  1. Clinical approach to kidney disease in kidney recipients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Josep M; Gutiérrez-Dalmau, Alex; Crespo, Josep; Saval, Núria; Grinyó, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, clinical criteria used by Spanish nephrologists when approaching chronic kidney disease (CKD) in kidney recipients, as well as their level of maintenance and control of renal function, were evaluated. An epidemiological, observational, multicenter, nation-wide, prospective study was carried out, with a 6-month follow-up period. Three hundred and sixty-eight adult patients with stage3 kidney disease after a 24-month or longer post-transplantation follow-up period were included. Visits schedule included a retrospective visit, a baseline visit, an optional mid-term visit, and a final visit at month6. Mean time since kidney transplantation was 8.2±5.4years. Most common pre-transplant cardiovascular risk factors were high blood pressure (80.2%), followed by high cholesterol levels (61.7%). Serum creatinine levels showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline visit to 6-month visit (0.06±0.22; P<.0001), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction was -1.03±6.14 (P=0.0014). Significant independent prognostic factors for GFR worsening were: higher 24-hour proteinuria (OR=1.001 per mg; P=.020), longer time since transplantation (OR=1.009 per month; P=.017), and lower hemoglobin levels (OR=1.261 per g/dl; P=.038). Donor age also had some negative influence (OR=1.021 per year; P=.106). Biopsies were obtained in only 8% of kidney transplant recipients with stage 3 CKD with an intervention being carried out in 25.4% of cases. Secondary markers and factors resulting in CKD progression, particularly anemia, are still frequently uncontrolled after kidney transplantation. Only about 2% of patients benefit from a therapeutic intervention based on a biopsy. Clinical perception differs from objective measures, which results in an obvious clinical inertia regarding risk factor control in such patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Kidney in potassium depletion. II. K/sup +/ handling by the isolated perfused rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Katz, A.I.

    1987-03-01

    In a companion paper the authors reported a large increment in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity and (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting tubules from K-depleted rats. To test the hypothesis that the increased number of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pumps in these animals may be involved in potassium reabsorption they examined the effect of ouabain on K excretion by isolated, perfused kidneys from rats fed a K-free diet for 3 wk. Kidneys from K-depleted rats retain potassium avidly, both the fractional (FE/sub K/) and absolute K excretion being approximately fivefold lower than in control kidneys. Ouabain (5 mM) increased FE/sub K/ in kidneys from each K-depleted rat; similar results were obtained when kidneys were perfused with low and high potassium concentrations. In contrast, ouabain produced a variable effect in control kidneys, that depended on the perfusate potassium concentration. In K-depleted rats amiloride did not significantly alter K excretion and did not block the ouabain-induced kaliuresis, suggesting that the latter is not due to enhanced secretion secondary to increased distal fluid delivery. These results provide evidence for ouabain-sensitive potassium reabsorption in kidneys of chronically K-depleted rats, and suggest an explanation for the increased Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase observed in such animals.

  3. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reduces the progression of total kidney volume and cyst enlargement in experimental polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H. T.; Rao, Padmashree; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Foster, Sheryl F.; Peduto, Anthony; Harris, David C. H.; Rangan, Gopala K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Heterocyclic dithiocarbamates have anti‐inflammatory and anti‐proliferative effects in rodent models of chronic kidney disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) reduces the progression of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Male Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rats (an ortholog of Nek8/NPHP9) received intraperitoneal injections of either saline vehicle or PDTC (40 mg/kg once or twice daily) from postnatal weeks 4 until 11. By serial magnetic resonance imaging at weeks 5 and 10, the relative within‐rat increase in total kidney volume and cyst volume were 1.3‐fold (P =0.01) and 1.4‐fold (P < 0.01) greater, respectively, in LPK + Vehicle compared to the LPK + PDTC(40 mg/kg twice daily) group. At week 11 in LPK rats, PDTC attenuated the increase in kidney weight to body weight ratio by 25% (P < 0.01) and proteinuria by 66% (P < 0.05 vs. LPK + Vehicle) but did not improve renal dysfunction. By quantitative whole‐slide image analysis, PDTC did not alter interstitial CD68+ cell accumulation, interstitial fibrosis, or renal cell proliferation in LPK rats at week 11. The phosphorylated form of the nuclear factor (NF)‐κB subunit, p105, was increased in cystic epithelial cells of LPK rats, but was not altered by PDTC. Moreover, PDTC did not significantly alter nuclear expression of the p50 subunit or NF‐κB (p65)‐DNA binding. Kidney enlargement in LPK rats was resistant to chronic treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. In conclusion, PDTC reduced renal cystic enlargement and proteinuria but lacked anti‐inflammatory effects in LPK rats. PMID:25501440

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, A V; Goodyer, P R; McTavish, A J

    1994-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding increases in late-gestational rat kidney and then falls toward basal adult levels postnatally during the 1st wk. We report that the increase in EGF binding is accompanied by an increase in EGF receptor (EGFR) protein and activation of EGFR tyrosine kinase. Multiple proteins were endogenously tyrosine phosphorylated in kidney membranes from fetal rats, and the phosphorylation pattern was similar in rats ranging from 16 to 21 days of gestation. Tyrosine phosphorylation was, however, almost undetectable in 12-wk adult rat kidneys (controls). Among the phosphoproteins in fetal kidney, a prominent 170-kDa protein was identified as EGFR. Endogenous tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR (reflecting receptor activation) was 30-fold higher in fetal kidney membranes than in adult (3- to 7-fold higher when adjusted for differences in EGF binding or EGFR protein content). The EGFR substrate, phospholipase C-gamma 1, was tyrosine phosphorylated in fetal kidneys but not adult, and a greater proportion was membrane-associated in fetal kidneys, consistent with activation of phospholipase C-gamma 1. Thus EGFR tyrosine kinase activity is increased in late-gestational rat kidney. Induction and activation of EGFR may mediate perinatal renal cell growth and development.

  5. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Dysplasia What is kidney dysplasia? Kidney dysplasia is a condition in which ... Kidney dysplasia in one kidney What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  6. Sirtuin 1: A Target for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lili; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhua; Luo, Manyu; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase that is necessary for caloric restriction–related lifespan extension. SIRT1, as an intracellular energy sensor, detects the concentration of intracellular NAD+ and uses this information to adapt cellular energy output to cellular energy requirements. Previous studies on SIRT1 have confirmed its beneficial effects on cellular immunity to oxidative stress, reduction of fibrosis, suppression of inflammation, inhibition of apoptosis, regulation of metabolism, induction of autophagy and regulation of blood pressure. All of the above biological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Therefore, the activation of SIRT1 may become a therapeutic target to improve the clinical outcome of kidney diseases. In this review, we give an overview of SIRT1 and its molecular targets as well as SIRT1-modulated biological processes, with a particular focus on the role of SIRT1 in kidney diseases. PMID:25587857

  7. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'.

  8. Sirtuin 1: A Target for Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lili; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhua; Luo, Manyu; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-12

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an evolutionarily conserved NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that is necessary for caloric restriction-related lifespan extension. SIRT1, as an intracellular energy sensor, detects the concentration of intracellular NAD(+) and uses this information to adapt cellular energy output to cellular energy requirements. Previous studies on SIRT1 have confirmed its beneficial effects on cellular immunity to oxidative stress, reduction of fibrosis, suppression of inflammation, inhibition of apoptosis, regulation of metabolism, induction of autophagy and regulation of blood pressure. All of the above biological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Therefore, the activation of SIRT1 may become a therapeutic target to improve the clinical outcome of kidney diseases. In this review, we give an overview of SIRT1 and its molecular targets as well as SIRT1-modulated biological processes, with a particular focus on the role of SIRT1 in kidney diseases.

  9. Pregnancy and contraceptive counseling of women with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    Women with kidney disease of childbearing age should expect proactive counseling regarding pregnancy and contraception. Discussions should include the impact of pregnancy on their kidney disease and the impact of kidney disease on maternal and fetal outcomes. However, nephrologists rarely discuss sexual dysfunction, infertility, menstrual irregularities, and contraception with their premenopausal women patients. This review will consider pregnancy-related issues to discuss when counseling women with all stages of chronic kidney disease. Issues related to contraception in women on dialysis, women with functioning kidney transplants, and those with chronic kidney disease will also be reviewed.

  10. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Jared J.

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after being elbowed in the flank during a pickup basketball game, a 35-year-old healthy man has severe, colicky abdominal pain followed by gross hematuria. He is hospitalized, and a renal ultrasound scan reveals bilateral polycystic kidneys and liver cysts, previously unknown to the patient. The blood pressure is 160/100 mm Hg. The serum creatinine concentration is 0.9 mg per deciliter (80 μmol per liter). The pain subsides in 2 days with analgesics, rest, and fluids; the gross hematuria resolves in 4 days, although microscopic hematuria persists. How should his case be further evaluated and managed? PMID:20009161

  11. Dermatoglyphics in kidney diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Salgado, Sujatha S; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases are becoming a major cause of global burden with high mortality and morbidity. The origins of most kidney diseases are known, but for some the exact aetiology is not yet understood. Dermatoglyphics is the scientific study of epidermal ridge patterns and it has been used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to detect or predict different medical conditions that have foetal origin. However, there have been a limited number of studies that have evaluated a dermatoglyphic relationship in different kidney diseases. The aim of this review was to systematically identify, review and appraise available literature that evaluated an association of different dermatoglyphic variables with kidney diseases. This review is reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. The PubMed(®) (Medline), POPLINE, Cochrane Library and Trip Database and grey literature sources such as OpenGrey, Google Scholar, and Google were searched to earliest date to 17 April 2014. Of the 36 relevant publications, 15 were included in the review. Of these studies, there are five case reports, seven case series and three comparative studies. Possible association of dermatoglyphics with Wilms tumor (WT) had been evaluated in two comparative studies and one case series that found fewer whorls and a lower mean total ridge count (TRC). Another study evaluated adult polycystic kidney disease (APCD) type III that revealed lower TRC means in all cases. All other case series and case reports describe dermatoglyphics in various kidney disease such as acro-renal-ocular syndrome, potter syndrome, kabuki makeup syndrome, neurofaciodigitorenal syndrome, syndactyly type V, ring chromosome 13 syndrome, trisomy 13 syndrome and sirenomelia. It is evident that whorl pattern frequency and TRC have been used widely to investigate the uncertainty related to the origin of several kidney diseases such as WT and APCD type III. However, small sample sizes

  12. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a kidney.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Public Service Announcement Kidney Disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Wait too long to talk about kidney disease and you could be waiting for a ...

  13. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  14. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23802624

  15. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Agustsdottir, Inger M; Indridason, Olafur S; Edvardsson, Vidar O

    2016-03-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. An observational cohort study. All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD, end-stage renal disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and changes in eGFR. Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were females and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6-67.9) years. Median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0-31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 (55%) patients and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3 to 5, including 11 (21%) patients with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 (62%) patients had experienced kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stages 3 to 5. Of 14 (26%) patients with stage 5 CKD, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 (55%) patients. The median eGFR slope was -0.38 (range, -21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73m(2) per year in patients receiving treatment with an xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and -5.74 (range, -75.8 to -0.10) mL/min/1.73m(2) per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (P=0.001). Use of observational registry data. Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, whereas nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without a history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Obesity and Kidney Disease: Hidden Consequences of the Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Furth, Susan L; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obesity is one of the strongest risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease, and also for nephrolithiasis and for kidney cancer. This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

  17. Obesity and kidney disease: hidden consequences of the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Furth, Susan L; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic. Obesity is one of the strongest risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease, and also for nephrolithiasis and for kidney cancer. This year the World Kidney Day promotes education on the harmful consequences of obesity and its association with kidney disease, advocating healthy lifestyle and health policy measures that make preventive behaviors an affordable option.

  18. Obesity in kidney disease: A heavyweight opponent

    PubMed Central

    Felizardo, Raphael Jose Ferreira; da Silva, Marina Burgos; Aguiar, Cristhiane Favero; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important worldwide challenge that must be faced in most developed and developing countries because of unhealthy nutritional habits. The consequences of obesity and being overweight are observed in different organs, but the kidney is one of the most affected. Excess adipose tissue causes hemodynamic alterations in the kidney that can result in renal disease. However, obesity is also commonly associated with other comorbidities such as chronic inflammation, hypertension and diabetes. This association of several aggravating factors is still a matter of concern in clinical and basic research because the pathophysiologic mechanisms surrounding chronic kidney disease development in obese patients remain unclear. This review will discuss the consequences of obesity in the context of renal injury. PMID:25332896

  19. A perspective on chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianyong; Yang, Hai-Chun; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) will progress to end stage without treatment, but the decline of renal function may not be linear. Compared with glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria, new surrogate markers, such as kidney injury molecule-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated protein, apolipoprotein A-IV, and soluble urokinase receptor, may allow potential intervention and treatment in the earlier stages of CKD, which could be useful for clinical trials. New omic-based technologies reveal potential new genomic and epigenomic mechanisms that appear different from those causing the initial disease. Various clinical studies also suggest that acute kidney injury is a major risk for progressive CKD. To ameliorate the progression of CKD, the first step is optimizing renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade. New drugs targeting endothelin, transforming growth factor-β, oxidative stress, and inflammatory- and cell-based regenerative therapy may have add-on benefit. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  1. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  2. Curcumin Ameliorates Kidney Function and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Suleimani, Yousuf; Al Kalbani, Jamila; Al Bahlani, Shadia; Ashique, Mohammed; Manoj, Priyadarsini; Al Dhahli, Buthaina; Al Abri, Nadia; Naser, Heba T; Yasin, Javed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Hartmann, Christina; Schupp, Nicole

    2017-05-31

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to involve inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the impact of curcumin (diferuloyl methane, a phenolic turmeric pigment), which has strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities on kidney structure and function in rats with adenine-induced CKD. Rats were treated for 5 weeks with adenine to induce CKD-like renal damage and combined with three doses of curcumin. Markers of kidney function and oxidative stress were quantified in plasma, urine, renal homogenates and on kidney tissue. Curcumin was found to significantly abate adenine-induced toxic effects such as reduced creatinine clearance, elevated neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels and raised urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activities. Curcumin markedly reduced renal morphological damage and histopathological markers of inflammation, fibrosis and apoptosis. Curcumin further reduced adenine-induced hypertension, urinary albumin, the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, cystatin C and adiponectin. It restored plasma sclerostin concentrations and lowered oxidative stress in renal homogenates. In animals treated with the two higher curcumin concentrations, alone or in combination with adenine, an increased expression of the antioxidative transcription factor Nrf2 was found as well as up-regulation of the activity of its direct target glutathione reductase, and of an indirect target, the glutathione level. In conclusion, curcumin exhibits salutary effects against adenine-induced CKD in rats by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via up-regulation of the transcription factor Nrf2. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Kidney Disease in Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur Linnet; Palsson, Runolfur; Sch. Agustsdottir, Inger M.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Edvardsson, Vidar O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a purine metabolism disorder causing kidney stones and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The course of nephrolithiasis and CKD has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to examine long-term kidney outcomes in patients with APRT deficiency. Study Design An observational cohort study. Setting & Participants All patients enrolled in the APRT Deficiency Registry of the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium. Outcomes Kidney stones, acute kidney injury (AKI), stage of CKD and kidney failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and changes in eGFR. Measurements Serum creatinine and eGFR calculated using creatinine-based equations. Results Of 53 patients, 30 (57%) were female and median age at diagnosis was 37.0 (range, 0.6–67.9) years. The median duration of follow-up was 10.3 (range, 0.0–31.5) years. At diagnosis, kidney stones had developed in 29 patients (55%) and 20 (38%) had CKD stages 3–5, including 11 patients (21%) with stage 5. At latest follow-up, 33 patients (62%) had had kidney stones; 18 (34%), AKI; and 22 (42%), CKD stage 3–5. Of the 14 (26%) patients with CKD stage 5, 12 had initiated renal replacement therapy. Kidney stones recurred in 18 of 33 patients (55%). The median eGFR slope was −0.38 (range, −21.99 to 1.42) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in patients receiving treatment with xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitor and −5.74 (range, −75.8 to −0.10) mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in those not treated prior to the development of stage 5 CKD (p=0.001). Limitations Use of observational registry data. Conclusions Progressive CKD and AKI episodes are major features of APRT deficiency, while nephrolithiasis is the most common presentation. Advanced CKD without history of kidney stones is more prevalent than previously reported. Our data suggest that timely therapy may retard CKD progression. PMID:26724837

  4. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  5. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  6. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  7. 42 CFR 410.48 - Kidney disease education services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kidney disease education services. 410.48 Section... Kidney disease education services. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Kidney disease patient... disease. Physician means a physician as defined in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Qualified person...

  8. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  9. Metabolomics in the study of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert H; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2011-10-25

    Metabolomics--the nontargeted measurement of all metabolites produced by the body--is beginning to show promise in both biomarker discovery and, in the form of pharmacometabolomics, in aiding the choice of therapy for patients with specific diseases. In its two basic forms (pattern recognition and metabolite identification), this developing field has been used to discover potential biomarkers in several renal diseases, including acute kidney injury (attributable to a variety of causes), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and kidney cancer. NMR and gas chromatography or liquid chromatography, together with mass spectrometry, are generally used to separate and identify metabolites. Many hurdles need to be overcome in this field, such as achieving consistency in collection of biofluid samples, controlling for batch effects during the analysis and applying the most appropriate statistical analysis to extract the maximum amount of biological information from the data obtained. Pathway and network analyses have both been applied to metabolomic analysis, which vastly extends its clinical relevance and effects. In addition, pharmacometabolomics analyses, in which a metabolomic signature can be associated with a given therapeutic effect, are beginning to appear in the literature, which will lead to personalized therapies. Thus, metabolomics holds promise for early diagnosis, increased choice of therapy and the identification of new metabolic pathways that could potentially be targeted in kidney disease.

  10. Pain management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Z H; Gupta, S; Warfield, C A; Steinman, T I

    2001-11-01

    Pain is a common complaint in patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and a systematic approach is needed to differentiate the etiology of the pain and define an approach to management. A thorough history is the best clue to the multifactorial causes of the pain, superimposed upon an understanding of the complex innervation network that supplies the kidneys. The appropriate use of diagnostic radiology (especially MRI) will assist in differentiating the mechanical low back pain caused by cyst enlargement, cyst rupture and cyst infection. Also, the increased incidence of uric acid nephrolithiasis as a factor in producing renal colic must be considered when evaluating acute pain in the population at risk. MRI is not a good technique to detect renal calculi, a frequent cause of pain in polycystic kidney disease. If stone disease is a possibility, then abdominal CT scan and/or ultrasound should be the method of radiologic investigation. Pain management is generally not approached in a systematic way in clinical practice because most physicians lack training in the principles of pain management. The first impulse to give narcotics for pain relief must be avoided. Since chronic pain cannot be "cured," an approach must include techniques that allow the patient to adapt to chronic pain so as to limit interference with their life style. A detailed stepwise approach for acute and chronic pain strategies for the patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is outlined.

  11. Autosomal recessive and dominant polycystic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Righetti, M; Battini, G

    2004-12-01

    It is possible to identify renal cysts in several subjects by ultrasonography imaging techniques. Among the inherited polycystic kidney diseases we include autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and autosomal dominant polycystic diseases such as von Hippel-Lindau disease, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1 and TSC2), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ARPKD is a rare disease, related to PKHD1 gene, located on chromosome 6p21, that encodes a protein named polyductin/fibrocystin. Pathoanatomical features are bilateral kidney involvement with multiple microcysts, and invariably liver involvement with portal and interlobular fibrosis. A single genetic defect leads to different degrees of renal and hepatic involvement with very different phenotypes and different clinical outcome, in the same family too. ARPKD clinically may show 4 different forms: perinatal, neonatal, infantile, and juvenile. ADPKD is much more frequent (1: 400-1000 live births), and can arise from mutations in 2 different genes, named PKD1 located on chromosome 16p13.3, and PKD2 located on chromosome 4q21-23. The proteins encoded by the PKD1 and PKD2 genes are named polycystins which play crucial roles in several biologic processes. To explain the focal lesions that affected different organs and tissues the "double hit" theory has been proposed (germinal mutation plus somatic mutation on PKD1 or PKD2). Recently, biologic evidence documented the crucial role of the renal primary cilia on the formation of polycystins to induce cystogenesis. ADPKD may be clinically characterized by abdominal pain, hypertension, episodes of gross hematuria, headache, renal stones, aortic and cerebral aneurysms, mitral valve prolapse, and polycystic liver disease. ADPKD is slowly progressive disease responsible for up 10% of end stage renal failure (ESRF) in every country of the world. Male sex, PKD1 gene, episodes of gross hematuria, and the precocity and severity of hypertension play an

  12. Women, kidney disease, and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrew; Radovic, Milan; Garovic, Vesna D

    2013-09-01

    Several glomerular diseases may occur in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in such patients should be planned when the disease has been in remission for a minimum of 6 months to minimize maternal and fetal complications. Immunosuppressive agents should be optimized before conception to include those that are safe for pregnancy. The complexity of medical management when caring for these patients calls for a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of a nephrologist, rheumatologist, obstetrician, and pharmacist. This review will address the physiological changes of pregnancy that may affect glomerular disease presentation, activity, and diagnosis; specific glomerular diseases primary and secondary to systemic diseases in the context of pregnancy; fetal and maternal complications and long-term effects; diagnosis and differential diagnosis; and treatment strategies that are considered relatively safe with respect to fetal intrauterine exposure.

  13. Averting the legacy of kidney disease--focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of chronic kidney disease later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced chronic kidney disease in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplant, whereas only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  14. Chronic kidney Disease and the Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Marcello; Riellae, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing. George Bernard Shaw The proportion of older people in the general population is steadily increasing worldwide, with the most rapid growth in low-and middle-income countries [1]. This demographic change is to be celebrated, because it is the consequence of socioeconomic development and better life expectancy. However, population aging also has important implications for society - in diverse areas including health systems, labor markets, public policy, social programs, and family dynamics [2]. A successful response to the aging population will require capitalizing on the opportunities that this transition offers, as well as effectively addressing its challenges. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem that is characterized by poor health outcomes and very high health care costs. CKD is a major risk multiplier in patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke - all of which are key causes of death and disability in older people [3]. Since the prevalence of CKD is higher in older people, the health impact of population aging will depend in part on how the kidney community responds. March 13, 2014 will mark the celebration of the 9th World Kidney Day (WKD), an annual event jointly sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. The topic for WKD 2014 is "CKD in older people". This article reviews the key links between kidney function, age, health and illness - and discusses the implications of the aging population for the care of people with CKD.

  15. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  16. Dengue-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Nayer, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A mosquito-borne viral illness highly prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, dengue is considered a major global health threat by the World Health Organization. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. An RNA virus from the genus Flavivirus, dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes aegypti,the yellow fever mosquito. Dengue is asymptomatic in as many as one half of infected individuals. Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness accompanied by constitutional symptoms. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are the severe forms of dengue infection.Dengue infection has been associated with a variety of renal disorders. Acute renal failure is a potential complication of severe dengue infection and is typically associated with hypotension, rhabdomyolysis, or hemolysis. Acute renal failure complicates severe dengue infection in 2-5% of the cases and carries a high mortality rate. Proteinuria has been detected in as high as 74% of patients with severe dengue infection. Hematuria has been reported in up to 12.5% of patients. Various types of glomerulonephritis have been reported during or shortly after dengue infection in humans and mouse models of dengue infection. Mesangial proliferation and immune complex deposition are the dominant histologic features of dengue-associated glomerulonephritis. On a rare occasion, dengue infection is associated with systemic autoimmune disorders involving the kidneys. In the vast majority of cases, dengue infection and associated renal disorders are self-limited.

  17. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Has ... and what parents can do to help. Treating Kidney Diseases Treatment begins with dietary changes and medicines. ...

  18. Kidney Disease and Diabetes - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease and Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Winter ... family are at risk for kidney disease or diabetes—conditions that affect millions of Americans. Photo courtesy ...

  19. Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167715.html Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat And, the ... abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests. Chronic kidney disease can as much as double a patient's risk ...

  20. 1 in 7 Americans Has Kidney Disease: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_166431.html 1 in 7 Americans Has Kidney Disease: CDC Statistics should serve as a 'warning bell,' ... HealthDay News) -- Thirty million American adults have chronic kidney disease -- but many don't know it. That rate -- ...

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. Recent findings It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. Summary This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition. PMID:25635587

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children.

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition.

  3. [Treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Torra, Roser

    2014-01-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent hereditary kidney disease. However it lacks a specific treatment. Its prevalence is 1/800 and causes the need for renal replacement therapy in 8-10% of patients on dialysis or kidney transplant. It is caused by mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 genes, which cause a series of alterations in the polycystic cells, which have become therapeutic targets. There are many molecules that are being tested to counteract the alterations of these therapeutic targets. There are studies in all phases of research, from phase i to phase iv. Some of the molecules being tested are tolvaptan, mTOR inhibitors and, among many other, somatostatin analogues. These drugs are extensively reviewed in this article. Based on the accumulated experience the primary objective of the trials is the slowing of the increase in renal volume. Yet other renal end points such as renal function and hypertension are necessary. It is expected that in the coming years we can have specific, well tolerated, effective and affordable drugs for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  4. Dengue-associated kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    J Lizarraga, Karlo; Nayer, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: A mosquito-borne viral illness highly prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, dengue is considered a major global health threat by the World Health Organization. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results: An RNA virus from the genus Flavivirus, dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes aegypti,the yellow fever mosquito. Dengue is asymptomatic in as many as one half of infected individuals. Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness accompanied by constitutional symptoms. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are the severe forms of dengue infection.Dengue infection has been associated with a variety of renal disorders. Acute renal failure is a potential complication of severe dengue infection and is typically associated with hypotension, rhabdomyolysis, or hemolysis. Acute renal failure complicates severe dengue infection in 2-5% of the cases and carries a high mortality rate. Proteinuria has been detected in as high as 74% of patients with severe dengue infection. Hematuria has been reported in up to 12.5% of patients. Various types of glomerulonephritis have been reported during or shortly after dengue infection in humans and mouse models of dengue infection. Mesangial proliferation and immune complex deposition are the dominant histologic features of dengue-associated glomerulonephritis. On a rare occasion, dengue infection is associated with systemic autoimmune disorders involving the kidneys. Conclusions: In the vast majority of cases, dengue infection and associated renal disorders are self-limited. PMID:24772398

  5. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK.

  6. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  7. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  8. Hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation in young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jongejan, H.T.; van der Kogel, A.J.; Provoost, A.P.; Molenaar, J.C.

    1987-09-01

    The mechanism of a rise in blood pressure after kidney irradiation is unclear but most likely of renal origin. We have investigated the role of the renin-angiotensin system and dietary salt restriction in the development of systolic hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation in young and adult rats. Three to 12 months after a single X-ray dose of 7.5 or 12.5 Gy to both kidneys of young and adult rats, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma renin concentration (PRC) were measured regularly. A single X-ray dose of 12.5 Gy caused a moderate rise in SBP and a slight reduction in PRC in both young and adult rats. A dose of 7.5 Gy did not significantly alter the SBP or PRC during the follow-up period of 1 year. In a second experiment, the kidneys of young rats received an X-ray dose of 20 Gy. Subsequently, rats were kept on a standard diet (110 mmol sodium/kg) or a sodium-poor diet (10 mmol sodium/kg). On both diets, SBP started to rise rapidly 3 months after kidney irradiation. Sodium balance studies carried out at that time revealed an increased sodium retention in the irradiated rats compared to controls on the same diet. In rats on a low sodium intake, there was neither a delay nor an alleviation in the development of hypertension. Compared to controls, the PRC tended to be lower in irradiated rats up to 4 months after irradiation. Subsequently, malignant hypertension developed in all 20 Gy rats, resulting in pressure natriuresis, stimulating the renin-angiotensin system. Our findings indicated that hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation was not primarily the result of an activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Although there were some indications that sodium retention played a role, dietary sodium restriction did not influence the development of hypertension.

  9. EFFECTS OF SALVIA MILTIORRHIZAE ON THE KIDNEY OF RATS WITH SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND OBSTRUTIVE JAUNDICE.

    PubMed

    Guibing, Ren; Xiping, Zhang; Xiaowen, Ding; Dehong, Zou; Hongjiang, Yang; Xiaoru, Meng; Wenju, Mo; Xiangming, He; Shuai, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and obstructive jaundice (OJ) are frequent recurring diseases that bring about huge threat to human health. Some reports have demonstrated that Salviae miltiorrhizae can protect multiple organs of SAP and OJ model animals or patients, but their related mechanisms were not clear. In this study, we observed the effects of Salvia miltiorrhizae injection on apoptosis and NF-κB expression in kidney and explored the protective effect and mechanism of Salvia miltiorrhizae on the kidney of SAP or OJ rats. The results obtained will provide a theoretical basis for clinical application of Salvia miltiorrhizae. A total of 288 rats were used for SAP -and OJ-associated experiments. The mortality rates of rats, the contents of serum BUN and CREA, the expression levels of Bax, NF-κB proteins and the apoptosis index were observed, respectively. The pathological changes in the kidney of SAP or OJ rats in treated group were mitigated to varying degrees. At 6 and 12 hours after operation in SAP rats or on 21 and 28 days after operation in OJ rats, the contents of serum CREA in treated group were significantly lower than those in model control group; At 3 and 6 hours after operation, the staining intensity of Bax protein of kidney in treated group was significantly lower than that in model control group; on 14 days after operation, the apoptosis index in the kidney of OJ rats in treated group was significantly lower than that in model control group. Salvia miltiorrhizae can exert protective effects on the kidney of SAP and OJ rats.

  10. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all p<0.05). Glibenclamide decreased infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kidney abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    López Revuelta, K; Ricard Andrés, M P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease exhibits numerous kidney structural and functional abnormalities, changes that are seen along the entire length of the nephron. Changes are most marked in patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia, but are also seen in those with compound heterozygous states and the sickle cell trait. The renal features of sickle cell disease include some of the most common reasons for referral to nephrologists, such as hematuria, proteinuria, tubular disturbances and chronic kidney disease. Therapy of these conditions requires specialized knowledge of their distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Spanish Haemathology and Hemotherapy Association has recently publicated their Clinical Practice Guidelines of SCD management. Renal chapter is reproduced in this article for Nefrología difussion.

  12. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD.

  13. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  14. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  15. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  16. Age-related changes in the function of autophagy in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Shi, Suozhu; Cui, Shaoyuan; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2012-04-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated intracellular process for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, especially protein aggregates and damaged organelles. It is essential for maintaining healthy cells. Impaired or deficient autophagy is believed to cause or contribute to aging and age-related disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of age on autophagy in the kidneys of 3-, 12-, and 24-month-old Fischer 344 rats. The results revealed that autophagy-related gene (Atg)7 was significantly downregulated in kidneys of increasing age. The protein expression level of the autophagy marker light chain 3/Atg8 exhibited a marked decline in aged kidneys. The levels of p62/SQSTM1 and polyubiquitin aggregates, representing the function of autophagy and proteasomal degradation, increased in older kidneys. The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage, was also increased in older kidneys. Analysis by transmission electron microscope demonstrated swelling and disintegration of cristae in the mitochondria of aged kidneys. These results suggest that autophagic function decreases with age in the kidneys of Fischer 344 rats, and autophagy may mediate the process of kidney aging, leading to the accumulation of damaged mitochondria.

  17. Kidney Tissue Targeted Metabolic Profiling of Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Rats by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Li, Aiping; Gao, Jining; Li, Hong; Qin, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common pathological process in the progression of kidney disease. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomic approach was used to analyze the kidney tissues of rats with renal interstitial fibrosis (RIF), induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The combination of a variety of statistical methods were used to screen out 14 significantly changed potential metabolites, which are related with multiple biochemical processes including amino acid metabolism, adenine metabolism, energy metabolism, osmolyte change and induced oxidative stress. The exploration of the contralateral kidneys enhanced the understanding of the disease, which was also supported by serum biochemistry and kidney histopathology results. In addition, the pathological parameters (clinical chemistry, histological and immunohistochemistry results) were correlated with the significantly changed differential metabolites related with RIF. This study showed that targeted tissue metabolomic analysis can be used as a useful tool to understand the mechanism of the disease and provide a novel insight in the pathogenesis of RIF. PMID:27695416

  18. [Diabetic nephropathy/diabetic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Boucek, P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which belongs to the triad of diabetic microvascular complications, is currently the main cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. DKD usually simultaneously leads to a deteriorated long-term control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure, and to the development of diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and atherosclerotic complications, which are the main causes of patients' mortality. Screening of the initial stages of DKD is to be based on the detection of increased albumin leak into the urine, microalbuminuria, and the reduction of renal function by means of estimates of glomerular filtration rate based on the serum creatinine level. The main objective of the prophylactic and treatment measures is to prevent the onset of DKD, or at least to stop its transition into an irreversible, progressive stage characterised by a permanent, often nephrotic proteinuria. The basic procedures in the prevention and treatment of DKD are maintaining the optimal metabolic control of diabetes and intensive hypertension treatment based on the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Reaching the stage of progressive renal insufficiency (serum creatinine level approximately > or = 200 micromol/l) is an indication for further follow-up in the nephrology department, which will then take the necessary preparatory measures for dialysis treatment. The optimal method of kidney function replacement for patients with DKD is kidney transplantation, or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  19. Resveratrol improves mitochondrial function in the remnant kidney from 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yan; Lu, Miaomiao; Han, Yarong; Zhou, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Li, Lijing; Jin, Ruixia

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Resveratrol has been demonstrated to be beneficial for the recovery of kidney diseases. In this study, the 5/6 nephrectomized rat was used as a CKD model and the TGF-β1-exposed mouse mesangial cells were used as an in vitro model. Pathological examination showed that resveratrol treatment attenuated glomerular injury in the remnant kidney of 5/6 nephrectomized rat. Additionally, resveratrol improved mitochondrial function in vivo and in vitro, as evidenced by increasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing ATP, decreasing reactive oxygen species production and enhancing activities of complex I and III. Furthermore, the dysregulated expressions of electron transport chain proteins and fission/fusion proteins in the kidney of 5/6 nephrectomize rats and TGF-β1-exposed mesangial cells were restored by resveratrol. Finally, upregulated sirt1 and PGC-1α deacetylation were found after treatment with resveratrol in vivo and in vitro, which may contribute to the mitochondrial protective effects of resveratrol. The results demonstrate that resveratrol protects the mitochondria of kidney in 5/6 nephrectomized rats and TGF-β1 induced mesangial cells. The study provides new insights into the renoprotective mechanisms of resveratrol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Skeletal effects of zoledronic acid in an animal model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, N. X.; Gattone, V. H.; Chen, X.; Carr, A. J.; LeBlanc, P.; Brown, D.; Moe, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bisphosphonates reduce skeletal loss and fracture risk, but their use has been limited in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study shows skeletal benefits of zoledronic acid in an animal model of chronic kidney disease. Introduction Bisphosphonates are routinely used to reduce fractures but limited data exists concerning their efficacy in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that zoledronic acid produces similar skeletal effects in normal animals and those with kidney disease. Methods At 25 weeks of age, normal rats were treated with a single dose of saline vehicle or 100 µg/kg of zoledronic acid while animals with kidney disease (approximately 30 % of normal kidney function) were treated with vehicle, low dose (20 µg/kg), or high dose (100 µg/kg) zoledronic acid, or calcium gluconate (3 % in the drinking water). Skeletal properties were assessed 5 weeks later using micro-computed tomography, dynamic histomorphometry, and mechanical testing. Results Animals with kidney disease had significantly higher trabecular bone remodeling compared to normal animals. Zoledronic acid significantly suppressed remodeling in both normal and diseased animals yet the remodeling response to zoledronic acid was no different in normal and animals with kidney disease. Animals with kidney disease had significantly lower cortical bone biomechanical properties; these were partially normalized by treatment. Conclusions Based on these results, we conclude that zoledronic acid produces similar amounts of remodeling suppression in animals with high turnover kidney disease as it does in normal animals, and has positive effects on select biomechanical properties that are similar in normal animals and those with chronic kidney disease. PMID:22907737

  1. Chronic kidney disease and premature ageing.

    PubMed

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Kotanko, Peter; Schols, Annemie M W J; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) shares many phenotypic similarities with other chronic diseases, including heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis. The most apparent similarity is premature ageing, involving accelerated vascular disease and muscle wasting. We propose that in addition to a sedentary lifestyle and psychosocial and socioeconomic determinants, four major disease-induced mechanisms underlie premature ageing in CKD: an increase in allostatic load, activation of the 'stress resistance response', activation of age-promoting mechanisms and impairment of anti-ageing pathways. The most effective current interventions to modulate premature ageing-treatment of the underlying disease, optimal nutrition, correction of the internal environment and exercise training-reduce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress and induce muscle anabolism. Deeper mechanistic insight into the phenomena of premature ageing as well as early diagnosis of CKD might improve the application and efficacy of these interventions and provide novel leads to combat muscle wasting and vascular impairment in chronic diseases.

  2. Role of aldosterone in the remnant kidney model in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, E L; Kren, S; Hostetter, T H

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) participates in the injury sustained by the remnant kidney. Our studies assessed the importance of aldosterone in that model and the response of aldosterone to drugs interfering with the RAAS. Initially, four groups of rats were studied: SHAM-operated rats, untreated remnant rats (REM), REM rats treated with losartan and enalapril (REM AIIA), and REM AIIA rats infused with exogenous aldosterone (REM AIIA + ALDO). The last group was maintained with aldosterone levels comparable to those in untreated REM rats by constant infusion of exogenous aldosterone. REM rats had larger adrenal glands and a > 10-fold elevation in plasma aldosterone compared to SHAM. REM AIIA rats demonstrated significant suppression of the hyperaldosteronism as well as marked attenuation of proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis compared to REM. REM AIIA + ALDO rats manifested greater proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis than REM AIIA rats. Indeed, by 4 wk of observation all of these features of the experimental disease were similar in magnitude in REM AIIA + ALDO and untreated REM. In separate REM rats spironolactone administration did not reduce glomerular sclerosis but did transiently reduce proteinuria, lowered arterial pressure, and lessened cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, aldosterone contributes to hypertension and renal injury in the remnant kidney model. PMID:8770880

  3. Histopathology of kidney disease in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1956-01-01

    Kidney disease is one of the most puzzling fish diseases known to exist in the United States. In less than Io years it has invaded the Pacific Northwest, exacting a heavy toll of hatchery salmon. Its first appearance apparently was in Massachusetts where Belding and Merrill' described a disease similar to that now seen on the Pacific Coast. In I946 it was diagnosed in Washington2 and since that time has been observed in an ever increasing number of hatcheries. There are unpublished reports of the same or similar diseases in both California and Washington in the early I93o's.3 The latest outbreaks occurred in the Federal hatcheries at Berlin, New Hampshire, and Cortland, New York, in brook, brown, and rainbow trout.4 There is evidence to indicate that the disease may be much more widely spread in New York State.5 The disease is especially dangerous since little is known of the origin or source of the causative agent. Indeed, the classification of the diplobacillus associated with kidney disease is still uncertain. Thus, with our present knowledge, it is difficult or impossible to eradicate the malady from an infected hatchery. Histopathologic studies were undertaken to clarify the pathology of the disease and to compare the eastern form with the western form.

  4. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  5. Phosphate Additive Avoidance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    St-Jules, David E; Goldfarb, David S; Pompeii, Mary Lou; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2017-05-01

    IN BRIEF Dietary guidelines for patients with diabetes extend beyond glycemic management to include recommendations for mitigating chronic disease risk. This review summarizes the literature suggesting that excess dietary phosphorus intake may increase the risk of skeletal and cardiovascular disease in patients who are in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) despite having normal serum phosphorus concentrations. It explores strategies for limiting dietary phosphorus, emphasizing that food additives, as a major source of highly bioavailable dietary phosphorus, may be a suitable target. Although the evidence for restricting phosphorus-based food additives in early CKD is limited, diabetes clinicians should monitor ongoing research aimed at assessing its efficacy.

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Canaud, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is a common autoimmune disease caused by pathogenic antiphospholipid antibodies, leading to recurrent thrombosis and/or obstetrical complications. Importantly for nephrologists, antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with various renal manifestations including large renal vessel thrombosis, renal artery stenosis, and a constellation of intrarenal lesions that has been termed antiphospholipid nephropathy. This last condition associates various degrees of acute thrombotic microangiopathy, proliferative and fibrotic lesions of the intrarenal vessels, and ischemic modifications of the renal parenchyma. The course of the disease can range from indolent nephropathy to devastating acute renal failure. The pejorative impact of antiphospholipid antibody-related renal complication is well established in the context of systemic lupus erythematous or after renal transplantation. In contrast, the exact significance of isolated antiphospholipid nephropathy remains uncertain. The evidence to guide management of the renal complications of antiphospholipid syndrome is limited. However, the recent recognition of the heterogeneous molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of intrarenal vascular lesions in antiphospholipid syndrome have opened promising tracks for patient monitoring and targeted therapeutic intervention.

  7. Renin and angiotensinogen gene expression in maturing rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, R.A.; Lynch, K.R.; Chevalier, R.L.; Wilfong, N.; Everett, A.; Carey, R.M.; Peach, M.J. )

    1988-04-01

    To determine whether angiotensinogen (A{sub o}) and renin are synthesized by the immature kidney and to assess the changes in intrarenal reinin distribution that occur with maturation, the kidneys from 24 newborn and 12 adult Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were processed for renin immunocytochemistry using a highly specific anti-rat renin antibody. Kidney renin and A{sub o} relative mRNA levels (mRNA/total RNA) were detected by Northern and dot blot techniques, using full-length rat renin and A{sub o} cDNAs. Renal renin concentration (RRC) was measured by radioimmunoassay of angiotensin I (ANG I) and expressed as ng ANG I{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}{center dot}mg protein{sup {minus}1} in the incubation media. RRC was higher in newborn than in adult SHR (979 {+-} 164 vs. 206 {+-} 47) and WKY. In the newborn kidneys of both rat strains, renin was distributed throughout the entire length of the afferent arterioles and interlobular arteries, whereas in the adult kidneys renin was confined to the classical juxtaglomerular position. With maturation, there was a decrease in the proportion of immunoreactive juxtaglomerular apparatuses and arterial segments that contained renin. Kidney renin mRNA levels were 7.9-fold higher in the newborn than in the adult animals. A{sub o} mRNA was detected in the newborn and adult kidneys of both rat strains. This study demonstrates conclusively that both renin and A{sub o} genes are expressed in the newborn kidney, providing evidence for a local renin-angiotensin system that is subjected to developmental changes.

  8. Effect of Nigella sativa on the kidney function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dollah, Mohammad Aziz; Parhizkar, Saadat; Izwan, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is an amazing herb which is used in traditional medicine for a wide range of illnesses including bronchial asthma, dysentery, gastrointestinal problems, as well as beneficial effect on blood lipids, lowering blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides level. This study aimed to determine the toxic effect of N. sativa powder on the kidney function which was evaluated by serum urea and creatinine and through histopathological examination of kidney tissue. Methods and Materials: In this study, 24 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (six each). The rats were kept in the separate cage with three rats per cage. The treatment groups were given rat pellet containing N. sativa dose at 0.01, 0.10, and 1.00 g/kg body weight which were considered as low, normal, and high dose for five weeks while control group fed with rat chow pellet without supplementation. At the end of 35 days, the rats were sacrificed to take the blood sample and to remove the kidney organ for toxicity evaluation. Statistical analyses were done through one-way ANOVA using SPSS. Results: The finding revealed that there was no significant difference in serum urea of treatment groups compared with the control group. The results showed a significant decline in serum creatinine of high dose of Nigella sativa treated compared with low dose treated and control groups (p<0.05). Histopathological examination of kidney tissue showed normal kidney architecture with no tissue degeneration, inflammation, necrosis, and tubular dilation in all groups. Conclusion: With the evidence of normal urea and creatinine level in blood and normal kidney tissue in histology examination for all treatment groups, it is suggested that there is no toxic effect on kidney function of Nigella sativa at different doses for five-week period. PMID:25050269

  9. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Huber, Tobias B; Edelstein, Charles L; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy.

  10. Ghrelin and cachexia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Nakamura, Norifumi; Inui, Akio

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue and a potent orexigenic factor that stimulates feeding by interacting with hypothalamic feeding-regulatory nuclei. Its multifaceted effects are potentially beneficial as a treatment in human disease states. In both adult and pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, decreased appetite plays a major role in wasting, which in turn is linked to morbidity and mortality; wasting has also been linked to high levels of leptin and proinflammatory cytokines. The beneficial effects of ghrelin treatment in CKD are potentially mediated by multiple concurrent actions, including the stimulation of appetite-regulating centers, anti-inflammatory effects, and direct kidney effects. Further evaluation of this appetite-regulating hormone in CKD is needed to confirm previous findings and to determine the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Polycystic kidney disease in a Chartreux cat.

    PubMed

    Volta, Antonella; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Gelati, Aldo; Bertoni, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in cats. It has been widely described in Persians and Persian-related cats and sporadically in other breeds. The purpose of the present paper is to describe the first reported case of PKD in a 12-year-old female Chartreux cat. The cat was referred with polyuria and polydipsia and enlarged and irregular kidneys at palpation. Multiple renal cysts and a single liver cyst were identified by ultrasound and the inherited pattern was confirmed by genetic test (polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP) assay). Chartreux cats should be included in the screening programme of PKD, and PKD should be always considered as a possible cause of chronic renal failure in this breed.

  12. Stroke in adult polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M.; Gonzalo, A.; Gobernado, J. M.; Orte, L.; Quereda, C.; Ortuño, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence of acute cerebrovascular events, 142 patients with adult polycystic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients (9.8%) had 19 cerebral attacks. Six patients (4.2%) had intracranial haemorrhage attacks (three ruptured intracranial aneurysms and three cerebral haemorrhages). Ischaemic events occurred in nine patients (five cerebral infarctions and four transient ischaemic attacks). Patients with ischaemic attacks had a better outcome than patients with haemorrhagic events even when transient ischaemic attacks were excluded. Patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were younger. Cerebral complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with adult polycystic kidney disease. They can prove disabling prior to or after dialysis and transplantation. PMID:1480536

  13. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients.

  14. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giorgina B.; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M.; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M.; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients. PMID:26676663

  15. [Pathophysiology of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Magdalena; Jędras, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is both an important cause and consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is present in 80-85% of the patients. The article summarizes the main pathogenetic factors of hypertension in CKD such as: sodium retention, increased activity the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis and endothelium-mediated vasodilatation, oxidative stress, disorders of calcium metabolism and parathyroid hormone secretion, vascular calcification and increased arterial stiffness.

  16. Chronic kidney disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Prabir Kumar; Bradley, John R

    2007-01-01

    It has been estimated that chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects about one in 200 of the population in the UK. There is an increased awareness of the need to identify patients in primary care with CKD at an earlier stage, so that treatments can be initiated to delay progression and prevent complications and appropriate nephrological referral can be made. In this article we will review how measures to identify patients with CKD can improve its management. PMID:17197687

  17. [Vitamin D and kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Étienne; Thervet, Éric; Courbebaisse, Marie

    2013-10-01

    Calcitriol and analogs inhibit renin-angiotensin system, which has a pivotal role in glomerular and tubulo-interstitial damages and proteinuria, and inhibit NF-κB activation which is known to play an important role in renal diseases by promoting inflammation and fibrogenesis. Vitamin D presents interesting pleiotropic effects for the CKD patient (reduction of mortality, antiproteinuric effect and anti-inflammatory properties). "Native" vitamin D (cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol) administration in these patients also decrease parathyroid hormone levels. Native vitamin D administration in CKD patients is safe and does not lead to increased risk of vascular calcification, despite the known hypercalcemic and hyperphosphoremic properties of the molecule in its active form. Native vitamin D administration is not associated with an increased risk of renal stones, at pharmacological doses and without important concomitant administration of calcium salts. In the field of renal transplantation, experimental studies show that vitamin D analogs have a protective role against acute rejection but clinical studies remain mainly observational.

  18. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ... Albumin in the Urine Managing CKD Eating Right Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Preventing ...

  19. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1, 2017 | Bethesda, MD Workshop on Immune System Engineering for Targeted Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) ... Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  20. C-peptide and diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    2017-01-01

    Kidney disease is a serious development in diabetes mellitus and poses an increasing clinical problem. Despite increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, there have been no new therapies for this condition in the last 20 years. Mounting evidence supports a biological role for C-peptide, and findings from multiple studies now suggest that C-peptide may beneficially affect the disturbed metabolic and pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies of C-peptide in animal models and in humans with type 1 diabetes all suggest a renoprotective effect for this peptide. In diabetic rodents, C-peptide reduces glomerular hyperfiltration and albuminuria. Cohort studies of diabetic patients with combined islet and kidney transplants suggest that maintained C-peptide secretion is protective of renal graft function. Further, in short-term studies of patients with type 1 diabetes, administration of C-peptide is also associated with a lowered hyperfiltration rate and reduced microalbuminuria. Thus, the available information suggests that type 1 diabetes should be regarded as a dual hormone deficiency disease and that clinical trials of C-peptide in diabetic nephropathy are both justified and urgently required.

  1. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Fassett, Robert G; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2015-10-26

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin's antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations.

  2. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K.; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F.; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S.; Fassett, Robert G.; Bulmer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin’s antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations. PMID:26498893

  3. World Kidney Day 2016: averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  4. What happens to the heart in chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, E; Mark, P B

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease seen in this population is attributable to both traditional and novel vascular risk factors. Risk of sudden cardiac or arrhythmogenic death is greatly exaggerated in chronic kidney disease, particularly in patients with end stage renal disease where the risk is roughly 20 times that of the general population. The reasons for this increased risk are not entirely understood and while atherosclerosis is accelerated in the presence of chronic kidney disease, premature myocardial infarction does not solely account for the excess risk. Recent work demonstrates that the structure and function of the heart starts to alter early in chronic kidney disease, independent of other risk factors. The implications of cardiac remodelling and hypertrophy may predispose chronic kidney disease patients to heart failure, arrhythmia and myocardial ischaemia. Further research is needed to minimise cardiovascular risk associated with structural and functional heart disease associated with chronic kidney disease.

  5. Culture-modified bone marrow cells attenuate cardiac and renal injury in a chronic kidney disease rat model via a novel antifibrotic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Advani, Andrew; Liao, Christine; Kuliszewski, Michael A; Trogadis, Judy; Thai, Kerri; Advani, Suzanne L; Zhang, Yuan; Kelly, Darren J; Leong-Poi, Howard; Keating, Armand; Marsden, Philip A; Stewart, Duncan J; Gilbert, Richard E

    2010-03-04

    Most forms of chronic kidney disease are characterized by progressive renal and cardiac fibrosis leading to dysfunction. Preliminary evidence suggests that various bone marrow-derived cell populations have antifibrotic effects. In exploring the therapeutic potential of bone marrow derived cells in chronic cardio-renal disease, we examined the anti-fibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived culture modified cells (CMCs) and stromal cells (SCs). In vitro, CMC-conditioned medium, but not SC-conditioned medium, inhibited fibroblast collagen production and cell signalling in response to transforming growth factor-beta. The antifibrotic effects of CMCs and SCs were then evaluated in the 5/6 nephrectomy model of chronic cardio-renal disease. While intravascular infusion of 10(6) SCs had no effect, 10(6) CMCs reduced renal fibrosis compared to saline in the glomeruli (glomerulosclerosis index: 0.8+/-0.1 v 1.9+/-0.2 arbitrary units) and the tubulointersitium (% area type IV collagen: 1.2+/-0.3 v 8.4+/-2.0, p<0.05 for both). Similarly, 10(6) CMCs reduced cardiac fibrosis compared to saline (% area stained with picrosirius red: 3.2+/-0.3 v 5.1+/-0.4, p<0.05), whereas 10(6) SCs had no effect. Structural changes induced by CMC therapy were accompanied by improved function, as reflected by reductions in plasma creatinine (58+/-3 v 81+/-11 micromol/L), urinary protein excretion (9x/divided by 1 v 64x/divided by 1 mg/day), and diastolic cardiac stiffness (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship: 0.030+/-0.003 v 0.058+/-0.011 mm Hg/microL, p<0.05 for all). Despite substantial improvements in structure and function, only rare CMCs were present in the kidney and heart, whereas abundant CMCs were detected in the liver and spleen. Together, these findings provide the first evidence suggesting that CMCs, but not SCs, exert a protective action in cardio-renal disease and that these effects may be mediated by the secretion of diffusible anti-fibrotic factor(s).

  6. Culture-Modified Bone Marrow Cells Attenuate Cardiac and Renal Injury in a Chronic Kidney Disease Rat Model via a Novel Antifibrotic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Andrew; Liao, Christine; Kuliszewski, Michael A.; Trogadis, Judy; Thai, Kerri; Advani, Suzanne L.; Zhang, Yuan; Kelly, Darren J.; Leong-Poi, Howard; Keating, Armand; Marsden, Philip A.; Stewart, Duncan J.; Gilbert, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Most forms of chronic kidney disease are characterized by progressive renal and cardiac fibrosis leading to dysfunction. Preliminary evidence suggests that various bone marrow-derived cell populations have antifibrotic effects. In exploring the therapeutic potential of bone marrow derived cells in chronic cardio-renal disease, we examined the anti-fibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived culture modified cells (CMCs) and stromal cells (SCs). Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro, CMC-conditioned medium, but not SC-conditioned medium, inhibited fibroblast collagen production and cell signalling in response to transforming growth factor-ß. The antifibrotic effects of CMCs and SCs were then evaluated in the 5/6 nephrectomy model of chronic cardio-renal disease. While intravascular infusion of 106 SCs had no effect, 106 CMCs reduced renal fibrosis compared to saline in the glomeruli (glomerulosclerosis index: 0.8±0.1 v 1.9±0.2 arbitrary units) and the tubulointersitium (% area type IV collagen: 1.2±0.3 v 8.4±2.0, p<0.05 for both). Similarly, 106 CMCs reduced cardiac fibrosis compared to saline (% area stained with picrosirius red: 3.2±0.3 v 5.1±0.4, p<0.05), whereas 106 SCs had no effect. Structural changes induced by CMC therapy were accompanied by improved function, as reflected by reductions in plasma creatinine (58±3 v 81±11 µmol/L), urinary protein excretion (9×/÷1 v 64×/÷1 mg/day), and diastolic cardiac stiffness (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship: 0.030±0.003 v 0.058±0.011 mm Hg/µL, p<0.05 for all). Despite substantial improvements in structure and function, only rare CMCs were present in the kidney and heart, whereas abundant CMCs were detected in the liver and spleen. Conclusions/Significance Together, these findings provide the first evidence suggesting that CMCs, but not SCs, exert a protective action in cardio-renal disease and that these effects may be mediated by the secretion of diffusible anti

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathophysiology of the rat kidney in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Mazurchuk, R.J.; Acara, M.A.; Nickerson, P.A.; Fiel, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging was performed on rats before induction of diabetes with streptozotocin (STZ) and at 2 and 12 days postinduction. Images revealed an increase in maximal longitudinal and axial dimensions of the kidneys at 2 days and a further increase at 12 days. Similarly, an increase in the size of the remaining kidney was seen in a rat which underwent uninephrectomy as a positive control. Two major differences were observed between the kidney undergoing compensatory hypertrophy and those developing diabetic nephropathy: (i) Expansion of the renal vasculature was seen only in images of the diabetic rat; (ii) A loss in conspicuity of the normal corticomedullary junction was seen in the T2-weighted images of the diabetic rat but not in the uninephrectomized rat. Histologic examination revealed that the medulla increased to a size greater than the cortex during diabetic nephropathy whereas the medullary volume was less than that of the cortex during compensatory hypertrophy. In vitro T1 relaxation times in cortex, outer medulla and inner medulla of kidneys from control rats were measured and compared with the same respective regions in diabetic rats. When these values were correlated with tissue water content, a linear increase in relaxation rate versus percent water content from cortex to inner medulla was found in the control kidneys, but this correlation was absent in diabetic nephropathy. These studies demonstrate that MRI is an effective noninvasive tool for studying the course of renal hypertrophy and hydration changes in the development of renal disease in STZ-induced diabetes in the rat.

  8. Cellular localization of aquaporin 7 in the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, K; Imai, M; Sasaki, S

    2000-01-01

    The cDNA for the seventh mammalian aquaporin (AQP7) was isolated from rat testis, and its expression was demonstrated at the tail of late spermatids [Ishibashi et al: J Biol Chem 1997;272:20782-20786]. AQP7 is also expressed in the kidney. The localization of AQP7 in the kidney is unknown. We examined the cellular localization of AQP7 in the kidney with Northern blot, reverse transcribed PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in the rat kidney. In Northern blot, AQP7 was expressed in the cortex and the outer medulla but absent in the inner medulla of the kidney. Reverse transcribed PCR of rat nephron segments revealed the selective expression of AQP7 at the proximal straight tubules (PST). Western blot of the membrane fraction of outer medulla revealed a single band of approximately 33 kDa. Immunohistochemistry of the rat kidney showed the selective expression of AQP7 at the brush border membranes of PST (S3 segment). AQP7 is now shown to be localized selectively at the brush border membranes of PST in the rat kidney. The result suggests that AQP7 may function as a pathway for transcellular water transport in PST in concert with more widely expressed AQP1 in proximal tubules. Alternatively, as AQP7 transports urea as well as water, AQP7 may function as a passive urea secretory pathway in this segment and may play a role in the formation and/or maintenance of the medullary urea concentration gradient. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. The role of urinary peptidomics in kidney disease research.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-03-01

    Urinary peptidomics focuses on endogenous urinary peptide content. Many studies now show the usefulness of this approach for the discovery and validation of biomarkers in kidney diseases that are as varied as chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, congenital anomalies of the kidney and the urinary tract, and polycystic kidney disease. Most studies focus on chronic kidney disease and demonstrate that urinary peptidome analysis can substantially contribute to early detection and stratification of patients with chronic kidney disease. A number of multicenter studies are ongoing that aim further validation in a clinical setting and broaden the applicability of urinary peptides. The association of urinary peptides with kidney disease also starts to deliver information on the pathophysiology of kidney disease with emphasis on extracellular matrix remodeling. Bioinformatic peptide centric tools have been developed that allow to model the changes in protease activity involved in kidney disease, based on the urinary peptidome content. A novel application of urinary peptidome analysis is the back-translation of results obtained in humans to animals for animal model validation and improvement of readout in these preclinical models. In conclusion, urinary peptidomics not only contribute to detection and stratification of kidney disease in the clinic, but might also create a new impulse in drug discovery through better insight in the pathophysiology of disease and optimized translatability of animal models.

  10. Chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bartges, Joseph W

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs commonly in older dogs and cats. Advances in diagnostics, staging, and treatment are associated with increased quality and quantity of life. Dietary modification has been shown to increase survival and quality of life and involves more than protein restriction as diets modified for use with CKD are lower in phosphorous and sodium, potassium and B-vitamin replete, and alkalinizing, and they contain n3-fatty acids. Additionally, recognition and management of CKD-associated diseases such as systemic arterial hypertension, proteinuria, and anemia benefit patients. This article summarizes staging and management of CKD in dogs and cats.

  11. Drug discovery for polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Bao-xue

    2011-01-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a most common human genetic diseases, fluid-filled cysts displace normal renal tubules and cause end-stage renal failure. PKD is a serious and costly disorder. There is no available therapy that prevents or slows down the cystogenesis and cyst expansion in PKD. Numerous efforts have been made to find drug targets and the candidate drugs to treat PKD. Recent studies have defined the mechanisms underlying PKD and new therapies directed toward them. In this review article, we summarize the pathogenesis of PKD, possible drug targets, available PKD models for screening and evaluating new drugs as well as candidate drugs that are being developed. PMID:21642949

  12. Using Zebrafish to Study Kidney Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Jerman, Stephanie; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2017-01-01

    The kidneys are a crucial pair of organs that are responsible for filtering the blood to remove waste, maintain electrolyte and water homeostasis, and regulate blood pressure. There are a number of factors, both genetic and environmental, that can impair the function of the kidneys resulting in significant morbidity and mortality for millions of people affected by kidney disease worldwide. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has emerged as an attractive vertebrate model in the study of kidney development and disease and has proven to be a powerful tool in the advancement of how kidney development occurs in vertebrates and how the kidney repairs itself after injury. Zebrafish share significant similarities in kidney development and composition of nephrons, the functional unit of the kidney. This makes the zebrafish a very promising model to study the mechanisms by which renal developmental defects occur. Furthermore, zebrafish are ideally suited for the study of how vertebrate kidneys respond to injury and have provided researchers with invaluable information on repair processes after kidney injury. Importantly, zebrafish have profound potential for discovering treatment modalities and, in fact, studies in zebrafish models have provided leads for therapeutics for human patients suffering from kidney disease and kidney injury. Here, we discuss the similarities and differences in zebrafish and mammalian kidney models, and highlight some of the major contributions the zebrafish has made in the understanding of kidney development and disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphological Characteristics of Renal Artery and Kidney in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoldas, Atilla; Dayan, Mustafa Orhun

    2014-01-01

    The gross anatomy and morphometry of the kidney and renal arteries were studied in the strains of laboratory rat: Sprague-Dawley (Sp) and Wistar (W) rats. Total of 106 three-dimensional endocasts of the intrarenal arteries of kidney that were prepared using standard injection-corrosion techniques were examined. A single renal artery was observed in 100% of the cases. The renal arteries were divided into a dorsal and a ventral branch. The dorsal and ventral branches were divided into two branches, the cranial and caudal branch. Renal arteries were classified into types I and II, depending on the cranial and caudal branches and their made of branching. The present study also showed that the right kidney was slightly heavier than the left one and that the kidney of the male was generally larger than that of the female. The mean live weights of the Sprague-Dawley and Wistar rats were found to be 258.26 ± 5.9 and 182.4 ± 19.05 g, respectively. The kidney weights were significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with body weights. The kidney weights were not found significantly correlated (P > 0.01) with the length of renal arteries. PMID:24737971

  14. [Polycystic kidney disease in a patient using lithium chronically].

    PubMed

    Atagün, Murat Ilhan; Oral, Esad Timuçin; Sevinç, Can

    2013-01-01

    Lithium remains to be the gold standard in the treatment of mood disorders. This study presents a case treated with lithium for an extended period with a good response. Following an increase in creatinine levels, further investigation of renal dysfunction revealed polycystic kidney disease. Lithium was used prior to the diagnosis of polycystic kidney disease, resulting in the unique opportunity to examine the effects of lithium on kidneys with polycystic kidney disease. Within this context, this study also discusses the pharmacokinetics of lithium, and its possible relation to cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease.

  15. Sodium: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Canned beans, chicken, fish and meat l Canned tomato products, including juice l Canned and pickled vegetables, ... KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  16. Histopathology of kidney of albino rat poisoned with uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, K.A.; Garg, V.K.; Garg, V.

    1980-01-01

    Heavy metals input into the media either terrestrial or aquatic is an important aspect of environmental pollution. Heavy metals are known to produce toxic effects on the different tissues of various terrestrial and aquatic animals. Some of these are highly toxic at even very low concentrations and they alter the cellular architecture of many organs including the kidney. Little has been done on the effect of rare earth metals, particularly that of uranium on the kidney of animals. In the present paper histopathological changes produced by uranium on the kidney of albino rats are discussed.

  17. Rho kinase inhibition in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko

    2013-10-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family and their down-stream effectors Rho associated kinases (ROCKs) are the molecules that converge a spectrum of pathophysiological signals triggered by the diabetic milieu and represent promising molecular targets for nephroprotective treatment in diabetes. The review discusses recent studies exploring the consequences of diabetes-induced Rho-ROCK activation in the kidney and the effects of ROCK inhibition (ROCKi) in experimental diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Studies in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes have indicated blood pressure-independent nephroprotective actions of ROCKi in DKD. The underlying mechanisms include attenuation of diabetes-induced increases in renal expression of prosclerotic cytokines and extracellular matrix, anti-oxidant effects and protection of mitochondrial function, resulting in slower development of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The studies have also shown antiproteinuric effects of ROCKi that could be related to reductions in permeability of the glomerular barrier and beneficial effects on podocytes. Glomerular haemodynamic mechanisms might also be involved. Despite remaining questions in this field, such as the effects in podocytes later in the course of DKD, specificity of currently available ROCKi, or the roles of individual ROCK isoforms, recent evidence in experimental diabetes suggests that ROCKi might in future broaden the spectrum of treatments available for patients with DKD. This is supported by the evidence generated in models of non-diabetic kidney disease and in clinical studies in patients with various cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Cyclodextrin Protects Podocytes in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Guzman, Johanna; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Lehto, Markku; Aguillon-Prada, Robier; Mendez, Armando; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Yoo, TaeHyun; Villarreal, Rodrigo; Maiguel, Dony; Johnson, Kevin; Goldberg, Ronald; Nair, Viji; Randolph, Ann; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G.; Burke, George W.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fornoni, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease despite multifactorial intervention. We demonstrated that increased cholesterol in association with downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1 occurs in normal human podocytes exposed to the sera of patients with type 1 diabetes and albuminuria (DKD+) when compared with diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (DKD−) and similar duration of diabetes and lipid profile. Glomerular downregulation of ABCA1 was confirmed in biopsies from patients with early DKD (n = 70) when compared with normal living donors (n = 32). Induction of cholesterol efflux with cyclodextrin (CD) but not inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin prevented podocyte injury observed in vitro after exposure to patient sera. Subcutaneous administration of CD to diabetic BTBR (black and tan, brachiuric) ob/ob mice was safe and reduced albuminuria, mesangial expansion, kidney weight, and cortical cholesterol content. This was followed by an improvement of fasting insulin, blood glucose, body weight, and glucose tolerance in vivo and improved glucose-stimulated insulin release in human islets in vitro. Our data suggest that impaired reverse cholesterol transport characterizes clinical and experimental DKD and negatively influences podocyte function. Treatment with CD is safe and effective in preserving podocyte function in vitro and in vivo and may improve the metabolic control of diabetes. PMID:23835338

  19. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  20. Sexual function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Priya; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2007-04-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and lead to sexual dysfunction, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and altered mineral metabolism. Common clinical problems include disturbances in menstruation in women, erectile dysfunction in men, and decreased libido and infertility in both sexes. Organic factors tend to be prominent and are related to uremia and other comorbid illnesses. Psychological factors and depression may exacerbate the primary problem. Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are seen early in CKD and tend to worsen after patients start dialysis. Hypogonadism plays a dominant role in male sexual function, whereas changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function predominate in female sexual dysfunction. In patients on dialysis, treatment strategies include optimizing dose of dialysis, correction of anemia with erythropoietin, and correction of hyperparathyroidism. Successful kidney transplantation may restore normal sexual function, especially in younger patients.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woroniecka, Karolina I.; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Mohtat, Davoud; Thomas, David B.; Pullman, James M.; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the single leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., for which a cure has not yet been found. The aim of our study was to provide an unbiased catalog of gene-expression changes in human diabetic kidney biopsy samples. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Affymetrix expression arrays were used to identify differentially regulated transcripts in 44 microdissected human kidney samples. DKD samples were significant for their racial diversity and decreased glomerular filtration rate (~25–35 mL/min). Stringent statistical analysis, using the Benjamini-Hochberg corrected two-tailed t test, was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in control and diseased glomeruli and tubuli. Two different web-based algorithms were used to define differentially regulated pathways. RESULTS We identified 1,700 differentially expressed probesets in DKD glomeruli and 1,831 in diabetic tubuli, and 330 probesets were commonly differentially expressed in both compartments. Pathway analysis highlighted the regulation of Ras homolog gene family member A, Cdc42, integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in DKD glomeruli. The tubulointerstitial compartment showed strong enrichment for inflammation-related pathways. The canonical complement signaling pathway was determined to be statistically differentially regulated in both DKD glomeruli and tubuli and was associated with increased glomerulosclerosis even in a different set of DKD samples. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have cataloged gene-expression regulation and identified multiple novel genes and pathways that may play a role in the pathogenesis of DKD or could serve as biomarkers. PMID:21752957

  2. Hypertension in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Arlene B.; Stepniakowski, Konrad; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is common and occurs in a majority of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients prior to loss of kidney function. Hypertension relates to progressive kidney enlargement, and is a significant independent risk factor for progression to end stage renal disease. The pathogenesis of hypertension in ADPKD is complex and dependent on many factors that influence each other. Pkd1 and Pkd2 expression levels are highest in the major vessels and are present in the cilia of endothelial cells and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Decreased or absent polycystin 1 or 2 expression is associated with abnormal vascular structure and function. Pkd1/Pkd2 deficiency results in reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels, altered endothelial response to shear stress with attenuation in vascular relaxation. 10–20% of ADPKD children demonstrate hypertension and the majority of adults are hypertensive before any loss of kidney function. Cardiac abnormalities such as left ventricular hypertrophy and carotid intimal wall thickening are present prior to the development of hypertension in ADPKD. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs in ADPKD due to decreased NO production as well as bilateral cyst expansion and intra-renal ischemia. With increasing cyst size, further activation of the RAAS occurs, blood pressure increases and a vicious cycle ensues with enhanced cyst growth and hypertension ultimately leading to ESRD. Inhibition of the angiotensin aldosterone system is possible with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. However, interventional studies have not yet demonstrated benefit in slowing progression to renal failure in ADPKD. Currently, large multicenter studies are being performed to determine the beneficial effects of RAAS inhibition both early and late in ADPKD. PMID:20219618

  3. 78 FR 28859 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases B... Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney...

  4. Screening of ragdoll cats for kidney disease: a retrospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paepe, D; Saunders, J H; Bavegems, V; Paes, G; Peelman, L J; Makay, C; Daminet, S

    2012-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of renal abnormalities in ragdoll cats. Ragdoll breeders often warn clients to watch for future renal problems, mainly due to chronic interstitial nephritis and polycystic kidney disease. Therefore, ragdoll screening by abdominal ultrasonography, measurement of serum creatinine and urea concentrations and genetic testing is often performed without documented scientific evidence of increased risk of renal disease. Retrospective evaluation of ragdoll screening for renal disease at one institution over an eight-year period. Renal ultrasonography was performed in 244 healthy ragdoll cats. Seven cats were positive for polycystic kidney disease, 21 were suspected to have chronic kidney disease, 8 had abnormalities of unknown significance and 2 cats had only one visible kidney. Cats suspected to have chronic kidney disease were significantly older and had significantly higher serum urea and creatinine concentrations than cats with normal renal ultrasonography. All 125 genetically tested cats were negative for polycystic kidney disease. However, only one of the seven ultrasonographically positive cats underwent genetic testing for polycystic kidney disease. Ultrasonographic findings compatible with chronic kidney disease were observed in almost 10% of cats, and polycystic kidney disease occurred at a low prevalence (<3%) in this ragdoll population. Further studies are required to elucidate if ragdoll cats are predisposed to chronic kidney disease. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. Kidney function and plasma copeptin levels in healthy kidney donors and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zittema, Debbie; van den Berg, Else; Meijer, Esther; Boertien, Wendy E; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; Franssen, Casper F M; de Jong, Paul E; Bakker, Stephan J L; Navis, Gerjan; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-09-05

    Plasma copeptin, a marker of arginine vasopressin, is elevated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and predicts disease progression. It is unknown whether elevated copeptin levels result from decreased kidney clearance or as compensation for impaired concentrating capacity. Data from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and healthy kidney donors before and after donation were used, because after donation, overall GFR decreases with a functionally normal kidney. Data were obtained between October of 2008 and January of 2012 from healthy kidney donors who visited the institution for routine measurements predonation and postdonation and patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who visited the institution for kidney function measurement. Plasma copeptin levels were measured using a sandwich immunoassay, GFR was measured as (125)I-iothalamate clearance, and urine concentrating capacity was measured as urine-to-plasma ratio of urea. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, total kidney volume was measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (n=122, age=40 years, men=56%) had significantly higher copeptin levels (median=6.8 pmol/L; interquartile range=3.4-15.7 pmol/L) compared with donors (n=134, age=52 years, men=49%) both predonation and postdonation (median=3.8 pmol/L; interquartile range=2.8-6.3 pmol/L; P<0.001; median=4.4 pmol/L; interquartile range=3.6-6.1 pmol/L; P<0.001). In donors, copeptin levels did not change after donation, despite a significant fall in GFR (from 105 ± 17 to 66 ± 10; P<0.001). Copeptin and GFR were significantly associated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (β=-0.45, P<0.001) but not in donors. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, GFR and total kidney volume were both associated significantly with urine-to-plasma ratio of urea (β=0.84, P<0

  6. Ursolic Acid provides kidney protection in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Jinping, Lu; Xia, Li; Renyong, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. However, the treatment of DN is still a problem in the world. Inflammatory process plays a critical role in the development of DN. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatment of DN is worth exploring now and in the future. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of ursolic acid (UA) on renal function in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with UA for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, urine albumin excretion, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were measured. In addition, renal oxidative stress level, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, P-selectin expression, and kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Sixteen weeks following streptozotocin injection, the rats produced significant alteration in renal function and increased oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression in the kidneys. Interestingly, UA significantly prevented biochemical and histopathologic changes in the kidneys associated with diabetes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, UA treatment lowered urine albumin excretion, renal oxidative stress level, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression. Moreover, UA treatment also improved renal histopathologic changes in rats with diabetes. UA treatment exhibited a protective effect on kidneys in diabetic rats, implying that UA could be a potential treatment for diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Distinctive effects of plant protein sources on renal disease progression and associated cardiac hypertrophy in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Gauthier, Joy; Roy, Manon; Jia, Yong; Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2011-07-01

    Dietary soy protein reduces renal disease progression in a number of renal diseases, suggesting that plant compared with animal proteins may be renoprotective. The inclusion of other plant protein sources could enhance compliance of intervention diets, but the effects of other plant protein sources are not known. Weanling Han:SPRD-cy rats with experimental polycystic kidney disease were given hemp-, pea- and soy protein-based diets compared with the standard AIN 93G diet with casein as the protein source. Kidneys from diseased rats given diets which contained soy or hemp protein compared with casein-based diets were less enlarged, had lower fluid content, smaller cyst volumes, less fibrosis, lower chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) levels and normalized serum creatinine levels. Soy and hemp protein diets also normalized heart size, which was enlarged in diseased compared with normal rats consuming casein. Kidneys from diseased rats given pea protein compared with casein were more enlarged and had higher fluid content and cyst volumes, despite growing better and having lower serum creatinine and renal chemokine receptor 2 levels, and similar levels of renal fibrosis. Not all plant proteins are equally protective in experimental kidney disease and associated cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. External Iliac Artery Dissection During Kidney Transplant for Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Caveat for Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Karusseit, Victor O L O L

    2017-08-11

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a common cause of end-stage renal failure and an indication for transplant. The genetic mutation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease also causes vascular abnormalities, mainly aneurysms but also medial dissection. Here, a case of dissection of the recipient artery during a kidney transplant procedure in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is described. Dissection caused occlusion of both the external iliac artery and the donor renal artery. Occlusion was recognized intraoperatively, and the kidney was salvaged by in situ reperfusion of the kidney with cold preservation solution, excision of the affected recipient arterial segment, and reanastomosis of the donor artery to the internal iliac artery. The external iliac artery defect was replaced with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The transplanted kidney achieved good function. This is the first description of a case of recognition of recipient arterial dissection during a kidney transplant procedure for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Surgeons should be aware of the phenomenon of arterial dissection in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and should be vigilant while anastomosing the artery during kidney transplant in these patients.

  9. Therapeutic targets for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia D

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a common genetic disease in which renal enlargement and loss of function is caused by progressive expansion of tubular cysts. To reverse the detrimental effects of PKD gene mutation(s) and to slow cystic expansion, new drug therapies are required. The underlying cell biology leading to identification of molecular targets for PKD is reviewed. Specific focus is on studies published at the early pre-clinical level. These include genetic and epigenetic modulators, and drugs to slow cystic expansion and disease progression. Discussion of specific drugs and clinical trials is not within the scope of this article. Literature research methods included EndNote and PubMed online searches using keyword combinations: polycystic kidneys disease, pre-clinical, molecular targets, signal transduction, genetic modulators, epigenetic, therapeutic, receptors, kinases. Where possible, the most recent citations concerning a given target are referenced. It is suggested that the most promising targets for future therapeutic development are those that target upstream signaling events at cell membranes, such as the vasopressin-2 receptor (AVPR2), EGFR/ErbB2, and the β-1-integrin receptor, as well as the intracellular integrator kinase, c-Src.

  10. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  11. IgG4-related kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    IgG4-related kidney disease is a term that refers to any form of renal involvement by IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), a recently recognized systemic immune-mediated disease. The most common renal manifestation is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN), which presents as acute or chronic renal insufficiency, renal mass lesions, or both. On biopsy, IgG4-TIN shows a plasma cell-rich interstitial inflammatory infiltrate with increased IgG4+ plasma cells, along with expansile interstitial fibrosis; tubular basement membrane immune complex deposits are common. IgG4-TIN usually shows a brisk response to immunosuppressive therapy. Glomeruli may be affected by IgG4-RD, usually in the form of membranous glomerulonephritis. Other patterns of glomerular disease include IgA nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and endocapillary or mesangioproliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis. IgG4-related plasma cell arteritis has also been observed in the kidney. This review describes the histopathologic and immunophenotypic patterns of renal involvement by IgG4-RD, with associated clinical, radiographic, and serologic features.

  12. Developmental Programming of Hypertension and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Euming; Yosypiv, Ihor V.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the concept that changes in the intrauterine milieu during “sensitive” periods of embryonic development or in infant diet after birth affect the developing individual, resulting in general health alterations later in life. This phenomenon is referred to as “developmental programming” or “developmental origins of health and disease.” The risk of developing late-onset diseases such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity or type 2 diabetes is increased in infants born prematurely at <37 weeks of gestation or in low birth weight (LBW) infants weighing <2,500 g at birth. Both genetic and environmental events contribute to the programming of subsequent risks of CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW individuals. A number of observations suggest that susceptibility to subsequent CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW infants is mediated, at least in part, by reduced nephron endowment. The major factors influencing in utero environment that are associated with a low final nephron number include uteroplacental insufficiency, maternal low-protein diet, hyperglycemia, vitamin A deficiency, exposure to or interruption of endogenous glucocorticoids, and ethanol exposure. This paper discusses the effect of premature birth, LBW, intrauterine milieu, and infant feeding on the development of hypertension and renal disease in later life as well as examines the role of the kidney in developmental programming of hypertension and CKD. PMID:23251800

  13. Developmental programming of hypertension and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chong, Euming; Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the concept that changes in the intrauterine milieu during "sensitive" periods of embryonic development or in infant diet after birth affect the developing individual, resulting in general health alterations later in life. This phenomenon is referred to as "developmental programming" or "developmental origins of health and disease." The risk of developing late-onset diseases such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity or type 2 diabetes is increased in infants born prematurely at <37 weeks of gestation or in low birth weight (LBW) infants weighing <2,500 g at birth. Both genetic and environmental events contribute to the programming of subsequent risks of CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW individuals. A number of observations suggest that susceptibility to subsequent CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW infants is mediated, at least in part, by reduced nephron endowment. The major factors influencing in utero environment that are associated with a low final nephron number include uteroplacental insufficiency, maternal low-protein diet, hyperglycemia, vitamin A deficiency, exposure to or interruption of endogenous glucocorticoids, and ethanol exposure. This paper discusses the effect of premature birth, LBW, intrauterine milieu, and infant feeding on the development of hypertension and renal disease in later life as well as examines the role of the kidney in developmental programming of hypertension and CKD.

  14. ARISTOLOCHIC ACID I METABOLISM IN THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Priestap, Horacio A.; Torres, M. Cecilia; Rieger, Robert A.; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Freshwater, Tomoko; Taft, David R.; Barbieri, Manuel A.; Iden, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acids are natural nitro-compounds found globally in the plant genus Aristolochia that have been implicated in the severe illness in humans termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Aristolochic acids undergo nitroreduction, among other metabolic reactions, and active intermediates arise that are carcinogenic. Previous experiments with rats showed that aristolochic acid I (AA-I), after oral administration or injection, is subjected to detoxication reactions to give aristolochic acid Ia, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates that can be found in urine and faeces. Results obtained with whole rats do not clearly define the role of liver and kidney in such metabolic transformation. In this study, in order to determine the specific role of the kidney on the renal disposition of AA-I and to study the biotransformations suffered by AA-I in this organ, isolated kidneys of rats were perfused with AA-I. AA-I and metabolite concentrations were determined in perfusates and urines using HPLC procedures. The isolated perfused rat kidney model showed that AA-I distributes rapidly and extensively in kidney tissues by uptake from the peritubular capillaries and the tubules. It was also established that the kidney is able to metabolize AA-I into aristolochic acid Ia, aristolochic acid Ia O-sulfate, aristolactam Ia, aristolactam I and aristolactam Ia O-glucuronide. Rapid demethylation and sulfation of AA-I in the kidney generate aristolochic acid Ia and its sulfate conjugate that are voided to the urine. Reduction reactions to give the aristolactam metabolites occur to a slower rate. Renal clearances showed that filtered AA-I is reabsorbed at the tubules whereas the metabolites are secreted. The unconjugated metabolites produced in the renal tissues are transported to both urine and perfusate whereas the conjugated metabolites are almost exclusively secreted to the urine. PMID:22118289

  15. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  16. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Michael E.; Hruska, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well, as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This Overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy. PMID:26356179

  17. Rare inherited kidney diseases: challenges, opportunities, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V A M; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-05-24

    At least 10% of adults and nearly all children who receive renal-replacement therapy have an inherited kidney disease. These patients rarely die when their disease progresses and can remain alive for many years because of advances in organ-replacement therapy. However, these disorders substantially decrease their quality of life and have a large effect on health-care systems. Since the kidneys regulate essential homoeostatic processes, inherited kidney disorders have multisystem complications, which add to the usual challenges for rare disorders. In this review, we discuss the nature of rare inherited kidney diseases, the challenges they pose, and opportunities from technological advances, which are well suited to target the kidney. Mechanistic insights from rare disorders are relevant for common disorders such as hypertension, kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Sex differences in kidney gene expression during the life cycle of F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kwekel, Joshua C; Desai, Varsha G; Moland, Carrie L; Vijay, Vikrant; Fuscoe, James C

    2013-07-31

    The kidney functions in key physiological processes to filter blood and regulate blood pressure via key molecular transporters and ion channels. Sex-specific differences have been observed in renal disease incidence and progression, as well as acute kidney injury in response to certain drugs. Although advances have been made in characterizing the molecular components involved in various kidney functions, the molecular mechanisms responsible for sex differences are not well understood. We hypothesized that the basal expression levels of genes involved in various kidney functions throughout the life cycle will influence sex-specific susceptibilities to adverse renal events. Whole genome microarray gene expression analysis was performed on kidney samples collected from untreated male and female Fischer 344 (F344) rats at eight age groups between 2 and 104 weeks of age. A combined filtering approach using statistical (ANOVA or pairwise t test, FDR 0.05) and fold-change criteria (>1.5 relative fold change) was used to identify 7,447 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 7,447 DEGs revealed sex-related differences in mRNA expression at early (2 weeks), middle (8, 15, and 21 weeks), and late (104 weeks) ages in the rat life cycle. Functional analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) of these sex-different genes indicated over-representation of specific pathways and networks including renal tubule injury, drug metabolism, and immune cell and inflammatory responses. The mRNAs that code for the qualified urinary protein kidney biomarkers KIM-1, Clu, Tff3, and Lcn2 were also observed to show sex differences. These data represent one of the most comprehensive in-life time course studies to be published, assessing sex differences in global gene expression in the F344 rat kidney. PCA and Venn analyses reveal specific periods of sexually dimorphic gene expression which are associated with functional categories (xenobiotic

  20. Sex differences in kidney gene expression during the life cycle of F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The kidney functions in key physiological processes to filter blood and regulate blood pressure via key molecular transporters and ion channels. Sex-specific differences have been observed in renal disease incidence and progression, as well as acute kidney injury in response to certain drugs. Although advances have been made in characterizing the molecular components involved in various kidney functions, the molecular mechanisms responsible for sex differences are not well understood. We hypothesized that the basal expression levels of genes involved in various kidney functions throughout the life cycle will influence sex-specific susceptibilities to adverse renal events. Methods Whole genome microarray gene expression analysis was performed on kidney samples collected from untreated male and female Fischer 344 (F344) rats at eight age groups between 2 and 104 weeks of age. Results A combined filtering approach using statistical (ANOVA or pairwise t test, FDR 0.05) and fold-change criteria (>1.5 relative fold change) was used to identify 7,447 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the 7,447 DEGs revealed sex-related differences in mRNA expression at early (2 weeks), middle (8, 15, and 21 weeks), and late (104 weeks) ages in the rat life cycle. Functional analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) of these sex-different genes indicated over-representation of specific pathways and networks including renal tubule injury, drug metabolism, and immune cell and inflammatory responses. The mRNAs that code for the qualified urinary protein kidney biomarkers KIM-1, Clu, Tff3, and Lcn2 were also observed to show sex differences. Conclusions These data represent one of the most comprehensive in-life time course studies to be published, assessing sex differences in global gene expression in the F344 rat kidney. PCA and Venn analyses reveal specific periods of sexually dimorphic gene expression which are associated with

  1. Gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psycho social factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected prior to the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men while the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed towards optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure.

  2. Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease--Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  3. Averting the legacy of kidney disease: focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:28031959

  4. Averting the legacy of kidney disease – focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group amongst children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help to detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, whilst only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policymakers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27247150

  5. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J.R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Schaefer, F.

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, in that the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease as a consequence of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that the World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27096201

  6. Subclinical chronic kidney disease modifies the diagnosis of experimental acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Succar, Lena; Pianta, Timothy J; Davidson, Trent; Pickering, John W; Endre, Zoltán H

    2017-09-01

    Extensive structural damage within the kidney must be present before serum creatinine increases. However, a subclinical phase of chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually goes undetected. Here we tested whether experimental subclinical CKD would modify functional and damage biomarker profiles of acute kidney injury (AKI). Subclinical CKD was induced in rats by adenine or aristolochic acid models but without increasing serum creatinine. After prolonged recovery (three to six weeks), AKI was induced with a subnephrotoxic dose of cisplatin. Urinary levels of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), cytochrome C, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), clusterin, and interleukin-18 increased during CKD induction, without an increase in serum creatinine. After AKI in adenine-induced CKD, serum creatinine increased more rapidly, while increased urinary KIM-1, clusterin, and MCP-1 were delayed and reduced. Increased serum creatinine and biomarker excretion were associated with diffuse tubulointerstitial injury in the outer stripe of outer medulla coupled with over 50% cortical damage. Following AKI in aristolochic acid-induced CKD, increased serum creatinine, urinary KIM-1, clusterin, MCP-1, cytochrome C, and interleukin-18 concentrations and excretion were greater at day 21 than day 42 and inversely correlated with cortical injury. Subclinical CKD modified functional and damage biomarker profiles in diametrically opposite ways. Functional biomarker profiles were more sensitive, while damage biomarker diagnostic thresholds and increases were diminished and delayed. Damage biomarker concentrations and excretion were inversely linked to the extent of prior cortical damage. Thus, thresholds for AKI biomarkers may need to be lower or sampling delayed in the known presence of CKD. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    to measure serum creatinine. 5b. urine collection twice each month for measurements of protein and creatinine ratios Task 6. Intravital imaging ...information on the renal function, GFR and blood flow. In addition static CT images were obtained to measure kidney and cyst volumes. The CT scans were... images from kidneys stained for SAA (red) show GFP+ cells in kidneys from rats that received control (A) cells. SAA co-localizes with GFP (resulting

  8. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    González-Parra, Emilio; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency. PMID:22701173

  9. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  10. Chronic kidney disease in small animals.

    PubMed

    Polzin, David J

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects multiple body systems and presents with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Proper application of conservative medical management can profoundly affect the clinical course of CKD. Diagnosis and management is facilitated by staging CKD and applying therapies that are appropriate for the patient's stage of CKD. Therapy and follow-up of CKD are described, with emphasis on stage-based therapy to ameliorate clinical signs and slow progression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative stress and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    Slowing the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a critical part of the management of affected dogs and cats. Renal oxidant stress is a previously unrecognized factor in the progression of canine CKD and is likely to be similarly important in feline CKD. Renin-angiotensin antagonism, calcium channel antagonism, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, and antihypertensive and antiproteinuric therapy are commonly recommended for dogs and cats with CKD. These therapies would be expected to reduce renal oxidant stress by decreasing reactive oxygen species generation. Newer data indicate that dietary supplementation with specific antioxidants is an important consideration for limiting renal oxidant stress and progression of CKD.

  12. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kristin M.; Adams, Michael A.; Holden, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population. PMID:24212088

  13. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  14. The role of epigenetics in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, M; Lindholm, B; Stenvinkel, P; Ekström, J T

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of changes in gene expression that occur without changes in DNA sequence. These reversible modifications include DNA methylation, histone acetylation and RNA interference. Epigenetic changes are fundamental for the regulatory physiological processes that regulate gene activity; therefore, these changes are altered in response to environmental factors or disease states, but, in many circumstances, they are also believed to contribute to disease occurrence and progression. So far, studies of the epigenome have been scarce in nephrology. However, there is evidence that in the uremic milieu, several features such as inflammation, dyslipidaemia, hyperhomocysteinaema, oxidative stress as well as vitamin and nutritional deficiencies may affect the epigenome, and impact patient outcome. The present review describes the current knowledge on epigenetic alterations in the course of various kidney disease states. Although the science of epigenetics is still in its infancy, it seems that it may help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms in uraemia, and allow novel treatment strategies to be developed.

  15. Cardiometabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Manrique, Camila; McFarlane, Samy I; Sowers, James R

    2006-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular (CV) disease, and CV-related premature death. More than 8 million people in the United States have CKD; therefore, preventive stratiegies should be directed at identifying risk factors for this condition. There is growing evidence implicating the cardiometabolic syndrome, a clustering of CV risk factors that include obesity, insulin resistance, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, dysglycemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Factors mediating this relationship include increased glomerular filtration, increased vascular permeability, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and inappropriate secretion of growth factors. The consequences are microalbuminuria, a marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, renal vascular proliferation, extracellular matrix expansion, and CKD. Prevention of CKD should be directed at controlling all components of the cardiometabolic syndrome, with the ultimate goal of reducing the burden imposed by ESRD.

  16. Diagnosing kidney disease in the genetic era.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sindhuri; Gharavi, Ali G

    2015-07-01

    Recent technological improvements have increased the use of genetic testing in the clinic. This review serves to summarize the many practical benefits of genetic testing, discusses various methodologies that can be used clinically, and exemplifies ways in which genetics is propelling the field forward in nephrology. The advent of next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies has heralded an unprecedented number of discoveries in the field of nephrology, providing many opportunities for incorporating genomic diagnostics into clinical care. The use of genetic testing, particularly in pediatrics, can provide accurate diagnoses in puzzling cases, resolve misclassification of disease, and identify subsets of individuals with treatable conditions. Genetic testing may have broad benefits for patients and their families. Knowing the precise molecular etiology of disease can help clinicians determine the exact therapeutic course, and counsel patients and their families about prognosis. Genetic discoveries can also improve the classification of kidney disease and identify new targets for therapy.

  17. Polycystic kidney disease: an unrecognized emerging infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Hjelle, M. A.; Hjelle, J. T.; Jones, M.; Mayberry, W. R.; Dombrink-Kurtzman, M. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Nowak, D. M.; Darras, F. S.

    1997-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases in humans. We contend that it may be an emerging infectious disease and/or microbial toxicosis in a vulnerable human subpopulation. Use of a differential activation protocol for the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay showed bacterial endotoxin and fungal (1-->3)-beta-D-glucans in cyst fluids from human kidneys with PKD. Fatty acid analysis of cyst fluid confirmed the presence of 3-hydroxy fatty acids characteristic of endotoxin. Tissue and cyst fluid from three PKD patients were examined for fungal components. Serologic tests showed Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida antigens. IgE, but not IgG, reactive with Fusarium and Candida were also detected in cyst fluid. Fungal DNA was detected in kidney tissue and cyst fluid from these three PKD patients, but not in healthy human kidney tissue. We examine the intertwined nature of the actions of endotoxin and fungal components, sphingolipid biology in PKD, the structure of PKD gene products, infections, and integrity of gut function to establish a mechanistic hypothesis for microbial provocation of human cystic disease. Proof of this hypothesis will require identification of the microbes and microbial components involved and multifaceted studies of PKD cell biology. PMID:9204292

  18. Life cycle analysis of kidney gene expression in male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kwekel, Joshua C; Desai, Varsha G; Moland, Carrie L; Vijay, Vikrant; Fuscoe, James C

    2013-01-01

    Age is a predisposing condition for susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and progression as well as acute kidney injury that may arise due to the adverse effects of some drugs. Age-related differences in kidney biology, therefore, are a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of genes expressed in the kidney at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Therefore, establishing changes in baseline expression data between these life stages is the first and necessary step in evaluating this hypothesis. Untreated male F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Kidneys were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Agilent whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. An ANOVA (p<0.01) coupled with a fold-change>1.5 in relative mRNA expression, was used to identify 3,724 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Principal component analyses of these DEGs revealed three major divisions in life-cycle renal gene expression. K-means cluster analysis identified several groups of genes that shared age-specific patterns of expression. Pathway analysis of these gene groups revealed age-specific gene networks and functions related to renal function and aging, including extracellular matrix turnover, immune cell response, and renal tubular injury. Large age-related changes in expression were also demonstrated for the genes that code for qualified renal injury biomarkers KIM-1, Clu, and Tff3. These results suggest specific groups of genes that may underlie age-specific susceptibilities to adverse drug reactions and disease. This analysis of the basal gene expression patterns of renal genes throughout the life cycle of the rat will improve the use of current and future renal biomarkers and inform our assessments of kidney injury and disease.

  19. Decellularization of Rat Kidneys to Produce Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mei; Yaling, Yu; Zhibin, Wang; Jianse, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) retains three-dimensional structures for the stimulation of cell growth, with components of the ECM relatively conserved between species. Interest in the use of decellularized scaffold-based strategies for organ regeneration is increasing rapidly. Decellularized scaffolds derived from animal organs are a promising material for organ engineering, with a number of prominent advances having been reported in the past few years.In this article we describe a simple and robust methodology for generating decellularized rat kidneys. To obtain these scaffolds, we perfuse rat kidneys with detergents through the abdominal aorta. After decellularization, kidney scaffolds are harvested for evaluation of vascular structure and histology. Qualitative evaluation involves vascular corrosion casting, transmission electron microscopy, and several different histological and immunofluorescent methods. SDS residue levels are assessed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS).

  20. Role of ultrasonographic chronic kidney disease score in the assessment of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yaprak, Mustafa; Çakır, Özgür; Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Dayanan, Ramazan; Akın, Selçuk; Değirmen, Elif; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Turgut, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy imaging procedure to comment on the kidney disease. Data are limited about the relation between estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) and all 3 renal US parameters, including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity, in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score calculated via these ultrasonographic parameters. One hundred and twenty patients with stage 1-5 CKD were enrolled in this study. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. US was performed by the same radiologist who was blinded to patients' histories and laboratory results. US parameters including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity were obtained from both kidneys. All 3 parameters were scored for each kidney, separately. The sum of the average scores of these parameters was used to calculate ultrasonographic CKD score. The mean age of patients was 63.34 ± 14.19 years. Mean kidney length, parenchymal thickness, ultrasonographic CKD score and median parenchymal echogenicity were found as 96.2 ± 12.3, 10.97 ± 2.59 mm, 6.28 ± 2.52 and 1.0 (0-3.5), respectively. e-GFR was positively correlated with kidney length (r = 0.343, p < 0.001), parenchymal thickness (r = 0.37, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with CKD score (r = -0.587, p < 0.001) and parenchymal echogenicity (r = -0.683, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for distinction of e-GFR lower than 60 mL/min showed that the ultrasonographic CKD score higher than 4.75 was the best parameter with the sensitivity of 81% and positive predictivity of 92% (AUC, 0.829; 95% CI, 0.74-0.92; p < 0.001). We found correlation between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score via using all ultrasonographic parameters. Also, our study showed

  1. Role of Integrin-Beta 1 in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Role of Integrin-Beta 1 in Polycystic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gabriele Luca Gusella, Ph.D...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is caused by the dysregulation of the PKD1 or PKD2...characterized a novel cell line from human loop of Henle epithelium that can serve as a unique model to study medullary cystic kidney disease -2 (MCKD2) and

  2. Diabetic kidney disease: from physiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; de Fuentes, Mercedes Muros; Górriz, José L; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) defines the functional, structural and clinical abnormalities of the kidneys that are caused by diabetes. This complication has become the single most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. The pathophysiology of DKD comprises the interaction of both genetic and environmental determinants that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, which leads to the damage of the glomerular filtration barrier, a highly specialized structure formed by the fenestrated endothelium, the glomerular basement membrane and the epithelial podocytes, that permits a highly selective ultrafiltration of the blood plasma. DKD evolves gradually over years through five progressive stages. Briefly they are: reversible glomerular hyperfiltration, normal glomerular filtration and normoalbuminuria, normal glomerular filtration and microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and renal failure. Approximately 20–40% of diabetic patients develop microalbuminuria within 10–15 years of the diagnosis of diabetes, and about 80–90% of those with microalbuminuria progress to more advanced stages. Thus, after 15–20 years, macroalbuminuria occurs approximately in 20–40% of patients, and around half of them will present renal insufficiency within 5 years. The screening and early diagnosis of DKD is based on the measurement of urinary albumin excretion and the detection of microalbuminuria, the first clinical sign of DKD. The management of DKD is based on the general recommendations in the treatment of patients with diabetes, including optimal glycaemic and blood pressure control, adequate lipid management and abolishing smoking, in addition to the lowering of albuminuria. PMID:24907306

  3. Chronic kidney disease in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kondo, Kazuoki

    2012-02-01

    Menopause is derived from the Greek words men (month) and pauses (cessation) and means permanent cessation of menstruation after the loss of ovarian activity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has recently been associated with cardiovascular events in several studies. CKD patients have a heavy burden of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in addition to a range of nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation and abnormal metabolism of calcium and phosphate. In this review, the association of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is discussed. CKD mineral and bone disorder, characterized by disturbances of calcium/phosphate/parathyroid hormone, bone abnormalities and vascular and soft tissue calcification, is highly prevalent in CKD and is a strong, independent predictor of bone fracture, CVD and death. Estrogen has been shown to: (a) decrease the expression of angiotensin type 1 receptors in vasculature and kidneys; (b) reduce the expression and activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and (c) cause the release of angiotensinogen substrate from the liver. However, the degree of activation or suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by estrogen has not been clearly established. Clinical data on the effects of estrogen therapy on bone mineral densities are extremely limited in the ESRD population. CVD is the most common cause of death in postmenopausal women with CKD and many contributing factors have been explored. Future research for prevention of CVD in postmenopausal women with CKD would focus on the biology of vascular calcification as well as bone loss.

  4. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  5. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease diagnosed in utero. Review.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Magdalena; Huras, Hubert; Wiecheć, Marcin; Jach, Robert; Radoń-Pokracka, Małgorzata; Górecka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of most common inherited renal diseases. It is estimated that very early onset ADPKD affects even 2% patients. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of genetics, prenatal diagnosis and prognosis in very early onset autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  6. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results Statistically significant correlation between the estimated creatinine clearance values and the average of the calculated values of kidney volume was found (p<0.01). Average value of the kidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  7. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Duarte, Daniella Bezerra; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by organisms from the genus Schistosoma. The disease is endemic in tropical areas, where there are currently millions of people living in areas with transmission risk. Schistosomiasis-associated kidney disease is not frequently described in literature. The disease has a chronic evolution, with variable severity. Glomerulonephritis is described in 10-12% in autopsy studies. Proteinuria is reported in 20% of patients with S. mansoni infection. Schistosomal glomerulopathy generally occur in young patients, male, with hepato-splenomegaly. The glomerular lesion in schistosomiasis has an immunological nature. Antigens from the parasite seem to be related to glomerulopathy and have been found in the sera of humans and animals infected by the S. mansoni. Vesical involvement is common in the infection by S. haematobium, a parasitic disease prevalent in African countries. In the S. haematobium infection, hematuria and dysuria can be observed due to inflammation and ulceration in the bladder mucosa, generaly occuring 3 to 4 months after primary infection. Specific antiparasitic treatment is indicated to all patients infected by Schistosoma. There are 2 drugs available for treatment, praziquantel and oxamniquine. We revise the general aspects of the disease and describe the features of renal involvement in schistosomiasis.

  8. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  9. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  10. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  11. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  13. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  14. Effects of RAAS Inhibitors in Patients with Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Hong; Liu, Di; Liu, Yexin; Li, Huiqiong; Tan, Xia; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Zhang, Hongqing

    2017-08-08

    Proteinuria and decline of renal function are associated with progression of kidney disease. The Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation, fluid volume, and sodium balance. Overactivity of RAAS contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of clinical conditions including progress of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review summarizes the use of RAAS inhibitors as dual therapy or monotherapy in different stages of kidney disease. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated RAAS inhibitors prevent proteinuria, kidney fibrosis and slow decline of renal function and thus play a protective role in both early and end stages of kidney disease. While combination use of RAAS inhibitors showed higher efficiency compared with monotherapy, it is also associated with higher incidence of adverse events. Besides ACEI/ARBs, more mechanism research of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in kidney disease should be performed.

  15. Sex-linked differences in the course of chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure: a study in 5/6 nephrectomized Ren-2 transgenic hypertensive rats with volume overload induced using aorto-caval fistula.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Luděk; Škaroupková, Petra; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz

    2016-10-01

    The role of hypertension and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in sex-related differences in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) remain unclear, especially when the two diseases are combined. In male and female Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR), a model of hypertension with activation of endogenous RAS, CKD was induced by 5/6 renal mass reduction (5/6 NX) and CHF was elicited by volume overload achieved by creation of an aorto-caval fistula (ACF). The primary aim of the study was to examine long-term CKD- and CHF-related mortality, especially in animals with CKD and CHF combined, with particular interest in the potential sex-related differences. The follow-up period was 23 weeks after the first intervention (5/6 NX). We found, first, that TGR did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in the course of 5/6 NX-induced CKD. Second, in contrast, TGR exhibited important sex-related differences in the course of ACF-induced CHF-related mortality: intact female TGR showed higher survival rate than male TGR. This situation is reversed in the course of combined 5/6 NX-induced CKD and ACF-induced CHF-related mortality: intact female TGR exhibited poorer survival than male TGR. Third, the survival rate in animals with combined 5/6 NX-induced CKD and ACF-induced CHF was significantly worsened as compared with rat groups that were exposed to 'single organ disease'. Collectively, our present results clearly show that CKD aggravates long-term mortality of animals with CHF. In addition, TGR exhibit remarkable sexual dimorphism with respect to CKD- and CHF-related mortality, especially in animals with combined CKD and CHF.

  16. A high affinity kidney targeting by chitobionic acid-conjugated polysorbitol gene transporter alleviates unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kim, Sanghwa; Firdous, Jannatul; Lee, Ah-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Seo, Min Kyeong; Park, Tae-Eun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-01

    Aside from kidney transplantation - a procedure which is exceedingly dependent on donor-match and availability leading to excessive costs - there are currently no permanent treatments available which reverse kidney injury and failure. However, kidney-specific targeted gene therapy has outstanding potential to treat kidney-related dysfunction. Herein we report a novel kidney-specific targeted gene delivery system developed through the conjugation of chitobionic acid (CBA) to a polysorbitol gene transporter (PSGT) synthesized from sorbitol diacrylate and low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) carrying hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene to alleviate unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. CBA-PSGT performed exceptionally well for targeted delivery of HGF to kidney tissues compared to its non-targeted counterparts (P < 0.001) after systemic tail-vein injection and significantly reduced the UUO symptoms, returning the UUO rats to a normal health status. The kidney-targeted CBA-PSGT-delivered HGF also strikingly reduced various pathologic and molecular markers in vivo such as the level of collagens (type I and II), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and the expressions of ICAM-1, TIMP-1 and α-SMA which play a critical role in obstructive kidney functions. Therefore, CBA-PSGT should be further investigated because of its potential to alleviate UUO and kidney-related diseases using high affinity kidney targeting.

  17. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  18. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Chronic kidney disease and pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease complicates an increasing number of pregnancies, and at least 4% of childbearing-aged women are afflicted by this condition. Although diabetic nephropathy is the most common type of chronic kidney disease found in pregnant women, a variety of other primary and systemic kidney diseases also commonly occur. In the setting of mild maternal primary chronic kidney disease (serum creatinine <1.3 mg/dL) without poorly controlled hypertension, most pregnancies result in live births and maternal kidney function is unaffected. In cases of more moderate and severe maternal primary chronic kidney disease, the incidence of fetal prematurity, low birth weight, and death increase substantially, and the risk of accelerated irreversible decline in maternal kidney function, proteinuria, and hypertensive complications rise dramatically. In addition to kidney function, maternal hypertension and proteinuria portend negative outcomes and are important factors to consider when risk stratifying for fetal and maternal complications. In the setting of diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephropathy, other systemic disease features such as disease activity, the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, and glycemic control play important roles in determining pregnancy outcomes. Concomitant with advances in obstetrical management and kidney disease treatments, it appears that the historically dismal maternal and fetal outcomes have greatly improved.

  20. 5/6th nephrectomy in combination with high salt diet and nitric oxide synthase inhibition to induce chronic kidney disease in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Verhaar, Marianne C; Bongartz, Lennart G; Joles, Jaap A

    2013-07-03

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem. Slowing CKD progression is a major health priority. Since CKD is characterized by complex derangements of homeostasis, integrative animal models are necessary to study development and progression of CKD. To study development of CKD and novel therapeutic interventions in CKD, we use the 5/6th nephrectomy ablation model, a well known experimental model of progressive renal disease, resembling several aspects of human CKD. The gross reduction in renal mass causes progressive glomerular and tubulo-interstitial injury, loss of remnant nephrons and development of systemic and glomerular hypertension. It is also associated with progressive intrarenal capillary loss, inflammation and glomerulosclerosis. Risk factors for CKD invariably impact on endothelial function. To mimic this, we combine removal of 5/6th of renal mass with nitric oxide (NO) depletion and a high salt diet. After arrival and acclimatization, animals receive a NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-Arginine) (L-NNA) supplemented to drinking water (20 mg/L) for a period of 4 weeks, followed by right sided uninephrectomy. One week later, a subtotal nephrectomy (SNX) is performed on the left side. After SNX, animals are allowed to recover for two days followed by LNNA in drinking water (20 mg/L) for a further period of 4 weeks. A high salt diet (6%), supplemented in ground chow (see time line Figure 1), is continued throughout the experiment. Progression of renal failure is followed over time by measuring plasma urea, systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. By six weeks after SNX, renal failure has developed. Renal function is measured using 'gold standard' inulin and para-amino hippuric acid (PAH) clearance technology. This model of CKD is characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), hypertension (systolic blood pressure>150 mmHg), proteinuria (> 50 mg/24 hr) and mild uremia (>10 mM). Histological

  1. Chronic kidney disease and life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Tonelli, Marcello; Manns, Braden J; Ravani, Pietro; Ahmed, Sofia B; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2012-08-01

    Life expectancy is commonly used as an indicator of health and reflects disease burden in the population. The life expectancy for patients with lower levels of kidney function has not been reported. The abridged life table method was applied to calculate the life expectancies of men and women from age 30 to 85 years, by levels of kidney function as defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): ≥ 60, 45-59, 30-44 and 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Men and women aged 40 years had a life expectancy of 30.5 and 34.6 years at eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 24.5 and 28.7 years at eGFR 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 14.5 and 16.5 years at eGFR 30-44 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 10.4 and 9.1 years at eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. Life expectancy was longer for women compared with men at all ages and eGFR categories, other than for eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2) where there was no difference in life expectancy by gender. A lower level of kidney function is associated with a reduction in life expectancy for both men and women.

  2. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-12-24

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials.

  3. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials. PMID:28058212

  4. Insulin-mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage in LLC-PK1 pig kidney cell line, female rat primary kidney cells, and male ZDF rat kidneys in vivo.

    PubMed

    Othman, Eman Maher; Kreissl, Michael C; Kaiser, Franz R; Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Stopper, Helga

    2013-04-01

    Hyperinsulinemia, a condition with excessively high insulin blood levels, is related to an increased cancer incidence. Diabetes mellitus is the most common of several diseases accompanied by hyperinsulinemia. Because an elevated kidney cancer risk was reported for diabetic patients, we investigated the induction of genomic damage by insulin in LLC-PK1 pig kidney cells, rat primary kidney cells, and ZDF rat kidneys. Insulin at a concentration of 5nM caused a significant increase in DNA damage in vitro. This was associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the presence of antioxidants, blockers of the insulin, and IGF-I receptors, and a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, the insulin-mediated DNA damage was reduced. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB or AKT) was increased and p53 accumulated. Inhibition of the mitochondrial and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphatase oxidase-related ROS production reduced the insulin-mediated damage. In primary rat cells, insulin also induced genomic damage. In kidneys from healthy, lean ZDF rats, which were infused with insulin to yield normal or high blood insulin levels, while keeping blood glucose levels constant, the amounts of ROS and the tumor protein (p53) were elevated in the high-insulin group compared with the control level group. ROS and p53 were also elevated in diabetic obese ZDF rats. Overall, insulin-induced oxidative stress resulted in genomic damage. If the same mechanisms are active in patients, hyperinsulinemia might cause genomic damage through the induction of ROS contributing to the increased cancer risk, against which the use of antioxidants and/or ROS production inhibitors might exert protective effects.

  5. Social Environmental Stressors, Psychological Factors, and Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Marino A.; Beech, Bettina M.; Sims, Mario; Brown, Tony N.; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Taylor, Herman A.; Williams, David R.; Crook, Errol

    2010-01-01

    Kidney disease is one of the most striking examples of health disparities in American public health. Disparities in the prevalence and progression of kidney disease are generally thought to be a function of group differences in the prevalence of kidney disease risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. However, the presence of these comorbidities does not completely explain the elevated rate of progression from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end-stage renal disease among high-risk populations such as African Americans. We believe that the social environment is an important element in the pathway from CKD risk factors to CKD and end-stage renal disease. This review of the literature draws heavily from social science and social epidemiology to present a conceptual frame specifying how social, economic, and psychosocial factors interact to affect the risks for and the progression of kidney disease. PMID:19240646

  6. The Association between Elevated Levels of Peripheral Serotonin and Its Metabolite – 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and Bone Strength and Metabolism in Growing Rats with Mild Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Znorko, Beata; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Rogalska, Joanna; Roszczenko, Alicja; Brzóska, Małgorzata Michalina; Pryczynicz, Anna; Kemona, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with disturbances in bone strength and metabolism. The alterations of the serotonergic system are also observed in CKD. We used the 5/6 nephrectomy model of CKD to assess the impact of peripheral serotonin and its metabolite– 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid on bone biomechanical properties and metabolism in growing rats. The animals were sacrificed one and three months after nephrectomy. Biomechanical properties were determined on two different bone types: the cortical bone of the femoral diaphysis using three-point bending test and the mixed cortico-trabecular bone by the bending test of the femoral neck. Biomechanical tests revealed preserved cortical bone strength, whereas work to fracture (W) and yield load (Fy) of mixed cortico-trabecular bone were significantly lower in CKD compared to controls. Serum activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a bone formation marker, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP 5b) reflecting bone resorption, were similar in CKD and controls. ALP was associated with lower femoral stiffness and strength, and higher displacements and W. TRACP 5b was inversely associated with cortical Fu and W. The elevated peripheral serotonergic system in CKD was: inversely associated with stiffness but positively related to the displacements and W; inversely associated with cortical Fy but positively correlated with this parameter in cortico-trabecular bone; inversely associated with ALP in controls but positively correlated with this biomarker in CKD animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the distinct effect of mild degree of CKD on bone strength in rapidly growing rats. The impaired renal function affects the peripheral serotonin metabolism, which in turn may influence the strength and metabolism of bones in these rats. This relationship seems to be beneficial on the biomechanical properties of the cortico-trabecular bone, whereas the cortical bone strength can be potentially reduced. PMID

  7. Translational science in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-07-15

    The KDIGO definition of chronic kidney disease (CKD) allowed a more detailed characterization of CKD causes, epidemiology and consequences. The picture that has emerged is worrisome from the point of view of translation. CKD was among the fastest growing causes of death in the past 20 years in age-adjusted terms. The gap between recent advances and the growing worldwide mortality appears to result from sequential roadblocks that limit the flow from basic research to clinical development (translational research type 1, T1), from clinical development to clinical practice (translational research T2) and result in deficient widespread worldwide implementation of already available medical advances (translational research T3). We now review recent advances and novel concepts that have the potential to change the practice of nephrology in order to improve the outcomes of the maximal number of individuals in the shortest possible interval. These include: (i) updating the CKD concept, shifting the emphasis to the identification, risk stratification and care of early CKD and redefining the concept of aging-associated 'physiological' decline of renal function; (ii) advances in the characterization of aetiological factors, including challenging the concept of hypertensive nephropathy, the better definition of the genetic contribution to CKD progression, assessing the role of the liquid biopsy in aetiological diagnosis and characterizing the role of drugs that may be applied to the earliest stages of injury, such as SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic kidney disease (DKD); (iii) embracing the complexity of CKD as a network disease and (iv) exploring ways to optimize implementation of existing knowledge. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. 75 FR 2147 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Committee: National Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Advisory Council. Date: February 24, 2010... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Room 715, MSC 5452, Bethesda, MD... Kidney Diseases Advisory Council; Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases Subcommittee....

  9. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients.

  10. The impact of antihypertensives on kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Diego F; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Ruilope, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Arterial hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are intimately related. The control of blood pressure (BP) levels is strongly recommended in patients with CKD in order to protect the kidney against the accompanying elevation in global cardiovascular (CV) risk. Actually, the goal BP in patients with CKD involves attaining values <140/90 mmHg except if albuminuria is present. In this case, it is often recommended to attain values <130/80 mmHg, although some guidelines still recommend <140/90 mmHg. Strict BP control to values of systolic BP around 120 mmHg was recently shown to be safe in CKD according to data from the SPRINT trial, albeit more data confirming this benefit are required. Usually, combination therapy initiated with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) and commonly followed by the addition of a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic is needed. Further studies are required as well as new drugs in particular after the positive data obtained from new oral anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:28529721

  11. Management of hyperkalaemia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-11-01

    Hyperkalaemia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), in part because of the effects of kidney dysfunction on potassium homeostasis and in part because of the cluster of comorbidities (and their associated treatments) that occur in patients with CKD. Owing to its electrophysiological effects, severe hyperkalaemia represents a medical emergency that usually requires prompt intervention, whereas the prevention of hazardous hyperkalaemic episodes in at-risk patients requires measures aimed at the long-term normalization of potassium homeostasis. The options for effective and safe medical interventions to restore chronic potassium balance are few, and long-term management of hyperkalaemia is primarily limited to the correction of modifiable exacerbating factors. This situation can result in a difficult trade-off in patients with CKD, because drugs that are beneficial to these patients (for example, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system antagonists) are often the most prominent cause of their hyperkalaemia. Maintaining the use of these beneficial medications while implementing various strategies to control potassium balance is desirable; however, discontinuation rates remain high. The emergence of new medications that specifically target hyperkalaemia could lead to a therapeutic paradigm shift, emphasizing preventive management over ad hoc treatment of incidentally discovered elevations in serum potassium levels.

  12. Regulatory T cells in kidney disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan Min; Wang, Yiping; Zhang, Geoff Y; Zheng, Guoping; Yi, Shounan; O'Connell, Philip J; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important in maintaining immune homeostasis and preventing autoimmune disease, including autoimmune kidney disease. It is also likely that they play a role in limiting kidney transplant rejection and potentially in promoting transplant tolerance. Although other subsets of Tregs exist, the most potent and well-defined Tregs are the Foxp3 expressing CD4(+) Tregs derived from the thymus or generated peripherally. These CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs limit autoimmune renal disease in animal models, especially chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. Furthermore, other subsets of Tregs, including CD8 Tregs, may play a role in immunosuppression in kidney disease. The development and protective mechanisms of Tregs in kidney disease and kidney transplantation involve multiple mechanisms of suppression. Here we review the development and function of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs. We discuss the specific application of Tregs as a therapeutic strategy to prevent kidney disease and to limit kidney transplant rejection and detail clinical trials in this area of transplantation.

  13. Burden of chronic kidney disease: North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2013-01-01

    North Africa (NAF) is composed of six countries located in the African Sahara, namely the Western Sahara, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Common features between these countries include similar climate, ecology, population genetics, and the socioeconomic environment. This commonality reflects on the chronic kidney disease (CKD) profile in these countries. While there are some estimates on the epidemiology of end-stage kidney disease, that of earlier stages is unknown. Several national screening programs are currently addressing this issue, such as the EGIPT-CKD project in Egypt and the MAREMAR study in Morocco. Preliminary results from the former suggest a prevalence of proteinuria in 10.6% of the relatives of patients on regular dialysis treatment. Despite the lack of reliable registries, it was possible to gather information on the etiology of CKD by direct contact with leading nephrologists in those countries. It turns out that glomerulonephritis (GN) accounts for 9–20%, diabetes 11–18%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis 10–35%, chronic interstitial nephritis 7–17%, and polycystic disease 2–3%. Compared to two decades earlier, diabetes has become more common at the expense of GN, proliferative GN, and amyloidosis regressed in favor of IgA and membranous nephropathies in Tunisian adults. Conventional schistosomal nephropathies are regressing in favor of hepatitis C viral (HCV) nephropathy in Egyptians. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is increasing at the expense of proliferative GNs in the region at large. Access to regular dialysis has been optimized during the past decade, with favorable outcomes despite the high incidence of HCV infection, tuberculosis, and protein-calorie malnutrition. Kidney transplantation is available in all NAF countries except the Western Sahara. About 650 transplants are performed annually from live donors, the majority in Egypt, where data from the largest center in Mansoura display a 10-year graft survival of 62

  14. Diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in cats with mild chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, J; Moore, K; Elliott, J; Syme, H

    2008-06-01

    In cats with concurrent hyperthyroidism and non-thyroidal illnesses such as chronic kidney disease, total thyroxine concentrations are often within the laboratory reference range (19 to 55 nmol/l). The objective of the study was to determine total thyroxine, free thyroxine and/or thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations in cats with mild chronic kidney disease. Total thyroxine, free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone were measured in three groups. The hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease group (n=16) had chronic kidney disease and clinical signs compatible with hyperthyroidism but a plasma total thyroxine concentration within the reference range. These cats were subsequently confirmed to be hyperthyroid at a later date. The chronic kidney disease-only group (n=20) had chronic kidney disease but no signs of hyperthyroidism. The normal group (n=20) comprised clinically healthy senior (>8 years) cats. In 4 of 20 euthyroid chronic kidney disease cats, free thyroxine concentrations were borderline or high (> or =40 pmol/l). In the hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease group, free thyroxine was high in 15 of 16 cats, while thyroid-stimulating hormone was low in 16 of 16 cats. Most hyperthyroidism-chronic kidney disease cats (14 of 16) had total thyroxine greater than 30 nmol/l, whereas all the chronic kidney disease-only cats had total thyroxine less than 30 nmol/l. The combined measurement of free thyroxine with total thyroxine or thyroid-stimulating hormone may be of merit in the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in cats with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Quantitative MRI of kidneys in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Edwards, Marie E; Garg, Ishan; Irazabal, Maria V; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Harris, Peter C; King, Bernard F; Torres, Vicente E; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Erickson, Bradley J

    2017-06-28

    To evaluate the reproducibility and utility of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the assessment of kidneys in young adults with normal renal function (eGFR ranged from 90 to 130 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and patients with early renal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). This prospective case-control study was performed on ten normal young adults (18-30 years old) and ten age- and sex-matched patients with early renal parenchymal disease (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). All subjects underwent a comprehensive kidney MRI protocol, including qualitative imaging: T1w, T2w, FIESTA, and quantitative imaging: 2D cine phase contrast of the renal arteries, and parenchymal diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The normal controls were imaged on two separate occasions ≥24 h apart (range 24-210 h) to assess reproducibility of the measurements. Quantitative MR imaging sequences were found to be reproducible. The mean ± SD absolute percent difference between quantitative parameters measured ≥24 h apart were: MTI-derived ratio = 4.5 ± 3.6%, DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) = 6.5 ± 3.4%, BOLD-derived R2* = 7.4 ± 5.9%, and MRE-derived tissue stiffness = 7.6 ± 3.3%. Compared with controls, the ADPKD patient's non-cystic renal parenchyma (NCRP) had statistically significant differences with regard to quantitative parenchymal measures: lower MTI percent ratios (16.3 ± 4.4 vs. 23.8 ± 1.2, p < 0.05), higher ADCs (2.46 ± 0.20 vs. 2.18 ± 0.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, p < 0.05), lower R2*s (14.9 ± 1.7 vs. 18.1 ± 1.6 s(-1), p < 0.05), and lower tissue stiffness (3.2 ± 0.3 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5 kPa, p < 0.05). Excellent reproducibility of the quantitative measurements was obtained in all cases. Significantly different quantitative MR parenchymal

  16. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Tobias B.; Edelstein, Charles L.; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy. PMID:22692002

  17. Accelerated senescence in kidneys of low-birth-weight rats after catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, Valerie A; Compston, Catharine A; Simmen, Thomas; Mueller, Thomas F

    2009-12-01

    Epidemiological studies show a strong association between low birth weight and hypertension, renal, and cardiovascular disease, especially after catch-up growth. Senescence is an important contributor to the progression of chronic disease. Developmentally programmed premature senescence may be a link among low birth weight, catch-up growth, and adult disease. Low birth weight was induced by feeding pregnant rats a low-protein diet from day 12 of gestation to 10 days postdelivery. Low- and normal-birth-weight male offspring were weaned onto regular or high-calorie diets to enhance catch-up growth. Kidneys and hearts of offspring were analyzed for RNA and protein markers of stress-induced senescence (p16, p21, p53, Rb). Markers of mitochondrial stress (p66Shc) and activation of endoplasmic reticulum protein secretion (Ero1alpha) were analyzed as regulators of reactive oxygen species generation. Reactive oxygen species are known to be associated with premature aging. Senescence markers were not different in low- or normal-birth-weight kidneys at birth. During rapid catch-up growth, p16 and p21 increased significantly in low-birth-weight kidneys and hearts (P < 0.01). Renal p16 levels increased progressively and were significantly higher in low-birth-weight kidneys at 3 and 6 mo (P < or = 0.02). Renal p66Shc and Ero1alpha were significantly higher in low- compared with normal- birth-weight kidneys at 6 mo, suggesting reactive oxygen species generation (P < or = 0.03). Low-birth-weight rats exhibit accelerated senescence in kidneys and hearts after rapid catch-up growth, a likely important link between early growth and subsequent hypertension, renal, and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Lutein protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Guo; Qi, Zong-Cai; Liu, Wei-Liang; Wang, Wei-Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Ischemia‑reperfusion (I/R) injury has a major impact on renal dysfunction during transplantation. The present study investigated the role of lutein against I/R injury‑induced oxidative stress in rat kidneys. Biochemical analysis and oxidative stress parameters demonstrated that lutein protected the rat kidney significantly from I/R injury. Pretreatment with lutein significantly increased the total antioxidant capacity with a concomitant decline in the total oxidant status. Rats with I/R injury showed a significant increase in oxidative stress. The results revealed significant increases in the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content with concomitant decreases in enzymic and non‑enzymic antioxidants. The activity of these enzymes was reversed and demonstrated a significant increase following lutein pre‑treatment compared with the rats subjected to I/R injury alone. Furthermore, lutein protected the renal tissue from I/R injury by maintaining normal kidney architecture and led to a reduction in the levels of the renal markers urea and creatinine in the serum. These results demonstrated clear evidence that lutein offered a significant protective effect against I/R injury by enhancing antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  19. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    PubMed

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P <0.0001). There was no significant effect on RI value in either kidney in terms of age or sex. RI could be considered a valuable diagnostic tool in cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  20. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  1. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population.

  2. Integrative Biology of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Jennifer L.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the US is diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Despite significant efforts to improve outcomes in DKD, the impact on disease progression has been disappointing. This has prompted clinicians and researchers to search for alternative approaches to identify persons at risk, and to search for more effective therapies to halt progression of DKD. The identification of novel therapies is critically dependent on a more comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of DKD, specifically at the molecular level. A more expansive and exploratory view of DKD is needed to complement more traditional research approaches that have focused on single molecules. Summary In recent years, sophisticated research methodologies have emerged within systems biology that should allow for a more comprehensive disease definition of DKD. Systems biology provides an interdisciplinary approach to describe complex interactions within biological systems, including how these interactions influence systems' functions and behaviors. Computational modeling of large, system-wide, quantitative data sets is used to generate molecular interaction pathways, such as metabolic and cell signaling networks. Key Messages Importantly, the interpretation of data generated by systems biology tools requires integration with enhanced clinical research data and validation using model systems. Such an integrative biological approach has already generated novel insights into pathways and molecules involved in DKD. In this review, we highlight recent examples of how combining systems biology with traditional clinical and model research efforts results in an integrative biology approach that significantly adds to the understanding of the complex pathophysiology of DKD. PMID:26929927

  3. A computer-aided diagnostic system for kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jahantigh, Farzad Firouzi; Malmir, Behnam; Avilaq, Behzad Aslani

    2017-01-01

    Background Disease diagnosis is complicated since patients may demonstrate similar symptoms but physician may diagnose different diseases. There are a few number of investigations aimed to create a fuzzy expert system, as a computer aided system for disease diagnosis. Methods In this research, a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in a kidney clinic in Tehran, Iran in 2012. Medical diagnosis fuzzy rules applied, and a set of symptoms related to the set of considered diseases defined. The input case to be diagnosed defined by assigning a fuzzy value to each symptom and then three physicians asked about each suspected diseases. Then comments of those three physicians summarized for each disease. The fuzzy inference applied to obtain a decision fuzzy set for each disease, and crisp decision values attained to determine the certainty of existence for each disease. Results Results indicated that, in the diagnosis of seven cases of kidney disease by examining 21 indicators using fuzzy expert system, kidney stone disease with 63% certainty was the most probable, renal tubular was at the lowest level with 15%, and other kidney diseases were at the other levels. The most remarkable finding of this study was that results of kidney disease diagnosis (e.g., kidney stone) via fuzzy expert system were fully compatible with those of kidney physicians. Conclusion The proposed fuzzy expert system is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to diagnose several typical input cases. The developed system decreases the effort of initial physical checking and manual feeding of input symptoms. PMID:28392995

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process. PMID:22829845

  5. [Iron therapy in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Maciej; Kohmann, Anna

    Iron deficiency is one of the main causes of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, and iron supplements along the erythropoietin constitute the basis of its therapy. Among hemodialysis patients a preferred method of iron supplementation is an intravenous route, but the route of administration of iron to patients with nondialysis CKD raises a lot of controversy. Treatment with oral iron is cheap, does not require vascular access, but of lower efficacy due to insufficient absorption and frequent occurrence of side effects from the gastrointestinal, with discontinuation of therapy. Intravenous iron though effective is associated with the risk of allergic reactions, oxidative stress and the risk of iron overload. Modern oral medications may constitute an alternative to intravenous iron.

  6. Chronic kidney disease - different role for HDL?

    PubMed

    Jacek, Rysz; Anna, Gluba; Danilo, Fliser; Timo, Speer; Andrzej, Wiecek

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging health hazard, connected to very high cardiovascular mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Increased cardiovascular risk cannot be explained only by traditional risk factors. Patients with renal dysfunction have significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism and HDL in these patients becomes dysfunctional. It has been documented that in patients with CKD lower plasma level of HDL cholesterol and reduced ability of HDL to bind to ABCA1 are seen, which result in slowing down the reverse cholesterol transport and disturbances in HDL maturation due to decreased lecithin cholesterol ester transfer protein. Studies demonstrated that HDL of CKD patients loses its vasoprotective, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and turns into a noxious particle which promotes endothelial dysfunction via stimulating superoxide production and limiting NO bioavailability. Alterations of HDL at the 'molecular and functional level' are also seen in renal transplant recipients even in those with excellent graft function.

  7. HIV and kidney diseases: 35 years of history and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are often misdiagnosed. Despite reductions in morbidity and mortality owing to widespread use of highly effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still more common in these patients than in the general population, and are associated with poor health outcomes. HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV immune complex kidney diseases are the more recognizable HIV-related kidney diseases. However, a broad spectrum of kidney disorders related or not directly related with HIV infection can be observed, including cART-induced AKI, CKD, proximal tubular dysfunction, crystalluria and urolithiasis, among others. This review summarizes the major epidemiologic studies of kidney diseases in HIV-infected patients, discusses novel approaches that may potentially limit nephrotoxicity such as the use of tenofovir alafenamide, and outlines current screening measures for early diagnosis of kidney dysfunction or tubular damage, and for accurate detection of increased risk for acute or chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27994853

  8. HIV and kidney diseases: 35 years of history and consequences.

    PubMed

    Campos, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto; Soto, Karina

    2016-12-01

    Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are often misdiagnosed. Despite reductions in morbidity and mortality owing to widespread use of highly effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still more common in these patients than in the general population, and are associated with poor health outcomes. HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV immune complex kidney diseases are the more recognizable HIV-related kidney diseases. However, a broad spectrum of kidney disorders related or not directly related with HIV infection can be observed, including cART-induced AKI, CKD, proximal tubular dysfunction, crystalluria and urolithiasis, among others. This review summarizes the major epidemiologic studies of kidney diseases in HIV-infected patients, discusses novel approaches that may potentially limit nephrotoxicity such as the use of tenofovir alafenamide, and outlines current screening measures for early diagnosis of kidney dysfunction or tubular damage, and for accurate detection of increased risk for acute or chronic kidney diseases.

  9. Diabetic kidney disease: from physiology to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mora-Fernández, Carmen; Domínguez-Pimentel, Virginia; de Fuentes, Mercedes Muros; Górriz, José L; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2014-09-15

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) defines the functional, structural and clinical abnormalities of the kidneys that are caused by diabetes. This complication has become the single most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. The pathophysiology of DKD comprises the interaction of both genetic and environmental determinants that trigger a complex network of pathophysiological events, which leads to the damage of the glomerular filtration barrier, a highly specialized structure formed by the fenestrated endothelium, the glomerular basement membrane and the epithelial podocytes, that permits a highly selective ultrafiltration of the blood plasma. DKD evolves gradually over years through five progressive stages. Briefly they are: reversible glomerular hyperfiltration, normal glomerular filtration and normoalbuminuria, normal glomerular filtration and microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and renal failure. Approximately 20-40% of diabetic patients develop microalbuminuria within 10-15 years of the diagnosis of diabetes, and about 80-90% of those with microalbuminuria progress to more advanced stages. Thus, after 15-20 years, macroalbuminuria occurs approximately in 20-40% of patients, and around half of them will present renal insufficiency within 5 years. The screening and early diagnosis of DKD is based on the measurement of urinary albumin excretion and the detection of microalbuminuria, the first clinical sign of DKD. The management of DKD is based on the general recommendations in the treatment of patients with diabetes, including optimal glycaemic and blood pressure control, adequate lipid management and abolishing smoking, in addition to the lowering of albuminuria. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45–50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD. PMID:26090382

  11. Increases in kidney volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be detected within 6 months.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Andreas D; Poster, Diane; Krauer, Fabienne; Weishaupt, Dominik; Raina, Shagun; Senn, Oliver; Binet, Isabelle; Spanaus, Katharina; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2009-01-01

    Kidney volume growth is considered the best surrogate marker predicting the decline of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. To assess the therapeutic benefit of new drugs more rapidly, changes in kidney volume need to be determined over a short time interval. Here we measured renal volume changes by manual segmentation volumetry applied to magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained with an optimized T1-weighted acquisition protocol without gadolinium-based contrast agents. One hundred young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function had a significant increase in total kidney volume by 2.71+/-4.82% in 6 months. Volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 1.000 for intra-observer and 0.996 for inter-observer agreement, with acceptable within-subject standard deviations. The change in renal volume correlated with baseline total kidney volume in all age subgroups. Total kidney volume positively correlated with male gender, hypertension, albuminuria and a history of macrohematuria but negatively with creatinine clearance. Albuminuria was associated with accelerated volume progression. Our study shows that increases in kidney volume can be reliably measured over a 6 month period in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences.

  12. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control.

  13. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine.

  14. Ouabain Contributes to Kidney Damage in a Rat Model of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Villa, Luca; Buono, Roberta; Ferrandi, Mara; Molinari, Isabella; Benigni, Fabio; Bettiga, Arianna; Colciago, Giorgia; Ikehata, Masami; Messaggio, Elisabetta; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Manunta, Paolo

    2016-10-14

    Warm renal ischemia performed during partial nephrectomy has been found to be associated with kidney disease. Since endogenous ouabain (EO) is a neuro-endocrine hormone involved in renal damage, we evaluated the role of EO in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). We measured plasma and renal EO variations and markers of glomerular and tubular damage (nephrin, KIM-1, Kidney-Injury-Molecule-1, α1 Na-K ATPase) and the protective effect of the ouabain inhibitor, rostafuroxin. We studied five groups of rats: (1) normal; (2) infused for eight weeks with ouabain (30 µg/kg/day, OHR) or (3) saline; (4) ouabain; or (5) saline-infused rats orally treated with 100 µg/kg/day rostafuroxin for four weeks. In group 1, 2-3 h after IRI, EO increased in ischemic kidneys while decreased in plasma. Nephrin progressively decreased and KIM-1 mRNA increased starting from 24 h. Ouabain infusion (group 2) increased blood pressure (from 111.7 to 153.4 mmHg) and ouabain levels in plasma and kidneys. In OHR ischemic kidneys at 120 h from IRI, nephrin, and KIM-1 changes were greater than those detected in the controls infused with saline (group 3). All these changes were blunted by rostafuroxin treatment (groups 4 and 5). These findings support the role of EO in IRI and suggest that rostafuroxin pre-treatment of patients before partial nephrectomy with warm ischemia may reduce IRI, particularly in those with high EO.

  15. Inhalation of mercury vapor can cause the toxic effects on rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Nilgün; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Altunkaynak, Muhammed Eyüp; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Ünal, Deniz; Akgül, Hayati Murat

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam has been used in dentistry as a filling material. The filler comprises mercury (Hg). It is considered one of the most important and widespread environmental pollutants, which poses a serious potential threat for the humans and animals. However, mercury deposition affects the nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and especially renal systems. In most animals' species and humans, the kidney is one of the main sites of deposition of mercury and target organ for its toxicity. In this study, the effects of mercury intake on kidney in rats were searched. For the this purpose; we used 24 adult female Wistar albino rats (200 g in weight) obtained from Experimental Research and Application Center of Atatürk University with ethical approval. Besides, they were placed into a specially designed glass cage. Along this experiment for 45 days, subjects were exposed to (1 mg/m(3)/day) mercury vapor. However, no application was used for the control subjects. At the end of the experiment, kidney samples were obtained from all subjects and processed for routine light microscopic level and stereological aspect were assessed. Finally, according to our results, mercury affects the histological features of the kidney. That means, the severe effects of mercury has been shown using stereological approach, which is one of the ideal quantitative methods in the current literature. In this study, it was detected that chronic exposure to mercury vapor may lead to renal damage and diseases in an experimental rat model.

  16. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney.

  17. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  18. The podocyte in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stitt-Cavanagh, Erin; MacLeod, Laura; Kennedy, Chris

    2009-10-14

    Approaching epidemic levels, diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is now the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Microalbuminuria is an early clinical marker of DKD that results from damage to the glomerular filtration barrier at the level of the highly differentiated glomerular podocyte cells. Injury to these epithelial cells, podocytopathies, includes cellular hypertrophy, foot process effacement, detachment from the glomerular basement membrane, and apoptosis. Here we review the role of a number of recently identified factors that contribute to podocytopathies in DKD. These factors include members of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) types 1 and 2, prorenin and its receptor, reactive oxygen species (ROS), prostanoids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and their receptors (RAGE), adiponectin, and microRNAs. As the number of therapeutic options that slow, but do not halt, the progression of DKD to ESRD remains limited, a more comprehensive understanding of the signaling events that contribute to this increasingly prevalent disease may identify novel avenues for treatment and prevention.

  19. Inflammation and cachexia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wai W; Paik, Kyung Hoon; Mak, Robert H

    2010-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with cachexia and increased mortality risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Inflammation suppresses appetite and causes the loss of protein stores. In CKD patients, increased serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may be caused by reduced renal function, volume overload, oxidative or carbonyl stress, decreased levels of antioxidants, increased susceptibility to infection in uremia, and the presence of comorbid conditions. Cachexia is brought about by the synergistic combination of a dramatic decrease in appetite and an increase in the catabolism of fat and lean body mass. Pro-inflammatory cytokines act on the central nervous system to alter appetite and energy metabolism and to provide a signal-through the nuclear factor-kappaB and ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathways-that causes muscle wasting. Further research into the molecular pathways leading to inflammation and cachexia may lead to novel therapeutic therapies for this devastating and potentially fatal complication of chronic disease.

  20. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Kidney injury biomarkers in hypertensive, diabetic, and nephropathy rat models treated with contrast media.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Rodney L; Stewart, Sharron R; Thompson, Karol L; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) refers to a decline in renal function following exposure to iodinated contrast media (CM). The present study was initiated to explore the role of known human risk factors (spontaneous hypertension, diabetes, protein-losing nephropathy) on CIN development in rodent models and to determine the effect of CM administration on kidney injury biomarkers in the face of preexisting kidney injury. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (hypertension), streptozotocin-treated Sprague Dawley rats (diabetes), and Dahl salt-sensitive rats (protein-losing nephropathy) were given single intravenous injections of the nonionic, low osmolar contrast medium, iohexol. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (sCr), and urinary biomarkers; albumin, lipocalin 2 (Lcn-2), osteopontin (Opn), kidney injury molecule 1 (Kim-1), renal papillary antigen 1 (Rpa-1), α-glutathione S-transferase (α-Gst), µ-glutathione S-transferase (µ-Gst), and beta-2 microglobulin (β2m) were measured in disease models and appropriate controls to determine the response of these biomarkers to CM administration. Each disease model produced elevated biomarkers of kidney injury without CM. Preexisting histopathology was exacerbated by CM but little or no significant increases in biomarkers were observed. When 1.5-fold or greater sCr increases from pre-CM were used to define true positives, receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis of biomarker performance showed sCr was the best predictor of CIN across disease models. β2m, Lcn-2, and BUN were the best predictors of histopathology defined kidney injury.

  2. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD.

  3. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. Conclusions: The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25093157

  4. [Chronic kidney disease : What is currently available for treatment?

    PubMed

    Fleig, S; Patecki, M; Schmitt, R

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in the general population with an estimated prevalence of roughly 2 million in Germany. Typically, chronic kidney disease is progressive and in the terminal stage the patients require dialysis or kidney transplantation. In many cases the disease remains silent for a long time but early stages are already associated with increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore early detection is very important. In recent years several new concepts have been introduced that might help to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease or improve the accompanying risks. Here, we want to provide a nephrologist's perspective on the current guidelines for the treatment and prevention of chronic kidney disease. We summarize which diagnostic approaches are useful for general practitioners and we take a pragmatic look at the existing opportunities for combating renal functional decline. We also shed light on established measures to minimize the risk of comorbidities.

  5. Apoptosis of rat kidney cells after 241-americium administration.

    PubMed

    Labéjof, L; Berry, J P; Duchambon, P; Poncy, J L; Galle, P

    1998-01-01

    Tumors induction by americium is well known but there are no data on the biological effects of this radionucleide at subcellular level. In order to study the possible ultrastructural lesions induced by this element, a group of rats were injected with 241-Americium-citrate (9 kBq), once a week for five weeks and sacrificed 7 days after the last injection. We describe the alterations observed in the cortex kidney using cytochemical (TUNEL reaction) and histochemical (PAS staining) methods for light microscopy as well as electron microscopy techniques. Various types of lesions were detected: condensation of nuclear chromatine, fragmentation of the nuclei, swollen mitochondria, disappearance of mitochondrial crests and skrinking of the cytoplasm. This study clearly demonstrated the induction of apoptosis by americium in rat cortex kidney cells.

  6. Extracellular vesicles in diagnosis and therapy of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Qisheng; Liu, Yutao; Dong, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are endogenously produced, membrane-bound vesicles that contain various molecules. Depending on their size and origins, EVs are classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes. A fundamental function of EVs is to mediate intercellular communication. In kidneys, recent research has begun to suggest a role of EVs, especially exosomes, in cell-cell communication by transferring proteins, mRNAs, and microRNAs to recipient cells as nanovectors. EVs may mediate the cross talk between various cell types within kidneys for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They may also mediate the cross talk between kidneys and other organs under physiological and pathological conditions. EVs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, including renal fibrosis, end-stage renal disease, glomerular diseases, and diabetic nephropathy. The release of EVs with specific molecular contents into urine and plasma may be useful biomarkers for kidney disease. In addition, EVs produced by cultured cells may have therapeutic effects for these diseases. However, the role of EVs in kidney diseases is largely unclear, and the mechanism underlying EV production and secretion remains elusive. In this review, we introduce the basics of EVs and then analyze the present information about the involvement, diagnostic value, and therapeutic potential of EVs in major kidney diseases.

  7. Effects of TORC1 Inhibition during the Early and Established Phases of Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H. T.; Schwensen, Kristina G.; Foster, Sheryl; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Ozimek-Kulik, Justyna E.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.; Peduto, Anthony; Rangan, Gopala K.

    2016-01-01

    The disease-modifying effects of target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) inhibitors during different stages of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are not well defined. In this study, male Lewis Polycystic Kidney Disease (LPK) rats (a genetic ortholog of human NPHP9, phenotypically characterised by diffuse distal nephron cystic growth) and Lewis controls received either vehicle (V) or sirolimus (S, 0.2 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection 5 days per week) during the early (postnatal weeks 3 to 10) or late stages of disease (weeks 10 to 20). In early-stage disease, sirolimus reduced kidney enlargement (by 63%), slowed the rate of increase in total kidney volume (TKV) in serial MRI by 78.2% (LPK+V: 132.3±59.7 vs. LPK+S: 28.8±12.0% per week) but only partly reduced the percentage renal cyst area (by 19%) and did not affect the decline in endogenous creatinine clearance (CrCl) in LPK rats. In late-stage disease, sirolimus reduced kidney enlargement (by 22%) and the rate of increase in TKV by 71.8% (LPK+V: 13.1±6.6 vs. LPK+S: 3.7±3.7% per week) but the percentage renal cyst area was unaltered, and the CrCl only marginally better. Sirolimus reduced renal TORC1 activation but not TORC2, NF-κB DNA binding activity, CCL2 or TNFα expression, and abnormalities in cilia ultrastructure, hypertension and cardiac disease were also not improved. Thus, the relative treatment efficacy of TORC1 inhibition on kidney enlargement was consistent at all disease stages, but the absolute effect was determined by the timing of drug initiation. Furthermore, cystic microarchitecture, renal function and cardiac disease remain abnormal with TORC1 inhibition, indicating that additional approaches to normalise cellular dedifferentiation, inflammation and hypertension are required to completely arrest the progression of PKDs. PMID:27723777

  8. Effects of TORC1 Inhibition during the Early and Established Phases of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Foster, Sheryl; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Ozimek-Kulik, Justyna E; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Peduto, Anthony; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    The disease-modifying effects of target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) inhibitors during different stages of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are not well defined. In this study, male Lewis Polycystic Kidney Disease (LPK) rats (a genetic ortholog of human NPHP9, phenotypically characterised by diffuse distal nephron cystic growth) and Lewis controls received either vehicle (V) or sirolimus (S, 0.2 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection 5 days per week) during the early (postnatal weeks 3 to 10) or late stages of disease (weeks 10 to 20). In early-stage disease, sirolimus reduced kidney enlargement (by 63%), slowed the rate of increase in total kidney volume (TKV) in serial MRI by 78.2% (LPK+V: 132.3±59.7 vs. LPK+S: 28.8±12.0% per week) but only partly reduced the percentage renal cyst area (by 19%) and did not affect the decline in endogenous creatinine clearance (CrCl) in LPK rats. In late-stage disease, sirolimus reduced kidney enlargement (by 22%) and the rate of increase in TKV by 71.8% (LPK+V: 13.1±6.6 vs. LPK+S: 3.7±3.7% per week) but the percentage renal cyst area was unaltered, and the CrCl only marginally better. Sirolimus reduced renal TORC1 activation but not TORC2, NF-κB DNA binding activity, CCL2 or TNFα expression, and abnormalities in cilia ultrastructure, hypertension and cardiac disease were also not improved. Thus, the relative treatment efficacy of TORC1 inhibition on kidney enlargement was consistent at all disease stages, but the absolute effect was determined by the timing of drug initiation. Furthermore, cystic microarchitecture, renal function and cardiac disease remain abnormal with TORC1 inhibition, indicating that additional approaches to normalise cellular dedifferentiation, inflammation and hypertension are required to completely arrest the progression of PKDs.

  9. The diabetic rat kidney mediates inosituria and selective urinary partitioning of D-chiro-inositol.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao-Han; Choong, Bernard; Phillips, Anthony R J; Loomes, Kerry M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus with a pressing need for effective metabolic markers to detect renal impairment. Of potential significance are the inositol compounds, myo-inositol (MI), and the less abundant stereoisomer, D-chiro-inositol (DCI), which are excreted at increased levels in the urine in diabetes mellitus, a phenomenon known as inosituria. There is also a selective urinary excretion of DCI compared to MI. As the biological origins of altered inositol metabolism in diabetes mellitus are unknown, the aim of this study was to determine whether the diabetic kidney was directly responsible. Kidneys isolated from four-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were characterized by a 3-fold reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) compared to matched non-diabetic kidneys. When perfused with fixed quantities of MI (50 µM) and DCI (5 µM) under normoglycemic conditions (5 mM glucose), GFR-normalized urinary excretion of MI was increased by 1.7-fold in diabetic vs. non-diabetic kidneys. By comparison, GFR-normalized urinary excretion of DCI was increased by 4-fold. Perfusion conditions replicating hyperglycemia (20 mM glucose) potentiated DCI but not MI urinary excretion in both non-diabetic and diabetic kidneys. Overall, there was a 2.4-fold increase in DCI urinary excretion compared to MI in diabetic kidneys that was independent of glucose ambience. This increased urinary excretion of DCI and MI in diabetic kidneys occurred despite increased renal expression of the inositol transporters, sodium myo-inositol transporter subtype 1 and 2 (SMIT1 and SMIT2). These findings show that the diabetic kidney primarily mediates inosituria and altered urinary partitioning of MI and DCI. Urinary inositol levels might therefore serve as an indicator of impaired renal function in diabetes mellitus with wider implications for monitoring chronic kidney disease.

  10. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  11. Hereditary kidney diseases: highlighting the importance of classical Mendelian phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Heidet, Laurence; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    A Mendelian inheritance underlies a nonnegligible proportion of hereditary kidney diseases, suggesting that the encoded proteins are essential for maintenance of the renal function. The identification of genes involved in congenital anomalies of the kidney and in familial forms of nephrotic syndrome significantly increased our understanding of the renal development and kidney filtration barrier physiology. This review will focus on the classical phenotype and clinical heterogeneity observed in the monogenic forms of these disorders. In addition, the role of susceptibility genes in kidney diseases with a complex inheritance will also be discussed.

  12. Histone deacetylases in kidney development: implications for disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaowei; El-Dahr, Samir S

    2013-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymes that regulate a broad range of biological processes through removal of acetyl groups from histones as well as non-histone proteins. Recent studies using a variety of pharmacological inhibitors and genetic models of HDACs have revealed a central role of HDACs in control of kidney development. These findings provide new insights into the epigenetic mechanisms underlying congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and implicate the potential of HDACs as therapeutic targets in kidney diseases, such as cystic kidney diseases and renal cell cancers. Determining the specific functions of individual HDAC members would be an important task of future research.

  13. T lymphocytes mediate hypertension and kidney damage in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Carmen; Das, Satarupa; Lund, Hayley; Mattson, David L

    2010-04-01

    This study examined mechanisms by which immune cells participate in the development of hypertension and renal disease in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Increasing dietary salt from 0.4% to 4.0% NaCl significantly increased renal infiltration of T lymphocytes from 8.8 +/- 1.2 x 10(5) to 14.4 +/- 2.0 x 10(5) cells/2 kidneys, increased arterial blood pressure from 131 +/- 2 to 165 +/- 6 mmHg, increased albumin excretion rate from 17 +/- 3 to 129 +/- 20 mg/day, and resulted in renal glomerular and tubular damage. Furthermore, renal tissue ANG II was not suppressed in the kidneys of SS rats fed 4.0% NaCl. Administration of the immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; 20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) prevented the infiltration of T lymphocytes and attenuated Dahl SS hypertension and renal disease. In contrast to vehicle-treated rats, Dahl SS rats administered MMF demonstrated a suppression of renal tissue ANG II from 163 +/- 26 to 88 +/- 9 pg/g of tissue when fed high salt. Finally, it was demonstrated that the T lymphocytes isolated from the kidney possess renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. These data indicate that infiltrating T cells are capable of participating in the production of ANG II and are associated with increased intrarenal ANG II, hypertension, and renal disease. The suppression of T-cell infiltration decreased intrarenal ANG II and prevented Dahl SS hypertension and kidney damage. As such, infiltrating cells are capable of participating in the established phase of Dahl SS hypertension.

  14. Hypertension in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting 1 in 1000 individuals. Previously termed "adult polycystic kidney disease", ADPKD is now known to have important clinical manifestations beginning early in life and even in utero. Hypertension is an important risk factor for progressive renal and cardiovascular disease in children with ADPKD and may signify irremediable organ injury. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and treatment strategies in hypertension associated with pediatric ADPKD.

  15. [Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    López Gómez, J M

    2008-01-01

    1. All patients with anemia secondary to CKD should be treated and evaluated for possible treatment, irrespective of underlying disease, associated comorbidity or possibility of kidney replacement therapy. 2. In patients treated with ESAs, Hb concentrations should be monitored at least monthly. 3. Hb targets: In all patients with CKD, Hb concentration should be > 11 g/dl and there is no evidence to justify total correction of anemia on a routine basis. Normalization of Hb levels in CKD is associated with an improvement in health-related quality of life, but without differences in mortality or the rate of loss of kidney function (Strength of Recommendation A). 4. Indications for iron therapy: Iron therapy is required in the large majority of patients with CKD treated with ESAs to achieve a Hb equal to or greater than 11 g/dl (Strength of Recommendation B). The recommended serum concentration of ferritin is > 100 mg/dl, which should be associated with a TSI > 20% (Strength of Recommendation C). Iron therapy in patients with CKD can be given orally or intravenously, although the IV route is more effective (Strength of Recommendation A). 5. The initial dose of ESA and its adjustments will depend on the patients clinical condition, baseline Hb levels, the Hb target and the rate of increase in Hb levels observed (Strength of Recommendation C). 6. In all cases and for all ESAs, the subcutaneous route is the recommended route of administration for patients with CKD (Strength of Recommendation C). 7. Resistance to ESAs: A hyporesponse to ESAs is considered to be present when an Hb level of 11 g/dl is not achieved with a dose of epoetin > 300 IU/kg/week or a dose of darbepoetin alpha > 1.5 microg/kg/week (Strength of Recommendation B). 8. There is insufficient evidence in patients with CKD to justify routine use of coadjuvant treatments.

  16. Selenium-containing proteins of rat kidney and liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Viljoen, A.J.; Motchnik, P.A.; Tappel, A.L. )

    1989-12-01

    Selenium (Se)-containing proteins in microsomal fractions of rat kidney and liver were investigated after isotopic labeling of rats with ({sup 75}Se)selenite. More than 85% of the {sup 75}Se in the solubilized microsomal extracts precipitated with protein after trichloroacetic acid treatment. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), used to separate the labeled protein subunits in the solubilized microsomal extracts, revealed several {sup 75}Se-containing proteins in addition to glutathione peroxidase. {sup 75}Se-labeled subunits with molecular weights of 55, 30, 26, 22, 19, and 17 kDa were present in microsomal fractions of kidney and liver. The {sup 75}Se-labeled tryptic peptide of the 55 kDa subunit had the same Rf value on a 17% SDS-PAGE gel as the peptide from plasma selenoprotein P. A time-course study of the labeling of individual protein subunits in kidney and liver microsomes from Se-supplemented and Se-deficient rats showed that most of the {sup 75}Se was associated with the 55 kDa subunit 3 hr after injection. The amount of {sup 75}Se associated with this protein subunit decreased by 12 hr, with a concurrent increase in the labeling of lower molecular-weight subunits. The results support the hypothesis that there is a mechanism for transfer of Se from the 55 kDa subunit to other Se-containing proteins.

  17. The Toxicity of Aluminum Chloride on Kidney of Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyu; Wang, Qin; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Xu; Zhuang, Cuicui; Xu, Feibo; Cao, Zheng; Li, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the toxicity of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) exposure in the rat kidney. Forty male Wistar rats (5 weeks old), weighing 110-120 g, were randomly divided into four groups: control group (CG, 0 g/L AlCl3), low dose group (LG, 0.4 g/L AlCl3), mid dose group (MG, 0.8 g/L AlCl3), and high dose group (HG, 1.6 g/L AlCl3). Rats were administered AlCl3 in their drinking water for 120 days. A variety of measurements were taken including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the kidney and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and cystatin C (Cys-C) concentrations in the serum. In addition, Al and β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) concentrations and the activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) in the urine were determined. The results showed that in the AlCl3-treated groups SOD and GSH-PX activities were decreased, while NAG activity and Al, MDA, BUN, Cys-C, and β2-MG concentrations were increased, compared with the CG. This study indicates that AlCl3 exposure induces oxidative stress and suppresses kidney function.

  18. Kidney transplantation procedures in rats: assessments, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Pahlavan, Payam S; Smallegange, Corry; Adams, Michael A; Schumacher, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Kidney transplantation in rats is an experimental model often used for the development of general microsurgical or transplantation techniques, for immunologic studies, and for analyzing transplant-associated long-term arterial blood-pressure changes. The aim of the present study was to analyze different surgical techniques of kidney transplantation in rats, with emphasis on minimizing surgical complications and establishing guidelines for their prevention and management. Complications were categorized into general (e.g., core body temperature drop, ischemic time) and surgically related vascular and urinary tract complications. In conclusion, a significant reduction of the complication rate in renal transplantation in rats can be achieved by placing the animal on a heating pad at an appropriate temperature. To reduce the risk of vascular thrombosis, ice-cold saline with heparin and careful flushing of the donor kidneys are recommended. Vascular complications can be avoided by performing "end-to-end" anastomosis techniques. The use of stents and cannulas in the urinary tract is associated with a high risk of urinary tract obstruction, and therefore is not recommended.

  19. CA V is present in rat kidney mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Dodgson, S.J.; Contino, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Guinea pig liver mitochondria contain the unique carbonic anhydrase isozyme, CA V. Prior to sacrifice, 15 rats and 15 guinea pigs were either fed normal lab chow (group 1), starved 48 hours (group 2) or fed normal lab chow and given to drink only water with added HCl, pH 2.5 (group 3). Mitochondria were prepared from excised livers and kidneys. CA V activity of disrupted mitochondria was measured by /sup 18/O-mass spectrometric technique at pH 7.4, 37/sup 0/C, 25 mM NaHCO/sub 3/. Mass spectrometric CA assays with intact kidney mitochondria localize CA V activity to the matrix, as was found for liver mitochondria. It has been shown in hepatocytes prepared from starved guinea pigs and rats that inhibition of CA V results in decreased rate of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate. These present results are in line with the published observation that rat kidneys are much more gluconeogenic than guinea pig, and that this is increased by starvation and acidosis.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates ischemic acute kidney injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Bragança, Ana Carolina; Volpini, Rildo A; Canale, Daniele; Gonçalves, Janaína G; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa M; Sanches, Talita R; Seguro, Antonio C; Andrade, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) increases the risk of death in hospitalized patients. Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) induces acute kidney injury (AKI), which activates cell cycle inhibitors, including p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and genomic target of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is in turn a potent immunomodulator with antiproliferative effects. In this study, we assess the impact of VDD in renal IRI. Wistar rats were divided into groups, each evaluated for 30 days: control (receiving a standard diet); VDD (receiving a vitamin D-free diet); IRI (receiving a standard diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28); and VDD + IRI (receiving a vitamin D-free diet and subjected to 45-min bilateral renal ischemia on day 28). At 48 h after IRI, animals were euthanized; blood, urine, and kidney tissue samples were collected. Compared with IRI rats, VDD + IRI rats showed a more severe decrease in glomerular filtration rate, greater urinary protein excretion, a higher kidney/body weight ratio and lower renal aquaporin 2 expression, as well as greater morphological damage, characterized by increased interstitial area and tubular necrosis. Our results suggest that the severity of tubular damage in IRI may be associated with downregulation of vitamin D receptors and p21. VDD increases renal inflammation, cell proliferation and cell injury in ischemic AKI. PMID:25780095

  1. Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Iwao, H.; Nakamura, N.; Ikemoto, F.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizuhira, V.; Yokofujita, J.

    1987-01-01

    Rat renal renin, highly purified and labeled with /sup 125/I, was intravenously given to conscious rats, to study the fate of the circulating renin. Rat antirenin antiserum was used to identify the labeled renin. The disappearance of (/sup 125/I)-renin from the plasma showed two exponential components and the metabolic clearance rate was 11.4 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg. Both 70% hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy decreased the clearance rate by about 50%. (/sup 125/I)-renin accumulated mainly in the liver and kidney, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the degradation of (/sup 125/I)-renin by these organs. Biliary excretion of (/sup 125/I)-renin was negligible and urinary excretion accounted for 2% of the injected dose. Light- and electron-microscopic autoradiography indicated that (/sup 125/I)-renin is taken up mainly by Kupffer cells and proximal convoluted tubular cells in the liver and kidney, respectively, and thereafter distributes to the lysosomes. In conclusion, both the liver and kidney are responsible for the clearance of circulating renin.

  2. Rat Kidney Cancers Determined by Dietary Ochratoxin A in the First Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An experiment to explore renal carcinogenic efficacy of male rat exposure to dietary ochratoxin A (OTA) only in the first year of life has been made in comparison to lifetime exposure. Ten months exposure to OTA at 300 µg/kg b.w. was sufficient to cause high incidence of tumours which became apparent clinically after a latency of up to a year. As a putative model for human kidney cancer, the study shows a silent organ-specific carcinogenic effect through protracted exposure up to middle age and focused probably on very few nephrons. So far, tumourigenesis has not been recognised until in the last quarter of natural rat life, but for OTA, rat renal carcinogenesis requires both long exposure and only during the first year of normal longevity. The present findings offer an experimental framework within which systematic histopathology during tumourigenesis might show whether findings of mechanistic studies in key focal neoplasms can reasonably be applied to OTA as a putative renal carcinogen for idiopathic kidney cancer in humans. Already, the rat tumours mimic those occurring spontaneously in the Eker rat, and there is disparity between the large necessary OTA exposure in the rat and the trace amounts of OTA consumed by humans. In all such complex considerations it is important to adhere rigorously to established principles of disease epidemiology. PMID:28326281

  3. Periodontitis associated with Chronic Kidney Disease among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Effie; Hall, Yoshio; Swede, Helen; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective In comparison to non-Hispanic whites, a number of healthcare disparities, including poor oral health, have been identified among Hispanics in general and Mexican-Americans in particular. We hypothesized that Mexican-Americans with Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) would have higher prevalence of chronic periodontitis compared to Mexican Americans with normal kidney function, and that the level of kidney function would be inversely related to the prevalence of periodontal disease. Method We examined this hypothesis using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988–1994 (NHANES III) dataset. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP)/Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definition for periodontitis. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the CKD-Epidemiology (EPI) equation for Hispanic populations. The classification to CKD stages was based on the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative. Results Periodontitis prevalence increased across the kidney function groups showing a statistically significant dose-response association (p<0.001). Mexican Americans with reduced kidney function were 2-fold more likely to have periodontitis compared to Mexican Americans with normal kidney function after adjusting for potential confounders such as smoking, diabetes and socioeconomic status. Multivariate adjusted Odds Ratio for periodontitis significantly increased with 1, 5 and 10 mL/minute eGFR reduction from the mean. Conclusion This is the first report, to the best our knowledge, that showed an increase of periodontitis prevalence with decreased kidney function in this population. PMID:22775287

  4. Diagnostic challenges of kidney diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Robin; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Frésard, Anne; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Lucht, Frédéric; Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent comorbidity in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) associated with an increase in cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis of CKD is difficult in PLWH. Areas covered: We reviewed the main diagnostic tools for CKD in PLWH, and discussed their strengths and limits. We performed a literature search on PubMed to identify reviews and clinical trials dealing with attractive kidney biomarkers of CKD in PLWH, with the following key words: 'HIV AND kidney', 'HIV AND Kidney biomarkers', 'CKD AND Kidney biomarkers'. Expert commentary: Currently, CKD diagnosis is based on the estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR), and measurement of proteinuria by urine protein/creatinine ratio (uPCR). These parameters are independent and complementary predictors of outcomes. GFR estimates are lacking in accuracy in PLWH. The best GFR estimate is CKD-EPI study equation. Moreover, low-grade proteinuria is associated with an increased risk of kidney disease progression in PLWH, and guidelines derived from the general population may lack sensitivity. Different biomarkers of kidney diseases like N-acetyl beta glucosaminidase (NAG), Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1), and Alpha-1-microglobulin may predict kidney disease progression and mortality in PLWH. Others may help clinicians detect antiretroviral-induced tubulopathy, or predict cardiovascular events. More studies are needed to validate the routine use of these types of biomarkers.

  5. 77 FR 34395 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Medication Adherence among Children with CKD: Ancillary Studies... Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research,...

  6. 76 FR 34717 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Islet Autoantibodies Ancillary... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, GUDMAP Project Cooperative Grants....

  7. Increased albumin permeation in eyes, aorta, and kidney of hypertensive rats fed galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, R.G.; LaRose, L.; Chang, K.; Weigel, C.J.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    These experiments were undertaken to determine whether ingestion of galactose increases albumin permeation in the vasculature of hypertensive rats. 50% dextrin (control) or 50% galactose diets were fed to unilaterally nephrectomized, male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g. Hypertension (systolic pressure >175 mmHg) was induced by weekly IM injections of 25 mg/kg DOCA and 1% saline drinking water; 3 months later /sup 125/I-albumin permeation was assessed in whole eyes, aorta and kidneys. /sup 125/I-albumin permeation was significantly increased in all 3 tissues of hypertensive rats (n = 9) vs controls (n = 9): aorta (3.30 +/- 0.19 (SD) vs 2.87 +/- 0.14), eye (3.15 +/- 0.14 vs 2.59 +/- 0.11), and kidney (6.58 +/- 0.63 vs 3.85 +/- 0.50). Albumin permeation was increased still further in hypertensive rats fed the galactose diet (n = 8): aorta (3.75 +/- 0.38), eye (3.82 +/- 0.17), and kidney (10.74 +/- 3.13). Hypertension +/- galactose feeding had no effect on albumin permeation in lung, skin, or brain. These findings indicate that: (1) hypertension increases albumin permeation in vessels affected by diabetic vascular diseases, and 2) hypertension-induced increases in albumin permeation are increased still further by galactose ingestion, presumably mediated by imbalances in polyol/insitol metabolism (analogous to those induced by diabetes) independent of hyperglycemia and/or insulinopenia.

  8. Gut microbiome and kidney disease: a bidirectional relationship.

    PubMed

    Al Khodor, Souhaila; Shatat, Ibrahim F

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advances and efforts, including powerful metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses, have led to a tremendous growth in our understanding of microbial communities. Changes in microbial abundance or composition of human microbial communities impact human health or disease state. However, explorations into the mechanisms underlying host-microbe interactions in health and disease are still in their infancy. Although changes in the gut microbiota have been described in patients with kidney disease, the relationships between pathogenesis, mechanisms of disease progression, and the gut microbiome are still evolving. Here, we review changes in the host-microbiome symbiotic relationship in an attempt to explore the bidirectional relationship in which alterations in the microbiome affect kidney disease progression and how kidney disease may disrupt a balanced microbiome. We also discuss potential targeted interventions that may help re-establish this symbiosis and propose more effective ways to deploy traditional treatments in patients with kidney disease.

  9. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  10. Con: Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate binders are prescribed to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients based on associations of serum phosphate concentrations with mortality and calcification, experimental evidence for direct calcifying effects of phosphate on vascular smooth muscle tissue and the central importance of phosphate retention in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Current knowledge regarding phosphate metabolism in CKD provides important insight into disease mechanisms and supports future clinical trials of phosphate binders in CKD patients to determine the impact of these medications on clinically relevant outcomes. The risks and benefits of phosphate binders cannot be inferred from association studies of serum phosphate concentrations, which are inconsistent and subject to confounding, animal-experimental data, which are based on conditions that differ from human disease, or physiological arguments, which are limited to known regulatory factors. Many interventions that targeted biochemical pathways suggested by association studies and suspected biological importance have yielded null or harmful results. Clinical trials of phosphate binders are of high clinical and scientific importance to nephrology. Demonstration of reduced rates of clinical disease in such trials could lead to important health benefits for CKD patients, whereas negative results would refocus efforts to understand and treat CKD-MBD. Clinical trials that employ highly practical or ‘pragmatic’ designs represent an optimal approach for determining the safety and effectiveness of phosphate binders in real-world settings. Absent clinical trial data, observational studies of phosphate binders in large CKD populations could provide important information regarding the benefits, risks and/or unintended side effects of these medications. PMID:26681747

  11. Con: Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate binders are prescribed to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients based on associations of serum phosphate concentrations with mortality and calcification, experimental evidence for direct calcifying effects of phosphate on vascular smooth muscle tissue and the central importance of phosphate retention in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Current knowledge regarding phosphate metabolism in CKD provides important insight into disease mechanisms and supports future clinical trials of phosphate binders in CKD patients to determine the impact of these medications on clinically relevant outcomes. The risks and benefits of phosphate binders cannot be inferred from association studies of serum phosphate concentrations, which are inconsistent and subject to confounding, animal-experimental data, which are based on conditions that differ from human disease, or physiological arguments, which are limited to known regulatory factors. Many interventions that targeted biochemical pathways suggested by association studies and suspected biological importance have yielded null or harmful results. Clinical trials of phosphate binders are of high clinical and scientific importance to nephrology. Demonstration of reduced rates of clinical disease in such trials could lead to important health benefits for CKD patients, whereas negative results would refocus efforts to understand and treat CKD-MBD. Clinical trials that employ highly practical or 'pragmatic' designs represent an optimal approach for determining the safety and effectiveness of phosphate binders in real-world settings. Absent clinical trial data, observational studies of phosphate binders in large CKD populations could provide important information regarding the benefits, risks and/or unintended side effects of these medications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Issar, Tushar; Krishnan, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages. PMID:27867500

  13. Building the chronic kidney disease management team.

    PubMed

    Spry, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The need to be efficient and the demands for performance-based service are changing how nephrologists deliver care. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in patients with complex medical and social problems. CKD management requires that multidisciplinary professionals provide patient education, disease management, and psychosocial support. To remain cost-efficient, many physicians are training and supervising midlevel practitioners in the delivery of specialized health care. Specialized care that meets present CKD patient needs is best delivered in a CKD clinic. Three models of CKD clinic are identified: (1) anemia management CKD clinic, (2) the basic CKD clinic, and (3) the comprehensive CKD clinic. Each clinic model is based on critical elements of staffing, billable services, and patient-focused health care. Billable services are anemia-management services, physician services that may be provided by midlevel practitioners, and medical nutrition therapy. In some cases, social worker services may be billable. Building a patient-focused clinic that offers CKD management requires planning, familiarity with federal regulations and statutes, and skillful practitioners. Making services cost-efficient and outcome oriented requires careful physician leadership, talented midlevel practitioners, and billing professionals who understand the goals of the CKD clinic. As Medicare payment reforms evolve, a well-organized CKD program can be well poised to meet the requirements of payers and congressional mandates for performance-based purchasing.

  14. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  15. Chronic kidney disease and fragility fracture.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Junichiro James

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis is defined simply as "a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fracture. Thus, any bone lesion that causes fragility fracture is osteoporosis, which has quite heterogeneous backgrounds. Chronic kidney disease-related bone and mineral disease (CKD-MBD) is defined as "a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD, which is manifested by abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism and/or extra-skeletal calcification". Although CKD-MBD is one of the possible causes of osteoporosis, we do not have evidences that CKD-MBD is the only or crucial determinant of bone mechanical strength in CKD patients. The risk of hip fracture is considerably high in CKD patients. Drugs that intervene in systemic mineral metabolism, indeed, lead to the improvement on bone histology in CKD patients. However, it remains unclear whether the intervention in systemic mineral metabolism also improves bone strength, today. Thus, the use of drugs that directly act on bone and the introduction of fracture liaison concept are promising strategies for fragility fracture prevention among CKD patients, as well as treatment for CKD-MBD.

  16. ACE and ACE2 in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ohashi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) activation has a significant influence on renal disease progression. The classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-angiotensin II (Ang II)-Ang II type 1 (AT1) axis is considered to control the effects of RAS activation on renal disease. However, since its discovery in 2000 ACE2 has also been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the RAS. The synthesis and catabolism of Ang II are regulated via a complex series of interactions, which involve ACE and ACE2. In the kidneys, ACE2 is expressed in the proximal tubules and less strongly in the glomeruli. The synthesis of inactive Ang 1-9 from Ang I and the catabolism of Ang II to produce Ang 1-7 are the main functions of ACE2. Ang 1-7 reduces vasoconstriction, water retention, salt intake, cell proliferation, and reactive oxygen stress, and also has a renoprotective effect. Thus, in the non-classical RAS the ACE2-Ang 1-7-Mas axis counteracts the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. This review examines recent human and animal studies about renal ACE and ACE2. PMID:25664248

  17. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Pattern recognition receptors and the inflammasome in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Jaklien C; Kors, Lotte; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Florquin, Sandrine

    2014-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) are families of pattern recognition receptors that, together with inflammasomes, sense and respond to highly conserved pathogen motifs and endogenous molecules released upon cell damage or stress. Evidence suggests that TLRs, NLRs and the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome have important roles in kidney diseases through regulation of inflammatory and tissue-repair responses to infection and injury. In this Review, we discuss the pathological mechanisms that are related to TLRs, NLRs and NLRP3 in various kidney diseases. In general, these receptors are protective in the host defence against urinary tract infection, but can sustain and self-perpetuate tissue damage in sterile inflammatory and immune-mediated kidney diseases. TLRs, NLRs and NLRP3, therefore, have become promising drug targets to enable specific modulation of kidney inflammation and suppression of immunopathology in kidney disease.

  19. Automated Segmentation of Kidneys from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngwoo; Ge, Yinghui; Tao, Cheng; Zhu, Jianbing; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Yu, Alan S.L.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Our study developed a fully automated method for segmentation and volumetric measurements of kidneys from magnetic resonance images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and assessed the performance of the automated method with the reference manual segmentation method. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Study patients were selected from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease. At the enrollment of the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease Study in 2000, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease were between 15 and 46 years of age with relatively preserved GFRs. Our fully automated segmentation method was on the basis of a spatial prior probability map of the location of kidneys in abdominal magnetic resonance images and regional mapping with total variation regularization and propagated shape constraints that were formulated into a level set framework. T2–weighted magnetic resonance image sets of 120 kidneys were selected from 60 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and divided into the training and test datasets. The performance of the automated method in reference to the manual method was assessed by means of two metrics: Dice similarity coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient of segmented kidney volume. The training and test sets were swapped for crossvalidation and reanalyzed. Results Successful segmentation of kidneys was performed with the automated method in all test patients. The segmented kidney volumes ranged from 177.2 to 2634 ml (mean, 885.4±569.7 ml). The mean Dice similarity coefficient ±SD between the automated and manual methods was 0.88±0.08. The mean correlation coefficient between the two segmentation methods for the segmented volume measurements was 0.97 (P<0.001 for each crossvalidation set). The results from the crossvalidation sets were highly comparable

  20. Automated Segmentation of Kidneys from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoo; Ge, Yinghui; Tao, Cheng; Zhu, Jianbing; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Yu, Alan S L; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Landsittel, Doug P; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2016-04-07

    Our study developed a fully automated method for segmentation and volumetric measurements of kidneys from magnetic resonance images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and assessed the performance of the automated method with the reference manual segmentation method. Study patients were selected from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease. At the enrollment of the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease Study in 2000, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease were between 15 and 46 years of age with relatively preserved GFRs. Our fully automated segmentation method was on the basis of a spatial prior probability map of the location of kidneys in abdominal magnetic resonance images and regional mapping with total variation regularization and propagated shape constraints that were formulated into a level set framework. T2-weighted magnetic resonance image sets of 120 kidneys were selected from 60 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and divided into the training and test datasets. The performance of the automated method in reference to the manual method was assessed by means of two metrics: Dice similarity coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient of segmented kidney volume. The training and test sets were swapped for crossvalidation and reanalyzed. Successful segmentation of kidneys was performed with the automated method in all test patients. The segmented kidney volumes ranged from 177.2 to 2634 ml (mean, 885.4±569.7 ml). The mean Dice similarity coefficient ±SD between the automated and manual methods was 0.88±0.08. The mean correlation coefficient between the two segmentation methods for the segmented volume measurements was 0.97 (P<0.001 for each crossvalidation set). The results from the crossvalidation sets were highly comparable. We have developed a fully automated method for segmentation of kidneys from abdominal

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Kidney Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chonchol, Michel; Gitomer, Berenice; Isakova, Tamara; Cai, Xuan; Salusky, Isidro; Pereira, Renata; Abebe, Kaleab; Torres, Vicente; Steinman, Theodor I; Grantham, Jared J; Chapman, Arlene B; Schrier, Robert W; Wolf, Myles

    2017-09-07

    Increases in fibroblast growth factor 23 precede kidney function decline in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; however, the role of fibroblast growth factor 23 in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease has not been well characterized. We measured intact fibroblast growth factor 23 levels in baseline serum samples from 1002 participants in the HALT-PKD Study A (n=540; mean eGFR =91±17 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) and B (n=462; mean eGFR =48±12 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). We used linear mixed and Cox proportional hazards models to test associations between fibroblast growth factor 23 and eGFR decline, percentage change in height-adjusted total kidney volume, and composite of time to 50% reduction in eGFR, onset of ESRD, or death. Median (interquartile range) intact fibroblast growth factor 23 was 44 (33-56) pg/ml in HALT-PKD Study A and 69 (50-93) pg/ml in Study B. In adjusted models, annualized eGFR decline was significantly faster in the upper fibroblast growth factor 23 quartile (Study A: quartile 4, -3.62; 95% confidence interval, -4.12 to -3.12 versus quartile 1, -2.51; 95% confidence interval, -2.71 to -2.30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P for trend <0.001; Study B: quartile 4, -3.74; 95% confidence interval, -4.14 to -3.34 versus quartile 1, -2.78; 95% confidence interval, -2.92 to -2.63 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P for trend <0.001). In Study A, higher fibroblast growth factor 23 quartiles were associated with greater longitudinal percentage increase in height-adjusted total kidney volume in adjusted models (quartile 4, 6.76; 95% confidence interval, 5.57 to 7.96 versus quartile 1, 6.04; 95% confidence interval, 5.55 to 6.54; P for trend =0.03). In Study B, compared with the lowest quartile, the highest fibroblast growth factor 23 quartile was associated with elevated risk for the composite outcome (hazard ratio, 3.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.84 to 5.25). Addition of fibroblast growth factor 23 to a model of annualized decline in eGFR≥3.0 ml/min per 1.73 m(2

  2. Impact of Lifestyle Modification on Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Onyenwenyi, Chijoke; Ricardo, Ana C

    2015-09-01

    Kidney disease is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with adverse health outcomes, including progression to end-stage renal disease. In the general population, adherence to a healthy lifestyle is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Among individuals with diabetic kidney disease, modifications in lifestyle factors, including diet, physical activity, smoking habits, and body mass index, represent a promising cost-effective therapeutic adjunct to pharmacologic treatment of kidney disease incidence and progression.

  3. Exercise capacity in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Natália Lopes; Cunha, Thulio Marquez; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Higa, Elisa Mieko Suemitsu; Nishiura, José Luiz; Neder, José Alberto; Almeida, Waldemar Silva; Schor, Nestor

    2014-08-01

    Reports about exercise performance in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are scarce. We aimed to evaluate exercise capacity and levels of nitric oxide and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in normotensive patients with ADPKD. Prospective controlled cohort study. 26 patients with ADPKD and 30 non-ADPKD control participants (estimated glomerular filtration rate>60 mL/min/1.73 m2, aged 19-39 years, and blood pressure [BP]<140/85 mmHg). We excluded smokers, obese people, and individuals with associated diseases. ADPKD versus control. Exercise capacity and nitric oxide and ADMA levels in response to exercise. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and serum and urinary nitric oxide, plasma ADMA, and BP levels before and after exercise. Mean basal systolic and diastolic BP, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and age did not differ between the ADPKD and control groups (116±12 vs. 110±11 mmHg, 76±11 vs 71±9 mmHg, 113±17 vs. 112±9.6 mL/min/1.73 m2, and 30±8 vs. 28.9±7.3 years, respectively). Peak oxygen uptake and anaerobic threshold were significantly lower in the ADPKD group than in controls (22.2±3.3 vs. 31±4.8 mL/kg/min [P<0.001] and 743.6±221 vs. 957.4±301 L/min [P=0.01], respectively). Postexercise serum and urinary nitric oxide levels in patients with ADPKD were not significantly different from baseline (45±5.1 vs. 48.3±4.6 μmol/L and 34.7±6.5 vs. 39.8±6.8 μmol/mg of creatinine, respectively), contrasting with increased postexercise values in controls (63.1±1.9 vs. 53.9±3.1 μmol/L [P=0.01] and 61.4±10.6 vs. 38.7±5.6 μmol/mg of creatinine [P=0.01], respectively). Similarly, whereas postexercise ADMA level did not change in the ADPKD group compared to those at rest (0.47±0.04 vs. 0.45±0.02 μmol/L [P=0.6]), it decreased in controls (0.39±0.02 vs. 0.47±0.02 μmol/L [P=0.006]), as expected. A negative correlation between nitric oxide and ADMA levels after exercise was found in only the control group (r = -0.60; P<0.01). Absence

  4. Extracellular microRNA signature in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Jagdeesan; Ramezani, Ali; Hubal, Monica; Knoblach, Susan; Shrivastav, Shashi; Karandish, Sara; Scott, Richard; Maxwell, Nirmal; Ozturk, Savas; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Raj, Dominic S

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression. In this study we characterized the circulating and urinary miRNA pattern associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, using Affymetrix GeneChip miR 4.0 in 28 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Top miRNA discoveries from the human studies were validated in an Alb/TGFβ mouse model of CKD, and in rat renal proximal tubular cells (NRK52E) exposed to TGFβ1. Plasma and urinary levels of procollagen III N-terminal propeptide and collagen IV were elevated in patients with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Expression of 384 urinary and 266 circulatory miRNAs were significantly different between CKD patients with eGFR ≥30 vs. <30 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2) Pathway analysis mapped multiple miRNAs to TGFβ signaling-related mRNA targets. Specifically, Let-7a was significantly downregulated, and miR-130a was significantly upregulated, in urine of patients with eGFR <30; miR-1825 and miR-1281 were upregulated in both urine and plasma of patients with decreased eGFR; and miR-423 was significantly downregulated in plasma of patients with decreased eGFR. miRNA expression in urine and plasma of Alb/TGFβ mice generally resembled and confirmed most, although not all, of the observations from the human studies. In response to TGFβ1 exposure, rat renal proximal tubular cells overexpressed miR-1825 and downregulated miR-423. Thus, miRNA are associated with kidney fibrosis, and specific urinary and plasma miRNA profile may have diagnostic and prognostic utility in CKD. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases: Conclusions from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Aymé, Ségolène; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Day, Simon; Devuyst, Olivier; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Klein, Jon B; Knoers, Nine V A M; Perrone, Ronald D; Roberts, Julia; Schaefer, Franz; Torres, Vicente E; Cheung, Michael; Wheeler, David C; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-10-01

    Rare kidney diseases encompass at least 150 different conditions, most of which are inherited. Although individual rare kidney diseases raise specific issues, as a group these rare diseases can have overlapping challenges in diagnosis and treatment. These challenges include small numbers of affected patients, unidentified causes of disease, lack of biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, and need for complex care. To address common clinical and patient issues among rare kidney diseases, the KDIGO Controversies Conference entitled, Common Elements in Rare Kidney Diseases, brought together a panel of multidisciplinary