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Sample records for kidney transplant biopsies

  1. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring.

  2. [The role of percutaneous renal biopsy in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Manfro, R C; Lee, J Y; Lewgoy, J; Edelweiss, M I; Gonçalves, L F; Prompt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is an useful tool for diagnostic and therapeutic orientation in renal transplantation. PURPOSE--To evaluate the current role of PRB in post-transplant acute renal dysfunction (ARD) of renal allografts. METHODS--Sixty-five renal transplant patients were submitted to 95 valid renal biopsies with no major complications. RESULTS--There was disagreement between the clinical and the pathological diagnosis in 28 occasions (29.5%). In 36 cases (37.9%) the results of the pathological examination led to a modification in patient's management. These modifications were most commonly the avoidance or witholding of a steroid pulse (8 cases); nephrectomy of the renal allograft (8 cases); witholding or decrease of cyclosporine dosage (6 cases); giving a steroid pulse (5 cases) and giving antibiotics to treat acute pyelonephritis in 4 cases. The use of kidneys from cadaveric donors was significantly associated with an increased number of biopsies (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--These results demonstrate that even though several less invasive procedures are currently employed, renal biopsy is still an indispensable method to the management of ARD in renal transplant patients.

  3. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Renal biopsy; Biopsy - kidney ... Barisoni L, Arend LJ, Thomas DB. Introduction to renal biopsy. In: Zhou M, Mari-Galluzzi C, eds. ... Saunders; 2015:chap 7. Topham PS, Chen Y. Renal biopsy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, ...

  4. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right diagnosis. What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... procedure. What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  5. Sixteen Gauge biopsy needles are better and safer than 18 Gauge in native and transplant kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Mölne, Johan; Hadimeri, Henrik; Hadimeri, Ursula; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Background Kidney biopsies are essential for optimal diagnosis and treatment. Purpose To examine if quality and safety aspects differ between types and sizes of biopsy needles in native and transplant kidneys. Material and Methods A total of 1299 consecutive biopsies (1039 native and 260 transplant kidneys) were included. Diagnostic quality, needle size and type, clinical data and complications were registered. Eight-three percent of the data were prospective. Results In native kidney biopsies, 16 Gauge (G) needles compared to 18 G showed more glomeruli per pass (11 vs. 8, P <  0.001) with less complications. Sub-analysis in native kidney biopsies revealed that 18 G 19-mm side-notch needles resulted in more major (11.3% vs. 3%; odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-12.3) and overall complications (12.4% vs. 4.8%; OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.1) in women than in men. If the physician had performed less compared to more than four native kidney biopsies per year, minor (3.5% vs. 1.4%; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1-6.2) and overall complications (11.5% vs. 7.4%; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5) were more common. In transplant kidney biopsies, 16 G needles compared to 18 G resulted in more glomeruli per pass (12 vs. 8, P <  0.001). No differences existed in frequency of biopsy complications. The localization of performing biopsies was not a risk factor to develop complications. Conclusion Kidney biopsies taken by 16 G needles result in better histological quality and lower frequency of complications compared to 18 G. For native kidney biopsies the performer of the biopsy should do at least four biopsies per year.

  6. Pretransplant and protocol biopsies may help in defining short and mid-term kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Esposito, C; Migotto, C; Torreggiani, M; Maggi, N; Manini, A; Castoldi, F; Grosjean, F; Mangione, F; Abelli, M; Scaramuzzi, M L; Catucci, D; Dal Canton, A

    2012-09-01

    Although many variables may affect long-term graft survival no biomarker is available to identify donor kidney with poor quality and with inadequate short and long-term outcome. While in marginal donors pre-transplant renal biopsies are commonly performed to establish if donor kidneys are suitable for transplantation they are not performed in standard donors. In this study we assessed the relevance of pre-transplant morphological features on post-transplant renal function and evaluated the association between perioperative parameters with posttransplant histological and clinical findings. Kidney transplant recipients undergone pre-transplant and post transplant protocol biopsies at 1, 6, and 12 months were enrolled in the study. Perioperative and posttransplant clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded. Semiquantitative analysis of PAS stained kidney sections was used to determine the degree of lesions. Glomerular volume was measured by computed morphometry. A strong inverse correlation was found between donor age and renal graft function at 1, 6, and 12 months after transplantation. A prompt functional recovery was associated with a better renal function at 6 months and one year. Kidneys with higher glomerular volume demonstrated a lower serum creatinine at 1 month. Higher tubulo-interstitial grading at protocol biopsies was associated with a poor renal function at 1 month. Our findings confirm the importance of donor age in kidney transplant long-term outcome and demonstrate that pretransplant and protocol biopsies are valid options to determine graft outcome and to define therapeutic strategies and tailor immunosuppressive regimen for each patient.

  7. Kidney transplant rejection and tissue injury by gene profiling of biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Flechner, Stuart M; Kurian, Sunil M; Head, Steven R; Sharp, Starlette M; Whisenant, Thomas C; Zhang, Jie; Chismar, Jeffrey D; Horvath, Steve; Mondala, Tony; Gilmartin, Timothy; Cook, Daniel J; Kay, Steven A; Walker, John R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2004-09-01

    A major challenge for kidney transplantation is balancing the need for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, while minimizing drug-induced toxicities. We used DNA microarrays (HG-U95Av2 GeneChips, Affymetrix) to determine gene expression profiles for kidney biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in transplant patients including normal donor kidneys, well-functioning transplants without rejection, kidneys undergoing acute rejection, and transplants with renal dysfunction without rejection. We developed a data analysis schema based on expression signal determination, class comparison and prediction, hierarchical clustering, statistical power analysis and real-time quantitative PCR validation. We identified distinct gene expression signatures for both biopsies and PBLs that correlated significantly with each of the different classes of transplant patients. This is the most complete report to date using commercial arrays to identify unique expression signatures in transplant biopsies distinguishing acute rejection, acute dysfunction without rejection and well-functioning transplants with no rejection history. We demonstrate for the first time the successful application of high density DNA chip analysis of PBL as a diagnostic tool for transplantation. The significance of these results, if validated in a multicenter prospective trial, would be the establishment of a metric based on gene expression signatures for monitoring the immune status and immunosuppression of transplanted patients.

  8. Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy kidney ... bloodstream via a machine (dialysis) or a kidney transplant to stay alive. Mayo Clinic's approach . Mayo Clinic ...

  9. Outpatient renal needle biopsy of the transplanted kidney: safety profile.

    PubMed

    Petrone, H; Frapiccini, M G; Skare, R; Baran, M

    2011-11-01

    Since May 2005, we began performing renal graft biopsies as outpatient procedures when the patient's condition did not require hospitalization. To evaluate the safety profile of the 137 procedures performed in 111 patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of complications after all biopsies between 4 May 2005 and 6 January 6, 2011. The analysis focused on types of complications as well as needs for hospitalization with length of stay, for blood transfusion or for a further intervention. There were complications in 10.9% of procedures (n = 15) with 8% requiring hospitalization (n = 11). The complications were: gross hematuria (n = 10) including blockage of urinary flow (n = 2) with one subject requiring urologic intervention, and one patient experienced severe pain at the puncture site. Neither renal graft nor patient survival was threatened; there was no hemodynamic decompensation needing blood transfusions. The average hospital stay was 2.27 days (range = 1-8). Outpatient renal biopsies in 111 patients (137 procedures) had an 8% incidence of complications requiring admission and an average length of hospitalization of 2.27 days. Gross hematuria the most frequent problem, in no way compromised patient or graft survival showing it to be a safe outpatient procedure.

  10. Clinical and molecular significance of microvascular inflammation in transplant kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anjali; Broin, Pilib Ó; Bao, Yi; Pullman, James; Kamal, Layla; Ajaimy, Maria; Lubetzky, Michelle; Colovai, Adriana; Schwartz, Daniel; de Boccardo, Graciela; Golden, Aaron; Akalin, Enver

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) are continuously evolving. Here we investigated the clinical and molecular significance of different Banff microvascular inflammation (MVI) scores in transplant kidney biopsies. A total of 356 patients with clinically indicated kidney transplant biopsies were classified into three groups based on MVI scores of 0, 1, 2, or more for Groups 1-3, respectively. Gene expression profiles were assessed using arrays on a representative subset of 93 patients. The incidence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies was increased from 25% in Group 1 to 36% in Group 2 and to 54% in Group 3. Acute and chronic AMR were significantly more frequent in Group 3 (15% and 35%) compared with the Group 2 (3% and 15%) and Group 1 (0% and 5%), respectively. Gene expression profiles showed increased interferon-γ and rejection-induced, cytotoxic and regulatory T-cell, natural killer cell-associated and donor-specific antibody (DSA)-selective transcripts in Group 3 compared with Groups 1 and 2. There was no significant difference in gene expression profiles between the Groups 1 and 2. Increased intragraft expression of DSA-selective transcripts was found in the biopsies of C4d- Group 3 patients. Thus, an MVI score of 2 or more was significantly associated with a histological diagnosis of acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Hence, increased intragraft DSA-selective gene transcripts may be used as molecular markers for AMR, especially in C4d- biopsies.

  11. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  12. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of mycophenolic acid in human kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Md Dom, Zaipul I; Noll, Benjamin D; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A; Russ, Graeme R; Hesselink, Dennis A; van Gelder, Teun; Sallustio, Benedetta C

    2014-01-15

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) has a low therapeutic index and large inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability necessitating therapeutic drug monitoring to individualise dosing after transplantation. There is an ongoing discrepancy as to whether plasma MPA concentrations sufficiently predict kidney rejection or toxicity and whether immunosuppressant concentrations within the graft tissue may better predict transplant outcomes. The aim of the study was to develop an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of MPA concentrations in human kidney biopsies taken as part of routine clinical procedures. A total of 4 surplus human kidney biopsies obtained from 4 different kidney transplant recipients were available to use for this study. MPA was also quantified in 2 kidney samples from rats administered MPA to assess tissue extraction reproducibility. Human kidney biopsies and rat kidneys were homogenised mechanically and underwent liquid-liquid extraction before analysis by LC-MS/MS. MPA-free human kidney tissue was used in calibrators and quality control samples. Analyte detection was achieved from multiple reaction monitoring of the ammonium adducts of both MPA (m/z 321.1→207.3) and N-phthaloyl-l-phenylalanine (PPA, internal standard, m/z 296.2→250.2) using positive electrospray ionisation. The method was linear (calibration curves R(2)>0.99, n=10), precise, and accurate with coefficients of variation and bias less than 15%. Extraction efficiencies for MPA and PPA were approximately 97% and 86%, respectively, and matrix effects were minimal. In 4 kidney transplant recipients, tissue MPA concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 7.7ng/mg of tissue, however, the correlation between blood (C0) and tissue MPA concentrations could not be established. The method was successfully applied to the quantification of MPA in human kidney biopsies without the need to alter current clinical protocols.

  13. The diagnostic yield and complications of open lung biopsies in kidney transplant patients with pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tomotani, Daniere Yurie Vieira; Pacheco, Eduardo Souza; de Sandes-Freitas, Tainá Veras; Viana, Laila Almeida; de Oliveira Pontes, Edgar Porto; Tamura, Nikkei; Tedesco-Silva, Hélio; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro; Freitas, Flávio Geraldo Rezende

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of open lung biopsy (OLB) in determining the specific diagnosis and the related complications in patients with undiagnosed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Methods This single center, retrospective study included adult kidney transplant patients who underwent OLB. The patients had diffuse pulmonary infiltrates without definitive diagnoses and failed to respond to empiric antibiotic treatment. We analyzed the number of specific diagnoses, changes in treatment and the occurrence of complications in these patients. A logistic regression was used to determine which variables were predictors of hospital mortality. Results From April 2010 to April 2014, 87 patients consecutively underwent OLB. A specific diagnosis was reached in 74 (85.1%) patients. In 46 patients (53%), their therapeutic management was changed after the OLB results. Twenty-five (28.7%) patients had complications related to the OLB. The hospital mortality rate was 25.2%. Age, SAPS3 score and complications related to the procedure were independent predictors of all-cause mortality. Conclusions OLB is a high-risk procedure with a high diagnostic yield in kidney transplant patients with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates who did not have a definitive diagnosis and who failed to respond to empiric antibiotic treatment. Complications related to OLB were common and were independently associated with intra-hospital mortality. PMID:28203420

  14. A Probabilistic Approach to Histologic Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Famulski, K S; Chang, J

    2017-01-01

    Histologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplant biopsies uses lesion score cutoffs such as 0 versus >0 rather than actual scores and requires donor-specific antibody (DSA); however, cutoffs lose information, and DSA is not always reliable. Using microarray-derived molecular ABMR scores as a histology-independent estimate of ABMR in 703 biopsies, we reassessed criteria for ABMR to determine relative importance of various lesions, the utility of equations using actual scores rather than cutoffs, and the potential for diagnosing ABMR when DSA is unknown or negative. We confirmed that the important features for ABMR diagnosis were peritubular capillaritis (ptc), glomerulitis (g), glomerular double contours, DSA and C4d staining, but we questioned some features: arterial fibrosis, vasculitis, acute tubular injury, and sum of ptc+g scores. Regression equations using lesion scores predicted molecular ABMR more accurately than score cutoffs (area under the curve 0.85-0.86 vs. 0.75). DSA positivity improved accuracy, but regression equations predicted ABMR with moderate accuracy when DSA was unknown. Some biopsies without detectable DSA had high probability of ABMR by regression, although most had HLA antibody. We concluded that regression equations using lesion scores plus DSA maximized diagnostic accuracy and can estimate probable ABMR when DSA is unknown or undetectable.

  15. Microarray diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant biopsies: an international prospective study (INTERCOM).

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Pereira, A B; Chang, J; Matas, A; Picton, M; De Freitas, D; Bromberg, J; Serón, D; Sellarés, J; Einecke, G; Reeve, J

    2013-11-01

    In a reference set of 403 kidney transplant biopsies, we recently developed a microarray-based test that diagnoses antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) by assigning an ABMR score. To validate the ABMR score and assess its potential impact on practice, we performed the present prospective INTERCOM study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01299168) in 300 new biopsies (264 patients) from six centers: Baltimore, Barcelona, Edmonton, Hannover, Manchester and Minneapolis. We assigned ABMR scores using the classifier created in the reference set and compared it to conventional assessment as documented in the pathology reports. INTERCOM documented uncertainty in conventional assessment: In 41% of biopsies where ABMR features were noted, the recorded diagnoses did not mention ABMR. The ABMR score correlated with ABMR histologic lesions and donor-specific antibodies, but not with T cell-mediated rejection lesions. The agreement between ABMR scores and conventional assessment was identical to that in the reference set (accuracy 85%). The ABMR score was more strongly associated with failure than conventional assessment, and when the ABMR score and conventional assessment disagreed, only the ABMR score was associated with early progression to failure. INTERCOM confirms the need to reduce uncertainty in the diagnosis of ABMR, and demonstrates the potential of the ABMR score to impact practice.

  16. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  17. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival.

  18. BIOPSY-PROVEN BK VIRUS NEPHROPATHY WITHOUT DETECTABLE BK VIREMIA IN A ONE-YEAR POST-KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Pumchandh, Norawee; Satirapoj, Bancha; Termmathurapoj, Sumeth; Pongthanapisith, Viroj

    2015-07-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) is an important clinical problem in kidney transplant (KT) recipients. The sequence of disease is usually viruria, viremia and then nephropathy. Diagnosis of BK virus (BKV) infection includes checking BKV DNA in the urine, in the plasma and histology on renal biopsy. This last method is used to diagnose BKVN. We describe a KT patient with BKVN without detectable BK viremia. A 62-year-old female with hypertensive nephropathy underwent renal transplant from a living relative donor in December 2011. Fourteen months after transplantation, her serum creatinine(SCr) rose up from 1.2 to 1.6 mg/dl with biopsy-proven acute antibody-mediated and cellular rejection. After pulse methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin, her SCr decreased to baseline but she subsequently developed cytomegalovirus infection with pancytopenia and transaminitis. The SCr rose to 1.9 mg/dl despite ganciclovir treatment. Renal ultrasound and antegrade pyelogram showed partial obstruction of the proximal ureter with moderate hydronephrosis. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for BKV DNA was negative (less than 10 copies/ml). A renal biopsy was performed and the pathology revealed viral cytopathic changes in the tubular epithelium with interstitial inflammation. The renal biopsy also showed BKV nucleic acid sequences by in-situ hybridization confirming BKVN. Immunosuppression regimen was changed to cyclosporine, low-dose prednisolone and leflunomide. A temporary percutaneous nephrostomy was performed. Her renal function improved within one week. The diagnosis of BKVN should be considered in a KT recipient with a rising SCr with or without BK viremia and should be made by renal biopsy.

  19. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) of Marginal Donors Allocated by Standardized Pre-Transplant Donor Biopsy Assessment: Distribution and Association with Graft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfini, I.; Buzio, C.; Zanelli, P.; Palmisano, A.; Cremaschi, E.; Vaglio, A.; Piotti, G.; Melfa, L.; La Manna, G.; Feliciangeli, G.; Cappuccilli, M.; Scolari, M.P.; Capelli, I.; Panicali, L.; Baraldi, O.; Stefoni, S.; Buscaroli, A.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Errico, A.; Cappelli, G.; Bonucchi, D.; Rubbiani, E.; Albertazzi, A.; Mehrotra, A.; Cravedi, P.; Maggiore, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-transplant donor biopsy (PTDB)-based marginal-donor allocation systems to single or dual renal transplantation could increase the use of organs with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) in the highest range (e.g. >80 or >90), whose discard rate approximates 50% in the US. To test this hypothesis, we retrospectively calculated the KDPI and analyzed the outcomes of 442 marginal kidney transplants (340 single transplants: 278 with a PTDB Remuzzi score <4 [median KDPI:87; interquartile range(IQR):78-94] and 62 with a score =4 [median KDPI:87; IQR:76-93]; 102 dual transplants [median KDPI: 93; IQR:86-96]) and 248 single standard transplant controls [median KDPI:36; IQR:18-51]. PTDB-based allocation of marginal grafts led to a limited discard rate of 15% for kidneys with KDPI of 80-90 and of 37% for kidneys with a KDPI of 91-100. Although 1-year eGFRs were significantly lower in recipients of marginal kidneys (-9.3, -17.9, and -18.8ml/min, for dual transplants, single kidneys with PTDB score <4, and =4, respectively; P<0.001), graft survival (median follow-up 3.3 years) was similar between marginal and standard kidney transplants (hazard ratio: 1.20 [95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.79; P=0.38]). In conclusion, PTDB-based allocation allows the safe transplantation of kidneys with KDPI in the highest range that may otherwise be discarded. PMID:25155294

  20. Early changes in scores of chronic damage on transplant kidney protocol biopsies reflect donor characteristics, but not future graft function.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Ben; Veighey, Kristin; Mahenderan, Arundathi; Manook, Miriam; Henry, Joanne; Nitsch, Dorothea; Harber, Mark; Dupont, Peter; Wheeler, David C; Jones, Gareth; Fernando, Bimbi; Howie, Alexander J; Veitch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The amount of irreversible injury on renal allograft biopsy predicts function, but little is known about the early evolution of this damage. In a single-center cohort, we examined the relationship between donor-, recipient-, and transplantation-associated factors and change in a morphometric index of chronic damage (ICD) between protocol biopsies performed at implantation and at 2-3 months. We then investigated whether early delta ICD predicted subsequent biochemical outcomes. We found little evidence to support differences between the study group, who had undergone serial biopsies, and a contemporaneous control group, who had not. In allografts with serial biopsies (n = 162), there was an increase in ICD between implantation (median: 2%, IQR:0-8) and 2-3 months post-transplant (median 8% IQR:4-15; p < 0.0001). Donation from younger or live donors was independently associated with smaller early post-transplant increases in ICD. There was no evidence for a difference in delta ICD between donation after cardiac death vs. donation after brain death, nor association with length of cold ischemia. After adjustment for GFR at the time of the second biopsy, delta ICD after three months did not predict allograft function at one yr. These findings suggest that graft damage develops shortly after transplantation and reflects donor factors, but does not predict future biochemical outcomes.

  1. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  2. Cuba's kidney transplantation program.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Alexander; Pérez, Alexis; Pérez de Prado, Juan C; Fernández-Vega, Silvia; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Arce, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    The first kidney transplant in Cuba was performed on 24 February 1970, using a cadaveric donor. In 1979, living donor kidney transplantation began between first-degree relatives. A total of 2775 patients are enrolled in renal replacement therapy in 47 hospitals across the country, 1440 of whom are awaiting kidney transplantation. Organs for the kidney program are procured in 63 accredited hospitals equipped for multidisciplinary management of brain death. Accordingly, over 90% of transplanted kidneys are from cadaveric donors. Identification of potential recipients is carried out through a national, computerized program that affords all patients the same opportunity regardless of distance from a transplant center, and selection of the most suitable candidate is based primarily on HLA compatibility. KEYWORDS Chronic renal failure, kidney transplantation.

  3. Nutrition in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Tallarita, Tiziano; Ekser, Burcin; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2013-10-01

    Organ transplantation has progressively established itself as the preferred therapy for many end-stage organ failures. However, many of these chronic diseases and their treatments can negatively affect nutritional status, leading to malnutrition and mineral deficiencies.Nutritional status is an important determinant of the clinical outcome of kidney transplant recipients.Malnutrition and obesity may represent a contraindication to transplantation in many cases and may increase the risk of postoperative complications after the transplantation. Nutritional support in kidney transplant recipients is challenging, since it must take into account the pre-transplant nutritional status, the side effects of immunosuppression, the function of the transplanted graft, the presence of infection, and the general status of the patient at the time of the transplantation.With these considerations in mind, we reviewed current literature on the impact of nutritional status on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

  4. Kidney Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Here Kidney Transplant (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Kidney Transplant (National Kidney Foundation) Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation (National Institute of Diabetes ...

  5. Antibody-mediated rejection, T cell-mediated rejection, and the injury-repair response: new insights from the Genome Canada studies of kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Reeve, Jeff P; Pereira, Andre B; Hidalgo, Luis G; Famulski, Konrad S

    2014-02-01

    Prospective studies of unselected indication biopsies from kidney transplants, combining conventional assessment with molecular analysis, have created a new understanding of transplant disease states and their outcomes. A large-scale Genome Canada grant permitted us to use conventional and molecular phenotypes to create a new disease classification. T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), characterized histologically or molecularly, has little effect on outcomes. Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) manifests as microcirculation lesions and transcript changes reflecting endothelial injury, interferon-γ effects, and natural killer cells. ABMR is frequently C4d negative and has been greatly underestimated by conventional criteria. Indeed, ABMR, triggered in some cases by non-adherence, is the major disease causing failure. Progressive dysfunction is usually attributable to specific diseases, and pure calcineurin inhibitor toxicity rarely explains failure. The importance of ABMR argues against immunosuppressive drug minimization and stands as a barrier to tolerance induction. Microarrays also defined the transcripts induced by acute kidney injury (AKI), which correlate with reduced function, whereas histologic changes of acute tubular injury do not. AKI transcripts are induced in kidneys with late dysfunction, and are better predictors of failure than fibrosis and inflammation. Thus progression reflects ongoing parenchymal injury, usually from identifiable diseases such as ABMR, not destructive fibrosis.

  6. Unique molecular changes in kidney allografts after simultaneous liver-kidney compared with solitary kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2017-02-20

    Kidney allografts transplanted simultaneously with liver allografts from the same donor are known to be immunologically privileged. This is especially evident in recipients with high levels of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. Here we investigated the mechanisms of liver's protective impact using gene expression in the kidney allograft. Select solitary kidney transplant or simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed and separated into four groups: 16 cross-match negative kidney transplants, 15 cross-match positive kidney transplants, 12 cross-match negative simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, and nine cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. Surveillance biopsies of cross-match-positive kidney transplants had increased expression of genes associated with donor-specific antigens, inflammation, and endothelial cell activation compared to cross-match-negative kidney transplants. These changes were not found in cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplant biopsies when compared to cross-match-negative simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In addition, simultaneously transplanting a liver markedly increased renal expression of genes associated with tissue integrity/metabolism, regardless of the cross-match status. While the expression of inflammatory gene sets in cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplants was not completely reduced to the level of cross-match-negative kidney transplants, the downstream effects of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies were blocked. Thus, simultaneous liver-kidney transplants can have a profound impact on the kidney allograft, not only by decreasing inflammation and avoiding endothelial cell activation in cross-match-positive recipients, but also by increasing processes associated with tissue integrity/metabolism by unknown mechanisms.

  7. Obesity and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Rahul M; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-06-01

    There is a worldwide epidemic of obesity, and an increasing number of patients who are obese are presenting for solid-organ transplantation. Obesity increases the risk for delayed graft function and local wound complications after technically successful kidney transplantation. Obese patients are more likely to have comorbid factors leading to premature death with a functioning kidney transplant. We suggest the use of World Health Organization criteria when reporting the impact of obesity on recipients of solid-organ transplants. Prospective multicenter studies are indicated to evaluate long-term outcomes in obese patients who successfully receive a kidney transplant. Rigorous efforts should be made to optimize weight before and after solid-organ transplantation by a judicious combination of diet, exercise, minimization of steroid therapy, surgery, and psychological therapies.

  8. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  9. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100087.htm Kidney transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  10. Transplant biopsy beyond light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adam, Benjamin; Mengel, Michael

    2015-08-07

    Despite its long-standing status as the diagnostic "gold standard", the renal transplant biopsy is limited by a fundamental dependence on descriptive, empirically-derived consensus classification. The recent shift towards personalized medicine has resulted in an increased demand for precise, mechanism-based diagnoses, which is not fully met by the contemporary transplantation pathology standard of care. The expectation is that molecular techniques will provide novel pathogenetic insights that will allow for the identification of more accurate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. Here we review the current state of molecular renal transplantation pathology. Despite significant research activity and progress within the field, routine adoption of clinical molecular testing has not yet been achieved. The recent development of novel molecular platforms suitable for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue will offer potential solution for the major barriers to implementation. The recent incorporation of molecular diagnostic criteria into the 2013 Banff classification is a reflection of progress made and future directions in the area of molecular transplantation pathology. Transcripts related to endothelial injury and NK cell activation have consistently been shown to be associated with antibody-mediated rejection. Prospective multicenter validation and implementation of molecular diagnostics for major entities remains an unmet clinical need in transplantation. It is expected that an integrated system of transplantation pathology diagnosis comprising molecular, morphological, serological, and clinical variables will ultimately provide the greatest diagnostic precision.

  11. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  12. Bioengineering Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    One in ten Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, and close to 90,000 people die each year from causes related to kidney failure. Patients with end-stage renal disease are faced with two options: hemodialysis or transplantation. Unfortunately, the reach of transplantation is limited because of the shortage of donor organs and the need for immunosuppression. Bioengineered kidney grafts theoretically present a novel solution to both problems. Herein we discuss the history of bioengineering organs, the current status of bioengineered kidneys, considerations for the future of the field, and challenges to clinical translation. We hope that by integrating principles of tissue engineering, and stem cell and developmental biology, bioengineered kidney grafts will advance the field of regenerative medicine while meeting a critical clinical need. PMID:25217267

  13. [Sexuality after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Steiner, T; Wunderlich, H; Ott, U

    2009-12-01

    The quality of life of patients after kidney transplantation is of increasing interest. In this connection, issues of sexuality are meaningful too. Many patients with end-stage kidney disease suffer from sexual disorders. More than 50% of the male patients on dialysis and even more females are affected by disturbances such as erectile dysfunction and loss of libido or abnormal menstrual cycles. After successful kidney transplantation most symptoms in women are improved, whereas in men disturbances in erectile function often persist or even deteriorate. In these patients treatment with inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 is a valid option with an effective response. In women with stable graft function pregnancy can be achieved successfully. Nevertheless, pregnant kidney allograft recipients should be considered as high-risk patients needing special care under the supervision of a team of obstetricians and nephrologists.

  14. Pregnancy and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; McKay, Dianne B

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of experience with child bearing in women with kidney transplants, these pregnancies remain high risk with an increased prevalence of hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Infertility, common in women with end-stage renal disease, is rapidly restored after transplant although pregnancy rates appear lower in transplant recipients than the general public. Many unanswered questions exist, some old questions such as what is the optimal timing of pregnancy after transplant, whether breast feeding is safe, the long-term impact if any on the offspring, and whether pregnancy negatively affects the kidney graft; and some new questions such as whether to modify immunosuppression in a patient taking a mycophenolic acid-containing drug, whether kidney donation has a deleterious impact on future pregnancies, whether to use erythropoietin-stimulating agents, and the role of BK virus. Counseling about contraception and pregnancy after transplant should be initiated during the pretransplant evaluation process. It is important because of the rapid restoration of fertility that occurs after transplant as well as the many risks and unanswered questions that remain.

  15. Transplanting Kidneys from Deceased Donors With Severe Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Heilman, R L; Smith, M L; Kurian, S M; Huskey, J; Batra, R K; Chakkera, H A; Katariya, N N; Khamash, H; Moss, A; Salomon, D R; Reddy, K S

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to determine outcomes with transplanting kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury, defined as a donor with terminal serum creatinine ≥2.0 mg/dL, or a donor requiring acute renal replacement therapy. We included all patients who received deceased donor kidney transplant from June 2004 to October 2013. There were 162 AKI donor transplant recipients (21% of deceased donor transplants): 139 in the standard criteria donor (SCD) and 23 in the expanded criteria donor (ECD) cohort. 71% of the AKI donors had stage 3 (severe AKI), based on acute kidney injury network (AKIN) staging. Protocol biopsies were done at 1, 4, and 12 months posttransplant. One and four month formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 48 patients (24 AKI donors, 24 non-AKI) underwent global gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays (96 arrays). DGF was more common in the AKI group but eGFR, graft survival at 1 year and proportion with IF/TA>2 at 1 year were similar for the two groups. At 1 month, there were 898 differentially expressed genes in the AKI group (p-value <0.005; FDR <10%), but by 4 months there were no differences. Transplanting selected kidneys from deceased donors with AKI is safe and has excellent outcomes.

  16. ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morath, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Döhler, Bernd; Opelz, Gerhard; Süsal, Caner

    2017-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation has long been considered a contraindication to successful kidney transplantation. During the last 25 years, increasing organ shortage enforced the development of strategies to overcome the ABO antibody barrier. In the meantime, ABOi kidney transplantation has become a routine procedure with death-censored graft survival rates comparable to the rates in compatible transplantations. Desensitization is usually achieved by apheresis and B cell-depleting therapies that are accompanied by powerful immunosuppression. Anti-A/B antibodies are aimed to be below a certain threshold at the time of ABOi kidney transplantation and during the first 2 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, even a rebound of anti-A/B antibodies does not appear to harm the kidney transplant, a phenomenon that is called accommodation, but is poorly understood. There is still concern, however, that infectious complications such as viral disease, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and severe urinary tract infections are increased after ABOi transplantations. Recent data from the Collaborative Transplant Study show that during the first year after kidney transplantation, one additional patient death from an infectious complication occurs in 100 ABOi kidney transplant recipients. Herein, we review the recent evidence on ABOi kidney transplantation with a focus on desensitization strategies and respective outcomes. PMID:28321223

  17. ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morath, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Döhler, Bernd; Opelz, Gerhard; Süsal, Caner

    2017-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation has long been considered a contraindication to successful kidney transplantation. During the last 25 years, increasing organ shortage enforced the development of strategies to overcome the ABO antibody barrier. In the meantime, ABOi kidney transplantation has become a routine procedure with death-censored graft survival rates comparable to the rates in compatible transplantations. Desensitization is usually achieved by apheresis and B cell-depleting therapies that are accompanied by powerful immunosuppression. Anti-A/B antibodies are aimed to be below a certain threshold at the time of ABOi kidney transplantation and during the first 2 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, even a rebound of anti-A/B antibodies does not appear to harm the kidney transplant, a phenomenon that is called accommodation, but is poorly understood. There is still concern, however, that infectious complications such as viral disease, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and severe urinary tract infections are increased after ABOi transplantations. Recent data from the Collaborative Transplant Study show that during the first year after kidney transplantation, one additional patient death from an infectious complication occurs in 100 ABOi kidney transplant recipients. Herein, we review the recent evidence on ABOi kidney transplantation with a focus on desensitization strategies and respective outcomes.

  18. A simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipient with IgA nephropathy limited to native kidneys and BK virus nephropathy limited to the transplant kidney.

    PubMed

    Ujire, Manasa P; Curry, Michael P; Stillman, Isaac E; Hanto, Douglas W; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition in the native kidneys of patients with liver disease is well described. Secondary IgA nephropathy usually is thought to be benign, but hematuria, proteinuria, and loss of kidney function have been reported in this context. BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney transplant loss; however, BK virus nephropathy is rare in the native kidneys of patients who underwent transplantation of other organs. We report the case of a patient with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease and chronic kidney disease with hematuria who underwent simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. His kidney function decreased over the course of several weeks posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplant kidney showed BK virus nephropathy, but no IgA deposits. In contrast, biopsy of the native kidneys showed IgA deposits, but no BK virus nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation wherein both the native and transplant kidneys were biopsied posttransplantation and showed exclusively different pathologies. These findings confirm the predilection of BK virus nephropathy for transplant rather than native kidneys.

  19. Complications of the percutaneous kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Whittier, William L

    2012-05-01

    Percutaneous kidney biopsy is an integral part of a nephrologist's practice. It has helped to define nephrology as a subspecialty. When indicated, it is a necessary procedure to help patients, as it allows for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic information. Although very safe, this procedure can give rise to complications, mainly related to bleeding. Since its development in the 1950s, modifications have been made to the approach and the technique, which have improved the diagnostic yield while keeping it a safe procedure. Alterations to the standard approach may be necessary if risk factors for bleeding are present. In addition, obesity, pregnancy, and solitary kidney biopsy are all special circumstances that change the procedure itself or the risk of the procedure. Today, kidney biopsy is a vital procedure for the nephrologist: clinically relevant, safe, and effective.

  20. Relationships among injury, fibrosis, and time in human kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Jeffery M.; Famulski, Konrad S.; Reeve, Jeff; Chang, Jessica; Halloran, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney transplant biopsies offer an opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. We studied the relationships between the time of biopsy after transplant (TxBx), histologic fibrosis, diseases, and transcript expression. METHODS. Expression microarrays from 681 kidney transplant indication biopsies taken either early (n = 282, <1 year) or late (n = 399, >1 year) after transplant were used to analyze the molecular landscape of fibrosis in relationship to histologic fibrosis and diseases. RESULTS. Fibrosis was absent at transplantation but was present in some early biopsies by 4 months after transplant, apparently as a self-limited response to donation implantation injury not associated with progression to failure. The molecular phenotype of early biopsies represented the time sequence of the response to wounding: immediate expression of acute kidney injury transcripts, followed by fibrillar collagen transcripts after several weeks, then by the appearance of immunoglobulin and mast cell transcripts after several months as fibrosis appeared. Fibrosis in late biopsies correlated with injury, fibrillar collagen, immunoglobulin, and mast cell transcripts, but these were independent of time. Pathway analysis revealed epithelial response-to-wounding pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin. CONCLUSION. Fibrosis in late biopsies had different associations because many kidneys had potentially progressive diseases and subsequently failed. Molecular correlations with fibrosis in late biopsies were independent of time, probably because ongoing injury obscured the response-to-wounding time sequence. The results indicate that fibrosis in kidney transplants is driven by nephron injury and that progression to failure reflects continuing injury, not autonomous fibrogenesis. TRIAL REGISTRATION. INTERCOM study (www.clinicalTrials.gov; NCT01299168). FUNDING. Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada. PMID:27699214

  1. Recurrence of primary hyperoxaluria after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malakoutian, Tahereh; Asgari, Mojgan; Houshmand, Massoud; Mohammadi, Ronak; Aryani, Omid; Mohammadi Pargoo, Esmaeel; Ghods, Ahad J

    2011-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a genetic disorder in glyoxylate metabolism that leads to systemic overproduction of oxalate. Functional deficiency of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase in this disease leads to recurrent nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, systemic oxalosis, and kidney failure. We present a young woman with end-stage renal disease who received a kidney allograft and experienced early graft failure presumed to be an acute rejection. There was no improvement in kidney function, and she was required hemodialysis. Ultimately, biopsy revealed birefringent calcium oxalate crystals, which raised suspicion of primary hyperoxaluria. Further evaluations including genetic study and metabolic assay confirmed the diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1. This suggests a screening method for ruling out primary hyperoxaluria in suspected cases, especially before planning for kidney transplantation in patients with end-stage renal disease who have nephrocalcinosis, calcium oxalate calculi, or a family history of primary hyperoxaluria.

  2. When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Needs ... to monitor their new kidney function. About the Kidneys Kidneys are bean-shaped organs located near the ...

  3. Kidney transplantation in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m2 or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  4. A new apparatus for standardized rat kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P M

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney.

  5. [Three cases of de novo multiple myeloma after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Nieto-Ríos, John Fredy; Zuluaga, Mónica; Serna, Lina María; Aristizábal, Arbey; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Gálvez, Kenny Mauricio; Flórez, Adriana Alejandra; Zuluaga, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    Light chain-associated kidney compromise is frequent in patients with monoclonal gammopathies; it affects the glomeruli or the tubules, and its most common cause is multiple myeloma. It may develop after a kidney transplant due to recurrence of a preexisting multiple myeloma or it can be a de novo disease manifesting as graft dysfunction and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy is always necessary to confirm the diagnosis.We describe three cases of kidney graft dysfunction due to multiple myeloma in patients without presence of the disease before the transplant.

  6. Acute Pancreatitis after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tabakovic, Mithat; Salkic, Nermin N.; Bosnjic, Jasmina; Alibegovic, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare but life-threatening complication in patients with transplanted kidney. The incidence of acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation ranges from 2% to 7%, with mortality rate between 50 and 100%. We report a case of a female patient aged 46 years, developing an interstitial acute pancreatitis 8 years following a renal transplantation. The specific aethiological factor was not clearly established, although possibility of biliary pancreatitis with spontaneous stone elimination and/or medication-induced pancreatitis remains the strongest. Every patient after renal transplantation with an acute onset of abdominal pain should be promptly evaluated for presence of pancreatitis with a careful application of the most appropriate diagnostic procedure for each individual patient. PMID:23259142

  7. Kidney Transplant Survival Up Among Babies, Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163937.html Kidney Transplant Survival Up Among Babies, Kids Patients under age ... News) -- Survival rates for children who get kidney transplants have improved significantly over the last half-century, ...

  8. The Native Kidney Biopsy: Update and Evidence for Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jonathan J; Mocanu, Michaela; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2016-02-05

    The kidney biopsy is the gold standard in the diagnosis and management of many diseases. Since its introduction in the 1950s, advancements have been made in biopsy technique to improve diagnostic yield while minimizing complications. Here, we review kidney biopsy indications, techniques, and complications in the modern era. We also discuss patient populations in whom special consideration must be given when considering a kidney biopsy and the important role that the kidney biopsy plays in nephrology training. These data are presented to develop best practice strategies for this essential procedure.

  9. Transplantation of horseshoe kidney en bloc.

    PubMed

    Nahas, W C; Hakim, N S; Mazzucchi, E; Antonopoulos, L M; Eltayar, A R; Labruzzo, C; Chocair, P R; Arap, S

    2000-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is probably the most common renal fusion anomaly. With the continuous donor shortage, transplant surgeons tend to accept donors previously considered unsuitable. We present a successful case of en bloc horseshoe kidney transplant in a single recipient. The literature is reviewed. The use of horseshoe kidneys in transplantation is recommended in selected cases.

  10. Kidney Transplant in Third World Countries.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Nadey; Miner, Elijah; Hakim, David; El Tayyar, Adil

    2016-11-01

    This paper relates to our transplant experiences in Third World countries. Over the years, I have started kidney transplant programs in Aden, Yemen and Abuja, Nigeria and restarted the transplant program in Khartoum, Sudan.

  11. Talking about Kidney Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan; Swift, Julia

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project in which information about the moral issues surrounding tissue transplants was obtained and videotaped for classroom use. Moral positions and possible educational strategies are discussed. Examples of student statements are presented. (CW)

  12. Emphysematous pyelonephritis in a transplanted kidney

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paula Dalsoglio; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare infection characterized by necrosis and gas accumulation in the renal parenchyma, adjacent tissues, and/or urinary collecting system. This entity is rarely reported in transplanted kidneys. Computed tomography imaging is necessary for diagnosis and risk classification. The authors described the case of a 58-year-old man who underwent a kidney transplant and presented sepsis from a urinary tract infection. An abdominal tomography showed some characteristics of emphysematous pyelonephritis associated with an abscess. A graft biopsy, performed 45 days after the transplant, failed to show signs of infection, and tubule-interstitial and vascular rejection were ruled out. The patient had a poor outcome, and a nephrectomy was needed, the pathological analysis of which yielded the diagnosis of chronic pyelonephritis with necrotizing papillitis. The patient became hemodynamically unstable and died. The authors highlight the current tomographic criteria for the diagnosis and treatment of emphysematous pyelonephritis and question the validity of accepting the same standards used to guide the treatment of patients without transplants, and call attention to the importance of the clinical status for the indication of nephrectomy in cases of emphysematous pyelonephritis. PMID:28210573

  13. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a kidney transplant and how does it work? A kidney transplant is surgery to place a healthy kidney from a donor into your ... many members, including your surgeon—the doctor who places the kidney in ... health. The nephrologist may work in partnership with a nurse practitioner or a ...

  14. Altitude and arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Grebe, Scott O; Fehr, Thomas; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Mueller, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    The kidney is very susceptible to hypoxic injury. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) induce vasoconstriction and might reduce renal tissue oxygenation. We aimed to investigate if the synergistic deleterious effects of CNI-treatment and hypoxia of high altitude living might accelerate the development of arteriolar hyalinosis in kidney allografts. We stratified all patients who received a kidney graft from 2000 to 2010 in our centre (n = 477) in three groups according to the residential elevation (below 400, between 400 to 600 and above 600 m above sea level) and we retrospectively re-evaluated all transplant biopsies performed during follow-up, specifically looking at the degree of arteriolar hyalinosis, the hallmark of chronic CNI nephrotoxicity. Living at high altitude was markedly associated with a higher degree of arteriolar hyalinosis (P < 0.001). Haemoglobin levels confirmed the functional relevance of different arterial oxygenation among the groups (P = 0.01). Thus, patients living at high altitude seem to be more susceptible to the development of arteriolar hyalinosis after kidney transplantation.

  15. Acute Page kidney following renal allograft biopsy: a complication requiring early recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Caumartin, Y; Warren, J; Luke, P P W

    2008-06-01

    The acute Page kidney phenomenon occurs as a consequence of external compression of the renal parenchyma leading to renal ischemia and hypertension. Between January 2000 and September 2007, 550 kidney transplants and 518 ultrasound-guided kidney biopsies were performed. During that time, four recipients developed acute oligo-anuria following ultrasound-guided allograft biopsy. Emergent doppler-ultrasounds were performed demonstrating absence of diastolic flow as well as a sub-capsular hematoma of the kidney. Prompt surgical exploration with allograft capsulotomy was performed in all cases. Immediately after capsulotomy, intraoperative Doppler study demonstrated robust return of diastolic flow. Three patients maintained good graft function, and one kidney was lost due to acute antibody-mediated rejection. We conclude that postbiopsy anuria associated with a subcapsular hematoma and acute absence of diastolic flow on doppler ultrasound should be considered pathognomonic of APK. All renal transplant specialists should be able to recognize this complication, because immediate surgical decompression can salvage the allograft.

  16. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control.

  17. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  18. Transplantation of kidneys with tumors.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Porta, Camillo; Cosmai, Laura; Santoni, Matteo; Sandrini, Silvio; Salviani, Chiara; Gallieni, Maurizio; Balestra, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    The shortage of donors in the face of the increasing number of patients wait-listed for renal transplantation has prompted several strategies including the use of kidneys with a tumor, whether found by chance on harvesting from a deceased donor or intentionally removed from a living donor and transplanted after excision of the lesion. Current evidence suggests that a solitary well-differentiated renal cell carcinoma, Fuhrman nuclear grade I-II, less than 1 cm in diameter and resected before grafting may be considered at minimal risk of recurrence in the recipient who, however, should be informed of the possible risk and consent to receive such a graft.

  19. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Rossidis, A; Lim, M A; Palmer, M; Levine, M H; Naji, A; Bloom, R D; Abt, P L

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, >100 000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant. Given the paucity of organs available for transplant, expansion of eligibility criteria for deceased donation is of substantial interest. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is viewed as a contraindication to kidney donation, perhaps because SCD substantially alters renal structure and function and thus has the potential to adversely affect multiple physiological processes of the kidney. To our knowledge, transplantation from a donor with SCD has never been described in the literature. In this paper, we report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a 37-year-old woman with SCD who died from an intracranial hemorrhage. Nearly 4 mo after transplant, both recipients are doing well and are off dialysis. The extent to which kidneys from donors with SCD can be safely transplanted with acceptable outcomes is unknown; however, this report should provide support for the careful expansion of kidneys from donors with SCD without evidence of renal dysfunction and with normal tissue architecture on preimplantation biopsies.

  20. Huge abdominal cyst occurred after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, H P; Yu, H C; Park, H S; Song, J S; Kang, K P; Kim, W; Park, S K; Lee, S

    2014-01-01

    This case demonstrates continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis-related endometrial tissue migration and occurrence of huge cystic endometriosis by the recovery of menstrual period after kidney transplantation.

  1. Treating stones in transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Sadideen, H; Goldsmith, D

    2013-02-01

    The formation of calculi in renal allografts is an uncommon complication in renal transplant recipients, with a reported incidence of 0.2-1.7% according to retrospective studies. Although the majority of these stones appear to form de novo following renal transplantation (RTX), there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that more often than previously thought they may be transplanted with the donor graft itself. The etiology and pathophysiology of renal graft stones is multifactorial. A combination of metabolic and urodynamic factors predispose to stone formation and these are generally found more frequently in allograft rather than native kidneys. In addition tertiary hyperparathyroidism (following RTX) plays an important role. Renal allograft stones can pose significant challenges for the clinician. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and must be prompt, as these patients' reliance on a solitary kidney for their renal function leaves them susceptible to significant morbidity. However, reports in the literature come largely from anecdotal experience and case reports, meaning that there is a limited consensus regarding how best to manage the condition. We suggest that interventional treatment should be guided primarily by stone size and individual patient presentation. Good outcomes have been reported with shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and ureteroscopy, but optimal management of the risk factors leading to calculi formation (i.e., prevention) will remain the most cost-effective management.

  2. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  3. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  4. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  5. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  6. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  7. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  8. Kidney Transplantation in the Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sáez, María José; Pascual, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease, kidney transplantation (KT) with or without a pancreas transplant is the treatment of choice. We aimed to review current data regarding kidney and pancreas transplant options in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes and the outcomes of different treatment modalities. In general, pancreas transplantation is associated with long-term survival advantages despite an increased short-term morbidity and mortality risk. This applies to simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation or pancreas after KT compared to KT alone (either living donor or deceased). Other factors as living donor availability, comorbidities, and expected waiting time have to be considered whens electing one transplant modality, rather than a clear benefit in survival of one strategy vs. others. In selected type 2 diabetic patients, data support cautious utilization of simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation when a living kidney donor is not an option. Pancreas and kidney transplantation seems to be the treatment of choice for most type 1 diabetic and selected type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26239558

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  10. Baseline donor chronic renal injury confers the same transplant survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Salji, M; Bardsley, V; Chen, Y; Thiru, S; Griffiths, M H; Copley, H C; Saeb-Parsy, K; Bradley, J A; Torpey, N; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-03-01

    Histological assessment of baseline chronic kidney injury may discriminate kidneys that are suitable for transplantation, but has not been validated for appraisal of donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidneys. 'Time-zero' biopsies for 371 consecutive, solitary, deceased-donor kidneys transplanted at our center between 2006 and 2010 (65.5% DCD, 34.5% donation after brain death [DBD]) were reviewed and baseline chronic degenerative injury scored using Remuzzi's classification. High scores correlated with donor age and extended criteria donors (42% of donors), but the spectrum of scores was similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Transplant outcomes for kidneys scoring from 0 to 4 were comparable (1 and 3 year graft survival 95% and 92%), but were much poorer for kidneys scoring ≥5, with 1 year graft survival only 73%, and 12.5% suffering primary nonfunction. Critically, high Remuzzi scores conferred the same survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys. On multi-variable regression analysis, time-zero biopsy score was the only independent predictor for graft survival, whereas one-year graft estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) correlated with donor age and biopsy score. In conclusion, the relationship between severity of chronic kidney injury and transplant outcome is similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Kidneys with Remuzzi scores of ≤4 can be implanted singly with acceptable results.

  11. Cryo-preserved porcine kidneys are feasible for teaching and training renal biopsy: “the bento kidney”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of patients as the primary teaching modality for learning procedures is being questioned. While there have been advancements in the technology used for performing needle biopsies in both native and transplanted kidneys, there has been little advancement in teaching and training tools. We have developed a portable ex-vivo kidney, the Bento Kidney, using cryo-preserved porcine kidneys for teaching this procedure. Methods The kidney is thawed, perfused by a pump, covered with skin for realistic haptic feedback, and then used with existing biopsy technology to teach the technique. Results Thirty porcine kidneys were used in this pilot research, and nine were shipped to physicians at a distant facility. Renal biopsy was then performed using a core biopsy needle and ultrasound guidance. There was some leakage of fluid from all kidneys noted. All trainees felt that the model was realistic, and judged at a mean score of 8.7 (SD 0.8) on a scale of 1 (not useful) to 10 (very useful). Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates that cryo-preserved porcine kidneys can be successfully used to teach and train renal biopsy techniques, and provides haptic feedback as well as realistic real-time ultrasound images. Further large scale studies are needed to demonstrate value from the educational point of view for nephrology and transplantation. PMID:23369318

  12. Pulmonary Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Phaeoacremonium in a Kidney Transplant Recipient: Successful Treatment with Posaconazole

    PubMed Central

    Monaganti, Saivaralaxmi; Santos, Carlos A. Q.; Markwardt, Andrea; Pence, Morgan A.; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of pulmonary phaeohyphomycosis in a 49-year-old woman 6 years after kidney transplantation. She presented with dyspnea, cough, and fatigue. Her chest CT scan revealed nodular opacities in the right upper lung. A fine needle aspirate biopsy culture yielded Phaeoacremonium and surgical pathology of the biopsy showed chronic inflammation. We successfully treated her with posaconazole and managed drug interactions between posaconazole and tacrolimus. This is the second reported case of biopsy-proven pulmonary infection by Phaeoacremonium in a kidney transplant recipient and successfully treated with posaconazole. PMID:24959182

  13. Adverse perinatal outcome and later kidney biopsy in the mother.

    PubMed

    Vikse, Bjørn Egil; Irgens, Lorentz M; Bostad, Leif; Iversen, Bjarne M

    2006-03-01

    Strong associations of adverse perinatal outcomes have been identified with later cardiovascular disease in the mother. Few studies have addressed associations with kidney disease. This study investigated whether perinatal outcomes are associated with later clinical kidney disease as diagnosed by kidney biopsy. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway contains data on all childbirths in Norway since 1967. The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry contains data on all kidney biopsies in Norway since 1988. All women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1998 were included. Pregnancy-related predictors of later kidney biopsy were analyzed by Cox regression analyses. A total of 756,420 women were included, and after a mean period of 15.9+/-9.4 yr, 588 had a kidney biopsy. Compared with women without preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of >or=2.5 kg, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had a relative risk (RR) for a later kidney biopsy of 1.7, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of <1.5 kg had an RR of 2.9, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of >or=2.5 kg had an RR of 2.5, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had an RR of 4.5, and women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of <1.5 kg had an RR of 17. Similar results were found in adjusted analyses and after exclusion of women with diabetes, kidney disease, or rheumatic disease before pregnancy. The same risk patterns applied to any of the specific categories of kidney disease as well as specific kidney diseases investigated. Women who have preeclampsia and give birth to offspring with low birth weight and short gestation have a substantially increased risk for having a later kidney biopsy.

  14. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Sanaz; Rahmati, Mohamad Reza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Gooran, Shahram; Alizadeh, Farimah; Khaki, Siavash; Mortazavi, Seyede Hamideh; Pourmand, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61%) patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8%) the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%). A total of 166 (41.5%) patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5%) had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2%) developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8%) remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45%) patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55%) didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  15. Kidney Exchange to Overcome Financial Barriers to Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rees, M A; Dunn, T B; Kuhr, C S; Marsh, C L; Rogers, J; Rees, S E; Cicero, A; Reece, L J; Roth, A E; Ekwenna, O; Fumo, D E; Krawiec, K D; Kopke, J E; Jain, S; Tan, M; Paloyo, S R

    2017-03-01

    Organ shortage is the major limitation to kidney transplantation in the developed world. Conversely, millions of patients in the developing world with end-stage renal disease die because they cannot afford renal replacement therapy-even when willing living kidney donors exist. This juxtaposition between countries with funds but no available kidneys and those with available kidneys but no funds prompts us to propose an exchange program using each nation's unique assets. Our proposal leverages the cost savings achieved through earlier transplantation over dialysis to fund the cost of kidney exchange between developed-world patient-donor pairs with immunological barriers and developing-world patient-donor pairs with financial barriers. By making developed-world health care available to impoverished patients in the developing world, we replace unethical transplant tourism with global kidney exchange-a modality equally benefitting rich and poor. We report the 1-year experience of an initial Filipino pair, whose recipient was transplanted in the United states with an American donor's kidney at no cost to him. The Filipino donor donated to an American in the United States through a kidney exchange chain. Follow-up care and medications in the Philippines were supported by funds from the United States. We show that the logistical obstacles in this approach, although considerable, are surmountable.

  16. The global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo G; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy

    2012-05-01

    World Kidney Day on 8 March 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost-effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation, and vaccination. Even in high-income countries, the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical, and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental, and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  17. Kidney transplant tourism: cases from Canada.

    PubMed

    Wright, L; Zaltzman, J S; Gill, J; Prasad, G V R

    2013-11-01

    Canada has a marked shortfall between the supply and demand for kidneys for transplantation. Median wait times for deceased donor kidney transplantation vary from 5.8 years in British Columbia, 5.2 years in Manitoba and 4.5 years in Ontario to a little over 2 years in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Living donation provides a viable option for some, but not all people. Consequently, a small number of people travel abroad to undergo kidney transplantation by commercial means. The extent to which they are aware of the potential risks to their health and the health of the kidney vendors is unclear. Travel abroad to obtain a kidney commercially i.e. transplant tourism (TT), raises ethical issues which include the exploitation of the poor, uncertainty of donor informed consent to nephrectomy, poor clinical care and lack of follow up for the donor, commodification of the body and inequity of access to medical care for donors. Also, TT widens socioeconomic disparities in access to transplantation, differing from the Canadian system of universal coverage for healthcare. The Canadian transplant community has discussed how to respond to patients who plan to travel abroad for TT or return with a purchased kidney. Unease rests in the tension between the duty to care for legitimate Canadian residents and the unwillingness to enable TT. This paper discusses three anonymized cases and the Canadian responses to TT as recorded in academic literature and a formal statement by relevant professional bodies.

  18. The Global role of kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guillermo Garcia; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy; For the World Kidney Day Steering Committee 2012

    2012-01-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit. PMID:24475391

  19. The global role of kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Harden, P.; Chapman, J.

    2012-01-01

    World Kidney Day on 8 March 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatments by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries, place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation, and vaccination. Even in high-income countries, the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical, and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental, and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the 1 million people a year who have a right to benefit. PMID:22787305

  20. Belatacept and mediastinal histoplasmosis in a kidney transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Rengel, Tatiana; Andrews, José; Paulero, Matías; Iotti, Alejandro; Forastiero, Agustina; Lombi, Fernando; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Forrester, Mariano; Iriarte, Romina; Agorio, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background: In transplantation immunosuppression enhances the appearance of opportunist infections. An ideal balance between the prevention of rejection, the lowest risk of infections and the highest rates of graft survival is a continuous challenge. Lower doses of immunosuppression may diminish the risk of infections, metabolic and hemodynamic complications or even of malignancy, but may expose patients to episodes of acute rejection. New drugs are being developed to improve graft survival at the lowest risk of side effects. Belatacept has recently been introduced in kidney transplantation to inhibit the co-ligand signal of T cell stimulation. It is a drug with a safe profile, is well-tolerated and appears to improve long-term survival of kidney grafts. However, there may be an increase in opportunistic infections which may be facilitated by T cell depression, as Aspergillus sp., Cryptococcus neoformans or tuberculosis. Case Presentation: We describe a 59-year-old female who developed fever, clinical wasting and a mediastinal mass 31 months after receiving a living non-related kidney transplant while on belatacept therapy. A mediastinal node biopsy disclosed the presence of Histoplasma capsulatum. Infection successfully resolved after appropriate antifungal treatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Histoplasma capsulatum in a kidney transplanted patient on belatacept therapy PMID:27152295

  1. [Current status and development of kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kirste, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the first successful procedure in 1954 kidney transplantation has become a standard therapy of end stage renal disease. The knowledge of immunoregulation and immune response of the body has enabled people to recognize acute rejection of organs. HLA-testing and organ exchange on basis of HLA-compatibility are extremely important for a successful kidney transplantation. A shortage of organs is limiting the further increase of transplantations. Chronic rejection is in most cases the reason for late graft failure. Further investigations to develop new immunosuppressive drugs and to clarify immunological processes underlying chronic rejections are necessary in the future.

  2. Kidney Transplant Outcomes After Primary, Repeat and Kidney After Nonrenal Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Puneet; Gao, Xiaotian; Mehta, Rajil; Landsittel, Douglas; Wu, Christine; Nusrat, Rabeeya; Puttarajappa, Chethan; Tevar, Amit D.; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvements in renal allograft outcomes have permitted kidney transplantation after prior kidney allograft failure as well as after nonrenal solid organ transplantation. This study compares renal allograft outcomes in the 3 groups, that is, primary, repeat, and kidney after nonrenal solid organ transplantation, where transplant group was coded as a time-dependent variable. Methods We retrospectively reviewed registry data for kidney transplant recipients at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center from January 2000 to December 2011. We compared overall graft survival between the 3 groups using Cox regression modeling. We calculated 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival and half-lives for each group where feasible. Results The study cohort (N = 2014) consisted of group A (primary kidney transplant, n = 1578, with 7923.2 years of follow-up time), group B (repeat kidney transplant, n = 314, with 1566.7 years of follow-up time) and group C (kidney post-nonrenal solid organ transplant, n = 176, with 844.8 years of follow-up time). Of the 1578 patients in the primary kidney transplant group, 74 later received a repeat transplant and thus also have follow-up counted in the repeat kidney transplant group. The median follow-up was 56, 53, and 55 months, respectively. The 5-year actuarial and death-censored graft survival was 68.69%, 68.79%, and 66.48% and 65.53%, 67.68%, and 62.92%, respectively (P = 0.70). There was no difference in overall graft survival in the Cox-adjusted analysis (group B: odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.26; P = 0.79; group C: odds ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.23; P = 0.76). Conclusions The adjusted kidney graft survivals in the 3 groups were similar. PMID:27500265

  3. Outcomes of shipped live donor kidney transplants compared with traditional living donor kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Treat, Eric G; Miller, Eric T; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Maliski, Sally L; Hicks, Elisabeth M; Williams, Kristen C; Whitted, Lauren A; Gritsch, Hans A; McGuire, Suzanne M; Mone, Thomas D; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    The disparity between kidney transplant candidates and donors necessitates innovations to increase organ availability. Transporting kidneys allows for living donors and recipients to undergo surgery with a familiar transplant team, city, friends, and family. The effect of shipping kidneys and prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) with living donor transplantation outcomes is not clearly known. This retrospective matched (age, gender, race, and year of procedure) cohort study compared allograft outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants and nonshipped living donor kidney transplants. Fifty-seven shipped live donor kidneys were transplanted from 31 institutions in 26 cities. The mean shipping distance was 1634 miles (range 123-2811) with mean CIT of 12.1 ± 2.8 h. The incidence of delayed graft function in the shipped cohort was 1.8% (1/57) compared to 0% (0/57) in the nonshipped cohort. The 1-year allograft survival was 98% in both cohorts. There were no significant differences between the mean serum creatinine values or the rates of serum creatinine decline in the immediate postoperative period even after adjusted for gender and differences in recipient and donor BMI. Despite prolonged CITs, outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants were similar when compared to matched nonshipped living donor kidney transplants.

  4. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-09-03

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation.

  5. Metallothionein in rabbit kidneys preserved for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elinder, C G; Lundgren, G; Nordberg, M; Palm, B; Piscator, M

    1984-03-01

    Thirteen rabbits were given repeated cadmium injections to achieve cadmium concentrations in kidney cortex ranging from 0.05 to 1 mmole Cd/kg wet weight. Another four animals served as controls. One kidney from each animal was frozen directly to -70 degrees C whereas the other kidney was kept for 24 hr at +4 degrees C in a preservative (Sachs' solution) to simulate conditions for preservation of human donor kidneys before transplantation. Protein binding of cadmium, zinc and copper in kidney homogenates and the concentration of metallothionein (MT) were measured in the kidney that was frozen directly and in the kidney that had been preserved. No gross differences in either the protein binding of cadmium, zinc and copper or in the MT content were seen between the directly frozen and preserved kidneys from the same animal. This indicates that MT is not rapidly broken down in rabbit kidneys which have been preserved similarly to human donor kidneys for 24 hr in a standard preservative solution prior to a transplantation.

  6. Incidence of kidney stones in kidney transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Jaffer Sathick, Insara J; Dhondup, Tsering; Erickson, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the incidence and characteristics of kidney stones in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the inception of the databases through March 2016. Studies assessing the incidence of kidney stones in kidney transplant recipients were included. We applied a random-effects model to estimate the incidence of kidney stones. RESULTS Twenty one studies with 64416 kidney transplant patients were included in the analyses to assess the incidence of kidney stones after kidney transplantation. The estimated incidence of kidney stones was 1.0% (95%CI: 0.6%-1.4%). The mean duration to diagnosis of kidney stones after kidney transplantation was 28 ± 22 mo. The mean age of patients with kidney stones was 42 ± 7 years. Within reported studies, approximately 50% of kidney transplant recipients with kidney stones were males. 67% of kidney stones were calcium-based stones (30% mixed CaOx/CaP, 27%CaOx and 10%CaP), followed by struvite stones (20%) and uric acid stones (13%). CONCLUSION The estimated incidence of kidney stones in patients after kidney transplantation is 1.0%. Although calcium based stones are the most common kidney stones after transplantation, struvite stones (also known as “infection stones”) are not uncommon in kidney transplant recipients. These findings may impact the prevention and clinical management of kidney stones after kidney transplantation. PMID:28058231

  7. Cardiac toxoplasmosis after heart transplantation diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy.

    PubMed

    Petty, L A; Qamar, S; Ananthanarayanan, V; Husain, A N; Murks, C; Potter, L; Kim, G; Pursell, K; Fedson, S

    2015-10-01

    We describe a case of cardiac toxoplasmosis diagnosed by routine endomyocardial biopsy in a patient with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) intolerance on atovaquone prophylaxis. Data are not available on the efficacy of atovaquone as Toxoplasma gondii prophylaxis after heart transplantation. In heart transplant patients in whom TMP-SMX is not an option, other strategies may be considered, including the addition of pyrimethamine to atovaquone.

  8. [Kidney donors and kidney transplantation in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Giessing, M; Conrad, S; Schönberger, B; Huland, H; Budde, K; Neumayer, H-H; Loening, S A

    2004-08-01

    The likelihood of terminal renal insufficiency escalates with age, increasing the risk of dying as a patient requiring dialysis. In 1999, Eurotransplant initiated the Eurotransplant Senior Programm (ESP), in which the kidneys of old donors (>64 years) are allocated to recipients 64 years and older. Allocation does not take HLA-matching into account and is performed regionally only according to blood-group-compatibility to keep the storage time short. As a consequence of the short ischemic time, and thus reduced non-immunological damage to the anyways susceptible old kidney, graft-function and graft-survival in the ESP are very good. The results of the initial 5 years of this program show that it successfully utilizes more kidneys from old donors and that more old recipients are being transplanted, with a satisfactory graft-function. Increased donor- and/or recipient age require a thorough evaluation to exclude malignant and other diseases. Furthermore, short term controls on the waiting list and following kidney transplantation are prerequisites for successful transplantation in the aged recipient. If this is guaranteed, kidney transplantation in the old recipient-even with old donor organs-is a good alternative to the morbidity of a prolonged dialysis. Nevertheless, the role of HLA-matching should be reconsidered to reduce rejections.

  9. Myoglobin cast nephropathy in a kidney transplant patient with normal creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira da Fonseca, Elissa; Jittirat, Arksarapuk; Birdwell, Kelly A; Fogo, Agnes B

    2015-04-01

    Delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients is a known complication associated with increased risk of acute rejection and reduced transplant survival after 1 year. There are multiple risk factors, including prolonged cold ischemia time, donor age, and cause of donor's death. Major causes of delayed graft function are acute kidney injury in the donor, often from prolonged terminal ischemia, reflected by acute tubular injury in the recipient. However, the differential diagnosis of delayed graft function includes acute rejection, recurrence of the primary glomerular diseases, and other less commonly encountered conditions. A transplant kidney biopsy usually is required to elucidate the correct cause and initiate the right treatment, which is crucial for transplant survival. We report a case of a transplant recipient who developed delayed graft function due to an uncommon cause. After correct diagnosis, the patient's transplant function improved.

  10. Pregnancy management of women with kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Dávid Ágoston; Szabó, László; Jenei, Katalin; Fedor, Roland; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Kabai, Krisztina; Záhonyi, Anita; Asztalos, László; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    Women with renal disease, besides many dysfunctions, face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy due to uremia and changes of the hormonal functions. After renal transplantation, sexual dysfunction improves, providing the possibility of successful pregnancy for women of childbearing age. However, kidney transplanted patients are high-risk pregnant patients with increased maternal and fetal risks, and the graft also may be compromised during pregnancy; most studies report on several successive deliveries due to multidisciplinary team management. In clinical practice, the graft is rarely affected during the period of gestation. Fetal development disorders are also rare although preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation are common. For now, several studies and clinical investigations proved that, under multidisciplinary control, kidney transplanted female patients are also possible to have safe pregnancy and successful delivery. There are conflicting data in the literature about the prevention of complications and the timing of pregnancy. Herein, we would like to present some experience of our centre. A total of 847 kidney transplantations have been performed between June 1993 and December 2013 with 163 childbearing aged females (18-45 years) in our center. We report on three kidney transplanted patients who have given birth to healthy newborns. In our practice, severe complications have not been observed.

  11. Pregnancy management of women with kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Dávid ágoston; Szabó, László; Jenei, Katalin; Fedor, Roland; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Kabai, Krisztina; Záhonyi, Anita; Asztalos, László; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease, besides many dysfunctions, face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy due to uremia and changes of the hormonal functions. After renal transplantation, sexual dysfunction improves, providing the possibility of successful pregnancy for women of childbearing age. However, kidney transplanted patients are high-risk pregnant patients with increased maternal and fetal risks, and the graft also may be compromised during pregnancy; most studies report on several successive deliveries due to multidisciplinary team management. In clinical practice, the graft is rarely affected during the period of gestation. Fetal development disorders are also rare although preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation are common. For now, several studies and clinical investigations proved that, under multidisciplinary control, kidney transplanted female patients are also possible to have safe pregnancy and successful delivery. There are conflicting data in the literature about the prevention of complications and the timing of pregnancy. Herein, we would like to present some experience of our centre. A total of 847 kidney transplantations have been performed between June 1993 and December 2013 with 163 childbearing aged females (18–45 years) in our center. We report on three kidney transplanted patients who have given birth to healthy newborns. In our practice, severe complications have not been observed. PMID:26767122

  12. [The kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors].

    PubMed

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dashkova, N G; Salimov, É L

    2012-01-01

    The experience of 28 allotransplantations of ABO-incompatible kidneys was compared with the treatment results of 38 ABO-compatible renal transplantations. The transplanted kidney function, morphological changes of the transplanted kidney and the comparative analysis of actuary survival in both groups showed no significant difference. The results of the study prove the validity of the kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors.

  13. Robotic kidney implantation for kidney transplantation: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Monika E; Pugin, Francois; Bucher, Pascal; Fasel, Jean; Markar, Sheraz; Morel, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    Despite improvements in minimally invasive techniques over recent decades, kidney implantation into the iliac fossa has remained a domain of open surgery. However, it was hypothesized that it would be feasible to perform robotic transplant kidney implantation as a means of reducing surgical trauma. Two robotic kidney transplantations into the iliac fossa were attempted in human cadavers. In the first cadaver, a 5 cm incision was placed in the right lower abdomen, the peritoneum was mobilized in a cranial direction, the iliac vessels were identified, and the kidney placed in the pre-peritoneal space. The incision was sealed with a gel port through which the Vinci(©) Surgical System was installed. In the second cadaver, a robotic kidney implantation with robotically sutured vascular and ureteric anastomoses was performed trans-abdominally. Open incision, identification, placement of gel port, and robotic docking were feasible. Robotic performance of vascular anastomosis was not possible in the first cadaver because of advanced decay and excess fat in the surgical field. Robotic kidney positioning was feasible and anastomoses were performed successfully in the second cadaver within 35, 25, and 20 min (arterial, venous, and ureteric, respectively). Robotic kidney transplantation seems feasible in human cadavers if tissue condition is suitable, but is very technically challenging. Because of the delicacy of anatomical structures, the cadaveric model with the risk of advanced decay and the absence of circulation sets limits on the exploration of this complex procedure. Hence, further research and animal work in this area is critical to improve understanding of the benefits and limitations of robotic kidney implantation.

  14. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2016-04-21

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population.

  15. Effect of kidney transplantation on bone.

    PubMed

    Kodras, K; Haas, M

    2006-08-01

    A broad range of different factors aggravates renal osteodystrophy, which is present in virtually all patients with chronic kidney disease and after successful kidney transplantation. Altered hormonal status, including sex hormones and parathyroid hormone (PTH), a deficit of 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D(3) (calcitriol), immunosuppressive therapy and post-operative immobilization contribute to a progressive loss of bone density and structure. The decrease of bone mass is particularly prominent during the first 6 months after kidney transplantation and is associated with an increased number of fractures, both compared with the normal population as well as with dialysis patients. At particular risk are patients with a history of diabetes, long duration of haemodialysis and post-menopausal women. To prevent post-transplant bone loss prescription of steroids should be minimized and withdrawn as early as possible. Additional intake of alpha-calcidol [25(OH) vitamin D(3)] or calcitriol, despite normal serum levels, reduces persistent hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation, improves intestinal calcium absorption and activates osteoblasts. Inhibition of osteoclasts by biphosphonate therapy seems to effectively reverse bone loss during the early and late course of kidney transplantation. However, as the majority of transplant recipients have a low-turnover bone disease, inhibition of osteoclasts, through which bone turnover is impaired, might further reduce osteoblast activity and promote osteoid synthesis. Most investigations were small-scale studies with 10-100 participants and a follow up of only 12 months. This makes conclusions on the effect of any intervention on the fracture rate impossible. Larger, randomized multicentre studies investigating bone-sparing therapy on hard end points are therefore advocated.

  16. New Solutions to Reduce Discard of Kidneys Donated for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reese, Peter P; Harhay, Meera N; Abt, Peter L; Levine, Matthew H; Halpern, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is a cost-saving treatment that extends the lives of patients with ESRD. Unfortunately, the kidney transplant waiting list has ballooned to over 100,000 Americans. Across large areas of the United States, many kidney transplant candidates spend over 5 years waiting and often die before undergoing transplantation. However, more than 2500 kidneys (>17% of the total recovered from deceased donors) were discarded in 2013, despite evidence that many of these kidneys would provide a survival benefit to wait-listed patients. Transplant leaders have focused attention on transplant center report cards as a likely cause for this discard problem, although that focus is too narrow. In this review, we examine the risks associated with accepting various categories of donated kidneys, including discarded kidneys, compared with the risk of remaining on dialysis. With the goal of improving access to kidney transplant, we describe feasible proposals to increase acceptance of currently discarded organs.

  17. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  18. Paired kidney exchange transplantation: Maximizing the donor pool

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Sethi, S.; Bansal, S. B.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, paired kidney exchange (PKE) transplantation has gained popularity worldwide as a viable alternative for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who have incompatible or sensitized donors. This study presents our experience with PKE transplantation and compares outcome between PKE and non-PKE renal transplant recipients. Between February 2010 and November 2013, 742 transplants were performed, of which 26 (3.5%) were PKE transplantations. All were two-way exchanges. PKE recipients were significantly older than non-PKE (46.73 ± 9.71 vs. 40.08 ± 13.36 years; P = 0.012) while donor ages were comparable. PKE patients had significantly higher number of HLA mismatches (5.03 ± 1.14 vs. 3.49 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 3–47 months), there was no significant difference in patient survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.65%; P = 0.596) and death censored graft survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.37%; P = 1). Mean serum creatinine at 1 month and at last follow-up was lower in PKE versus non-PKE group (0.98 ± 0.33 vs. 1.3 ± 0.61 mg/dl; P = 0.008 and 0.96 ± 0.30 vs. 1.27 ± 0.57 mg/dl, P = 0.006, respectively). Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 11.5% in PKE group and 16.89% in non-PKE patients (P = 0.6). To conclude, paired kidney donation is an excellent way of increasing the donor pool and needs to be promoted to overcome the shortage of suitable kidney in our country. PMID:26664210

  19. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found.

  20. Evaluation of kidney transplantation programmes using system simulation.

    PubMed

    Devi, S Prasanna; Kumar, S Saravana; Rao, K Suryaprakasa

    2012-06-01

    In the case of kidney transplantations, there is always a serious imbalance between the number of kidneys donated for transplantation and the number of persons wishing to receive a transplant. This not only affects the quality of life of those unable to obtain a transplant, but it also has important repercussions on the treatment of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) by transplantation and dialysis. Also there are a number of ways in which the kidney transplantation can be achieved, such as the cadaveric kidney transplantation, live donor kidney transplantation, kidney paired donation and list exchange. A simulation study of all the referred programmes is performed using simulation models developed for each programme to obtain the better estimate of the average waiting time of a patient per year. With the estimates given by the simulation models, the best serving programme for each blood type patient is selected, declared and recommended.

  1. Thoracic radiology in kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Joel E; Rabkin, John M

    2002-04-01

    Renal transplantation accounts for more than half of all solid organ transplants performed in the U.S., and the liver is the second most commonly transplanted solid organ. Although abdominal imaging procedures are commonplace in these patients, there has been relatively little attention paid to thoracic imaging applications. Preoperative imaging is crucial to aid in the exclusion of infectious or malignant disease. In the perioperative time period, thoracic imaging focuses both on standard intensive care unit care, including monitoring devices and their complications, and on the early infections that can occur. Postoperative management is divided into three time periods, and the principles governing the occurrence of infections and malignancies are reviewed. Anatomic and pathologic aspects unique to kidney and liver transplantation patients are also discussed.

  2. Kidney transplantation in Canada, 1981-84.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, J R; Hutchinson, T A; Arbus, G S; Posen, G A

    1986-01-01

    The Canadian Renal Failure Register was established in 1980. Data have been collected annually for all Canadian patients in whom irreversible kidney failure developed and who required dialysis or transplantation. The authors present actuarial patient and graft survival rates for 1981-84. In 1984, patients with a functioning renal graft accounted for 43.9% of the patients with end-stage renal disease. The number of transplants performed increased from 482 in 1981 to 662 in 1984; however, 1,022 patients undergoing dialysis (25.2%) were on an active waiting list for a transplant at the end of 1984. Greater effort is needed to increase the transplantation rate. PMID:3530420

  3. Follicular T helper cells and humoral reactivity in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    de Graav, G N; Dieterich, M; Hesselink, D A; Boer, K; Clahsen-van Groningen, M C; Kraaijeveld, R; Litjens, N H R; Bouamar, R; Vanderlocht, J; Tilanus, M; Houba, I; Boonstra, A; Roelen, D L; Claas, F H J; Betjes, M G H; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells play a pivotal role in alloreactivity in kidney transplantation. Follicular T helper (Tfh) cells play an important role in the differentiation of B cells into immunoglobulin-producing plasmablasts [through interleukin (IL)-21]. It is unclear to what extent this T cell subset regulates humoral alloreactivity in kidney transplant patients, therefore we investigated the absolute numbers and function of peripheral Tfh cells (CD4POSCXCR5POS T cells) in patients before and after transplantation. In addition, we studied their relationship with the presence of donor-specific anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA), and the presence of Tfh cells in rejection biopsies. After transplantation peripheral Tfh cell numbers remained stable, while their IL-21-producing capacity decreased under immunosuppression. When isolated after transplantation, peripheral Tfh cells still had the capacity to induce B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which could be inhibited by an IL-21-receptor-antagonist. After transplantation the quantity of Tfh cells was the highest in patients with pre-existent DSA. In kidney biopsies taken during rejection, Tfh cells co-localized with B cells and immunoglobulins in follicular-like structures. Our data on Tfh cells in kidney transplantation demonstrate that Tfh cells may mediate humoral alloreactivity, which is also seen in the immunosuppressed milieu. PMID:25557528

  4. Failure of isolated kidney transplantation in a pediatric patient with primary hyperoxaluria type 2.

    PubMed

    Naderi, GholamHossein; Latif, AmirHossein; Tabassomi, Firouzeh; Esfahani, Seyed Taher

    2014-05-01

    PH type 2 is caused by decreased activity of GRHPR enzyme that eventually leads to ESRD and systemic oxalosis. Here, we describe an Iranian pediatric patient with PH2 and early ESRD development who received recommended treatment by undergoing isolated kidney transplantation. Diagnosis criteria included a history of reoccurring calcium oxalate renal stones and elevated oxalate levels combined with liver biopsy and decreased enzymatic activity at age five. ESRD prompted transplantation and was performed at age nine. On Day 12 post-op, his serum creatinine level increased. A graft biopsy showed calcium oxalate crystal deposits in renal tubes with no evidence of acute rejection, which resolved with intensive hydration and administration of a potassium citrate solution. Subsequent biopsies confirmed results found in first biopsy. Despite the immunosuppressive therapy, his serum creatinine level increased again after 11 months. Renal tubular obstruction then led to graft nephrectomy. Pathological analysis of tissue confirmed findings of past biopsies. This was a very rare case of early ESRD in PH2 resulting in a failed isolated kidney transplant. As the GRHPR enzyme is predominantly expressed in liver, we suggest a combined liver-kidney transplant may be beneficial in patients with PH2.

  5. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  6. [Calcification in nonfunctioning transplanted kidneys].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Sánchez, R J; Fernández, E J; Peces, C

    2007-01-01

    Failed renal allografts often are left in situ in patients who revert to chronic dialysis therapy or who undergo retransplantation. These organs may be the site of massive calcification despite their lack of physiological function. Calcification of an endstage renal allograft is sometimes found incidentally. We report here two patients who developed extensive calcification of the renal graft, one was on chronic hemodialysis and the other had a second renal transplantation with normal renal function. The precise pathogenesis of calcification and the factors which determine its tissue localization are unclear. Factors postulated to promote the development of metastatic calcification include an elevated calcium phosphate product, severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, aluminium toxicity and duration of dialytic therapy. In some cases local factors related with the chronic inflammatory rejection process are probably involved as well. However, the exact relative contribution of these factors remains unresolved. Unless specific clinical indications are present, transplant nephrectomy is not necessary for calcified end-stage renal allografts.

  7. The case for pancreas after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Mangus, Richard S; Hollinger, Edward F; Taber, Tim E; Goble, Michelle L; Mohler, Elaine; Milgrom, Martin L; Powelson, John A

    2009-01-01

    Pancreas after kidney (PAK) transplantation has historically demonstrated inferior pancreas allograft survival compared to simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Under our current immunosuppression protocol, we have noted excellent outcomes and rare immunological graft loss. The goal of this study was to compare pancreas allograft survival in PAK and SPK recipients using this regimen. This was a single center retrospective review of all SPK and PAK transplants performed between January 2003 and November 2007. All transplants were performed with systemic venous drainage and enteric exocrine drainage. Immunosuppression included induction with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (thymoglobulin), early steroid withdrawal, and maintenance with tacrolimus and sirolimus or mycophenolate mofetil. Study end points included graft and patient survival and immunosuppression related complications. Transplants included PAK 61 (30%) and SPK 142 (70%). One-yr patient survival was PAK 98% and SPK 95% (p = 0.44) and pancreas graft survival was PAK 95% and SPK 90% (p = 0.28). Acute cellular rejection was uncommon with 2% requiring treatment in each group. Survival for PAK using thymoglobulin induction, early steroid withdrawal and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression is at least comparable to SPK and should be pursued in the recipient with a potential living donor.

  8. The transcriptome of the implant biopsy identifies donor kidneys at increased risk of delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T F; Reeve, J; Jhangri, G S; Mengel, M; Jacaj, Z; Cairo, L; Obeidat, M; Todd, G; Moore, R; Famulski, K S; Cruz, J; Wishart, D; Meng, C; Sis, B; Solez, K; Kaplan, B; Halloran, P F

    2008-01-01

    Improved assessment of donor organ quality at time of transplantation would help in management of potentially usable organs. The transcriptome might correlate with risk of delayed graft function (DGF) better than conventional risk factors. Microarray results of 87 consecutive implantation biopsies taken postreperfusion in 42 deceased (DD) and 45 living (LD) donor kidneys were compared to clinical and histopathology-based scores. Unsupervised analysis separated the 87 kidneys into three groups: LD, DD1 and DD2. Kidneys in DD2 had a greater incidence of DGF (38.1 vs. 9.5%, p < 0.05) than those in DD1. Clinical and histopathological risk scores did not discriminate DD1 from DD2. A total of 1051 transcripts were differentially expressed between DD1 and DD2, but no transcripts separated DGF from immediate graft function (adjusted p < 0.01). Principal components analysis revealed a continuum from LD to DD1 to DD2, i.e. from best to poorest functioning kidneys. Within DD kidneys, the odds ratio for DGF was significantly increased with a transcriptome-based score and recipient age (p < 0.03) but not with clinical or histopathologic scores. The transcriptome reflects kidney quality and susceptibility to DGF better than available clinical and histopathological scoring systems.

  9. BK Virus in Recipients of Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1971, the BK virus, a human polyomavirus, has emerged as a significant cause of renal dysfunction and transplant graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Improved screening methods have been effective in assisting in the early identification of the virus, and thus, prompt intervention to prevent the progression of the disease. Treatment options for the virus are limited; therefore, lowering immunosuppressive medications should be considered the first line of treatment. Current adjunctive therapies are not guaranteed to control the viral activity and may have limited therapeutic value.

  10. Delayed Graft Function 5 Months After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Tim; Pries, Alexandra; Kapischke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Delayed kidney graft function Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor kidney transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Delayed graft function is a clinical term to describe the failure of the transplanted kidney to function immediately after transplantation. Case Report: A 59-year-old woman suffered from a rare case of delayed graft function lasting 148 days after unrelated living donor kidney transplantation. Until now, 15 years after transplantation, organ function is still good, with serum creatinine levels about 1.4 to 2.0 mg/dl. Conclusions: Even after prolonged graft dysfunction, good graft function can be achieved. PMID:26915643

  11. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values.

  12. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting.

  13. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  14. [Antibiotic prophylaxis before kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gallego, E; Anaya, F; Franco, A; Valderrábano, F

    1990-02-01

    The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period of renal transplantation (RT). Before RT, the patients were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: 1) cefotaxime (intravenous infusion of 1 g one hour before the operation). 2) Ceftriaxone (1 g i.v. given in a similar way). 3) Control (without antibiotics). Patients who required antibiotic therapy during the first 3 postoperative weeks were excluded. 20 recipients of cadaveric renal grafts were included in each group. There were 39 males and 21 females with a mean age of 39.9 years. One patient from the cefotaxime group (5%), 2 from the ceftriaxone group (10%) and 2 from the control group (10%) developed infection of the surgical wound, all due to grampositive organisms. 19 patients had urinary tract infections: 7 from the control group (35%), 7 from the cefotaxime group (35%), and 5 from the ceftriaxone group (25%). The development of wound infection was not correlated with urea, creatinine, hemoglobin or total protein levels, or with urinary tract infection or fistula, diabetes or fever. The mean packed red cell volume of the patients who developed wound infection was 24.7 +/- 1.2 vs 28.6 +/- 6.6 in those who did not (p less than 0.01). All patients with visible hematoma and 3 of 10 with perirenal blood collection had wound infection. It was concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis for renal transplantation was useless in our patients.

  15. Living unrelated donor kidney transplantation between spouses.

    PubMed

    Haberal, M; Gulay, H; Tokyay, R; Oner, Z; Enunlu, T; Bilgin, N

    1992-01-01

    From November 3, 1975 to November 3, 1990, 874 kidney transplants were performed at out centers. Of these, 675 (77.2%) were from living donors and 199 (22.8%) were from cadaver donors. Five hundred eighty (66.4%) of the living donors were first degree related while 99 (11.3%) were unrelated or second degree related donors, 29 of which were spouses. All donor recipient pairs were ABO-compatible, with the exception of one pair. Donor recipient relations were wife to husband in 25 cases and husband to wife in 4 cases. All were first grafts and started functioning during surgery. In this series, the follow-up for the recipients was 4 to 64 months (mean 33.5 +/- 4.5 months). One-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 81.9%, respectively. Two-year patient survival and graft survival rates were 92.4% and 78.2%, respectively. The single ABO-incompatible case is also doing well, 21 months postoperatively. This study demonstrates that the interspouse kidney transplantation may be used when cadaver organ shortage is a problem. While providing the couple with a better quality of life, interspouse kidney transplantation also enables the couple to share the joy of giving and receiving the "gift of life" from one another.

  16. [The duration of action of vecuronium in five patients after kidney transplantation--comparison with that during kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Takita, K; Mashio, H; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Kemmotsu, O

    1995-06-01

    We compared the duration of vecuronium action in five patients after the kidney transplantation with that during kidney transplantation. After the transplantation, three patients required no hemodialysis therapy but two patients underwent hemodialysis therapy again. In all these five patients, including patients who were back to hemodialysis therapy, the durations of vecuronium action after receiving transplanted kidney were shorter than those during kidney transplantation. These shortened durations are speculated to be mainly due to excretion of vecuronium by the transplanted kidney and the effect of long term steroid therapy. However in this study the durations of vecuronium action in patients who required further hemodialysis therapy were also shorter than those during kidney transplantation. To determine whether this is a common or exceptional phenomenon, further evaluation should be needed.

  17. Fatal cutaneous mucormycosis after kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Davuodi, Setareh; Manshadi, Seyed Ali Dehghan; Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Yazdi, Farhad; Khazravi, Mona; Fazli, Jafar Taghizade

    2015-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic infection that is caused by Mucorales from the Zygomycetes class. Patients with severe immunodeficiency admitted to the hospital are at greatest risk for developing this infection. Mucormycosis usually is transmitted in humans by inhalation or inoculation of spores in the skin or mucous membranes. A 66-year-old man developed a surgical wound infection at 1 week after kidney transplant that did not improve despite broad-spectrum antibiotics and debridement. He was transferred to our hospital 45 days after transplant and had fever and a large purulent wound that was surrounded by a black necrotizing margin. Immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued and the dosage of prednisolone was decreased. Massive debridement was performed but was incomplete because he had full-thickness abdominal wall necrosis. Histopathology showed broad fungal hyphae without septation, consistent with the diagnosis of mucormycosis. Despite antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and additional debridement, the patient died of septic shock at 52 days after kidney transplant. Cutaneous fungal infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any nonhealing infected wound that does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in patients with predisposing risk factors such as transplant.

  18. Human skin carcinoma arising from kidney transplant-derived tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Verneuil, Laurence; Varna, Mariana; Ratajczak, Philippe; Leboeuf, Christophe; Plassa, Louis-François; Elbouchtaoui, Morad; Schneider, Pierre; Sandid, Wissam; Lebbé, Celeste; Peraldi, Marie-Noelle; Sigaux, François; de Thé, Hugues; Janin, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Tumor cells with donor genotype have been identified in human skin cancer after allogeneic transplantation; however, the donor contribution to the malignant epithelium has not been established. Kidney transplant recipients have an increased risk of invasive skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is associated with accumulation of the tumor suppressor p53 and TP53 mutations. In 21 skin SCCs from kidney transplant recipients, we systematically assessed p53 expression and donor/recipient origin in laser-microdissected p53+ tumor cells. In one patient, molecular analyses demonstrated that skin tumor cells had the donor genotype and harbored a TP53 mutation in codon 175. In a kidney graft biopsy performed 7 years before the skin SCC diagnosis, we found p53+ cells in the renal tubules. We identified the same TP53 mutation in these p53+ epithelial cells from the kidney transplant. These findings provide evidence for a donor epithelial cell contribution to the malignant skin epithelium in the recipient in the setting of allogeneic kidney transplantation. This finding has theoretical implications for cancer initiation and progression and clinical implications in the context of prolonged immunosuppression and longer survival of kidney transplant patients.

  19. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper.

  20. Incidence and Risk Factors of Persistent Hyperparathyroidism After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakai, K; Fujii, H; Ishimura, T; Fujisawa, M; Nishi, S

    Persistent hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation is related to graft function, but pre-transplantation risk factors of persistent hyperparathyroidism have not been evaluated in detail. We enrolled 86 patients who had undergone kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2014. Nine patients showed persistent hyperparathyroidism characterized by the following: 1) serum parathyroid hormone levels >65 pg/mL and serum calcium levels >10.5 mg/dL at 1 year after kidney transplantation; 2) parathyroidectomy after kidney transplantation; and 3) reintroduction of cinacalcet after kidney transplantation. Compared with other patients, these 9 patients had significantly longer duration of dialysis therapy (186 ± 74 mo vs 57 ± 78 mo) and more frequent treatment with cinacalcet during dialysis (89% vs 12%). Multivariate analysis showed that dialysis vintage, calcium phosphate products, and cinacalcet use before kidney transplantation were independent risk factors of persistent hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation. A receiver operating characteristic curve showed 72 months as the cutoff value of dialysis vintage and 55 as the cutoff value of calcium phosphate products. In conclusion, dialysis vintage >6 years, calcium phosphate products >55 (mg/dL)(2), and cinacalcet use before kidney transplantation are strong predictors of persistent hyperparathyroidism. High-risk patients should be evaluated for parathyroid enlargement, and parathyroidectomy must be considered before kidney transplantation.

  1. Arteriolar hyalinization in implantation kidney biopsies as a predictor of graft function.

    PubMed

    Wazna, E; Pazik, J; Perkowska-Ptasińska, A; Lewandowski, Z; Nazarewski, S; Chmura, A; Durlik, M

    2009-10-01

    The shortage of organs suitable for transplantation has caused a constant evolution of donor acceptance criteria, making an implantation biopsy a valuable tool to predict kidney allograft survival. Preimplantation vascular changes may be divided into sclerosis or intimal fibrous thickening or arteriolar hyalinization. Increasing evidence has indicated their impact on graft function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of preimplantation arteriolar hyalinization for the stability of kidney allograft function. Among a prospective cohort study of 53 kidney recipients (implantation: 2006-2007) who showed serum creatinine values between 1 and 2 mg/dL at 3 months after engraftment, the mean observation time was 24 +/- 8.7 months. At the end of the observation, kidney function as defined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (eGFR C-G) was significantly diminished in individuals with preimplantation evidences of arteriolar hyalinization (mean values: 51.2 +/- 14.8 and 62.0 +/- 16.7, respectively; P < .03) or serum creatinine concentrations (1.76 +/- 0.36 vs 1.51 +/- 0.48 mg/dL; P < .09). The negative influence of arteriolar hyalinosis on allograft function was time-dependent; an early satisfactory filtration rate did not preclude progressive kidney dysfunction.

  2. En bloc transplantation of horseshoe kidney in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jun Bae; Lee, Jae Myeong; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Lee, Kyo Won; Park, Jae Berm; Kim, Sung Joo

    2017-01-01

    Transplantation of the horseshoe kidney can be performed en bloc or split into 2 grafts according to the vascular anomaly and the existence of the urinary collecting system in isthmus. From 2011 to 2014, there were 3 horseshoe kidney transplantations in Korea and transplantations were performed at 2 different centers. The transplantations were carried out successfully for all recipients without complications. All recipients have shown good graft kidney function after transplantation. No severe complication was revealed during follow-up period. We described the surgical technique used in the en bloc method to overcome various vascular anomalies and difficulties in choosing cannulation site and postoperative complications. En bloc transplantation of a horseshoe kidney is a useful strategy for patients with end-stage renal disease, and can provide favorable outcomes compared to the transplantation of a normal kidney. PMID:28289672

  3. En bloc transplantation of horseshoe kidney in Korea.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jun Bae; Lee, Jae Myeong; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Lee, Kyo Won; Park, Jae Berm; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Su Hyung

    2017-03-01

    Transplantation of the horseshoe kidney can be performed en bloc or split into 2 grafts according to the vascular anomaly and the existence of the urinary collecting system in isthmus. From 2011 to 2014, there were 3 horseshoe kidney transplantations in Korea and transplantations were performed at 2 different centers. The transplantations were carried out successfully for all recipients without complications. All recipients have shown good graft kidney function after transplantation. No severe complication was revealed during follow-up period. We described the surgical technique used in the en bloc method to overcome various vascular anomalies and difficulties in choosing cannulation site and postoperative complications. En bloc transplantation of a horseshoe kidney is a useful strategy for patients with end-stage renal disease, and can provide favorable outcomes compared to the transplantation of a normal kidney.

  4. TRANSPLANTATION IN MASS OF THE KIDNEYS

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis

    1908-01-01

    Among so many etiological factors, it is impossible to discriminate which are responsible for the complications which took place in our experiments. An attempt to explain the occurrence of nephritis, cedema or calcification of the arterial system, for instance, will not be made, but the technique of the operations will be modified in order to suppress as much as possible the causes which may originate these secondary changes. The purpose of this article was not to analyze minutely the physiological or pathological character of the functions of transplanted kidneys, but merely to ascertain whether these functions are efficiently reëstablished. It is to be concluded that an animal which has undergone a double nephrectomy and the grafting of both kidneys from another animal can secrete almost normal urine with his new organs, and live in good health at least for a few weeks. This demonstrates that it is possible to reëstablish efficiently the functions of transplanted kidneys. PMID:19867126

  5. Acute oxalate nephropathy following kidney transplantation: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Diana; Gheissari, Alaleh; Shaabani, Pooria; Tabibian, Seyed Reza; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Seirafian, Shiva; Merrikhi, Alireza; Fesharakizadeh, Mehdi; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2015-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposition is a common finding immediately after kidney transplantation. However, small depositions of CaOx could be benign while extensive depositions lead to poor graft outcome. Here we report three cases with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), bilateral nephrolithiasis, and unknown diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) who underwent a renal transplant and experienced an early-onset graft failure. Although an acute rejection was suspected, renal allograft biopsies and subsequent allograft nephrectomies showed extensive CaOx deposition, which raised a suspicion of PH. Even though increased urinary excretion of CaOx was found in all patients, this diagnosis could be confirmed with further tests including genetic study and metabolic assay. In conclusion, massive CaOx deposition in kidney allograft is an important cause of poor allograft survival and needs special management. Furthermore, our cases suggest patients with ESRD and a history of nephrolithiasis should be screened for elevated urinary oxalate excretion and rule out of PH. PMID:26664431

  6. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  7. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  8. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-12-24

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials.

  9. Complement related kidney diseases: Recurrence after transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of renal disease after renal transplantation is becoming one of the main causes of graft loss after kidney transplantation. This principally concerns some of the original diseases as the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), in particular the MPGN now called C3 glomerulopathy. Both this groups of renal diseases are characterized by congenital (genetic) or acquired (auto-antibodies) modifications of the alternative pathway of complement. These abnormalities often remain after transplantation because they are constitutional and poorly influenced by the immunosuppression. This fact justifies the high recurrence rate of these diseases. Early diagnosis of recurrence is essential for an optimal therapeutically approach, whenever possible. Patients affected by end stage renal disease due to C3 glomerulopathies or to atypical HUS, may be transplanted with extreme caution. Living donor donation from relatives is not recommended because members of the same family may be affected by the same gene mutation. Different therapeutically approaches have been attempted either for recurrence prevention and treatment. The most promising approach is represented by complement inhibitors. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5 convertase is the most promising drug, even if to date is not known how long the therapy should be continued and which are the best dosing. These facts face the high costs of the treatment. Eculizumab resistant patients have been described. They could benefit by a C3 convertase inhibitor, but this class of drugs is by now the object of randomized controlled trials. PMID:28058212

  10. Chronic diarrhea due to duodenal candidiasis in a patient with a history of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Majalan, Nader; Moghaddasi, Sarasadat; Qane, Mohammad Davud; Shefaie, Farzane; Masoumi Dehshiri, Roghayyeh; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kassem; Baghbanian, Mahmoud

    2014-11-01

    Candida infection in the small intestine is uncommon. We report an unusual case of duodenal candidiasis that presented as chronic diarrhea in a patient who had previously undergone kidney transplantation. A 60-year-old man presented with profuse watery diarrhea that had lasted 6 months 13 years after kidney transplantation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results indicated candidiasis within the esophagus and duodenum. Biopsy results revealed active duodenitis with hyphal and yeast forms of Candida overlying the duodenal epithelium in periodic acid Schiff staining. The patient was successfully treated with fluconazole. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaint of diarrhea. Duodenal candidiasis may be the result of chronic diarrhea in patients with a history of kidney transplantation.

  11. [Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression. Identical twins and kidney transplantation following a successful bone marrow graft].

    PubMed

    Hadi, Riad Abdel; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Ribeiro, Adriana Reginato; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation without maintenance immunosuppression has been sporadically reported in the literature. The cases include non-adherent patients who discontinued their immunosuppressive medications, transplantation between identical twins, kidney transplantation after a successful bone marrow graft from the same donor and simultaneous bone marrow and kidney transplantation for the treatment of multiple myeloma with associated renal failure. There are also ongoing clinical trials designed to induce donor specific transplant tolerance with infusion of hematopoietic cells from the same kidney donor. Here we describe two cases of renal transplantation without immunosuppression as examples of situations described above.

  12. Kidney Transplantation for Kidney Failure Due to Multiple Myeloma: Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuy X; Wolf, Jeffrey L; Peralta, Carmen A; Webber, Allison B

    2017-03-17

    Transplantation centers have historically considered a history of multiple myeloma as a contraindication to kidney transplantation due to high recurrence rates and poor transplant survival. However, there have been significant advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, with improved patient survival, which may allow for successful kidney transplantation in these patients. We report on 4 patients who underwent kidney transplantation at our institution between 2009 and 2015 after having achieved a very good partial response or better with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. All 4 patients received kidneys from living donors; 2 underwent induction therapy with basiliximab, and 2, with thymoglobulin. One patient had progression of myeloma, which responded well to therapy. All had functioning transplants at 1 year after kidney transplantation. No patients experienced a rejection episode or infections with BK polyomavirus or cytomegalovirus, with follow-up ranging from 16 to 58 months after kidney transplantation. Our experience suggests that kidney transplantation is feasible in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. Future studies are necessary to compare outcomes in these patients with other high-risk patients undergoing kidney transplantation.

  13. Pro: urine proteomics as a liquid kidney biopsy: no more kidney punctures!

    PubMed

    Mischak, Harald

    2015-04-01

    In this article, the benefits of urinary proteomics in comparison with kidney biopsy are discussed. The majority of urinary proteins are generated by the kidney, hence the urinary proteome holds substantial information on the kidney, and assessment of the urinary proteome could be considered a 'liquid biopsy'. The main question is how well the information contained in the urinary proteome can be assessed today, if it is ready to be routinely used, and what are the advantages and possible disadvantages in comparison with current standards. Since chronic kidney disease (CKD) is by far the largest area in nephrology based on the number of patients affected, the focus of this article is on CKD. Substantial progress was made in the last decade in urinary proteomics, and today we have comparable urinary proteome datasets of tens of thousands of subjects available. Clinical proteomics studies in CKD including close to, or even exceeding, 1000 subjects have recently been published, demonstrating a benefit over the current state-of-the-art in diagnosis and especially prognosis. The first large multicentric randomized controlled intervention trial aiming at preventing CKD by employing urinary proteomics-guided intervention has been initiated recently. These data provide ample evidence for the utility and value of urinary proteomics in nephrology. A further consideration is that the purpose of the biopsy, be it 'liquid' or 'solid', is to guide intervention. However, essentially all drug targets are proteins, not microscopic structures. Therefore, obtaining information on the proteome to guide intervention appears to be the most appropriate approach. Presenting more detailed evidence, I argue that urinary proteome analysis can, in most cases, be employed to guide therapeutic intervention, can be repeated multiple times as it is without any direct risk or discomfort and can be considered as a liquid biopsy.

  14. Protocol of the KTFT-TALK study to reduce racial disparities in kidney transplant evaluation and living donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Kellee; Croswell, Emilee; Abaye, Menna; Bryce, Cindy L; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Good, Deborah S; Freehling Heiles, Cathleen A; Dew, Mary Amanda; Boulware, L Ebony; Tevar, Amit D; Myaskovsky, Larissa

    2017-02-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the optimal treatment for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The evaluation process for a kidney transplant is complex, time consuming, and burdensome to the ESKD patient. Also, race disparities exist in rates of transplant evaluation completion, transplantation, and LDKT. In December 2012 our transplant center implemented a streamlined, one-day evaluation process, dubbed Kidney Transplant Fast Track (KTFT). This paper describes the protocol of a two-part study to evaluate the effectiveness of KTFT at increasing transplant rates (compared to historical controls) and the TALK intervention (Talking About Live Kidney Donation) at increasing LDKT during KTFT. All participants will receive the KTFT evaluation as part of their usual care. Participants will be randomly assigned to TALK versus no-TALK conditions. Patients will undergo interviews at pre-transplant work-up and transplant evaluation. Transplant status will be tracked via medical records. Our aims are to: (1) test the efficacy and cost effectiveness of the KTFT in reducing time to complete kidney transplant evaluation, and increasing kidney transplant rates relative to standard evaluation practices; (2) test whether TALK increases rates of LDKT during KTFT; and (3) determine whether engaging in a streamlined and coordinated-care evaluation experience within the transplant center reduces negative perceptions of the healthcare system. The results of this two-pronged approach will help pave the way for other transplant centers to implement a fast-track system at their sites, improve quality of care by transplanting a larger number of vulnerable patients, and address stark race/ethnic disparities in rates of LDKT.

  15. The Kidney as a Reservoir for HIV-1 after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Viard, Jean-Paul; Anglicheau, Dany; Bienaimé, Frank; Muorah, Mordi; Galmiche, Louise; Gribouval, Olivier; Noël, Laure-Helene; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Martinez, Frank; Sberro-Soussan, Rebecca; Scemla, Anne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Friedlander, Gérard; Antignac, Corinne; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Terzi, Fabiola; Rouzioux, Christine; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the recent publication of data showing favorable outcomes for patients with HIV-1 and ESRD, kidney transplantation has become a therapeutic option in this population. However, reports have documented unexplained reduced allograft survival in these patients. We hypothesized that the unrecognized infection of the transplanted kidney by HIV-1 can compromise long-term allograft function. Using electron microscopy and molecular biology, we examined protocol renal transplant biopsies from 19 recipients with HIV-1 who did not have detectable levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA at transplantation. We found that HIV-1 infected the kidney allograft in 68% of these patients. Notably, HIV-1 infection was detected in either podocytes predominately (38% of recipients) or tubular cells only (62% of recipients). Podocyte infection associated with podocyte apoptosis and loss of differentiation markers as well as a faster decline in allograft function compared with tubular cell infection. In allografts with tubular cell infection, epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules frequently contained abnormal mitochondria, and both patients who developed features of subclinical acute cellular rejection had allografts with tubular cell infection. Finally, we provide a novel noninvasive test for determining HIV-1 infection of the kidney allograft by measuring HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels in patients’ urine. In conclusion, HIV-1 can infect kidney allografts after transplantation despite undetectable viremia, and this infection might influence graft outcome. PMID:24309185

  16. The kidney as a reservoir for HIV-1 after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Guillaume; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Viard, Jean-Paul; Anglicheau, Dany; Bienaimé, Frank; Muorah, Mordi; Galmiche, Louise; Gribouval, Olivier; Noël, Laure-Helene; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Martinez, Frank; Sberro-Soussan, Rebecca; Scemla, Anne; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Friedlander, Gérard; Antignac, Corinne; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Terzi, Fabiola; Rouzioux, Christine; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    Since the recent publication of data showing favorable outcomes for patients with HIV-1 and ESRD, kidney transplantation has become a therapeutic option in this population. However, reports have documented unexplained reduced allograft survival in these patients. We hypothesized that the unrecognized infection of the transplanted kidney by HIV-1 can compromise long-term allograft function. Using electron microscopy and molecular biology, we examined protocol renal transplant biopsies from 19 recipients with HIV-1 who did not have detectable levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA at transplantation. We found that HIV-1 infected the kidney allograft in 68% of these patients. Notably, HIV-1 infection was detected in either podocytes predominately (38% of recipients) or tubular cells only (62% of recipients). Podocyte infection associated with podocyte apoptosis and loss of differentiation markers as well as a faster decline in allograft function compared with tubular cell infection. In allografts with tubular cell infection, epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules frequently contained abnormal mitochondria, and both patients who developed features of subclinical acute cellular rejection had allografts with tubular cell infection. Finally, we provide a novel noninvasive test for determining HIV-1 infection of the kidney allograft by measuring HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels in patients' urine. In conclusion, HIV-1 can infect kidney allografts after transplantation despite undetectable viremia, and this infection might influence graft outcome.

  17. Bilateral native nephrectomy for refractory hypertension in kidney transplant and kidney pancreas transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Mark J.; Hinton, Sandra; Aronoff, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is common in renal transplant patients and sometimes very difficult to control. Refractory hypertension can adversely affect renal graft and patient survival. Many antihypertensive medications are not well tolerated or can have important drug interactions with immunosuppressive medications. These drugs can cause significant side effects including fluid depletion, azotemia, electrolyte imbalance, and anemia. Bilateral native nephrectomy in renal transplant patients has been reported to be beneficial in controlling severe hypertension. We report five patients with severe hypertension despite as many as 9 different antihypertensive medications. All patients had previous kidney or simultaneous kidney pancreas transplantation. Each of our patients underwent laparoscopic bilateral native nephrectomy. Renal function varied from creatinine of 1.4–2.4, and the number of antihypertensive medications from 3 to 9 at the time of nephrectomy surgery. Mean arterial blood pressure improved in all five patients at 3–6 months post nephrectomy, the number of antihypertensive medications decreased in 4, but renal function remained stable at 3–6 months in only 3 patients. We found laparoscopic bilateral native nephrectomy to be beneficial in renal and simultaneous kidney pancreas transplant patients with severe and refractory hypertension. Our patients with better baseline renal allograft function at time of nephrectomy received the most benefit. No decrease in allograft function could be attributed to acute rejection. PMID:26348394

  18. AB32. Sexuality after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for persons with ESRD, and in general, KTx recipients have increased survival rates and enjoy overall better QOL than those on dialysis However, one thing of QOL that does not seem to improve post-transplant is sexuality. In fact, one study found that sexuality was the only aspect of QOL that did not improve after transplantation. Roughly, 50% of males and at least the same percent of females. Sexuality is important to QOL and is considered a basic human right and an important component of general health by WHO. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life. Encompassing Related causes, difficulties with sexuality and sexual functioning are most likely a result of both psychological and physiological factors, side effects of required medications, weight gain, hirsutism, and loss of sexually attractive following KTx, post-transplant complications and/or comorbid conditions. Hypertension and depression require medications. Almost all transplant recipients have or will eventually develop one or more comorbid conditions (diabetes) or experience side effects from treatments (pretransplant dialysis) or medications that can have a negative effect on their sexuality or sexual functioning Publications The first studies that examined sexuality among persons with ESRD were done in the 1970s. Retrospectively compare their sexual functioning levels. One of the largest of these early studies, conducted by Levy, was a nationwide survey of 519 persons belonging to the National Association of Patients on Hemodialysis and Transplantation. Three sexual functioning questions. There are 48% of men and 26% of women reported the development of or worsening of a sexual dysfunction as their ESRD progressed. And 35% of males and 25% of females reported a worsening of sexual function at the start of HD. 59% of all male HD patients and 43% of all male KTx recipients considered themselves to be partially or totally

  19. Assessment of allograft function using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Lal, Hira; Yadav, Abhishek; Bhadhuria, Dharmendra; Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit

    2014-11-01

    Developing a non-invasive method such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) could be used as a feasible and reproducible modality in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction. We assessed the functional status of the renal allograft by DWMRI and its applicability in assessment of graft dysfunction on all end-stage renal transplant patients who attained normal renal function on the 7th day post-transplantation. Follow-up imaging of the recipient allograft was performed at the end of 90 and 180 days and in case of graft dysfunction. Kidney biopsies were performed to correlate with the corresponding MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps of the cortex and medulla were obtained by studying the DWMRI. The ADC values were significantly lower in the medulla compared with the cortex in normal donor kidneys and normally functioning transplanted kidneys, while they decreased significantly when rejection occurred. The reduction in ADC values occurred both in the cortex and in the medulla, and correlated with the degree of rejection on the kidney biopsies. The ADC values increased significantly during the recovery from rejection. We conclude that DWMRI can be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of transplant patients during acute rejection.

  20. Light chain crystalline kidney disease: diagnostic urine microscopy as the "liquid kidney biopsy".

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Castano, Ekaterina; Fogazzi, Giovanni B; Perazella, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder, which often causes parenchymal kidney disease. Light chain (LC) cast nephropathy represents the most common renal lesion. In some instances, LC crystals precipitate within renal tubular lumens and deposit within proximal tubular cell cytoplasms. Importantly, urine microscopy in such patients can provide insight into the underlying LC-related lesion. Here we present two patients with MM complicated by acute kidney injury (AKI) where LC crystalline casts were observed on urinary sediment analysis. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubular injury with LC crystal casts within both tubular lumens and renal tubular epithelial cell cytoplasms. These findings suggest that the urinary sediment may be a non-invasive way to diagnose LC crystalline-induced AKI in patients with MM.

  1. Donor-associated malignancy in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cai-Bin; Gerber, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer cells with donor genotype have been identified in allogeneic transplant patients; however, the donor contribution to the recipient’s epithelial malignancy remains to be established. In this issue of the JCI, Verneuil et al. provide the first evidence for donor contribution to the malignant epithelium of skin squamous cell carcinoma in a kidney transplant recipient. This case report may have important implications for cancer research and clinical care of long-surviving kidney transplant patients. PMID:23979157

  2. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft.

  3. [Towards the development of living donor kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Macher, Marie-Alice

    2016-12-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has been increasing since 2008. Living donors represent a significant potential for organ transplants, in a context where the needs outstrip the availability of organs from deceased donors. However, patients are still poorly informed regarding the conditions in which these transplants are possible.

  4. Combined liver-kidney transplantation in a child with primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Polinsky, M S; Dunn, S; Kaiser, B A; Schulman, S L; Wolfson, B J; Elfenbein, I B; Baluarte, H J

    1991-05-01

    A 3.5-year-old boy presented with end-stage renal disease and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Renal biopsy demonstrated marked parenchymal calcium oxalate deposition and a diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) was made. Following 2 years of hemodialysis he received two renal allografts which were lost at 7 and 11 months, respectively, due to biopsy-proven recurrent oxalosis. Combined liver-kidney transplantation was then performed, after which renal and hepatic function initially stabilized. The patient died on the 28th postoperative day, of infectious complications and progressive respiratory insufficiency. However, comparisons between the patterns of urinary oxalate excretion noted after the isolated renal and liver-kidney transplants indicated that, following the latter, successful biochemical correction of the enzyme defect responsible for type 1 PH had occurred.

  5. Early post-transplant complications following ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Naciri Bennani, Hamza; Abdulrahman, Zhyiar; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Delarche, Antoine; Game, Xavier; Esposito, Laure; Doumerc, Nicolas; Debiol, Bénédicte; Kamar, Nassim; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Living-kidney transplantation is increasing because of the scarcity of kidneys from deceased donors and the increasing numbers of patients on waiting lists for a kidney transplant. Living-kidney transplantation is now associated with increased long-term patient- and allograft-survival rates. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify, in a cohort of 44 ABO-incompatible (ABOi) live-kidney transplant patients, the main complications that occurred within 6 months post-transplantation, and to compare these findings with those from 44 matched ABO-compatible (ABOc) live-kidney transplant patients who were also from our center. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study assessed post-transplantation complications in 44 ABO-i versus 44 matched ABO-c patients. All patients were comparable at baseline except that ABO-i patients had greater immunological risks. Results: During the 6-month post-transplant period, more ABO-i patients presented with postoperative bleeds, thus requiring significantly more blood transfusions. Bleeds were associated with significantly lower values of fibrinogen, platelets, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin levels. Surgical complications, patient- and graft-survival rates, and kidney-function statuses were similar between both groups at 6 months post-transplantation. Conclusions: We conclude that impairment of hemostatic factors at pre-transplant explained the increased risk of a post-transplant bleed in ABO-i patients. PMID:27047806

  6. Regulatory T cells in kidney disease and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan Min; Wang, Yiping; Zhang, Geoff Y; Zheng, Guoping; Yi, Shounan; O'Connell, Philip J; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important in maintaining immune homeostasis and preventing autoimmune disease, including autoimmune kidney disease. It is also likely that they play a role in limiting kidney transplant rejection and potentially in promoting transplant tolerance. Although other subsets of Tregs exist, the most potent and well-defined Tregs are the Foxp3 expressing CD4(+) Tregs derived from the thymus or generated peripherally. These CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs limit autoimmune renal disease in animal models, especially chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. Furthermore, other subsets of Tregs, including CD8 Tregs, may play a role in immunosuppression in kidney disease. The development and protective mechanisms of Tregs in kidney disease and kidney transplantation involve multiple mechanisms of suppression. Here we review the development and function of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs. We discuss the specific application of Tregs as a therapeutic strategy to prevent kidney disease and to limit kidney transplant rejection and detail clinical trials in this area of transplantation.

  7. [Color-Doppler semiology in transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Rivolta, R; Castagnone, D; Burdick, L; Mandelli, C; Mangiarotti, R

    1993-05-01

    Color-encoded duplex ultrasonography (CEDU) makes a more accurate technique in kidney graft monitoring by combining real-time US with pulsed Doppler studies of renal vasculature. It is a non-invasive and easy technique. Suitable to study the whole renal artery and vein, CEDU also allows the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the intrarenal vasculature and therefore the easy diagnosis of such vessel dysfunctions as arteriovenous fistulas following biopsy. Moreover, Doppler spectral analysis can be used to distinguish among different causes of renal allograft dysfunction--i.e. rejection, cyclosporine nephrotoxicity or acute tubular necrosis. The value of the resistive index for the differential diagnosis is discussed. CEDU allows a more reliable measurement of renal blood flow thanks to the more precise evaluation of renal artery diameter and mean flow velocity.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Associated With Vancomycin When Laxity Leads to Injury and Findings on Kidney Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Madhavi; Lwin, Lin; Villanueva, Hugo; Yoo, Jinil

    2016-01-01

    The issue of vancomycin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) has resurged with the use of intravenous vancomycin as a first-line antibiotic, often for prolonged periods of time for the management of serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, and with a higher recommended trough level (15-20 μg/mL). We have observed 3 patients on intravenous vancomycin who developed very high trough levels (>40 μg/mL) and severe (stage 3) AKI. Those 3 patients underwent kidney biopsy for unresolving AKI, which revealed findings compatible with acute tubular necrosis. The first patient initially developed asymptomatic acute interstitial nephritis because of a concomitant antibiotic that caused worsening of kidney function, and the dose of vancomycin was not properly adjusted while staying at the nursing home. The second was an emaciated patient (BMI, 14) whose serum creatinine level was a deceptive marker of kidney function for the proper dosing of vancomycin, resulting in a toxic level. The third patient developed vancomycin-related AKI on an initially high therapeutic level, which then contributed to further rising in vancomycin level and subsequently causing severe AKI. One patient required hemodialysis, but all 3 patients ultimately recovered their kidney function significantly. A regular monitoring (preferably twice weekly) of serum creatinine and vancomycin trough level is advisable to minimize vancomycin-associated AKI, primarily acute tubular necrosis, for patients requiring prolonged administration of vancomycin (>2 weeks) on the currently recommended higher therapeutic trough levels (>15 μg/mL).

  9. Commercial kidney transplantation is an important risk factor in long-term kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Ananth, Sailesh; Palepu, Sneha; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Transplant tourism, a form of transplant commercialization, has resulted in serious short-term adverse outcomes that explain reduced short-term kidney allograft survival. However, the nature of longer-term outcomes in commercial kidney transplant recipients is less clear. To study this further, we identified 69 Canadian commercial transplant recipients of 72 kidney allografts transplanted during 1998 to 2013 who reported to our transplant center for follow-up care. Their outcomes to 8 years post-transplant were compared with 702 domestic living donor and 827 deceased donor transplant recipients during this period using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Among many complications, notable specific events included hepatitis B or C seroconversion (7 patients), active hepatitis and/or fulminant hepatic failure (4 patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (2 patients), and a type A dissecting aortic aneurysm. Commercial transplantation was independently associated with significantly reduced death-censored kidney allograft survival (hazard ratio 3.69, 95% confidence interval 1.88-7.25) along with significantly delayed graft function and eGFR 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) or less at 3 months post-transplant. Thus, commercial transplantation represents an important risk factor for long-term kidney allograft loss. Concerted arguments and efforts using adverse recipient outcomes among the main premises are still required in order to eradicate transplant commercialization.

  10. How can a vascular surgeon help in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Thaveau, Fabien; Caillard, Sophie; Georg, Yannick; Moulin, Bruno; Wolf, Philippe; Geny, Bernard; Chakfe, Nabil

    2017-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is a surgical procedure involving both vascular and ureteric anastomoses. As a matter of fact, it can be performed either by urologists or vascular surgeons. However, vascular surgeon's expertise can be helpful at different times. In the present paper we describe how can vascular surgeons help at the different stages of kidney transplantation process in modern care: 1) before kidney transplantation for recipient preparation in order to allow subsequent graft implantation, either by performing percutaneous embolization of renal arteries in the setting of polycystic kidney disease or treatment of aneurysmal or occlusive lesions that would contra-indicate graft implantation; 2) at the time of surgery graft back table preparation and repair; and 3) after surgery for long-term follow-up, including transplant renal artery stenosis treatment or transplant nephrectomy.

  11. Improvements in kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, E R Pieter; Snoeijs, Maarten G J; Habets, Margot A W; Brandsma, D Steven; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J; Christiaans, Maarten H L; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the growing waiting list for kidney transplantation, we explored the limits of kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death by liberally accepting marginal donor kidneys for transplantation. As the percentage of primary non-function (PNF) increased, we evaluated our transplantation program and implemented changes to reduce the high percentage of PNF in 2005, followed by a second evaluation over the period 2006-2009. Recipients of a kidney from a donor after cardiac death between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed, with PNF as outcome measure. During the period 2002-2005, the percentage of PNF increased and crossed the upper control limits of 12% which was considered as unacceptably high. After implementation of changes, this percentage was reduced to 5%, without changing the number of kidney transplantations from donors after cardiac death. Continuous monitoring of the quality of care is essential as the boundaries of organ donation and transplantation are sought. Meticulous donor, preservation, and recipient management make extension of the donor potential possible, with good results for the individual recipient. Liberal use of kidneys from donors after cardiac death may contribute to a reduction in the waiting list for kidney transplantation and dialysis associated mortality.

  12. The interaction of the international society concerning kidney transplants--a consideration of diseased kidney transplants in Japan and transplant tourism over the world.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Asako

    2009-04-01

    In November 2006 in Japan, it was detected that there were 41 cases that diseased kidneys were harvested from patients and then were transplanted to other renal failure patients. This "Diseased kidney transplant" was prohibited in Japan since 2007 because of a lot of problems. On the other hand, in Japan, although there are about 12,000 patients on a waiting list for a transplant, only 10% of those get a transplant. Recently it appears that some patients have gone overseas for kidney transplants (transplant tourism). Concerning the background of transplant tourism, the issues are three points following. First, globalization caused recipients to go abroad easier and faster. Second, transnational law is difficult to institutionalize. Third, there is economical gap in not only international but also domestic. We should discuss again diseased kidney transplant in not only professionals but also in Japanese civilized society.

  13. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence.

  14. Repeat Kidney Transplantation After Failed First Transplant in Childhood: Past Performance Informs Future Performance

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Meera; Wood, Alexander; Mitra, Nandita; Furth, Susan L.; Abt, Peter L.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kidney transplant graft survival is almost uniformly superior for initial transplants compared to repeat transplants. We investigate the association between first and second kidney transplant graft survival in patients who underwent initial transplant during their pediatric years and whether age at second transplant is associated with outcome. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measurements This is a retrospective analysis of Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)data from October 1987 to May 2009 examining second kidney graft survival in 2281 patients who received their first transplant at <18 years of age using Kaplan-Meier statistics. Factors associated with second graft survival were identified using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. Results Patients with first kidney graft survival of >5 years had better second graft survival compared to patients with first graft survival of 30 days-5 years (p<0.01). Patients with first kidney graft survival less than 30 days had similar second kidney graft outcomes(p=0.50) as those with >5 year first kidney graft survival, demonstrating that very early first graft loss is not associated with poor second transplant outcome. Patients 15-20 years of age at second transplant have lower second graft survival compared to other age groups; p<0.01, regardless of other recipient/donor characteristics and recurrent disease. Conclusions Poor second transplant outcomes are identified among patients with previous pediatric kidney transplant with first graft survival >30 days, but < 5 years, and those receiving second transplants at a high risk age category (15-20 years). These groups may benefit from increased attention both pre- and post-transplant. PMID:25803500

  15. Allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Prashar, Rohini; Putchakayala, Krishna G; Kane, William J; Denny, Jason E; Kim, Dean Y; Malinzak, Lauren E

    2017-02-24

    We report a rare case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma that occurred 12 years after kidney transplantation. A 67-year-old Caucasian male with a past surgical history of kidney transplant presented to the emergency department at a local hospital with left lower abdominal tenderness. He recalled that his cat, which weighs 15 lbs, jumped on his abdomen 7 d prior. On physical examination, a small tender mass was noticed at the incisional site of the kidney transplant. He was producing a normal amount of urine without hematuria. His serum creatinine level was slightly elevated from his baseline. Computer tomography revealed a large subscapular hematoma around the transplant kidney. The patient was observed to have renal trauma grade II at the hospital over a period of three days, and he was finally transferred to a transplant center after his urine output significantly decreased. Doppler ultrasound demonstrated an extensive peri-allograft hypoechoic area and abnormal waveforms with absent arterial diastolic flow and a patent renal vein. Despite surgical decompression, the allograft failed to respond appropriately due to the delay in surgical intervention. This is the third reported case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney following kidney transplantation. This case reinforces that kidney care differs if the kidney is solitary or a transplant. Early recognition and aggressive treatments are mandatory, especially in a case with Doppler signs that are suggestive of compression.

  16. Allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Prashar, Rohini; Putchakayala, Krishna G; Kane, William J; Denny, Jason E; Kim, Dean Y; Malinzak, Lauren E

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney secondary to trauma that occurred 12 years after kidney transplantation. A 67-year-old Caucasian male with a past surgical history of kidney transplant presented to the emergency department at a local hospital with left lower abdominal tenderness. He recalled that his cat, which weighs 15 lbs, jumped on his abdomen 7 d prior. On physical examination, a small tender mass was noticed at the incisional site of the kidney transplant. He was producing a normal amount of urine without hematuria. His serum creatinine level was slightly elevated from his baseline. Computer tomography revealed a large subscapular hematoma around the transplant kidney. The patient was observed to have renal trauma grade II at the hospital over a period of three days, and he was finally transferred to a transplant center after his urine output significantly decreased. Doppler ultrasound demonstrated an extensive peri-allograft hypoechoic area and abnormal waveforms with absent arterial diastolic flow and a patent renal vein. Despite surgical decompression, the allograft failed to respond appropriately due to the delay in surgical intervention. This is the third reported case of allograft loss from acute Page kidney following kidney transplantation. This case reinforces that kidney care differs if the kidney is solitary or a transplant. Early recognition and aggressive treatments are mandatory, especially in a case with Doppler signs that are suggestive of compression. PMID:28280700

  17. Impact of ABO incompatible kidney transplantation on living donor transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi-KT) is an important approach for overcoming donor shortages. We evaluated the effect of ABOi-KT on living donor KT. Methods Two nationwide transplantation databases were used. We evaluated the impact of ABOi-KT on overall living donor transplant activity and spousal donation as subgroup analysis. In addition, we compared the clinical outcome between ABOi-KT and ABO compatible KT (ABOc-KT) from spousal donor, and performed a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to define the risk factors affecting the allograft outcomes. Result The introduction of ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT by 12.2% and its portion was increased from 0.3% to 21.7% during study period. The ABOi-KT in living unrelated KT was two times higher than that of living related donor KT (17.8 vs.9.8%). Spousal donor was a major portion of living unrelated KT (77.6%) and ABOi-KT increased spousal donation from 10% to 31.5% in living donor KT. In addition, increasing rate ABOi-KT from spousal donor was 10 times higher than that of living related donor. The clinical outcome (incidence of acute rejection, allograft function, and allograft and patient survival rates) of ABOi-KT from spousal donor was comparable to that of ABOc-KT. Neither ABO incompatibility nor spousal donor was associated with acute rejection or allograft failure on multivariate analysis. Conclusions ABOi-KT increased overall living donor KT, and ABOi-KT from spousal donor is rapidly increasing with favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:28323892

  18. Costimulation Blockade in Kidney Transplantation: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Malvezzi, Paolo; Jouve, Thomas; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of solid-organ transplantation, calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based therapy remains the cornerstone of immunosuppression. However, long-term use of CNIs is associated with some degree of nephrotoxicity. This has led to exploring the blockade of some costimulation pathways as an efficient immunosuppressive tool instead of using CNIs. The only agent already in clinical use and approved by the health authorities for kidney transplant patients is belatacept (Nulojix), a fusion protein that interferes with cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4. Belatacept has been demonstrated to be as efficient as cyclosporine-based immunosuppression and is associated with significantly better renal function, that is, no nephrotoxicity. However, in the immediate posttransplant period, significantly more mild/moderate episodes of acute rejection have been reported, favored by the fact that cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein pathway has an inhibitory effect on the alloimmune response; thereby its inhibition is detrimental in this regard. This has led to the development of antibodies that target CD28. The most advanced is FR104, it has shown promise in nonhuman primate models of autoimmune diseases and allotransplantation. In addition, research into blocking the CD40-CD154 pathway is underway. A phase II study testing ASK1240, that is, anti-CD40 antibody has been completed, and the results are pending. PMID:27472094

  19. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Dawn K.; Campbell, Latoya E.; Weil, Jennifer; Kaplan, Bruce; Clarkson, Marie; Finlayson, Jean; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Chakkera, Harini A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown. Methods Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed. Result Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant. Conclusions Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose

  20. Ruptured Hemangioma of a Native Kidney: An Unusual Cause of Postoperative Hemorrhage in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Poznańska, Grażyna; Wlazlak, Michał; Hogendorf, Piotr; Szymański, Dariusz; Strzelczyk, Janusz; Durczyński, Adam

    2017-03-14

    BACKGROUND Retroperitoneal bleeding as a consequence of non-traumatic kidney or allograft rupture is well known, but there are no reports on hemorrhagia from a native kidney after allogeneic renal transplantation. Therefore, we present the first such case to be published and highlight the possibility of this complication after renal transplantation. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 28-year-old male patient who developed early post-transplant hemorrhagia from a ruptured native kidney. The patient underwent left-sided nephrectomy. Histopathological examination revealed ruptured hemangioma of the patient's native left kidney. The further postoperative period was not complicated. The patient was discharged on the 18th postoperative day, with good transplant function. CONCLUSIONS Transplantologists should be aware of the fact that in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, native kidney hemangioma may rupture in the early post-transplant period, and it can be a life-threating and difficult to diagnose complication.

  1. Successful Management of Calciphylaxis in a Kidney Transplant Patient: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Arnold, Frederic; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke; Wobser, Rika; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Walz, Gerd; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calciphylaxis is a rare and often fatal condition mostly associated with end-stage renal disease. The pathophysiology remains elusive and treatment options are scarce. We present a rare case of severe calciphylaxis after kidney transplantation in a patient with persistent hyperparathyroidism. Case description A 78-year-old man with a history of end-stage renal disease developed edema and ulcerations on both lower limbs 14 months after kidney transplantation while receiving an mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor to manage polyoma virus-associated nephropathy. Skin biopsies taken from the ulcerations confirmed calciphylaxis. A multimodal treatment regimen combining medical (calcium-free phosphate binders, cinacalcet, paricalcitol, sodium thiosulfate, antibiotic treatment) and surgical treatments (debridement and autologous skin transplantation) ultimately resulted in successful wound healing. Discussion We describe a case of severe calciphylaxis in a nonuremic patient after kidney transplantation. Rapid diagnosis by skin biopsy and an aggressive multimodal therapy regimen followed by long-term oral sodium thiosulfate treatment were crucial factors for a favorable outcome. PMID:27500261

  2. [Membranous aspects of kidney transplantation and reasons of transplant antioxidant defense].

    PubMed

    Berdichevskiĭ, B A; Tsvettskikh, V E; Zhmurov, V A; Kononov, S L; Berdichevskaia, E B; Zhuravleva, T D; Kiianiuk, N S; Razumiak, T V; Nedorezoniuk, S V

    2000-01-01

    Special membranological studies of the role of antioxidant emoxipine in combined pharmacological support of stable function of the transplanted kidney in 30 patients have shown that this drug restores phospholipid pool of red cell membranes and improves their physical properties. No significant fluctuations of cyclosporin A blood concentrations were registered. Emoxipine addition to combined therapy of patients with transplanted kidney is recommended.

  3. Non-English Speakers Less Likely to Be on Kidney Transplant List

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationship, the researchers found the link between not speaking English and not being on a kidney transplant waiting ... English proficiency and need a kidney transplant use English-speaking patient advocates and interpreters during transplant clinic visits. " ...

  4. Kidney transplant in Nigeria: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Umezurike Hughes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy for patients with end stage kidney disease. However management of patients with kidney transplant in resource poor countries is evolving and groaning under several mental, financial and infrastructural challenges. The objective of the study is to evaluate the management of patients with kidney transplant in a kidney care Centre in Nigeria. Methods This was a non-randomized prospective study. The study population were post-transplant patients presenting between 1st August 2010 and 31st December 2014.The biodata, pre and post-transplant details of these patients were documented. The data was analysed using SPSS Vs 17. Results A total of 47 patients were studied with M: F ratio of 4:1, the mean age was 45.4 ± 13.6 years. Chronic glomerulonephritis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and HIV related kidney disease were the commonest cause of CKD. Financial constraint delayed transplant in 66% and non-availability of donor in 17.2%. About 90% of the transplants were in India and 81% either financed the transplant either directly or through a relation. There was no cadaveric transplant and about 70% of the donors were not related. Tacrolimus, mycophenolate and prednisolone were most frequently used immunosuppressive combination. The one and three years graft survival were 95.3% and 67.6% respectively while corresponding patients survival were 97.7% and 82.4% respectively. Septicaemia, acute rejection and urinary tract infection were most common complications. Conclusion Management of patients with kidney transplant has good prospect despite the challenges. PMID:28292075

  5. Weight, Gender Appear to Play Part in Kidney Transplant Success

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164374.html Weight, Gender Appear to Play Part in Kidney Transplant Success ... THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Weight and gender differences between donors and recipients can affect the ...

  6. Scintigraphic evaluation of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Melloul, M.M.; Shmueli, D.; Mechlis-Frish, S.; Shapira, Z.; Baniel, J.; Rousso, I.; Cohen, M.; Lubin, E.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic evaluation of a rare case of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney is presented. Uptake of Tc-99m DMSA in the involved area was reduced and the Ga-67 uptake was increased.

  7. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population.

  8. Wait List Death and Survival Benefit of Kidney Transplantation among Non-renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, James R.; Reese, Peter P.; Sonnad, Seema; Bloom, Roy D.; Levine, Matthew H.; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The disparity between the number of patients waiting for kidney transplantation and the limited supply of kidney allografts has renewed interest in the benefit from kidney transplantation experienced by different groups. This study evaluated kidney transplant survival benefit in prior non-renal transplant recipients (kidney after liver, KALi; lung, KALu; heart, KAH) compared to primary isolated (KA1) or repeat isolated kidney (KA2) transplant. Multivariable Cox regression models were fit using UNOS data for patients wait listed and transplanted from 1995–2008. Compared to KA1, the risk of death on the wait list was lower for KA2 (p<0.001;HR=0.84;CI=0.81–0.88), but substantially higher for KALu (p<0.001;HR=3.80;CI=3.08–4.69), KAH (p<0.001;HR=1.92;CI=1.66–2.22), and KALi (p<0.001;HR=2.69;CI=2.46–2.95). Following kidney transplant, patient survival was greatest for KA1, similar among KA2, KALi, KAH, and inferior for KALu. Compared to the entire wait list, renal transplantation was associated with a survival benefit among all groups except KALu (p=0.017;HR=1.61;CI=1.09–2.38), where post-transplant survival was inferior to the wait list population. Recipients of KA1 kidney transplantation have the greatest post-transplant survival and compared to the overall kidney wait list, the greatest survival benefit. PMID:20977641

  9. Successful transplantation of kidneys from elderly circulatory death donors by using microscopic and macroscopic characteristics to guide single or dual implantation.

    PubMed

    Mallon, D H; Riddiough, G E; Summers, D M; Butler, A J; Callaghan, C J; Bradbury, L L; Bardsley, V; Broecker, V; Saeb-Parsy, K; Torpey, N; Bradley, J A; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-11-01

    Most kidneys from potential elderly circulatory death (DCD) donors are declined. We report single center outcomes for kidneys transplanted from DCD donors over 70 years old, using preimplantation biopsy Remuzzi grading to inform implantation as single or dual transplants. Between 2009 and 2012, 43 single transplants and 12 dual transplants were performed from elderly DCD donors. Remuzzi scores were higher for dual than single implants (4.4 vs. 3.4, p < 0.001), indicating more severe baseline injury. Donor and recipient characteristics for both groups were otherwise similar. Early graft loss from renal vein thrombosis occurred in two singly implanted kidneys, and in one dual-implanted kidney; its pair continued to function satisfactorily. Death-censored graft survival at 3 years was comparable for the two groups (single 94%; dual 100%), as was 1 year eGFR. Delayed graft function occurred less frequently in the dual-implant group (25% vs. 65%, p = 0.010). Using this approach, we performed proportionally more kidney transplants from elderly DCD donors (23.4%) than the rest of the United Kingdom (7.3%, p < 0.001), with graft outcomes comparable to those achieved nationally for all deceased-donor kidney transplants. Preimplantation biopsy analysis is associated with acceptable transplant outcomes for elderly DCD kidneys and may increase transplant numbers from an underutilized donor pool.

  10. Preemptive kidney transplantation--a team experience in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, F; Curi, L; González-Carballido, G; Núñez, N; Manzo, L; Kurdián, M; Larre Borges, P; Nin, M; Orihuela, S

    2014-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage chronic renal disease. In Uruguay, the prevalence of patients on dialysis is 757 patients per millon inhabitants, plus 316 alive with a functioning renal graft. We install a preemptive renal transplantation program. Twenty-five patients received grafts without dialysis from 2004 to 2013, 5 receiving their 2nd transplantation and 17 from cadaveric donors, with 7.4 ± 7.7 months in the waiting list. At 24 months, patients' survival rate was 100% and the grafts' 97%, with a serum creatinine of 1.4 ± 0.6 mg%. The developed programs of dialysis and renal health care contributed install our preemptive kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation should be proposed to selected patients with chronic renal failure as primary therapy of substitution of renal function.

  11. National Kidney Registry: 213 transplants in three years.

    PubMed

    Veale, Jeffrey; Hil, Garet

    2010-01-01

    Since its establishment in 2008, the National Kidney Registry has facilitated 213 kidney transplants between unrelated living donors and recipients at 28 transplant centers. Rapid innovations in matching strategies, advanced computer technologies, good communication and an evolving understanding of the processes at participating transplant centers and histocompatibility laboratories are among the factors driving the success of the NKR. Virtual cross match accuracy has improved from 43% to 91% as a result of changes to the HLA typing requirements for potential donors and improved mechanisms to list unacceptable HLA antigens for sensitized patients. A uniform financial agreement among participating centers eliminated a major roadblock to facilitate unbalanced donor kidney exchanges among centers. The NKR transplanted 64% of the patients registered since 2008 and the average waiting time for those transplanted in 2010 was 11 months.

  12. Biopsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Biopsies - Overview A biopsy is the removal of tissue ... What are the limitations of biopsies? What are biopsies? A biopsy is the removal of tissue in ...

  13. [Kidney procurement and transplantation from a surgical perspective].

    PubMed

    Heuer, M; Frühauf, N R; Treckmann, J; Witzke, O; Paul, A; Kaiser, G M

    2009-02-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best therapeutic option in many patients with end-stage renal disease, because it significantly increases lifespan over that of patients who remain on dialysis. Because of organ shortage the average waiting time for a suitable kidney in Germany is about four years after the onset of dialysis treatment. Currently about 80% of all transplanted kidneys are obtained from brain-dead patients. The possibility for kidney transplantation after living donation reduces the minimum waiting time to a few weeks. An optimized organizational strategy as well as donor and recipient preparation are possible in living donation, resulting in excellent transplant quality and a short cold-ischemia time. Pre-emptive kidney transplantation after living donation is an attractive treatment option without the need for previous dialysis and is also an option for children. The excellent long-term results after kidney transplantation have been caused by improvement of operative technique, organizational strategy, donor preparation, postoperative care and, in particular, immunosuppression.

  14. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  15. Geographic Determinants of Access to Pediatric Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hojun; Potluri, Vishnu; Abt, Peter L.; Shults, Justine; Amaral, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Children receive priority in the allocation of deceased donor kidneys for transplantation in the United States, but because allocation begins locally, geographic differences in population and organ supply may enable variation in pediatric access to transplantation. We assembled a cohort of 3764 individual listings for pediatric kidney transplantation in 2005–2010. For each donor service area, we assigned a category of short (<180 days), medium (181–270 days), or long (>270 days) median waiting time and calculated the ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to pediatric candidates and the percentage of these kidneys locally diverted to adults. We used multivariable Cox regression analyses to examine the association between donor service area characteristics and time to deceased donor kidney transplantation. The Kaplan–Meier estimate of median waiting time to transplantation was 284 days (95% confidence interval, 263 to 300 days) and varied from 14 to 1313 days across donor service areas. Overall, 29% of pediatric-quality kidneys were locally diverted to adults. Compared with areas with short waiting times, areas with long waiting times had a lower ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to candidates (3.1 versus 5.9; P<0.001) and more diversions to adults (31% versus 27%; P<0.001). In multivariable regression, a lower kidney to candidate ratio remained associated with longer waiting time (hazard ratio, 0.56 for areas with <2:1 versus reference areas with ≥5:1 kidneys/candidates; P<0.01). Large geographic variation in waiting time for pediatric deceased donor kidney transplantation exists and is highly associated with local supply and demand factors. Future organ allocation policy should address this geographic inequity. PMID:24436470

  16. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  17. Epidemiology of infections in kidney transplant recipients - data miner's approach.

    PubMed

    Wojciuk, Bartosz; Myślak, Marek; Pabisiak, Krzysztof; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Giedrys-Kalemba, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Infections remain a frequent complication following organ transplantation. Agents present within the general population remain common in recurrent infections among renal transplant recipients. Data mining methodology has become a promising source of information about patterns in the organ transplant recipient population. The aim of the study was to use data mining to describe the factors influencing single and recurrent infections in kidney transplant recipients. A group of 159 recipients who underwent kidney transplantation between 2005 and 2008 was analysed. RapidMiner and Statistica softwares were used to create decision tree models based on CART Quinlan and C&RT algorithms. There were 171 microbiologically confirmed episodes among 67 recipients (41%), and 191 separate species isolations were performed. Over 50% of the infected patients underwent two or more infectious episodes. Two classification decision tree models were created. The following features were enabled to differentiate the groups with single or recurrent infections: the duration of cold ischaemia, the post-transplant hospitalization period, the cause of chronic kidney disease and pathogens. The post-transplant hospitalization period and the length of cold ischaemia appear to be the principal parameters differentiating the subpopulations analysed. These coexisting factors, connected with recurrent infections in kidney transplant recipients, resemble a network which requires an advanced analysis to support the traditional statistics.

  18. Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: the Indian experience with kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    According to the Indian chronic kidney disease registry, in 2010 only 2% of end stage kidney disease patients were managed with kidney transplantation, 37% were managed with dialysis and 61% were treated conservatively without renal replacement therapy. In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. The most common reason to decline a donor for directed living donation is ABO incompatibility, which eliminates up to one third of the potential living donor pool. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. In transplant centres with a large living donor kidney transplantation program KPD does not require extra infrastructure, decreases waiting time, avoids transplant tourism and prevents commercial trafficking. Although KPD is still underutilized in India, it has been performed more frequently in recent times. To substantially increase donor pool and transplant rates, transplant centres should work together towards a national KPD program and frame a uniform acceptable allocation policy.

  19. Giardia lamblia infection after pancreas-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Ann Abkjaer; Horneland, Rune; Birn, Henrik; Svensson, My

    2016-01-18

    Infection is a common complication of solid organ transplantation. It is associated with an increased risk of acute cellular rejection and loss of graft function. The most common infections are due to bacteria and viruses, including transmission of cytomegalovirus from donor to recipient. In the past years, an increasing number of parasitic infections have been documented in transplant recipients. We describe the first reported case of intestinal Giardia lamblia transmission following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation.

  20. Urinary Obstruction of Transplanted Kidney Caused by Uterine Adenomyosis and 2-Year Posthysterectomy Psoas Abscess in Conjunction with Transplanted Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Yuta; Nohara, Takahiro; Mizokami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Urinary obstruction of the transplanted kidney caused by uterine leiomyoma is an extremely rare condition. To the best of our knowledge, there are only two reports in English literature. Psoas abscess secondary to renal graft pyelonephritis is also uncommon. We present this unusual case and its treatment course. A 43-year-old female presented with renal dysfunction. She was started on peritoneal dialysis from the age of 26 years and received kidney transplantation from her mother (living donor) at the age of 27 years. Computed tomography (CT) revealed right hydronephrosis and a large uterine mass compressing the distal ureter of the transplanted kidney. After a simple total hysterectomy, her renal function improved. Two years following the hysterectomy, she experienced painful urination, fever, right abdominal pain, and right lower limb pain. CT and T2-weighed magnetic resonance imaging of her pelvis demonstrated right psoas abscess in conjunction with transplanted kidney. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics alone, which resulted in a good response. Urinary obstruction of the transplanted kidney caused by uterine leiomyoma is an extremely rare condition. Psoas abscess secondary to transplanted kidney pyelonephritis is also rare. We should keep these rare diseases in mind when treating such cases. PMID:28097036

  1. [Advantages of living donor kidney transplantation; possibilities in the national transplantation program].

    PubMed

    Petrányi, Gyozo; Gyódi, Eva; Padányi, Agnes; Rajczy, Katalin

    2004-12-05

    The review paper summarizes the advantages of the living donor kidney transplantation aiming that this kind of activity should get more support in Hungary. It is a general phenomenon overall the world, that there is no more possibility to increase the number of cadaver transplantations, and the outcome of them is also worsening because of the accumulation of aged patients with long time period of dialysis treatment. The paper points out the better results of living donor kidney transplantation underlining that the kidney long term survival, in general, is 10% over the cadaver kidney survival with significant less complication. The indication of living related and unrelated donor kidney transplantation is reported and the harmless of donor kidney removal demonstrated. An important part of the review contains the ethical, legal and social issue of the living donation, moreover, its economical benefit. It shows that in certain countries the living donation becomes in the forefront of the transplantation activity, which demonstrates from statistical point of view the overall benefit in comparison to cadaver transplantation. Based on the experience of those countries, which are performing this type of transplantation for a long time ago recommendation is given what should be the methodology to increase the activity in this field of transplantation.

  2. Outcomes of Pediatric Kidney Transplantation in Recipients of a Previous Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hamdani, G; Zhang, B; Liu, C; Goebel, J; Zhang, Y; Nehus, E

    2017-03-07

    Children who receive a non-renal solid organ transplant may develop secondary renal failure requiring kidney transplantation. We investigated outcomes of 165 pediatric kidney transplant recipients who previously received a heart, lung, or liver transplant using data from 1988 to 2012 reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing. Patient and allograft survival were compared with 330 matched primary kidney transplant (PKT) recipients. Kidney transplantation after solid organ transplant (KASOT) recipients experienced similar allograft survival: 5- and 10-year graft survival was 78% and 60% in KASOT recipients, compared to 80% and 61% in PKT recipients (p = 0.69). However, KASOT recipients demonstrated worse 10-year patient survival (75% KASOT vs. 97% PKT, p < 0.001). Competing risks analysis indicated that KASOT recipients more often experienced graft loss due to patient death (p < 0.001), whereas allograft failure per se was more common in PKT recipients (p = 0.01). To study more recent outcomes, kidney transplants performed from 2006 to 2012 were separately investigated. Since 2006, KASOT and PKT recipients had similar 5-year graft survival (82% KASOT vs. 83% PKT, p = 0.48), although 5-year patient survival of KASOT recipients remained inferior (90% KASOT vs. 98% PKT, p < 0.001). We conclude that despite decreased patient survival, kidney allograft outcomes in pediatric KASOT recipients are comparable to those of PKT recipients.

  3. [The combined transplantation of the pancreatoduodenal complex and kidney].

    PubMed

    Kaabak, M M; Zokoev, A K; Babenko, N N

    2013-01-01

    Patients with diabetic nephropathy comprise up to 30% of dialisis population. The treatment optimum for these patients remains the transplantation of pancreas and kidney. There were no successful attempts in Russia so long ago as the end of the previous century. The issue analyses the experience of the SCS (where the first successful transplantation of kidney-pancreas complex was conducted) and other Russian institutes, where the problem is elaborated. Flaws and advantages of the used operative methods of pancreas and Β-cells transplantation; early and long-term results are thoroughly discussed.

  4. Recommendations for donation after circulatory death kidney transplantation in Europe.

    PubMed

    van Heurn, L W Ernest; Talbot, David; Nicholson, Michael L; Akhtar, Mohammed Z; Sanchez-Fructuoso, Ana I; Weekers, Laurent; Barrou, Benoit

    2016-07-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors provides an invaluable source for kidneys for transplantation. Over the last decade, we have observed a substantial increase in the number of DCD kidneys, particularly within Europe. We provide an overview of risk factors associated with DCD kidney function and survival and formulate recommendations from the sixth international conference on organ donation in Paris, for best-practice guidelines. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Topics are discussed, including donor selection, organ procurement, organ preservation, recipient selection and transplant management.

  5. Pregnancy and contraceptive counseling of women with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    Women with kidney disease of childbearing age should expect proactive counseling regarding pregnancy and contraception. Discussions should include the impact of pregnancy on their kidney disease and the impact of kidney disease on maternal and fetal outcomes. However, nephrologists rarely discuss sexual dysfunction, infertility, menstrual irregularities, and contraception with their premenopausal women patients. This review will consider pregnancy-related issues to discuss when counseling women with all stages of chronic kidney disease. Issues related to contraception in women on dialysis, women with functioning kidney transplants, and those with chronic kidney disease will also be reviewed.

  6. Graft and Patient Survival Outcomes of a Third Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Robert R.; Gupta, Meera; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Wood, Alexander; Abt, Peter L.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The waiting time for deceased donor renal transplantation in the United States continues to grow. Retransplant candidates make up a small but growing percentage of the overall transplant waiting list and raise questions about the stewardship of scarce resources. The utility of renal transplantation among individuals with two prior renal transplants is not described in the literature and we thus sought to determine the survival benefit associated with a third kidney transplant (3KT). Methods Multivariable Cox regression models were created to determine characteristics associated with 3KT outcomes and the survival benefit of 3KT among recipients wait listed and transplanted within the United States between 1995 and 2009. Results 4,334 patients were waitlisted for a 3KT and 2,492 patients received a 3KT. In a multivariate analysis, 3KT demonstrated an overall patient survival benefit compared to the wait list (HR-0.379, CI=0.302-0.475 p<0.001) for those awaiting their first, second or third kidney transplants, although an inferior graft outcome compared to first kidney transplants. The time to survival benefit did not accrue until 8-months after transplant. Additionally we found that the duration of second graft survival was predictive of third graft survival, such that second graft survival beyond 5 years is associated with superior 3KT graft survival. Second graft loss in 30 days or less was not associated with inferior 3KT graft survival. Conclusion 3KT achieves a survival benefit over remaining on the wait list, although is associated with inferior graft outcomes compared to first kidney transplants. Graft survival of the second transplant beyond 5 years is associated with superior 3KT graft survival. PMID:25121473

  7. Cat-scratch disease relapse in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Rheault, Michelle N; van Burik, Jo-Anne; Mauer, Michael; Ingulli, Elizabeth; Ferrieri, Patricia; Jessurun, Jose; Chavers, Blanche M

    2007-02-01

    Cat-scratch disease, an infectious illness infrequently reported in kidney transplant patients, is caused by the organism Bartonella henselae and is transmitted through contact with cats or kittens. It is a self-limited disorder in the general pediatric population. Here we present a case of unsuspected cat-scratch disease in a pediatric kidney transplant patient who presented with fever and lymphadenopathy. Eight months after treatment with a short course of azithromycin, the patient developed a recurrence of cat-scratch disease. We emphasize that the evaluation of a young immunocompromised kidney transplant patient presenting with fever and lymphadenopathy should include unusual infections such as cat-scratch disease. We review the diagnosis and treatment of this uncommon infection in the organ transplant population.

  8. Origin of enriched regulatory t cells in patients receiving combined kidney/bone marrow transplantation to induce transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; DeWolf, Susan; Savage, Thomas M; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Obradovic, Aleksandar; LoCascio, Samuel A; Shonts, Brittany; Zuber, Julien; Lau, Sai Ping; Shah, Ravi; Morris, Heather; Steshenko, Valeria; Zorn, Emmanuel; Preffer, Frederic I; Olek, Sven; Dombkowski, David M; Turka, Laurence A; Colvin, Robert; Winchester, Robert; Kawai, Tatsuo; Sykes, Megan

    2017-03-01

    We examined tolerance mechanisms in patients receiving HLA-mismatched combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT) that led to transient chimerism under a previously-published non-myeloablative conditioning regimen (Immune Tolerance Network study ITN036). Polychromatic flow cytometry (FCM) and high throughput sequencing of TCRβ hypervariable regions of DNA from peripheral blood T regulatory cells (Tregs) and CD4 non-Tregs revealed marked early enrichment of regulatory T cells (CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) Foxp3(+) ) in blood that resulted from peripheral proliferation (Ki67(+) ), possibly new thymic emigration (CD31(+) ) and, in one tolerant subject, conversion from non-Tregs. Among recovering conventional T cells, central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells predominated. A large fraction of the T cell clones detected in post-transplant biopsy specimens by TCR sequencing were detected in the peripheral blood and were not donor-reactive. Our results suggest that enrichment of Tregs by new thymic emigration and lymphopenia-driven peripheral proliferation in the early post-transplant period may contribute to tolerance following CKBMT. Furthermore, most conventional T cell clones detected in immunologically quiescent post-transplant biopsies appear to be circulating cells in the microvasculature rather than infiltrating T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Parainfluenza 3 Infections Early After Kidney or Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Helanterä, I; Anttila, V-J; Loginov, R; Lempinen, M

    2017-03-01

    Parainfluenza virus (PIV) can cause serious infections after hematopoietic stem cell or lung transplantation. Limited data exist about PIV infections after kidney transplantation. We describe an outbreak of PIV-3 in a transplant unit. During the outbreak, 45 patients were treated on the ward for postoperative care after kidney or simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantation. Overall, 29 patients were tested for respiratory viruses (12 patients with respiratory symptoms, 17 asymptomatic exposed patients) from nasopharyngeal swabs using polymerase chain reaction. PIV-3 infection was confirmed in 12 patients. One patient remained asymptomatic. In others, symptoms were mostly mild upper respiratory tract symptoms and subsided within a few days with symptomatic treatment. Two patients suffered from lower respiratory tract symptoms (dyspnea, hypoxemia, pulmonary infiltrates in chest computed tomography) and required supplemental oxygen. Four of six SPK patients and eight of 39 of kidney transplant patients were infected with PIV (p = 0.04). In patients with follow-up tests, PIV-3 shedding was still detected 11-16 days after diagnosis. Despite rapid isolation of symptomatic patients, PIV-3 findings were diagnosed within 24 days, and the outbreak ceased only after closing the transplant ward temporarily. In conclusion, PIV-3 infections early after kidney or SPK transplantation were mostly mild. PIV-3 easily infected immunosuppressed transplant recipients, with prolonged viral shedding.

  10. Kidney transplantation in the context of renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Todd E

    2009-12-01

    Kidney transplantation has dramatically evolved from a life-saving yet unproven therapy for patients with renal failure to a mature field that is the preferred treatment for those suffering from ESRD. Patients who receive a transplant experience a 68% lower risk of death compared with those waiting on dialysis for a transplant. This benefit is afforded to all patient subgroups including the elderly (> or =70 yr), and diabetics, who can gain 11 yr of extra life with transplantation. Prolonged transplant wait times result in a higher risk of death but this can be ameliorated with preemptive transplantation. Future challenges will focus on appropriate organ allocation and addressing long-term renal function and comorbid conditions so patients can enjoy the full benefits of transplantation.

  11. The influence of warm ischemia elimination on kidney injury during transplantation – clinical and molecular study

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Hałoń, Agnieszka; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Myszka, Marta; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Polak, Wojciech; Boratyńska, Maria; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Kidney surface cooling was used during implantation to assess the effect of warm ischemia elimination on allograft function, histological changes and immune-related gene expression. 23 recipients were randomly assigned to a group operated on with kidney surface cooling during implantation (ice bag technique, IBT group), and the other 23 recipients receiving the contralateral kidney from the same donor were operated on with a standard technique. Three consecutive kidney core biopsies were obtained during the transplantation procedure: after organ recovery, after cold ischemia and after reperfusion. Gene expression levels were determined using low-density arrays (Format 32, TaqMan). The IBT group showed a significantly lower rate of detrimental events (delayed graft function and/or acute rejection, p = 0.015) as well as higher glomerular filtration rate on day 14 (p = 0.026). A greater decrease of MMP9 and LCN2 gene expression was seen in the IBT group during total ischemia (p = 0.003 and p = 0.018). Elimination of second warm ischemia reduced the number of detrimental events after kidney transplantation, and thus had influence on the short-term but not long-term allograft function. Surface cooling of the kidney during vascular anastomosis may reduce some detrimental effects of immune activation resulting from both brain death and ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27808277

  12. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progresses, specific histologic disturbances in the bone develop, which may or may not be predictable from the biochemical and hormonal changes that are associated with chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients may have had underlying bone disease before developing kidney failure or may have been treated with agents that will alter the classical pathologic findings of the bones in chronic kidney disease and their relation to parathyroid hormone. Thus, in stage 5 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy with quantitative histomorphometric analysis is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. In contrast to stage 5 chronic kidney disease, there are very few data on the histologic changes in bone in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. There also is no adequate information on the etiopathogenesis of bone disease in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. Thus, because biochemical data cannot predict bone pathology in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy should be used to define these bone changes and to allow appropriate therapeutic approaches. PMID:18988703

  13. Functional Status, Time to Transplantation, and Survival Benefit of Kidney Transplantation Among Wait-Listed Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Shults, Justine; Bloom, Roy D.; Mussell, Adam; Harhay, Meera N.; Abt, Peter; Levine, Matthew; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Karlawish, Jason T.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of an aging end-stage renal disease population with multiple comorbidities, transplantation professionals face challenges in evaluating the global health of patients awaiting kidney transplantation. Functional status might be useful for identifying which patients will derive a survival benefit from transplantation versus dialysis. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of wait-listed patients using data on functional status from a national dialysis provider linked to United Network for Organ Sharing registry data. Setting & Participants Adult kidney transplant candidates added to the waiting list between the years 2000 and 2006. Predictor Physical function scale of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Healthy Survey, analyzed as a time-varying covariate. Outcomes Kidney transplantation; Survival benefit of transplantation versus remaining wait-listed. Measurements We used multivariable Cox regression to assess the association between physical function with study outcomes. In survival benefit analyses, transplant status was modeled as a time-varying covariate. Results The cohort comprised 19,242 kidney transplant candidates (median age, 51 years; 36% black race) receiving maintenance dialysis. Candidates in the lowest baseline physical function quartile were more likely to be inactivated (adjusted HR vs. highest quartile, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.21-1.39) and less likely to undergo transplantation (adjusted HR vs. highest quartile, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.61-0.68). After transplantation, worse physical function was associated with shorter 3-year survival (84% vs. 92% for the lowest vs. highest function quartiles). However, compared to dialysis, transplantation was associated with a statistically significant survival benefit by 9 months for patients in every function quartile. Limitations Functional status is self-reported. Conclusions Even patients with low function appear to live longer with kidney transplantation versus dialysis. For waitlisted

  14. [Need and demand of kidneys for transplantation in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Milanés, C L; Bellorín-Font, E; Weisinger, J; Pernalete, N; Urbina, D; Paz-Martínez, V

    1993-01-01

    The number of cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation has become insufficient around the world. Despite concerted efforts, we have been unsuccessful in greatly improve the supply of organ donors, and consequently the number of end stage renal failure patients awaiting for kidney transplantation continues to increase. The primary objective of this paper is to quantify the need and supply of kidneys for transplant in Venezuela. An overview of the current level of kidney transplant activity in Venezuela is presented, observing that the activity with cadaveric donors had been predominant since 1983, although not to an optimal level. The annual activity in kidney transplant between 1989-1991 remained stable in 6 transplants/million people, but went sharply down to 4.6 in 1992. An estimate of the current need is around 10 donors/million people. This is in contrast with an effective donation rate of only 2.01 and 1.92 donors/million achieved in 1990 and 1991 respectively. The most frequent cause for no donation was the lack of familiar consent. Based on an analysis of the factors involved in the shortage of donor supply in Venezuela, we present some recommendations to increase the availability of cadaveric organ donors in the country. These measures include an improvement of education and legal regulation in the field of organ donation and transplantation, and following the Spanish model, the creation of a program of hospital transplant coordinators that can detect and evaluate potential organ donors as well as coordinate the logistical aspects of transplantation.

  15. [Diabetes following kidney transplantation. Report of 35 cases].

    PubMed

    Kaaroud, Hayet; Khiari, Karima; Beji, Soumaya; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Ayed, Khaled; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2004-02-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication of renal transplantation. It has a prevalence rate ranging from 3 to 46%. We undertook a retrospective study of 175 nondiabetic renal transplant recipients to determine the prevalence rate, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of PTDM in kidney transplant recipients in our region. Thirty five patients (20%) developed PTDM, 50% were diagnosed by 3 months post transplantation. Eight patients (22.8%) were insulin recurrent. PTDM was independent of kidney source, family history of diabetes, age, sex, incidence of acute rejection, body weight gain, steroid or cyclosporine dose, use of beta-blockers and cytomegalovirus infection. Acturial 5 years survival was 79.4% in the diabetic compared to 80.5% in the control group. Patient survival was similar in the two groups. We conclude that PTDM is frequent in our patients. No significant risk factors of PTDM were identified in this study.

  16. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  17. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  18. [New possibilities in kidney transplantation from live unrelated donors].

    PubMed

    Bosković, S

    1990-01-01

    The kidney transplantation, as a method of medical treatment, could not be developed faster in our country for many years. A number of demands for transplantation grows much faster than our modest capability. The similar, but in a rather smaller degree, this problem occurs in some other countries in the world. The main cause is: the organization of corpse collecting and the conservatism of doctors. The latter problem, in the countries of western hemisphere, is surpassed more easily by a doctor codex and a legal obligation that involves doctors actively in this process, which is not the case in our country. The organization of corpse collecting in some states of the USA is highly developed, but however it does not give sufficient number of organs for the cadaveric transplantation. New, additional possibilities are found: the taking of even organs (kidneys) from alive unrelated donors, spouses, which excludes the possibility of greed and gives, only in the USA, about 1.500 additional alive transplantations per year. The complementary medical attitude towards the increasing of number of cadaveric transplantations is: considerably freely taking of kidneys from cadavers without tissue compatibility, only with the compatibility of blood groups of ABO system. Since the immunological criteria, in our country, are very intensified by the Zagreb immunology group, e.g. from 75-100% for alive transplantation, or the minimum of 50% tissue compatibility for cadaveric transplantation, this old-fashioned attitude has considerably lowered the number of transplantations in our country.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Kidney transplantation at the University of Pennsylvania: 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Porrett, Paige M; Kamoun, Malek; Parsons, Ron; Bloom, Roy; Goral, Simin; Reese, Peter; Grossman, Robert; Baluarte, Jorge; Bleicher, Melissa; Doyle, Alden; Markmann, James F; Levine, Matt; Barker, Clyde; Olthoff, Kim; Naji, Ali; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Kidney transplantation at the University of Pennsylvania has grown substantially over the past 11 years. Although our transplant volume has increased primarily as a consequence of multiorgan transplants as well as the utilization of historically "marginal" allografts, our post-transplantation outcomes remain excellent in both children and adults. We attribute these outcomes to technical improvements in tissue typing and donor-recipient crossmatching, modification of immunosuppression protocols, and rigorous donor and recipient selection. In the next decade, we hope to substantially expand our living donor program and refine our overall donor and recipient selection process such that we maintain excellent post-transplant outcomes in the face of aging and increasingly comorbid donors and recipients. We further predict significant changes in post-transplant management of kidney recipients with respect to immunosuppression regimens. In particular, we anticipate the modulation of immunosuppression regimens in recipients with high titers of donor-specific antibody and the integration of B-cell specific immunosuppression into post-transplant patient care. Only time will tell whether such therapies will 1) improve long-term outcomes, 2) allow us to diminish the degree of non-specific pharmacologic immunosuppression currently in use, 3) or even promote donor-specific tolerance in kidney transplant recipients.

  20. Trends in kidney transplantation outcome: the Andalusian Kidney Transplant Registry, 1984-2007.

    PubMed

    Gentil Govantes, M A; Rodriguez-Benot, A; Sola, E; Osuna, A; Mazuecos, A; Bedoya, R; Borrego, J; Muñoz-Terol, J M; Castro, P; Alonso, M

    2009-06-01

    Herein we have presented the first report from the Andalusian Kidney Transplant Registry, a Public Health Service Regional Registry in Andalusia, Spain (general population, 8 million). The current analysis was limited to 5599 kidney-alone transplants from deceased donors, grouped into 4 time periods: 1984-1989 (n = 846); 1990-1995 (n = 1172); 1996-2001 (n = 1801); and 2002-2007 (n = 2060). The age of the transplant patients rose over time to 21.7% of recipients of ages >or=60 years in 2002-2007. In the later years we observed an increased incidence of vascular and diabetic causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients who underwent retransplantation increased from 2.7% in 1984-1989 to 8.1% in 2002-2007. Time on previous renal replacement therapy (RRT) increased from 33.1 +/- 29 to 48 +/- 53 months. Patient survivals at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96%, 91%, 83%, and 63%, respectively. Censoring for death, graft survivals were 90%, 80%, 67%, and 45%, respectively. Compared with the 1984-1989 period, patient survival improved by about 10% (P < .001) since 1990, remaining stable to 2007. Censored 5-year graft survivals progressively improved from 72% to 77%, 82%, and 85% (P < .001). Upon multivariate analysis, gender, age >39 years, diabetes, and RRT duration were independent predictors of patient survival. Age <18 years, retransplantation, and positive hepatitis C virus serology were independent predictors of lower graft survival. Considering 1984-1989 as the reference time period, both patient and graft mortality risks continuously decreased over the following 3 periods (relative risk [RR] = 0.5-0.4-0.3 for patient mortality; RR = 0.8-0.6-0.5 for graft mortality). In summary, despite an increased number of adverse risk factors, both patient and graft survivals have improved from 1984 to date.

  1. Recurrent atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome post kidney transplant due to a CD46 mutation in the setting of SMARCAL1-mediated inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel; Mallett, Andrew J; Patel, Chirag; Francis, Ross S; Johnson, David W; Mudge, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    Disorders in the regulation of the alternate complement pathway often result in complement-mediated damage to the microvascular endothelium and can be associated with both glomerulonephritis and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Inherited defects in complement regulatory genes or autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins are predictive of the severity of the disease and the risk of recurrence post kidney transplantation. Heterozygous mutations in CD46, which codes for a transmembrane cofactor glycoprotein membrane cofactor protein, usually have a lower incidence of end-stage kidney disease and decreased risk of recurrent disease post transplant, as wild-type membrane cofactor protein is present in the transplanted kidney. However, some patients with CD46 mutations have a second variant in other complement regulatory genes increasing the severity of disease. The following case report illustrates the course of a young adult patient with end-stage kidney disease initially ascribed to seronegative systemic lupus erythematosus, who presented with biopsy-proven thrombotic microangiopathy following kidney transplantation. It highlights the complexity associated with disorders of complement regulation and the need for a high index of suspicion and genetic testing in patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy post-transplant.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure.

  3. International kidney paired donation transplantations to increase kidney transplant of O group and highly sensitized patient: First report from India

    PubMed Central

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Shah, Priya S; Wakhare, Pavan S; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Ghodela, Vijay A; Varyani, Umesh T; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Varsha B; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the first international living related two way kidney paired donation (KPD) transplantation from India which occurred on 17th February 2015 after legal permission from authorization committee. METHODS Donor recipient pairs were from Portugal and India who were highly sensitized and ABO incompatible with their spouse respectively. The two donor recipient pairs had negative lymphocyte cross-matching, flow cross-match and donor specific antibody in two way kidney exchange with the intended KPD donor. Local KPD options were fully explored for Indian patient prior to embarking on international KPD. RESULTS Both pairs underwent simultaneous uneventful kidney transplant surgeries and creatinine was 1 mg/dL on tacrolimus based immunosuppression at 11 mo follow up. The uniqueness of these transplantations was that they are first international KPD transplantations in our center. CONCLUSION International KPD will increases quality and quantity of living donor kidney transplantation. This could be an important step to solving the kidney shortage with additional benefit of reduced costs, improved quality and increased access for difficult to match incompatible pairs like O blood group patient with non-O donor and sensitized patient. To the best of our knowledge this is first international KPD transplantation from India. PMID:28280697

  4. Severe antibody-mediated rejection following IVIG infusion in a kidney transplant recipient with BK-virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mainra, R; Xu, Q; Chibbar, R; Hassan, A; Shoker, A

    2013-06-01

    Intravenous immune-globulin (IVIG) use in renal transplantation has increased, with common uses including desensitization, treatment of antibody mediated rejection and adjunctive therapy for BK virus nephropathy. Although considered generally safe, potential side effects can occur in up to 23% of patients including acute kidney injury. We present a case of an unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a renal transplant recipient following IVIG infusion. A 48-year-old nonsensitized female with end stage renal disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease received a deceased donor kidney transplant. The initial post-transplant period was unremarkable however at three years post-transplant the patient develops BK virus nephropathy. Despite a reduction in immunosuppression, graft function worsened and IVIG infusion was commenced. Immediately following the IVIG infusion, the patient develops anuric acute kidney injury necessitating hemodialysis. Renal transplant biopsy performed before and after the IVIG infusion revealed the de novo development of acute antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies in the serum. Anti-HLA and donor-specific antibodies were also confirmed in a diluted sample of the IVIG preparation. We argue that the anti-HLA antibodies present in the IVIG caused an acute antibody mediated rejection in this previously nonsensitized female.

  5. Adverse Outcomes of Tacrolimus Withdrawal in Immune-Quiescent Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Hricik, Donald E; Formica, Richard N; Nickerson, Peter; Rush, David; Fairchild, Robert L; Poggio, Emilio D; Gibson, Ian W; Wiebe, Chris; Tinckam, Kathryn; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Samaniego-Picota, Milagros; Brennan, Daniel C; Schröppel, Bernd; Gaber, Osama; Armstrong, Brian; Ikle, David; Diop, Helena; Bridges, Nancy D; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Concerns about adverse effects of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) have prompted development of protocols that minimize their use. Whereas previous CNI withdrawal trials in heterogeneous cohorts showed unacceptable rates of acute rejection (AR), we hypothesized that we could identify individuals capable of tolerating CNI withdrawal by targeting immunologically quiescent kidney transplant recipients. The Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-09 Trial was a randomized, prospective study of nonsensitized primary recipients of living donor kidney transplants. Subjects received rabbit antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Six months post-transplantation, subjects without de novo donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), AR, or inflammation at protocol biopsy were randomized to wean off or remain on tacrolimus. The intended primary end point was the change in interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy score between implantation and 24-month protocol biopsies. Serially collected urine CXCL9 ELISA results were correlated with outcomes. The study was terminated prematurely because of unacceptable rates of AR (4 of 14) and/or de novo DSAs (5 of 14) in the tacrolimus withdrawal arm. Positive urinary CXCL9 predated clinical detection of AR by a median of 15 days. Analyses showed that >16 HLA-DQ epitope mismatches and pretransplant, peripheral blood, donor-reactive IFN-γ ELISPOT assay results correlated with development of DSAs and/or AR on tacrolimus withdrawal. Although data indicate that urinary CXCL9 monitoring, epitope mismatches, and ELISPOT assays are potentially informative, complete CNI withdrawal must be strongly discouraged in kidney transplant recipients who are receiving standard-of-care immunosuppression, including those who are deemed to be immunologically quiescent on the basis of current clinical and laboratory criteria.

  6. The Global Role of Kidney Transplantation for the World Kidney Day Steering Committee 2012

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Harden, P.; Chapman, J.

    2012-01-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th, 2012, provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments, both for the quality and quantity of life, that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high-income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit. PMID:25013617

  7. Changing Paradigms in the Management of Rejection in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Mirela; Takano, Tomoko; Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: P4 medicine denotes an evolving field of medicine encompassing predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory medicine. Using the example of kidney allograft rejection because of donor-recipient incompatibility in human leukocyte antigens, this review outlines P4 medicine’s relevance to the various stages of the kidney transplant cycle. Sources of information: A search for English articles was conducted in Medline via OvidSP (up to August 18, 2016) using a combination of subject headings (MeSH) and free text in titles, abstracts, and author keywords for the concepts kidney transplantation and P4 medicine. The electronic database search was expanded further on particular subject headings. Findings: Available histocompatibility methods exemplify current applications of the predictive and preventive domains of P4 medicine in kidney transplant recipients’ care. Pharmacogenomics are discussed as means to facilitate personalized immunosuppression regimens and promotion of active patient participation as a means to improve adherence. Limitations: For simplicity, this review focuses on rejection. P4 medicine, however, should more broadly address health concerns in kidney transplant recipients, including competing outcomes such as infections, malignancies, and cardiovascular disease. This review highlights how biomarkers to evaluate these competing outcomes warrant validation and standardization prior to their incorporation into clinical practice. Implications: Consideration of all 4 domains of the P4 medicine framework when caring for and/or studying kidney transplant recipients has the potential of increasing therapeutic efficiency, minimizing adverse effects, decreasing health care costs, and maximizing wellness. Technologies to gauge immune competency, immunosuppression requirements, and early/reversible immune-mediated injuries are required to optimize kidney transplant care. PMID:28270929

  8. Understanding Trends in Kidney Function 1 Year after Kidney Transplant in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihung; Tilea, Anca; Gillespie, Brenda; Shahinian, Vahakn; Banerjee, Tanushree; Grubbs, Vanessa; Powe, Neil; Rios-Burrows, Nilka; Pavkov, Meda; Saran, Rajiv

    2017-03-07

    Lower eGFR 1 year after kidney transplant is associated with shorter allograft and patient survival. We examined how practice changes in the past decade correlated with time trends in average eGFR at 1 year after kidney transplant in the United States in a cohort of 189,944 patients who received a kidney transplant between 2001 and 2013. We calculated the average eGFR at 1 year after transplant for the recipient cohort of each year using the appropriate Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation depending on the prevailing methodology of creatinine measurement, and used linear regression to model the effects of practice changes on the national post-transplant eGFR trend. Between the 2001-2005 period and the 2011-2013 period, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained essentially unchanged, with differences of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.65) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.01) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) among deceased and living donor kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Over time, the mean age of recipients increased and more marginal organs were used; adjusting for these trends unmasked a larger temporal improvement in post-transplant eGFR. However, changes in immunosuppression practice had a positive effect on average post-transplant eGFR and balanced out the negative effect of recipient/donor characteristics. In conclusion, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained stable, despite increasingly unfavorable attributes in recipients and donors. With an aging ESRD population and continued organ shortage, preservation of average post-transplant eGFR will require sustained improvement in immunosuppression and other aspects of post-transplant care.

  9. Pilot feasibility research of Chinese version of kidney transplant questionnaire in recipients of living donor kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yujian; Zhang, Wenxin; Mao, Sha; Gao, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Li, Jun; Wang, Letian; Guan, Zhaojie; Shen, Zhongyang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of the Chinese version of Kidney Transplant Questionnaire (KTQ) by evaluating the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Chinese recipients of living donor kidney transplantation. Methods: The English version of KTQ was translated into Chinese and underwent cultural adaptation to obtain the Chinese version of KTQ. HRQoL of 136 Chinese recipients of living donor kidney transplantation that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated to assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire. Results: One hundred and thirty-six recipients (98 males and 38 females) of living donor kidney transplantation were included. The mean age of the recipients was 43.91 years. For each dimension of the questionnaire, the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.7-0.9, test-retest reliability coefficient ≥0.7, goodness of fit index (GFI) >0.9, and comparative fitness index (CFI) >0.9. Conclusion: The validity and reliability of the Chinese version of KTQ is similar to the English version, suggesting that the Chinese version of KTQ could be applied as a disease-specific questionnaire to evaluate the HRQoL of the recipients of living donor kidney transplantation in China. PMID:26885244

  10. The bioethics and utility of selling kidneys for renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berman, E; Lipschutz, J M; Bloom, R D; Lipschutz, J H

    2008-06-01

    In the 53 years since kidney transplantation was first performed, this procedure has evolved from a highly speculative biomedical endeavor to a medically viable and often standard course of therapy. Long-term survival is markedly improved among patients who receive a kidney compared with patients who remain on the waiting list for such an organ. As outcomes have improved and more clinical indications have emerged, the number of people awaiting transplantation has grown significantly. In stark contrast to the robust expansion of the waiting list, the number of available deceased donors has remained relatively constant over the last several years. The current mechanism for procuring kidneys relies on voluntary donations by the general public, with the primary motivation being altruism. However, in light of the ever-increasing waiting list, it is the researchers' belief that the current system needs to be revised if supply is ever going to meet demand. In response to this critical organ shortage, different programs have been developed in an attempt to increase organ donation. At present, however, no solution to the problem has emerged. This report begins by outlining the scope of the problem and current legislation governing the procurement of transplantable organs/tissues in the United States. It continues with an overview of different proposals to increase supply. It concludes by exploring some of the controversy surrounding the proposal to increase donation using financial incentives. Though the following discussion certainly has implications for other transplantable organs, this report focuses on kidney transplantation because the waiting list for kidneys is by far the longest of all waiting lists for solid organs; and, as kidney transplant carries the smallest risk to living donors, it is the least ethically problematic.

  11. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...' local dialysis facilities. (b) Standard: Dialysis services. Kidney transplant centers must furnish inpatient dialysis services directly or under arrangement. (c) Standard: Participation in network activities. Kidney transplant centers must cooperate with the ESRD Network designated for their geographic area,...

  12. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...' local dialysis facilities. (b) Standard: Dialysis services. Kidney transplant centers must furnish inpatient dialysis services directly or under arrangement. (c) Standard: Participation in network activities. Kidney transplant centers must cooperate with the ESRD Network designated for their geographic area,...

  13. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...' local dialysis facilities. (b) Standard: Dialysis services. Kidney transplant centers must furnish inpatient dialysis services directly or under arrangement. (c) Standard: Participation in network activities. Kidney transplant centers must cooperate with the ESRD Network designated for their geographic area,...

  14. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...' local dialysis facilities. (b) Standard: Dialysis services. Kidney transplant centers must furnish inpatient dialysis services directly or under arrangement. (c) Standard: Participation in network activities. Kidney transplant centers must cooperate with the ESRD Network designated for their geographic area,...

  15. Of kin and kidneys: do kinship networks contribute to racial disparities in living donor kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Daw, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, racial disparities in kidney transplantation are large and especially stark for living donor transplants. Medical researchers frequently attribute this to the availability of medically compatible living kidney donors, who are usually kin. This paper evaluates this hypothesis by testing whether African American transplant candidates likely have lesser access to suitable living donors in their kinship networks than white candidates. This paper evaluates this hypothesis using a simulation design. Contrary to prior research on this topic, this simulation analysis concludes that black-white disparities in living donor kidney transplantation are unlikely to be the result of group differences in the availability of suitable donors. Although individual white kin are individually more likely to be suitable donors, African Americans' larger average kinship networks compensate for this difference.

  16. Histological spectrum of pulmonary manifestations in kidney transplant recipients on sirolimus inclusive immunosuppressive regimens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After the introduction of novel effective immunosuppressive therapies, kidney transplantation became the treatment of choice for end stage renal disease. While these new therapies lead to better graft survival, they can also cause a variety of complications. Only small series or case reports describe pulmonary pathology in renal allograft recipients on mTOR inhibitor inclusive therapies. The goal of this study was to provide a systematic review of thoracic biopsies in kidney transplant recipients for possible association between a type of immunosuppressive regimen and pulmonary complications. Methods A laboratory database search revealed 28 of 2140 renal allograft recipients (18 males and 10 females, 25 to 77 years old, mean age 53 years) who required a biopsy for respiratory symptoms. The histological features were correlated with clinical findings including immunosuppressive medications. Results The incidence of neoplasia on lung biopsy was 0.4% (9 cases), which included 3 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenocarcinomas, 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 1 lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and 2 post transplant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease was identified in 0.4% (9 cases), and included 5 cases of pulmonary hemorrhage, 3 cases of organizing pneumonia and 1 case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Five (0.2%) cases showed histological features indicative of a localized infectious process. Patients on sirolimus had neoplasia less frequently than patients on other immunosuppressive combinations (12.5% vs. 58.3%, p = 0.03). Lung biopsies in 4 of 5 patients with clinically suspected sirolimus toxicity revealed pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole histological finding or in combination with other patterns. Conclusions Our study documents a spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions in renal allograft recipients on current immunosuppressive therapies. Sirolimus inclusive regimens are associated with increased risk of pulmonary

  17. Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hall, E C; Segev, D L; Engels, E A

    2013-03-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated cancer risk, but it is unknown if cancer risk differs across race and ethnicity as in the general population. US kidney recipients (N = 87,895) in the Transplant Cancer Match Study between 1992 and 2008 were evaluated for racial/ethnic differences in risk for six common cancers after transplantation. Compared to white recipients, black recipients had lower incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0.60, p<0.001) and higher incidence of kidney (aIRR 2.09, p<0.001) and prostate cancer (aIRR 2.14, p<0.001); Hispanic recipients had lower incidence of NHL (aIRR 0.64, p = 0.001), lung (aIRR 0.41, p < 0.001), breast (aIRR 0.53, p = 0.003) and prostate cancer (aIRR 0.72, p = 0.05). Colorectal cancer incidence was similar across groups. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) measured the effect of transplantation on cancer risk and were similar for most cancers (p≥0.1). However, black and Hispanic recipients had larger increases in kidney cancer risk with transplantation (SIRs: 8.96 in blacks, 5.95 in Hispanics vs. 4.44 in whites), and only blacks had elevated prostate cancer risk following transplantation (SIR: 1.21). Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after transplantation mirror general population patterns, except for kidney and prostate cancers where differences reflect the effects of end-stage renal disease or transplantation.

  18. Comparing Three Data Mining Methods to Predict Kidney Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Leila; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Pourmand, Gholamreza; fard, Ziba Aghsaei; Borhani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important complications of post-transplant is rejection. Analyzing survival is one of the areas of medical prognosis and data mining, as an effective approach, has the capacity of analyzing and estimating outcomes in advance through discovering appropriate models among data. The present study aims at comparing the effectiveness of C5.0 algorithms, neural network and C&RTree to predict kidney transplant survival before transplant. Method: To detect factors effective in predicting transplant survival, information needs analysis was performed via a researcher-made questionnaire. A checklist was prepared and data of 513 kidney disease patient files were extracted from Sina Urology Research Center. Following CRISP methodology for data mining, IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2, C5.0, C&RTree algorithms and neural network were used. Results: Body Mass Index (BMI), cause of renal dysfunction and duration of dialysis were evaluated in all three models as the most effective factors in transplant survival. C5.0 algorithm with the highest validity (96.77%) was the first in estimating kidney transplant survival in patients followed by C&RTree (83.7%) and neural network (79.5%) models. Conclusion: Among the three models, C5.0 algorithm was the top model with high validity that confirms its strength in predicting survival. The most effective kidney transplant survival factors were detected in this study; therefore, duration of transplant survival (year) can be determined considering the regulations set for a new sample with specific characteristics. PMID:28163356

  19. Antidiabetic therapy in post kidney transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Werzowa, Johannes; Säemann, Marcus; Haidinger, Michael; Krebs, Michael; Hecking, Manfred

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after kidney transplantation that affects up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. By pathogenesis, PTDM is a diabetes form of its own, and may be characterised by a sudden, drug-induced deficiency in insulin secretion rather than worsening of insulin resistance over time. In the context of deteriorating allograft function leading to a re-occurrence of chronic kidney disease after transplantation, pharmacological interventions in PTDM patients deserve special attention. In the present review, we aim at presenting the current evidence regarding efficacy and safety of the modern antidiabetic armamentarium. Specifically, we focus on incretin-based therapies and insulin treatment, besides metformin and glitazones, and discuss their respective advantages and pitfalls. Although recent pilot trials are available in both prediabetes and PTDM, further studies are warranted to elucidate the ideal timing of various antidiabetics as well as its long-term impact on safety, glucose metabolism and cardiovascular outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

  20. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment.

  1. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard; Frymoyer, Adam; Lewandowski, Andrew; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Feig, Daniel I.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Warady, Bradley A.; Goebel, Jens W.; Schwartz, George J.; Lewis, Kenneth; Anand, Ravinder; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options—including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors—are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7–17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard non-compartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n=13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30–59 ml/min per 1.73m2), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  2. Maternal compared with paternal donor kidneys are associated with poorer graft outcomes after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wai H; McDonald, Stephen P; Coates, Patrick T; Chapman, Jeremy R; Russ, Graeme R; Wong, Germaine

    2016-03-01

    Noninherited maternal human leukocyte antigens may be less detrimental on allograft outcomes after kidney transplantation compared with noninherited paternal antigens, but this association in the era of modern immunosuppression remains unknown. Here we determine the association between parental donor kidneys, acute rejection, and graft failure in primary live-donor parental kidney transplant recipients using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry between 1997 and 2012. Of the 1139 recipients followed for a median of 7.2 years (8588 person-years), 652 received kidneys from maternal donors. Compared with paternal donor kidneys, maternal donor kidneys were associated with a significantly increased risk of acute rejection (adjusted odds ratio 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.07) and significant overall graft loss. The latter was confined to recipients who have experienced acute rejection (adjusted hazard ratio 1.60; 95%CI, 1.05-2.43) but not in those who did not experience acute rejection. Thus, our study suggests that recipients of maternal donor kidneys have a greater risk of rejection and graft loss. Hence, clinicians and patients should be cognizant of this association when determining which of the 2 parental donors is most suitable for transplantation.

  3. Scintigraphic detection of urinary leakage after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    DeLange, E E; Pauwels, E K; Lobatto, S; Tjon Pian Gi-van Loon, C E; van Hooff, J P

    1982-01-01

    Urinary leakage after kidney transplantation is a serious complication. In a retrospective study we analyzed 8 relevant cases of 14 patients with urinary leakage. In these eight patients kidney scintigraphy indicated the presence of urinary extravasation. Compared with other imaging modalities such as IV urography, cystography and ultrasound, scintigraphy seems to be an easy and safe method to detect urinary leakage. Moreover scintigraphic examination may suggest leakage, while this may not be clinically evident or suspected.

  4. The Histopathologic Spectrum of Kidney Biopsies in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Patrick D.; Larsen, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Kidney disease as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), has been the subject of case reports. However, no cases series examining IBD and kidney disease has been published to date. This study aimed to evaluate a large series of kidney biopsy specimens from patients with IBD to better define the spectrum and relative frequencies of IBD-associated kidney pathology. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective review of native kidney biopsy specimens obtained from March 2001 to June 2012 identified 83 patients with IBD. Standard processing of all biopsy specimens included light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. Results There were 45 cases of CD and 38 cases of UC represented. The most common indication for kidney biopsy was acute or chronic kidney failure (63% [52 of 83]) and nephrotic-range proteinuria (16% [13 of 83]). IgA nephropathy was the most common diagnosis (24% [20 of 83]), followed by interstitial nephritis (19% [16 of 83]), arterionephrosclerosis (12% [10 of 83]), acute tubular injury (8% [7 of 83]), proliferative GN (7% [6 of 83]), and minimal-change disease (5% [4 of 83]). When compared, the frequency of IgA nephropathy in IBD was significantly higher than in all other native renal biopsy specimens from the same time period (24% [20 of 83] versus 8% [2734 of 33,630]; P<0.001). Of the 16 cases of interstitial nephritis, 9 (56%) had current or recent past exposure to aminosalicylates, including all cases of granulomatous interstitial nephritis. Conclusions IBD is associated with a spectrum of kidney diseases most commonly affecting the glomerular and tubulointerstitial compartments. IgA nephropathy is the most frequent kidney biopsy diagnosis in IBD and has a significantly higher diagnostic prevalence compared with all non-IBD kidney biopsy specimens. This may reflect a common pathogenic mechanism. Although many

  5. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on clinical outcomes in HIV + kidney transplant recipients: Review of 58 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lorio, Marco A.; Morris, Michele I.; Abbo, Lilian M.; Simkins, Jacques; Guerra, Giselle; Roth, David; Kupin, Warren L.; Mattiazzi, Adela; Ciancio, Gaetano; Chen, Linda J.; Burke, George W.; Figueiro, Jose M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Camargo, Jose F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) poses challenging drug-drug interactions with immunosuppressant agents in transplant recipients.  We aimed to determine the impact of specific antiretroviral regimens in clinical outcomes of HIV + kidney transplant recipients.  Methods: A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted at a large academic center. Subjects included 58 HIV - to HIV + adult, first-time kidney transplant patients. The main intervention was ART regimen used after transplantation.  The main outcomes assessed at one- and three-years were: patient survival, death-censored graft survival, and biopsy-proven acute rejection; we also assessed serious infections within the first six months post-transplant.  Results: Patient and graft survival at three years were both 90% for the entire cohort. Patients receiving protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimens had lower patient survival at one and three years than patients receiving PI-sparing regimens: 85% vs. 100% ( p=0.06) and 82% vs. 100% ( p=0.03), respectively. Patients who received PI-containing regimens had twelve times higher odds of death at 3 years compared to patients who were not exposed to PIs (odds ratio, 12.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-1602; p=0.02).  Three-year death-censored graft survival was lower in patients receiving PI vs. patients on PI-sparing regimens (82 vs 100%, p=0.03). Patients receiving integrase strand transfer inhibitors-containing regimens had higher 3-year graft survival. There were no differences in the incidence of acute rejection by ART regimen. Individuals receiving PIs had a higher incidence of serious infections compared to those on PI-sparing regimens (39 vs. 8%, p=0.01).  Conclusions: PI-containing ART regimens are associated with adverse outcomes in HIV + kidney transplant recipients. PMID:28299182

  6. Functional status and survival after kidney transplantation1–12

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Bloom, Roy D.; Shults, Justine; Thomasson, Arwin; Mussell, Adam; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Abt, Peter; Levine, Matthew; Caplan, Arthur; Feldman, Harold I.; Karlawish, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Background Older patients constitute a growing proportion of U.S. kidney transplant recipients and often have a high burden of comorbidities. A summary measure of health such as functional status might enable transplant professionals to better evaluate and counsel these patients about their prognosis after transplant. Methods We linked UNOS registry data about post-transplant survival with pre-transplant functional status data (physical function [PF] scale of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36) among individuals undergoing kidney transplant from 6/1/2000 – 5/31/2006. We examined the relationship between survival and functional status with multivariable Cox regression, adjusted for age. Using logistic regression models for three-year survival, we also estimated the reduction in deaths in the hypothetical scenario that recipients with poor functional status in this cohort experienced modest improvements in function. Results The cohort comprised 10,875 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with a mean age of 50 years; 14% were ≥65. Differences in three-year mortality between highest and lowest PF groups ranged from 3% among recipients <35 years to 14% among recipients ≥65 years. In multivariable Cox regression, worse PF was associated with higher mortality (HR 1.66 for lowest versus highest PF quartiles; p<0.001). Interactions between PF and age were non-significant. We estimated that 11% fewer deaths would occur if KTRs with the lowest functional status experienced modest improvements in function. Conclusions Across a wide age range, functional status was an independent predictor of post-transplant survival. Functional status assessment may be a useful tool with which to counsel patients about post-transplant outcomes. PMID:24113514

  7. The clinical course of IgA nephropathy after kidney transplantation and its management.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Panagiotellis, Konstantinos; Melexopoulou, Christine; Boletis, John N

    2017-02-02

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is one of the most common primary glomerulonephritides worldwide causing end stage renal disease in up to 20-40% of affected patients, nearly two decades post diagnosis. Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with renal failure, secondary to glomerular diseases. However, IgA nephropathy has a strong tendency to recur in the graft, and although initially thought to be a benign condition, several reports of graft loss, due to recurrent IgA nephropathy, there have been over the last three decades. Overall graft survival has been significantly improved in kidney transplantation, as a result of reduced incidence of acute rejection, as more potent and more specific immunosuppressive agents are now available in clinical practice. Thus, the rates of IgA nephropathy and other glomerulonephritides recurrence are expected to increase, since graft survival has been improved. However, the reported incidence of IgA nephropathy recurrence in the graft varies substantially across centers, as a consequence of different levels of interest, diverse biopsy policies and differing durations of follow up, of the published studies. Notably, recurrence rates of patients receiving graft biopsies by clinical indication only, ranges from 13% to 50% with graft loss being between 1.3% and 16%. The aim of this review is to underline important pathogenetic insights of IgA nephropathy, describe the clinical course of the disease after kidney transplantation, with emphasis on the incidence of recurrence and the associated risk factors, and finally provide all available options for its management in transplant recipients.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  9. 77 FR 49447 - Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation... trials of drugs and therapeutic biologics in kidney transplantation. This public workshop is intended to... evaluate patient and allograft outcome in clinical trials of kidney transplantation. The meeting...

  10. Kidney and liver transplantation in children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease: data from the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jessica W; Furth, Susan L; Ruebner, Rebecca L

    2014-11-01

    The natural history and survival of children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease undergoing solid organ transplantation have infrequently been described. We report outcomes in a cohort of US children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease receiving solid organ transplants over 20 yr. Retrospective cohort study of pediatric transplant recipients with diagnoses of fibrocystic liver-kidney disease from 1/1990 to 3/2010, using data from the SRTR. Subjects were categorized by the first transplanted organ: LT, KT, or SLK. Primary outcomes were death, re-transplant, transplant of the alternate organ, or initiation of dialysis. Seven hundred and sixteen subjects were transplanted in this period. Median age at first transplant was 9.7 yr. Of the LT, 14 (19%) required a second liver transplant at median of 0.2 yr, and five (7%) required kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 9.0 yr. Of the KT, 188 (31%) required a second kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 5.9 yr. Twenty-nine (5%) subsequently received liver transplant at a median of 6.0 yr. Among patients in this registry, far more children underwent kidney than liver transplants. The risk of subsequently needing transplantation of an alternate organ was low.

  11. Laser acupuncture reduces pain in pediatric kidney biopsies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oates, Aris; Benedict, Kelly A; Sun, Karen; Brakeman, Paul R; Lim, Jessica; Kim, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate laser acupuncture (LA) as an adjuvant therapy in pain management during percutaneous kidney biopsy procedure in children and adolescents. This prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial enrolled patients aged 7 to 26 years admitted to a children's hospital for percutaneous kidney biopsy. Patients received LA to treatment points (acupuncture group) or sham points (control group) before the procedure. The laser delivered a dose of 42 J/cm over 10 acupoints. Patients and parents rated the pain during and after the biopsy, and change in pain scores were calculated for each patient. Anxiety, vital signs, sedation medication, and patient's biopsy experience were secondary outcomes. Sixty-nine treatments (33 in the acupuncture group and 36 in the control group) were eligible for analysis. Patients in the acupuncture group reported a significantly improved change in the pain score after the biopsy compared with the controls (0.8 vs -0.5, P = 0.044). Patients in the acupuncture group had a statistically significant decrease in procedure vital signs including heart rate (-1.8 vs 5.6, P = 0.043) and respiratory rate (-2.4 vs 0.4, P = 0.045) when compared with controls. Parents also perceived a correspondingly greater improvement in their child's pain for those in the acupuncture group compared with the controls (2.3 vs 0.3, P = 0.04). Adjunctive LA significantly improved pain after pediatric percutaneous kidney biopsies.

  12. Brincidofovir Use after Foscarnet Crystal Nephropathy in a Kidney Transplant Recipient with Multiresistant Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Romain; Zandotti, Christine; Alain, Sophie; Decourt, Alexandre; Purgus, Raj; Bornet, Charleric; Daniel, Laurent; Moal, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) antiviral drug resistance constitutes an increasing challenge in transplantation. Foscarnet is usually proposed when resistance for ganciclovir is suspected, but its use is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Case Presentation. We report a case of multiresistant CMV disease in a kidney transplant recipient. Foscarnet was prescribed after ganciclovir treatment failure in a patient with two mutations in the UL97 viral gene. Foscarnet induced biopsy-proven kidney crystal precipitation that resulted in severe acute transplant failure and nephrotic syndrome. Despite a large decrease in immunosuppression, CMV disease was not controlled and a salvage therapy with Brincidofovir (BCV), which is an oral lipid conjugate of cidofovir with limited nephrotoxicity, was attempted. Clinical and virological remission was observed after a 21-day course of BCV, despite mild and reversible liver toxicity. However, a new relapse could not be effectively cured by BCV due to a new mutation in the UL54 gene, which is known to confer resistance to cidofovir. A new course of foscarnet finally resulted in prolonged CMV remission. Herein, we present a review of foscarnet nephropathy cases in solid-organ transplanted patients. Conclusions. This unique case highlights the potential benefit of BCV use during resistant CMV infection, although mutations in the UL54 gene may limit its therapeutic efficacy. These findings need to be confirmed in clinical trials. PMID:28348914

  13. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  14. Eculizumab to treat antibody-mediated rejection in a 7-year-old kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Hassib; Rotman, Samuel; Matter, Maurice; Girardin, Eric; Aubert, Vincent; Pascual, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    We report on successful early eculizumab administration to treat acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient. The recipient is a 7-year-old boy who received, 6 months after a desensitization protocol with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusion, a second kidney transplant in the presence of low donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). Both pretransplant lymphocytotoxic and flow cytometric crossmatch were negative. Allograft function recovered promptly, with excellent initial function. On postoperative day (POD) 4, the child developed significant proteinuria with an acute rise in serum creatinine. Allograft biopsy showed severe acute ABMR. Intravenous eculizumab (600 mg), preceded by a single session of plasmapheresis, was administered on POD 5 and 12 along with a 4-day thymoglobulin course. After the first dose of eculizumab, a strikingly rapid normalization of allograft function with a decrease in proteinuria occurred. However, because circulating DSA levels remained elevated, the child received 3 doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (POD 15, 16, and 17), with a significant subsequent decrease in DSA levels. At 9 months after transplant, the child continues to maintain excellent allograft function with undetectable circulating DSA levels. This unique case highlights the potential efficacy of using early eculizumab to rapidly reverse severe ABMR in pediatric transplantation, and therefore it suggests a novel therapeutic approach to treat acute ABMR.

  15. Male microchimerism at high levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with end stage renal disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M; Azzouz, Doua F; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD.

  16. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  17. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  18. Cystatin C and renal function in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Franco, M C P; Nagasako, S S; Machado, P G; Nogueira, P C K; Pestana, J O M; Sesso, R

    2009-12-01

    In clinical practice, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is often determined with serum creatinine. However, studies have shown cystatin C to be a better parameter for the diagnosis of impaired renal function. We compared GFR estimated by plasma cystatin C with GFR estimated by serum creatinine in a sample of 50 pediatric renal transplant recipients and 24 healthy children. The correlation between GFR estimated by serum creatinine and by cystatin C was significant (r = 0.75; P < 0.001, Person's correlation); however, in pediatric kidney transplant recipients, the GFR was 6.7 mL/min lower when determined using cystatin C rather than serum creatinine. Moreover, using GFR estimated by cystatin C we found that 42% of the pediatric kidney transplant recipients had an estimated GFR <60 mL.min-1.1.73 (m(2))-1, whereas when GFR was estimated by the serum creatinine formula only 16% of the children had values below this cutoff point indicative of chronic kidney disease (P < 0.001). We conclude that, in pediatric kidney transplant recipients, estimation of GFR yields lower values when cystatin C is used rather than serum creatinine.

  19. Fifteen years of kidney biopsies in children: a single center in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Ashraf; Eid, Riham; Sarhan, Amr; Hammad, Ayman; El-Refaey, Ahmed Mahmoud; El-Mougy, Atef; Zedan, Mohammed Magdy; ElHusseini, Fatma; El-Rahman, Ashraf Abd

    2014-11-01

    This study retrospectively investigates the indications and results of renal biopsy in children to determine the patterns of childhood kidney disease in a single tertiary children's hospital in Egypt. We included all the patients who underwent ultrasound-guided renal biopsy from 1998 to 2012. All the kidney biopsies were studied under light microscopy, while immunofluorescence and electron microscopy were performed when indicated. A total of 1246 renal biopsies were performed over 15 years, on 1096 patients. The mean age of the patients at the time of biopsy was 9.2±3.7 years. The main indication for a biopsy was the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (n=354, 28.4%), followed by the atypical nephrotic syndrome (n=250, 20.1%), and renal abnormalities in the systemic diseases (n=228, 18.3 %). In the 1226 pathologically diagnosed specimens, primary glomerulonephritis was the most common finding (n=826, 67.4%), followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (n=238, 19.4%). The most common causes of primary glomerulonephritis were Minimal Change Disease (MCD) (n=267, 21.8%), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (n=188, 15. 3%), and focal proliferative glomerulonephritis (n=164, 13.3%). Lupus nephritis (n=209, 17%) was the most common cause of secondary glomerulonephritis. We conclude that the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome was the most frequent indication for biopsy and minimal change disease was the most common histopathological finding in our population.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Kidney Preservation Solutions Prior to Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Abdurrahman; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Kazan, Dilek; Akgoz, Muslum; Senal, Merve Oztug; Berber, Ibrahim; Titiz, Izzet; Bilsel, Gokhan; Kilercik, Hakan; Karaosmanoglu, Kubra; Cicek, Muslum; Yurtsever, Ilknur; Yazıcı, Cevat

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in kidney transplantation is the optimal functional preservation of the organ until its transplantation into the appropriate recipient. Despite intensive efforts, the functional preservation period remains limited to hours. During this time, as a result of cellular injury, various proteins, peptides, and other molecules are released by the organ into the preservation medium. In this study, we used proteomic techniques to analyze the protein profiles of preservation solutions in which organs had been preserved prior to their transplantation. Samples were obtained from the preservation solutions of 25 deceased donor kidneys scheduled for transplantation. The protein profiles of the solutions were analyzed using 2D gel electrophoresis/MALDI-TOF and LC-MS/MS. We identified and quantified 206 proteins and peptides belonging to 139 different groups. Of these, 111 proteins groups were belonging to kidney tissues. This study used proteomic techniques to analyze the protein profiles of organ preservation solutions. These findings will contribute to the development of improved preservation solutions to effectively protect organs for transplantation. PMID:28036361

  1. Donor cancer transmission in kidney transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xiao, D; Craig, J C; Chapman, J R; Dominguez-Gil, B; Tong, A; Wong, G

    2013-10-01

    Transplantation of any biological material from a donor to a host will carry some inherent risk of disease transmission. Our aims were to summarize the totality of the published evidence about donor cancer transmission among kidney transplant recipients and to determine the cancer-specific survival of these patients. We systematically reviewed all case reports, case series and registry studies that described the outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with donor cancer transmission published to December 2012. A total of 69 studies with 104 donor-transmitted cancer cases were identified. The most common transmitted cancer types were renal cancer (n = 20, 19%), followed by melanoma (n = 18, 17%), lymphoma (n = 15, 14%) and lung cancer (n = 9, 9%). Patients with melanoma and lung cancers had the worst prognosis, with less than 50% of recipients surviving after 24 months from transplantation. Recipients with transmitted renal cancers had the best outcomes, with over 70% of recipients surviving for at least 24 months after transplantation. Overall, the risk of donor transmission of cancer appears low, but there is a high likelihood of reporting bias. Our findings support the current recommendations for rejecting organs from donors with a history of melanoma and lung cancer, but suggest that the use of donor kidneys with a history of small, incidental renal cell cancer may be reasonable.

  2. [Non-sparing surgery of a transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Monllau Font, Vanesa; Rosales Bordes, Antonio; Rodríguez Escovar, Fernando; Esquena Fernández, Salvador; Villavicencio Mavrich, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasement on the incidence of tumours within the population of renal transplanted, from three to five times over general population. Related to urological tumours, it emphasizes an increase in the incidence of the renal carcinoma, around 4,7% against 3% on general population. In this case, we present a 56-year-old patient, who suffered a renal transplant 8 years ago. Incidentally, it is diagnosed a 3 cm mass at the back face of the transplanted kidney, suggestive of renal neoplasm. Given the characteristics of the mass, of the patient and because of the good graft function, we propose the non-sparing surgery of the transplanted kidney as treatment. The patient went back home 6 days after the surgery, with a creatinine value of 106 micromol/L. The pathology of the piece was a papilar carcinoma, type II, pT1aG3, free margins of tumour. The non-sparing techniques like the partial nephrectomy, the criotherapy and the radiofrequency ablation, can be useful and must be considered when it is tried to preserve the renal function, overall in case of bilateral tumours or solitary kidney, and in small and/or eccentric tumours. Renal neoplasms necessarily does not imply the loss of the graft and allows a similar handling to transplanted patient, applying conservative techniques in selected cases.

  3. Kidney transplantation procedures in rats: assessments, complications, and management.

    PubMed

    Pahlavan, Payam S; Smallegange, Corry; Adams, Michael A; Schumacher, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Kidney transplantation in rats is an experimental model often used for the development of general microsurgical or transplantation techniques, for immunologic studies, and for analyzing transplant-associated long-term arterial blood-pressure changes. The aim of the present study was to analyze different surgical techniques of kidney transplantation in rats, with emphasis on minimizing surgical complications and establishing guidelines for their prevention and management. Complications were categorized into general (e.g., core body temperature drop, ischemic time) and surgically related vascular and urinary tract complications. In conclusion, a significant reduction of the complication rate in renal transplantation in rats can be achieved by placing the animal on a heating pad at an appropriate temperature. To reduce the risk of vascular thrombosis, ice-cold saline with heparin and careful flushing of the donor kidneys are recommended. Vascular complications can be avoided by performing "end-to-end" anastomosis techniques. The use of stents and cannulas in the urinary tract is associated with a high risk of urinary tract obstruction, and therefore is not recommended.

  4. Successful Simultaneous Liver-Kidney Transplantation in the Presence of Multiple High-Titered Class I and II Antidonor HLA Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Flavio; Girnita, Alin; Brailey, Paul; Witte, David; Wang, Jiang; Cuffy, Madison C.; Diwan, Tayyab; Tremblay, Simon; Revollo, Jane Y.; Alloway, Rita R.; Schoech, Michael R.; Anwar, Nadim; Shah, Shimul A.; Woodle, Steve E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The results of simultaneous liver-kidney transplants in highly sensitized recipients have been controversial in terms of antibody-mediated rejection and kidney allograft outcomes. This case report provides a detailed and sophisticated documentation of histocompatibility and pathologic data in a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant performed in a recipient with multiple high-titered class I and II antidonor HLA antibodies and a strongly positive cytotoxic crossmatch. Patient received induction with steroids, rituximab, and eculizumab without lymphocyte depleting agents. The kidney transplant was delayed by 6 hours after the liver transplant to allow more time to the liver allograft to “absorb” donor-specific antibodies (DSA). Interestingly, the liver allograft did not prevent immediate antibody-mediated injury to the kidney allograft in this highly sensitized recipient. Anti-HLA single antigen bead analysis of liver and kidney allograft biopsy eluates revealed deposition of both class I and II DSA in both liver and kidney transplants during the first 2 weeks after transplant. Afterward, both liver and kidney allograft functions improved and remained normal after a year with progressive reduction in serum DSA values. PMID:27990486

  5. Black markets, transplant kidneys and interpersonal coercion

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J S

    2006-01-01

    One of the most common arguments against legalising markets in human kidneys is that this would result in the widespread misuse that is present in the black market becoming more prevalent. In particular, it is argued that if such markets were to be legalised, this would lead to an increase in the number of people being coerced into selling their kidneys. Moreover, such coercion would occur even if markets in kidneys were regulated, for those subject to such coercion would not be able to avail themselves of the legal protections that regulation would afford them. Despite the initial plausibility of this argument, there are three reasons to reject it. Firstly, the advantages of legalising markets in human kidneys would probably outweigh its possible disadvantages. Secondly, if it is believed that no such coercion can ever be tolerated, markets in only those human kidneys that fail to do away with coercion should be condemned. Finally, if coercion is genuinely opposed, then legalising kidney markets should be supported rather than opposed, for more people would be coerced (ie, into not selling) were such markets to be prohibited. PMID:17145908

  6. Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of the general Swedish population: a study of biopsies from living kidney donors.

    PubMed Central

    Barregård, L; Svalander, C; Schütz, A; Westberg, G; Sällsten, G; Blohmé, I; Mölne, J; Attman, P O; Haglind, P

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium, mercury, and lead concentrations were determined in deep-frozen kidney cortex biopsies taken from 36 living, healthy Swedish kidney donors (18 males and 18 females), who were 30-71 (mean 53) years of age. Information about occupation, smoking, the presence of dental amalgam, and fish consumption could be obtained for 27 of the donors. The samples (median dry weight 0.74 mg) were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the results were transformed to wet-weight concentrations. The median kidney Cd was 17 micrograms/g (95% confidence interval, 14-23 micrograms/g), which was similar in males and females. In 10 active smokers, the median kidney Cd was 24 micrograms/g, and in 12 who never smoked, it was 17 micrograms/g. The median kidney Hg was 0.29 micrograms/g, with higher levels in females (median 0.54 micrograms/g) than in males (median 0.16 micrograms/g). Subjects with amalgam fillings had higher kidney Hg (median 0.47 micrograms/g, n = 20) than those without dental amalgam (median 0.15 micrograms;g/g, n = 6), but kidney Hg was below the detection limit in some samples. Nearly half of the samples had kidney Pb below the detection limit. The median kidney Pb was estimated as 0. 14 micrograms/g. This is the first study of heavy metals in kidney cortex of living, healthy subjects, and the results are relatively similar to those of a few previous autopsy studies, indicating that results from autopsy cases are not seriously biased in relation to kidney metal concentrations in the general population. Cd concentrations in those who never smoked were relatively high, indicating considerable Cd intake from the diet in Sweden. The effect of dental amalgam on kidney Hg was as expected, although the reason for the difference in Hg levels between males and females is unclear. Images Figure 1 PMID:10544153

  7. Derivation of a Predictive Model for Graft Loss Following Acute Kidney Injury in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Amber O.; van Walraven, Carl; Fergusson, Dean; Garg, Amit X.; Knoll, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in the kidney transplant population. Objective: To derive a multivariable survival model that predicts time to graft loss following AKI. Design: Retrospective cohort study using health care administrative and laboratory databases. Setting: Southwestern Ontario (1999-2013) and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (1996-2013). Patients: We included first-time kidney only transplant recipients who had a hospitalization with AKI 6 months or greater following transplant. Measurements: AKI was defined using the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria (stage 1 or greater). The first episode of AKI was included in the analysis. Graft loss was defined by return to dialysis or repeat kidney transplant. Methods: We performed a competing risk survival regression analysis using the Fine and Gray method and modified the model into a simple point system. Graft loss with death as a competing event was the primary outcome of interest. Results: A total of 315 kidney transplant recipients who had a hospitalization with AKI 6 months or greater following transplant were included. The median (interquartile range) follow-up time was 6.7 (3.3-10.3) years. Graft loss occurred in 27.6% of the cohort. The final model included 6 variables associated with an increased risk of graft loss: younger age, increased severity of AKI, failure to recover from AKI, lower baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased time from kidney transplant to AKI admission, and receipt of a kidney from a deceased donor. The risk score had a concordance probability of 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.82). The predicted 5-year risk of graft loss fell within the 95% CI of the observed risk more than 95% of the time. Limitations: The CIs of the estimates were wide, and model overfitting is possible due to the limited sample size; the risk score requires validation to determine its clinical utility. Conclusions: Our prognostic risk score uses commonly available

  8. Local Expansion of Donation After Circulatory Death Kidney Transplant Activity Improves Waitlisted Outcomes and Addresses Inequities of Access to Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mirshekar-Syahkal, B; Summers, D; Bradbury, L L; Aly, M; Bardsley, V; Berry, M; Norris, J M; Torpey, N; Clatworthy, M R; Bradley, J A; Pettigrew, G J

    2017-02-01

    In the United Kingdom, donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidney transplant activity has increased rapidly, but marked regional variation persists. We report how increased DCD kidney transplant activity influenced waitlisted outcomes for a single center. Between 2002-2003 and 2011-2012, 430 (54%) DCD and 361 (46%) donation after brain death (DBD) kidney-only transplants were performed at the Cambridge Transplant Centre, with a higher proportion of DCD donors fulfilling expanded criteria status (41% DCD vs. 32% DBD; p = 0.01). Compared with U.K. outcomes, for which the proportion of DCD:DBD kidney transplants performed is lower (25%; p < 0.0001), listed patients at our center waited less time for transplantation (645 vs. 1045 days; p < 0.0001), and our center had higher transplantation rates and lower numbers of waiting list deaths. This was most apparent for older patients (aged >65 years; waiting time 730 vs. 1357 days nationally; p < 0.001), who received predominantly DCD kidneys from older donors (mean donor age 64 years), whereas younger recipients received equal proportions of living donor, DBD and DCD kidney transplants. Death-censored kidney graft survival was nevertheless comparable for younger and older recipients, although transplantation conferred a survival benefit from listing for only younger recipients. Local expansion in DCD kidney transplant activity improves survival outcomes for younger patients and addresses inequity of access to transplantation for older recipients.

  9. Artery Wall Assessment Helps Predict Kidney Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Salido, Eduardo; Pitti, Sergio; Rufino, Margarita; González-Posada, José Manuel; Torres, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients have high cardiovascular risk, and vascular inflammation may play an important role. We explored whether the inflammatory state in the vessel wall was related to carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and patient survival following kidney transplantation. Methods In this prospective observational cohort study we measured c-IMT and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in the inferior epigastric artery in 115 kidney transplant candidates. Another c-IMT measurement was done 1-year post-transplantation in 107. By stepwise multiple regression analysis we explored factors associated with baseline c-IMT and their changes over time. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was constructed to identify risk factors for mortality. Results A worse cardiovascular profile (older age, smoker, diabetic, carotid plaque, systolic blood pressure and vascular calcification) and higher VCAM-1 levels were found in patients in the highest baseline c-IMT tertile, who also had a worse survival. Factors independently related to baseline c-IMT were age (β=0.369, P<0.0001), fasting glucose (β=0.168, P=0.045), smoking (β=0.228, P=0.003) and VCAM-1 levels (β=0.244, P=0.002). Independent factors associated with c-IMT measurement 1-year post-transplantation were baseline c-IMT (β=-0.677, P<0.0001), post-transplant diabetes (β=0.225, P=0.003) and triglycerides (β=0.302, P=0.023). Vascular VCAM-1 levels were associated with increased risk of mortality in bivariate and multivariate Cox regression. Notably, nearly 50% of patients showed an increase or maintenance of high c-IMT 1 year post-transplantation and these patients experienced a higher mortality (13 versus 3.5%; P=0.021). Conclusion A worse cardiovascular profile and a higher vascular VCAM-1 protein levels at time of KT are related to subclinical atheromatosis. This could lead to a higher post-transplant mortality. Pre-transplant c IMT, post-transplant diabetes and

  10. [Kidney donor with severe disseminated intravascular coagulation: transplantation however successful].

    PubMed

    Keeris, Lodewijk M; Bergmans, Dennis C J J; van der Sande, Frank M; Wind, Tineke J; van Suylen, Robert Jan; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2009-01-01

    A 41-year-old male, with no previous medical history, was admitted to our intensive care unit with severe isolated neurotrauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of E1-M1-V1, mid-dilated unreactive pupils and severe abnormalities on the brain CT-scan. A severe syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and non-oliguric renal insufficiency developed. Following clinical and neurophysiological examination the patient was declared brain-dead, and the family gave permission for organ donation. The left kidney was transplanted and functioned well immediately. However, in view of the DIC and renal function disorders the right kidney was not considered usable for transplantation elsewhere. Pathological examination revealed many fibrin thrombi in the glomerular capillaries and acute tubular necrosis. This case supports the view that thrombotic microangiopathy in kidneys of patients with DIS, even with renal function impairment, is not an a priori reason for excluding donation.

  11. Gallium-67 imaging in human heart transplantation: correlation with endomyocardial biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Meneguetti, J.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Soares, J. Jr.; Bellotti, G.; Bocchi, E.; Higuchi, M.L.; Stolff, N.; Hironaka, F.H.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Pileggi, F.

    1987-05-01

    Endomyocardial biopsy seems to be the most accurate method to use for diagnosis and follow-up of acute rejection of the transplanted heart. This investigation compared a noninvasive procedure, gallium-67 imaging, with endomyocardial biopsy in the detection of acute rejection in heart transplantation. Seven male patients (aged 41 to 54 years) sequentially had 46 gallium-67 scintigrams and 46 endomyocardial biopsies between 1 week and 8 months after transplantation. Both studies were obtained in the same day, 48 hours after the administration of an intravenous injection of gallium-67 citrate. Cardiac uptake was graded as negative, mild, moderate, and marked according to an increasing count ratio with rib and sternal uptakes. Histologic findings were graded as negative, mild acute rejection, moderate acute rejection, severe acute rejection, resolving rejection, and nonspecific reaction. Negative biopsies were not found with moderate uptake, and neither moderate nor severe acute rejection were found with negative scintigrams. Imaging sensitivity was 83% with 17% false negatives and 9% false positives. Of seven studies with moderate uptake, five showed moderate acute rejection, and the patients had specific therapy with a decline in uptake, which correlated with resolving rejection. It is conceivable that in the future this technique may be used as a screening procedure for sequential endomyocardial biopsies in the follow-up of heart transplant patients.

  12. The Bioethics and Utility of Selling Kidneys for Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Elisheva; Lipschutz, Jonathan M.; Bloom, Roy D.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2008-01-01

    In the fifty years since kidney transplantation was first performed, this procedure has evolved from a highly speculative biomedical endeavor to a medically viable and often standard course of therapy (1). Long-term survival is markedly improved among patients who receive a kidney compared with patients who remain on the waiting list for such an organ (2). As outcomes have improved and more clinical indications have emerged, the number of people awaiting transplantation has grown significantly. In stark contrast to the robust expansion of the waiting list, the number of available deceased donors has remained relatively constant over the last several years (1). The current mechanism for procuring kidneys relies on voluntary donations by the general public, with the primary motivation being altruism. However, in light of the ever-increasing waiting list, it is the authors’ belief that the current system needs to be revised if supply is ever going to meet demand. In response to this critical organ shortage, different programs have been developed in an attempt to increase organ donation. At present, however, no solution to the problem has emerged. This paper begins by outlining the scope of the problem and current legislation governing the procurement of transplantable organs/tissues in the United States. It continues with an overview of different proposals to increase supply. It concludes by exploring some of the controversy surrounding the proposal to increase donation using financial incentives. Though the following discussion certainly has implications for other transplantable organs, this paper will focus on kidney transplantation because the waiting list for kidneys is by far the longest of all the solid organs; and, as it carries the smallest risk to living donors, is the least ethically problematic. PMID:18589084

  13. Approach to the Highly Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidate.

    PubMed

    Keith, Douglas S; Vranic, Gayle M

    2016-04-07

    For patients with ESRD, kidney transplant offers significant survival and quality-of-life advantages compared with dialysis. But for patients seeking transplant who are highly sensitized, wait times have traditionally been long and options limited. The approach to the highly sensitized candidate for kidney transplant has changed substantially over time owing to new advances in desensitization, options for paired donor exchange (PDE), and changes to the deceased-donor allocation system. Initial evaluation should focus on determining living-donor availability because a compatible living donor is always the best option. However, for most highly sensitized candidates this scenario is unlikely. For candidates with an incompatible donor, PDE can improve the prospects of finding a compatible living donor but for many highly sensitized patients the probability of finding a match in the relatively small pools of donors in PDE programs is limited. Desensitization of a living donor/recipient pair with low levels of incompatibility is another reasonable approach. But for pairs with high levels of pathologic HLA antibodies, outcomes after desensitization for the patient and allograft are less optimal. Determining the degree of sensitization by calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) is critical in counseling the highly sensitized patient on expected wait times to deceased-donor transplant. For candidates with a high likelihood of finding a compatible deceased donor in a reasonable time frame, waiting for a kidney is a good strategy. For the candidate without a living donor and with a low probability of finding a deceased-donor match, desensitization on the waiting list can be considered. The approach to the highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate must be individualized and requires careful discussion among the transplant center, patient, and referring nephrologist.

  14. Albuminuria and posttransplant chronic kidney disease stage predict transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ngan N; Tonelli, Marcello; Lentine, Krista L; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ye, Feng; Wen, Kevin; Klarenbach, Scott

    2017-03-30

    In 2012, the KDIGO guidelines updated the classification system for chronic kidney disease to include albuminuria. Whether this classification system predicts adverse clinical outcomes among kidney transplant recipients is unclear. To evaluate this, we conducted a retrospective study using linked databases in Alberta, Canada to follow kidney transplant recipients from 2002-2011. We examined the association between an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 60 or more, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and albuminuria (normal, mild, heavy) at one year post-transplant and subsequent mortality and graft loss. There were 900 recipients with a functioning graft and at least one outpatient serum creatinine and urine protein measurement at one year post-transplant. The median age was 51.2 years, 38.7% were female, and 52% had an eGFR of 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more. The risk of all-cause mortality and death-censored graft loss was increased in recipients with reduced eGFR or heavier albuminuria. The adjusted incidence rate per 1000 person-years of all-cause mortality for recipients with an eGFR of 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and heavy albuminuria vs. an eGFR 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more and normal protein excretion was 117 (95% confidence interval 38-371) vs. 15 (9-23) (rate ratio 8). Corresponding rates for death-censored graft loss were 273 (88-1203) vs. 6 (3-9) (rate ratio 49). Reduced eGFR and heavier albuminuria in kidney transplant recipients are associated with an increased risk of mortality and graft loss. Thus, eGFR and albuminuria may be used together to identify, evaluate, and manage transplant recipients who are at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes.

  15. The Influence of Induction Therapy for Kidney Transplantation after a Non-Renal Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, James R.; Levine, Matthew H.; Reese, Peter P.; Bloom, Roy D.; Goral, Simin; Naji, Ali; Abt, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Non-renal transplant recipients who subsequently develop ESRD and undergo kidney transplantation are medically and immunologically complex due to comorbidities, high cumulative exposure to immunosuppressants, and sensitization to alloantigen from the prior transplant. Although prior non-renal transplant recipients are one of the fastest growing segments of the kidney wait list, minimal data exist to guide the use of antibody induction therapy (IT+) at the time of kidney after lung (KALu), heart (KAH), and liver (KALi) transplant. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This retrospective cohort study used national registry data to examine IT use and survival after kidney transplantation. Separate multivariate Cox regression models were constructed to assess patient survival for IT+ and IT− KALu (n=232), KAH (n=588), and KALi (n=736) recipients. Results Use of IT increased during the study period. The percentage of patients considered highly sensitized (panel reactive antibody ≥20%) was not statistically significant between IT+ and IT− groups. IT+ was not associated with improvement in 1- and 10-year patient survival for KALu (P=0.20 and P=0.22, respectively) or for KAH (P=0.90 and P=0.14, respectively). However, IT+ among KALi was associated with inferior patient survival at 1 and 10 years (P=0.04 and P=0.02, respectively). Conclusions Use of IT for kidney transplantation among prior non-renal transplant recipients may not offer a survival advantage in KALu or KAH. However, due to limited power, these findings should be interpreted cautiously. IT+ was associated with inferior outcomes for KALi. Use of IT should be judicially reconsidered in this complex group of recipients. PMID:22076872

  16. [Ovarian function in women after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, B; Marianowski, L; Gradowska, L

    1994-08-01

    The full recovery of reproductive age patients suffering from chronic renal failure due to a successful transplant should include the restoration of normal reproductive functions. In the study data are presented concerning the resumption of menstruation and the evaluation of the ovarian function of renal transplant recipients. After a successful renal transplant the ovarian function improves considerably but isn't always fully restored which can be attributed to the renal efficiency grade or result from the administered immunosuppressive treatment. Approximately 40% of the patients have ovulatory cycles with a normal length of the luteal phase. 40% have also ovulatory cycles but the luteal phase is shorter and the progesterone values are lower. The remaining patients have anovulatory cycles with low estrogen values and a high FSH and LH concentration.

  17. Gonadal dysfunction and infertility in kidney transplant patients receiving sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Boobes, Yousef; Bernieh, Bassam; Saadi, Hussein; Raafat Al Hakim, M; Abouchacra, Samra

    2010-06-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosupressor of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) group. Recent studies have emphasized a potential impact of sirolimus on male gonadal function. We report our clinical experience with sirolimus-induced gonadal dysfunction and infertility in both male and female kidney transplant patients. Of the 170 kidney transplant patients, nine (5.3%) patients (six males and three females) were receiving sirolimus. Follow-up data for two male patients were not available. The one unmarried female patient developed amenorrhea post-transplantation and had resumption of her menstrual cycles after discontinuation of sirolimus. The remaining six married patients (four males and two females), who all had fathered or conceived children in the pre-transplantation period, developed gonadal dysfunction and infertility on average 5-12 months after transplantation. Sirolimus was discontinued in all four male patients with full recovery of the oligo/azospermia and restoration of fertility. Both married female patients developed amenorrhea post-transplantation. Sirolimus was discontinued in one female patient with resumption of her menstrual cycles. In this small population of patients treated with sirolimus, the prevalence rate of reversible gonadal dysfunction and infertility was significant in both males and females. Infertility secondary to sirolimus is under-diagnosed and should be studied further.

  18. Should we perform kidney transplants on foreign nationals?

    PubMed

    Fortin, Marie-Chantal; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2014-12-01

    In Canada, there are currently no guidelines at either the federal or provincial level regarding the provision of kidney transplantation services to foreign nationals (FN). Renal transplant centres have, in the past, agreed to put refugee claimants and other FNs on the renal transplant waiting list, in part, because these patients (refugee claimants) had health insurance through the Interim Federal Health Programme to cover the costs of medication and hospital care. However, severe cuts recently made to this programme have forced clinicians to question whether they should continue with transplants for FNs, for financial and ethical reasons. This paper first examines different national policies (eg, in Canada, USA, France and the UK) to map the diversity of approaches regarding transplantation for FNs, and then works through different considerations commonly used to support or oppose the provision of organs to these patients: (1) the organ shortage; (2) the free-rider problem; (3) the risk of becoming a transplant destination; (4) the impact on organ donation rates; (5) physicians' duties; (6) economic concerns; (7) vulnerability. Using a Canadian case as a focus, and generalising through a review of various national policies, we analyse the arguments for and against transplantation for FNs with a view to bringing clarity to what is a sensitive political and clinical management issue. Our aim is to help transplant centres, clinicians and ethicists reflect on the merits of possible options, and the rationales behind them.

  19. A Method for Murine Islet Isolation and Subcapsular Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zmuda, Erik J.; Powell, Catherine A.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2011-01-01

    Since the early pioneering work of Ballinger and Reckard demonstrating that transplantation of islets of Langerhans into diabetic rodents could normalize their blood glucose levels, islet transplantation has been proposed to be a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes 1,2. More recently, advances in human islet transplantation have further strengthened this view 1,3. However, two major limitations prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread clinical reality: (a) the requirement for large numbers of islets per patient, which severely reduces the number of potential recipients, and (b) the need for heavy immunosuppression, which significantly affects the pediatric population of patients due to their vulnerability to long-term immunosuppression. Strategies that can overcome these limitations have the potential to enhance the therapeutic utility of islet transplantation. Islet transplantation under the mouse kidney capsule is a widely accepted model to investigate various strategies to improve islet transplantation. This experiment requires the isolation of high quality islets and implantation of islets to the diabetic recipients. Both procedures require surgical steps that can be better demonstrated by video than by text. Here, we document the detailed steps for these procedures by both video and written protocol. We also briefly discuss different transplantation models: syngeneic, allogeneic, syngeneic autoimmune, and allogeneic autoimmune. PMID:21525838

  20. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  1. Identification of a novel AGXT gene mutation in primary hyperoxaluria after kidney transplantation failure.

    PubMed

    M'dimegh, Saoussen; Omezzine, Asma; Hamida-Rebai, Mériam Ben; Aquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; M'barek, Ibtihel; Sahtout, Wissal; Zellama, Dorsaf; Souche, Geneviéve; Achour, Abdellatif; Abroug, Saoussen; Bouslama, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a genetic disorder in glyoxylate metabolism that leads to systemic overproduction of oxalate. Functional deficiency of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase in this disease leads to recurrent nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, systemic oxalosis, and kidney failure. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular etiology of kidney transplant loss in a young Tunisian individual. We present a young man with end-stage renal disease who received a kidney allograft and experienced early graft failure. There were no improvement in kidney function; he required hemodialysis and graft biopsy revealed calcium oxalate crystals, which raised suspicion of primary hyperoxaluria. Genetic study in the AGXT gene by PCR direct sequencing identified three missense changes in heterozygote state: the p. Gly190Arg mutation next to two other novels not previously described. The classification of the deleterious effect of the missense changes was developed using the summered results of four different mutation assessment algorithms, SIFT, PolyPhen, Mutation Taster, and Align-GVGD. This system classified the changes as polymorphism in one and as mutation in other. The patient was compound heterozygous mutations. Structural analysis showed that the novel mutation, p.Pro28Ser mutation, affects near the dimerization interface of AGT and positioned on binding site instead of the inhibitor, amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA). With the novel AGXT mutation, the mutational spectrum of this gene continues to broaden in our population. The diagnosis of PH1 was not recognized until after renal transplant with fatal consequences, which led us to confirm the importance of screening before planning for kidney transplantation in population with a relatively high frequency of AGXT mutation carriers.

  2. The Advantages of an Attenuated Total Internal Reflection Infrared Microspectroscopic Imaging Approach for Kidney Biopsy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gulley-Stahl, Heather J.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sommer, André J.

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of an ATR-FTIR imaging approach for kidney biopsy analysis are described. Biopsy sections collected from kidney stone formers are analyzed at the initial stages of stone development to provide insights into stone growth and formation. The majority of tissue analysis currently conducted with IR microspectroscopy is performed with a transflection method. The research presented in this manuscript demonstrates that ATR overcomes many of the disadvantages of transflection or transmission measurements for tissue analysis including an elimination of spectral artifacts. When kidney biopsies with small mineral inclusions are analyzed with a transflection approach, specular reflection, and the Christiansen effect (anomalous dispersion) can occur leading to spectral artifacts. Another effect specific to the analysis of mineral inclusions present in kidney biopsies is known as the reststrahlen effect where the inclusions become strong reflectors near an absorption band. ATR eliminates these effects by immersing the sample in a high index medium. Additionally, the focused beam size for ATR is decreased by a factor of four when a germanium internal reflection element is used, allowing the acquisition of spectra from small mineral inclusions several micrometers in diameter. If quantitative analysis of small mineral inclusions is ultimately desired, ATR provides the photometrically accurate spectra necessary for quantification. PMID:20132593

  3. Kidneys at higher risk of discard: expanding the role of dual kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, B; Mohan, S; Cohen, D J; Radhakrishnan, J; Nickolas, T L; Stone, P W; Tsapepas, D S; Crew, R J; Dube, G K; Sandoval, P R; Samstein, B; Dogan, E; Gaston, R S; Tanriover, J N; Ratner, L E; Hardy, M A

    2014-02-01

    Half of the recovered expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys are discarded in the United States. A new kidney allocation system offers kidneys at higher risk of discard, Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI)>85%, to a wider geographic area to promote broader sharing and expedite utilization. Dual kidney transplantation (DKT) based on the KDPI is a potential option to streamline allocation of kidneys which otherwise would have been discarded. To assess the clinical utility of the KDPI in kidneys at higher risk of discard, we analyzed the OPTN/UNOS Registry that included the deceased donor kidneys recovered between 2002 and 2012. The primary outcomes were allograft survival, patient survival and discard rate based on different KDPI categories (<80%, 80-90% and >90%). Kidneys with KDPI>90% were associated with increased odds of discard (OR=1.99, 95% CI 1.74-2.29) compared to ones with KDPI<80%. DKTs of KDPI>90% were associated with lower overall allograft failure (HR=0.74, 95% CI 0.62-0.89) and better patient survival (HR=0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.98) compared to single ECD kidneys with KDPI>90%. Kidneys at higher risk of discard may be offered in the up-front allocation system as a DKT. Further modeling and simulation studies are required to determine a reasonable KDPI cutoff percentile.

  4. The effect of mannitol administration to kidney donor on short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Hellieh Sadat; Nooraei, Navid; Asgary, Majeed; Hashemian, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    As the cases of kidney transplant are increasing, the need to apply the factors to increase the success of transplant seems necessary. Mannitol increases the osmotic pressure and urine volume as a protective agent on renal tubules. We aimed to evaluate the effect of mannitol on short-term outcome of kidney transplantation by comparing two groups based on prescribing mannitol to donors. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 kidney recipients were assigned in two groups (30 in each), except that in one group donors received mannitol. They were studied with respect to age, gender, weight, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), sodium (Na), potassium (K) and arterial blood gas (ABG) before and after surgery, and their pulse rate (PR) and blood pressure (BP) before, during and after surgery. Their urine volume was assessed in the operation room and the first 24 h after surgery. The short-term outcome, including BUN and Cr in the first 10 days after transplant, have been charted. Both the case (mannitol-positive donor patient) and the control (mannitol negative) groups were the same regarding the results gained for pre- and post-operative parameters. Follow-up assessments showed no significant differences in renal function. Based on this, we conclude that mannitol administration to donors does not have a beneficial effect on the prognosis and short-term outcome of transplantation on recipients; therefore, we feel that it should not be advised for kidney donors.

  5. Cancer incidence in kidney transplant recipients: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Different publications show an increased incidence of neoplasms in renal transplant patients. The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of cancer in the recipients of renal transplants performed in the A Coruña Hospital (Spain) during the period 1981–2007. Methods/Design During the study period 1967 kidney transplants were performed, corresponding to 1710 patients. Patients with neoplasms prior to the transplant will be excluded (n = 38). A follow-up study was carried out in order to estimate cancer incidence after transplantation. For each patient, information included donor and recipient characteristics, patients and graft survival and cancer incidence after transplantation. Incident cancer is considered as new cases of cancer after the transplant with anatomopathological confirmation. Their location will be classified according to the ICD-9. The analysis will be calculated using the indirect standardisation method. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates in the Spanish general population will be obtained from the Carlos III Health Institute, the National Epidemiology Centre of the Ministry of Science and Technology. Crude first, second and third-year post-transplantation cancer incidence rates will be calculated for male and female recipients. The number of cases of cancer at each site will be calculated from data in the clinical records. The expected number of cancers will be calculated from data supplied by the Carlos III Health Institute. For each tumour location we will estimate the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), using sex-specific cancer incidence rates, by dividing the incidence rate for the transplant patients by the rate of the general population. The 95% confidence intervals of the SIRs and their associated p-values will be calculated by assuming that the observed cancers follow a Poisson distribution. Stratified analysis will be performed to examine the variation in the SIRs with sex and length of follow-up. Competing

  6. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, S.; Nasir, K.; Drohlia, M. F.; Salman, B.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  7. Risk factors for fracture in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Lam, Ngan N; McArthur, Eric; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Knoll, Gregory A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Kim, S Joseph; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general and transplant-specific risk factors for fractures in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of all adults who received a kidney-only transplant (n = 2723) in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to determine general and transplant-specific risk factors for major fractures (proximal humerus, forearm, hip, and clinical vertebral). The final model was established using the backward elimination strategy, selecting risk factors with a P-value ≤ 0.2 and forcing recipient age and sex into the model. We also assessed risk factors for other fracture locations (excluding major fractures, and fractures involving the skull, hands or feet). RESULTS: There were 132 major fractures in the follow-up (8.1 fractures per 1000 person-years). General risk factors associated with a greater risk of major fracture were older recipient age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) per 5-year increase 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19] and female sex (aHR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.28-2.57). Transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of fracture included older donor age (5-year increase) (aHR = 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02-1.17) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by diabetes (aHR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.09-2.72) or cystic kidney disease (aHR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.08-2.78) (compared to glomerulonephritis as the reference cause). Risk factors across the two fracture locations were not consistent (major fracture locations vs other). Specifically, general risk factors associated with an increased risk of other fractures were diabetes and a fall with hospitalization prior to transplantation, while length of time on dialysis, and renal vascular disease and other causes of ESRD were the transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of other fractures. CONCLUSION: Both general and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with a higher risk of fractures in kidney transplant

  8. Biopsy-verified bronchiolitis obliterans and other noninfectious lung pathologies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Andersen, Claus B; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Gormsen, Magdalena; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Buchvald, Frederik; Heilmann, Carsten; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann; Moser, Claus; Sengeløv, Henrik; Müller, Klaus Gottlob

    2015-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Lung biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis. This study describes the course of BO and assesses the congruity between biopsy-verified BO and a modified version of the National Institutes of Health's consensus criteria for BO syndrome (BOS) based exclusively on noninvasive measures. We included 44 patients transplanted between 2000 and 2010 who underwent lung biopsy for suspected BO. Of those, 23 were diagnosed with BO and 21 presented other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, such as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, interstitial pneumonia, and nonspecific interstitial fibrosis. Compared with patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, BO patients had significantly lower values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity, and maximal mid-expiratory flow throughout follow-up, but there was no difference in the change in pulmonary function from the time of lung biopsy. The BO diagnosis was not associated with poorer overall survival. Fifty-two percent of patients with biopsy-verified BO and 24% of patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathology fulfilled the BOS criteria. Pathological BO diagnosis was not superior to BOS criteria in predicting decrease in pulmonary function beyond the time of biopsy. A lung biopsy may provide a characterization of pathological patterns that can extend our knowledge on the pathophysiology of HSCT-related lung diseases.

  9. Can deceased donor with recurrent primary brain tumor donate kidneys for transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Modi, Pranjal R.; Pal, Bipin C.; Modi, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased donors is in its infancy in India. Cadaver organ donation was accepted legally in 1994 by the “Human Organs Transplantation Act.” Marginal donors are now accepted by many centers for kidney transplantation. We report a case of procurement of both kidneys from a young deceased donor having recurrent primary brain tumor, transplanted into two adult recipients with successful outcome. PMID:26941500

  10. Summary of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for Management of the Failing Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    The British Transplantation Society "Guideline for Transplantation Management of the Failing Kidney Transplant" was published in May 2014. This is the first national guideline in this field. In line with previous guidelines published by the British Transplantation Society, the guideline has used the GRADE system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations.This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for the management of the failing kidney graft in the United Kingdom and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at: http://www.bts.org.uk/MBR/Clinical/Guidelines/Current/Member/Clinical/Current_Guidelines.aspx.

  11. Polycythemia after kidney transplantation: influence of the native kidneys on the production of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ianhex, L E; Da Fonseca, J A; Chocair, P R; Maspes, V; Sabbaga, E

    1977-01-01

    3 patients with renal transplantation who developed polycythemia presented normalization of the hemoglobin levels immediately after nephrectomy of the native kidneys. This observation induced the authors to study the role of the native kidneys in the genesis of polycythemia in recipients of renal allografts. Comparison was made among 32 patients submitted to renal transplantation, with maintenance of native kidneys (group I) and among 31 under the same conditions, but without the native kidneys (group II). Both groups were comparable according to age, sex, rejection crisis incidence and immunosuppressive therapy. It was observed that the hemoglobin levels of group I were significantly higher (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.005) than those observed in group II, from the 3rd to the 30th posttransplantation month, becoming comparable from the 36th to the 54th months. The hemoglobin production, measured by the kinetics of labeled iron (59Fe), was higher in patients of group I. The authors concluded that the native kidneys are responsible for the observed polycythemia after a kidney transplantation.

  12. ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation without Post-Transplant Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, J. M.; Fontaine, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Blood group incompatibility remains a significant barrier to kidney transplantation. Approximately one-third of donors are blood group incompatible with their intended recipient. Options for these donor-recipient pairs include blood group incompatible transplantation or kidney paired donation. However, the optimal protocol for blood group incompatible transplantation is unknown. Protocols differ in techniques to remove ABO antibodies, titer targets and immunosuppression regimens. In addition, the mechanisms of graft accommodation to blood group antigens remain poorly understood. We describe a blood group incompatible protocol using pre-transplant therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab in addition to prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. In this protocol, we do not exclude patients based on a high initial titer and do not implement post-transplant TPE. All 16 patients who underwent this protocol received a living donor transplant with 100 percent patient and graft survival, and no reported episodes of antibody-mediated rejection to date with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (range 0.75 to 4.7 years). We conclude that blood group incompatible transplantation can be achieved without post-transplant TPE. PMID:25739580

  13. CINACALCET IMPROVES BONE DENSITY IN POST KIDNEY TRANSPLANT HYPERPARATHYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cho, ME; Duan, Z; Chamberlain, CE; Reynolds, JC; Ring, MS; Wright, EC; Mannon, RB

    2010-01-01

    The recent availability of cinacalcet has provided a possible alternative to parathyroidectomy in kidney transplant patients with persistent hyperparathyroidism, but its effect on bone mass density (BMD) is unknown. From our database containing 163 kidney transplants performed at our center from 1999-2007, we compared recipients who received cinacalcet for persistent hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism following renal tx (n=8; CIN) with up to 2 other post tx patients matched for age, sex, race, and graft function (n=15; CON). The outcome of the study was BMD changes from baseline to 12, 24, and 36 months post renal tx. Repeated Measures Mixed model was used to assess the difference of BMD change between two groups. Cinacalcet therapy was started at a median of 9 months (range; 1, 24 months) post tx with a mean dose 56±29 mg/d (mean duration; 1.6 years, range; 1, 2.1). Cinacalcet therapy was associated with significant reduction of serum calcium compared to control. Cinacalcet therapy was associated with greater BMD increase at the hip over the 36-month post transplant period. Cinacalcet was well tolerated. Our results suggest that cinacalcet may have a small but favorable effect on bone density following kidney transplantation. PMID:21094814

  14. The Critically Ill Kidney Transplant Recipient: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Canet, Emmanuel; Zafrani, Lara; Azoulay, Élie

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplantation performed worldwide. Up to 6% of kidney transplant recipients experience a life-threatening complication that requires ICU admission, chiefly in the late posttransplantation period (≥ 6 months). Acute respiratory failure and septic shock are the main reasons for ICU admission. Cardiac pulmonary edema, bacterial pneumonia, acute graft pyelonephritis, and bloodstream infections account for the vast majority of diagnoses in the ICU. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is the most common opportunistic infection, and one-half of the patients so infected require mechanical ventilation. The incidence of cytomegalovirus visceral infections in the era of preemptive therapy has dramatically decreased. Drug-related neutropenia, sirolimus-related pneumonitis, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome are among the most common immunosuppression-associated toxic effects. Importantly, the impact of critical illness on graft function is worrisome. Throughout the ICU stay, acute kidney injury is common, and about 40% of the recipients require renal replacement therapy. One-half of the patients are discharged alive and free from dialysis. Hospital mortality can reach 30% and correlates with acute illness severity and reason for ICU admission. Transplant characteristics are not predictors of short-term survival. Graft survival depends on pre-ICU graft function, disease severity, and renal toxicity of ICU investigations and treatments.

  15. Impact of combined acute rejection on BK virus-associated nephropathy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jung; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Koo, Tai Yeon; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Han, Miyeun; Jeon, Hee Jung; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-12-01

    BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN) is one of the major causes of allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant (KT) patients. We compared BKVAN combined with acute rejection (BKVAN/AR) with BKVAN alone in KT patients. We retrospectively analyzed biopsy-proven BKVAN in KT patients from 2000 to 2011 at Seoul National University Hospital. Among 414 biopsies from 951 patients, biopsy-proven BKVAN was found in 14 patients. Nine patients had BKVAN alone, while 5 patients had both BKVAN and acute cellular rejection. BKVAN in the BKVAN alone group was detected later than in BKVAN/AR group (21.77 vs 6.39 months after transplantation, P=0.03). Serum creatinine at diagnosis was similar (2.09 vs 2.00 mg/dL). Histological grade was more advanced in the BKVAN/AR group (P=0.034). Serum load of BKV, dose of immunosuppressants, and tacrolimus level showed a higher tendency in the BKVAN alone group; however it was not statistically significant. After anti-rejection therapy, immunosuppression was reduced in the BKVAN/AR group. Renal functional deterioration over 1 yr after BKVAN diagnosis was similar between the two groups (P=0.665). These findings suggest that the prognosis of BKVAN/AR after anti-rejection therapy followed by anti-BKV therapy might be similar to that of BKVAN alone after anti-BKV therapy.

  16. Sirolimus use and cancer incidence among US kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Yanik, E L; Gustafson, S K; Kasiske, B L; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Hess, G P; Engels, E A; Segev, D L

    2015-01-01

    Sirolimus has anti-carcinogenic properties and can be included in maintenance immunosuppressive therapy following kidney transplantation. We investigated sirolimus effects on cancer incidence among kidney recipients. The US transplant registry was linked with 15 population-based cancer registries and national pharmacy claims. Recipients contributed sirolimus-exposed time when sirolimus claims were filled, and unexposed time when other immunosuppressant claims were filled without sirolimus. Cox regression was used to estimate associations with overall and specific cancer incidence, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers (not captured in cancer registries). We included 32,604 kidney transplants (5687 sirolimus-exposed). Overall, cancer incidence was suggestively lower during sirolimus use (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70-1.11). Prostate cancer incidence was higher during sirolimus use (HR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.15-3.02). Incidence of other cancers was similar or lower with sirolimus use, with a 26% decrease overall (HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.96, excluding prostate cancer). Results were similar after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. This modest association does not provide strong evidence that sirolimus prevents posttransplant cancer, but it may be advantageous among kidney recipients with high cancer risk. Increased prostate cancer diagnoses may result from sirolimus effects on screen detection.

  17. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  18. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys: initial results in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Olivier; Grenier, Nicolas; Deminère, Colette; Lasseur, Catherine; Delmas, Yahsou; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detection and characterization of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO). Among 21 patients initially enrolled, 12 scheduled for renal biopsy for acute or rapidly progressive renal failure (n = 7) or renal graft rejection (n = 5) completed the study. Three magnetic resonance (MR) sessions were performed with a 1.5-T system, before, immediately after and 72 h after i.v. injection of USPIO at doses of 1.7-2.6 mg of iron/kg. Signal intensity change was evaluated visually and calculated based on a region of interest (ROI) positioned on the kidney compartments. Histological examination showed cortical macrophage infiltration in four patients (>5 macrophages/mm(2)), two in native kidneys (proliferative extracapillary glomerulonephritis) and two in transplants (acute rejection). These patients showed a 33 +/- 18% mean cortical signal loss on T2*-weighted images. In the remaining eight patients, with <5 macrophages/mm(2), there was no cortical signal loss. However, in three of these, presenting with ischemic acute tubular necrosis, a strong (42 +/- 18%) signal drop was found in the medulla exclusively. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging can demonstrate infiltration of the kidneys by macrophages both in native and transplanted kidneys and may help to differentiate between kidney diseases.

  19. Filtration Markers, Cardiovascular Disease, Mortality, and Kidney Outcomes in Stable Kidney Transplant Recipients: The FAVORIT Trial.

    PubMed

    Foster, M C; Weiner, D E; Bostom, A G; Carpenter, M A; Inker, L A; Jarolim, P; Joseph, A A; Kusek, J W; Pesavento, T; Pfeffer, M A; Rao, M; Solomon, S D; Levey, A S

    2017-03-03

    Cystatin C and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) are filtration markers associated with adverse outcomes in non-transplant populations, sometimes with stronger associations than for creatinine. We evaluated associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate from cystatin C (eGFRcys ), B2M (eGFRB2M ), and creatinine (eGFRcr ) with cardiovascular outcomes, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients using a case-cohort study nested within the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial. A random subcohort was selected (N=508; mean age 51.6 years, median transplant vintage 4 years, 38% women, 23.6% non-white race) with enrichment for cardiovascular events (N=306; 54 within the subcohort), mortality (N=208; 68 within the subcohort), and kidney failure (N=208; 52 within the subcohort). Mean eGFRcr , eGFRcys , and eGFRB2M were 46.0, 43.8, and 48.8 mL/min/1.73m(2), respectively. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios for eGFRcys and eGFRB2M <30 vs. 60+ were 2.02 (95% CI 1.09-3.76; p=0.03) and 2.56 (1.35-4.88; p=0.004) for cardiovascular events; 3.92 (2.11-7.31) and 4.09 (2.21-7.54; both p<0.001) for mortality; and 9.49 (4.28-21.00) and 15.53 (6.99-34.51; both p<0.001) for kidney failure. Associations persisted with additional adjustment for baseline eGFRcr . We conclude that cystatin C and B2M are strongly associated with cardiovascular events, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Polycystic kidney disease and cancer after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Calvet, James P; Yu, Alan S L; Lynch, Charles F; Wang, Connie J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Engels, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common form of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), is a disorder with characteristics of neoplasia. However, it is not known whether renal transplant recipients with PKD have an increased risk of cancer. Data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, which contains information on all solid organ transplant recipients in the United States, were linked to 15 population-based cancer registries in the United States. For PKD recipients, we compared overall cancer risk with that in the general population. We also compared cancer incidence in PKD versus non-PKD renal transplant recipients using Poisson regression, and we determined incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, dialysis duration, and time since transplantation. The study included 10,166 kidney recipients with PKD and 107,339 without PKD. Cancer incidence in PKD recipients was 1233.6 per 100,000 person-years, 48% higher than expected in the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 1.60), whereas cancer incidence in non-PKD recipients was 1119.1 per 100,000 person-years. The unadjusted incidence was higher in PKD than in non-PKD recipients (IRR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20). However, PKD recipients were older (median age at transplantation, 51 years versus 45 years for non-PKD recipients), and after multivariable adjustment, cancer incidence was lower in PKD recipients than in others (IRR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91). The reason for the lower cancer risk in PKD recipients is not known but may relate to biologic characteristics of ADPKD or to cancer risk behaviors associated with ADPKD.

  1. Utilization of elderly donors in living related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, S; Manga Sahin, G; Turkmen, A; Sever, M S

    2006-03-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. However, its application is limited due to inadequate organ supply, mainly because many dialysis patients do not have suitable living donors. The increasing discrepancy between organ supply and demand has forced many transplant centers to consider using organs procured from marginal donors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether utilization of kidneys from living related elderly donors is safe for the recipients in the long term. We analyzed the clinical results of 296 consecutive recipients of living related renal transplants, among whom 44 recipients received kidneys from donors over 60 years of age. By the end of 12 months, the mean serum creatinine level of the recipients who were transplanted from the older donors was higher (1.55 +/- 0.45 mg/dL) than that from other donors (1.21 +/- 0.3 mg/dL), but the difference was not significant (P = .08). In the long term (60 months), the graft function was similar (1.88 +/- 0.55 vs 1.52 +/- 0.38) for both groups. The similarity in outcomes of ideal versus older donors as shown less in the present series has encouraged us to utilize elderly living donors. We concluded that transplantations performed from the elderly donors yielded similar results to those of conventional donors. The long waiting list for transplantation, the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, should encourage us to be more flexible about donor selection.

  2. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome. PMID:24659873

  3. Kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Ekser, Burcin; Giuffrida, Giuseppe; Caglià, Pietro; Gula, Riccardo; Ardita, Vincenzo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2014-03-21

    The increasing demand for organ donors to supply the increasing number of patients on kidney waiting lists has led to most transplant centers developing protocols that allow safe utilization from donors with special clinical situations which previously were regarded as contraindications. Deceased donors with previous hepatitis C infection may represent a safe resource to expand the donor pool. When allocated to serology-matched recipients, kidney transplantation from donors with hepatitis C may result in an excellent short-term outcome and a significant reduction of time on the waiting list. Special care must be dedicated to the pre-transplant evaluation of potential candidates, particularly with regard to liver functionality and evidence of liver histological damage, such as cirrhosis, that could be a contraindication to transplantation. Pre-transplant antiviral therapy could be useful to reduce the viral load and to improve the long-term results, which may be affected by the progression of liver disease in the recipients. An accurate selection of both donor and recipient is mandatory to achieve a satisfactory long-term outcome.

  4. The outcome of commercial kidney transplant tourism in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Masin, Jelka; Rambabova-Busljetic, Irena; Pusevski, Vlado; Dohcev, Saso; Ivanovski, Ognen; Popov, Zivko

    2011-01-01

    The lack of cadaver organs for transplantation motivates some Balkan patients to go to developing countries to buy a kidney. We have followed 36 patients who received kidney transplants in Lahore and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The patients had not been cleared for transplantation with a standard pre-transplant work-up: 80% were hepatitis-C virus (HCV) or HBsAg positive. During follow-up, seven patients died. Sixteen patients experienced wound infections with post-operative hernias, and three patients developed peri-renal hematomas. Six abscesses and four lymphoceles occurred, and four urinary fistulas were surgically treated. Nephrectomy was performed in three patients because of renal artery thrombosis. Nine patients developed active hepatitis C, and four patients manifested cytomegalovirus disease. Three patients developed steroid diabetes, and three patients experienced acute myocardial infarction. Nine patients had one or more rejection episodes. Urinary tract infection with Pseudomonas or Escherichia occurred frequently. The one-yr patient and graft survival rates were 80% and 68%, respectively. Paid unregulated renal transplantation is not recommended for both ethical reasons and because of an association with excessive morbidity and mortality.

  5. Human polyomavirus 9 infection in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Els; Wunderink, Herman F; van der Blij-de Brouwer, Caroline S; Zaaijer, Hans L; Rotmans, Joris I; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Feltkamp, Mariet C W

    2014-06-01

    Several human polyomaviruses of unknown prevalence and pathogenicity have been identified, including human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9). To determine rates of HPyV9 infection among immunosuppressed patients, we screened serum samples from 101 kidney transplant patients in the Netherlands for HPyV9 DNA and seroreactivity. A total of 21 patients had positive results for HPyV9 DNA; positivity rates peaked at 3 months after transplantation, but the highest viral loads were measured just after transplantation. During 18 months of follow-up, HPyV9 seroprevalence increased from 33% to 46% among transplant patients; seroprevalence remained stable at ≈30% in a control group of healthy blood donors in whom no HPyV9 DNA was detected. Further analysis revealed an association between detection of HPyV9 and detection of BK polyomavirus but not of cytomegalovirus. Our data indicate that HPyV9 infection is frequent in kidney transplant patients, but the nature of infection-endogenous or donor-derived-and pathogenic potential of this virus remain unknown.

  6. Pretransplant identification of acute rejection risk following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lebranchu, Yvon; Baan, Carla; Biancone, Luigi; Legendre, Christophe; Morales, José Maria; Naesens, Maarten; Thomusch, Oliver; Friend, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Lack of an accepted definition for 'high immunological risk' hampers individualization of immunosuppressive therapy after kidney transplantation. For recipient-related risk factors for acute rejection, the most compelling evidence points to younger age and African American ethnicity. Recipient gender, body mass, previous transplantation, and concomitant infection or disease do not appear to be influential. Deceased donation now has only a minor effect on rejection risk, but older donor age remains a significant predictor. Conventional immunological markers (human leukocyte antigen [HLA] mismatching, pretransplant anti-HLA alloantibodies, and panel reactive antibodies) are being reassessed in light of growing understanding about the role of donor-specific antibodies (DSA). At the time of transplant, delayed graft function is one of the most clear-cut risk factors for acute rejection. Extended cold ischemia time (≥ 24 h) may also play a contributory role. While it is not yet possible to establish conclusively the relative contribution of different risk factors for acute rejection after kidney transplantation, the available data point to variables that should be taken into account at the time of transplant. Together, these offer a realistic basis for planning an appropriate immunosuppression regimen in individual patients.

  7. Transplantation of Kidneys From Donors With Acute Kidney Injury: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Boffa, C; van de Leemkolk, F; Curnow, E; Homan van der Heide, J; Gilbert, J; Sharples, E; Ploeg, R J

    2017-02-01

    The gap between supply and demand in kidney transplantation has led to increased use of marginal kidneys; however, kidneys with acute kidney injury are often declined/discarded. To determine whether this policy is justified, we analyzed outcomes of donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) in a large UK cohort. A retrospective analysis of the UK Transplant Registry evaluated deceased donors between 2003 and 2013. Donors were classified as no AKI, or AKI stage 1-3 according to Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Relationship of AKI with delayed graft function/primary nonfunction (DGF/PNF), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and graft-survival at 90 days and 1 year was analyzed. There were 11 219 kidneys (1869 [17%] with AKI) included. Graft failure at 1 year is greater for donors with AKI than for those without (graft survival 89% vs. 91%, p = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 1.20 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.41]). DGF rates increase with donor AKI stage (p < 0.005), and PNF rates are significantly higher for AKIN stage 3 kidneys (9% vs. 4%, p = 0.04) Analysis of association between AKI and recipient eGFR suggests a risk of inferior eGFR with AKI versus no AKI (p < 0.005; OR 1.25 [95% CI: 1.08-1.31]). We report a small reduction in 1-year graft-survival of kidneys from donors with AKI. We conclude that AKI stage 1 or 2 kidneys should be used; however, caution is advised for AKI stage 3 donors.

  8. Characterization of vaginal lactobacilli in women after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martirosian, G; Radosz-Komoniewska, H; Pietrzak, B; Ekiel, A; Kamiński, P; Aptekorz, M; Doleżych, H; Samulska, E; Jóźwiak, J

    2012-04-01

    Limited number of publications described vaginal microflora after kidney transplantation. Our PubMed search revealed only 18 publications including words "vaginal bacteria & kidney transplant" in the period of 1978-2011. The aim of this study was to characterize lactobacilli isolated from vaginal swabs of women after kidney transplantation, compared with healthy women. Eighteen renal transplant recipients (mean age 36.1) and 20 healthy women (mean age 36.0) were evaluated. Lactobacilli were cultured on MRS and Columbia blood agars. Biochemical identification with API 50 CHL (bioMerieux, Marcy L'Etoile, France) and multiplex PCR according to Song et al. was performed. Lactobacilli were tested for production of H(2)O(2). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of selected antimicrobial agents were determined with E-tests (bioMerieux, Marcy L'Etoile, France) and interpreted with CLSI and EUCAST criteria. No bacterial vaginosis was found among studied women. Two strains of group I were identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii; 18 strains as Lactobacillus gasseri and 15 strains as Lactobacillus crispatus. Only 3 strains from group II were not identified by species-specific mPCR. Group IV was represented with 2 unidentified strains. Vaginal lactobacilli isolated from healthy women represented more homogenous group compared with heterogenous renal transplant recipients. Biochemical identification of lactobacilli by API 50 CHL kits was concordant with mPCR results only in 7 cases (17.5%), all 7 strains were identified as L. crispatus. Majority (93%) of lactobacilli were H(2)O(2) producers. All isolated lactobacilli (100%) demonstrated high resistance to metronidazole (MIC > 256 μg/ml). Only 2 strains resistant to vancomycin (MICs: 32 and 256 μg/ml respectively), in the study and control group, and one to moxifloxacin (MIC = 32 μg/ml), were found. Resistance to metronidazole and vancomycin was concordant in CLSI and EUCAST (2010) criteria. Although significant

  9. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  10. Tolerance in Kidney Transplantation: What Is on the B Side?

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, Francesc E.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory B cells (Breg) are in the spotlight for their role in immune homeostasis maintenance and tolerance achievement as in the last years the correlation with functional and increased Breg numbers in autoimmune diseases and transplantation has been extensively proven. Their study is, however, in its infancy with still little knowledge and consensus on their origin, phenotype, and mechanism of action. All this hampers the pursuit of an effective Breg induction method for therapeutic purposes. In this review we aim to summarize the studies on human Breg and their implication in kidney transplantation and to further discuss the issues surrounding therapeutic applications of this cell subset. PMID:27956762

  11. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  12. Histiocytic Sarcoma in a Kidney Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pollen, Maressa; El Jamal, Siraj; Lewin, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is an aggressive neoplasm with only limited number of reported series of cases and rare case reports of occurrence as a posttransplant neoplastic disorder. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and the optimal treatment is still under investigation. We describe an unusual case of HS in a patient with a remote history of kidney transplant. Method and Results. A 54-year-old male with a remote history of renal transplantation under maintenance immunosuppression presented with features of sepsis. CT abdomen revealed multiple heterogeneous masses in bilateral native kidneys and liver and enlarged abdominal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Viral serology work-up was negative. Needle core biopsy revealed a highly undifferentiated neoplasm comprised of highly atypical large cells with eosinophilic to vacuolated cytoplasm and hemophagocytosis. Extended panel of immunohistochemistry proved histiocytic lineage for the tumor cells. The patient expired 2 weeks following the diagnosis. Conclusion. Our case along with three previously published case reports raised the possibility of HS as a treatment-related neoplasm or a posttransplantation neoplastic disorder in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:27795864

  13. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  14. Urotensin II levels in patients with chronic kidney disease and kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Urotensin II is a potent vasoactive peptide that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. There is no study reporting the role and level of this peptide in recipients of kidney transplant. So we aimed to study the plasma levels of urotensin II in this group of patients. Methods. Plasma urotensin II levels were analyzed in 110 subjects, who were divided into three groups: group 1 (35 kidney transplant recipients), group 2 (36 patients with chronic kidney disease), and group 3 (39 healthy controls). Results. Analysis of logarithmic transformation of urotensin II, i.e. log (urotensin II × 1000) levels, with a one-way analysis of variance yielded a P value of 0.001. Post-hoc analysis showed significantly higher log (urotensin II × 1000) levels in group 1 than groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). One of the important features of the subjects of this group was that they were taking immunosuppressive drugs because of renal transplantation. Conclusions. High urotensin II levels in recipients of kidney transplants could be drug-related (immunosuppressive drugs) and may be of practical importance that may be used to improve the long-term outcome of the patients. PMID:22098077

  15. Everolimus immunosuppression in kidney transplantation: What is the optimal strategy?

    PubMed

    Witzke, Oliver; Sommerer, Claudia; Arns, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Two main everolimus-based strategies have been pursued to facilitate calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) reduction after kidney transplantation: (i) everolimus with reduced CNI exposure from time of transplant and (ii) pre-emptive introduction of everolimus with CNI reduction or withdrawal at some point post-transplant. Randomized trials have shown no loss of immunosuppressive efficacy for everolimus (targeting 3-8 ng/mL) with reduced-exposure CNI versus standard-exposure CNI and mycophenolic acid (MPA) in low-to-moderate risk patients. Renal function has tended to be numerically, but not significantly, higher with everolimus and reduced-CNI versus MPA and standard-CNI. One study which used very low CsA exposure in everolimus-treated patients reported a substantial improvement in estimated GFR compared to controls, but this requires confirmation. Pre-emptive conversion to everolimus at three to six months after kidney transplantation significantly improves long-term renal function, but with an increased rate of mild acute rejection. Earlier conversion (up to two months post-transplant) can lead to an increase in rejection risk, while later conversion (more than six months post-transplant) is unproductive unless baseline renal function is good. This article considers the risks and benefits associated with either strategy, and reviews specific clinical situations that influence the optimal approach in individual patients. The balance of evidence suggests two options. De novo everolimus with reduced CNI, steroids and induction therapy ensures immunosuppressive efficacy in low- or standard-risk populations, and investigations into this strategy are ongoing. Conversion to everolimus with CNI withdrawal between three and six months post-transplant offers a long-term renoprotective effect if baseline graft function is good.

  16. Effect of a legal initiative on deceased- and living-donor kidney transplantation in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, T; Rahamimov, R; Elhalel, M D; Cohen, J; Mor, E

    2013-05-01

    The severe organ shortage in Israel has prompted many patients to undergo kidney transplantation abroad. In May 2008, the Israeli Knesset approved the Israel Transplant Law prohibiting organ trade and disallowing health insurers to reimburse the cost of illegal transplantation abroad. The aim of this study was to assess the initial effect of the law on kidney transplantations inside and outside the country. The number of kidney transplantations performed inside and outside Israel was compared between the 3-year periods before and after implementation of the transplant law (2006-2008 and 2009-2011). Further analysis compared the number of deceased-donor and live-donor transplantations performed in Israel during the same periods. The results showed that the number of transplants performed abroad dropped significantly, from a median of 143 per year during 2006-2008 to <45 per year during 2009-2011. There was a parallel increase in the number of kidney transplantations from living donors, from a median of 56 transplants per year in 2006-2008 to 78 per year in 2008-2011, with a peak of 117 transplants in 2011. In conclusion, the Israel Transplant Law has dramatically affected kidney transplantation practices in Israel by reducing transplantation tourism and increasing living-donor kidney transplantations.

  17. A case of accelerated acute rejection after ABO-compatible living unrelated kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Nanae; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Yamamoto, Izumi; Mitome, Jun; Maruyama, Yukio; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Yoichi; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 59-yr-old Japanese woman with chronic renal failure caused by IgA nephropathy and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related glomerulonephritis underwent kidney transplantation from a living unrelated spousal donor. The blood type was compatible, while the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing showed a 5/6 locus mismatch. She had become pregnant twice by her donor and had never received blood transfusions. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity cross-match, flow cytometry cross-match (FCXM), and flow panel reactive antibody (PRA) were negative. She initially underwent one week of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) immediately before transplantation to reduce the risk of antibody-mediated rejection. Induction therapy consisted of MMF, tacrolimus (TAC), methylprednisolone (MP), and basiliximab. The allograft function was excellent immediately after the operation. However, the urine output and platelet count declined rapidly on post-operative day (POD) 3, while the serum creatinine (sCr) and lactate dehydrogenase levels rose gradually. Subsequently, we could not detect the diastolic arterial flow on Doppler sonography. We diagnosed accelerated acute rejection and treated her with plasma exchange (PEX), intravenous MP pulse therapy, and rituximab. The first episode biopsy on POD 7 revealed acute vascular rejection and acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff score AMR II). Her urinary excretion increased beginning on POD 13, while the sCr level decreased gradually and reached 0.9 mg/dL on POD 22. In our retrospective analysis, the LAB screen detected donor-specific antibody (DSA). This case suggested that, for successful kidney transplantation in highly sensitized recipients, such as husband-to-wife spousal kidney transplantation with a history of pregnancy, we should keep the risk of AMR in mind, even if the sensitive antibody detection tests are negative.

  18. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Nafar, Mohsen; Sahraei, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Samavat, Shiva; Vaziri, Nosartolah D

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients. Presence and severity of oxidative stress can be assessed by various biomarkers produced from interaction of reactive oxygen species with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, nitric oxide, glutathione, etc. In addition, expression and activities of redox-sensitive molecules such as antioxidant enzymes can serve as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Via activation of nuclear factor kappa B, oxidative stress promotes inflammation which, in turn, amplifies oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species generation by activated immune cells. Therefore, inflammation markers are indirect indicators of oxidative stress. Many treatment options have been evaluated in studies conducted at different stages of transplantation in humans and animals. These studies have provided useful strategies for use in donors or in organ preservation solutions. However, strategies tested for use in post-transplant phase have been largely inconclusive and controversial. A number of therapeutic options have been exclusively examined in animal models and only a few have been tested in humans. Most of the clinical investigations have been of short duration and have provided no insight into their impact on the long-term survival of transplant patients. Effective treatment of oxidative stress in transplant population remains elusive and awaits future explorations.

  19. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping strategies, and psychosocial adjustment following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Renato; Lombardo, Caterina; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Poli, Luca; Bennardi, Linda; Giordanengo, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Violani, Cristiano

    2016-11-09

    This study examined the relations between appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping, and adjustment dimensions following kidney transplantation (KT). Two models were tested: (1) the main effects model proposing that stress appraisal and coping strategies are directly associated with adjustment dimensions; and (2) the moderating model of stress proposing that each coping strategy interacts with stress appraisal. Importantly, there is a lack of research examining the two models simultaneously among recipients of solid organ transplantation. A total of 174 KT recipients completed the questionnaires. Predictors of post-transplant adjustment included appraisal of transplant-related stressors and coping strategies (task-, emotion-, and avoidance-focused). Adjustment dimensions were psychological distress, worries about the transplant, feelings of guilt, fear of disclosure of transplant, adherence, and responsibility for the functioning of the new organ. The main and moderating effects were tested with regression analyses. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping were related to all adjustment dimensions, except of adherence and responsibility. Task-oriented coping was positively related to responsibility. Avoidance-oriented coping was negatively correlated with adherence. Only 1 out of 18 hypothesized interactive terms was significant, yielding a synergistic interaction between appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping on the sense of guilt. The findings have the potential to inform interventions promoting psychosocial adjustment among KT recipients.

  20. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury: a major protagonist in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a frequent event in kidney transplantation, particularly when the kidney comes from a deceased donor. The brain death is usually associated with generalized ischaemia due to a hyperactivity of the sympathetic system. In spite of this, most donors have profound hypotension and require administration of vasoconstrictor agents. Warm ischaemia after kidney vessels clamping and the cold ischaemia after refrigeration also reduce oxygen and nutrients supply to tissues. The reperfusion further aggravates the state of oxidation and inflammation created by ischaemia. IRI first attacks endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells. The lesions may be so severe that they lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and delayed graft function (DGF), which can impair the graft survival. The unfavourable impact of DGF is worse when DGF is associated with acute rejection. Another consequence of IRI is the activation of the innate immunity. Danger signals released by dying cells alarm Toll-like receptors that, through adapter molecules and a chain of kinases, transmit the signal to transcription factors which encode the genes regulating inflammatory cells and mediators. In the inflammatory environment, dendritic cells (DCs) intercept the antigen, migrate to lymph nodes and present the antigen to immunocompetent cells, so activating the adaptive immunity and favouring rejection. Attempts to prevent IRI include optimal management of donor and recipient. Calcium-channel blockers, l-arginine and N-acetylcysteine could obtain a small reduction in the incidence of post-transplant DGF. Fenoldopam, Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Dopamine proved to be helpful in reducing the risk of AKI in experimental models, but there is no controlled evidence that these agents may be of benefit in preventing DGF in kidney transplant recipients. Other antioxidants have been successfully used in experimental models of AKI but only a few studies of poor

  1. Intravenous Renal Cell Transplantation for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    improves renal function and structure in other models of renal failure: CKD due to cisplatin-mediated injury (4), diabetic nephropathy (Am J Physiol...cells prevents progression of chronic renal failure in rats with ischemic- diabetic nephropathy . Am J Physiol. Renal. 305:F1804- F1812 6. Mason SB...successful long-term kidney cell engraftment and renal regeneration in diabetic nephropathy and also cell auto-transplants (9). We used adult

  2. 76 FR 42716 - Effects of Ischemia Reperfusion Injury on Outcomes in Kidney Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Effects of Ischemia Reperfusion Injury on Outcomes in Kidney.../reperfusion injury (IRI) on outcomes in kidney transplantation. This public workshop is intended to obtain... conditions in kidney transplant recipients. Date and Time: The public workshop will be held on September...

  3. Anesthesia Management in Aortic Dissection in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Muharrem; Erdil, Feray; Sanlı, Mukadder; Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Durmus, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplant is a last resort to increase the life expectancy and quality of life in patients with renal failure. Aortic dissection is a disease that requires emergency intervention; it is characterized by sudden life-threatening back or abdominal pain. In the case described, constant chest pain that increased with respiration was present on examination of a 28-year-old man (85 kg, 173 cm) who presented at our emergency department complaining of severe back pain. He had undergone a kidney transplant in 2004 from his mother (live donor). He was diagnosed with acute Type II aortic dissection and was scheduled for emergent surgery. Because there were no surgical or anesthetic complications, the patient with 79 and 89 minutes aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass durations was sent, intubated, to intensive care unit. When nephrotoxic agents are avoided and blood flow is stabilized, cardiovascular surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass may be performed seamlessly in patients who have undergone a kidney transplant.

  4. Ultrasonic imaging characteristics of transplanted kidneys with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Liang, W X; Cai, M J; Jiang, L; Xie, Y Q; Yuan, W L; Zhang, H

    2014-08-29

    We investigated the ultrasonic imaging characteristics of transplanted kidneys with delayed graft function (DGF). Ultrasonography was performed in 44 patients after kidney transplantation, and a time-intensity analysis was performed to compare the differences between patients with normal graft function (NGF) and those with DGF. Compared with the NGF group, the DGF group had earlier arrival time, shorter time to peak, and higher arrival intensity and peak intensity (P < 0.05). The variation-of-intensity parameters in different renal cortices increased, whereas the variation-of-time parameter decreased, in those with DGF (P < 0.05). In conclusion, compared with the NGF group, the microcirculation perfusion of transplanted kidneys in the DGF group showed higher perfusion with earlier arrival time, shorter time to peak, and higher arrival intensity and peak intensity. In addition, the intensity variations of contrast agent in different renal cortices from patients with DGF were greater, whereas the variations in perfusion time were smaller than those in patients with NGF.

  5. Microsporidia Infection in a Mexican Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Oscar Xavier; Alvarez-Torres, Octavio; Ofelia Uribe-Uribe, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms of the microsporidia group are obligated intracellular protozoa that belong to the phylum Microspora; currently they are considered to be related or belong to the fungi reign. It is considered an opportunistic infection in humans, and 14 species belonging to 8 different genera have been described. Immunocompromized patients such as those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), also HIV serum-negative asymptomatic patients, with poor hygienic conditions, and recipients of bone marrow or solid organ transplantation are susceptible to develop deinfection. Sixty transplanted patients with renal microsporidia infection have been reported worldwide. The aim of this paper is to inform about the 2nd case of kidney transplant and microsporidia infection documented in Mexico. PMID:24558617

  6. Vitamin D: a new player in kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Sala, Gabriele

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin D is a hormone with pleiotropic effects. It mainly regulates calcium and phosphate metabolism through interactions with FGF23 and its receptor klotho. In addition, it has been shown that Vitamin D also regulates the immune response and has protective effects from cardiovascular disease, cancer and infections. Most renal transplant recipients have overt Vitamin D deficiency, a condition that may be associated with a decline in graft function and other complications. After kidney transplantation, elevated levels of FGF23 may predict increased risks of death and allograft loss. Theoretically, an optimal Vitamin D supplementation might favor operational tolerance and protect transplant recipients from the triad cardiovascular disease-cancer-infection. However, more solid data are needed to confirm this and to set the optimal level of serum Vitamin D supplementation in order to attain the best clinical outcome.

  7. Compatibility and kidney transplantation: the way to go.

    PubMed

    Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2012-01-01

    Long lasting debates in the past questioned the relevance of any sort of compatibility in post mortal kidney transplantation. It is for no say that fully compatible transplants have the highest chances for a long patient and graft survival. In the present report the use of HLA-DR as a representative of the Major Histocompatibility Complex class II genes in the allocation of organs is discussed. The major arguments are the easiness to offer to patients a compatible graft in a relatively short waiting time, an increase in graft survival, the less sensitization during the transplantation period, and the lower waiting time for a retransplant. Even if the number of organ donors remains the same a lowering of the mean waiting time is expected because of the longer period of graft survival.

  8. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients.

  9. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  10. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  11. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hepatocyte growth factor in development of fibrosis in the transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, Terese; Marcussen, Niels; Nyengaard, Jens R; Wogensen, Lise; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-02-01

    Late renal graft loss is associated with interstitial fibrosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is thought to facilitate fibrosis through interaction with TGF-β1, while hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) may act antifibrotic in the kidney allograft. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of HIF-1α and HGF in protocol biopsies as possible prognostic biomarkers for renal fibrosis. Thirty-nine renal transplant recipients were included in the study. Protocol biopsies performed 1 and 2 years after transplantation were used for immunohistochemistry analysis. The correlation between HIF-1α/HGF and the Banff score was analysed. In addition, progression in renal fibrosis and graft survival among recipients with high or low expression of HIF-1α/HGF after transplantation was compared. There was no significant correlation between fibrosis and the HIF-1α expression 1 and 2 years after transplantation, but an inverse significant correlation between the HGF expression and the fibrosis score 1 year after transplantation was shown. Even when adjusting for human leucocyte antigen mismatches, there was a significant relationship between fibrosis and HGF expression. Graft survival was not significantly correlated to HIF-1α or HGF at 1 year, although the trend was towards better graft survival with high HGF. HGF may have antifibrotic effects in human renal transplants. (Central.Denmark.Region.Committee number: 1-10-72-318-13).

  12. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Salter, Tracey; Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine; Hilton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a "full house" immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting "past resolved" infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  13. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  14. Kidney Transplantation as Primary Therapy for End-Stage Renal Disease: A National Kidney Foundation/Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF/KDOQI™) Conference

    PubMed Central

    Abecassis, Michael; Bartlett, Stephen T.; Collins, Allan J.; Davis, Connie L.; Delmonico, Francis L.; Friedewald, John J.; Hays, Rebecca; Howard, Andrew; Jones, Edward; Leichtman, Alan B.; Merion, Robert M.; Metzger, Robert A.; Pradel, Francoise; Schweitzer, Eugene J.; Velez, Ruben L.; Gaston, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney transplantation is the most desired and cost-effective modality of renal replacement therapy for patients with irreversible chronic kidney failure (end-stage renal disease, stage 5 chronic kidney disease). Despite emerging evidence that the best outcomes accrue to patients who receive a transplant early in the course of renal replacement therapy, only 2.5% of incident patients with end-stage renal disease undergo transplantation as their initial modality of treatment, a figure largely unchanged for at least a decade. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The National Kidney Foundation convened a Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) conference in Washington, DC, March 19 through 20, 2007, to examine the issue. Fifty-two participants representing transplant centers, dialysis providers, and payers were divided into three work groups to address the impact of early transplantation on the chronic kidney disease paradigm, educational needs of patients and professionals, and finances of renal replacement therapy. Results: Participants explored the benefits of early transplantation on costs and outcomes, identified current barriers (at multiple levels) that impede access to early transplantation, and recommended specific interventions to overcome those barriers. Conclusions: With implementation of early education, referral to a transplant center coincident with creation of vascular access, timely transplant evaluation, and identification of potential living donors, early transplantation can be an option for substantially more patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:18256371

  15. The molecular landscape of antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection: evidence for NK involvement through CD16a Fc receptors.

    PubMed

    Venner, J M; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Chang, J; Halloran, P F

    2015-05-01

    The recent recognition that antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the major cause of kidney transplant loss creates strong interest in its pathogenesis. We used microarray analysis of kidney transplant biopsies to identify the changes in pure ABMR. We found that the ABMR transcript changes in the initial Discovery Set were strongly conserved in a subsequent Validation Set. In the Combined Set of 703 biopsies, 2603 transcripts were significantly changed (FDR < 0.05) in ABMR versus all other biopsies. In cultured cells, the transcripts strongly associated with ABMR were expressed in endothelial cells, e.g. cadherins CDH5 and CDH13; IFNG-treated endothelial cells, e.g. phospholipase PLA1A and chemokine CXCL11; or NK cells, e.g. cytotoxicity molecules granulysin (GNLY) and FGFBP2. Other ABMR transcripts were expressed in normal kidney but not cell lines, either increased e.g. Duffy chemokine receptor (DARC) or decreased e.g. sclerostin (SOST). Pathway analysis of ABMR transcripts identified angiogenesis, with roles for angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factors; leukocyte-endothelial interactions; and NK signaling, including evidence for CD16a Fc receptor signaling elements shared with T cells. These data support a model of ABMR involving injury-repair in the microcirculation induced by cognate recognition involving antibody and CD16a, triggering IFNG release and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  16. Monitoring of Human Uterus Transplantation With Cervical Biopsies: A Provisional Scoring System for Rejection.

    PubMed

    Mölne, J; Broecker, V; Ekberg, J; Nilsson, O; Dahm-Kähler, P; Brännström, M

    2016-11-21

    Until now, absolute uterine factor infertility has been the major untreatable form of female infertility. Uterus transplantation has recently proven to be the first successful treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility, with demonstration of live births. In this study, live donation uterus transplantation was performed in nine women. In total, 163 cervical biopsies (149 protocol, 14 follow-up) were taken to detect histopathological signs of rejection. Based on experience from animal experiments, we used a three-grade scoring system to evaluate biopsies systematically. Nine episodes of rejection were diagnosed in five patients: grade 1 in six episodes, grade 2 in two episodes, and grade 3 in one episode. Treatment decisions were based on histopathology, and all rejection episodes were reversed after treatment. The biopsies were reviewed retrospectively, and immunohistochemistry was performed to characterize the inflammatory infiltrates. A borderline category was introduced to avoid overtreatment of patients. Based on our review of all biopsies, we put forward a simple grading system for monitoring of rejection and to guide immunosuppressive treatment in uterus transplantation.

  17. The impact of method on kidney graft and patient survival in kidney-pancreas transplantations for type I diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dinckan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoglu, Ibrahim; Kocak, Huseyin; Mesci, Ayhan; Altunbas, Hasan; Gurkan, Alihan

    2015-01-01

    Patients who develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) associated with Type I Diabetes Mellitus may receive kidney alone (KA) transplantation, simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantation, or a pancreas after kidney (PAK) transplantation. The goal of this study is to examine the long-term impact of pancreas transplantation on kidney graft and patient survival rates. A total of 85 transplantation cases, consisting of 30 that received living donor KA, 21 that received SPK, and 34 that received PAK, from 2003-2010 at Akdeniz University Organ Transplantation Institute were retrospectively screened. There was a graft loss in 4 cases from the KA group, and in 1 case from each of the SPK and PAK groups. The five-year kidney graft survival rates were 86.7% in KA, 95.2% in SPK, and 97.1% in PAK. There was a single patient loss in both KA and SPK. The kidney survival percentages were higher in SPK and PAK groups compared to the KA group. Therefore, SPK should be the primary preference in these patients; however, for the cases that have a living donor, pancreas transplantation should be considered after kidney transplantation, or the patients can be followed-up on with close blood sugar control.

  18. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  19. Effect of deoxyspergualin on vascular rejection in canine kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, K; Takahashi, K; Nemoto, K; Okada, M; Yasuo, M; Hayasaka, Y; Toma, H; Ota, K

    1994-08-01

    Deoxyspergualin (DSG), an analogue of spergualin produced by Bacillus laterosporus, has a strong immunosuppressive effect in various transplantation models. In this study, we investigated the effect of DSG on vascular rejection in canine kidney transplantation. To enhance vascular rejection, donor-specific blood transfusion (DST) was carried out on days 28, 21 and 14 preceding kidney transplantation. After DST, the donor kidney was transplanted to the recipient iliac fossa. The recipient animals were divided into five groups: namely, Group 1 (n = 7), no treatment; Group 2 (n = 6), DST only; Group 3 (n = 5), DSG only (treated with DSG intravenously at 1.2 mg./kg./day for the first 3 days after transplantation, 1.0 mg./kg./day for the following 3 days and 0.8 mg./kg./day for the following 8 days); Group 4 (n = 6), DST and DSG treatment (same protocol as Group 3); and Group 5 (n = 5), DST and cyclosporine (CsA) (treated with CsA orally at 10 mg./kg./day for 14 days after transplantation). In Group 2, DST treatment significantly reduced kidney graft survival time (8.6 +/- 2.2 days) compared with Group 1 (14.1 +/- 5.5 days). Despite DST, DSG treatment (Group 4) significantly prolonged graft survival time (29.5 +/- 2.6 days), whereas treatment with CsA (Group 5) did not prolong survival time (14.1 +/- 5.5 days) (Group 4 versus 5, p < 0.01). The onset of rejection was significantly delayed in Group 4 (22.1 +/- 2.7 days) compared with Groups 2 (5.7 +/- 2.4 days) and 5 (13.0 +/- 5.7 days) (p < 0.01). In contrast, the interval between rejection onset and animal death was significantly reduced in Groups 2 (3.0 +/- 0.6 days) and 5 (2.4 +/- 1.0 days) compared with Group 4 (7.3 +/- 1.7 days) (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that DSG successfully prevented humoral-type (accelerated acute-type) rejections. Histologically, nonDST groups (Groups 1 and 3) showed minimum vascular rejection. In contrast, all recipients in Group 2 showed severe vascular rejection, as did 80% of Cs

  20. Hispanic/Latino Disparities in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Role of a Culturally Competent Transplant Program

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elisa J.; Lee, Jungwha; Kang, Raymond; Ladner, Daniela P.; Skaro, Anton I.; Holl, Jane L.; French, Dustin D.; Abecassis, Michael M.; Caicedo, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic Americans face disparities in access to kidney transplantation, particularly living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). This study compared characteristics of LDKT recipients before and after implementing the Hispanic Kidney Transplant Program (HKTP) at Northwestern Medicines (NM) and other centers. Methods The NM HKTP, initiated in December 2006, delivers culturally and linguistically competent and congruent care. Program-specific data were used to compare the mean ratios of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013), and to compare the characteristics of NM's adult LDKT patients between pre-HKTP and post-HKTP. The same ratio was calculated for transplant centers in regions with a significant Hispanic population (≥25%) and performing in the top tertile of total LDKT volume in the pre-HKTP period. The number of Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients added to the waiting list were compared between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013) as a proxy for increased patient referrals and a pathway by which the HKTP may increase LDKTs. Results The ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs significantly increased by 70% after the implementation of NM's HKTP (pre-HKTP mean = 0.20, post-HKTP mean = 0.34; P= 0.001). None of the other transplant centers experienced a similar increase in their ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs. The NM waiting list additions grew by 91% among Hispanics, but grew only 4% for non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions These data suggest that the development and implementation of a culturally congruent transplant program can positively affect Hispanic LDKT and thereby reduce Hispanics disparities in LDKT rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively evaluate the generalizability of implementing such culturally competent interventions at other transplant programs. PMID:27500229

  1. Prognostic Value of Serum Biomarkers of Autoimmunity for Recurrence of IgA Nephropathy after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berthoux, Francois; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mohey, Hesham; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A

    2017-03-02

    A prognostic biomarker for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) recurrence after renal transplant is lacking. We followed 96 consecutive first renal transplant recipients with native kidney IgAN (79 men; 92 deceased donors; mean age =48.1 years old) on calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppression over 10 years for death, allograft failure, and clinicopathologic recurrence (CPR; clinically evident and biopsy proven). Using time-dependent Cox regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves, we assessed prognostic significance of levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1; autoantigen) and Gd-IgA1-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies in serum obtained at time of transplant or native kidney IgAN diagnosis (30 patients only). Overall, 13 patients died, 34 kidneys failed (17 due to CPR), and 34 patients developed CPR after a mean interval of 5.8 years. Compared with healthy controls (n=30), patients had significantly elevated serum Gd-IgA1 levels at diagnosis and transplant, but levels did not associate with any outcome. Patients also had significantly elevated levels of normalized (but not total) serum Gd-IgA1-specific IgG autoantibodies at diagnosis and transplant, and the level at transplant associated with higher risk of CPR (relative risk, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 5.71; P=0.01; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.51 to 0.74; P=0.05). Normalized Gd-IgA1-specific IgG autoantibody level remained an independent risk factor for CPR in multivariate analysis. Serum Gd-IgA1-specific IgA autoantibody level did not change between diagnosis and transplant or predict outcome. This study emphasizes post-transplant prognostic value of normalized serum IgG antiglycan autoantibody level in patients with IgAN.

  2. Functional cardiovascular reserve predicts survival pre-kidney and post-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Stephen M S; Iqbal, Hasan; Kanji, Hemali; Hamborg, Thomas; Aldridge, Nicolas; Krishnan, Nithya; Imray, Chris H E; Banerjee, Prithwish; Bland, Rosemary; Higgins, Robert; Zehnder, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance is an important comorbidity in patients with CKD. Anaerobic threshold (AT) determines the upper limits of aerobic exercise and is a measure of cardiovascular reserve. This study investigated the prognostic capacity of AT on survival in patients with advanced CKD and the effect of kidney transplantation on survival in those with reduced cardiovascular reserve. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, cardiovascular reserve was evaluated in 240 patients who were waitlisted for kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2010, and patients were followed for ≤5 years. Survival time was the primary endpoint. Cumulative survival for the entire cohort was 72.6% (24 deaths), with cardiovascular events being the most common cause of death (54.2%). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, patients with AT <40% of predicted peak VO2 had a significantly reduced 5-year cumulative overall survival rate compared with those with AT ≥40% (P<0.001). Regarding the cohort with AT <40%, patients who underwent kidney transplantation (6 deaths) had significantly better survival compared with nontransplanted patients (17 deaths) (hazard ratio, 4.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.78 to 11.38; P=0.002). Survival did not differ significantly among patients with AT ≥40%, with one death in the nontransplanted group and no deaths in the transplanted group. In summary, this is the first prospective study to demonstrate a significant association of AT, as the objective index of cardiovascular reserve, with survival in patients with advanced CKD. High-risk patients with reduced cardiovascular reserve had a better survival rate after receiving a kidney transplant.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Clinical Decision Aid to Improve Access to Kidney Transplantation: iChoose Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Rachel E.; Basu, Mohua; Mohan, Sumit; Smith, Kayla D.; Wolf, Michael; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John J.; Chiles, Mariana; Russell, Allison; McPherson, Laura; Gander, Jennifer; Pastan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, as it substantially increases a patient's survival and is cost saving compared to a lifetime of dialysis. However, transplantation is not universally chosen by patients with renal failure, and limited knowledge about the survival benefit of transplantation vs. dialysis may play a role. We created a mobile application clinical decision aid called iChoose Kidney to improve access to individualized prognosis information comparing dialysis and transplantation outcomes. We describe the iChoose Kidney study, a randomized controlled trial designed to test the clinical efficacy of a mobile health decision aid among end-stage renal disease patients referred for kidney transplantation at three large, diverse transplant centers across the U.S. Approximately 450 patients will be randomized to receive either: (1) standard of care or “usual” transplantation education, or (2) standard of care plus iChoose Kidney. The primary outcome is change in knowledge about the survival benefit of kidney transplantation vs. dialysis from baseline to immediate follow-up; secondary outcomes include change in treatment preferences, improved decisional conflict, and increased access to kidney transplantation. Analyses are also planned to examine effectiveness across subgroups of race, socioeconomic status, health literacy and health numeracy. Engaging patients in health care choices can increase patient empowerment and improve knowledge and understanding of treatment choices. If the effectiveness of iChoose Kidney has a greater impact on patients with low health literacy, lower socioeconomic status, and minority race, this decision aid could help reduce disparities in access to kidney transplantation. PMID:27610423

  4. Early post-transplant urinary IP-10 expression after kidney transplantation is predictive of short- and long-term graft function.

    PubMed

    Matz, M; Beyer, J; Wunsch, D; Mashreghi, M-F; Seiler, M; Pratschke, J; Babel, N; Volk, H-D; Reinke, P; Kotsch, K

    2006-05-01

    The early identification of renal transplant recipients at enhanced risk of developing acute and subclinical rejection would allow individualized adjustment of immunosuppression before functional graft injury occurs and would exclude these patients from drug-weaning studies. Protein and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction-based analyses of candidate markers in urine open the opportunity to closely monitor kidney-transplanted patients non-invasively. The chemokine interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10; CXCL10) might be an interesting candidate to uncover ongoing immune processes within the graft. Urine samples from kidney-transplanted recipients were retrospectively analyzed for IP-10 mRNA and protein expression. IP-10 levels were correlated with the incidence of acute rejection episodes proven by histology and long-term graft function assessed by the glomerular filtration rate 6 months post transplantation. IP-10 expression in urine identified patients with ongoing acute rejection episodes several days before a biopsy was indicated by rising serum creatinine levels. Most importantly, elevated levels of urinary IP-10 protein within the first four postoperative weeks were predictive of graft function at 6 months even in the absence of acute rejection. These data reveal a correlation between elevated IP-10 expression in urine at early time points post-transplantation and intragraft immune activation that leads to acute rejection and compromised long-term graft function.

  5. Outcomes for kidney transplants at the National University Health System: comparison with overseas transplants.

    PubMed

    Vathsala, Anantharaman

    2010-01-01

    The 5-year and 10-year graft survivals for 186 deceased donor (DD) transplants performed at National University Health System (NUHS) were 79.9% and 58.4% respectively. 5-year and 10-year patient survivals for DD transplants performed at NUHS were 94.2% and 83.4%. The 5-year and 10-year graft survivals for 128 living donor (LD) transplants performed at NUHS were 90.2% and 72% respectively. 5-year and 10-year patient survivals for DD transplants performed at NUHS were 98.6% and 95.1%. The projected graft half lives were 14.6 and 20.6 years for DD and LD transplants respectively. These results compare favorably with the 10-year survival rates of 40% and 58% for DD and LD grafts reported by the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) in 2010. The younger age and the lower prevalence of diabetes and HLAmismatch in the DD and LD transplant study populations, in comparison to the USRDS population and perhaps better access and compliance to maintenance immunosuppression, could have contributed to these excellent outcomes. The 5-year and 10-year graft survivals for 162 transplants receiving what were likely deceased donor kidneys from China were 89.2% and 69.2% respectively. Although these survivals were apparently better than that for DD performed at NUHS, the advantage for China Tx disappeared when DD with primary non function or vascular thrombosis were excluded from analysis. The 5-year and 10-year patient survivals for 30 transplants receiving live non-related transplants from India were 82.3% and 60.1%. Both groups were considered to have received commercial transplants based on various aspects of history from the patients. Among those receiving China_Tx or India Tx, there were a disproportionate number of males and Chinese; and a significant proportion underwent pre-emptive transplant or transplant after only a short period of dialysis. Prevalence of post-transplant hepatitis B was significantly higher among China_Tx than their DD counterparts (7.7% vs. 1.2%, P = 0

  6. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  7. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  8. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nemcek AA. Percutaneous biopsy. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, Venbrux AC, Morgan RA, eds. Image- ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  9. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus Does Not Impair Closure of Punch Biopsy Wounds in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Shelley B.; Gonzales, Josephine; Boyett, Megan; Costanzo, Anne; Han, Peggy P.; Steinberg, Steven; McKay, Dianne B.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are approved to prevent allograft rejection and control malignancy. Unfortunately, they are associated with adverse effects, such as wound healing complications that detract from more extensive use. There is a lack of prospective wound healing studies to monitor patients treated with mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus or sirolimus, especially in nondiabetics. Methods Patients receiving everolimus with standard immunosuppressant therapy or standard immunosuppressant therapy without everolimus were administered 3-mm skin biopsy punch wounds in the left scapular region. Homeostatic gene expression was examined in the skin obtained from the biopsy and wound surface area was examined on day 7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined for cytokine production. Results There are no significant changes in autophagy related 13, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, IL-2, kruppel-like factor 4, and TGFB1 gene expression in the skin suggesting that there is little impact of everolimus on these genes within nonwounded skin. Peripheral blood T cells are more sensitive to cell death in everolimus-treated patients, but they retain the ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines required for efficient wound repair. Importantly, there is no delay in the closure of biopsy wounds in patients receiving everolimus as compared to those not receiving mTOR inhibition. Conclusions Everolimus treatment is not associated with impaired closure of skin biopsy wounds in kidney transplant recipients. These data highlight the importance of exploring whether larger surgical wounds would show a similar result and how other factors, such as diabetes, impact wound healing complications associated with mTOR suppression.

  10. Lymphocyte Activation Markers in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Fatina I.; Elghoroury, Eman A.; Elshamaa, Manal F.; Bazaraa, Hafez M.; Salah, Doaa M.; Kassem, Neemat M. A.; Ibrahim, Mona H.; El-Saaid, Gamila S.; Nasr, Soha A.; Koura, Hala M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: The role of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) in immune tolerance in experimental transplantation is very important but the clinical significance of circulating Tregs in the peripheral blood is undetermined. We evaluated the association between the frequency of T cell activation markers CD25 and CD71 and clinical parameters that may affect the level of these T cell markers. Methods: In 47peditric kidney transplant (KT) recipients and 20 healthy controls, the frequency of T cell activation markers, CD25 and CD71 was measured with flow cytometry after transplantation. Two clinical protocols of induction immunosuppression were used: (1) anti-thymocyte globulin (THYMO) group (n =29) and Basiliximab (BSX) group (n=10). Results: The percentage of circulating CD25 after KT was significantly lower than that in the controls. There is no significant difference between KT and the controls s regard to circulating CD71. The percentage of CD25 was significantly increased in children with acute rejection compared with those without acute rejection. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) decreased the frequency of CD25 but mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor did not. The proportion of CD25 significantly decreased in THYMO group during the first year after transplantation. Conclusion: The frequency of circulating T cell activation marker CD25 in pediatric KT recipients is strongly affected by CNIs, and a high frequency of CD25 is associated with acute rejection during the early posttransplant period. The measurement of T cell activation markers, may become a useful immune monitoring tool after kidney transplantation. PMID:26508906

  11. Kidney transplantation in patients with systemic sclerosis: a nationwide multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique; Dehay, Julien; Ott, Julien; Sberro, Rebecca; Brunelle, Charlotte; Kamar, Nassim; Colosio, Charlotte; Chatelet, Valérie; Albano, Laetitia; Girerd, Sophie; Audard, Vincent; Barbet, Christelle; Dantal, Jacques; Ducloux, Didier; Durrbach, Antoine; Garrigue, Valérie; Hazzan, Marc; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Mariat, Christophe; Merville, Pierre; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Moulin, Bruno; Guerrot, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    Kidney transplantation is one of the therapeutic options for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in systemic sclerosis (SS). Current evidence demonstrates poorer patient and graft survival after transplantation in SS than in other primary kidney diseases. All the patients presenting ESRD associated with SS who had received a kidney allograft between 1987 and 2013 were systematically included from 20 French kidney transplantation centres. Thirty-four patients received 36 kidney transplants during the study period. Initial kidney disease was scleroderma renal crisis in 76.4%. Extrarenal involvement of SS was generally stable, except cardiac and gastrointestinal involvements, which worsened after kidney transplantation in 45% and 26% of cases, respectively. Patient survival was 100%, 90.3% and 82.5% at 1, 3 and 5 years post-transplant, respectively. Pulmonary involvement of SS was an independent risk factor of death after transplantation. Death-censored graft survival was 97.2% after 1 and 3 years, and 92.8% after 5 years. Recurrence of scleroderma renal crisis was diagnosed in three cases. In our study, patient and graft survivals after kidney transplantation can be considered as excellent. On this basis, we propose that in the absence of extrarenal contraindication, SS patients presenting with ESRD should be considered for kidney transplantation.

  12. Pregnancy after kidney transplantation: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Mezza, E; Oggé, G; Attini, R; Rossetti, M; Soragna, G; Consiglio, V; Burdese, M; Vespertino, E; Tattoli, F; Gai, M; Motta, D; Segoloni, G P; Todros, T; Piccoli, G B

    2004-12-01

    Despite the relatively little space for transplantation in most medical schools, this issue is considered interesting by the students both for its clinical and ethical implications. The students were asked to choose a particular aspect of nephrology for a 2-hour case discussion. They chose the case of a 35-year-old female, kidney transplant recipient now 1.5 years postoperatively, who was coming to seek advice about pregnancy. The aim of the present work is to report an integration between narrative and evidence-based medicine (EBM) approaches. The search strategy was developed within a multidisciplinary working group, two of whose members were also masters in the methodology of systematic revisions. The first step in the discussion was the identification of ethical and methodological problem. In a rapidly developing field, books are unlikely to be able to give updated information. One needs to interact with electronic databases. In this context, no randomized controlled trial on pregnancy is expected. The evidence is likely to be heterogeneous. Prenatal care delivery differs around the world in part related to attitudes toward pregnancy, which depend upon religion and traditions. The second step was the definition of the search strategy. The third step, was selecting and cataloging the evidence. The titles and abstracts retrieved by the search strategy (272 items) were examined to identify full papers to be retrieved. The evidence retrieved was screened for the type of paper (reviews, primary studies, case reports, case series) and for the authors to give an indirect idea of duplicate publication bias. Teaching a complex and ever-changing subject, such as kidney transplantation, is a difficult task. The case of a young woman seeking information on the probability to undergo a successful pregnancy was particularly likely to exemplify the importance of being aware of the biases of the book-based information and on the need to interact with the internet. The search

  13. Human papilloma virus infection in female kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Lessan-Pezeshki, Mahboob; Nahayati, Mohamad Ali

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical intra-epithelial lesions in transplanted patients. Cervical Papanicolaou (Pap) smear/HPV test and colposcopic examinations were performed in 58 patients who were candidates for renal transplant surgery; these tests were repeated one year later. Their age range was 26-53 years (mean, 37.2 years). Hypertension was the most common cause of renal insufficiency (34.4%), while in 41.4% of the patients, the causative pathology was unknown. In 24.1% of the patients, there was no history of dialysis, i.e. they had pre-emptive transplantation. The mean duration of marriage (years since first intercourse) was 16.2 years (range, 1-35). Coitus interruptus was the most common contraceptive method used (37.9%), followed by tubal ligation and condom (10.3% and 6.9%, respectively). All patients had negative Pap tests and normal gynecologic exam before undergoing transplantation. The Pap test remained normal after transplant surgery, although the HPV test became positive in four patients (6.9%). There were five cases of white epithelium on colposcopy, but biopsy showed normal metaplasia. Two cases of extensive anogenital warts were treated by CO 2 laser, and one patient had recurrent warts, which responded well to second laser surgery. None of the study patients had squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL) or vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia. Our study suggests that screening with HPV and Pap test should be performed before transplant surgery and should be repeated at regular intervals in order to avoid irreversible situations such as high-grade SILs, which are difficult to treat. Avoiding high-risk sexual relations in this group of patients is highly recommended.

  14. New Organ Allocation System for Combined Liver-Kidney Transplants and the Availability of Kidneys for Transplant to Patients with Stage 4-5 CKD.

    PubMed

    Asch, William S; Bia, Margaret J

    2016-12-27

    A new proposal has been created for establishing medical criteria for organ allocation in recipients receiving simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In this article, we describe the new policy, elaborate on the points of greatest controversy, and offer a perspective on the policy going forward. Although we applaud the fact that simultaneous liver-kidney transplant activity will now be monitored and appreciate the creation of medical criteria for allocation in simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, we argue that some of the criteria proposed, especially those for allocating a kidney to a liver recipient with AKI, are too liberal. We call on the nephrology community to follow the consequences of this new policy and push for a re-examination of the longstanding policy of allocating kidneys to multiorgan transplant recipients before all other candidates. The charge to protect our system of equitable organ allocation is very challenging, but it is a challenge that we must embrace.

  15. Management and prevention of post-transplant malignancies in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The central issue in organ transplantation remains suppression of allograft rejection. Thus, the development of immunosuppressive drugs has been the key to successful allograft function. The increased immunosuppressive efficiency obtained in the last two decades in kidney transplantation dramatically reduced the incidence of acute rejection. However, the inevitable trade-off was an increased rate of post-transplant infections and malignancies. Since the incidence of cancer in immunosuppressed transplant recipients becomes greater over time, and the introduction of new immunosuppressive strategies are expected to extend significantly allograft survival, the problem might grow exponentially in the near future. Thus, cancer is becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients otherwise successfully treated by organ transplantation. There are at least four distinct areas requiring consideration, which have a potentially serious impact on recipient outcome after transplantation: (i) the risk of transmitting a malignancy to the recipient within the donor organ; (ii) the problems of previously diagnosed and treated malignancy in the recipient; (iii) the prevention of de novo post-transplant malignant diseases and (iv) the management of these complex and often life-threatening clinical problems. In this scenario, the direct and indirect oncogenic potential of immunosuppressive therapy should be always carefully considered. PMID:26413294

  16. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an examination table. The technician will place a firm pillow or sandbag under a person’s body to ... Care Professionals Community Outreach and Health Fairs Health Communication Programs FAQs About NIDDK Meet the Director Offices & ...

  17. Socioeconomic deprivation and barriers to live-donor kidney transplantation: a qualitative study of deceased-donor kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Phillippa K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tomson, Charles R V; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Socioeconomically deprived individuals with renal disease are less likely to receive a live-donor kidney transplant than less-deprived individuals. This qualitative study aimed to identify reasons for the observed socioeconomic disparity in live-donor kidney transplantation. Design A qualitative study using face-to-face in-depth semistructured interviews. Setting A UK tertiary renal referral hospital and transplant centre. Participants Purposive sampling was used to select deceased-donor transplant recipients from areas of high socioeconomic deprivation (SED) (19 participants), followed by a low SED comparison group (13 participants), aiming for maximum diversity in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, primary renal disease and previous renal replacement therapy. Methods Participants were interviewed following their routine transplant clinic review. Interviews were digitally audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using NVivo software and analysed using the constant comparison method described in Grounded Theory. Results Themes common and distinct to each socioeconomic group emerged. 6 themes appeared to distinguish between individuals from areas of high and low SED. 4 themes were distinct to participants from areas of high SED: (1) Passivity, (2) Disempowerment, (3) Lack of social support and (4) Short-term focus. 2 themes were distinct to the low SED group: (1) Financial concerns and (2) Location of donor. Conclusions Several of the emerging themes from the high SED individuals relate to an individual's lack of confidence and skill in managing their health and healthcare; themes that are in keeping with low levels of patient activation. Inadequate empowerment of socioeconomically deprived individuals by healthcare practitioners was also described. Financial concerns did not emerge as a barrier from interviews with the high SED group. Interventions aiming to redress the observed socioeconomic inequity should be targeted at both

  18. Diagnosis of kidney transplant obstruction using Mag3 diuretic renography.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, B J; Cohn, D A; Spicer, S T; Evans, S G; Chapman, J R; Gruenewald, S M

    2001-02-01

    Kidney transplant obstruction (KTO) following renal transplantation remains an important reversible cause of allograft dysfunction, requiring prompt diagnosis to prevent long-term graft damage. Although ultrasound can accurately diagnose renal transplant hydronephrosis, it cannot be used to assess its functional significance. We prospectively assessed the utility of technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc99m MAG3) diuretic renography for the diagnosis of allograft KTO, using standard visual and quantitative parameters, as well as calculated renal output efficiency (OE), which has been postulated to improve diagnostic yield. From a cohort of 45 renal transplant patients, two subgroups were formed. The first group of transplant recipients (n = 21) with stable function and no obstruction was used to derive normal values for Tc99m MAG3 scans. A second group of transplant recipients with acute renal dysfunction in whom KTO was clinically suspected was used to test the diagnostic utility of these derived values (n = 43 scans). KTO was diagnosed independently of the MAG3 scans by a fall in the serum creatinine in response to renal pelvis urinary drainage. OE in 12 renal allografts with KTO was significantly reduced compared with 31 Tc99m MAG3 scans without KTO (59.6 +/- 18.9 vs. 81.6 +/- 5.4%, p < 0.001). In KTO, the mean time of isotope appearance in the bladder (time to bladder [TTB]) was extended compared with unobstructed allografts (7.9 +/- 4.1 vs. 3.6 +/- 1.5 min, p < 0.001). Measurement of OE significantly improved the accuracy of diuretic MAG3 renography in the diagnosis of renal allograft KTO, especially when supplemented by the TTB, parenchymal transit time and shape of the renogram curve. Ureteric obstruction of the kidney transplant can be diagnosed with an OE reduced to < 75% (sensitivity 92%, specificity 87%) and confirmed by isotope hold-up in the pelvicalyceal system. A normal or slowly declining renogram curve effectively excluded KTO (sensitivity of

  19. Stabilization of estimated glomerular filtration rate in kidney transplantation from deceased donors with acute kidney injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wiwattanathum, Punlop; Ingsathit, Atiporn; Kantachuvesiri, Surasak; Arpornsujaritkun, Nuttapon; Tirapanich, Wiwat; Sumethkul, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate and compare the outcomes of kidney transplant (KT) from deceased donors among standard criteria, acute kidney injury (AKI) and expanded criteria donors (ECDs). METHODS This retrospective study included 111 deceased donor kidney transplant recipients (DDKT). Deceased donors were classified as standard criteria donor (SCD), AKI donor and ECD. AKI was diagnosed and classified based on change of serum Cr by acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria. Primary outcome was one-year estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from Cr by CKD-EPI. Multivariate regression analysis was done by adjusting factors such as type of DDKT, %Panel-reactive antibodies, cold ischemic time, the presence of delayed graft function and the use of induction therapy. Significant factors that can affect the primary outcomes were then identified. RESULTS ECD group had a significantly lower eGFR at one year (33.9 ± 17.3 mL/min) when compared with AKI group (56.6 ± 23.9) and SCD group (63.6 ± 19.9) (P < 0.001). For AKI group, one-year eGFR was also indifferent among AKIN stage 1, 2 or 3. Patients with AKIN stage 3 had progressive increase of eGFR from 49.6 ± 27.2 at discharge to 61.9 ± 29.0 mL/min at one year. From Kaplan-Meier analysis, AKI donor showed better two-year graft survival than ECD (100% vs 88.5%, P = 0.006). Interestingly, AKI group had a stable eGFR at one and two year. The two-year eGFR of AKI group was not significantly different from SCD group (56.6 ± 24.5 mL/min vs 58.6 ± 23.2 mL/min, P = 0.65). CONCLUSION Kidney transplantations from deceased donors with variable stage of acute kidney injuries were associated with favorable two-year allograft function. The outcomes were comparable with KT from SCD. This information supports the option that deceased donors with AKI are an important source of organ for kidney transplantation even in the presence of stage 3 AKI. PMID:28058222

  20. Hepatic sinusoidal dilatation with portal hypertension during azathioprine treatment after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gerlag, P G; Lobatto, S; Driessen, W M; Deckers, P F; Van Hooff, J P; Schröder, E; Assmann, K M; Van Haelst, U J

    1985-01-01

    An unusual hepatic disease developed in 3 patients with a well-functioning kidney graft 16-24 months after transplantation. Vague abdominal pain, increased bleeding tendency and edema were initial complaints, and hepato- or splenomegaly and ascites were found as well. Liver function tests were not or only mildly disturbed; hemolysis and pancytopenia were always present. Colloid uptake was absent at liver scintigraphy and the hepatic venous wedge pressure was increased. Esophageal varices were demonstrated. Liver biopsy showed extensive midzonal and pericentral sinusoidal dilatation. After discontinuation of azathioprine the symptoms and the extent of sinusoidal dilatation disappeared gradually, but after 1-3 years fibrosis or micronodular cirrhosis had developed and splenomegaly with hypersplenism remained. These observations strongly suggest an association between chronic use of azathioprine and the development of venous congestion of the liver with sinusoidal dilatation, eventually resulting in chronic liver disease.

  1. Acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Becker, Jan U; Immenschuh, Stephan; Ahlenstiel, Thurid

    2015-03-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is a diagnostic challenge in renal transplantation medicine. However, it is an important diagnosis to make, since chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) is the main cause of long-term graft loss. Antibody-mediated rejection is diagnosed by detecting donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in the blood in combination with observing typical histomorphological signs in kidney biopsy, as described in the Banff classification. Therapy is based on the removal of DSAs by administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption. Reoccurrence of antibodies is diminished by the use of rituximab, increased immunosuppression, and in some cases additional experimental substances. A combination of these techniques has been shown to be successful in the majority of cases of acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Routine DSA monitoring is warranted for early detection of antibody-mediated rejection.

  2. Effect of splenectomy on first cadaver kidney transplants.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, F P; Reckard, C R; Ketel, B L; Schulak, J A

    1980-01-01

    A prospective study was begun in January 1975 to evaluate the effect of splenectomy on graft and patient survival in recipients of first cadaver kidney transplants. Ninety-two cases were evaluated. Splenectomy increased the survival of both grafts and recipients. The benefit from splenectomy compensated readily for the perioperative morbidity of splenectomy and the long-term increased risk of sepsis from certain bacteria for the asplenic patient. Splenectomy exerted its effect by reducing the incidence and intensity of rejection episodes. It was not clear whether the observation resulted from a direct immunosuppressive effect of splenectomy or from the increased tolerance to azathioprine observed in asplenic recipients. Finally, splenectomy negated an effect of race that had been observed earlier for survival of cadaver transplants and recipients. PMID:7000012

  3. Recent Developments in Kidney Transplantation – A Critical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Womer, Karl L.; Kaplan, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances have been made in decreasing acute rejection rates and improving short-term graft survival in kidney transplant recipients. Whether these advances ultimately will lead to a commensurate improvement in long-term survival is not yet known. In recent years, greater attention has been placed on defining the precise etiology of graft loss, determining how far and with what agents we can minimize immunosuppression, and delineating the nature of both T cell-mediated as well as antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, with the growing disparity of available organs and patients in need of a transplant, greater attention has been placed on optimizing allocation. In this mini-review, we will focus on developments over the last couple of years, paying particular attention to insights, studies, and observations that may attempt to elucidate some of these open questions. PMID:19459815

  4. Cancer Incidence among Heart, Kidney, and Liver Transplant Recipients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwai-Fong; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Ke, Hung-Yen; Lin, Yi-Chang; Lin, Feng-Yen; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Population-based evidence of the relative risk of cancer among heart, kidney, and liver transplant recipients from Asia is lacking. The Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a population-based cohort study of transplant recipients (n = 5396), comprising 801 heart, 2847 kidney, and 1748 liver transplant recipients between 2001 and 2012. Standardized incidence ratios and Cox regression models were used. Compared with the general population, the risk of cancer increased 3.8-fold after heart transplantation, 4.1-fold after kidney transplantation and 4.6-fold after liver transplantation. Cancer occurrence showed considerable variation according to transplanted organs. The most common cancers in all transplant patients were cancers of the head and neck, liver, bladder, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Male recipients had an increased risk of cancers of the head and neck and liver, and female kidney recipients had a significant risk of bladder and kidney cancer. The adjusted hazard ratio for any cancer in all recipients was higher in liver transplant recipients compared with that in heart transplant recipients (hazard ratio = 1.5, P = .04). Cancer occurrence varied considerably and posttransplant cancer screening should be performed routinely according to transplanted organ and sex. PMID:27196400

  5. Kidney transplantation in immunologically high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Keven, K; Sengul, S; Celebi, Z K; Tuzuner, A; Yalcin, F; Duman, T; Tutkak, H

    2013-04-01

    An increased number of sensitized patients await kidney transplantation (KTx). Sensitization has a major impact on patient mortality and morbidity due to prolonged waiting time and may preclude live donor transplantation. However, recent reports have shown that KTx can be performed successfully using novel immunosuppressive protocols. This study presents our experience with patients displaying donor-specific antibody (DSA) (+). We enrolled 5 lymphocyte cross-match (LCM) negative (complement-dependent cytotoxicity) and panel-reactive antibody (PRA) plus DSA-positive patients mean fluorescein intensity [MFI] > 1000) who underwent living kidney donor procedures. All subjects were females and their mean age was 36.7 years. In our protocol, we started mycophenolate mofetil (2 g/d), tacrolimus (0.01 mg/kg) and prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg) on day -6. We performed 2 sessions of total plasma exchange (TPE) with albumin replacement and administered 2 doses of IVIG (5 g/d). On day -1, we added rituximab (200 mg). On the operation day and on day +4, the patients received doses of basiliximab. Serum samples were taken on days -6, 0, and 30 as well as at 1 year after transplantation. All patients displayed immediate graft function. Mean basal DSA titer was 5624 MFI. After desensitization, the MFI titers decreased at the time of transplantation to 2753 MFI, and were 2564 MFI at the 1st month and 802 MFI at 1st year. Three patients experienced acute rejection episodes (60%). After treatment for rejection, the average follow-up was 17 months and last creatinine levels were 0.6-0.8 mg/dL (minimum-maximum). In conclusion, KTx can be succesfully performed in sensitized patients displaying DSA. However, there seems to be a greater acute rejection risk. There is no consensus regarding adequate doses of IVIG or plasmapheresis treatments; furthermore, more studies are needed to clarify the safe MFI titer of the DSA.

  6. Effect of TREM-1 blockade and single nucleotide variants in experimental renal injury and kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, A.; Kers, J.; Emal, D.; Stroo, I.; Teske, G. J. D.; Butter, L. M.; Claessen, N.; Damman, J.; Derive, M.; Navis, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J. C.; Dessing, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR)-injury induces activation of innate immune response which sustains renal injury and contributes to the development of delayed graft function (DGF). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a pro-inflammatory evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptor expressed on a variety of innate immune cells. TREM-1 expression increases following acute and chronic renal injury. However, the function of TREM-1 in renal IR is still unclear. Here, we investigated expression and function of TREM-1 in a murine model of renal IR using different TREM-1 inhibitors: LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein. In a human study, we analyzed the association of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the TREM1 gene in a cohort comprising 1263 matching donors and recipients with post-transplant outcomes, including DGF. Our findings demonstrated that, following murine IR, renal TREM-1 expression increased due to the influx of Trem1 mRNA expressing cells detected by in situ hybridization. However, TREM-1 interventions by means of LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein did not ameliorate IR-induced injury. In the human renal transplant cohort, donor and recipient TREM1 gene variant p.Thr25Ser was not associated with DGF, nor with biopsy-proven rejection or death-censored graft failure. We conclude that TREM-1 does not play a major role during experimental renal IR and after kidney transplantation. PMID:27928159

  7. Markers of coagulation activation and acute kidney injury in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Sangeeta R; Seidel, Kristy; Pao, Emily; Lawler, Rick; McDonald, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The etiology of AKI is unknown because biopsies are rarely performed. The pathophysiology of injury is inferred from clinical data. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is often invoked as the cause of renal injury. Patients > 2 years undergoing their first HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) participated in this study. We prospectively measured plasma markers of coagulation activation, (PAI-1 and tPA) and fibrinolyis (D-dimer) weekly in 149 patients during the first 100 days post-transplant. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations between these markers and AKI (doubling of baseline serum creatinine). Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine associations between day 100 urinary albumin to creatinine ratios (ACR) and these markers. Thirty one percent of patients developed AKI. Though elevations in these markers occurred frequently, neither PAI-1 nor tPA were associated with development of AKI. D-dimer was associated with a slightly increased risk of AKI (RR=1.76; p-value 0.04). None of these markers were associated with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100. The lack of an association with AKI suggests that endothelial injury in the form of TMA is not a common cause of AKI early after transplant. PMID:25665045

  8. Aggressive angiomyxoma of transplanted kidney mimicking posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Gorsi, Ujjwal; Naranje, Priyanka; Rathi, Manish; Nada, Ritambhara; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2017-01-01

    Angiomyxoma is a scarce neoplasm arising from the soft tissues of perineum and pelvis, more commonly seen in the females. For such a tumor to arise in a renal allograft is rare and has previously been reported only in few case. We report a case of aggressive angiomyxoma arising de novo in the renal allograft nine-year posttransplantation. We describe its imaging features on ultrasound and computed tomography which closely mimic the more usual tumor of the transplanted kidney, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and suggest that angiomyxoma may be considered as a differential diagnosis in a case of soft tissue mass arising within the renal allograft.

  9. Normothermic Ex Vivo Kidney Perfusion for the Preservation of Kidney Grafts prior to Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kaths, J. Moritz; Spetzler, Vinzent N.; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Echeverri, Juan; Louis, Kristine S.; Foltys, Daniel B.; Strempel, Mari; Yip, Paul; John, Rohan; Mucsi, Istvan; Ghanekar, Anand; Bagli, Darius; Robinson, Lisa; Selzner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation has become a well-established treatment option for patients with end-stage renal failure. The persisting organ shortage remains a serious problem. Therefore, the acceptance criteria for organ donors have been extended leading to the usage of marginal kidney grafts. These marginal organs tolerate cold storage poorly resulting in increased preservation injury and higher rates of delayed graft function. To overcome the limitations of cold storage, extensive research is focused on alternative normothermic preservation methods. Ex vivo normothermic organ perfusion is an innovative preservation technique. The first experimental and clinical trials for ex vivo lung, liver, and kidney perfusions demonstrated favorable outcomes. In addition to the reduction of cold ischemic injury, the method of normothermic kidney storage offers the opportunity for organ assessment and repair. This manuscript provides information about kidney retrieval, organ preservation techniques, and isolated ex vivo normothermic kidney perfusion (NEVKP) in a porcine model. Surgical techniques, set up for the perfusion solution and the circuit, potential assessment options, and representative results are demonstrated. PMID:26275014

  10. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  11. Functional assessment of transplanted kidneys with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ting; Li, Ying-Chun; Yin, Long-Lin; Pu, Hong; Chen, Jia-Yuan

    2015-10-28

    Kidney transplantation has emerged as the treatment of choice for many patients with end-stage renal disease, which is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Given the shortage of clinically available donor kidneys and the significant incidence of allograft dysfunction, a noninvasive and accurate assessment of the allograft renal function is critical for postoperative management. Prompt diagnosis of graft dysfunction facilitates clinical intervention of kidneys with salvageable function. New advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology have enabled the calculation of various renal parameters that were previously not feasible to measure noninvasively. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides information on renal diffusion and perfusion simultaneously, with quantification by the apparent diffusion coefficient, the decrease of which reflects renal function impairment. Diffusion-tensor imaging accounts for the directionality of molecular motion and measures fractional anisotropy of the kidneys. Blood oxygen level-dependent MR evaluates intrarenal oxygen bioavailability, generating the parameter of R2* (reflecting the concentration of deoxyhemoglobin). A decrease in R2* could happen during acute rejection. MR nephro-urography/renography demonstrates structural data depicting urinary tract obstructions and functional data regarding the glomerular filtration and blood flow. MR angiography details the transplant vasculature and is particularly suitable for detecting vascular complications, with good correlation with digital subtraction angiography. Other functional MRI technologies, such as arterial spin labeling and MR spectroscopy, are showing additional promise. This review highlights MRI as a comprehensive modality to diagnose a variety of etiologies of graft dysfunction, including prerenal (e.g., renal vasculature), renal (intrinsic causes) and postrenal (e.g., obstruction of the collecting system) etiologies.

  12. Successful treatment of renal failure caused by multiple myeloma with HLA-identical living kidney and bone marrow transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wagner, L; Lengyel, L; Mikala, G; Reményi, P; Piros, L; Csomor, J; Fábry, L; Tordai, A; Langer, R M; Masszi, T

    2013-01-01

    Here we have described a successful HLA-identical living allogeneic kidney transplantation after bone marrow transplantation in a patient with end-stag liver disease caused by multiple myeloma (MM). Our case is unique, because this combined transplantation is rarely possible and because of our unique immunosuppressive and management strategies. A 45-year-old man with ESRD MM and κ light-chain nephropathy was diagnosed. Cytostatic treatment resulted in partial remission, so autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (SCT) was performed leading to a complete remission; however the patient remained anuric. The patient's HLA-identical brother offered to be a donor of peripheral stem cells for collection and cryopreservation. Kidney transplantation was performed with a combination of tacrolimus sirolimuns, and methylprednisolone. With a well-functioning kidney graft, allogeneic SCT was performed in the incipient relapse phase of MM, after total body irradiation. Severe oropharyngeal infections, diarrhea, sepsis, and renal failure. Fearing acute renal rejection, we administered steroid bolus. He experienced therapy with gradual restoration of kidney function. Then, steroid-responsive acute graft-versus-host disease (grade II, predominantly bowel) was diagnosed on the background of diarrhea, which returned once. Later he experienced a left subclavian vein thrombosis at the site of a central venous catheter and sepsis. Having recovered from these events, the patient enjoys good health, with stable kidney function and normal protein excretion. After the steroid was stopped, a bone marrow biopsy revealed full-donor type normocellular hemopoiesis. Because of the chimerism, we gradually discontinued the immunosuppression including, sirolimus and finally tacrolimus, since with minimal trough levels there were no complications. Bone marrow biopsy showed a complete remission. In MM with ESRD HLA-identical combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation from a living donor

  13. The impact of surveillance and rapid reduction in immunosuppression to control BK virus-related graft injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Flechner, Stuart M; Liu, Xiaobo; Schold, Jesse; Tian, Devin; Srinivas, Titte R; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B

    2013-08-01

    We prospectively screened 609 consecutive kidney (538) and kidney-pancreas (71) transplant recipients for BK viremia over a 4-year interval using polymerase chain reaction viral load detection and protocol kidney biopsies. We found that BK viremia is common at our center: total cases 26.7%, cases during first year 21.3% (mean 4 months), and recipients with ≥ 10 000 copies/ml 12.3%. We found few predictive clinical or demographic risk factors for any BK viremia or viral loads ≥ 10,000 copies/ml, other than prior treatment of biopsy confirmed acute rejection and/or higher immunosuppressive blood levels of tacrolimus (P = 0.001) or mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.007). Viral loads at diagnosis (<10 000 copies/ml) demonstrated little impact on graft function or survival. However, rising copy numbers demand early reductions in immunosuppressive drug doses of at least 30-50%. Viral loads >185 000 copies/ml at diagnosis were predictive of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN; OR: 113.25, 95% CI: 17.22-744.6, P < 0.001). Surveillance for BK viremia and rapid reduction of immunosuppression limited the incidence of BKVAN to 1.3%. The addition of leflunomide or ciprofloxacin to immunosuppressive dose reduction did not result in greater rates of viral clearance. These data support the role of early surveillance for BK viremia to limit the impact on transplant outcome, although the most effective schedule for screening awaits further investigation.

  14. Recurrent proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits of IgG2λ subtype in a transplanted kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Marui, Yuji; Nakamura, Michio; Takaichi, Kenmei; Tomikawa, Shinji; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2013-09-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposits (PGNMID) is a recently described disease entity. In the kidney transplantation literature, only 6 recurrent and 2 de novo PGNMID cases, including 7 of the IgG3 subclass (6 with κ light chain and 1 with λ light chain) and 1 of the IgG1 subclass (λ light chain), have been described to date. We describe a 52-year-old man with end-stage renal disease whose primary glomerular disease had been suggested to be membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. The patient underwent living related donor kidney transplantation and presented with proteinuria, hematuria, and decreased kidney function at 4 months posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplanted kidney showed diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent granular glomerular staining for IgG, C3, and λ light chain, with IgM, IgA, and κ light chain undetectable. Immunofluorescence staining for IgG subclass showed signal for IgG2 only. Retrospective analysis of the native kidney biopsy specimen also showed the same monoclonal glomerular staining for the IgG2λ subtype. These findings led us to the diagnosis of PGNMID of the IgG2λ subtype as both the primary glomerular disease and recurrent disease in the transplanted kidney. Recurrence was treated with high-dose prednisolone, which decreased proteinuria, hematuria, and serum creatinine level. The case demonstrates that PGNMID of the IgG2λ subtype also can recur in the transplanted kidney.

  15. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  16. The two kidney to one kidney transition and transplant glomerulopathy: a podocyte perspective.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Afshinnia, Farsad; Wang, Su Q; Wickman, Larysa; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Nishizono, Ryuzoh; Kikuchi, Masao; Huang, Yihung; Samaniego, Milagros; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-06-01

    The attrition rate of functioning allografts beyond the first year has not improved despite improved immunosuppression, suggesting that nonimmune mechanisms could be involved. Notably, glomerulopathies may account for about 40% of failed kidney allografts beyond the first year of engraftment, and glomerulosclerosis and progression to ESRD are caused by podocyte depletion. Model systems demonstrate that nephrectomy can precipitate hypertrophic podocyte stress that triggers progressive podocyte depletion leading to ESRD, and that this process is accompanied by accelerated podocyte detachment that can be measured in urine. Here, we show that kidney transplantation "reverse nephrectomy" is also associated with podocyte hypertrophy and increased podocyte detachment. Patients with stable normal allograft function and no proteinuria had levels of podocyte detachment similar to levels in two-kidney controls as measured by urine podocyte assay. By contrast, patients who developed transplant glomerulopathy had 10- to 20-fold increased levels of podocyte detachment. Morphometric studies showed that a subset of these patients developed reduced glomerular podocyte density within 2 years of transplantation due to reduced podocyte number per glomerulus. A second subset developed glomerulopathy by an average of 10 years after transplantation due to reduced glomerular podocyte number and glomerular tuft enlargement. Reduced podocyte density was associated with reduced eGFR, glomerulosclerosis, and proteinuria. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that podocyte depletion contributes to allograft failure and reduced allograft half-life. Mechanisms may include immune-driven processes affecting the podocyte or other cells and/or hypertrophy-induced podocyte stress causing accelerated podocyte detachment, which would be amenable to nonimmune therapeutic targeting.

  17. Outpatient versus Inpatient Observation after Percutaneous Native Kidney Biopsy: A Cost Minimization Study

    PubMed Central

    Maripuri, Saugar; Penson, David F.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Percutaneous kidney biopsy (PKB) is the primary diagnostic tool for kidney disease. Outpatient ‘day surgery’ (ODS) following PKB in low-risk patients has previously been described as a safe alternative to inpatient observation (IO). This study aims to determine if ODS is less costly compared to IO while accounting for all institutional costs (IC) associated with post-PKB complications, including death. Methods A cost minimization study was performed using decision analysis methodology which models relative costs in relation to outcome probabilities yielding an optimum decision. The potential outcomes included major complications (bleeding requiring blood transfusion or advanced intervention), minor complications (bleeding or pain requiring additional observation), and death. Probabilities were obtained from the published literature and a base case was selected. IC were obtained for all complications from institutional activity-based cost estimates. The base case assumed a complication rate of 10% with major bleeding occurring in 2.5% of patients (for both arms) and death in 0.1 and 0.15% of IO and ODS patients, respectively. Results ODS costs USD 1,394 per biopsy compared to USD 1,800 for IO inclusive of all complications. IC for ODS remain less when overall complications <20%, major complications <5.5%, and IC per death kidney biopsy. PMID:21677428

  18. Assessment of Ten-Year-Long Results of Kidney Biopsies Performed on Children in the Thrace Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Özkayın, Neşe; Çıplak, Gökçe; Usta, Ufuk; Gençhellaç, Hakan; Temizöz, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Background Many children with kidney diseases can be diagnosed and treated without a biopsy. However, biopsy is a valuable method for the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of children with kidney diseases. Aims To evaluate the clinical and pathological profiles of the kidney biopsies in our department to provide epidemiological data for clinical practice. Study Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods Kidney biopsies and patient’s charts in pediatric patients performed between May 2005 and February 2015 at the Pediatric Nephrology Department, Trakya University School of Medicine were assessed retrospectively. Results A total of 100 patients were examined. Their mean age was 9.62±4.26 years (range: 1–17 years); 54% of the patients were girls and 46% were boys. The most frequent indication for kidney biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (33%). The most common kidney disease was primary glomerulonephritis, which was observed in 65% of cases. IgA nephropathy (24%) was the most frequently observed subtype in primary glomerulonephritis groups. Secondary glomerulonephritis was diagnosed in 35% of cases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (51%) was the most frequently observed subtype in the secondary glomerulonephritis groups. Conclusion IgA nephropathy and systemic lupus erythematosus were the most frequent primary and secondary glomerulonephritis in our region among children, respectively. PMID:27994909

  19. [Recurrence of segmental and focal glomerulosclerosis in transplanted kidneys].

    PubMed

    Chocair, P R; Noronha, I L; Ianhez, L E; Arap, S; Sabbaga, E

    1989-01-01

    The course of 16 patients with segmental and focal glomerulosclerosis (SFGS) with kidney transplantation is reported. Ten out of 16 (group I) had the diagnosis histologically confirmed in their native kidneys. In 6 (group II) the diagnosis was suggested by the early development of SFGS in the graft and was considered a recurrence of the baseline disease. The recurrence (in group I) was 40% and the main clinical parameter was proteinuria, in nephrotic level, with early development in all cases (less than 60 days). In those patients who had an early development of the baseline disease (less than 4 years) the recurrence was greater, observed in 5 out of 8 grafts with 3 grafts lost due to the recurrence of focal glomerulosclerosis. On the other hand, the patients whose baseline disease had a longer period of development presented a better course of the recurrent glomerulosclerosis and no grafts were lost in this cases. We believe that renal transplantation of a live donor must be avoided in those patients with quick developing SFGS.

  20. The Critical Role of Innate Immunity in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cucchiari, David; Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    For a long time now, kidney transplant rejection has been considered the consequence of either cellular or antibody-mediated reaction as a part of adaptive immunity response. The role of innate immunity, on the other hand, had been unclear for many years and was thought to be only ancillary. There is now consistent evidence that innate immune response is a condition necessary to activate the machinery of rejection. In this setting, the communication between antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes is of major importance. Indeed, T cells are unable to cause rejection if innate immunity is not activated. This field is currently being explored and several experiments in animal models have proved that blocking innate immunity activation can promote tolerance of the graft instead of rejection. The aim of this review is to systematically describe all the steps of innate immunity response in kidney transplant rejection, from antigen recognition to T-cells activation, with a focus on clinical consequences and possible future perspectives.

  1. [Skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Clarissa Morais Busatto; Gussão, Bruna Calvi; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffá

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world is facing an escalate in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Databases containing information about patients in end stage renal disease (ESRD), especially in the United States, were the sources of initial information about it. Brazil has the third largest population on dialysis in the world, and there are about 680 dialysis centers, spread across all units of the federation in the present, providing treatment to an estimated population of almost 90,000 patients. Cutaneous involvement in the chronic renal failure is characterized by a number of manifestations, which may be related to three processes: the primary renal disease, the uremic state, or the therapeutic measures used in their handling. The skin changes in these two classes of patients, dialysis and transplant recipients, have been the subject of several studies. n recent years, however, great progress has been achieved in these two therapeutic modalities, which may have changed not only the type of the dermatologic disorders associated with these two conditions, but also their intensity or frequency. This article aims to yield an update as to the topic skin diseases in hemodialysis and kidney transplant patients.

  2. Plasma Nitration of High-Density and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Bakillah, Ahmed; Tedla, Fasika; Ayoub, Isabelle; John, Devon; Norin, Allen J.; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Brown, Clinton

    2015-01-01

    Background. Functional abnormalities of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) could contribute to cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. We measured a validated marker of HDL dysfunction, nitrated apolipoprotein A-I, in kidney transplant recipients to test the hypothesis that a functioning kidney transplant reduces serum nitrated apoA-I concentrations. Methods. Concentrations of nitrated apoA-I and apoB were measured using indirect sandwich ELISA assays on sera collected from each transplant subject before transplantation and at 1, 3, and 12 months after transplantation. Patients were excluded if they have history of diabetes, treatment with lipid-lowering medications or HIV protease inhibitors, prednisone dose > 15 mg/day, nephrotic range proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or active inflammatory disease. Sera from 18 transplanted patients were analyzed. Four subjects were excluded due to insufficient data. Twelve and eight patients had creatinine < 1.5 mg/dL at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, respectively. Results. Nitrated apoA-I was significantly reduced at 12 months after transplantation (p = 0.039). The decrease in apoA-I nitration was associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (p = 0.047). In contrast to apoA-I, nitrated apoB was not affected after kidney transplantation. Conclusions. Patients with well-functioning grafts had significant reduction in nitrated apoA-I 12 months after kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed in a large cohort to determine if nitrated apoA-I can be used as a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk stratification in chronic kidney disease. PMID:26648662

  3. Urinary granzyme A mRNA is a biomarker to diagnose subclinical and acute cellular rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    van Ham, S Marieke; Heutinck, Kirstin M; Jorritsma, Tineke; Bemelman, Fréderike J; Strik, Merel C M; Vos, Wim; Muris, Jettie J F; Florquin, Sandrine; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Rowshani, Ajda T

    2010-11-01

    The distinction between T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and other causes of kidney transplant dysfunction such as tubular necrosis requires biopsy. Subclinical rejection (SCR), an established risk factor for chronic allograft dysfunction, can only be diagnosed by protocol biopsy. A specific non-invasive biomarker to monitor immunological graft status would facilitate diagnosis and treatment of common transplantation-related complications. To identify possible markers, we measured urinary mRNA levels of several cytolytic proteins by quantitative PCR. Our cohort of 70 renal transplant recipients had biopsy proven type I and type II TCMR, acute tubular necrosis, SCR, calcineurin inhibitor-toxicity, cytomegalovirus infection, and stable graft function with normal histology. Granzyme A (GzmA) mRNA was significantly higher in subclinical and acute cellular rejection compared to patients with stable grafts or those with tubular necrosis with 80% sensitivity and up to 100% specificity. Granzyme B and perforin mRNA levels could significantly discriminate acute rejection from stable or tubular necrosis, but were not significantly elevated during SCR. Importantly, only GzmA mRNA remained below detection limits from grafts that were stable and most with tubular necrosis. Hence, the presented data indicate that urinary GzmA mRNA levels may entail a diagnostic non-invasive biomarker to distinguish patients with subclinical and acute cellular rejection from those with tubular necrosis or stable grafts.

  4. Native kidney function after renal transplantation combined with other solid organs in preemptive patients.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Panicali, L; Persici, E; Conte, D; Cappuccilli, M L; Cuna, V; Capelli, I; Todeschini, P; D'Arcangelo, G Liviano; Stefoni, S

    2010-05-01

    Kidney transplantations combined with other solid organs are progressively increasing in number. There are no guidelines regarding the nephrologic indications for combined transplantations, namely liver-kidney (LKT), or heart-kidney (HKT), in preemptive patients with chronic kidney failure who are not on regular dialysis therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the functional contribution of the native kidneys after preemptive kidney transplantation combined with other solid organs. From 2004, 9 patients (aged 50.3 +/- 8.5 years) with chronic kidney failure (creatinine 2.5 +/- 1.0 mg/dL) caused by polycystic kidney disease (n = 4), vascular nephropathy (n = 2), interstitial nephropathy (n = 1), glomerulonephritis (n = 1), or end-stage kidney disease (n = 1), underwent combined transplantations (8 LKT, 1 HKT). A scintigraphic functional study (Tc-99DMSA or Tc-99mMAG3), was performed at 4 +/- 3 months after transplantation to evaluate the functional contribution of both the native kidneys and the graft. All patients were given immunosuppressive drugs, including a calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus/or cyclosporine). At the time of scintigraphy, renal function in all patients was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. The functional contribution of the transplanted kidneys was on average 77 +/- 18%. Only in 1 patient was the contribution of the graft <50%. At follow-up after 36 months, patient and kidney survivals were 100%. The study confirmed a high risk of loss of native kidney function in the presence of organic nephropathy. In light of our experience, a creatinine clearance <30 mL/min in an appropriate cutoff for a combined transplantation. Close clinical and instrumental assessment pretransplant is essential before proceeding with a combined transplant program to exclude functional forms and to optimize the use of organs.

  5. Kidney biopsy in the hepatosplenic form of infection with Schistosoma mansoni in man.

    PubMed

    da Silva, L C; de Brito, T; Camargo, M E; de Boni, D R; Lopes, J D; Gunji, J

    1970-01-01

    A study of early glomerular lesions was made in 8 patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni but having no clinical evidence of renal disease. Electron-microscopy of renal biopsies showed the presence of electron-dense deposits in basement membranes and of laminated bodies near the mesangial cells. Immunofluorescence showed that the deposits corresponded to IgG in 8 cases and to IgM in 2 cases. These lesions are comparable with those found in the kidneys of patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  6. Cyclosporine Sparing Effect of Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate Sodium in De Novo Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyung; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Sung Joo; Ha, Jongwon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The increased tolerability of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), compared to mycophenolate mofetil, among kidney transplant recipients has the potential to facilitate cyclosporine (CsA) minimization. Therefore, a prospective trial to determine the optimum EC-MPS dose in CsA-based immunosuppression regimens is necessary. Materials and Methods A comparative, parallel, randomized, open-label study was performed for 140 patients from four centers to compare the efficacy and tolerability of low dose CsA with standard dose EC-MPS (the investigational group) versus standard dose CsA with low dose EC-MPS (the control group) for six months in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Graft function, the incidence of efficacy failure [biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR), death, graft loss, loss to follow-up], and adverse events were compared. Results The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of the investigational group at six months post-transplantation was non-inferior to that of the control group (confidence interval between 57.3 mL/min/1.73m2 and 67.4 mL/min/1.73 m2, p<0.001). One graft loss was reported in the control group, and no patient deaths were reported in either group. The incidence of BCAR of the investigational group was 8.7%, compared to 18.8% in the control group (p=0.137), during the study period. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the incidence of discontinuations and serious adverse events (SAE) between the groups. Conclusion CsA minimization using a standard dose of EC-MPS kept the incidence of acute rejection and additional risks as low as conventional immunosuppression and provided therapeutic equivalence in terms of renal graft function and safety issues. PMID:27873516

  7. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  8. Changes in bone mineral metabolism parameters, including FGF23, after discontinuing cinacalcet at kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Xoana; Fuster, David; Paschoalin, Raphael; Oppenheimer, Federico; Rubello, Domenico; Perlaza, Pilar; Pons, Francesca; Torregrosa, Jose V

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of the administration of cinacalcet in dialytic patients who are scheduled for kidney transplantation, and in particular about the changes in FGF23 and other mineral metabolism parameters after surgery compared with recipients not on cinacalcet at kidney transplantation. We performed a prospective observational cohort study with recruitment of consecutive kidney transplant recipients at our institution. Patients were classified according to whether they were under treatment with cinacalcet before transplantation. Bone mineral metabolism parameters, including C-terminal FGF23, were measured at baseline, on day 15, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. In previously cinacalcet-treated patients, cinacalcet therapy was discontinued on the day of surgery and was not restarted after transplantation. A total of 48 kidney transplant recipients, 20 on cinacalcet at surgery and 28 cinacalcet non-treated patients, completed the follow-up. Serum phosphate declined significantly in the first 15 days after transplantation with no differences between the two groups, whereas cinacalcet-treated patients showed higher FGF23 levels, although not significant. After transplantation, PTH and serum calcium were significantly higher in cinacalcet-treated patients. We conclude that patients receiving cinacalcet on dialysis presented similar serum phosphate levels but higher PTH and serum calcium levels during the initial six months after kidney transplantation than cinacalcet non-treated patients. The group previously treated with cinacalcet before transplantation showed higher FGF23 levels without significant differences, so further studies should investigate its relevance in the management of these patients.

  9. Kidney Transplantation Outcomes across GN Subtypes in the United States.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Michelle M; Liu, Sai; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Lenihan, Colin R; Lafayette, Richard A; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-02-01

    Differences in kidney transplantation outcomes across GN subtypes have rarely been studied. From the US Renal Data System, we identified all adult (≥18 years) first kidney transplant recipients (1996-2011) with ESRD attributed to one of six GN subtypes or two comparator kidney diseases. We computed hazard ratios (HRs) for death, all-cause allograft failure, and allograft failure excluding death as a cause (competing risks framework) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Among the 32,131 patients with GN studied, patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) had the lowest mortality rates and patients with IgAN or vasculitis had the lowest allograft failure rates. After adjusting for patient- and transplant-related factors, compared with IgAN (referent), FSGS, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative GN, lupus nephritis, and vasculitis associated with HRs (95% confidence intervals) for death of 1.57 (1.43 to 1.72), 1.52 (1.34 to 1.72), 1.76 (1.55 to 2.01), 1.82 (1.63 to 2.02), and 1.56 (1.34 to 1.81), respectively, and with HRs for allograft failure excluding death as a cause of 1.20 (1.12 to 1.28), 1.27 (1.14 to 1.41), 1.50 (1.36 to 1.66), 1.11 (1.02 to 1.20), and 0.94 (0.81 to 1.09), respectively. Considering external comparator groups, and comparing with IgAN, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and diabetic nephropathy associated with higher HRs for mortality [1.22 (1.12 to 1.34) and 2.57 (2.35 to 2.82), respectively], but ADPKD associated with a lower HR for allograft failure excluding death as a cause [0.85 (0.79 to 0.91)]. Reasons for differential outcomes by GN subtype and cause of ESRD should be examined in future research.

  10. Injury to a transplanted kidney during caesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Badri Man; Throssell, David; McKane, William; Raftery, Andrew Thomas

    2007-06-01

    As fertility is restored after renal transplant, more female recipients of a renal transplant successfully complete pregnancies that are safe for the mother, the fetus, and the renal allograft. Although the transplanted kidney lies in one of the iliac fossae, normal vaginal delivery is not impeded by this positioning. Caesarean section is indicated in many scenarios, primarily for obstetric reasons, particularly when the transplanted kidney lies in a position where it could be injured. Here, we report our experiences managing a rare instance of injury to a transplanted kidney during caesarean section and discuss the relevant aspects of its management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of an injury to a transplanted kidney during caesarean section.

  11. Longitudinal measurement of physical activity following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dontje, M L; de Greef, M H G; Krijnen, W P; Corpeleijn, E; Kok, T; Bakker, S J L; Stolk, R P; van der Schans, C P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal observational study was to (i) examine the change of daily physical activity in 28 adult kidney transplant recipients over the first 12 months following transplantation; and (ii) to examine the change in metabolic characteristics and renal function. Accelerometer-based daily physical activity and metabolic- and clinical characteristics were measured at six wk (T1), three months (T2), six months (T3) and 12 months (T4) following transplantation. Linear mixed effect analyses showed an increase in steps/d (T1 = 6326 ± 2906; T4 = 7562 ± 3785; F = 3.52; p = 0.02), but one yr after transplantation only 25% achieved the recommended 10 000 steps/d. There was no significant increase in minutes per day spent on moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (T1 = 80.4 ± 63.6; T4 = 93.2 ± 55.1; F = 1.71; p = 0.17). Body mass index increased over time (T1 = 25.4 ± 3.2; T4 = 27.2 ± 3.8; F = 12.62; p < 0.001), mainly due to an increase in fat percentage (T1 = 30.3 ± 8.0; T4 = 34.0 ± 7.9; F = 14.63; p < 0.001). There was no significant change in renal function (F = 0.17; p = 0.92). Although the recipients increased physical activity, the majority did not meet the recommended levels of physical activity after one yr. In addition to the weight gain, this may result in negative health consequences. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies to support kidney transplant recipients to comply with healthy lifestyle recommendations, including regular physical activity.

  12. From Humoral Theory to Performant Risk Stratification in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, C; Viglietti, D; Mangiola, M; Loupy, A; Zeevi, A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to describe how we improve the model for risk stratification of transplant outcomes in kidney transplantation by incorporating the novel insights of donor-specific anti-HLA antibody (DSA) characteristics. The detection of anti-HLA DSA is widely used for the assessment of pre- and posttransplant risks of rejection and allograft loss; however, not all anti-HLA DSA carry the same risk for transplant outcomes. These antibodies have been shown to cause a wide spectrum of effects on allografts, ranging from the absence of injury to indolent or full-blown acute antibody-mediated rejection. Consequently, the presence of circulating anti-HLA DSA does not provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the risk stratification of allograft outcomes. Enhancing the predictive performance of anti-HLA DSA is currently one of the most pressing unmet needs for facilitating individualized treatment choices that may improve outcomes. Recent advancements in the assessment of anti-HLA DSA properties, including their strength, complement-binding capacity, and IgG subclass composition, significantly improved the risk stratification model to predict allograft injury and failure. Although risk stratification based on anti-HLA DSA properties appears promising, further specific studies that address immunological risk stratification in large and unselected populations are required to define the benefits and cost-effectiveness of such comprehensive assessment prior to clinical implementation.

  13. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  14. From Humoral Theory to Performant Risk Stratification in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Viglietti, D.; Mangiola, M.; Loupy, A.; Zeevi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to describe how we improve the model for risk stratification of transplant outcomes in kidney transplantation by incorporating the novel insights of donor-specific anti-HLA antibody (DSA) characteristics. The detection of anti-HLA DSA is widely used for the assessment of pre- and posttransplant risks of rejection and allograft loss; however, not all anti-HLA DSA carry the same risk for transplant outcomes. These antibodies have been shown to cause a wide spectrum of effects on allografts, ranging from the absence of injury to indolent or full-blown acute antibody-mediated rejection. Consequently, the presence of circulating anti-HLA DSA does not provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the risk stratification of allograft outcomes. Enhancing the predictive performance of anti-HLA DSA is currently one of the most pressing unmet needs for facilitating individualized treatment choices that may improve outcomes. Recent advancements in the assessment of anti-HLA DSA properties, including their strength, complement-binding capacity, and IgG subclass composition, significantly improved the risk stratification model to predict allograft injury and failure. Although risk stratification based on anti-HLA DSA properties appears promising, further specific studies that address immunological risk stratification in large and unselected populations are required to define the benefits and cost-effectiveness of such comprehensive assessment prior to clinical implementation. PMID:28133619

  15. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  16. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aufhauser, David D; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R; Bhatti, Tricia R; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R; Abt, Peter L; Wang, Liqing; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Thomasson, Arwin; Reese, Peter P; Hancock, Wayne W; Levine, Matthew H

    2016-05-02

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α-KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance.

  17. [Survival analysis of 487 patients with kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ianhez, L E; de Paula, F J; Campagnari, J C; Nahas, W C; Saldanha, L B; Arap, S; Sabbaga, E

    1992-01-01

    The causes of graft loss were analysed in a group of 487 kidney transplants, of which 252 (51.46%) concerned related donors, 139 (28.5%) cadaver donors and 96 (19.7%) non-related donors. A total of 74 kidneys were lost in the first 3 months after transplantation (15.19%). In 34 cases the loss was due to immunological factors (45.9%) in 21 cases (28.3%) to the death of the patients and in 19 cases (25.7%) to the technical causes. From 34 losses by immunological problems, 32 were rejections with humoral character (acute vascular rejection in 11 cases, late humoral rejection in 11 cases, immediate humoral rejection in 9 cases, ABO incompatibility in one case) and recurrence of original disease in one case. Acute cellular rejection was observed in only one patient. None of the patients died from immunological loss of the graft. The most frequent cause of death were sepsis (13 out of 21 patients) and the most common focus of infection was pulmonary (5 patients). It occurred most frequently with cadaveric donor, (10.07%). Death related to cardiovascular causes occurred in four patients, digestive in two and in consequence of arterial bleeding in two. Among the 23 losses by technical factors renal artery thrombosis was the most frequent (11 cases); renal rupture occurred in three cases, renal vein thrombosis in two rupture of arterial anastomosis in one and inviable kidney in another one. The technical loss was most frequent with cadaver donors (8.63%), followed by non-related donors (4.16%) and related donors (2.77%). Four patients died from causes directly related to technical factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Evolution of living donor kidney transplantation: historic, statistical, national and own experience data].

    PubMed

    Altes Ineva, María Pilar; Alonso Paz, Pastor; Abadia, Harry; Izquierdo Reyes, Laura; Oppenheimer, Federico; Alvarez-Vijande, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Despite representing a small percentage of the transplant activity in our country, living donor kidney transplantation is a good alternative for the future because the needs exceed the offer of cadaver donor organs. We present the evolution of living donor kidney transplantation in Spain from the beginning in accordance to the ONT (Organización Nacional de trasplantes), and our current situation in comparison with other countries, as well as data obtained from the experience in our hospital which began in 1965.

  19. Patients’ experiences from their received education about the process of kidney transplant: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ghadami, Ahmad; Memarian, Robaba; Mohamadi, Esa; Abdoli, Samereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kidney transplant needs long term treatment, care and a follow up. Patients with kidney transplant need support in fields of knowledge, skills and motivations. Several researches showed existing challenges regarding education of these patients. A qualitative study was conducted to define patients’ experiences from their received education about the process of kidney transplant. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative study with a content analysis approach. Sampling was purposive up to data saturation. The participants aged 18-60 years, had experienced transplantation. The data were collected by semi-structural individual in-depth interviews with 18 participants. The interviews were analyzed by Graneheim and Lundman content analysis method. Findings: Three general themes of “educational experiences at the beginning of transplantation”, “educational experiences in post transplantation care”, and “patients’ struggle to enhance their awareness in order to preserve their transplanted kidney” were emerged. Conclusions: The findings showed that patients’ did not receive adequate knowledge about kidney transplant process. This issue reveals an unstructured and uncoordinated education given to kidney transplant patients by health team members during kidney transplant process. With regard to high motivation of the patients, designing such educational program based on self-management in the process of kidney transplant for these recipients is essential. Nurses in their educational role can enable the patients through educating them about problem solving methods and selection of the best solution to preserve their transplanted kidney and consider renal transplant recipient self-management as their first priority toward these patients. PMID:23833599

  20. Long-term genotoxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs on lymphocytes of kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lizotti Cilião, Heloísa; Batista de Oliveira Camargo-Godoy, Rossana; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Zanuto, Amanda; Daher Alvares Delfino, Vinicius; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2016-08-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy can prevent rejection after organ transplantation. However, increased cancer risk is a serious complication among patients undergoing such therapy. We have evaluated whether prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs is genotoxic. DNA instability was assessed, using the comet and micronucleus assays, in blood lymphocytes of 76 kidney transplant patients. DNA damage detected by the comet assay increased with time after transplantation. The estimated glomerular filtration rate of the patients did not influence the incidence of DNA damage. No association between micronucleated mononucleated cells and time elapsed after transplantation was observed. Our results suggest that prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs in kidney transplant patients can induce genetic instability.

  1. Percutaneous renal biopsy of native kidneys: efficiency, safety and risk factors associated with major complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres Muñoz, Abel; Valdez-Ortiz, Rafael; González-Parra, Carlos; Espinoza-Dávila, Elvy; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E.; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of an automated biopsy device and real-time ultrasound (current technology) for percutaneous renal biopsies (PRBs) has improved the likelihood of obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis and has reduced the complications associated with renal biopsies. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the current PRB procedure and identify possible risk factors for the development of major complications. Material and methods We collected all native kidney PRBs performed with current technology in our institute from January 1998 to April 2008. Studied variables were collected from the patient's chart at the time of the biopsy. Results We analyzed 623 (96.4%) of 646 renal biopsies performed with the current automated procedure guided by real-time ultrasound. Although the effectiveness was 97.6%, there were 110 complications. Fourteen (2.24%) of these complications were major: 9 cases of renal hematoma, 2 cases with macroscopic hematuria (which needed blood transfusion), 1 case of intestinal perforation (which required exploratory laparotomy), 1 nephrectomy and 1 case of a dissecting hematoma. The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for developing major complications: diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, RR 7.6 (95% CI 1.35-43); platelet count ≤ 120×103/µl; RR 7.0 (95% CI 1.9-26.2); and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) ≥ 60 mg/dl, RR 9.27 (95% CI 2.8-30.7). Conclusions The observed efficacy and safety of the current technique in the present study were similar to observations in previous studies. Diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, platelets ≤ 120×103/µl and BUN ≥ 60 mg/dl were independent risk factors for the development of major complications following PRB. PMID:22291827

  2. A Review of Transplantation Practice of the Urologic Organs: Is It Only Achievable for the Kidney?

    PubMed Central

    Donati-Bourne, Jack; Roberts, Harry W; Rajjoub, Yaseen; Coleman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a viable treatment option for failure of most major organs. Within urology, transplantation of the kidney and ureter are well documented; however, evidence supporting transplantation of other urologic organs is limited. Failure of these organs carries significant morbidity, and transplantation may have a role in management. This article reviews the knowledge, research, and literature surrounding transplantation of each of the urologic organs. Transplantation of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder is discussed. Transplantation attempts have been made individually with each of these organs. Penile transplantation has only been performed once in a human. Testicular transplantation research was intertwined with unethical lucrative pursuits. Interest in urethra, bladder, and vas deferens transplantation has decreased as a result of successful surgical reconstructive techniques. Despite years of effort, transplantations of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder are not established in current practice. Recent research has shifted toward techniques of reconstruction, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:27222642

  3. A Review of Transplantation Practice of the Urologic Organs: Is It Only Achievable for the Kidney?

    PubMed

    Donati-Bourne, Jack; Roberts, Harry W; Rajjoub, Yaseen; Coleman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a viable treatment option for failure of most major organs. Within urology, transplantation of the kidney and ureter are well documented; however, evidence supporting transplantation of other urologic organs is limited. Failure of these organs carries significant morbidity, and transplantation may have a role in management. This article reviews the knowledge, research, and literature surrounding transplantation of each of the urologic organs. Transplantation of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder is discussed. Transplantation attempts have been made individually with each of these organs. Penile transplantation has only been performed once in a human. Testicular transplantation research was intertwined with unethical lucrative pursuits. Interest in urethra, bladder, and vas deferens transplantation has decreased as a result of successful surgical reconstructive techniques. Despite years of effort, transplantations of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder are not established in current practice. Recent research has shifted toward techniques of reconstruction, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

  4. Obesity and kidney transplant candidates: how big is too big for transplantation?.

    PubMed

    Lentine, Krista L; Delos Santos, Rowena; Axelrod, David; Schnitzler, Mark A; Brennan, Daniel C; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E

    2012-01-01

    Obesity impacts many inter-related, and sometimes conflicting, considerations for transplant practice. In this article, we describe an approach for applying available data on the importance of body composition to the kidney transplant population that separates implications for candidate selection, risk stratification among selected candidates, and interventions to optimize health of the individual. Transplant recipients with obesity defined by elevated body mass index (BMI) have been shown in many (but not all) studies to experience an array of adverse outcomes more commonly than normal-weight transplant recipients, including wound infections, delayed graft function, graft failure, cardiac disease, and increased costs. However, current studies have not defined limits of body composition that preclude clinical benefit from transplantation compared with long-term dialysis in patients who have passed a transplant evaluation. Formal cost-effectiveness studies are needed to determine if payers and society should be compensating centers for clinical and financial risks of transplanting obese end-stage renal disease patients. Recent studies also demonstrate the limitations of BMI alone as a measure of adiposity, and further research should be pursued to define practical measures of body composition that refine accuracy for outcomes prediction. Regarding individual management, observational registry studies have not found beneficial associations of pretransplant weight loss with patient or graft survival. However, association studies cannot distinguish purposeful from unintentional weight loss as a result of illness and comorbidity. Prospective evaluations of the impact of targeted risk modification efforts in this population including dietary changes, monitored exercise programs, and bariatric surgery are urgently needed.

  5. The effects of discontinuing cinacalcet at the time of kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jadoul, Michel; Baños, Ana; Zani, Valter J.; Hercz, Gavril

    2010-01-01

    Background. The calcimimetic, cinacalcet, is approved for treating secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis. Biochemical profiles and clinical outcomes in patients discontinuing cinacalcet at kidney transplantation have not been previously described. Methods. We performed a retrospective observational study evaluating post-transplant biochemical profiles and clinical outcomes in patients who had enrolled in phase 2 or 3 randomized, placebo-controlled studies of cinacalcet before receiving a kidney transplant. Results. The study included 28 former cinacalcet and 10 former placebo patients. Post-kidney transplant, there were no obvious differences between the two groups in levels of serum intact parathyroid hormone, calcium or phosphorus. One patient in each group underwent post-transplant parathyroidectomy. Kidney transplant failure was apparent in one former cinacalcet-treated patient (4%) and three former placebo patients (30%). The duration of hospitalization (mean ± standard error) immediately post-transplant in these two groups was 2.3 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.8 weeks, respectively. Conclusions. Using cinacalcet to treat SHPT in patients with CKD awaiting kidney transplantation does not appear to modify SHPT-related post-transplant biochemical profiles, or clinical outcomes, compared with placebo. PMID:20090879

  6. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone. METHODS Retrospective review of 40 OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD (serum creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dl for at least 3 months) at the University of Pennsylvania from February 2002 to July 2010. Primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) up to 3 years post-transplant. Secondary outcomes included incidence of stage 4 CKD (eGFR < 30 ml/min), need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), meeting criteria for kidney transplant listing (eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min), and mortality. RESULTS Median patient age was 56.5 years and 48% patients had pre-transplant diabetes. Median serum creatinine at transplant was 2.7 mg/dl (eGFR 24 ml/min). Median eGFR at 1, 2, and 3 years post-transplant was 35, 34, and 37 ml/min respectively. Twelve patients (30%) required RRT at a median of 1.21 years posttransplant and 16 (40%) achieved an eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min at 1.09 years post-transplant. Mortality was 35% at a median of 1.60 years post-transplant. CONCLUSIONS OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD have a substantial burden of post-transplant renal dysfunction and high short-term mortality, questioning the rationale for OLT alone in this population. PMID:24382253

  7. Analysis of histopathological pattern of kidney biopsy specimens in Kuwait: A single-center, five-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Emad; Al-Helal, Bassam; Asad, Reem; Kannan, Shreeram; Draz, Wael; Abdelgawad, Zeyad

    2015-11-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) varies in incidence in different geographical areas due to different socioeconomic conditions and ethnicity, genetic variability and environmental factors. Our study is aimed to determine the histopathological pattern of kidney biopsies in Kuwait over the preceding five years. In a prospective study, we analyzed the clinical and pathological data of 214 kidney biopsies that were performed during the period from November 2009 to November 2014 at the Al-Khezam Dialysis Center, Al-Adan Hospital, Kuwait. Kidney biopsies were performed percutaneously using an automated gun guided by ultrasound. The biopsy samples were processed for light microscopy and immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy was performed only in selected cases. Age, gender, serum creatinine, 24-h urinary protein, virology, immunology profiles, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological findings were recorded for analysis. Primary GN was reported in 46.7%, secondary GN was reported in 42.9% and tubulointerstitial disease was reported in 10.3% of the 214 kidney biopsies studied. Among primary GN, membranous GN (MGN) was the most common lesion (12.1%), followed by immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN, 11.7%), minimal change disease (9.8%), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (9.3%), membranoproliferative GN (1.9%), Alport's syndrome (1.4%) and fibrillary GN (0.46%). Among biopsies that showed secondary GN, lupus nephritis was the most common (11.7%), followed by hypertensive glomerulosclerosis (10.3%), crescentic GN (7.1%), diabetic nephropathy (3.3%), thrombotic microangiopathy (2.3%), amyloidosis (2.3%), post-infectious GN (1.4%) and myeloma kidney (0.9%). Among biopsies that showed tubulointerstitial disease, acute interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion (6.1%), followed by chronic interstitial nephritis (2.8%) and acute tubular necrosis (1.4%). Our study indicates that MGN was the most common primary GN, followed by IgAN, while lupus nephritis was the most

  8. Donor and recipient genetic variants in NLRP3 associate with early acute rejection following kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dessing, Mark C.; Kers, Jesper; Damman, Jeffrey; Navis, Gerjan J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) is a member of the inflammasome family and is of special interest in renal disease. Experimental studies have shown that Nlrp3 plays a significant role in the induction of renal damage and dysfunction in acute and chronic renal injury. However, the role of NLRP3 in human renal disease is completely unknown. From a retrospective cohort study, we determined in 1271 matching donor and recipient samples if several NLRP3 single nucelotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with primary non-function (PNF), delayed graft function (DGF), biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) and death-censored graft and patient survival. NLRP3 gain-of-function SNP (rs35829419) in donors was associated with an increased risk of BPAR while NLRP3 loss-of-function SNP (rs6672995) in the recipient was associated with a decreased risk of BPAR in the first year following renal transplantation (HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.38–2.64, P < 0.001 and HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55–0.97, P = 0.03 resp.). NLRP3 SNPs in both donor and recipient were not associated with PNF, DGF, graft survival or patient survival. We conclude that genetic variants in the NLRP3 gene affect the risk of acute rejection following kidney transplantation. PMID:27819323

  9. The pregnancy rate and live birth rate after kidney transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Santori, G; Fazio, F; Valente, U

    2012-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation recipients live longer and have better quality of life than patients on dialysis. Hypothalamic gonadal dysfunction in females who have ESRD may be reversed within the first few months after kidney transplantation, such as the ability to have children. Despite thousands of successful pregnancies in transplantation recipients, there is limited information about it. In this study, we evaluated the pregnancy rates and live birth rates in women (n = 133) who underwent kidney transplantation in our center from 1983 to 2010. Recipients of a second kidney transplantation and recipients of multiorgan transplantations were excluded. We observed 33 pregnancies with 11 live births (33.3%), 12 spontaneous abortions (36.36%), and 10 therapeutic abortions (30.3%). The pregnancy rate was 18%. The live birth rate was 33.3%. Therapeutic abortions were 36.3%, and the pregnancies resulting in fetal loss were 30.3%. The pregnancies were identified in 32 women. The majority of women (n = 32; 96.9%) had a single pregnancy, whereas 1 woman (3.1%) had two pregnancies. In our series, the pregnancy rates for kidney transplantation recipients were markedly lower and decreased more rapidly than those reported in the general population.

  10. Bilateral native nephrectomy reduces systemic oxalate level after combined liver-kidney transplant: A case report.

    PubMed

    Villani, Vincenzo; Gupta, Neena; Elias, Nahel; Vagefi, Parsia A; Markmann, James F; Paul, Elahna; Traum, Avram Z; Yeh, Heidi

    2017-03-05

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare liver enzymatic defect that causes overproduction of plasma oxalate. Accumulation of oxalate in the kidney and subsequent renal failure are fatal to PH1 patients often in pediatric age. Combined liver and kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice for end-stage renal disease due to PH1. Levels of plasma oxalate remain elevated for several months after liver transplantation, as the residual body oxalate is slowly excreted. Patients with persistent hyperoxaluria after transplant often require hemodialysis, and accumulation of residual oxalate in the kidney can induce graft dysfunction. As the native kidneys are the main target of calcium oxalate accumulation, we postulated that removal of native kidneys could drastically decrease total body oxalate levels after transplantation. Here, we report a case of bilateral nephrectomy at the time of combined liver-kidney transplantation in a pediatric PH1 patient. Bilateral nephrectomy induced a rapid decrease in plasma oxalate to normal levels in less than 20 days, compared to the several months reported in the literature. Our results suggest that removal of native kidneys could be an effective strategy to decrease the need for hemodialysis and the risk of renal dysfunction after combined liver-kidney transplantation in patients with PH1.

  11. Immune-mediated nephropathies in kidney transplants: recurrent or de novo diseases.

    PubMed

    Roberti, Isabel; Vyas, Shefali

    2016-11-01

    IMN contribute to ESRD in 13% children with renal transplant (txp). Recurrent or de novo IMN can cause graft dysfunction and/or failure, but the details regarding incidence, therapy, and outcome remain poorly understood. Retrospective single-center study of all pediatric kidney txp was carried out since 1998. Clinical presentation, pathology, therapy, and graft outcomes of children with recurrent or de novo IMN were reviewed. IMN was the primary etiology of ESRD in 28 of the 149 txp recipients. Eleven children had biopsy-proven post-txp IMN-six were recurrent and five had de novo. Presentation varied with changes in SCr and/or proteinuria. Initial therapy included higher doses of steroids, MMF, and tacrolimus. Outcome was excellent with only one late graft loss. Full remission was achieved in all other patients, but some had re-recurrence of the IMN. Median follow-up time was 11.8 years. IMN (recurrent or de novo) occurred in 7.4% (11 of 149) of all kidney txp performed at our center. IMN post-txp was often seen late post-txp, usually asymptomatic and noted to have relapsing pattern. Early diagnosis and prompt therapy resulted in excellent long-term outcome in children diagnosed with post-txp IMN.

  12. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  13. Endoscopic biopsy of islet transplants in the gastric submucosal space provides evidence of islet graft rejection in diabetic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Fujita, Minoru; Bottino, Rita; Piganelli, Jon D.; McGrath, Kevin; Li, Jiang; Lee, Whayoung; Iwase, Hayato; Wijkstrom, Martin; Bertera, Suzanne; Long, Cassandra; Landsittel, Douglas; Haruma, Ken; Cooper, David K.C.; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transplantation of islets into the gastric submucosal space (GSMS) has several advantages (e.g., avoidance of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory response [IBMIR], ability to biopsy). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoscopic biopsy of islet allografts transplanted into the GSMS in diabetic pigs can provide histopathological and immunohistochemical information that correlates with the clinical course (e.g.,, blood glucose level, insulin requirement). Islet allografts (Group1: 10,000 kIEq /kg [n = 4]; Group2: 15,000 kIEq /kg [n = 2]) were transplanted into the GSMS of diabetic pigs under immunosuppression. In Group2, the anti-oxidant, BMX-001 was applied during preservation, isolation, and culture of the islets, and at the time of transplantation. Endoscopic biopsies of the islet grafts were obtained one or 2 weeks after transplantation, and histopathological features were compared with the clinical course (e.g., blood glucose, insulin requirement). In Group1, in the absence of anti-oxidant therapy, most of the islets became fragmented, and there was no reduction in exogenous insulin requirement. In Group2, with an increased number of transplanted islets in the presence of BMX-001, more healthy insulin-positive islet masses were obtained at biopsy and necropsy (4 weeks), and these correlated with reductions in both blood glucose level and insulin requirement. In all cases, inflammatory cell infiltrates were present. After islet transplantation into the GSMS, endoscopic biopsy can provide information on graft rejection, which would be an immense advantage in clinical islet transplantation. PMID:26857703

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mohit; Manu, Gurusidda; Kwatra, Shivani; Owusu, Osei-Tutu

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective treatment strategy for lymphoproliferative disorders and bone marrow failure states including aplastic anemia and thalassemia. However, its use has been limited by the increased treatment related complications, including acute kidney injury (AKI) with an incidence ranging from 20% to 73%. AKI after HSCT has been associated with an increased risk of mortality. The incidence of AKI reported in recipients of myeloablative allogeneic transplant is considerably higher in comparison to other subclasses mainly due to use of cyclosporine and development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic groups. Acute GVHD is by itself a major independent risk factor for the development of AKI in HSCT recipients. The other major risk factors are sepsis, nephrotoxic medications (amphotericin B, acyclovir, aminoglycosides, and cyclosporine), hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), marrow infusion toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. The mainstay of management of AKI in these patients is avoidance of risk factors contributing to AKI, including use of reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, close monitoring of nephrotoxic medications, and use of alternative antifungals for prophylaxis against infection. Also, early identification and effective management of sepsis, tumor lysis syndrome, marrow infusion toxicity, and hepatic SOS help in reducing the incidence of AKI in HSCT recipients. PMID:27885340

  15. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  16. Early Rehospitalization after Kidney Transplantation: Assessing Preventability and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Harhay, M.; Lin, E.; Pai, A.; Harhay, M. O.; Huverserian, A.; Mussell, A.; Abt, P.; Levine, M.; Bloom, R.; Shea, J.A.; Troxel, A.B.; Reese, P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Early rehospitalization after kidney transplantation (KT) is common and may predict future adverse outcomes. Previous studies using claims data have been limited in identifying preventable rehospitalizations. We assembled a cohort of 753 adults at our institution undergoing KT from January 1, 2003—December 31, 2007. Two physicians independently reviewed medical records of 237 patients (32%) with early rehospitalization and identified 1) primary reason for and 2) preventability of rehospitalization. Mortality and graft failure were ascertained through linkage to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Leading reasons for rehospitalization included surgical complications (15%), rejection (14%), volume shifts (11%), and systemic and surgical wound infections (11% and 2.5%). Reviewer agreement on primary reason (85% of cases) was strong (kappa=0.78). Only 19 rehospitalizations (8%) met preventability criteria. Using logistic regression, weekend discharge (OR 1.59, p=0.01), waitlist time (OR 1.10, p=0.04), and longer initial length of stay (OR 1.42, p=0.03) were associated with early rehospitalization. Using Cox regression, early rehospitalization was associated with mortality (HR 1.55; p=0.03) but not graft loss (HR 1.33; p=0.09). Early rehospitalization has diverse causes and presents challenges as a quality metric after KT. These results should be validated prospectively at multiple centers to identify vulnerable patients and modifiable processes-of-care. PMID:24165498

  17. Vitrification of kidney precursors as a new source for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marco-Jiménez, Francisco; Garcia-Dominguez, Ximo; Jimenez-Trigos, Estrella; Vera-Donoso, Cesar D; Vicente, Jose S

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased or living human donors has been limited by donor availability as opposed to the increasing demand, and by the risk of allograft loss rejection and immunosuppressive therapy toxicity. In recent years, xenotransplantation of developed kidney precursor cells has offered a novel solution for the unlimited supply of human donor organs. Specifically, transplantation of kidney precursors in adult hosts showed that intact embryonic kidneys underwent maturation, exhibiting functional properties, and averted humoural rejection post-transplantation from non-immunosuppressed hosts. Even if supply and demand could be balanced using xenotransplants or lab-grown organs from regenerative medicine, the future of these treatments would still be compromised by the ability to physically distribute the organs to patients in need and to produce these products in a way that allows adequate inventory control and quality assurance. Kidney precursors originating from fifteen-day old rabbit embryos were vitrified using Cryotop® as a device and VM3 as vitrification solution. After 3 months of storage in liquid nitrogen, 18 kidney precursors were transplanted into non-immunosuppressed adult hosts by laparoscopy surgery. Twenty-one days after allotransplantation, 9 new kidneys were recovered. All the new kidneys recovered exhibited significant growth and mature glomeruli. Having achieved these encouraging results, we report, for the first time, that it is possible to create a long-term biobank of kidney precursors as an unlimited source of organs for transplantation, facilitating the inventory control and distribution of organs.

  18. Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation: A Global Initiative to Develop a Core Outcome Set for Trials in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Allison; Budde, Klemens; Gill, John; Josephson, Michelle A.; Marson, Lorna; Pruett, Timothy L.; Reese, Peter P.; Rosenbloom, David; Rostaing, Lionel; Warrens, Anthony N.; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C.; Crowe, Sally; Harris, Tess; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Tugwell, Peter; Van Biesen, Wim; Wheeler, David C.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Evangelidis, Nicole; Sautenet, Benedicte; Howell, Martin; Chapman, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although advances in treatment have dramatically improved short-term graft survival and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, long-term graft outcomes have not substantially improved. Transplant recipients also have a considerably increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infection, which all contribute to appreciable morbidity and premature mortality. Many trials in kidney transplantation are short-term, frequently use unvalidated surrogate endpoints, outcomes of uncertain relevance to patients and clinicians, and do not consistently measure and report key outcomes like death, graft loss, graft function, and adverse effects of therapy. This diminishes the value of trials in supporting treatment decisions that require individual-level multiple tradeoffs between graft survival and the risk of side effects, adverse events, and mortality. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation initiative aims to develop a core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation that is based on the shared priorities of all stakeholders. Methods This will include a systematic review to identify outcomes reported in randomized trials, a Delphi survey with an international multistakeholder panel (patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, members from industry) to develop a consensus-based prioritized list of outcome domains and a consensus workshop to review and finalize the core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation. Conclusions Developing and implementing a core outcome set to be reported, at a minimum, in all kidney transplantation trials will improve the transparency, quality, and relevance of research; to enable kidney transplant recipients and their clinicians to make better-informed treatment decisions for improved patient outcomes. PMID:27500269

  19. Neutralization Serotyping of BK Polyomavirus Infection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Brennan, Daniel C.; Çuburu, Nicolas; Storch, Gregory A.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Randhawa, Parmjeet S.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV or BKPyV) associated nephropathy affects up to 10% of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). BKV isolates are categorized into four genotypes. It is currently unclear whether the four genotypes are also serotypes. To address this issue, we developed high-throughput serological assays based on antibody-mediated neutralization of BKV genotype I and IV reporter vectors (pseudoviruses). Neutralization-based testing of sera from mice immunized with BKV-I or BKV-IV virus-like particles (VLPs) or sera from naturally infected human subjects revealed that BKV-I specific serum antibodies are poorly neutralizing against BKV-IV and vice versa. The fact that BKV-I and BKV-IV are distinct serotypes was less evident in traditional VLP-based ELISAs. BKV-I and BKV-IV neutralization assays were used to examine BKV type-specific neutralizing antibody responses in KTRs at various time points after transplantation. At study entry, sera from 5% and 49% of KTRs showed no detectable neutralizing activity for BKV-I or BKV-IV neutralization, respectively. By one year after transplantation, all KTRs were neutralization seropositive for BKV-I, and 43% of the initially BKV-IV seronegative subjects showed evidence of acute seroconversion for BKV-IV neutralization. The results suggest a model in which BKV-IV-specific seroconversion reflects a de novo BKV-IV infection in KTRs who initially lack protective antibody responses capable of neutralizing genotype IV BKVs. If this model is correct, it suggests that pre-vaccinating prospective KTRs with a multivalent VLP-based vaccine against all BKV serotypes, or administration of BKV-neutralizing antibodies, might offer protection against graft loss or dysfunction due to BKV associated nephropathy. PMID:22511874

  20. Multiple Aneurysms and a Transplanted Kidney in Behçet Disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Oroog; Nicholl, Philip; Carruthers, David; Geoghegan, James; Tiwari, Alok

    2017-02-01

    Arterial manifestation of Behçet disease represents a challenging clinical scenario with a potential for fatal complications. This case depicts the surgical management of a 4.5-cm infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a 6-cm left renal artery aneurysm in a patient with known Behçet disease. The presence of a contralateral living donor kidney transplant added to the complexity of the case. Open surgical repair was performed on both aneurysms with the use of axillofemoral bypass to protect the transplanted kidney. This case highlights the challenges of treating an aortic aneurysm in a patient with Behçet disease and a kidney transplant.

  1. Successful Combined Pancreas Fourth-Kidney Third and Pancreas Third-Kidney Second Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bösmüller, Claudia; Maglione, Manuel; Margreiter, Christian; Dziodzio, Tomasz; Biebl, Matthias; Pratschke, Johann; Öllinger, Robert; Öfner, Dietmar; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely few reports have been published on experience with multiple combined pancreas-kidney re-transplantation including long-term results. We here analyze our experience with two patients following successful combined pancreas fourth-kidney third and pancreas third-kidney second transplantation. Methods Patient and graft survival as well as graft function and major complications were recorded. Patient 1 (women, 47 years) underwent combined pancreas fourth-kidney third transplantation after previous removal of the first and second renal and the second pancreatic grafts. Patient 2 (men, 51 years) underwent combined pancreas third-kidney second transplantation after nephrectomy of the first renal graft. Immunosuppression consisted of induction with alemtuzumab and maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil/mycophenolic acid and steroids. Results After a follow-up of 44 and 49 months, respectively, both patients are doing well with stable graft function. Leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, bacterial sepsis, and chronic hepatitis C as major complications were controllable. Conclusions Multiple pancreas-retransplantations combined with simultaneous renal transplantation are feasible. Meticulous immunosuppression, careful monitoring, and excellent patient adherence are of crucial importance. PMID:27500224

  2. Complex kidneys for complex patients: the risk associated with transplantation of kidneys with multiple arteries into obese patients.

    PubMed

    Nath, J; Mastoridis, S; van Dellen, D; Guy, A J; McGrogan, D G; Krishnan, H; Pattenden, C; Inston, N G; Ready, A R

    2015-03-01

    Conflicting evidence surrounds clinical outcomes in obese individuals after transplantation; nonetheless, many are denied the opportunity to receive a transplant. Allografts with complex vascular anatomy are regularly used in both deceased and living donor settings. We established the risk of transplanting kidneys with multiple renal arteries into obese recipients. A retrospective analysis of data from 1095 patients undergoing renal transplantation between January 2004 and July 2013 at a single centre was conducted. Of these, 24.2% were obese (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)), whereas 25.1% of kidneys transplanted had multiple arteries, thereby making the transplantation of kidneys of complex anatomy into obese recipients a relatively common clinical occurrence. Vessel multiplicity was associated with inferior 1-year graft survival (85.8.% vs 92.1%, P = .004). Obese patients had worse 1-graft survival compared to those of normal BMI (86.8% vs 93.8%, P = .001). The risk of vascular complications and of graft loss within a year after transplantation were greater when grafts with multiple arteries were transplanted into obese recipients as compared to their nonobese counterparts (RR 2.00, CI 95% 1.07-3.65, and RR 1.95, CI 95% 1.02-3.65). Additionally, obese patients faced significantly higher risk of graft loss if receiving a kidney with multiple arteries compared to one of normal anatomy (RR 1.97, 95% CI 1.02-3.72). Thus, obese patients receiving complex anatomy kidneys face poorer outcomes, which should be considered when allocating organs, seeking consent, and arranging for aftercare.

  3. Macrophage density in early surveillance biopsies predicts future renal transplant function.

    PubMed

    Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Khalifa, Abedalrazag; Schmitz, Jessica; Dai, Wei; Einecke, Gunilla; Schwarz, Anke; Hallensleben, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Kreipe, Hans H; Haller, Hermann; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2017-03-27

    Inflammation impairs renal allograft survival but is difficult to quantify by eye at low densities. Here we measured leukocyte abundance in early surveillance biopsies by digital image analysis to test for a role of chemokine receptor genotypes and analyze the predictive value of leukocyte subsets to allograft function. In six-week surveillance biopsies, T-cell (CD3), B-cell (CD20), macrophage (CD68), and dendritic cell (CD209) densities were assessed in whole slide scans. Renal cortical CD3, CD20, and CD68 were significantly higher in histologic rejection. The CCR2 V64I genotype was associated with lower CD3 and CD209 densities. Above-median CD68 density was significantly associated with lower combined patient and graft survival with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-11.0). Both CD20 and CD68 densities inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) four years after transplantation. Additionally, CD68 correlated with eGFR loss. Among histological measurements including a complete Banff classification, only CD68 density was a significant predictor of an eGFR under 30ml/min after four years (odds ratio 7.4, 1.8-31.0) and part of the best eGFR prediction set in a multivariable linear regression analysis of multiple clinical and pathologic parameters. In a second independent cohort, the original CD68 median maintained its discriminative power for survival and eGFR. Thus, digital high-resolution assessment of CD68(+) leukocyte infiltration significantly improves prognostic value of early renal transplant biopsies.

  4. Older candidates for kidney transplantation: Who to refer and what to expect?

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Beatrice P; Forbes, Rachel C; Schaefer, Heidi M

    2016-01-01

    The number of older end-stage renal disease patients being referred for kidney transplantation continues to increase. This rise is occurring alongside the continually increasing prevalence of older end-stage renal disease patients. Although older kidney transplant recipients have decreased patient and graft survival compared to younger patients, transplantation in this patient population is pursued due to the survival advantage that it confers over remaining on the deceased donor waiting list. The upper limit of age and the extent of comorbidity and frailty at which transplantation ceases to be advantageous is not known. Transplant physicians are therefore faced with the challenge of determining who among older patients are appropriate candidates for kidney transplantation. This is usually achieved by means of an organ systems-based medical evaluation with particular focus given to cardiovascular health. More recently, global measures of health such as functional status and frailty are increasingly being recognized as potential tools in risk stratifying kidney transplant candidates. For those candidates who are deemed eligible, living donor transplantation should be pursued. This may mean accepting a kidney from an older living donor. In the absence of any living donor, the choice to accept lesser quality kidneys should be made while taking into account the organ shortage and expected waiting times on the deceased donor list. Appropriate counseling of patients should be a cornerstone in the evaluation process and includes a discussion regarding expected outcomes, expected waiting times in the setting of the new Kidney Allocation System, benefits of living donor transplantation and the acceptance of lesser quality kidneys. PMID:28058214

  5. Older candidates for kidney transplantation: Who to refer and what to expect?

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Beatrice P; Forbes, Rachel C; Schaefer, Heidi M

    2016-12-24

    The number of older end-stage renal disease patients being referred for kidney transplantation continues to increase. This rise is occurring alongside the continually increasing prevalence of older end-stage renal disease patients. Although older kidney transplant recipients have decreased patient and graft survival compared to younger patients, transplantation in this patient population is pursued due to the survival advantage that it confers over remaining on the deceased donor waiting list. The upper limit of age and the extent of comorbidity and frailty at which transplantation ceases to be advantageous is not known. Transplant physicians are therefore faced with the challenge of determining who among older patients are appropriate candidates for kidney transplantation. This is usually achieved by means of an organ systems-based medical evaluation with particular focus given to cardiovascular health. More recently, global measures of health such as functional status and frailty are increasingly being recognized as potential tools in risk stratifying kidney transplant candidates. For those candidates who are deemed eligible, living donor transplantation should be pursued. This may mean accepting a kidney from an older living donor. In the absence of any living donor, the choice to accept lesser quality kidneys should be made while taking into account the organ shortage and expected waiting times on the deceased donor list. Appropriate counseling of patients should be a cornerstone in the evaluation process and includes a discussion regarding expected outcomes, expected waiting times in the setting of the new Kidney Allocation System, benefits of living donor transplantation and the acceptance of lesser quality kidneys.

  6. Estimating the risks of acquiring a kidney abroad: a meta-analysis of complications following participation in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Anker, Ashley E; Feeley, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of odds ratios comparing the risks of participating in transplant tourism by acquiring a kidney abroad to the risks associated with domestic kidney transplant was undertaken. Comparison across 12 medical outcomes indicates transplant tourists are significantly more likely to contract cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B, HIV, post-transplantation diabetes mellitus, and wound infection than those receiving domestic kidney transplant. Results also indicate that domestic kidney transplant recipients experience significantly higher one-yr patient- and graft-survival rates. Analyses are supplemented by independent comparisons of outcomes and provide practitioners with weighted estimates of the proportion of transplant recipients experiencing 15 medical outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to caution patients of the medical risks associated with transplant tourism. Despite the illegal and unethical nature of transplant tourism, additional efforts are indicated to eliminate the organ trade and to educate wait-listed patients about the risks of transplant tourism.

  7. Bortezomib in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: A multicenter Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah; Claes, Donna; Ashoor, Isa; Chen, Ashton; Jandeska, Sara; Matar, Raed Bou; Misurac, Jason; Sherbotie, Joseph; Twombley, Katherine; Verghese, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection leads to allograft loss after kidney transplantation. Bortezomib has been used in adults for the reversal of antibody-mediated rejection; however, pediatric data are limited. This retrospective study was conducted in collaboration with the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received bortezomib for biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection between 2008 and 2015 were included. The objective was to characterize the use of bortezomib in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three patients received bortezomib for antibody-mediated rejection at nine pediatric kidney transplant centers. Ninety percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, 78% received plasmapheresis, and 78% received rituximab. After a median follow-up of 15 months, 65% of patients had a functioning graft. The estimated glomerular filtration rate improved or stabilized in 61% and 36% of patients at 3 and 12 months post-bortezomib, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis significantly predicted estimated glomerular filtration rate at 12 months after adjusting for chronic histologic changes (P .001). Fifty-six percent of patients showed an at least 25% reduction in the mean fluorescence intensity of the immune-dominant donor-specific antibody, 1-3 months after the first dose of bortezomib. Non-life-threatening side effects were documented in 21 of 33 patients. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients tolerated bortezomib without life-threatening side effects. Bortezomib may stabilize estimated glomerular filtration rate for 3-6 months in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with antibody-mediated rejection.

  8. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  9. Lack of benefit of early protocol biopsies in renal transplant patients receiving TAC and MMF: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Rush, D; Arlen, D; Boucher, A; Busque, S; Cockfield, S M; Girardin, C; Knoll, G; Lachance, J-G; Landsberg, D; Shapiro, J; Shoker, A; Yilmaz, S

    2007-11-01

    We conducted a randomized, multicenter study to determine whether treatment of subclinical rejection with increased corticosteroids resulted in beneficial outcomes in renal transplant patients receiving tacrolimus (TAC), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and prednisone. One hundred and twenty-one patients were randomized to biopsies at 0,1,2,3 and 6 months (Biopsy arm), and 119 to biopsies at 0 and 6 months only (Control arm). The primary endpoint of the study was the prevalence of the sum of the interstitial and tubular scores (ci + ct)> 2 (Banff) at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included clinical and subclinical rejection and renal function. At 6 months, 34.8% of the Biopsy and 20.5% of the Control arm patients had a ci + ct score >or= 2 (p = 0.07). Between months 0 and 6, clinical rejection episodes were 12 in 10 Biopsy arm patients and 8 in 8 Control arm patients (p = 0.44). Overall prevalence of subclinical rejection in the Biopsy arm was 4.6%. Creatinine clearance at 6 months was 72.9 +/- 21.7 in the Biopsy and 68.90 mL/min +/- 18.35 mL/min in the Control arm patients (p = 0.18). In conclusion, we found no benefit to the procurement of early protocol biopsies in renal transplant patients receiving TAC, MMF and prednisone, at least in the short term. This is likely due to their low prevalence of subclinical rejection.

  10. Arterial flow regulator enables transplantation and growth of human fetal kidneys in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, N K; Gu, J; Gu, S; Osorio, R W; Concepcion, W; Gu, E

    2015-06-01

    Here we introduce a novel method of transplanting human fetal kidneys into adult rats. To overcome the technical challenges of fetal-to-adult organ transplantation, we devised an arterial flow regulator (AFR), consisting of a volume adjustable saline-filled cuff, which enables low-pressure human fetal kidneys to be transplanted into high-pressure adult rat hosts. By incrementally withdrawing saline from the AFR over time, blood flow entering the human fetal kidney was gradually increased until full blood flow was restored 30 days after transplantation. Human fetal kidneys were shown to dramatically increase in size and function. Moreover, rats which had all native renal mass removed 30 days after successful transplantation of the human fetal kidney were shown to have a mean survival time of 122 days compared to 3 days for control rats that underwent bilateral nephrectomy without a prior human fetal kidney transplant. These in vivo human fetal kidney models may serve as powerful platforms for drug testing and discovery.

  11. Urinary Markers of Fibrosis and Risk of Cardiovascular Events and Death in Kidney Transplant Recipients: the FAVORIT Trial.

    PubMed

    Park, M; Katz, R; Shlipak, M G; Weiner, D; Tracy, R; Jotwani, V; Hughes-Austin, J; Gabbai, F; Hsu, C Y; Pfeffer, M; Bansal, N; Bostom, A; Gutierrez, O; Sarnak, M; Levey, A; Ix, J H

    2017-03-29

    Cardiovascular risk remains high in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) despite improved kidney function after transplant. Urinary markers of kidney fibrosis and injury may help to reveal mechanisms of this risk. In a case-cohort study among stable KTRs who participated in the FAVORIT trial, we measured 4 urinary proteins known to correlate with kidney tubulointerstitial fibrosis on biopsy (urine alpha 1 microglobulin [α1m], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], procollagen type I [PINP] and type III [PIIINP] N-terminal amino peptide) and evaluated associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (N=300) and death (N=371). In adjusted models, higher urine α1m (hazard ratio [HR] per doubling of biomarker 1.40 [95% CI 1.21, 1.62]), MCP-1 (HR 1.18 [1.03, 1.36]), and PINP (HR 1.13 [95% CI 1.03, 1.23]) were associated with CVD events. These 3 markers were also associated with death (HR per doubling α1m 1.51 [95% CI 1.32, 1.72]; MCP-1 1.31 [95% CI 1.13, 1.51]; PINP 1.11 [95% CI 1.03, 1.20]). Higher concentrations of urine α1m, MCP-1, and PINP may identify KTRs at higher risk for CVD events and death. These markers may identify a systemic process of fibrosis involving both the kidney and cardiovascular system, and give new insights into mechanisms linking the kidney with CVD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. A collaborative biomedical image mining framework: application on the image analysis of microscopic kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Goudas, T; Doukas, C; Chatziioannou, A; Maglogiannis, I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of biomedical image data is a complex procedure involving several processing phases, like data acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and classification. The proper combination and parameterization of the utilized methods are heavily relying on the given image data set and experiment type. They may thus necessitate advanced image processing and classification knowledge and skills from the side of the biomedical expert. In this work, an application, exploiting web services and applying ontological modeling, is presented, to enable the intelligent creation of image mining workflows. The described tool can be directly integrated to the RapidMiner, Taverna or similar workflow management platforms. A case study dealing with the creation of a sample workflow for the analysis of kidney biopsy microscopy images is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the proposed framework.

  13. Results of kidney transplantation in relation to HLA-A, B, DR matching and quality of donor organ.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, V; Dreikorn, K; Röhl, L

    1980-01-01

    The influence of HLA compatibility as well as immediate postoperative function on survival rates was investigated in 203 cadaver kidney transplants. HLA compatibility, especially DR compatibility, improved transplant survival significantly. A direct correlation was found between primary transplant function and long-term results. HLA compatibility and quality of the donor organ had a cumulative effect on kidney transplant survival. Our results are a further indication that besides HLA compatibility, optimal quality of donor organs has crucial significance for the results of transplantation.

  14. Local gene therapy with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protects against development of transplant vasculopathy in chronic kidney transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vavrincova-Yaghi, D; Deelman, L E; van Goor, H; Seelen, M A; Vavrinec, P; Kema, I P; Gomolcak, P; Benigni, A; Henning, R H; Sandovici, M

    2016-11-01

    Chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD) is the primary cause of late allograft loss in kidney transplantation. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is involved in fetomaternal tolerance and IDO gene therapy inhibits acute rejection following kidney transplantation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether gene therapy with IDO is able to attenuate CTD. Transplantation was performed in a rat Dark-Agouti to Wistar-Furth CTD model. Donor kidneys were incubated either with an adenovirus carrying IDO gene, a control adenovirus or saline. During the first 10 days recipients received low-dose cyclosporine. Body weight, blood pressure, serum creatinine and proteinuria were measured every 2 weeks. Rats were killed after 12 weeks. IDO had a striking beneficial effect on transplant vasculopathy at week 12. It also significantly improved body weight gain; it reduced blood pressure and decreased proteinuria during the follow-up. However, it did not affect the kidney function. In addition, IDO therapy significantly decreased the number of graft-infiltrating macrophages at week 12. The messenger RNA levels of forkhead box p3 and transforming grow factor-β were elevated in the IDO treated group at week 12. Here we show for first time a clear beneficial effect of local IDO gene therapy especially on transplant vasculopathy in a rat model of renal CTD.

  15. Combined kidney and intestinal transplantation in patients with enteric hyperoxaluria secondary to short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ceulemans, L J; Nijs, Y; Nuytens, F; De Hertogh, G; Claes, K; Bammens, B; Naesens, M; Evenepoel, P; Kuypers, D; Vanrenterghem, Y; Monbaliu, D; Pirenne, J

    2013-07-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease whereas indications for intestinal transplantation are currently restricted to patients with irreversible small bowel failure and severe complications of total parenteral nutrition (mostly shortage and infection of venous accesses, major electrolyte disturbances and liver failure). Enteric hyperoxaluria is secondary to certain intestinal diseases like intestinal resections, chronic inflammatory bowel disease and other malabsorption syndromes and can lead to end-stage renal disease requiring kidney transplantation. We report two patients suffering from renal failure due to enteric hyperoxaluria (secondary to extensive intestinal resection) in whom we elected to replace not only the kidney but also the intestine to prevent recurrence of hyperoxaluria in the transplanted kidney.

  16. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression. PMID:27695507

  17. Trends in Usage and Outcomes for Expanded Criteria Donor Kidney Transplantation in the United States Characterized by Kidney Donor Profile Index

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Aparna; Irish, Bill; Castleberry, Anthony; Vikraman, Deepak; Sanoff, Scott; Ravindra, Kadiyala; Sudan, Debra

    2016-01-01

    delayed graft function (DGF) in ECD recipients has significantly decreased over time from 35.2% in 2003 to 29.6% in 2011 (p=0.007), probably related to better understanding of the donor risk profile along with increased use of hypothermic machine perfusion and pretransplant biopsy to aid in optimal allograft selection. The recent decline in transplantation of KDPI >85% kidneys probably reflects risk-averse transplant center behavior. Whether discard of discordant SCD kidneys with KDPI >85% has contributed to this decline remains to be studied. PMID:28018757

  18. En-Bloc Transplant of the Liver, Kidney and Pancreas: Experience from a Latin American Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo, Luis A.; Villegas, Jorge I.; Serrano, Oscar; Millán, Mauricio; Sepúlveda, Mauricio; Jiménez, Diego; García, Jairo; Posada, Juan G.; Mesa, Liliana; Duran, Carlos; Schweineberg, Johanna; Dávalos, Diana; Manzi, Eliana; Sabogal, Angie; Aristizabal, Ana María; Echeverri, Gabriel J.

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 38 • Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: En-bloc transplantation (liver, kidney, pancreas) Symptoms: Encephalopathy • adynamia • ascites • asthenia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: En-bloc transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: En-bloc transplantation is a surgical procedure in which multiple organs are transplanted simultaneously. It has some similarities with multi-organ transplantation but offers certain advantages. This report highlights the experience of our interdisciplinary group regarding the treatment and follow-up of patients who received en-bloc transplantation, with the aim of encouraging the development of this surgical technique. Case Report: The first case is a 38-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, and chronic kidney failure who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no intraoperative complications. He had a prolonged hospital stay due to anemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which were resolved successfully. At follow-up, he had no requirement for insulin or for dialysis, or for new interventions. The second case describes a 48-year-old patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no complications. During the postoperative period, the patient suffered a possible episode of acute tubular necrosis, which evolved towards improvement, with a tendency to normal metabolic and renal functioning, with no additional events. The patient is currently in follow-up and is insulin-independent. Conclusions: En-bloc transplantation is a safe procedure, which is technically simple and which achieves excellent results. This procedure is indicated in patients with end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, and diabetes mellitus that is difficult to control. PMID:28148909

  19. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  20. Significance of isoagglutinin titer in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Dahae; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Hee-jung; Kwon, Seog-Woon; Han, Duck-Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2014-10-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABO-i) kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged for overcoming the shortage of organ donors. Although this technique initially achieved only low graft survival due to isoagglutinin, recently developed desensitization protocols have improved survival to levels that are comparable to ABO-compatible KT. However, isoagglutinin is still regarded as a major obstacle to ABO-i KT. In this study, we evaluate the impact of isoagglutinin titer on clinical outcomes as well as factors that may influence isoagglutinin titers. In total, data from 95 patients who underwent ABO-i KT were analyzed. Preoperatively, rituximab administration and plasmapheresis were performed until the titer was reduced to ≤1:4. Retrospective analysis included blood group; timing and dosage of rituximab; isoagglutinin titer; number of plasmapheresis; and clinical outcomes including graft survival and serum creatinine. Graft survival was 95.8% (n = 91) and average serum creatinine at 1- and 1.5-year post-ABOi-KT was 1.3. Three patients died of sepsis. The identified predictors of titer-rebound after transplant were short interval (<7 days) between rituximab and first plasmapheresis (P = 0.004); high initial titer (≥256) (P = 0.023); low titer-reduction rate (P < 0.001); and blood group O (P < 0.001). One patient who experienced a rebound developed antibody-mediated rejection. With low-dose (200 mg) rituximab, the change in isoagglutinin titer-rebound was not significant and the infection rate was significantly decreased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, isoagglutinin titer-rebound within the first 2 weeks after KT may be a risk factor for rejection. The factors identified as affecting titer-rebound after KT were high initial isoagglutinin titer, low titer-reduction rate, short interval, and blood group O.

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in kidney transplant recipients: Report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chi Yuen; Lo, Stanley Hok King; Chan, Ching Kit; Li, Fu Keung; Cheng, Ignatius Kum Po; Chau, Ka Foon

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, GISTs occurring in kidney transplant recipients, including their treatment and outcome, are rarely described in literature. We hereby report two kidney transplant recipients with GISTs. Our first patient was diagnosed with high-risk epithelioid gastric GIST 2 years after kidney transplant. He received everolimus after resection and remained disease-free for 2 years before liver metastasis was confirmed. Imatinib therapy was planned but he died of fulminant pneumonia shortly. Our second patient was diagnosed with spindle cell GISTs in the mesentery 1 year after kidney transplant. Only partial response was obtained with imatinib as new lesions continued to develop. Withdrawal of cyclosporine and introduction of sirolimus resulted in complete shrinkage of existing tumors and no new lesions. He remained disease-free for more than 10 years. Combination therapy consisting of imatinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi) seems to be safe and effective in kidney transplant recipients. However, therapeutic drug monitoring of mTORi is essential to avoid nephrotoxicity. Further trials addressing the optimal dosage of imatinib and mTORi in kidney transplant recipients are recommended.

  2. Development of the National Kidney Transplantation Program in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, F; Orihuela, S; Alvarez, I; Dibello, N; Curi, L; Nin, M; Wimber, E; Mizraji, R; Bengochea, M; González, G; Manzo, L; Toledo, R; Silva, W; Chopitea, Á; Lopez, D; Balboa, O; Porto, D; Noboa, O

    2015-10-01

    The first kidney transplantation (KT) in Uruguay was performed in 1969. We report the rates of KT and survival of patients and grafts up to December 2014. The country has a surface of 176,215 km(2) and a population of 3,286,314 inhabitants (18.6 inhabitants per km(2)). Till December 31, 2014, 1,940 KT have been performed in Uruguay (41.8 pmp that year); 90.4% of them were from cadaveric donors (CD). Median age of recipients (R) was 44 ± 14 years; R older than 55 years increased from 0 to 27% during the period. Our pre-emptive KT program started in 2007. Optimal donors (D) decreased from 65.2% to 35.5%, and D older than 45 years old increased from 9% to 37%. Trauma as cause of death decreased from 49% to 32% and stroke as cause of death increased from 25% to 39%. Patient survival rates at 1, 5, and 8 years were 93%, 87%, and 78%, respectively for KT performed between 1980 and 1989; they were 98%, 93%, and 89%, respectively, for KT performed between 1990 and1999; they were 97%, 91%, and 90%, respectively, for KT performed between 2000 and 2010. In December 2013, there were 1098 patients pmp in renal replacement therapy, 758 pmp in dialysis, and 340 pmp (30.9%) with a functioning graft. Our national KT program is mainly based (90.6%) on cadaveric donation. Epidemiological changes in the characteristics of R and D followed the changes in aging that occurred in the general population and the dialysis population. The survival rates from patients and kidneys are similar to those reported by the European and the American registries.

  3. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  4. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  5. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  6. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  7. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  8. Six end-stage renal disease patients benefited from first non-simultaneous single center 6-way kidney exchange transplantation in India

    PubMed Central

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Varyani, Umesh T; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Shah, Priya S; Wakhare, Pavan S; Ghodela, Vijay A; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Trivedi, Varsha B; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To avoid desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (KT) due to high costs and increased risk of infections from intense immunosuppression. METHODS We present institutional ethical review board - approved study of single center 6-way kidney exchange transplantation. The participants comprised ABO incompatibility (n = 1); positive cross-match and/or presence of donor specific antibody (n = 5). The average time required from registration in kidney paired donation (KPD) registry to find suitable donors was 45 d and time required to perform transplants after legal permission was 2 mo. RESULTS Graft and patient survival were 100%, and 100%, respectively. One patient had biopsy-proven acute borderline T cell rejection (Banff update 2013, type 3). Mean serum creatinine was 0.8 mg/dL at 9 mo follow-up. The waiting time in KPD was short as compared to deceased donor KT. CONCLUSION We report first non-simultaneous, single center, 6-way kidney exchange transplantation from India. Our experience will encourage other centers in India to undertake this practice. PMID:27872835

  9. Suggestions on how to make suboptimal kidney transplantation an ethically viable option

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Vincenzo; Buccelli, Claudio; De Micco, Francesco; Casella, Claudia; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Paternoster, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To overcome kidney donation, the pool of potentially eligible donors has been widened by using suboptimal organs harvested from living donors or cadavers. These organs may engender health complications as age, risk factors, and pathologies of donors fail to meet the standard donor criteria. After examining a wide array of literature on suboptimal kidney transplants, we evidenced two major issues: the lack of standardized terminology and the lack of longterm data on the health outcomes of both suboptimal living donors and recipients. Consequently, surgeons are still unable to provide patients with thorough information to obtain a well-informed consent. Suboptimal kidney transplantation still remains in its experimental stage, thereby raising many ethical and medico-legal concerns. We suggest that one possible solution to overcome some of the ethical shortcomings of suboptimal kidney donations is to provide living donors and recipients honest, accurate, and thorough information about its health risks. To this aim, we advocate adopting a widely standardized terminology that would embrace the whole concept of suboptimal kidney transplantation, increasing the number of future publications on the health outcomes of living donors and recipients, spurring ethical reflection to improve the experience of suboptimal kidney transplantation and reduce the waiting-list for kidney transplantation. PMID:28352845

  10. Renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney: successful organ-preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    Höppner, W; Grosse, K; Dreikorn, K

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a de novo renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney, which was detected 3 years after the transplantation. The tumor was excised under hypothermia and perfusion. Immunosuppression was not stopped and the function remained excellent. Close-mesh follow-up of 45 months showed no evidence or recurrence or metastasis.

  11. Cytopenia Occurrence in Kidney Transplant Recipients Within Early Post-transplant Period

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Atefeh; Najivash, Parisa; Khatami, Mohammad-Reza; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed incidence, severity, and time to occurrence of drug-induced leukopenia/thrombocytopenia within 1st month after kidney transplantation. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on newly kidney transplant recipients from two hospitals, Iran. Patients with thrombocytopenia due to acute antibody-mediated rejection were excluded from the study. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of patients within the 1st month after transplantation were collected. Findings: Of 213 patients, 14.1% and 66.2% experienced leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, respectively. Cytopenia happened more commonly among patients with thymoglobulin-containing regimen (for leukopenia: 24.6% vs. 0%, P < 0.001; for thrombocytopenia 84.4% vs. 41.8%, P < 0.001). Most leukopenia patients experienced Grades 1 and 2 of leukopenia (46.6% and 40% of patients). Most thrombocytopenic patients showed Grade 1 of thrombocytopenia (78.7%). Cumulative dose of thymoglobulin did not differ between patients with and without leukopenia (5.57 ± 1.13 vs. 5.9 ± 1.96 mg/kg; P = 0.613) or with and without thrombocytopenia (5.87 ± 1.86 vs. 5.56 ± 1.38 mg/kg; P = 0.29). Cytopenia were more common among recipients from deceased compared with from living donors (91.3% vs. 8.7% for leukopenia patients, P = 0.001; 69.9% vs. 33.1% for thrombocytopenia, P = 0.02). More patients with kidney from deceased donors received thymoglobulin in their immunosuppressive regimen (82% vs. 37%; P < 0.001). The median time to leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were 3 days and 1 day, respectively. Conclusion: Among immunosuppressive and prophylactic antimicrobial agents, thymoglobulin is more related to cytopenia; therefore, thymoglobulin dose reduction is recommended as the first intervention to manage cytopenia without need for reduction of its cumulative dose. The higher prevalence of cytopenia among recipients from deceased donors may be related to the higher use of thymoglobulin in these patients

  12. Donor-estimated GFR as an appropriate criterion for allocation of ECD kidneys into single or dual kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Snanoudj, R; Rabant, M; Timsit, M O; Karras, A; Savoye, E; Tricot, L; Loupy, A; Hiesse, C; Zuber, J; Kreis, H; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Lebret, T; Legendre, C; Delahousse, M

    2009-11-01

    It has been suggested that dual kidney transplantation (DKT) improves outcomes for expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys. However, no criteria for allocation to single or dual transplantation have been assessed prospectively. The strategy of DKT remains underused and potentially eligible kidneys are frequently discarded. We prospectively compared 81 DKT and 70 single kidney transplant (SKT) receiving grafts from ECD donors aged >65 years, allocated according to donor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): DKT if eGFR between 30 and 60 mL/min, SKT if eGFR greater than 60 mL/min. Patient and graft survival were similar in the two groups. In the DKT group, 13/81 patients lost one of their two kidneys due to hemorrhage, arterial or venous thrombosis. Mean eGFR at month 12 was similar in the DKT and SKT groups (47.8 mL/min and 46.4 mL/min, respectively). Simulated allocation of kidneys according to criteria based on day 0 donor parameters such as those described by Remuzzi et al., Andres et al. and UNOS, did not indicate an improvement in 12-month eGFR compared to our allocation based on donor eGFR.

  13. ENDOMYOCARDIAL BIOPSY AND SELECTIVE CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY ARE LOW RISK PROCEDURES IN PEDIATRIC HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Vincent, Julie A.; Zuckerman, Warren A.; Hoffman, Timothy M.; Canter, Charles E.; Blume, Elizabeth D.; Bergersen, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Background No prior reports documenting the safety and diagnostic yield of cardiac catheterization and endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) in heart transplant recipients include multicenter data. Methods Data on the safety and diagnostic yield of EMB procedures performed in heart transplant recipients were recorded in the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Outcomes Project database at 8 pediatric centers over a 3 year period. Adverse events (AE) were classified according to a 5 level severity scale. Generalized estimating equation models identified risk factors for high severity adverse events (HSAE) (Levels 3-5) and non-diagnostic biopsy samples. Results A total of 2665 EMB cases were performed in 744 pediatric heart transplant recipients (median age 12 years [IQR: 4.8,16.7] and 54% male). AE occurred in 88 cases (3.3%), of which 28 (1.1%) were HSAE. AE attributable to EMB included tricuspid valve injury, transient complete heart block, and RBBB. Amongst 822 cases involving coronary angiography, 10 (1.2%) resulted in a coronary related AE. There were no myocardial perforations or deaths. Multivariable risk factors for HSAE included fewer prior catheterizations (p=0.006) and longer case length (p=<0.001). EMB yielded sufficient tissue for diagnosis in 99% of cases. Longer time since heart transplant was the most significant predictor of a non-diagnostic biopsy sample (p<0.001). Conclusions In the current era, cardiac catheterizations involving EMB can be performed in pediatric heart transplant recipients with a low AE rate and high diagnostic yield. Risk of HSAE is increased in early post-transplant biopsies and with longer case length. Longer time since heart transplant is associated with non-diagnostic EMB sample. PMID:22209354

  14. Survey of Canadian Kidney Transplant Specialists on the Management of Morbid Obesity and the Transplant Waiting List

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gabriel; Soucisse, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with increased surgical complications and long-term cardiovascular mortality. Studies of access in kidney transplantation have found a bias against obese patients on the wait-listing. Objective: To determine the current state of clinical practice for the management of obesity in kidney transplantation. Design: A survey in two versions, PDF and traditional paper, composed of categorical questions. Setting: A pan-Canadian survey of transplant nephrologists and surgeons. Methods: The survey PDF was distributed electronically to the Kidney Group of the Canadian Society of Transplantation. A shorter, hardcopy version was distributed subsequently at a national transplant meeting. Results: There were 47 responses, including almost every Canadian adult transplant program. Most (81%) reported the use of a body mass index limit for access to the waiting list. However, only 40% reported a strict enforcement. There were several instances of intra-hospital disagreements regarding the use of a policy, among the centers with multiple responses. The body mass index limit was most commonly 40 kg/m2 (62%), followed by 35 kg/m2 (36%). Despite the body mass index limit, few centers (30%) reported having a weight management program. The reported experience with bariatric surgery was small, though nearly all replied that they would refer to a bariatric specialist in the future. Limitations: This national survey provides a broad assessment of clinical practice. The distinction between an official policy and informal clinical tendencies is difficult. The results cannot be used to support any specific limit or policy. Conclusions: This survey found that the body mass index limit for access to the kidney transplant waiting list was common in Canada. Several inconsistencies suggest a lack of official policy. To achieve equity in access, clear guidelines for obesity should be established and enforced. Bariatric surgery has the promise of rapid weight loss

  15. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells.

  16. The impact of ICAM1 and VCAM1 gene polymorphisms on chronic allograft nephropathy and transplanted kidney function.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, K; Domański, L; Pawlik, A; Wiśniewska, M; Safranow, K; Ciechanowski, K

    2013-01-01

    ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules play important roles in the immune response and emergence of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The several polymorphisms of ICAM1 and VCAM1 genes are associated with changes in molecular expression therefore affecting allograft function and immune responses after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of polymorphisms in ICAM1 and VCAM1 genes on biopsy-proven CAN and renal allograft function. The 270 Caucasian renal transplant recipients (166 men and 104 women) were genotyped for the rs5498 ICAM1 and rs1041163 and rs3170794 VCAM1 gene polymorphisms using real-time polymerase chain reaction. There was no correlation between polymorphisms and CAN. Creatinine concentrations in the first month after transplantation differed between the rs5498 ICAM1 genotypes (P = .095), being higher for GG carriers (AA + AG vs GG, P =.07) albeit not with statistical significance. Creatinine concentrations at 12, 24, and 36 months after transplantation differed significantly among rs5498 ICAM1 genotypes (P = .0046, P =.016, and P = .02) and were higher among GG carriers (AA + AG vs GG, P = .001, P = .004, and P = .006). Rs5498 ICAM1 GG genotype and receipient male gender were independent factors associated with higher creatinine concentrations. These results suggest that the rs5498 ICAM1 GG genotype may be associated with long-term allograft function.

  17. HIV infection in the native and allograft kidney: implications for management, diagnosis, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Rouzioux, Christine; Legendre, Christophe; Canaud, Guillaume

    2017-02-11

    The native kidney is a reservoir for HIV-1 and a site of viral replication, similar to lymphoid tissue, gut-associated lymphoid tissue or semen. The ability of the virus to persist may result from either a true latency or sequestration in an anatomic site that is not effectively exposed to antiretroviral therapy. The presence of HIV in kidney epithelial cells will lead progressively to end-stage renal disease. For decades, HIV-infected patients were excluded from consideration for kidney transplantation. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were the only forms of treatment available to these patients. The introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy has changed the overall prognosis of these patients and allowed them to benefit from kidney transplantation without an increased risk of opportunistic infections or cancer. However, we recently established that HIV-1 can infect kidney transplant epithelial cells in the absence of detectable viremia. The presence of HIV in kidney cells can manifest itself in multiple ways, ranging from indolent nephropathy and inflammation to proteinuria with glomerular abnormalities. Because the tools that are available to diagnose the presence of HIV in kidney cells are complex, the rate of infection is certainly underestimated. This finding will certainly have implications in the management of patients, particularly for HIV-positive donors. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent evidence that the allograft kidney can be infected by the virus after transplantation as well as the associated consequences.

  18. Increasing kidney transplantation in Britain: the importance of donor cards, public opinion and medical practice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A; Snell, M

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Health and Social Security has recently spent over three-quarters of a million pounds advertising the merits of kidney donor cards. The advertising campaign stresses that carrying signed cards requesting the removal of kidneys and other organs after death both increases the number of kidneys available and increases the number of kidney transplants that actually take place. This paper examines the relative success of the kidney donor card campaign in Britain and the nature of the relationship between a more widespread distribution of donor cards and the frequency of kidney transplantation. This is done in two main ways: Through a review of the evidence detailing public support expressed in the media and from social surveys (including original empirical work conducted at Bath University). By an analysis of previously unpublished statistical evidence made available by the Department of Health and Social Security. The paper concludes that the battle for public sympathy towards kidney donation has largely been won and the kidney donor card campaign has been a success. However these success perhaps deflect attention away from more important issues in the transplant equation, as the link between card carrying and increased transplantation is neither direct nor simple.

  19. Feasibility and Acceptability of the TALK Social Worker Intervention to Improve Live Kidney Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePasquale, Nicole; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Darrell, Linda; Boyer, LaPricia Lewis; Ephraim, Patti; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Live kidney transplantation (LKT) is underused by patients with end-stage renal disease. Easily implementable and effective interventions to improve patients' early consideration of LKT are needed. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) social worker intervention (SWI) improved consideration and pursuit of LKT among patients with…

  20. Canine pancreas and kidney transplantation following total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, P.; Allen, R.D.; Deane, S.A.; Ekberg, H.; Grierson, J.M.; Hawthorne, W.J.; Mears, D.C.; Tiver, K.; Little, J.M.; Stewart, G.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of total-lymphoid irradiation on survival of canine pancreas and kidney allografts was studied. TLI had a marked immunosuppressive effect as measured by in vitro immune responses and reduced circulating leukocytes. Despite the changes, median graft survival times for animals treated with 800 cGy (9 days) or 1800 cGy (9.5 days) were not significantly different from untreated control animals (7 days). The addition of low-dose antithymocyte globulin (10 mg/kg/day) on post-transplant days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 had no measurable synergistic effect. Similarly, median segmental pancreas allograft survival times after 1700-2200 cGy of TLI treatment (16.5 days) were only marginally longer than those of untreated controls (9 days). The only animal to maintain a graft for greater than 200 days was matched to the donor in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This animal was able to reject a third-party skin graft after 8 days while a graft from the original donor was still surviving after 21 days when the pancreas graft failed from a chronic-type rejection. These results indicate that TLI alone or in combination with ATG will not be predictably effective as a method of prolonging allograft survival. The role of matching major histocompatibility complex antigens in TLI treatment requires clarification.

  1. Impact of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Isla Pera, P; Moncho Vasallo, J; Guasch Andreu, O; Ricart Brulles, MJ; Torras Rabasa, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few qualitative studies of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK Tx) have been published. The aims of this study were to explore from the perspective of patients, the experience of living with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM), suffering from complications, and undergoing SPK Tx with good outcome; and to determine the impact of SPK Tx on patients and their social and cultural environment. Methods: We performed a focused ethnographic study. Twenty patients were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison following the method proposed by Miles and Huberman. Results: A functioning SPK Tx allowed renal replacement therapy and insulin to be discontinued. To describe their new situation, patients used words and phrases such as “miracle”, “being reborn” or “coming back to life”. Although the complications of T1DM, its surgery and treatment, and associated psychological problems did not disappear after SPK Tx, these were minimized when compared with the pretransplantation situation. Conclusion: For patients, SPK Tx represents a recovery of their health and autonomy despite remaining problems associated with the complications of T1DM and SPK Tx. The understanding of patients’ existential framework and their experience of disease are key factors for planning new intervention and improvement strategies. PMID:22936846

  2. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents.

  3. Growth, chronic kidney disease and pediatric kidney transplantation: is it useful to use recombinant growth hormone in Colombian children with renal transplant?

    PubMed

    Castañeda, D A; López, L F; Ovalle, D F; Buitrago, J; Rodríguez, D; Lozano, E

    2011-11-01

    Kidney transplantation has become the best treatment for children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In recent times, knowledge concerning the effect of CKD and kidney transplantation over the normal growth rate has increased; now it is known that 40% of children with CKD do not reach the expected height for age. Growth retardation has been associated with the type of nephropathy, metabolic and endocrine disorders that are secondary to kidney disease, immunosuppressive therapy with glucocorticoids, and suboptimal function of renal allograft. Nowadays, we know better the role of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis in growth retardation we can see it in children with CKD or recipients of renal allograft. Several studies have shown that administration of recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) has a positive effect on the longitudinal growth of children and teenagers who have received a kidney transplant. On the other hand, there have been reported side effects associated with using rhGH; however, these are not statistically significant. In this article, we show a small review about growth in children with CKD and/or recipients of renal allografts the growth pattern of three children who were known by the Transplant Group of National University of Colombia, and the results obtained with the use of rhGH in one of these cases. We want to show the possibility of achieving a secure use of rhGH in children with CKD and its use as a therapeutic option for treating the growth retardation in children with kidney transplantation, and set out the need of typifying the growth pattern of Colombian children with CKD and/or who are recipients of renal allografts through multicenter studies to propose and analyze the inclusion of rhGH in the therapeutic scheme of Colombian children with these two medical conditions. rhGH could be a useful tool for treating children with CKD or kidney transplantation who have not reached the expected longitudinal growth for age. However

  4. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury in kidney transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A; Mao, Shennen A; D'Costa, Matthew R; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the incidence of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the inception of the databases through July 2016. Studies assessing the incidence of CIAKI in kidney transplant recipients were included. We applied a random-effects model to estimate the incidence of CIAKI. RESULTS Six studies of 431 kidney transplant recipients were included in the analyses to assess the incidence of CIAKI in kidney transplant recipients. The estimated incidence of CIAKI and CIAKI-requiring dialysis were 9.6% (95%CI: 4.5%-16.3%) and 0.4% (95%CI: 0.0%-1.2%), respectively. A sensitivity analysis limited only to the studies that used low-osmolar or iso-osmolar contrast showed the estimated incidence of CIAKI was 8.0% (95%CI: 3.5%-14.2%). The estimated incidences of CIAKI in recipients who received contrast media with cardiac catheterization, other types of angiogram, and CT scan were 16.1% (95%CI: 6.6%-28.4%), 10.1% (95%CI: 4.2%-18.0%), and 6.1% (95%CI: 1.8%-12.4%), respectively. No graft losses were reported within 30 d post-contrast media administration. However, data on the effects of CIAKI on long-term graft function were limited. CONCLUSION The estimated incidence of CIAKI in kidney transplant recipients is 9.6%. The risk stratification should be considered based on allograft function, indication, and type of procedure. PMID:28280699

  5. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Kidney Failure What is kidney failure and how is it treated? Kidney failure ... Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis . Peritoneal dialysis Kidney Transplant A kidney transplant places a healthy kidney ...

  6. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. Objective: To describe the clinical resp