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Sample records for kidney transplant biopsies

  1. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring. PMID:27306873

  2. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the transplanted kidney: technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Huraib, S; Goldberg, H; Katz, A; Cardella, C J; deVeber, G A; Cook, G T; Uldall, P R

    1989-07-01

    Over 11 1/2 years, 420 percutaneous needle biopsies were obtained from the transplanted kidneys of 205 patients at one institution. The procedure was performed by one nephrologist and 55 nephrology trainees. No limit was placed on the number of biopsies performed on one kidney, and the highest number was seven. The complications were macroscopic hematuria in 28 biopsies, prolonged hematuria (greater than 24 hours) in eight, transient anuria in five, and prolonged anuria requiring surgical intervention in one. Perinephric hematoma occurred in three patients; retroperitoneal hematoma led to compression of the iliac vein in one. None of these complications led to loss of the transplant. It is suggested that the freedom from serious complication is related to the safety of the technique and the precautions applied to preparation of the patient. These are described in detail.

  3. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Renal biopsy; Biopsy - kidney ... Barisoni L, Arend LJ, Thomas DB. Introduction to renal biopsy. In: Zhou M, Mari-Galluzzi C, eds. ... Saunders; 2015:chap 7. Topham PS, Chen Y. Renal biopsy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, ...

  4. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... right diagnosis. [ Top ] What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... Top ] What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  5. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  6. Findings of graft biopsy specimens within 90 days after ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation compared with ABO-identical and non-identical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Masahiko; Koshino, Katsuhiro; Nobori, Syuji; Okajima, Hideaki; Masuzawa, Naoko; Urasaki, Koji; Yoshimura, Norio

    2010-07-01

    As immunosuppressive therapy has advanced, we have markedly improved the outcome of ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation. Consequently, graft survival at early phase after ABO-incompatible transplantation has been favorable than ABO-compatible transplantation in Japan. But in these days, it has been assumed that transplant glomerulopathy within one yr after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation might be significantly precipitated. That may be because of chronic, active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). We performed kidney graft biopsies at the early phase within 90 d after living donor kidney transplantation that involved the episode and protocol biopsies and studied findings of graft biopsy specimens when compared with ABO incompatible and compatible involving non-identical and identical transplantations. In ABO-incompatible transplant cases, the ratio occurring glomerulitis, especially severe injury of g 2-3, was significantly higher than that of identical and non-identical transplant cases (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in t score, i score, ptc score and v score between three transplant groups. The cases occurring AMR were concordant with the cases recognized with severe glomerulitis. AMR was difficult to be diagnosed by C4d analysis in ABO-incompatible transplant cases. Glomerular injury score, g score, may be considered as more significant and the injury should be cured thoroughly.

  7. Incidence of A-V Fistulas after Renal Biopsy of Native and Transplanted Kidney - Two Centers Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lubomirova, Mila; Krasteva, Rumiana; Bogov, Boris; Paskalev, Emil

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study is to make a retrospective analysis of the incidence of AV fistulas after renal biopsy (RB) of native and transplanted kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five hundred and sixteen (516) RB were analyzed. One hundred twenty nine (129) were native kidneys RB performed in Clinic of Nephrology (CN), 190 were performed in Clinic of Nephrology and transplantation (CNT) and 197 were transplanted kidney biopsies from the same clinic. Biopsy technique type Gun with needle 14G, 16 and 18 G was used in CN, CNT used the same technique with needles 16G. Doppler ultrasound was made for A-V fistulas diagnosis. RESULTS: The A-V fistulas incidence was 0.8%. The frequency of A-V fistulas registered in CN was significantly higher than that registered in CNT (2.3% vs. 0.5%, p < 0.01). Biopsies performed by 14 G needles provide a higher percentage of A-V fistulas compared to those done by 16 G. (3.3% vs. 2.4%, p < 0.5). The frequency of the A-V fistulas in native and transplanted kidneys in CNT was similar (0.5% vs. 0.5%, p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The A-V fistulas incidence is very low. The needle thickness is an important factor relevant to the risk of occurrence of A-V fistulas. PMID:27275228

  8. Renal graft biopsy assists diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction after kidney transplantation: a report of 106 cases.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Guo, Hui; Cai, Ming; Xiao, Li; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Haiyan; Shi, Bingyi

    2015-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is one of the most important complications after kidney transplantation. Renal graft biopsy is safe and reliable without adverse effects on the patients and transplanted kidneys, which was of great instructive significance in diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction after renal transplantation. This paper reported a case series of 106 patients underwent renal allograft biopsies. All biopsies were evaluated according to the Banff 2007 schema. 52 examples were obtained within 1 month after transplantation, and there were another 20 examples in one to two months and other 34 examples in two to three months. Appropriate therapy was applied and clinical outcomes were observed. All patients received renal biopsies and anti-inflammatory and hemostasis treatment without complications. There were 2 cases of hyperacute rejection, and 15 cases of acute AMR. All Paraffin-embedded samples were stained by HE, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Masson, and immunohistochemistry (C4d, cd20, cd45RO, SV40). All samples were found C4d immunohistochemical staining positive. Patients with acute AMR were managed by steroid intravenous pulse therapy, Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin intravenous pulse therapy, anti CD20 monoclonal antibody intravenous therapy and so on. Two cases of hyperacute rejection had renal failure, and received kidney excision; 12 cases in 15 cases of AMR recovered, another 2 cases did not recover with high-level creatine, and other 2 cases of renal allograft received excision.

  9. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  10. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival.

  11. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  12. BIOPSY-PROVEN BK VIRUS NEPHROPATHY WITHOUT DETECTABLE BK VIREMIA IN A ONE-YEAR POST-KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Pumchandh, Norawee; Satirapoj, Bancha; Termmathurapoj, Sumeth; Pongthanapisith, Viroj

    2015-07-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) is an important clinical problem in kidney transplant (KT) recipients. The sequence of disease is usually viruria, viremia and then nephropathy. Diagnosis of BK virus (BKV) infection includes checking BKV DNA in the urine, in the plasma and histology on renal biopsy. This last method is used to diagnose BKVN. We describe a KT patient with BKVN without detectable BK viremia. A 62-year-old female with hypertensive nephropathy underwent renal transplant from a living relative donor in December 2011. Fourteen months after transplantation, her serum creatinine(SCr) rose up from 1.2 to 1.6 mg/dl with biopsy-proven acute antibody-mediated and cellular rejection. After pulse methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin, her SCr decreased to baseline but she subsequently developed cytomegalovirus infection with pancytopenia and transaminitis. The SCr rose to 1.9 mg/dl despite ganciclovir treatment. Renal ultrasound and antegrade pyelogram showed partial obstruction of the proximal ureter with moderate hydronephrosis. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for BKV DNA was negative (less than 10 copies/ml). A renal biopsy was performed and the pathology revealed viral cytopathic changes in the tubular epithelium with interstitial inflammation. The renal biopsy also showed BKV nucleic acid sequences by in-situ hybridization confirming BKVN. Immunosuppression regimen was changed to cyclosporine, low-dose prednisolone and leflunomide. A temporary percutaneous nephrostomy was performed. Her renal function improved within one week. The diagnosis of BKVN should be considered in a KT recipient with a rising SCr with or without BK viremia and should be made by renal biopsy.

  13. Cuba's kidney transplantation program.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Alexander; Pérez, Alexis; Pérez de Prado, Juan C; Fernández-Vega, Silvia; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Arce, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    The first kidney transplant in Cuba was performed on 24 February 1970, using a cadaveric donor. In 1979, living donor kidney transplantation began between first-degree relatives. A total of 2775 patients are enrolled in renal replacement therapy in 47 hospitals across the country, 1440 of whom are awaiting kidney transplantation. Organs for the kidney program are procured in 63 accredited hospitals equipped for multidisciplinary management of brain death. Accordingly, over 90% of transplanted kidneys are from cadaveric donors. Identification of potential recipients is carried out through a national, computerized program that affords all patients the same opportunity regardless of distance from a transplant center, and selection of the most suitable candidate is based primarily on HLA compatibility. KEYWORDS Chronic renal failure, kidney transplantation.

  14. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  15. Clinical role of the renal transplant biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Winfred W.; Taheri, Diana; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Colvin, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous needle core biopsy is the definitive procedure by which essential diagnostic and prognostic information on acute and chronic renal allograft dysfunction is obtained. The diagnostic value of the information so obtained has endured for over three decades and has proven crucially important in shaping strategies for therapeutic intervention. This Review provides a broad outline of the utility of performing kidney graft biopsies after transplantation, highlighting the relevance of biopsy findings in the immediate and early post-transplant period (from days to weeks after implantation), the first post-transplant year, and the late period (beyond the first year). We focus on how biopsy findings change over time, and the wide variety of pathological features that characterize the major clinical diagnoses facing the clinician. This article also includes a discussion of acute cellular and humoral rejection, the toxic effects of calcineurin inhibitors, and the widely varying etiologies and characteristics of chronic lesions. Emerging technologies based on gene expression analyses and proteomics, the in situ detection of functionally relevant molecules, and new bioinformatic approaches that hold the promise of improving diagnostic precision and developing new, refined molecular pathways for therapeutic intervention are also presented. PMID:22231130

  16. [Infertility and kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Atallah, David; Salameh, Charbel; El Kassis, Nadine; Safi, Joelle; Lutfallah, Fouad; Bejjani, Lina; Ghaname, Wadih; Moukarzel, Maroun

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure impairs the endocrine system, especially in women, due to hyperprolactinemia, altering fertility, ovulatory cycles, libido and growth in adolescents. Renal transplantation is considered the best solution to the problems of renal failure and and of dialysis, as evidenced by comparing the rate of hyperprolactinemia (100% in chronic renal failure, 60% in patients on dialysis and 35% in post-transplantation). Kidney transplant is less efficient for restoring perfect function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis due in part to the immunosuppressant regimens prescribed. When these drugs are properly managed, transplantation will restore near normal sexual function.

  17. Bioengineering Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Ott, Harald C.

    2014-01-01

    One in ten Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, and close to 90,000 people die each year from causes related to kidney failure. Patients with end-stage renal disease are faced with two options: hemodialysis or transplantation. Unfortunately, the reach of transplantation is limited because of the shortage of donor organs and the need for immunosuppression. Bioengineered kidney grafts theoretically present a novel solution to both problems. Herein we discuss the history of bioengineering organs, the current status of bioengineered kidneys, considerations for the future of the field, and challenges to clinical translation. We hope that by integrating principles of tissue engineering, and stem cell and developmental biology, bioengineered kidney grafts will advance the field of regenerative medicine while meeting a critical clinical need. PMID:25217267

  18. Transplant biopsy beyond light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adam, Benjamin; Mengel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Despite its long-standing status as the diagnostic "gold standard", the renal transplant biopsy is limited by a fundamental dependence on descriptive, empirically-derived consensus classification. The recent shift towards personalized medicine has resulted in an increased demand for precise, mechanism-based diagnoses, which is not fully met by the contemporary transplantation pathology standard of care. The expectation is that molecular techniques will provide novel pathogenetic insights that will allow for the identification of more accurate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. Here we review the current state of molecular renal transplantation pathology. Despite significant research activity and progress within the field, routine adoption of clinical molecular testing has not yet been achieved. The recent development of novel molecular platforms suitable for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue will offer potential solution for the major barriers to implementation. The recent incorporation of molecular diagnostic criteria into the 2013 Banff classification is a reflection of progress made and future directions in the area of molecular transplantation pathology. Transcripts related to endothelial injury and NK cell activation have consistently been shown to be associated with antibody-mediated rejection. Prospective multicenter validation and implementation of molecular diagnostics for major entities remains an unmet clinical need in transplantation. It is expected that an integrated system of transplantation pathology diagnosis comprising molecular, morphological, serological, and clinical variables will ultimately provide the greatest diagnostic precision. PMID:26249165

  19. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  20. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard; Khwaja, Arif

    2016-07-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high- or low-turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  1. [BK virus nephropathy after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Bröcker, V; Schwarz, A; Becker, J U

    2011-09-01

    JC and BK viruses are strains of the polyomavirus group with pathogenic potential in humans. BK is the most frequent pathogenic agent of polyomavirus nephropathy (BKVN) in kidney transplant patients, which is only exceptionally caused by JC virus. Asymptomatic BK virus infection is often acquired in childhood and the virus persists in urothelium and kidneys of healthy individuals, where it can be reactivated under immunosuppression. Up to 10% of transplanted kidneys are affected by BKVN, while the risk of transplant failure due to BKVN exceeds 50% in some publications. In kidney biopsies BKVN leads to tubulointerstitial nephritis, which may be difficult to distinguish from acute cellular rejection without additional use of immunohistochemistry for a polyomavirus antigen. Typical hallmarks of BKVN include cytopathic effects caused by the virus with cell lysis, denudation of tubular basement membranes and nuclear inclusion bodies. An early diagnosis is essential for transplant survival, making screening of blood and urine for BK virus after kidney transplantation part of the standard care of renal transplant patients today. In the case of significant viremia or biopsy-proven BKVN immunosuppression is reduced to allow clearing of the virus.

  2. Aging Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Giordani, María C; Imperiali, Nora

    2016-01-01

    There are several immunological and non-immunological factors related to renal graft deterioration, and histological lesions such as interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy overlap with those observed in aging kidneys. Consequently, it has been proposed that kidney transplant senescence could contribute to graft loss. The process of cell senescence displays characteristics such as an increased expression of specific aging suppressor genes, shortened telomeres, mitochondrial changes, increased expression of negative regulators of the cell cycle, and immunological senescence. Additionally, tubular frailty characterizes the aged kidney, making it more susceptible to ischemia, reperfusion, toxic injury, and consequently, to inflammation. Moreover, renal tissue injury predisposes the older graft not only to progressive deterioration due to glomerular hyperfiltration, but also triggers acute rejection due to increased immunogenicity. In conclusion, renal graft senescence is a complex process, and its better understanding will help the nephrologist in its management in order to achieve a longer graft survival. PMID:27103042

  3. A simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipient with IgA nephropathy limited to native kidneys and BK virus nephropathy limited to the transplant kidney.

    PubMed

    Ujire, Manasa P; Curry, Michael P; Stillman, Isaac E; Hanto, Douglas W; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition in the native kidneys of patients with liver disease is well described. Secondary IgA nephropathy usually is thought to be benign, but hematuria, proteinuria, and loss of kidney function have been reported in this context. BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney transplant loss; however, BK virus nephropathy is rare in the native kidneys of patients who underwent transplantation of other organs. We report the case of a patient with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease and chronic kidney disease with hematuria who underwent simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. His kidney function decreased over the course of several weeks posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplant kidney showed BK virus nephropathy, but no IgA deposits. In contrast, biopsy of the native kidneys showed IgA deposits, but no BK virus nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation wherein both the native and transplant kidneys were biopsied posttransplantation and showed exclusively different pathologies. These findings confirm the predilection of BK virus nephropathy for transplant rather than native kidneys.

  4. Hypercoagulability in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Lockridge, Joseph B; Langewisch, Eric D; Norman, Douglas J; Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-04-01

    Thrombosis remains an important complication after kidney transplantation. Outcomes for graft and deep vein thrombosis are not favorable. The majority of early kidney transplant failure in adults is due to allograft thrombosis. Risk stratification, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention are critical to the management of thrombotic complications of transplant. In patients with end-stage renal disease, the prevalence of acquired risk factors for thrombosis is significantly high. Because of hereditary and acquired risk factors, renal transplant recipients manifest features of a chronic prothrombotic state. Identification of hereditary thrombotic risk factors before transplantation may be a useful tool for selecting appropriate candidates for thrombosis prophylaxis immediately after transplantation. Short-term anticoagulation may be appropriate for all patients after kidney transplantation.

  5. Pre-Transplant CDKN2A Expression in Kidney Biopsies Predicts Renal Function and Is a Future Component of Donor Scoring Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Gingell-Littlejohn, Marc; McGuinness, Dagmara; McGlynn, Liane M.; Kingsmore, David; Stevenson, Karen S.; Koppelstaetter, Christian; Clancy, Marc J.; Shiels, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    CDKN2A is a proven and validated biomarker of ageing which acts as an off switch for cell proliferation. We have demonstrated previously that CDKN2A is the most robust and the strongest pre-transplant predictor of post- transplant serum creatinine when compared to “Gold Standard” clinical factors, such as cold ischaemic time and donor chronological age. This report shows that CDKN2A is better than telomere length, the most celebrated biomarker of ageing, as a predictor of post-transplant renal function. It also shows that CDKN2A is as strong a determinant of post-transplant organ function when compared to extended criteria (ECD) kidneys. A multivariate analysis model was able to predict up to 27.1% of eGFR at one year post-transplant (p = 0.008). Significantly, CDKN2A was also able to strongly predict delayed graft function. A pre-transplant donor risk classification system based on CDKN2A and ECD criteria is shown to be feasible and commendable for implementation in the near future. PMID:23861858

  6. Murine Kidney Transplant Technique.

    PubMed

    Plenter, Robert; Jain, Swati; Ruller, Chelsea M; Nydam, Trevor L; Jani, Alkesh H

    2015-10-20

    The first mouse kidney transplant technique was published in 1973(1) by the Russell laboratory. Although it took some years for other labs to become proficient in and utilize this technique, it is now widely used by many laboratories around the world. A significant refinement to the original technique using the donor aorta to form the arterial anastomosis instead of the renal artery was developed and reported in 1993 by Kalina and Mottram (2) with a further advancement coming from the same laboratory in 1999 (3). While one can become proficient in this model, a search of the literature reveals that many labs still experience a high proportion of graft loss due to arterial thrombosis. We describe here a technique that was devised in our laboratory that vastly reduces the arterial thrombus reported by others (4,5). This is achieved by forming a heel-and-toe cuff of the donor infra-renal aorta that facilitates a larger anastomosis and straighter blood flow into the kidney.

  7. Kidney Transplantation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edmund; Segev, Dorry L.; Rabb, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Summary There is an increase in the older incident end-stage renal disease population that is associated with an increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease in the United States. This trend is paralleled by an increasing rate of kidney transplantation in the elderly. Although patient survival is lower in older versus younger kidney recipients, the elderly benefit from a reduction in mortality rate and improved quality of life with transplantation compared with dialysis. Immunologic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors influence transplant outcomes and should be recognized in the care of the elderly transplant patient. In this review, we discuss transplantation in the elderly patient, particularly the topics of access to transplantation, patient and graft survival, the impact of donor quality on transplant outcomes, immunology and immunosuppression of aging, and ethical considerations in the development of an equitable organ allocation scheme. PMID:20006794

  8. [Glomerular disease and living donor kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Rita; Rodríguez, Alejandra; Campistol, Josep M

    2005-01-01

    Glomerular diseases are an important and frequent cause of renal transplant graft loss in the mid-long term, mainly due to primary renal disease recurrence. Glomerular diseases have particular connotations in living donor kidney transplantation, due to the risk of primary disease recurrence and subsequent graft loss, and also the risk of development of glomerular disease related donors have for their genetic similitude. The incidence of glomerular disease recurrence after transplantation varies with type, being especially frequent in IgA nephropathy and type II membranous proliferative glomerulopathy. The difference between histological and clinical recurrence should always be established, being much more frequent the first. Renal biopsy is the essential diagnostic test to detect and confirm the existence of glomerular disease after transplant, with immunofluorescence study being necessary to determine the type of glomerular disease.

  9. Relationships among injury, fibrosis, and time in human kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Jeffery M.; Famulski, Konrad S.; Reeve, Jeff; Chang, Jessica; Halloran, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney transplant biopsies offer an opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. We studied the relationships between the time of biopsy after transplant (TxBx), histologic fibrosis, diseases, and transcript expression. METHODS. Expression microarrays from 681 kidney transplant indication biopsies taken either early (n = 282, <1 year) or late (n = 399, >1 year) after transplant were used to analyze the molecular landscape of fibrosis in relationship to histologic fibrosis and diseases. RESULTS. Fibrosis was absent at transplantation but was present in some early biopsies by 4 months after transplant, apparently as a self-limited response to donation implantation injury not associated with progression to failure. The molecular phenotype of early biopsies represented the time sequence of the response to wounding: immediate expression of acute kidney injury transcripts, followed by fibrillar collagen transcripts after several weeks, then by the appearance of immunoglobulin and mast cell transcripts after several months as fibrosis appeared. Fibrosis in late biopsies correlated with injury, fibrillar collagen, immunoglobulin, and mast cell transcripts, but these were independent of time. Pathway analysis revealed epithelial response-to-wounding pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin. CONCLUSION. Fibrosis in late biopsies had different associations because many kidneys had potentially progressive diseases and subsequently failed. Molecular correlations with fibrosis in late biopsies were independent of time, probably because ongoing injury obscured the response-to-wounding time sequence. The results indicate that fibrosis in kidney transplants is driven by nephron injury and that progression to failure reflects continuing injury, not autonomous fibrogenesis. TRIAL REGISTRATION. INTERCOM study (www.clinicalTrials.gov; NCT01299168). FUNDING. Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada. PMID:27699214

  10. Relationships among injury, fibrosis, and time in human kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Jeffery M.; Famulski, Konrad S.; Reeve, Jeff; Chang, Jessica; Halloran, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney transplant biopsies offer an opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. We studied the relationships between the time of biopsy after transplant (TxBx), histologic fibrosis, diseases, and transcript expression. METHODS. Expression microarrays from 681 kidney transplant indication biopsies taken either early (n = 282, <1 year) or late (n = 399, >1 year) after transplant were used to analyze the molecular landscape of fibrosis in relationship to histologic fibrosis and diseases. RESULTS. Fibrosis was absent at transplantation but was present in some early biopsies by 4 months after transplant, apparently as a self-limited response to donation implantation injury not associated with progression to failure. The molecular phenotype of early biopsies represented the time sequence of the response to wounding: immediate expression of acute kidney injury transcripts, followed by fibrillar collagen transcripts after several weeks, then by the appearance of immunoglobulin and mast cell transcripts after several months as fibrosis appeared. Fibrosis in late biopsies correlated with injury, fibrillar collagen, immunoglobulin, and mast cell transcripts, but these were independent of time. Pathway analysis revealed epithelial response-to-wounding pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin. CONCLUSION. Fibrosis in late biopsies had different associations because many kidneys had potentially progressive diseases and subsequently failed. Molecular correlations with fibrosis in late biopsies were independent of time, probably because ongoing injury obscured the response-to-wounding time sequence. The results indicate that fibrosis in kidney transplants is driven by nephron injury and that progression to failure reflects continuing injury, not autonomous fibrogenesis. TRIAL REGISTRATION. INTERCOM study (www.clinicalTrials.gov; NCT01299168). FUNDING. Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada.

  11. Immunologic monitoring in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Townamchai, Natavudh; Safa, Kassem; Chandraker, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Transplant biopsy has always been the gold standard for assessing the immune response to a kidney allograft (Chandraker A: Diagnostic techniques in the work-up of renal allograft dysfunction-an update. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 8:723-728, 1999). A biopsy is not without risk and is unable to predict rejection and is only diagnostic once rejection has already occurred. However, in the past two decades, we have seen an expansion in assays that can potentially put an end to the "drug level" era, which until now has been one of the few tools available to clinicians for monitoring the immune response. A better understanding of the mechanisms of rejection and tolerance, and technological advances has led to the development of new noninvasive methods to monitor the immune response. In this article, we discuss these new methods and their potential uses in renal transplant recipients.

  12. Do kidney histology lesions predict long-term kidney function after liver transplantation?

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Maaroufi, Chakib; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Servais, Aude; Meas-Yedid, Vannary; Tack, Ivan; Thervet, Eric; Cointault, Olivier; Esposito, Laure; Guitard, Joelle; Lavayssière, Laurence; Panterne, Clarisse; Muscari, Fabrice; Bureau, Christophe; Rostaing, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    Histological renal lesions observed after liver transplantation are complex, multifactorial, and interrelated. The aims of this study were to determine whether kidney lesions observed at five yr after liver transplantation can predict long-term kidney function. Ninety-nine liver transplant patients receiving calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based immunosuppression, who had undergone a kidney biopsy at 60±48 months post-transplant, were included in this follow-up study. Kidney biopsies were scored according to the Banff classification. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed at last follow-up, that is, 109±48 months after liver transplantation. eGFR decreased from 92±33 mL/min at transplantation to 63±19 mL/min after six months, to 57±17 mL/min at the kidney biopsy, to 54±24 mL/min at last follow-up (p<0.0001). At last follow-up, only three patients required renal replacement therapy. After the kidney biopsy, 13 patients were converted from CNIs to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, but no significant improvement in eGFR was observed after conversion. Elevated eGFR at six months post-transplant and a lower fibrous intimal thickening score (cv) observed at five yr post-transplant were the two independent predictive factors for eGFR≥60 mL/min at nine yr post-transplant. Long-term kidney function seems to be predicted by the kidney vascular lesions.

  13. A new apparatus for standardized rat kidney biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P M

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney.

  14. A New Apparatus for Standardized Rat Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Schirutschke, Holger; Gladrow, Lars; Norkus, Christian; Parmentier, Simon Paul; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival biopsies are frequently applied in rat kidney disease models, but several drawbacks such as surgical kidney trauma, bleeding risk and variable loss of kidney tissue are still unsolved. Therefore, we developed an easy-to-use core biopsy instrument and evaluated whether two consecutive kidney biopsies within the same kidney can be carried out in a standardized manner. On day 0, 18 Lewis rats underwent a right nephrectomy and 9 of these rats a subsequent first biopsy of the left kidney (Bx group). 9 control rats had a sham biopsy of the left kidney (Ctrl group). On day 7, a second kidney biopsy/sham biopsy was performed. On day 42, all animals were sacrificed and their kidneys were removed for histology. Biopsy cylinders contained 57±28 glomeruli per transversal section, representing an adequate sample size. PAS staining showed that the biopsy depth was limited to the renal cortex whereas surgical tissue damage was limited to the area immediately adjacent to the taken biopsy cylinder. On day 42, the reduction of functional renal mass after two biopsies was only 5.2% and no differences of body weight, blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis or number of ED-1 positive macrophages were found between both groups. In summary, our apparatus offers a safe method to perform repetitive kidney biopsies with minimal trauma and sufficient sample size and quality even in experimental disease models restricted to one single kidney. PMID:25506931

  15. Talking about Kidney Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan; Swift, Julia

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project in which information about the moral issues surrounding tissue transplants was obtained and videotaped for classroom use. Moral positions and possible educational strategies are discussed. Examples of student statements are presented. (CW)

  16. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control.

  17. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  18. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo; Oh, Eun-Jee; Chung, Byung Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  19. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis.

  20. Surgical complications of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyga, Z T; Kahan, B D

    1998-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, kidney transplantation has evolved tremendously, from an experimental procedure with barely 50% allograft acceptance to a highly refined management program with a success rate of 80-90%. Not only has the overall rate of complications decreased to less than 5%, due to more secure technical approaches, but also advances in immunosuppressive regimens have reduced the morbidity associated with the procedure. This contribution, addressing all stages of the transplant process (donor nephrectomy, benchwork preparation, and implantation) assesses potential pitfalls and technical misadventures that must be avoided in order to assure the patient of a complication-free course.

  1. Four decades of kidney transplantation in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alfonzo, Jorge P

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the background, beginnings, development, evolution and outcomes of kidney transplantation in Cuba. Nephrology as a medical specialty in Cuba began in 1962 and was formalized in 1966. Conditions were created to implement renal replacement therapy (including transplants), bring nephrology care to the entire country and train human resources who would assume this responsibility, making Cuba one of the first countries with a comprehensive program for renal patient care. After three unsuccessful cadaveric-donor kidney transplantations in 1968-69, the ensuing history of kidney transplantation can be summarized in the following three stages. 1970-1975: In January 1970, cadaveric-donor kidney transplantation began at the Nephrology Institute. That year, 17 kidney transplantations were performed; four of these patients lived with functional kidneys for 15-25 years; 10-year graft survival was 23.5% (Kaplan-Meier survival curve); HLA typing began in 1974. By December 1975, 170 grafts had been done in three hospitals. 1976-1985: Seven transplantation centers performed 893 grafts during this period. HLA-DR typing was introduced in 1976 and the National Histocompatibility Laboratory Network was founded in 1978. The first related living-donor kidney transplantation was done in 1979. 1986-2011: The National Kidney Transplantation Coordinating Center and the National Kidney Transplantation Program were created in 1986; the first combined kidney-pancreas transplantation was performed the same year. In 1990, cyclosporine and the Cuban monoclonal antibody IOR-T3 were introduced for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, as were other Cuban products (hepatitis B vaccine and recombinant human erythropoietin) for transplant patients. By December 2011, the cumulative number of transplants was 4636 (384 from related living donors). With over 40 years of experience, kidney transplantation is now well established in Cuba; it is free and universally accessible, on the

  2. When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... match test. This determines whether your child's immune system will accept the new kidney. If the test comes back negative, the kidney is acceptable and the transplant can begin. In the operating room, your child will be given general anesthesia ...

  3. Treating stones in transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Sadideen, H; Goldsmith, D

    2013-02-01

    The formation of calculi in renal allografts is an uncommon complication in renal transplant recipients, with a reported incidence of 0.2-1.7% according to retrospective studies. Although the majority of these stones appear to form de novo following renal transplantation (RTX), there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that more often than previously thought they may be transplanted with the donor graft itself. The etiology and pathophysiology of renal graft stones is multifactorial. A combination of metabolic and urodynamic factors predispose to stone formation and these are generally found more frequently in allograft rather than native kidneys. In addition tertiary hyperparathyroidism (following RTX) plays an important role. Renal allograft stones can pose significant challenges for the clinician. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and must be prompt, as these patients' reliance on a solitary kidney for their renal function leaves them susceptible to significant morbidity. However, reports in the literature come largely from anecdotal experience and case reports, meaning that there is a limited consensus regarding how best to manage the condition. We suggest that interventional treatment should be guided primarily by stone size and individual patient presentation. Good outcomes have been reported with shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and ureteroscopy, but optimal management of the risk factors leading to calculi formation (i.e., prevention) will remain the most cost-effective management.

  4. A new method for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong; Liu, Zexian; Pan, Zhicheng; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Linyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Xue, Yu; Wu, Duojiao

    2016-08-01

    For end-stage renal diseases, kidney transplantation is the most efficient treatment. However, the unexpected rejection caused by inflammation usually leads to allograft failure. Thus, a systems-level characterization of inflammation factors can provide potentially diagnostic biomarkers for predicting renal allograft rejection. Serum of kidney transplant patients with different immune status were collected and classified as transplant patients with stable renal function (ST), impaired renal function with negative biopsy pathology (UNST), acute rejection (AR), and chronic rejection (CR). The expression profiles of 40 inflammatory proteins were measured by quantitative protein microarrays and reduced to a lower dimensional space by the partial least squares (PLS) model. The determined principal components (PCs) were then trained by the support vector machines (SVMs) algorithm for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation. There were 30, 16, and 13 inflammation proteins that showed statistically significant differences between CR and ST, CR and AR, and CR and UNST patients. Further analysis revealed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network among 33 inflammatory proteins and proposed a potential role of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in CR. Based on the network analysis and protein expression information, two PCs were determined as the major contributors and trained by the PLS-SVMs method, with a promising accuracy of 77.5 % for classification of chronic rejection after kidney transplantation. For convenience, we also developed software packages of GPS-CKT (Classification phenotype of Kidney Transplantation Predictor) for classifying phenotypes. By confirming a strong correlation between inflammation and kidney transplantation, our results suggested that the network biomarker but not single factors can potentially classify different phenotypes in kidney transplantation. PMID:27278387

  5. Preemptive kidney transplantation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Preemptive kidney transplantation, as a treatment modality for end-stage renal disease, offers higher clinical advantages compared to maintenance dialysis. Nevertheless, preemptive transplantations raises ethical concerns, particularly regarding medical resource allocation. From an ethical perspective, health care decisions should be focused on the patient's needs. Nevertheless, a fair distribution model also requires the settlement of general policy decisions. The first part of the paper presents general ethical principles to be followed in organ allocation. The second part summarizes main advantages of preemptive transplantation in terms of clinical outcomes, survival (of both patients and grafts) and quality of life. The third section adds some suggestions for the fulfilment of general principles in the context of preemptive transplantation. The need to find an adequate balance of benefit (maximization of utility) and justice (fairness in organ allocation) is analyzed. A common set of rules for organ allocation should be adopted: fairness and transparency requires the prior definition of sound criteria for the allocation of scarce resources. PMID:19636169

  6. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  7. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  8. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  9. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  10. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  11. 42 CFR 409.18 - Services related to kidney transplantations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services related to kidney transplantations. 409.18... Access Hospital Services § 409.18 Services related to kidney transplantations. (a) Kidney transplants. Medicare pays for kidney transplantation surgery only if performed in a renal transplantation...

  12. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peev, Vasil; Reiser, Jochen; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT) has been described in approximately 30% of non-diabetic kidney-transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney-transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN) in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney-transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT. PMID:25221544

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  14. Enigmatic pruritus in a kidney transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John E.; Bleyer, Anthony J.; Yosipovitch, Gil; Sangueza, Omar P.; Murea, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus is a common problem following a kidney transplant and is usually attributable to new medications related to transplantation. We present an unusual case of pruritus that began several months after kidney transplantation. After changing several immunosuppressive medications, numerous clinical visits and consideration by the patient of stopping immunosuppression, scabies was diagnosed as the cause. Treatment with oral ivermectin and topical permethrin resulted in complete resolution of symptoms within 1 week. Transplant physicians should consider common causes of pruritus unrelated to transplantation; diagnostic skin lesions of scabies may be absent. PMID:26019849

  15. [Clinical anatomical features of chronic dysfunction in the transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Tardanico, R; Sandrini, S

    2004-01-01

    Histopathological features of transplanted kidneys which gradually lose graft function have been traditionally reported with the term of chronic rejection (CR). In 1997 Banff's classification indicated the adoption of a new term for all these histological features, namely Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), recommending that the presence of morphological aspects suggestive of chronic rejection, such as chronic transplant glomerulopathy (CTG) and proliferative endoarteritis (PE), has to be specified. On the basis of these criteria we reviewed the renal biopsies of 92 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from 1999 to 2002. In all cases the biopsy had been performed 6 months after organ transplantation. In 30 of the 92 patients CTG and/or PE was evident supporting a diagnosis of CR; on the contrary, in 11 of the 92 patients the final diagnosis based on histological evidence was that of CAN. Clinical and laboratory tests revealed that the presence of proteinuria in patients with CR at the time of diagnosis was the single statistically significant difference between these two groups. In 7 of the 32 patients where the diagnosis of CR was based on the presence of early features of CTG, the treatment with ACE-I induced complete remission of the proteinuria. Cyclosporine-induced arteriolopathy (CSA) represents an additional histological finding which has been associated with graft loss in the transplanted kidney. The observation of arteriolopathy, similar to CSA in patients who did not receive calcineurine inhibitors, suggests some caution in the use of this diagnostic criteria.

  16. Sarcoidosis in Native and Transplanted Kidneys: Incidence, Pathologic Findings, and Clinical Course

    PubMed Central

    Bagnasco, Serena M.; Gottipati, Srinivas; Kraus, Edward; Alachkar, Nada; Montgomery, Robert A.; Racusen, Lorraine C.; Arend, Lois J.

    2014-01-01

    Renal involvement by sarcoidosis in native and transplanted kidneys classically presents as non caseating granulomatous interstitial nephritis. However, the incidence of sarcoidosis in native and transplant kidney biopsies, its frequency as a cause of end stage renal disease and its recurrence in renal allograft are not well defined, which prompted this study. The electronic medical records and the pathology findings in native and transplant kidney biopsies reviewed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1/1/2000 to 6/30/2011 were searched. A total of 51 patients with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis and renal abnormalities requiring a native kidney biopsy were identified. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis, consistent with renal sarcoidosis was identified in kidney biopsies from 19 of these subjects (37%). This is equivalent to a frequency of 0.18% of this diagnosis in a total of 10,023 biopsies from native kidney reviewed at our institution. Follow-up information was available in 10 patients with biopsy-proven renal sarcoidosis: 6 responded to treatment with prednisone, one progressed to end stage renal disease. Renal sarcoidosis was the primary cause of end stage renal disease in only 2 out of 2,331 transplants performed. Only one biopsy-proven recurrence of sarcoidosis granulomatous interstitial nephritis was identified. Conclusions Renal involvement by sarcoidosis in the form of granulomatous interstitial nephritis was a rare finding in biopsies from native kidneys reviewed at our center, and was found to be a rare cause of end stage renal disease. However, our observations indicate that recurrence of sarcoid granulomatous inflammation may occur in the transplanted kidney of patients with sarcoidosis as the original kidney disease. PMID:25329890

  17. Spontaneous bilateral kidney rupture during autologous stem cell transplantation in a patient affected by amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Michele; Vischini, Gisella; De Angelis, Gottardo; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Arcese, William

    2011-01-01

    Kidney spontaneous rupture is not a recognized complication neither for amyloidosis nor of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). A 46-year-old white woman, affected by nephrotic syndrome, was diagnosed as AL amyloidosis by renal biopsy. We report the singular case of a bilateral spontaneous kidney rupture during ASCT for AL with renal rescue. PMID:25984105

  18. Kidney transplant tourism: cases from Canada.

    PubMed

    Wright, L; Zaltzman, J S; Gill, J; Prasad, G V R

    2013-11-01

    Canada has a marked shortfall between the supply and demand for kidneys for transplantation. Median wait times for deceased donor kidney transplantation vary from 5.8 years in British Columbia, 5.2 years in Manitoba and 4.5 years in Ontario to a little over 2 years in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Living donation provides a viable option for some, but not all people. Consequently, a small number of people travel abroad to undergo kidney transplantation by commercial means. The extent to which they are aware of the potential risks to their health and the health of the kidney vendors is unclear. Travel abroad to obtain a kidney commercially i.e. transplant tourism (TT), raises ethical issues which include the exploitation of the poor, uncertainty of donor informed consent to nephrectomy, poor clinical care and lack of follow up for the donor, commodification of the body and inequity of access to medical care for donors. Also, TT widens socioeconomic disparities in access to transplantation, differing from the Canadian system of universal coverage for healthcare. The Canadian transplant community has discussed how to respond to patients who plan to travel abroad for TT or return with a purchased kidney. Unease rests in the tension between the duty to care for legitimate Canadian residents and the unwillingness to enable TT. This paper discusses three anonymized cases and the Canadian responses to TT as recorded in academic literature and a formal statement by relevant professional bodies.

  19. The Global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo Garcia; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy; For The World Kidney Day Steering Committee 2012

    2012-07-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  20. The global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia Garcia, Guillermo; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th, 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  1. The global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo G; Harden, Paul; Chapman, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost-effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations that in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high-income countries, the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions that involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  2. Skin and kidney histological changes in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Tadeja; Alessiani, Mario; Pleskovič, Alojz; Pleskovič, Aleš; Zorc-Pleskovič, Ruda; Milutinović, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    Kidney transplantation (Ktx) is generally performed during end stage renal disease due to a loss of the kidneys' ability to filter wastes from the circulatory system. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after Ktx is a life-threatening complication that progresses to organ failure, systemic complications, and death. The current study evaluated the significance of histologic findings of GVHD as obtained from skin biopsies following Ktx in swine. A swine model of Ktx with tacrolimus-based immunosuppression was used to assess possible correlations between acute-graft-cellular rejection and skin histological findings for prediction of GVHD. Animals were divided into a Ktx treatment group or a control group with no Ktx and skin and kidney biopsies were histologically assessed at postoperative days 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60. Skin samples were analyzed and classified from grade 1 to 4 of skin GVHD and the major histopathological changes of kidney acute cellular rejection were described using Banff's score system. We observed a significant linear correlation between the histological grading values of skin biopsy changes and the histological grading values of kidney biopsies (Kendall's tau_b=0.993) in the Ktx experimental group. No histological changes were observed in controls. Our findings demonstrate the diagnostic value of staging skin GVHD after Ktx and suggest it's future utility for monitoring long term Ktx-induced changes.

  3. Belatacept and mediastinal histoplasmosis in a kidney transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Rengel, Tatiana; Andrews, José; Paulero, Matías; Iotti, Alejandro; Forastiero, Agustina; Lombi, Fernando; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Forrester, Mariano; Iriarte, Romina; Agorio, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background: In transplantation immunosuppression enhances the appearance of opportunist infections. An ideal balance between the prevention of rejection, the lowest risk of infections and the highest rates of graft survival is a continuous challenge. Lower doses of immunosuppression may diminish the risk of infections, metabolic and hemodynamic complications or even of malignancy, but may expose patients to episodes of acute rejection. New drugs are being developed to improve graft survival at the lowest risk of side effects. Belatacept has recently been introduced in kidney transplantation to inhibit the co-ligand signal of T cell stimulation. It is a drug with a safe profile, is well-tolerated and appears to improve long-term survival of kidney grafts. However, there may be an increase in opportunistic infections which may be facilitated by T cell depression, as Aspergillus sp., Cryptococcus neoformans or tuberculosis. Case Presentation: We describe a 59-year-old female who developed fever, clinical wasting and a mediastinal mass 31 months after receiving a living non-related kidney transplant while on belatacept therapy. A mediastinal node biopsy disclosed the presence of Histoplasma capsulatum. Infection successfully resolved after appropriate antifungal treatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Histoplasma capsulatum in a kidney transplanted patient on belatacept therapy PMID:27152295

  4. World Kidney Day 2012: the global role of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guillermo Garcia; Harden, Paul N; Chapman, Jeremy R

    2012-03-01

    There remain major challenges to providing optimal treatment for ESRD worldwide and a need, particularly in low-income economies, to mandate more focus on community screening and implementation of simple measures to minimize progression of chronic kidney disease. The recent designation of renal disease as an important noncommunicable disease at the United Nations High Level Meeting on Noncommunicable Diseases is one step in this direction.(32) But early detection and prevention programs will never prevent ESRD in everyone with chronic kidney disease, and kidney transplantation is an essential, viable, cost-effective, and life-saving therapy which should be equally available to all people in need. It may be the only tenable long-term treatment option for ESRD in low-income countries since it is both cheaper and provides a better outcome for patients than other treatment for ESRD. However, the success of transplantation has not been delivered evenly across the world and substantial disparities still exist in access to transplantation.We remain troubled by commercialization of living donor transplantation and exploitation of vulnerable populations for profit. There are solutions available. These include demonstrably successful models of kidney transplant programs in many developing countries; growing availability of less-expensive generic immunosuppressive agents; improved clinical training opportunities; governmental and professional guidelines legislating prohibition of commercialization and defining professional standards of ethical practice; and a framework for each nation to develop self-sufficiency in organ transplantation through focus on both living donation and especially nationally managed deceased organ donation programs. The Transplantation Society and the ISN have pledged to work together in coordinated joint global outreach programs to help establish and grow appropriate kidney transplant programs in low- and middle-income countries utilizing their

  5. Outcomes of shipped live donor kidney transplants compared with traditional living donor kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Treat, Eric G; Miller, Eric T; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Maliski, Sally L; Hicks, Elisabeth M; Williams, Kristen C; Whitted, Lauren A; Gritsch, Hans A; McGuire, Suzanne M; Mone, Thomas D; Veale, Jeffrey L

    2014-11-01

    The disparity between kidney transplant candidates and donors necessitates innovations to increase organ availability. Transporting kidneys allows for living donors and recipients to undergo surgery with a familiar transplant team, city, friends, and family. The effect of shipping kidneys and prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT) with living donor transplantation outcomes is not clearly known. This retrospective matched (age, gender, race, and year of procedure) cohort study compared allograft outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants and nonshipped living donor kidney transplants. Fifty-seven shipped live donor kidneys were transplanted from 31 institutions in 26 cities. The mean shipping distance was 1634 miles (range 123-2811) with mean CIT of 12.1 ± 2.8 h. The incidence of delayed graft function in the shipped cohort was 1.8% (1/57) compared to 0% (0/57) in the nonshipped cohort. The 1-year allograft survival was 98% in both cohorts. There were no significant differences between the mean serum creatinine values or the rates of serum creatinine decline in the immediate postoperative period even after adjusted for gender and differences in recipient and donor BMI. Despite prolonged CITs, outcomes for shipped live donor kidney transplants were similar when compared to matched nonshipped living donor kidney transplants.

  6. Kidney transplantation in infants and small children.

    PubMed

    Chavers, Blanche; Najarian, John S; Humar, Abhinav

    2007-11-01

    Transplantation is now the preferred treatment for children with end-stage kidney disease. But not all pediatric age groups have enjoyed the same success. The number of transplants in infants and young children has lagged behind the number in older children. One reason for this is the philosophy of some centers to maintain infants on dialysis until they reach some arbitrarily determined age, at which time they would undergo a transplant. If kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice for older children with renal failure, and equivalent results can be obtained in all age groups, why should it not be offered to these youngest patients? Our center's philosophy for many years has been not to restrict transplant based on size or age. We have performed over 50 kidney transplants in infant recipients, and have shown equivalent results to those obtained in older children. Important factors in obtaining a successful outcome include the use of adult kidneys from a living donor, careful attention to operative and perioperative care, and performing the transplant early or in a preemptive fashion. The latter allows for minimizing the negative impact of uremia on physical and neurologic development in infants.

  7. [Possibilities and limits of kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Erdmann, T; Templin, R

    1978-06-01

    Chronic haemodialysis and renal transplantation are mutually supplementing methods for the treatment of patients with terminal renal lesion. The two methods have proved their worth in clinical practice. The expectance of life of patients with chronic renal insufficiency could essentially be improved during the last years. In last consequence the successes of the transplantation of kidneys depend on the solution of immunobiological problems, which are not yet cleared up nowadays. 1. In the determination of genotypical determinants possibly not all are known or recognizable. 2. The at present clinically usable examination methods do not yet allow to recognize rejections so early that by an aimed immunosuppressive treatment irreversible damages on the graft may be prevented. After a transplantation of kidneys of relatives a long survival time of transplanted patients is better than after a transplantation of kidneys taken from dead bodies. The rejection is still the main factor of the failure of the graft, the sepsis is the most frequent cause of death. It is neccessary, to develop less toxical remedies for the adaptation of the graft. Nevertheless, thousands of optimally transplanted patients prove the usefulness of the allogenic transplantation of the kidney.

  8. A retrospective analysis of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Michela; Gregorini, Marilena; Rampino, Teresa; Bosio, Francesca; Bedino, Giulia; Piotti, Giovanni; Soccio, Grazia; Esposito, Pasquale; Klersy, Catherine; Abelli, Massimo; Borroni, Giovanni; Canton, Antonio Dal

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Kidney transplantation is the best option for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) failure. Prolonged use of immunosuppressive drugs often causes opportunistic infections and malignancies of skin and mucosae, but due to lack of a careful dermatological screening in several transplantation centers the diagnosis and the treatment of dermatological lesions in kidney transplant patients are underestimated. In addition after the introduction of interleukin (IL)-2 -receptor antagonists (basiliximab/daclizumab), mTOR inhibitors and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/mycophenolic acid (MPA) in new immunosuppressive protocols only a few studies have analyzed the skin and mucosal lesions in kidney transplant patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the cutaneous and mucosal diseases after kidney transplantation, and to investigate the association between these and different immunosuppressive protocols and/or demographic features. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using medical records of kidney transplantation between 2000 and 2009 at the Transplant Unit of Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. The study included 183 patients (M 57.3%, F 42.7%) aged 51.5±11.8 yr) with transplant age 52.3±34.9 months. Induction therapy was basiliximab and steroids based; maintenance therapy included combination-regimes from cyclosporine, tacrolimus, steroids, mycophenolate mofetil (MM), mycophenolic acid (MPA), rapamycin, everolimus. Anti-rejection therapy was steroid and/or thymoglobulines based. Diagnosis of cutaneous disease was made through examination of skin, mucous membranes, nails and hair evaluation. Skin biopsies, specific cultures and serological tests were done when required. Results: Skin and mucosal diseases were reported in 173 (95.7%) of patients; 88 (50.81%) showed viral lesions; 92 (53.01%) immunosuppression-related lesions; 28 (16.39%) benign tumours; 26 (15.3%) precancers /neoplastic lesions; 24 (14.21%) mycosis

  9. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  10. Polyomavirus associated nephropathy after kidney and pancreas transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Gracin, Sonja; Vojtusek, Ivana Kovacević; Vidas, Zeljko; Knotek, Mladen; Skelin, Ika Kardum; Ljubanović, Danica

    2010-06-01

    Polyomavirus virus associated nephropathy (PVAN) is an important cause of graft failure in the renal transplant population. The prevalence of PVAN has increased from 1% to 10% in the past decade, leading to loss of transplanted organ in 30% to 80% of cases. In the absence of specific antiviral drugs, early detection of disease and modification/reduction of immunosuppressive regimen is currently the cornerstone of therapy. In the setting of multiorgan transplantation, like simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPKT), diagnosis and therapy of PVAN can be even more challenging problem. We report a first described case of PVAN in patient after SPKT in Croatia. Patient is a 32 years old Caucasian male with type 1 diabetes mellitus and end stage renal failure, diagnosed for PVAN 6 month after SPKT. Patient was treated with reduced immunosuppressive regimen. At 32 month follow up, patient has preserved kidney and pancreas function with estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) rate of 91 mL/min and no signs of PVAN on his 2 year protocol kidney biopsy.

  11. Peculiarities of tuberculosis in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Bappa

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplant is becoming increasingly available in developing countries. Significant advances have been made globally since the first successful kidney transplant in 1954, with the advent of newer, more effective and more selective immunosuppressants. As a result, allograft and patient survival has increased, leaving infection and malignancy as major challenges. The incidence rate of tuberculsis in renal transplant recipients is directly proportional to the prevalence in the general population with the developing countries having the highest rates. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature on post renal transplant tuberculosis with a view to highlighting its peculiarities compared to tuberculosis in the general population. Several databases (Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane data base, Google Scholar and AJOL) were searched for articles using the key words Tuberculosis (MESH), Renal (OR Kidney), AND transplant. Hand search was also made of reference list of retrieved articles. Full text of relevant original articles were retrieved and appraised. Several studies have demonstrated increased risk of tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients, especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients has peculiarities such as difficulty in diagnosing latent TB, atypical presentations, increased risk of dissemination, increased mortality and interactions of anti-Tb drugs with transplant medications. Clinicians managing renal transplant recipients especially in developing countries should have a high index of suspicion for TB and be aware of its peculiarities in this patient population. PMID:24005585

  12. Myoglobin cast nephropathy in a kidney transplant patient with normal creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira da Fonseca, Elissa; Jittirat, Arksarapuk; Birdwell, Kelly A; Fogo, Agnes B

    2015-04-01

    Delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients is a known complication associated with increased risk of acute rejection and reduced transplant survival after 1 year. There are multiple risk factors, including prolonged cold ischemia time, donor age, and cause of donor's death. Major causes of delayed graft function are acute kidney injury in the donor, often from prolonged terminal ischemia, reflected by acute tubular injury in the recipient. However, the differential diagnosis of delayed graft function includes acute rejection, recurrence of the primary glomerular diseases, and other less commonly encountered conditions. A transplant kidney biopsy usually is required to elucidate the correct cause and initiate the right treatment, which is crucial for transplant survival. We report a case of a transplant recipient who developed delayed graft function due to an uncommon cause. After correct diagnosis, the patient's transplant function improved.

  13. Protein-Based Urine Test Predicts Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, August 22, 2013 Protein-based urine test predicts kidney transplant outcomes NIH- ... supporting development of noninvasive tests. Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can ...

  14. Pregnancy management of women with kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Dávid ágoston; Szabó, László; Jenei, Katalin; Fedor, Roland; Zádori, Gergely; Zsom, Lajos; Kabai, Krisztina; Záhonyi, Anita; Asztalos, László; Nemes, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease, besides many dysfunctions, face increasing infertility and high-risk pregnancy due to uremia and changes of the hormonal functions. After renal transplantation, sexual dysfunction improves, providing the possibility of successful pregnancy for women of childbearing age. However, kidney transplanted patients are high-risk pregnant patients with increased maternal and fetal risks, and the graft also may be compromised during pregnancy; most studies report on several successive deliveries due to multidisciplinary team management. In clinical practice, the graft is rarely affected during the period of gestation. Fetal development disorders are also rare although preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation are common. For now, several studies and clinical investigations proved that, under multidisciplinary control, kidney transplanted female patients are also possible to have safe pregnancy and successful delivery. There are conflicting data in the literature about the prevention of complications and the timing of pregnancy. Herein, we would like to present some experience of our centre. A total of 847 kidney transplantations have been performed between June 1993 and December 2013 with 163 childbearing aged females (18–45 years) in our center. We report on three kidney transplanted patients who have given birth to healthy newborns. In our practice, severe complications have not been observed. PMID:26767122

  15. Cardiac toxoplasmosis after heart transplantation diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy.

    PubMed

    Petty, L A; Qamar, S; Ananthanarayanan, V; Husain, A N; Murks, C; Potter, L; Kim, G; Pursell, K; Fedson, S

    2015-10-01

    We describe a case of cardiac toxoplasmosis diagnosed by routine endomyocardial biopsy in a patient with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) intolerance on atovaquone prophylaxis. Data are not available on the efficacy of atovaquone as Toxoplasma gondii prophylaxis after heart transplantation. In heart transplant patients in whom TMP-SMX is not an option, other strategies may be considered, including the addition of pyrimethamine to atovaquone.

  16. Trends in kidney transplantation rates and disparities.

    PubMed Central

    Stolzmann, Kelly L.; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; McElroy, Jane A.; Becker, Bryan N.; Remington, Patrick L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the likelihood of transplantation and trends over time among persons with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Wisconsin. METHODS: We examined the influence of patient- and community-level characteristics on the rate of kidney transplantation in Wisconsin among 22,387 patients diagnosed with ESRD between January 1, 1982 and October 30, 2005. We grouped patients by the year of ESRD onset in order to model the change in transplantation rates over time. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment, all other racial groups were significantly less likely to be transplanted compared with whites, and the racial disparity increased over calendar time. Older patients were less likely to be transplanted in all periods. Higher community income and education level and a greater distance from patients' residence to the nearest dialysis center significantly increased the likelihood of transplantation. Males also had a significantly higher rate of transplantation than females. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a growing disparity in transplantation rates by demographic characteristics and a consistent disparity in transplantation by socioeconomic characteristics. Future studies should focus on identifying specific barriers to transplantation among different subpopulations in order to target effective interventions. PMID:17722672

  17. Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in a Transplant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Salehipour, M.; Roozbeh, J.; Rasekhi, A. R.; Afrasiabi, M. A.; Rezaee, H.; Izadpanah, K.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a severe necrotizing infection of the kidney and its surrounding tissues. It is characterized by the production of gas within the kidney and perinephric structures. EPN often affects diabetic women but can also occur in nondiabetic patients who have ureteral obstruction and in immunocompromised patients. Herein, we report EPN in a 23-year-old woman who had a renal transplantation. PMID:25013564

  18. Robotic kidney implantation for kidney transplantation: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Monika E; Pugin, Francois; Bucher, Pascal; Fasel, Jean; Markar, Sheraz; Morel, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    Despite improvements in minimally invasive techniques over recent decades, kidney implantation into the iliac fossa has remained a domain of open surgery. However, it was hypothesized that it would be feasible to perform robotic transplant kidney implantation as a means of reducing surgical trauma. Two robotic kidney transplantations into the iliac fossa were attempted in human cadavers. In the first cadaver, a 5 cm incision was placed in the right lower abdomen, the peritoneum was mobilized in a cranial direction, the iliac vessels were identified, and the kidney placed in the pre-peritoneal space. The incision was sealed with a gel port through which the Vinci(©) Surgical System was installed. In the second cadaver, a robotic kidney implantation with robotically sutured vascular and ureteric anastomoses was performed trans-abdominally. Open incision, identification, placement of gel port, and robotic docking were feasible. Robotic performance of vascular anastomosis was not possible in the first cadaver because of advanced decay and excess fat in the surgical field. Robotic kidney positioning was feasible and anastomoses were performed successfully in the second cadaver within 35, 25, and 20 min (arterial, venous, and ureteric, respectively). Robotic kidney transplantation seems feasible in human cadavers if tissue condition is suitable, but is very technically challenging. Because of the delicacy of anatomical structures, the cadaveric model with the risk of advanced decay and the absence of circulation sets limits on the exploration of this complex procedure. Hence, further research and animal work in this area is critical to improve understanding of the benefits and limitations of robotic kidney implantation. PMID:27627957

  19. [Effects of the statins in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H M; Brennan, S; González, J M; Suki, W N

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to assess the immunosuppressive activity of statins in kidney transplantation, determining their effects on serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels post-transplantation, on the incidence of acute rejection episodes and on renal function. A total of 97 patients who underwent a kidney transplant in a three-year period, had more than one-month graft survival, and a minimum of one year of follow-up, were included. Group A consisted of 38 patients who received statins; this group was subsequently divided into four subgroups, according to the time post-transplant when statins were prescribed. Group B consisted of 59 patients (control Group). Initial and final serum total cholesterol levels in Group A were not different (218 +/- 7.8 mg/dl vs 222 +/- 7.5 mg/dl); however, final levels were higher than initial values in Group B (216 +/- 6.0 mg/dl vs 189 +/- 6.4 mg/dl, P = 0.0021). Initial serum triglyceride levels were higher than final levels in Group A (305 +/- 25.5 mg/dl vs 188 +/- 10.6 mg/dl, P < 0.0001). Group A showed a better allograft survival (P = 0.0350), a reduction in the incidence of acute rejection episodes (1 vs 38 events, P < 0.0001) and a lower serum creatinine level (1.96 +/- 0.21 mg/dl vs 2.77 +/- 0.27 mg/dl, P = 0.0374). In Group A subgroups, kidney function was significantly better in patients who received statins early after transplantation. These data suggest that in kidney transplantation statins exert additional immunosuppressive effects, reduce the number of acute rejection episodes, improve allograft survival and kidney function and are effective in preventing serum cholesterol from rising; these effects correlate with a significant decrease in serum triglyceride but are independent of a hypocholesterolemic action. PMID:11188951

  20. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Muthu, V.; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome. PMID:19718334

  1. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  2. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  3. Isobaric (gasless) laparoscopic liver and kidney biopsy in standing steers

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, O. Alberto; von Bredow, Jurgen; Li, Hui; Smith, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the suitability of an isobaric laparoscopic procedure, using a single port, for obtaining serial kidney and liver biopsy samples from standing steers. The samples were used in support of a pharmacokinetic tissue–fluid correlation study. Laparoscopic access was performed 3 times in each of 8 healthy Holstein steers, alternating from the right side to the left side and then to the right side again. The surgery was performed in standing stocks after the animals were given 3 doses of sulfadimethoxine sulfate intravenously and fasted for at least 18 h. Sedation and analgesia were achieved with acepromazine and xylazine. Lidocaine 2% was injected at the center of the paralumbar fossa (left or right), and an incision was made for introduction of a trocar–cannula assembly. Room air was allowed to enter the abdomen through the cannula at the time of insertion. Once the peritoneal cavity was reached, an operating endoscope was inserted. No pressurized insufflation was performed. A biopsy forceps was introduced into the operating channel of the endoscope to obtain a 100-mg kidney or liver sample. No complications were encountered. The 24 laparoscopic procedures provided 24 kidney and 16 liver samples. The results suggest that the isobaric (gasless) single-port laparoscopic technique is feasible for kidney and liver biopsy on standing steers. The procedure can be performed in a reliable and efficient manner in the sedated standing bovine. PMID:19337395

  4. Metabolic bone diseases in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rubin; Chouhan, Kanwaljit K

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic bone disease after kidney transplantation has a complex pathophysiology and heterogeneous histology. Pre-existing renal osteodystrophy may not resolve completely, but continue or evolve into a different osteodystrophy. Rapid bone loss immediately after transplant can persist, at a lower rate, for years to come. These greatly increase the risk of bone fracture and vertebral collapse. Each patient may have multiple risk factors of bone loss, such as steroids usage, hypogonadism, persistent hyperparathyroidism (HPT), poor allograft function, metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, vitamin D deficiency, aging, immobility and chronic disease. Clinical management requires a comprehensive approach to address the underlying and ongoing disease processes. Successful prevention of bone loss has been shown with vitamin D, bisphosphonates, calcitonin as well as treatment of hypogonadism and HPT. Novel approach to restore the normal bone remodeling and improve the bone quality may be needed in order to effectively decrease bone fracture rate in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24175250

  5. Paired kidney exchange transplantation: Maximizing the donor pool

    PubMed Central

    Jha, P. K.; Sethi, S.; Bansal, S. B.; Jain, M.; Sharma, R.; Phanish, M. K.; Duggal, R.; Ahlawat, R.; Kher, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, paired kidney exchange (PKE) transplantation has gained popularity worldwide as a viable alternative for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who have incompatible or sensitized donors. This study presents our experience with PKE transplantation and compares outcome between PKE and non-PKE renal transplant recipients. Between February 2010 and November 2013, 742 transplants were performed, of which 26 (3.5%) were PKE transplantations. All were two-way exchanges. PKE recipients were significantly older than non-PKE (46.73 ± 9.71 vs. 40.08 ± 13.36 years; P = 0.012) while donor ages were comparable. PKE patients had significantly higher number of HLA mismatches (5.03 ± 1.14 vs. 3.49 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 3–47 months), there was no significant difference in patient survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.65%; P = 0.596) and death censored graft survival (PKE 96.16% vs. non-PKE 96.37%; P = 1). Mean serum creatinine at 1 month and at last follow-up was lower in PKE versus non-PKE group (0.98 ± 0.33 vs. 1.3 ± 0.61 mg/dl; P = 0.008 and 0.96 ± 0.30 vs. 1.27 ± 0.57 mg/dl, P = 0.006, respectively). Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 11.5% in PKE group and 16.89% in non-PKE patients (P = 0.6). To conclude, paired kidney donation is an excellent way of increasing the donor pool and needs to be promoted to overcome the shortage of suitable kidney in our country. PMID:26664210

  6. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found. PMID:26749337

  7. Decreased Kidney Graft Survival in Low Immunological Risk Patients Showing Inflammation in Normal Protocol Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Melilli, Edoardo; Honkanen, Eero; Bestard, Oriol; Grinyo, Josep M.; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The pros and cons for implementing protocol biopsies (PB) after kidney transplantation are still a matter of debate. We aimed to address the frequency of pathological findings in PB, to analyze their impact on long-term graft survival (GS) and to analyze the risk factors predicting an abnormal histology. Methods We analyzed 946 kidney PB obtained at a median time of 6.5 (±2.9) months after transplantation. Statistics included comparison between groups, Kaplan-Meier and multinomial logistic regression analysis. Results and Discussion PB diagnosis were: 53.4% normal; 46% IFTA; 12.3% borderline and 4.9% had subclinical acute rejection (SCAR). Inflammation had the strongest negative impact on GS. Therefore we split the cases into: “normal without inflammation”, “normal with inflammation”, “IFTA without inflammation”, “IFTA with inflammation” and “rejection” (including SCAR and borderline). 15-year GS in PB diagnosed normal with inflammation was significantly decreased in a similar fashion as in rejection cases. Among normal biopsies, inflammation increased significantly the risk of 15-y graft loss (P = 0.01). Variables that predicted an abnormal biopsy were proteinuria, previous AR and DR-mismatch. Conclusion We conclude that inflammation in normal PB is associated with a significantly lower 15-y GS, comparable to rejection or IFTA with inflammation. PMID:27532630

  8. A lesson from kidney transplantation among identical twins: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rao, Zhengsheng; Huang, Zhongli; Song, Turun; Lin, Tao

    2015-09-01

    There continues to be disagreement related to the appropriate therapeutic regimen to be used when the donor and the recipient in kidney transplant operations are identical twins. Here we present two cases of kidney transplantation between identical twins. Both recipients had end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by primary nephropathy. We also present information gleaned from a literature review of similar cases. The first recipient was a 26-year-old man who experienced biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy 10 months post-transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and steroids were used to reverse this pathologic condition. Till now, 76 months post-transplantation, the patient is stable, and the new kidney is functioning well. The second recipient was a 20-year-old woman who had hematuria and proteinuria 3 months post-transplantation, and crescent glomerulonephritis with mild to moderate interstitial injury was proven by biopsy 11 months postoperatively. This patient did not respond to various treatments and resumed hemodialysis 15 months post-transplantation. These case studies show that immunosuppressive therapy should be maintained in kidney transplant recipients who are identical twins with ESRD caused by initial nephropathy. PMID:26189977

  9. Obesity Impacts Access to Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Dorry L.; Simpkins, Christopher E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Locke, Jayme E.; Warren, Daniel S.; Montgomery, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Current billing practices and mandates to report surgical outcomes are disincentives to surgical treatment of obese patients, who are at increased risk for longer hospital stays and higher complication rates. The objective of this study was to quantify the independent association between body mass index (BMI) and waiting time for kidney transplantation to identify potential provider bias against surgical treatment of the obese. A secondary data analysis was performed of a prospective cohort of 132,353 patients who were registered for kidney transplantation in the United States between 1995 and 2006. Among all patients awaiting kidney transplantation, the likelihood of receiving a transplant decreased with increasing degree of obesity, categorized by ranges of BMI (adjusted hazard ratios 0.96 for overweight, 0.93 for obese, 0.72 for severely obese, and 0.56 for morbidly obese, compared with a reference group of patients with normal BMI). Similarly, the likelihood of being bypassed when an organ became available increased in a graded manner with category of obesity (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.02 for overweight, 1.05 for obese, 1.11 for severely obese, and 1.22 for morbidly obese). Although matching an available organ with an appropriate recipient requires clinical judgment, which could not be fully captured in this study, the observed differences are dramatic and warrant further studies to understand this effect better and to design a system that is less susceptible to unintended bias. PMID:18094366

  10. Obesity impacts access to kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Segev, Dorry L; Simpkins, Christopher E; Thompson, Richard E; Locke, Jayme E; Warren, Daniel S; Montgomery, Robert A

    2008-02-01

    Current billing practices and mandates to report surgical outcomes are disincentives to surgical treatment of obese patients, who are at increased risk for longer hospital stays and higher complication rates. The objective of this study was to quantify the independent association between body mass index (BMI) and waiting time for kidney transplantation to identify potential provider bias against surgical treatment of the obese. A secondary data analysis was performed of a prospective cohort of 132,353 patients who were registered for kidney transplantation in the United States between 1995 and 2006. Among all patients awaiting kidney transplantation, the likelihood of receiving a transplant decreased with increasing degree of obesity, categorized by ranges of BMI (adjusted hazard ratios 0.96 for overweight, 0.93 for obese, 0.72 for severely obese, and 0.56 for morbidly obese, compared with a reference group of patients with normal BMI). Similarly, the likelihood of being bypassed when an organ became available increased in a graded manner with category of obesity (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.02 for overweight, 1.05 for obese, 1.11 for severely obese, and 1.22 for morbidly obese). Although matching an available organ with an appropriate recipient requires clinical judgment, which could not be fully captured in this study, the observed differences are dramatic and warrant further studies to understand this effect better and to design a system that is less susceptible to unintended bias.

  11. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  12. Mineral and bone disorder after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Taweesedt, Pahnwat T; Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2015-01-01

    After successful kidney transplantation, accumulated waste products and electrolytes are excreted and regulatory hormones return to normal levels. Despite the improvement in mineral metabolites and mineral regulating hormones after kidney transplantation, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism continues to present in most patients. During the first 3 mo, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and parathyroid hormone levels decrease rapidly in association with an increase in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production. Renal phosphate excretion resumes and serum calcium, if elevated before, returns toward normal levels. FGF-23 excess during the first 3-12 mo results in exaggerated renal phosphate loss and hypophosphatemia occurs in some patients. After 1 year, FGF-23 and serum phosphate return to normal levels but persistent hyperparathyroidism remains in some patients. The progression of vascular calcification also attenuates. High dose corticosteroid and persistent hyperparathyroidism are the most important factors influencing abnormal bone and mineral metabolism in long-term kidney transplant (KT) recipients. Bone loss occurs at a highest rate during the first 6-12 mo after transplantation. Measurement of bone mineral density is recommended in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate > 30 mL/min. The use of active vitamin D with or without bisphosphonate is effective in preventing early post-transplant bone loss. Steroid withdrawal regimen is also beneficial in preservation of bone mass in long-term. Calcimimetic is an alternative therapy to parathyroidectomy in KT recipients with persistent hyperparathyroidism. If parathyroidectomy is required, subtotal to near total parathyroidectomy is recommended. Performing parathyroidectomy during the waiting period prior to transplantation is also preferred in patients with severe hyperparathyroidism associated with hypercalcemia. PMID:26722650

  13. Emerging functions of autophagy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pallet, N; Livingston, M; Dong, Z

    2014-01-01

    In response to ischemic, toxic or immunological insults, the more frequent injuries encountered by the kidney, cells must adapt to maintain vital metabolic functions and avoid cell death. Among the adaptive responses activated, autophagy emerges as an important integrator of various extracellular and intracellular triggers (often related to nutrients availability or immunological stimuli), which, as a consequence,may regulate cell viability, and also immune functions,both innate or adaptive. The aim of this review is to make the synthesis of the recent literature on the implications of autophagy in the kidney transplantation field and to discuss the future directions for research. PMID:24369023

  14. Update on kidney transplantation in HIV-infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Norman, Silas P; Kommareddi, Mallika; Kaul, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection has historically been a contraindication to kidney transplantation. Prior to the era of potent antiretroviral therapy, the survival of HIV-infected patients was too poor to justify transplantation. In the last 15 years there has been substantial improvement in antiretroviral medications, such that HIV-positive patients are living longer and developing chronic diseases such as end-stage renal disease. The improvement in survival of HIV-positive patients has resulted in transplant centers increasingly considering infected patients appropriate for kidney transplantation. Recently, the results of the first prospective multicenter trial of kidney transplantation into HIV-positive candidates were released, showing the success and challenges of transplantation into this population. In light of the multicenter findings as well as national registry data, kidney transplantation should be considered the standard-of-care renal replacement therapy for HIV-positive end-stage renal disease patients and they should be referred and evaluated for kidney transplantation accordingly. PMID:22833063

  15. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  16. Diabetic nephropathy: Is it time yet for routine kidney biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Suarez, Maria L; Thomas, David B; Barisoni, Laura; Fornoni, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important long-term complications of diabetes. Patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and kidney failure. The clinical diagnosis of DN depends on the detection of microalbuminuria. This usually occurs after the first five years from the onset of diabetes, and predictors of DN development and progression are being studied but are not yet implemented into clinical practice. Diagnostic tests are useful tools to recognize onset, progression and response to therapeutic interventions. Microalbuminuria is an indicator of DN, and it is considered the only noninvasive marker of early onset. However, up to now there is no diagnostic tool that can predict which patients will develop DN before any damage is present. Pathological renal injury is hard to predict only with clinical and laboratory findings. An accurate estimate of damage in DN can only be achieved by the histological analysis of tissue samples. At the present time, renal biopsy is indicated on patients with diabetes under the suspicion of the presence of nephropathies other than DN. Results from renal biopsies in patients with diabetes had made possible the classification of renal biopsies in three major groups associated with different prognostic features: diabetic nephropathy, non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD), and a superimposed non-diabetic condition on underlying diabetic nephropathy. In patients with type 2 diabetes with a higher degree of suspicion for NDRD, it is granted the need of a renal biopsy. It is important to identify and differentiate these pathologies at an early stage in order to prevent progression and potential complications. Therefore, a more extensive use of biopsy is advisable. PMID:24379914

  17. Hypertension in dialysis and kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, GV Ramesh; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Tobe, Sheldon W; Lebel, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the Canadian Hypertension Education Program has studied the evidence supporting blood pressure control in people requiring renal replacement therapy for end-stage kidney disease, including those on dialysis and with renal transplants. According to the Canadian Organ Replacement Registry’s 2008 annual report, there were an estimated 33,832 people with end-stage renal disease in Canada at the end of 2006, an increase of 69.7% since 1997. Of these, 20,465 were on dialysis and 13,367 were living with a functioning kidney transplant. Thus, it is becoming more likely that primary care practitioners will be helping to care for these complex patients. With the lack of large controlled clinical trials, the consensus recommendation based on interpretation of the existing literature is that blood pressure should be lowered to below 140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients on renal replacement therapy and to below 130/80 mmHg for renal transplant patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease. PMID:19417862

  18. Successful kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhishui; Zeng, Fanjun; Ming, Changsheng; Lin, Zhengbin; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-03-01

    Highly sensitized patients experience an increased number of rejection episodes and have poorer graft survival rates; hence, sensitization is a significant barrier to both access to and the success of organ transplantation. This study reports our experience in kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients. Fourteen patients with sensitization or high levels of panelreactive antibodies (PRA) were studied. All patients were desensitized with pre-transplant intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)/plasmapheresis (PP) with or without rituximab and thymoglobulin induction therapy, combined with a Prograf/MMF/Pred immunosuppressive regimen. Of 14 patients, 10 showed good graft functions without acute rejection (AR) episodes. Acute cellular rejection in two patients was reversed by methylprednisolone. Two patients underwent antibody-mediated rejection; one was treated with PP/IVIG successfully, whereas the other lost graft functions due to the de novo production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA). Graft functions were stable, and there were no AR episodes in other patients. Conclusively, desensitization using PP/IVIG with or without rituximab increases the likelihood of successful live-donor kidney transplantation in sensitized recipients. PMID:21681679

  19. A case of Chagas' disease panniculitis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Prestes de; Pansard, Henry Mor; Arantes, Luiz Cláudio; Rodrigues, Arnaldo Teixeira; Daubermann, Melissa Falster; Azambuja, Marcos Felipe; Argenta, Laércio Cassol; Silva, Luiz Alberto Michet da

    2016-03-01

    Chagas' disease carries high morbidity and mortality due to acute parasitemia or cardiac, digestive, cutaneous or neurologic chronic lesions. Latin American countries have the majority of infected or at risk people. Transplanted patients using immunosuppressive agents may develop severe and even fatal forms of the disease. The available treatment causes frequent severe side-effects. A 59 years-old woman with end stage renal disease and positive serology for Chagas` disease, but without any clinical manifestation of this pathology, underwent kidney transplantation from a cadaveric donor and displayed three months later a thigh panniculitis from which a biopsy unveiled amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The skin lesions disappeared following treatment with benzonidazole, but the drug was discontinued due to severe pancytopenia. Along with this, infection with E. faecalis and cytomegalovirus were treated with vancomicin and ganciclovir. The patient kept very well afterwards, with no new skin lesions and with good graft function. One year and three months after the transplant, she had an emergency surgery for an aortic dissecting aneurysm. Irreversible shock and death occurred in the immediate post-surgical period. It was not possible to establish or to rule out a relationship between the trypanosomiasis and the aortic lesions. Chagas` disease must be remembered in differential diagnosis of several clinical situations in transplant patients, mainly in endemic areas. The treatment can yeld good clinical response, but serious side-effects from the drugs may ensue. More effective and better tolerated options are in need for treatment or prophylaxis. PMID:27049374

  20. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting.

  1. Kidney failure and transplantation in China.

    PubMed

    Ikels, C

    1997-05-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in China is approximately 120,000 cases per year; the vast majority of these new cases will die within a very short time because of the shortage of funds, dialysis machines, and organs for transplantation. This paper focuses on the reasons behind the organ shortage and the strategies proposed by the Chinese medical profession to increase the supply of transplantable kidneys. The data were gathered on multiple trips to China, Hong Kong and Taiwan between August 1993 and January 1995. During these trips the author spoke formally with nephrologists, urologists, dialysis and transplant nurses, and other individuals active in the field of organ procurement, and informally with others familiar with general hospital practice. The author also draws heavily on articles published in leading Chinese journals. The kidney shortage in China is produced by the same sorts of problems as exist in other countries, but the shortage is aggravated by certain beliefs and practices specific to Chinese populations. Live donation is hampered by traditional beliefs about the function of the kidney, while cadaver donation is hampered by reluctance to cut a body and a host of beliefs about ghosts, labeled "feudal superstitions" by the authorities. Cadaver donation is further restrained by the lack of legal recognition of "brain death". In response to the organ shortage, the Chinese medical community has expanded the range of eligible sources to include those condemned to death as criminals, a practice itself usually condemned by the wider international community. At the same time it has advocated: (1) enhancing corpse donation through propaganda work, administrative work, legal work, and incentives; (2) encouraging live donation; (3) familiarizing the public with the benefits of organ transplantation, and (4) pursuing the development of artificial organs.

  2. MICA variant promotes allosensitization after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tonnerre, Pierre; Gérard, Nathalie; Chatelais, Mathias; Poli, Caroline; Allard, Stéphanie; Cury, Sylvie; Bressollette, Céline; Cesbron-Gautier, Anne; Charreau, Béatrice

    2013-05-01

    MHC class I-related chain A (MICA) antigens are surface glycoproteins strongly implicated in innate immunity, and the MICA gene is highly polymorphic. Clinical observations suggest a role for donor MICA antigens expressed on transplant endothelial cells in the alloimmune response, but the effect of MICA genotype is not well understood. Here, we investigated the immunologic effect of the A5.1 mutation, related to the common MICA*008 allele. Compared with wild-type endothelial cells (ECs), homozygosity for MICA A5.1 associated with an endothelial phenotype characterized by 7- to 10-fold higher levels of MICA mRNA and MICA proteins at the cell surface, as well as exclusive release in exosomes instead of enzymatic cleavage. Mechanistically, we did not detect quantitative changes in regulatory microRNAs. Functionally, A5.1 ECs enhanced NKG2D interaction and natural killer cell activation, promoting NKG2D-dependent lysis of ECs. In kidney transplant recipients, polyreactive anti-MICA sera bound preferentially to ECs from MICA A5.1 donors, suggesting that MICA*008(A5.1) molecules are the preferential antigenic determinants on ECs of grafts. Furthermore, the incidence of MICA A5.1 mismatch revealed a statistically significant association between donor MICA A5.1 and both anti-MICA sensitization and increased proteinuria in kidney recipients. Taken together, these results identify the A5.1 mutation as an immunodominant factor and a potential risk factor for transplant survival.

  3. Acute Renal Failure - A Serious Complication in Patients After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Bogdanovic, Lj; Radunovic, M; Prostran, M; Naumovic, R; Simic-Ogrizovic, S; Radojevic-Skodric, S

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury releases proinflammatory cytokines and activates innate immunity. It has been suggested that the early innate response and the ischemic tissue damage play roles in the development of adaptive responses, which may lead to acute kidney rejection. Various durations of hypothermic kidney storage before transplantation add to ischemic tissue damage. The final stage of ischemic injury occurs during reperfusion that develops hours or days after the initial insult. Repair and regeneration processes occur together with cellular apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis and a favorable outcome is expected if regeneration prevails. Along the entire transplantation time course, there is a great demand for novel immune and nonimmune injury biomarkers. The use of these markers can be of great help in the monitoring of kidney injury in potential kidney donors, where acute kidney damage can be overlooked, in predicting acute transplant dysfunction during the early post-transplant periods, or in predicting chronic changes in long term followup. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that biomarkers that have the highest predictive value in acute kidney injury include NGAL, Cystatin C, KIM-1, IL-18, and L-FABP. Most investigations show that the ideal biomarker to fulfill all the needs in renal transplant has not been identified yet. Although, in many animal models, new biomarkers are emerging for predicting acute and chronic allograft damage, in human allograft analysis they are still not routinely accepted and renal biopsy still remains the gold standard. PMID:27498898

  4. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  5. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  6. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  7. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  8. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  9. [Kidney transplantation--a successful story started 110 years ago].

    PubMed

    Markić, Dean; Valencić, Maksim; Maricić, Anton; Spanjol, Josip; Racki, Sanjin; Fuckar, Zeljko

    2012-10-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most important medical achievement of the 20th century. Emerich Ullmann performed on March 7th 1902, in the Vienna, the first successful kidney transplantation. It was an autotransplantation in a dog, with a transposition of a kidney in the neck region. Graft function persisted over the next five days. Only the few months later Alexis Carrel performed in Lyon another succcessful kidney autotransplantation in a dog. Carrel was interested in the vascular anastomosis improvement. He developed the triangulation technique of vessel anastomosis and so called Carrel patch. Since then both techniques have become a standard in kidney transplantation. Carrel was awarded with Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1912 for his innovatory work in the field of transplantation and vascular surgery. These experimental transplantations preceded kidney transplantation in the humans which has become a routine operative procedure.

  10. [Kidney transplantation--a successful story started 110 years ago].

    PubMed

    Markić, Dean; Valencić, Maksim; Maricić, Anton; Spanjol, Josip; Racki, Sanjin; Fuckar, Zeljko

    2012-10-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most important medical achievement of the 20th century. Emerich Ullmann performed on March 7th 1902, in the Vienna, the first successful kidney transplantation. It was an autotransplantation in a dog, with a transposition of a kidney in the neck region. Graft function persisted over the next five days. Only the few months later Alexis Carrel performed in Lyon another succcessful kidney autotransplantation in a dog. Carrel was interested in the vascular anastomosis improvement. He developed the triangulation technique of vessel anastomosis and so called Carrel patch. Since then both techniques have become a standard in kidney transplantation. Carrel was awarded with Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1912 for his innovatory work in the field of transplantation and vascular surgery. These experimental transplantations preceded kidney transplantation in the humans which has become a routine operative procedure. PMID:23513418

  11. Pharmacological Tie2 activation in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Kristina; Njau, Florence; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann; David, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the therapeutic potential of vasculotide (VT) - a Tie2 activating therapeutic - in kidney transplantation. METHODS We performed a murine MHC-mismatched renal transplant model (C57Bl/6 male into Balb/c female) with 60 min cold and 30 min warm ischemia time. 500 ng VT was administered i.p. to donor mice 1 h before organ removal. In addition, recipients received 500 ng VT i.p. directly and 3 d after surgery. Survival was monitored and remaining animals were sacrificed 28 d after transplantation. In this model, we analyzed: (1) organ function; (2) Kaplan-Meier survival; (3) organ damage (periodic acid Schiff staining) via semi-quantitative scoring [0-4 (0 = no injury/inflammation to 4 = very severe injury/inflammation)]; (4) expression of renal endothelial adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) via immunofluorescence (IF) staining, immunoblotting and qPCR; (5) infiltration of inflammatory cells (IF Gr-1, F4/80); and (6) fibrosis via staining of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), Sirius red staining and immunoblotting of SMAD3 activation. RESULTS Exogenous activation of Tie2 with VT resulted in diminished expression of peritubular and glomerular endothelial adhesion molecules. Consequently, infiltration of inflammatory cells (analyzed as ICAM-1, Gr-1 and F4/80 positive cells) was reduced in VT-treated mice compared to controls. Additionally, VT was protective against fibrogenesis after kidney transplantation. Trends towards lower serum creatinine (vehicle: 142 ± 17 μmol/L vs VT: 94 ± 23 μmol/L), urea (vehicle: 76 ± 5 mmol/L vs VT: 60 ± 8 mmol/L) and lactate dehydrogenase (vehicle: 1288 ± 383 iU vs VT: 870 ± 275 iU) were observed on day 6 after transplantation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed improved survival rates in the VT-treated mice that did not reach statistical significance (27% vs 54%, P = 0.24, n = 11 per group). Exogenous activation of Tie2 via VT might reduce infiltration of inflammatory cells into renal tissue thereby protecting the

  12. Pharmacological Tie2 activation in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Kristina; Njau, Florence; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann; David, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the therapeutic potential of vasculotide (VT) - a Tie2 activating therapeutic - in kidney transplantation. METHODS We performed a murine MHC-mismatched renal transplant model (C57Bl/6 male into Balb/c female) with 60 min cold and 30 min warm ischemia time. 500 ng VT was administered i.p. to donor mice 1 h before organ removal. In addition, recipients received 500 ng VT i.p. directly and 3 d after surgery. Survival was monitored and remaining animals were sacrificed 28 d after transplantation. In this model, we analyzed: (1) organ function; (2) Kaplan-Meier survival; (3) organ damage (periodic acid Schiff staining) via semi-quantitative scoring [0-4 (0 = no injury/inflammation to 4 = very severe injury/inflammation)]; (4) expression of renal endothelial adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) via immunofluorescence (IF) staining, immunoblotting and qPCR; (5) infiltration of inflammatory cells (IF Gr-1, F4/80); and (6) fibrosis via staining of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), Sirius red staining and immunoblotting of SMAD3 activation. RESULTS Exogenous activation of Tie2 with VT resulted in diminished expression of peritubular and glomerular endothelial adhesion molecules. Consequently, infiltration of inflammatory cells (analyzed as ICAM-1, Gr-1 and F4/80 positive cells) was reduced in VT-treated mice compared to controls. Additionally, VT was protective against fibrogenesis after kidney transplantation. Trends towards lower serum creatinine (vehicle: 142 ± 17 μmol/L vs VT: 94 ± 23 μmol/L), urea (vehicle: 76 ± 5 mmol/L vs VT: 60 ± 8 mmol/L) and lactate dehydrogenase (vehicle: 1288 ± 383 iU vs VT: 870 ± 275 iU) were observed on day 6 after transplantation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed improved survival rates in the VT-treated mice that did not reach statistical significance (27% vs 54%, P = 0.24, n = 11 per group). Exogenous activation of Tie2 via VT might reduce infiltration of inflammatory cells into renal tissue thereby protecting the

  13. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  14. Chronic diarrhea due to duodenal candidiasis in a patient with a history of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Majalan, Nader; Moghaddasi, Sarasadat; Qane, Mohammad Davud; Shefaie, Farzane; Masoumi Dehshiri, Roghayyeh; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kassem; Baghbanian, Mahmoud

    2014-11-01

    Candida infection in the small intestine is uncommon. We report an unusual case of duodenal candidiasis that presented as chronic diarrhea in a patient who had previously undergone kidney transplantation. A 60-year-old man presented with profuse watery diarrhea that had lasted 6 months 13 years after kidney transplantation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results indicated candidiasis within the esophagus and duodenum. Biopsy results revealed active duodenitis with hyphal and yeast forms of Candida overlying the duodenal epithelium in periodic acid Schiff staining. The patient was successfully treated with fluconazole. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaint of diarrhea. Duodenal candidiasis may be the result of chronic diarrhea in patients with a history of kidney transplantation.

  15. Associations of Pre-Transplant Serum Albumin with Post-Transplant Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Streja, Elani; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Krishnan, Mahesh; Nissenson, Allen R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    The association between pre-transplant serum albumin concentration and post-transplant outcomes in kidney transplant recipients is unclear. We hypothesized that in transplant-waitlisted hemodialysis patients, lower serum albumin concentrations are associated with worse post-transplant outcomes. Linking the 5-year patient data of a large dialysis organization (DaVita) to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 8961 hemodialysis patients who underwent first kidney transplantation. Mortality or graft failure and delayed graft function (DGF) risks were estimated by Cox regression (hazard ratio [HR]) and logistic regression (Odds ratio [OR]), respectively. Patients were 48±13 years old and included 37% women and 27% diabetics. The higher pre-transplant serum albumin was associated with lower mortality, graft failure and DGF risk even after multivariate adjustment for case-mix, malnutrition-inflammation complex and transplant related variable. Every 0.2 g/dL higher pre-transplant serum albumin concentration was associated with 13% lower all-cause mortality (HR=0.87 [95% confidence interval: 0.82-0.93]), 17% lower cardiovascular mortality (HR=0.83[0.74-0.93]), 7% lower combined risk of death or graft failure (HR=0.93[0.89-0.97]), and 4% lower DGF risk (OR=0.96[0.93-0.99]). Hence, lower pre-transplant serum albumin level is associated with worse post-transplant outcomes. Clinical trials to examine interventions to improve nutritional status in transplant-wait-listed hemodialysis patients and their impacts on post-transplant outcomes are indicated. PMID:21449945

  16. Inflammation in the Setting of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction Post-Kidney Transplant: Phenotype & Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Ajay K.; Leduc, Robert; Jacobson, Pamala A.; Wildebush, Winston; Guan, Weihua; Schladt, David; Matas, Arthur J.; Oetting, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Allograft Dysfunction (CGD) is a common outcome in kidney transplants, but its pathogenesis is unclear. We investigated the CGD phenotype and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CGD. Method This prospective study enrolled 2,336 transplants from seven transplant centers in North America. CGD was defined as a greater than 25% rise in serum creatinine relative to a 3 month post-transplant baseline, requiring a kidney biopsy. We genotyped 2,724 SNPs in the initial 979 transplants which form the test cohort. Results CGD occurred 11.2 times per 100 person-years at a median of 509 ± 387 days from the three month baseline. CGD was independently associated with death- censored, allograft failure, in an adjusted analysis [HR=20.6 (11.8–35.8, p<0.001)]. Among 366 transplant recipients with CGD, 91% had inflammation on biopsy scores. 94 (26%) had inflammatory changes consistent with a diagnosis of concomitant acute rejection. SNPs in FM06 and FM03, potential drug metabolism genes, were associated with CGD, after accounting for multiple testing. Conclusion CGD phenotype with concomitant inflammation is associated with increased risk of allograft failure. SNPs associated with CGD in novel drug metabolism and transport genes, will be validated in subsequent transplants. PMID:23350966

  17. Kidney transplantation in HIV-positive adults: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Gathogo, Esther N; Hamzah, Lisa; Hilton, Rachel; Marshall, Neal; Ashley, Caroline; Harber, Mark; Levy, Jeremy B; Jones, Rachael; Boffito, Marta; Khoo, Saye H; Drage, Martin; Bhagani, Sanjay; Post, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive patients are at increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Kidney transplantation (KT) is an established treatment modality for ESKD in the general population. Recent data have confirmed the feasibility of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients, and kidney transplantation is increasingly offered to ESKD patients with well-controlled HIV infection. We report clinical outcomes in a national cohort study of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients. In all, 35 HIV-positive KT recipients who had undergone KT up to December 2010 (66% male, 74% black ethnicity) were identified; the median CD4 cell count was 366, all had undetectable HIV RNA levels at kidney transplantation, and 44% received a kidney from a live donor. Patient survival at 1 and 3 years was 91.3%, and graft survival 91.3% and 84.7%, respectively. At one-year post-kidney transplantation, the cumulative incidence of acute rejection was 48%, and the median (IQR) eGFR was 64 (46, 78) mL/min/1.73 m(2). Although HIV viraemia and HIV disease progression were uncommon, renal complications were relatively frequent. Our study corroborates the feasibility of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients. The high rates of acute rejection suggest that the optimal immune suppression strategy in this population remains to be refined.

  18. Reversible compensatory hypertrophy in transplanted brown Norway rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Churchill, M; Churchill, P C; Schwartz, M; Bidani, A; McDonald, F

    1991-07-01

    Recently we described methods for optimizing the function of transplanted rat kidneys. In unilaterally nephrectomized recipients, one week after surgery, the left transplanted kidney was identical to the right native kidney with respect to wet weight and the clearances of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid (PAH). The goals of the present experiments were first, to extend the post-surgery period to three weeks (sufficient to allow hypertrophic changes), and second, to study function of transplanted hypertrophied kidneys. Genetically identical Brown Norway rats were used as donor and recipients. Three weeks after transplanting a normal kidney into a unilaterally-nephrectomized recipient, the transplanted kidney had a normal plasma flow and was identical to the contralateral native kidney with respect to wet weight and the clearances of inulin and PAH. Three weeks after transplanting a normal kidney into a bilaterally-nephrectomized recipient, the wet weight, inulin and PAH clearances, and plasma flow of the transplanted kidney were all higher than control, and not significantly different from those observed in unilaterally-nephrectomized control rats. Thus, transplanted and native kidneys exhibited the same degree of compensatory hypertrophy. Hypertrophied donor kidneys (that is, the donor rat had been unilaterally-nephrectomized three weeks previously) remained hypertrophied in bilaterally-nephrectomized recipients, but in unilaterally-nephrectomized recipients, they regressed towards normal (that is, the values of wet weight, inulin and PAH clearances and plasma flow were significantly less than those in rats with only one kidney) while the contralateral native kidney remained normal (values of wet weight and inulin and PAH clearances were not different from control).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Methods in renal research: kidney transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tillou, Xavier; Howden, Brian O; Kanellis, John; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Ma, Frank Y

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation in small animals has been crucial in the development of anti-rejection therapies. While there is no substitute for a skilled microsurgeon, there are many aspects of the transplant procedure that can be modified to optimize the reproducibility and utility of the technique. This article provides a detailed description, including video recording, of orthotopic kidney transplantation in the rat. The key variables in the technique are also discussed. PMID:26648592

  20. Preemptive Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation: Considerations of Equity and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B. Po-Han; Coresh, Josef; Segev, Dorry L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives There exists gross disparity in national deceased donor kidney transplant availability and practice: waiting times exceed 6 years in some regions, but some patients receive kidneys before they require dialysis. This study aimed to quantify and characterize preemptive deceased donor kidney transplant recipients and compare their outcomes with patients transplanted shortly after dialysis initiation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database, first-time adult deceased donor kidney transplant recipients between 1995 and 2011 were classified as preemptive, early (on dialysis≤1 year), or late recipients. Random effects logistic regression and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were used to identify characteristics of preemptive deceased donor kidney transplant and evaluate survival in preemptive and early recipients, respectively. Results Preemptive recipients were 9.0% of the total recipient population. Patients with private insurance (adjusted odds ratio=3.15, 95% confidence interval=3.01–3.29, P<0.001), previous (nonkidney) transplant (adjusted odds ratio=1.94, 95% confidence interval=1.67–2.26, P<0.001), and zero-antigen mismatch (adjusted odds ratio=1.45, 95% confidence interval=1.37–1.54, P<0.001; Caucasians only) were more likely to receive preemptive deceased donor kidney transplant, even after accounting for center-level clustering. African Americans were less likely to receive preemptive deceased donor kidney transplant (adjusted odds ratio=0.44, 95% confidence interval=0.41–0.47, P<0.001). Overall, patients transplanted preemptively had similar survival compared with patients transplanted within 1 year after initiating dialysis (adjusted hazard ratio=1.06, 95% confidence interval=0.99–1.12, P=0.07). Conclusions Preemptive deceased donor kidney transplant occurs most often among Caucasians with private insurance, and survival is fairly

  1. Approach to kidney transplant in sensitized potential transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barbari, Antoine; Abbas, Souodod; Jaafar, Mahassen

    2012-10-01

    More than one-third of patients on waiting lists for kidney transplant are sensitized. Most have previously formed donor-specific and non-donor-specific serum antibodies and/or positive crossmatch by complement-dependent cytotoxity and/or flow cytometry. Two categories of alloantibodies include antibodies against major histocompatibility complex human leukocyte antigen class 1 and class 2 and antibodies against minor histocompatibility complex. A current positive crossmatch is an absolute contraindication for transplant. Positive historical panel reactive antibody and/or donor-specific antibodies (human leukocyte antigen and minor histocompatibility complex), even in the absence of a historical positive crossmatch, are associated with an increased risk for allosensitization, antibodymediated rejection, and accelerated graft failure. Desensitization protocols are numerous, complex, and expensive. It is recommended to perform a systematic determination of historical and current panel reactive antibody, donor-specific antibodies (human leukocyte antigen and minor histocompatibility complex), and crossmatch by the most sensitive assays. The risk of sensitization may be estimated from the combined results of the crossmatch with the donor and those of the recipient's panel reactive antibody and donor-specific antibodies at baseline. The adoption of a scoring system for risk stratification may facilitate the task of organ allocation for sensitized patients. Recipients with an estimated sensitization risk ≥ high may be referred preferably to the national waiting priority list and informed about the financial and the medical risks that may incur with future transplant. Sensitized patients at high risk for antibody-mediated rejection may benefit from a structured monitoring process involving systematic and regular immunologic, histologic, and functional assessments of the graft after transplant. We recommend the adoption and regular updating of these approaches to ensure

  2. Trends in the timing of pre-emptive kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grams, Morgan E; Massie, Allan B; Coresh, Josef; Segev, Dorry L

    2011-09-01

    Pre-emptive kidney transplantation is considered the best available renal replacement therapy, but no guidelines exist to direct its timing during CKD progression. We used a national cohort of 19,471 first-time pre-emptive kidney transplant recipients between 1995-2009 to evaluate patterns and implications of transplant timing. Mean estimated GFR (eGFR) at the time of pre-emptive transplant increased significantly over time, from 9.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2) in 1995 to 13.8 ml/min/1.73 m(2) in 2009 (P<0.001). Patients with eGFR ≥ 15 ml/min/1.73 m(2) represented an increasing proportion of pre-emptive transplant recipients, from 9% in 1995 to 35% in 2009; the trend for patients with eGFR ≥ 10 was similar (30% to 72%). We did not detect statistically significant differences in patient survival or death-censored graft survival between strata of eGFR at the time of transplant, either in the full cohort or in subgroup analyses of patients who might theoretically benefit from earlier pre-emptive transplantation. In summary, pre-emptive kidney transplantation is occurring at increasing levels of native kidney function. Earlier transplantation does not appear to associate with patient or graft survival, suggesting that earlier pre-emptive transplantation may subject donors and recipients to premature operative risk and waste the native kidney function of recipients.

  3. Trends in the Timing of Pre-emptive Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Morgan E.; Massie, Allan B.; Coresh, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Pre-emptive kidney transplantation is considered the best available renal replacement therapy, but no guidelines exist to direct its timing during CKD progression. We used a national cohort of 19,471 first-time pre-emptive kidney transplant recipients between 1995–2009 to evaluate patterns and implications of transplant timing. Mean estimated GFR (eGFR) at the time of pre-emptive transplant increased significantly over time, from 9.2 ml/min/1.73m2 in 1995 to 13.8 ml/min/1.73m2 in 2009 (P<0.001). Patients with eGFR≥15 ml/min/1.73m2 represented an increasing proportion of pre-emptive transplant recipients, from 9% in 1995 to 35% in 2009; the trend for patients with eGFR≥10 was similar (30% to 72%). We did not detect statistically significant differences in patient survival or death-censored graft survival between strata of eGFR at the time of transplant, either in the full cohort or in subgroup analyses of patients who might theoretically benefit from earlier pre-emptive transplantation. In summary, pre-emptive kidney transplantation is occurring at increasing levels of native kidney function. Earlier transplantation does not appear to associate with patient or graft survival, suggesting that earlier pre-emptive transplantation may subject donors and recipients to premature operative risk and waste the native kidney function of recipients. PMID:21617118

  4. [Bilateral stage nephrectomy as a preparation for kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Bauer, H W; Land, W

    1982-03-01

    The indication for nephrectomy prior to kidney transplantation has changed. Contrary to the formerly in nearly all transplantation centres practiced one-time two-sided nephrectomy, at present the removal of the patient's own kidneys prior to transplantation is done only if strictly indicated. In contrast to other transplantation centres which, if indicated, still today carry out bilateral nephrectomy prior to transplantation is done only if strictly indicated. In contrast to other transplantation centres which, if indicated, still today carry out bilateral nephrectomy prior to transplantation, since 1977 the transplantation centre of Munich prefers the two-time bilateral nephrectomy. Technique, surgical approach, indication and results of our method are presented. In the course of the discussion the disadvantages of the one-time bilateral nephrectomy are opposed to the advantages of the two-time method.

  5. Commercial kidney transplantation is an important risk factor in long-term kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Ananth, Sailesh; Palepu, Sneha; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Transplant tourism, a form of transplant commercialization, has resulted in serious short-term adverse outcomes that explain reduced short-term kidney allograft survival. However, the nature of longer-term outcomes in commercial kidney transplant recipients is less clear. To study this further, we identified 69 Canadian commercial transplant recipients of 72 kidney allografts transplanted during 1998 to 2013 who reported to our transplant center for follow-up care. Their outcomes to 8 years post-transplant were compared with 702 domestic living donor and 827 deceased donor transplant recipients during this period using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Among many complications, notable specific events included hepatitis B or C seroconversion (7 patients), active hepatitis and/or fulminant hepatic failure (4 patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (2 patients), and a type A dissecting aortic aneurysm. Commercial transplantation was independently associated with significantly reduced death-censored kidney allograft survival (hazard ratio 3.69, 95% confidence interval 1.88-7.25) along with significantly delayed graft function and eGFR 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) or less at 3 months post-transplant. Thus, commercial transplantation represents an important risk factor for long-term kidney allograft loss. Concerted arguments and efforts using adverse recipient outcomes among the main premises are still required in order to eradicate transplant commercialization.

  6. The evolution of untreated borderline and subclinical rejections at first month kidney allograft biopsy in comparison with histological changes at 6 months protocol biopsies.

    PubMed

    Masin-Spasovska, J; Spasovski, G; Dzikova, S; Petrusevska, G; Dimova, B; Lekovski, Lj; Popov, Z; Ivanovski, N; Polenakovic, M

    2005-08-01

    Our study sought to identify the possible implications of histological findings of borderline and subclinical rejections as well as histological markers of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) in protocol biopsies at 1 and 6 months after living-related kidney transplantation. Twenty-eight paired allograft biopsies were blindly reviewed using Banff '97 criteria, among which only 10.7% (6/56) showed no histopathological lesions. BR was found in 9/28 (32.1%) and 6/28 (21.4%), and SR in 3/28 (10.7%) and 10/28 (35.7%) of the patients, in the 1 and 6 month biopsies, respectively. The mean CAN score (sum of histological markers for chronicity) increased significantly at 6 months biopsy, 1.57 +/- 1.36 vs. 4.36 +/- 2.32 (p < 0.01). When compared according to chronicity index (CI < 5 >), the high CI group had a mean CAN score of 2.36 +/- 1.15 at 1 month, which increased to 5.14 +/- 1.99 at 6 months biopsy (188.9%). The proportion of these changes in low CI group were also increased from 0.79 +/- 1.12 to 3.57 +/- 2.38 (451.9%). In conclusion, a protocol 1 month biopsy may uncover a high prevalence of BR or SR in stable allografts. The presence of an untreated BR or SR in biopsies with low chronicity index showed greater susceptibility to histological deterioration on the 6 month biopsy, associated with rapid impairment of graft function and chronic allograft nephropathy.

  7. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results.

  8. Ganciclovir use evaluation in kidney transplantation departments

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffar, Maryam; Shahidi, Shahrzad; Badri, Shirinsadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we evaluated certain aspects of the usage and administration of one lifesaving, high-cost medication, i.e., Ganciclovir for the prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in transplant patients. Methods: This study was performed from 2013 to 2015 by conducting a medication use evaluation (MUE) program in the kidney transplantation departments of two tertiary care hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The MUE criteria for the drug were developed by applying drug information references. In every category of data, the number (percent) of cases, in which drug therapy was in accordance with the predetermined criteria, was calculated. Findings: During the study period, 67 cases were observed. The only documented drug interaction was the minor interaction of Ganciclovir with mycophenolate mofetil in 77% of the patients. In all patients, intravenous (IV) infusion was the route of administration, mainly in the peripheral veins. Four patients showed adverse drug reaction, which leads to Ganciclovir discontinuation. Ganciclovir was administered despite contraindication in 34.3% of the patients. Conclusion: In this study, we faced a relatively unacceptable situation, in which Ganciclovir is handled somehow inappropriately. It seems necessary to develop an updated local guideline to approximate the administering pattern of such costly medications to standard protocols. PMID:27512714

  9. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Dawn K.; Campbell, Latoya E.; Weil, Jennifer; Kaplan, Bruce; Clarkson, Marie; Finlayson, Jean; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Chakkera, Harini A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown. Methods Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed. Result Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant. Conclusions Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose

  10. Gastrointestinal surgical emergencies following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bardaxoglou, E; Maddern, G; Ruso, L; Siriser, F; Campion, J P; Le Pogamp, P; Catheline, J M; Launois, B

    1993-05-01

    This study reports major gastrointestinal complications in a group of 416 patients following kidney transplantation. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients received a cadaveric kidney while the other 17 received a living related organ. The immunosuppressive regimen changed somewhat during the course of the study but included azathioprine, prednisolone, antilymphocyte globulin, and cyclosporin. Perforations occurred in the colon (n = 6), small bowel (n = 4), duodenum (n = 2), stomach (n = 1), and esophagus (n = 1). There were five cases of acute pancreatitis, four of upper gastrointestinal and two of lower intestinal hemorrhage, two of acute appendicitis, one of acute cholecystitis, one postoperative mesenteric infarction, and two small bowel obstructions. Fifty percent of the complications occurred while patients were being given high-dose immunosuppression to manage either the early postoperative period or episodes of acute rejection. Ten percent of the complications had an iatrogenic cause. Of the 31 patients affected, 10 (30%) died as a direct result of their gastrointestinal complication. This high mortality appears to be related to the effects of the immunosuppression and the associated response to sepsis. Reduction of these complications can be achieved by improved surgical management, preventive measures, prompt diagnosis, and a reduced immunosuppressive protocol.

  11. [BK virus infections in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lanot, Antoine; Bouvier, Nicolas; Chatelet, Valérie; Dina, Julia; Béchade, Clémence; Ficheux, Maxence; Henri, Patrick; Lobbedez, Thierry; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    BK virus is near ubiquitous, with a seroprevalence of around 80% in the general population. Subsequent to an asymptomatic primary infection, BK virus then remains dormant in healthy subjects. Reactivation occurs in immunocompromised people. BKv is pathogenic mainly among patients who have received a kidney transplant, in whom the virus can cause specific tubulo-interstitial nephritis and even result in graft failure among approximately 20 to 30% of nephritic cases. Since the mid 90 s, incidence has increased with the use of new powerful immunosuppressor treatments. The cornerstone of BK virus infection or BK virus-associated nephropathy treatment is a decrease of the immunosuppressive regimen, which must then be offset with the risk of rejection. The use of several adjuvant therapies has been submitted (fluoroquinolones, leflunomide, intravenous immunoglobulins, cidofovir), with no sufficient proof enabling the recommendation of first-line prescription. The high frequency of this infection and its potential harmfulness argue for the use of prevention strategies, at least among patients presenting risk factors. Retransplantation is safe after a first kidney allograft loss caused by BK-virus nephropathy, on condition that a screening for viremia is frequently conducted.

  12. [BK virus infections in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lanot, Antoine; Bouvier, Nicolas; Chatelet, Valérie; Dina, Julia; Béchade, Clémence; Ficheux, Maxence; Henri, Patrick; Lobbedez, Thierry; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    BK virus is near ubiquitous, with a seroprevalence of around 80% in the general population. Subsequent to an asymptomatic primary infection, BK virus then remains dormant in healthy subjects. Reactivation occurs in immunocompromised people. BKv is pathogenic mainly among patients who have received a kidney transplant, in whom the virus can cause specific tubulo-interstitial nephritis and even result in graft failure among approximately 20 to 30% of nephritic cases. Since the mid 90 s, incidence has increased with the use of new powerful immunosuppressor treatments. The cornerstone of BK virus infection or BK virus-associated nephropathy treatment is a decrease of the immunosuppressive regimen, which must then be offset with the risk of rejection. The use of several adjuvant therapies has been submitted (fluoroquinolones, leflunomide, intravenous immunoglobulins, cidofovir), with no sufficient proof enabling the recommendation of first-line prescription. The high frequency of this infection and its potential harmfulness argue for the use of prevention strategies, at least among patients presenting risk factors. Retransplantation is safe after a first kidney allograft loss caused by BK-virus nephropathy, on condition that a screening for viremia is frequently conducted. PMID:26827190

  13. Bilateral renal lymphoma: rapid recovery from an acute kidney injury after open renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mitome, Taku; Furuya, Kazuhiro; Imano, Masashi; Osaka, Kimito; Yokomizo, Yumiko; Hayashi, Narihiko; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Yamanaka, Shoji; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Renal lymphoma as an initial lesion is relatively rare. Bilateral renal lymphoma frequently presents as acute kidney injury. With systematic chemotherapy for the lymphoma, patients usually recover their kidney function. However, in the case we describe here, the patient's kidney function recovered greatly after an open renal biopsy. Here, we review and discuss this unique case.

  14. Recombinant PTH therapy for severe hypoparathyroidism after kidney transplantation in pre-transplant parathyroidectomized patients: review of the literature and a case report.

    PubMed

    Hod, Tammy; Riella, Leonardo V; Chandraker, Anil

    2015-11-01

    Although transient hypocalcemia following kidney transplantation can occur, severe refractory hypocalcemia is uncommon. We report a case of a 31-yr-old highly sensitized man with end-stage renal disease caused by reflux nephropathy, who received an expanded criteria deceased donor kidney transplant. The post-transplant course was significant for profound hypocalcemia despite treatment with large doses of calcium and vitamin D, in the setting of severe hypoparathyroidism following a subtotal parathyroidectomy three yr prior to the transplant. His course was also complicated by suboptimal allograft function with significant new vascular changes seen in the allograft biopsy by seven wk post-transplant. Teriparatide (recombinant parathyroid hormone) injections were initiated (up to three times daily) with improvement in the vascular changes and a decrease in calcium phosphate calcification in biopsy, as well as reduction in hypercalciuria, restoration of calcium phosphate homeostasis and stabilization of allograft function. We describe six other cases of post-transplant hypoparathyroidism, with five of six having decreased allograft function and three of those five demonstrating significant accelerated vascular changes on biopsy. We discuss the use of teriparatide injections for the treatment of renal transplant recipients with impaired renal function in the setting of hypoparathyroidism.

  15. When is Transplantation with a "Marginal Kidney" Justifiable?

    PubMed

    Rouchi, Alireza Heidary; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    The ability of kidney transplantation to improve quality of life has made this therapeutic modality the treatment of choice among renal replacement therapies; however, the continuing organ shortage has forced the use of marginal kidneys as a supplementary source of allografts. It has been repeatedly suggested that failed kidney transplant recipients have greater morbidity and mortality compared with dialysis patients with no renal transplant history. Achieving an optimal balance between the advantages of kidney transplant and disadvantages of allografts with marginal quality is a topic of controversy in transplant medicine. The major and potentially life-threatening complications of immunosuppressive therapies and shorter lifespan following graft failure necessitate a reappraisal of kidney transplant programs from expanded-criteria deceased donors, which can neither necessarily give dialysis patients a better quality of life nor a significant survival benefit, especially in settings with additional diminished graft survival due to HLA-mismatch. It should be offered just to those with short life expectancy and with HLA-matching. The last item is very important in countries without mandatory HLA-matching protocols for kidney transplantation programs. PMID:27457730

  16. Kidney transplant access in the Southeast: view from the bottom.

    PubMed

    Patzer, R E; Pastan, S O

    2014-07-01

    The Southeastern region of the United States has the highest burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) but the lowest rates of kidney transplantation in the nation. There are many patient-, dialysis facility-, ESRD Network- and health system-level barriers that contribute to this regional disparity. Compared to the rest of the nation, the Southeast has a larger population of African-Americans and higher poverty, as well as more prevalent ESRD risk factors including hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Dialysis facilities--where ESRD patients receive the majority of their healthcare--play an important role in transplant access. Identifying characteristics of individual dialysis units with low rates of kidney transplantation, such as understaffing or for-profit status, can help identify targets for quality improvement initiatives. Geographic differences across the country can identify opportunities to increase funding for healthcare resources in proportion to patient and disease burden. Focusing interventions among dialysis facilities with the lowest transplant rates within the Southeast, such as provider and patient education, has the potential to increase referrals for kidney transplantation, leading to higher rates of kidney transplants in this region. Referral for transplantation should be measured on a national level to monitor disparities in early access to transplantation. Transplant centers have an obligation to assist underserved populations in ensuring equity in access to services. Policies that improve access to care for patients, such as the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, are particularly important for Southern states and may alleviate geographic disparities.

  17. Kidney Transplant Access in the Southeast: View From the Bottom

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, R. E.; Pastan, S. O.

    2014-01-01

    The Southeastern region of the United States has the highest burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) but the lowest rates of kidney transplantation in the nation. There are many patient-, dialysis facility–, ESRD Network– and health system–level barriers that contribute to this regional disparity. Compared to the rest of the nation, the Southeast has a larger population of African-Americans and higher poverty, as well as more prevalent ESRD risk factors including hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Dialysis facilities—where ESRD patients receive the majority of their healthcare—play an important role in transplant access. Identifying characteristics of individual dialysis units with low rates of kidney transplantation, such as understaffing or for-profit status, can help identify targets for quality improvement initiatives. Geographic differences across the country can identify opportunities to increase funding for healthcare resources in proportion to patient and disease burden. Focusing interventions among dialysis facilities with the lowest transplant rates within the Southeast, such as provider and patient education, has the potential to increase referrals for kidney transplantation, leading to higher rates of kidney transplants in this region. Referral for transplantation should be measured on a national level to monitor disparities in early access to transplantation. Transplant centers have an obligation to assist under-served populations in ensuring equity in access to services. Policies that improve access to care for patients, such as the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion, are particularly important for Southern states and may alleviate geographic disparities. PMID:24891223

  18. Scintigraphic evaluation of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Melloul, M.M.; Shmueli, D.; Mechlis-Frish, S.; Shapira, Z.; Baniel, J.; Rousso, I.; Cohen, M.; Lubin, E.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic evaluation of a rare case of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney is presented. Uptake of Tc-99m DMSA in the involved area was reduced and the Ga-67 uptake was increased.

  19. Preemptive kidney transplantation--a team experience in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, F; Curi, L; González-Carballido, G; Núñez, N; Manzo, L; Kurdián, M; Larre Borges, P; Nin, M; Orihuela, S

    2014-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage chronic renal disease. In Uruguay, the prevalence of patients on dialysis is 757 patients per millon inhabitants, plus 316 alive with a functioning renal graft. We install a preemptive renal transplantation program. Twenty-five patients received grafts without dialysis from 2004 to 2013, 5 receiving their 2nd transplantation and 17 from cadaveric donors, with 7.4 ± 7.7 months in the waiting list. At 24 months, patients' survival rate was 100% and the grafts' 97%, with a serum creatinine of 1.4 ± 0.6 mg%. The developed programs of dialysis and renal health care contributed install our preemptive kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation should be proposed to selected patients with chronic renal failure as primary therapy of substitution of renal function.

  20. Kidney transplantation in previous heart or lung recipients.

    PubMed

    Lonze, B E; Warren, D S; Stewart, Z A; Dagher, N N; Singer, A L; Shah, A S; Montgomery, R A; Segev, D L

    2009-03-01

    Outcomes after heart and lung transplants have improved, and many recipients survive long enough to develop secondary renal failure, yet remain healthy enough to undergo kidney transplantation. We used national data reported to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to evaluate outcomes of 568 kidney after heart (KAH) and 210 kidney after lung (KAL) transplants performed between 1995 and 2008. Median time to kidney transplant was 100.3 months after heart, and 90.2 months after lung transplant. Renal failure was attributed to calcineurin inhibitor toxicity in most patients. Outcomes were compared with primary kidney recipients using matched controls (MC) to account for donor, recipient and graft characteristics. Although 5-year renal graft survival was lower than primary kidney recipients (61% KAH vs. 73.8% MC, p < 0.001; 62.6% KAL vs. 82.9% MC, p < 0.001), death-censored graft survival was comparable (84.9% KAH vs. 88.2% MC, p = 0.1; 87.6% KAL vs. 91.8% MC, p = 0.6). Furthermore, renal transplantation reduced the risk of death compared with dialysis by 43% for KAH and 54% for KAL recipients. Our findings that renal grafts function well and provide survival benefit in KAH and KAL recipients, but are limited in longevity by the general life expectancy of these recipients, might help inform clinical decision-making and allocation in this population.

  1. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  2. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  3. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  4. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  5. Geographic Determinants of Access to Pediatric Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hojun; Potluri, Vishnu; Abt, Peter L.; Shults, Justine; Amaral, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Children receive priority in the allocation of deceased donor kidneys for transplantation in the United States, but because allocation begins locally, geographic differences in population and organ supply may enable variation in pediatric access to transplantation. We assembled a cohort of 3764 individual listings for pediatric kidney transplantation in 2005–2010. For each donor service area, we assigned a category of short (<180 days), medium (181–270 days), or long (>270 days) median waiting time and calculated the ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to pediatric candidates and the percentage of these kidneys locally diverted to adults. We used multivariable Cox regression analyses to examine the association between donor service area characteristics and time to deceased donor kidney transplantation. The Kaplan–Meier estimate of median waiting time to transplantation was 284 days (95% confidence interval, 263 to 300 days) and varied from 14 to 1313 days across donor service areas. Overall, 29% of pediatric-quality kidneys were locally diverted to adults. Compared with areas with short waiting times, areas with long waiting times had a lower ratio of pediatric-quality kidneys to candidates (3.1 versus 5.9; P<0.001) and more diversions to adults (31% versus 27%; P<0.001). In multivariable regression, a lower kidney to candidate ratio remained associated with longer waiting time (hazard ratio, 0.56 for areas with <2:1 versus reference areas with ≥5:1 kidneys/candidates; P<0.01). Large geographic variation in waiting time for pediatric deceased donor kidney transplantation exists and is highly associated with local supply and demand factors. Future organ allocation policy should address this geographic inequity. PMID:24436470

  6. Banff fibrosis study: multicenter visual assessment and computerized analysis of interstitial fibrosis in kidney biopsies.

    PubMed

    Farris, A B; Chan, S; Climenhaga, J; Adam, B; Bellamy, C O C; Serón, D; Colvin, R B; Reeve, J; Mengel, M

    2014-04-01

    Increasing interstitial fibrosis (IF) in native and kidney transplant biopsies is associated with functional decline and serves as a clinical trial end point. A Banff 2009 Conference survey revealed a range in IF assessment practices. Observers from multiple centers were asked to assess 30 renal biopsies with a range of IF and quantitate IF using two approaches on trichrome, Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and computer-assisted quantification of collagen III immunohistochemistry (C-IHC) slides, as well as assessing percent of cortical tubular atrophy% (TA%) and Banff total cortical inflammation score (ti-score). C-IHC using whole slide scans was performed. C-IHC assessment showed a higher correlation with organ function (r = -0.48) than did visual assessments (r = -0.32--0.42); computerized and visual C-IHC assessment also correlated (r = 0.64-0.66). Visual assessment of trichrome and C-IHC showed better correlations with organ function and C-IHC, than PAS, TA% and ti-score. However, visual assessment of IF, independent of approach, was variable among observers, and differences in correlations with organ function were not statistically significant among C-IHC image analysis and visual assessment methods. C-IHC image analysis correlated among three centers (r > 0.90, p < 0.0001, between all centers). Given the difficulty of visual IF assessment standardization, C-IHC image could potentially accomplish standardized IF assessment in multicenter settings. PMID:24712330

  7. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  8. Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: the Indian experience with kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    According to the Indian chronic kidney disease registry, in 2010 only 2% of end stage kidney disease patients were managed with kidney transplantation, 37% were managed with dialysis and 61% were treated conservatively without renal replacement therapy. In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. The most common reason to decline a donor for directed living donation is ABO incompatibility, which eliminates up to one third of the potential living donor pool. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. In transplant centres with a large living donor kidney transplantation program KPD does not require extra infrastructure, decreases waiting time, avoids transplant tourism and prevents commercial trafficking. Although KPD is still underutilized in India, it has been performed more frequently in recent times. To substantially increase donor pool and transplant rates, transplant centres should work together towards a national KPD program and frame a uniform acceptable allocation policy. PMID:24995599

  9. Increasing access to kidney transplantation in countries with limited resources: the Indian experience with kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    According to the Indian chronic kidney disease registry, in 2010 only 2% of end stage kidney disease patients were managed with kidney transplantation, 37% were managed with dialysis and 61% were treated conservatively without renal replacement therapy. In countries like India, where a well-organized deceased donor kidney transplantation program is not available, living donor kidney transplantation is the major source of organs for kidney transplantation. The most common reason to decline a donor for directed living donation is ABO incompatibility, which eliminates up to one third of the potential living donor pool. Because access to transplantation with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end stage kidney disease patients. KPD is a rapidly growing and cost-effective living donor kidney transplantation strategy for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. In principle, KPD is feasible for any centre that performs living donor kidney transplantation. In transplant centres with a large living donor kidney transplantation program KPD does not require extra infrastructure, decreases waiting time, avoids transplant tourism and prevents commercial trafficking. Although KPD is still underutilized in India, it has been performed more frequently in recent times. To substantially increase donor pool and transplant rates, transplant centres should work together towards a national KPD program and frame a uniform acceptable allocation policy.

  10. [Hemodynamic and hydrodynamic problems in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Schuldt, H H

    1979-09-01

    On the basis of general realisations and own experimental or clinical observations haemodynamic and hydrodynamic problems, respectively, of renal conditioning in the organism of the donor, the perfusion preservation and the phase of repeated blood supply are represented and discussed. It is shown that an improvement of the renal blood supply and of she flow of the urine in the donor with "dead brain" by alpha-adrenergic blockade or stimulation of beta-receptors is not sufficient for overcoming restrictions of the renal function. A pulsatile perfusion and the permanent opening of the vascular lumen when the medium changes between blood and perfusate are regarded as most favourable hydrodynamic prerequisites for the initial hypothermal lavation of blood. In continuous machine perfusion with oxygenated protein-containing solutions a dilation of the renal vessels takes place, so that the cortical perfusion is guaranteed also in low pressures. After the transplantation there exists a significant pathogenetic correlation between the total blood supply of the kidney and its early function.

  11. Emerging viral diseases in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Moal, Valérie; Zandotti, Christine; Colson, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are the most important cause of infections and a major source of mortality in Kidney Transplant Recipients (KTRs). These patients may acquire viral infections through exogenous routes including community exposure, donor organs, and blood products or by endogenous reactivation of latent viruses. Beside major opportunistic infections due to CMV and EBV and viral hepatitis B and C, several viral diseases have recently emerged in KTRs. New medical practices or technologies, implementation of new diagnostic tools, and improved medical information have contributed to the emergence of these viral diseases in this special population. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on emerging viral diseases and newly discovered viruses in KTRs over the last two decades. We identified viruses in the field of KT that had shown the greatest increase in numbers of citations in the NCBI PubMed database. BKV was the most cited in the literature and linked to an emerging disease that represents a great clinical concern in KTRs. HHV-8, PVB19, WNV, JCV, H1N1 influenza virus A, HEV, and GB virus were the main other emerging viruses. Excluding HHV8, newly discovered viruses have been infrequently linked to clinical diseases in KTRs. Nonetheless, pathogenicity can emerge long after the discovery of the causative agent, as has been the case for BKV. Overall, antiviral treatments are very limited, and reducing immunosuppressive therapy remains the cornerstone of management. PMID:23132728

  12. Tissue Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Expression in the Prediction of Renal Function for Several Years after Kidney Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Simic Ogrizovic, Sanja; Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana; Radojevic, Sanja; Pavlovic, Jelena; Kotur Stevuljevic, Jelena; Dopsaj, Violeta; Naumovic, Radomir

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Retrospective study was designed to examine the importance of tissue kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) expression in predicting kidney function in sixty patients (27 males) aged 34.15 ± 12.23 years with different kidney diseases over three years after kidney biopsy. Materials and Methods. Tissue KIM-1 expression was determined immunohistochemically and KIM-1 staining was scored semiquantitatively, as well as tubulointerstitialis (TIN), inflammation, atrophy, and fibrosis. Kidney function (MDRD formula) and proteinuria/day were evaluated at the time of biopsy (GFR0) and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months later. Results. Significantly positive correlations between tissue KIM-1 expression and age (r = 0.313), TIN inflammation (r = 0.456), fibrosis (r = 0.317), and proteinuria at 6 months (r = 0.394) as well as negative correlations with GFR0 (r = −0.572), GFR6 (r = −0.442), GFR24 (r = −0.398), and GFR36 (r = −0.412) were found. Meanwhile, TIN inflammation was the best predictor of all measured kidney functions during three years, while tissue KIM-1 expression (P = 0.016) was a predictor only at 6 months after biopsy. Conclusion. Tissue KIM-1 expression significantly predicts kidney function solely at 6 months after biopsy, when the effects of immune and nonimmune treatments are the strongest. PMID:24282337

  13. The effect of MICA antigens on kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Mei, Hong; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Good HLA matches do not guarantee rejection-free kidney transplantation, indicating that other antigens might be targets for rejection. The major histocompatibility complex class I-related antigens A (MICA) are polymorphic. Mismatched MICA epitopes may lead to antibodies against MICA antigens and induce immune response. Establishment of detection technique for MICA, including solid-phase, immunofluorescence, flow-crossmatch, make it possible to detect the types of MICA antibodies. Therefore, the pathological role of MICA antibodies has received an increased attention in kidney transplantation. This review describes and summarizes the data from recent studies related to the impact of MICA antibodies on kidney allografts rejection and survival. And also provides evidence that the presence of MICA antibodies before or after transplantation, as a risk factor, is likely to be responsible for transplant outcomes.

  14. Urologic considerations and complications in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Heather N; Darras, Frank S

    2015-07-01

    Urologic considerations during the kidney transplantation process, starting with initial recipient evaluation and continuing through the post-transplant, long-term follow-up, are critical for minimizing urologic complications and improving graft survival. Appropriate, targeted, preoperative urologic evaluation of the recipient allows for an optimized urinary tract to accept the graft, whereas post-transplant urologic follow-up and monitoring decrease the risk of graft lost secondary to a urologic cause, particularly in patients with a urologic reason for their kidney failure and in those patients with concomitant urologic diagnoses. Urologic complications comprise the second most common adverse post-transplant event, occurring in 2.5% to 14% of patients and are associated with high morbidity, graft loss, and mortality. Early and late urologic complications, including hematuria, hematoma, lymphocele, urine leak, ureteral stricture, nephrolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux, and their causes and treatment options are explored. A multidisciplinary team approach to kidney transplantation, including transplant surgery, urology, and nephrology, optimizes outcomes and graft survival. Although the current role of the urologist in kidney transplantation varies greatly by institution, appropriate consultation, participation, and monitoring in select patients is essential.

  15. The role of commercial non-related living kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, Michael M

    2003-01-01

    The motivation for dialysis patients to seek early, even pre-emptive, kidney transplantation from living donors is discussed. In most countries both the waiting time and the numbers of patients awaiting kidney transplantation are increasing. Local geopolitics in Jerusalem have produced a unique window to observe present transplant practices which include widespread international marketing of kidneys from paid living donors. These have been subject of media admonitions and total rejection by professional organizations. In a modern world, traditional medical paternalism to both donors and patients should be balanced by rights for individual autonomy. Since patients, donors and medical professionals are already participating in illicit organ trading, is it not time for us to seriously consider the ethical and logistic implications of legalizing financial remuneration for kidney donation? PMID:14733294

  16. The role of commercial non-related living kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, Michael M

    2003-01-01

    The motivation for dialysis patients to seek early, even pre-emptive, kidney transplantation from living donors is discussed. In most countries both the waiting time and the numbers of patients awaiting kidney transplantation are increasing. Local geopolitics in Jerusalem have produced a unique window to observe present transplant practices which include widespread international marketing of kidneys from paid living donors. These have been subject of media admonitions and total rejection by professional organizations. In a modern world, traditional medical paternalism to both donors and patients should be balanced by rights for individual autonomy. Since patients, donors and medical professionals are already participating in illicit organ trading, is it not time for us to seriously consider the ethical and logistic implications of legalizing financial remuneration for kidney donation?

  17. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top ] What are the steps in the transplant process? The transplant process has many steps. Talking with Your Health Care ... Current Funding Opportunities Funded Grants & Grant History Funding Process Research Programs & Contacts Research Training & Career Development Research ...

  18. [Diabetes following kidney transplantation. Report of 35 cases].

    PubMed

    Kaaroud, Hayet; Khiari, Karima; Beji, Soumaya; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Ayed, Khaled; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2004-02-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication of renal transplantation. It has a prevalence rate ranging from 3 to 46%. We undertook a retrospective study of 175 nondiabetic renal transplant recipients to determine the prevalence rate, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of PTDM in kidney transplant recipients in our region. Thirty five patients (20%) developed PTDM, 50% were diagnosed by 3 months post transplantation. Eight patients (22.8%) were insulin recurrent. PTDM was independent of kidney source, family history of diabetes, age, sex, incidence of acute rejection, body weight gain, steroid or cyclosporine dose, use of beta-blockers and cytomegalovirus infection. Acturial 5 years survival was 79.4% in the diabetic compared to 80.5% in the control group. Patient survival was similar in the two groups. We conclude that PTDM is frequent in our patients. No significant risk factors of PTDM were identified in this study.

  19. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-07-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV(+) donors to HIV(+) recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV(+) to HIV(+) kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV(+) to HIV(+) liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  20. Underutilization of Timely Kidney Transplants in Those With Living Donors.

    PubMed

    Sakhuja, A; Naik, A; Amer, H; Cibrik, D; Eikstadt, R; Schold, J D; Stegall, M D

    2016-03-01

    Preemptive kidney transplant (PKTx) and kidney transplant (KTx) within 1 year of dialysis initiation have been associated with superior outcomes. Wait times should be minimal for transplants with living donors; however, there is lack of literature studying utilization of timely KTx in this population. We designed this retrospective study using data from United Network for Organ Sharing Standard Transplant Analysis and Research files from 2000 to 2012 to assess the trends in utilization of PKTx and Early KTx (combination of PKTx or transplant within 1 year of dialysis initiation) in recipients of living donor KTx. Only 32.6% transplants were PKTx, and 61.9% were Early KTx. A significant improvement in proportion of PKTx was seen from 27.5% in 2000 to 35.4% in 2006, with no change since. Similarly, the proportion of Early KTx increased from 61.4% in 2000 to 63.6% in 2006, with no increase since. Similar results were seen after adjusted analysis and were independent of living donor type. Although there was some improvement in utilization of timely transplants in the early part of the last decade, there has been no improvement since. Considering the benefits of timely kidney transplant, it is important to understand the reasons behind the same and to improve utilization.

  1. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  2. Trends in kidney transplantation outcome: the Andalusian Kidney Transplant Registry, 1984-2007.

    PubMed

    Gentil Govantes, M A; Rodriguez-Benot, A; Sola, E; Osuna, A; Mazuecos, A; Bedoya, R; Borrego, J; Muñoz-Terol, J M; Castro, P; Alonso, M

    2009-06-01

    Herein we have presented the first report from the Andalusian Kidney Transplant Registry, a Public Health Service Regional Registry in Andalusia, Spain (general population, 8 million). The current analysis was limited to 5599 kidney-alone transplants from deceased donors, grouped into 4 time periods: 1984-1989 (n = 846); 1990-1995 (n = 1172); 1996-2001 (n = 1801); and 2002-2007 (n = 2060). The age of the transplant patients rose over time to 21.7% of recipients of ages >or=60 years in 2002-2007. In the later years we observed an increased incidence of vascular and diabetic causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients who underwent retransplantation increased from 2.7% in 1984-1989 to 8.1% in 2002-2007. Time on previous renal replacement therapy (RRT) increased from 33.1 +/- 29 to 48 +/- 53 months. Patient survivals at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96%, 91%, 83%, and 63%, respectively. Censoring for death, graft survivals were 90%, 80%, 67%, and 45%, respectively. Compared with the 1984-1989 period, patient survival improved by about 10% (P < .001) since 1990, remaining stable to 2007. Censored 5-year graft survivals progressively improved from 72% to 77%, 82%, and 85% (P < .001). Upon multivariate analysis, gender, age >39 years, diabetes, and RRT duration were independent predictors of patient survival. Age <18 years, retransplantation, and positive hepatitis C virus serology were independent predictors of lower graft survival. Considering 1984-1989 as the reference time period, both patient and graft mortality risks continuously decreased over the following 3 periods (relative risk [RR] = 0.5-0.4-0.3 for patient mortality; RR = 0.8-0.6-0.5 for graft mortality). In summary, despite an increased number of adverse risk factors, both patient and graft survivals have improved from 1984 to date.

  3. The global role of kidney transplantation for the world kidney day steering committee 2012.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Harden, P; Chapman, J

    2012-01-01

    World Kidney Day on March 8th, 2012, provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end-stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments, both for the quality and quantity of life, that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end-stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high-income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  4. [METHODS FOR DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES TO HLA ANTIGENS IN PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION AND COMBINED PANCREAS-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION].

    PubMed

    Ančić, Mirela; Maravić, Blaženko; Radman, Maja; Kovačić, Vedran

    2014-12-01

    The best possibility to treat chronic renal disease is renal transplantation. Especially important fact in transplantation is the percentage of so-called panel reactive antibody (PRA) that is focused on the human leukocyte antigen. There are several methods to determine the percentage of PRA in sensitized patients awaiting kidney transplants. The most important is the complement-dependent cytotoxicity. A higher value of PRA implies greater likelihood of positive cross-match with random donor and lower probability of receiving a transplant. Comparing the sensitivity of laboratory tests for determination of PRA percentage in patient serum, it is concluded that ELISA and flow cytometry proved to be more sensitive and specific.

  5. [Acute conditions after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Bujdák, P; Pribylincová, V; Reznícek, J; Miklosi, M; Breza, J

    2003-05-01

    There is a high risk of severe complications after kidney transplantation. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) the incidence of complications like ischaemic cardiac disease, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, perforation of colonic diverticulosis is especially higher. The authors want to indicate another specific complication, rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Within the group of 658 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1981 and January 2000 there were 54 (8.2%) patients with AD-PKD. Four patients with severe retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney we present in a short case reports. All cases were fatal. Expect morphologic and functional follow up of the graft it is necessary to follow up polycystic kidney and indicate urgent nephrectomy in the case of any change.

  6. A case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome diagnosed after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Min; Kim, Da Rae; Park, Ji Yoon; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Se Yun; Kim, Jin Sug; Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee, Sang-Ho; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Lee, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) diagnosed after kidney transplantation in Korea. RHS is a disease caused by latent varicella-zoster characterized to involve geniculate ganglion of the seventh cranial nerve. Patients who have undergone kidney transplantation can be easily affected by viral infections because of their immune-compromised status. A 35-year-old man with hypertensive end-stage renal disease underwent kidney transplantation. Two months after surgery, the recipient was diagnosed with RHS and treated with antivirals and steroids. However, after using the antiviral agents for the recommended duration, facial paralysis occurred as a new presentation and he required further treatment. Otalgia and periauricular vesicles improved, but the facial palsy remained. PMID:26779429

  7. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT DURING COMBINED LIVER AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.

    PubMed

    El Kouny, Amr; Harbi, Mohammed; Ismail, Hesham; Abouras, Chadi; Basha, Abdulatif; Abojeesh, Ibrahim; Naeim, Annas; Kashkoush, Sami; Khalid, Abdullah; Ohali, Wael; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-06-01

    Combined liver and kidney transplantation is a highly demanding and challenging procedure for anesthesiologists due to the lengthy and complicated nature of the procedure, the critical patient condition and the need to balance the intravascular volume to maintain the venous outflow of the hepatic allograft and also the diuresis of the renal allograft. Intravascular volume management and coagulation control, seem to be the most important issues during combined liver and kidney transplantation. There is sparsity of data in the literature concerning the anesthetic and fluid management in CLKT. We present and discuss the anesthetic management in a case series in three patients, who underwent combined liver and kidney transplantation in our institution during the last two years. PMID:27487641

  8. Acute kidney transplant failure following transurethral bladder polyp fulguration.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Bradley H.; Marroquin, Carlos E.; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Kuo, Paul C.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Butterly, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction and anastomotic leak represent the most common urologic complications of kidney transplantation. Delay in diagnosis or treatment can lead to allograft loss. Obstruction of the ureter occurs in 2% of kidney transplant recipients. Although the majority of cases are immediate technical complications of the operation, subsequent manipulation of the genitourinary system can result in iatrogenic ureteral injury. We report the case of a long-term kidney transplant recipient who developed obstructive uropathy and acute renal failure requiring dialysis after undergoing cystoscopy and bladder polyp fulguration. The etiology was inadvertent thermal injury of the ureteroneocystostomy incurred during the procedure. After attempted percutaneous management, definitive open repair resulted in a return of allograft function to baseline. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15779509

  9. Psychosocial needs assessment post kidney transplant: Feasibility of a post-transplant specific support group.

    PubMed

    Brijmohan, Angela; Famure, Olusegun; Sihota, Kiren; Shea, Mary; Marzario, Barbara; Mitchell, Margot

    2015-01-01

    This project assessed unmet psychosocial needs of kidney transplant recipients and the feasibility of a support group located at an urban Canadian hospital to meet those needs. A survey assessed transplant recipient concerns about psychosocial issues related to transplantation, interest in a support group, desired group composition, facilitation, leadership, barriers and alternative forms of support. Most respondents were more than two years since transplant and were more concerned about medical complications, returning to normalcy, and had a greater desire to talk to other transplant recipients. Forty per cent of respondents indicated they would be interested in a support group. However, 60% indicated that a support group hosted in the hospital setting would be a deterrent to attending, citing time and transportation as the greatest barriers. More research is needed to assess the feasibility of post-kidney transplant support groups closer to recipients' homes and the feasibility of alternative forms of support. PMID:26882632

  10. Renal denervation of the native kidneys for drug-resistant hypertension after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Linn C.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; ten Berge, Ineke J.M.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Reekers, Jim A.; Krediet, C.T. Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong rationale for renal denervation (RDN) of the native kidneys in kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant hypertension. We present a patient with a stable graft function, who underwent RDN for posttransplant therapy-resistant hypertension (24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) 143/89 mmHg, while compliantly using five different antihypertensive agents). After RDN, BP measurements and orthostatic complaints required withdrawal of two antihypertensive agents and halving a third. At 6 months, ABPM was 134/84 mmHg and allograft function remained unchanged. This case calls for designing well-designed prospective studies on RDN in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25713714

  11. Racial disparities in pediatric kidney transplantation in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Grace, Blair S; Kara, Tonya; Kennedy, Sean E; McDonald, Stephen P

    2014-11-01

    Racial disparities in transplantation rates and outcomes have not been investigated in detail for NZ, a country with unique demographics. We studied a retrospective cohort of 215 patients <18 yr who started renal replacement therapy in NZ 1990-2012, using the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA). Primary outcomes were time to first kidney transplant, death-censored graft survival, and retransplantation after loss of primary graft. Europeans and Asians were most likely to receive a transplant (92% and 91% transplanted within five yr, respectively), and Pacific and Māori patients were less likely to receive a transplant than Europeans (51% and 46%, respectively), reflecting disparities in live donor transplantation. Pacific patients were more likely to have glomerulonephritis and FSGS. Pacific patients had five-yr death-censored graft survival of 31%, lower than Māori (61%) and Europeans (88%). No Pacific patients who lost their grafts were re-transplanted within 72 patient-years of follow-up, whereas 14% of Māori patients and 36% of European and Asian patients were retransplanted within five yr. Current programs to improve live and deceased donation within Māori and Pacific people and management of recurrent kidney disease are likely to reduce these disparities.

  12. Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hall, E C; Segev, D L; Engels, E A

    2013-03-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated cancer risk, but it is unknown if cancer risk differs across race and ethnicity as in the general population. US kidney recipients (N = 87,895) in the Transplant Cancer Match Study between 1992 and 2008 were evaluated for racial/ethnic differences in risk for six common cancers after transplantation. Compared to white recipients, black recipients had lower incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0.60, p<0.001) and higher incidence of kidney (aIRR 2.09, p<0.001) and prostate cancer (aIRR 2.14, p<0.001); Hispanic recipients had lower incidence of NHL (aIRR 0.64, p = 0.001), lung (aIRR 0.41, p < 0.001), breast (aIRR 0.53, p = 0.003) and prostate cancer (aIRR 0.72, p = 0.05). Colorectal cancer incidence was similar across groups. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) measured the effect of transplantation on cancer risk and were similar for most cancers (p≥0.1). However, black and Hispanic recipients had larger increases in kidney cancer risk with transplantation (SIRs: 8.96 in blacks, 5.95 in Hispanics vs. 4.44 in whites), and only blacks had elevated prostate cancer risk following transplantation (SIR: 1.21). Racial/ethnic differences in cancer risk after transplantation mirror general population patterns, except for kidney and prostate cancers where differences reflect the effects of end-stage renal disease or transplantation. PMID:23331953

  13. Antidiabetic therapy in post kidney transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Werzowa, Johannes; Säemann, Marcus; Haidinger, Michael; Krebs, Michael; Hecking, Manfred

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after kidney transplantation that affects up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. By pathogenesis, PTDM is a diabetes form of its own, and may be characterised by a sudden, drug-induced deficiency in insulin secretion rather than worsening of insulin resistance over time. In the context of deteriorating allograft function leading to a re-occurrence of chronic kidney disease after transplantation, pharmacological interventions in PTDM patients deserve special attention. In the present review, we aim at presenting the current evidence regarding efficacy and safety of the modern antidiabetic armamentarium. Specifically, we focus on incretin-based therapies and insulin treatment, besides metformin and glitazones, and discuss their respective advantages and pitfalls. Although recent pilot trials are available in both prediabetes and PTDM, further studies are warranted to elucidate the ideal timing of various antidiabetics as well as its long-term impact on safety, glucose metabolism and cardiovascular outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

  14. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment. PMID:27105603

  15. Racial and ethnic disparities in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malek, Sayeed K; Keys, Brandon J; Kumar, Sanjaya; Milford, Edgar; Tullius, Stefan G

    2011-05-01

    Success of renal transplantation, as a viable alternative to dialysis, has been tempered by long-standing racial disparities. Ethnic minorities have less access to transplantation, are less likely to be listed for transplantation, and experience a higher rate of graft failure. Reasons for the existing racial disparities at various stages of the transplantation process are complex and multi-factorial. They include a combination of behavioral, social, environmental, and occupational factors, as well as potential intended or unintended discrimination within the healthcare system. Immunologic factors such as human leukocyte antigen matching, composition of the organ donor pool, and patient immune response, all of which affect post-transplantation graft rejection rates and patient survival, also contribute to health disparities between ethnic groups.

  16. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Lisinopril in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard; Frymoyer, Adam; Lewandowski, Andrew; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Feig, Daniel I.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Warady, Bradley A.; Goebel, Jens W.; Schwartz, George J.; Lewis, Kenneth; Anand, Ravinder; Patel, Uptal D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension in pediatric kidney transplant recipients contributes to long-term graft loss, yet treatment options—including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors—are poorly characterized in this vulnerable population. We conducted a multicenter, open-label pharmacokinetic (PK) study of daily oral lisinopril in 22 children (ages 7–17 years) with stable kidney transplant function. Standard non-compartmental PK analyses were performed at steady state. Effects on blood pressure were examined in lisinopril-naïve patients (n=13). Oral clearance declined in proportion to underlying kidney function; however, in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (30–59 ml/min per 1.73m2), exposure (standardized to 0.1 mg/kg/day dose) was within the range reported previously in children without a kidney transplant. In lisinopril-naïve patients, 85% and 77% had a ≥6 mmHg reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Lisinopril was well tolerated. Our study provides initial insight on lisinopril use in children with a kidney transplant, including starting dose considerations. PMID:25807932

  17. Transfemoral liver biopsy using a Quick-Core biopsy needle system in living donor liver transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Fen Qiang; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yu, Eunsil

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle in select living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) recipients. Eight LDLT recipients underwent 9 transfemoral liver biopsy sessions. Six patients had undergone modified right lobe (mRL) LDLT, and 2 patients had undergone dual-left lobe LDLT. The indications for transfemoral liver biopsy were a hepatic vein (HV) at an acute angle to the inferior vena cava (IVC) on the coronal plane and a thin (<10-mm) liver parenchyma surrounding the HV to be biopsied on enhanced computed tomography. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the right inferior HV in the mRL or the left HV in the right-sided left lobe with a cranial orientation was negotiated with a 5-Fr catheter via the common femoral vein. Then, a stiffening cannula was introduced into the HV over a stiff guide wire. Needle passage was then performed with an 18- or 19-gauge Quick-Core biopsy needle. Technical success was achieved in all sessions without major complications. The median number of needle passages was 4 (range = 2-6). The median total length of obtained liver specimens in each session was 44 mm (range = 24-75 mm). The median number of portal tracts was 18 (range = 10-29), and the obtained liver specimens were adequate for histological diagnosis in all sessions. In conclusion, transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle is an effective and safe alternative for obtaining a liver specimen when standard transjugular liver biopsy is not feasible because of an unfavorable HV angle with respect to the IVC and/or a thin liver parenchyma surrounding the HV. PMID:24916429

  18. From chronic kidney disease to kidney transplantation: The impact of obesity and its treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Brian; Bridson, Julie M; Sharma, Ajay; Halawa, Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with worse short-term outcomes after kidney transplantation but the effect on long-term outcomes is unknown. Although some studies have reported worse outcomes for obese recipients when compared to recipients with a BMI in the normal range, obese recipients who receive a transplant have better outcomes than those who remain wait-listed. Whether transplant candidates should be advised to lose weight before or after transplant has been debated and this is mainly due to the gap in the literature linking pre-transplant weight loss with better outcomes post-transplantation. The issue is further complicated by the use of BMI as a metric of body fat, the obesity paradox in dialysis patients and the different ethical viewpoints of utility versus equity. Measures used to reduce weight loss, including orlistat and bariatric surgery (in particular those with a malabsorptive component), have been associated with enteric hyperoxaluria with consequent risk of nephrolithiasis and oxalate nephropathy. In this review, we discuss the evidence regarding the use of weight loss measures in the kidney transplant candidate and recipient with a view to recommending whether weight loss should be pursued before or after kidney transplantation. PMID:27534874

  19. [Kidney disease in Sant' Andrea Hospital: a biopsy based epidemiologic study].

    PubMed

    Mei, Mariachiara; Menè, Paolo; Stoppacciaro, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the prevalence and pathological features of kidney inflammatory nephropathies diagnosed in Sant'Andrea Hospital, from January 2003 to April 2015. In this period, 246 kidney biopsies have been diagnosed in our Hospital. Excluding cases of kidney neoplasms and non-diagnostic samples, 195 cases were reviewed. Primary glomerulonephritis (GN) is the most common diagnosis. Among these, Membranous GN represents the majority of cases (20.4%), followed by IgA Nephropathy (12.7%). The higher prevalence of Membranous GN than IgA Nephropathy represents a difference between our study and national and international kidney biopsies registries. It can be considered a consequence of the average age of patients undergoing renal biopsy in our center (54,1 years). Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy are 1.5%. 10 out of 195 cases (5.1%) show end stage renal disease. This epidemiological study evaluates the prevalence of various kidney diseases in our database, the biopsy policy of SantAndrea Hospital and compares our results with national and international renal biopsies registries.

  20. The effect of pravastatin on acute rejection after kidney transplantation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, S; Wilkinson, A H; Kobashigawa, J A; Wang, X M; Chia, D; Ozawa, M; Zhong, H P; Hirata, M; Cohen, A H; Teraski, P I

    1996-05-27

    Hyperlipidemia is an important complication of kidney transplantation affecting up to 74% of recipients. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are reported to provide safe and effective treatment for this problem. A recent study suggests that pravastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, also decreases the incidence of both clinically severe acute rejection episodes and natural killer cell cytotoxicity after orthotopic heart transplantation. We have performed a prospective randomized pilot study of the effect of pravastatin on these same parameters after cadaveric kidney transplantation. Graft recipients were randomized to receive pravastatin after transplantation or no pravastatin (24 patients in each group) in addition to routine cyclosporine and prednisone immunosuppression. Lipid levels, acute rejection episodes and serial natural killer cell cytotoxicities were followed for 4 months after the transplant. At the end of the study period, pravastatin had successfully controlled mean total cholesterol levels (202.6 +/- 9.3 vs. 236.5 +/- 11.9 mg/dl, P < 0.02), LDL levels (107.9 +/- 6.6 vs.149.6 +/- 10.7 mg/dl, P < 0.002), and triglyceride levels (118.8 +/- 14.2 vs. 157.2 +/- 13.8 mg/dl, P < 0.05). In addition, the pravastatin-treated group experienced a reduction in the incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (25% vs. 58%, P = 0.01), the incidence of multiple rejections episodes (P < 0.05), and the use of both pulse methylprednisolone (P = 0.01) and OKT3 (P = 0.02). Mean natural killer cell cytotoxicity was similarly reduced (11.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 20.0 +/- 2.0% lysis of K562 target cells, P < 0.002). These data suggest that pravastatin exerts an additional immunosuppressive effect in kidney transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. PMID:8633373

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  2. Kidney and liver transplantation in children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease: data from the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jessica W; Furth, Susan L; Ruebner, Rebecca L

    2014-11-01

    The natural history and survival of children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease undergoing solid organ transplantation have infrequently been described. We report outcomes in a cohort of US children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease receiving solid organ transplants over 20 yr. Retrospective cohort study of pediatric transplant recipients with diagnoses of fibrocystic liver-kidney disease from 1/1990 to 3/2010, using data from the SRTR. Subjects were categorized by the first transplanted organ: LT, KT, or SLK. Primary outcomes were death, re-transplant, transplant of the alternate organ, or initiation of dialysis. Seven hundred and sixteen subjects were transplanted in this period. Median age at first transplant was 9.7 yr. Of the LT, 14 (19%) required a second liver transplant at median of 0.2 yr, and five (7%) required kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 9.0 yr. Of the KT, 188 (31%) required a second kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 5.9 yr. Twenty-nine (5%) subsequently received liver transplant at a median of 6.0 yr. Among patients in this registry, far more children underwent kidney than liver transplants. The risk of subsequently needing transplantation of an alternate organ was low.

  3. Effect of recipient age on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Khoury, Mansour; Nawfal, Naji; Shaheen, Joseph; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recipient age (RA) on kidney transplantation outcome in 107 transplant patients, with a follow-up of 1 year. Patients were divided in 3 groups: Group A (RA<50 years; 72 patients), Group B (RA 50-60 years, 19 patients), and Group C (RA>60 years; 16 patients). The rate and severity of acute rejection, infection rate and type, delayed graft function, hospital stay, creatinine levels (3, 6, 12 months), incidence at 1 year of post-transplant hypertension, cholesterol and triglycerides blood levels, and the rate of post-transplant surgical complications, and 1-year graft and patient survival were comparable between the 3 groups. However, creatinine blood level at 1 month and the 1-year fasting blood sugar were significantly higher in Group B. The RA does not seem to be of a significant predictive value, good selection and pre-transplant patient workout are important factors for a better outcome.

  4. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  5. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  6. Kidney transplantation: is there any place for refugees?

    PubMed

    Einollahi, B; Noorbala, M H; Kardavani, B; Moghani-Lankarani, M; Assari, S; Simforosh, N; Bagheri, N

    2007-05-01

    There are more than 8 million refugees worldwide with the Middle East bearing the brunt. Socioeconomic factors are the major obstacles that refugees encounter when seeking health care in the host country. It, therefore, comes as no surprise that refugees are denied equal opportunities for one of the most sophisticated and expensive medical procedures in the world, kidney transplantation. With respect to transplantation, refugees are caught between a rock and a hard place: as recipients they have to single-handedly clear many hurdles on the arduous road to renal transplantation and as donors they are left unprotected against human organ trafficking. It should be the moral responsibility of the host country to provide this population with a support network. The ways and means of establishing this network should be defined locally; nevertheless, enabling refugees to receive a transplant is the most basic step, which should be followed by the provision of financial support and follow-up facilities in a concerted effort to ensure the continued function of the invaluable graft. It is also necessary that refugees be protected from being an organ reservoir on the black market. There are no precise regional or international data available on kidney transplantation in refugees; among the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation countries, only Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and Turkey have thus far provided data on their respective kidney transplantation regulations and models. Other countries in the region should follow suit and design models tailored to the local needs and conditions. What could, indubitably, be of enormous benefit in the long term is the establishment of an international committee on transplantation in refugees. PMID:17524843

  7. Kidney biopsy in west of Iran: Complications and histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records and histopathology findings of 135 patients who underwent renal biopsies at two special hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah medical university during a six-year period (2003-2007). All were performed using Tru-Cut needle under ultrasound guidance. Twenty four specimens were unsatisfactory. There were 38 males (34.2%) and 73 females (65.7%) in 111 patients with adequate specimens (each specimen has more than 5 glomeruli); the mean age was 16.5 years (range 2-64 years). Side effects of the renal biopsies included pain at the site of biopsy in 2 (2.7%), gross hematuria in 1 (0.9%). Nephrotic syndrome was the most common indication for biopsy followed by acute renal failure of unknown etiology and nephritic syndrome. Primary glomerular disease was reported in 78 patients (70.2%) and also secondary glomerular disease in 33 patients (29.7%). Among the primary glomerulonephritis disease, minimal change disease and membranous glomerulonephritis were the commonest findings in children below the age of 16 years. Minimal change disease ranked first in adults whole membranous glomerular disease and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were more common in the elderly. In all patients lupus glomerular disease was the commonest secondary glomerular disease. We conclude that study on renal biopsy makes final diagnosis which is associated with an acceptably low rate of complications in our practice, and in all, the patterns of renal histology in our study vary slightly from those reported from other countries. PMID:20368927

  8. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-09-24

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  9. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  10. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-09-24

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research.

  11. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research.

  12. [Treatment with ESWL of lithiasis in the transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Morote Robles, J; Quintanilla Muñoz, B; Tremps Velázquez, E; López Pacios, M A; Fakiani Rumie, A; Ahmad Wahab, A; Ali Hinnaoui, N; Vila Barja, J; Soler Rosello, A

    1992-01-01

    Report on one case of lithiasis in a transplanted kidney treated successfully with extracorporeal shockwave lithotrity. This is considered to be the choice therapeutical method when there are no bone interposition or urinary tract obstruction which may preclude the correct removal of lithiasis fragments.

  13. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  14. Stumbling toward equity: the role of government in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dooley, L G; Gaston, R S

    1998-01-01

    In Mortal Peril, Professor Epstein is critical of the current, regulated system for organ donation and suggests that a market for organ tissue would better meet the needs of patients. In this response to Professor Epstein, Professor Laura Dooley and Dr. Robert Gaston pair their skills to attack Professor Epstein's analysis. As they have done on several other occasions, Professors Dooley and Gaston argue that the kidney donation and transplantation arena is fraught with racial inequity, and that Professor Epstein's proposal for a market in kidneys will exacerbate this inequity. The authors maintain that to prevent the poor from being excluded from transplants, the government plays a critical (if imperfect) role in the allocation of these scarce resources. Furthermore, government intervention is acceptable to correct past discrimination because there is scientific evidence that the disproportionate incidence of kidney failure in African Americans is related to the evolutionary pressures of slave trading and slavery. Professors Dooley and Gaston also defend their previous efforts to change the government system of allocation and characterize the government's willingness to adopt their recommendations as an appropriate response to scientific research rather than a governmental susceptibility to lobbying from special interest groups. Finally, the authors criticize Professor Epstein's argument that dialysis is a viable alternative to transplantation because there are significant differences in "quality of life, morbidity and survival." Professors Dooley and Gaston conclude that government intervention is necessary for maintaining the equity in kidney transplantation that a market system would not. PMID:12071208

  15. Male microchimerism at high levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with end stage renal disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M; Azzouz, Doua F; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD.

  16. Black markets, transplant kidneys and interpersonal coercion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J S

    2006-12-01

    One of the most common arguments against legalising markets in human kidneys is that this would result in the widespread misuse that is present in the black market becoming more prevalent. In particular, it is argued that if such markets were to be legalised, this would lead to an increase in the number of people being coerced into selling their kidneys. Moreover, such coercion would occur even if markets in kidneys were regulated, for those subject to such coercion would not be able to avail themselves of the legal protections that regulation would afford them. Despite the initial plausibility of this argument, there are three reasons to reject it. Firstly, the advantages of legalising markets in human kidneys would probably outweigh its possible disadvantages. Secondly, if it is believed that no such coercion can ever be tolerated, markets in only those human kidneys that fail to do away with coercion should be condemned. Finally, if coercion is genuinely opposed, then legalising kidney markets should be supported rather than opposed, for more people would be coerced (ie, into not selling) were such markets to be prohibited. PMID:17145908

  17. Regeneration and Experimental Orthotopic Transplantation of a Bioengineered Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeremy J; Guyette, Jacques; Gilpin, Sarah; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Vacanti, Joseph P; Ott, Harald C

    2013-01-01

    Over 100,000 individuals in the United States currently await kidney transplantation, while 400,000 individuals live with end-stage kidney disease requiring hemodialysis. The creation of a transplantable graft to permanently replace kidney function would address donor organ shortage and the morbidity associated with immunosuppression. Such a bioengineered graft must have the kidney’s architecture and function, and permit perfusion, filtration, secretion, absorption, and drainage of urine. We decellularized rat, porcine, and human kidneys by detergent perfusion, yielding acellular scaffolds with vascular, cortical and medullary architecture, collecting system and ureters. To regenerate functional tissue, we seeded rat kidney scaffolds with epithelial and endothelial cells, then perfused these cell-seeded constructs in a whole organ bioreactor. The resulting grafts produced rudimentary urine in vitro when perfused via their intrinsic vascular bed. When transplanted in orthotopic position in rat, the grafts were perfused by the recipient’s circulation, and produced urine via the ureteral conduit in vivo. PMID:23584091

  18. Kidney transplantation: ethical challenges in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed Ali

    2014-05-01

    There is a wide gap between organ supply and demand, which results in a very long waiting time for kidney transplantation and an increasing number of deaths of the patients while on the waiting list. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding organ donation, allocation and use of living donors through exploitation of the poor for the benefit of the wealthy. Success in the implementation of kidney transplantation programs in a country depends on various factors including the economic situation, religious approval, public views, medical expertise and existing legislation. The public attitude toward donation is pivotal in all transplantation programs; increasing the awareness of the leaders of religion is vital in this regard. PMID:24821144

  19. [Immunosuppressive protocols in kidney transplantation: with or without induction?].

    PubMed

    Nehme Chelala, Dania; Mourani, Chebl; Moukarzel, Maroun; Azar, Hiba

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice of end stage kidney disease. Over the years, kidney transplantation progressed tremendously, mainly by the improvement of immunosuppressive drugs used in the prevention of acute rejection. Since the introduction of cyclosporine in the 80s, many immunosuppressive protocols have been established. These protocols are characterized by two strategies: with or without induction. The agents used in induction therapies can be polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. The decision of using induction therapy relies mainly on the evaluation of the immunological risk in the recipient. Even if protocols with induction have improved early results concerning acute rejection, the protocoles without induction seem justified in some candidates. The optimal immunosuppressive protocol is not yet established, and individualization of immunosuppressive treatment is necessary. PMID:26591195

  20. Predicting and preventing readmissions in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Covert, Kelly L; Fleming, James N; Staino, Carmelina; Casale, Jillian P; Boyle, Kimberly M; Pilch, Nicole A; Meadows, Holly B; Mardis, Caitlin R; McGillicuddy, John W; Nadig, Satish; Bratton, Charles F; Chavin, Kenneth D; Baliga, Prabhakar K; Taber, David J

    2016-07-01

    A lack of research exploring post-transplant process optimization to reduce readmissions and increasing readmission rates at our center from 2009 to 2013 led to this study, aimed at assessing the effect of patient and process factors on 30-d readmission rates after kidney transplantation. This was a retrospective case-control study in adult kidney transplant recipients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were utilized to assess patient and process determinants of 30-d readmissions. 384 patients were included; 30-d readmissions were significantly associated with graft loss and death (p = 0.001). Diabetes (p = 0.049), pharmacist identification of poor understanding or adherence, and prolonged time on hemodialysis prior to transplant were associated with an increased risk of 30-d readmissions. After controlling for risk factors, readmission rates were only independently predicted by pharmacist identification of patient lack of understanding or adherence regarding post-transplant medications and dialysis exposure for more than three yr (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.10-4.71, p = 0.026 and OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.22, 3.70, respectively), both of which were significantly modified by history of diabetes. Thirty-d readmissions are attributable to both patient and process-level factors. These data suggest that a lack of post-transplant medication knowledge in high-risk patients drives early hospital readmission.

  1. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy were a helpful diagnostic clue of stenosis of the iliac segment proximal to the transplant renal artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, H; Saigo, K; Hasegawa, M; Akutsu, N; Maruyama, M; Otsuki, K; Matsumoto, I; Kawaguchi, T; Kitamura, H; Asano, T; Kenmochi, T; Itou, T; Matsubara, H

    2014-01-01

    Common iliac artery stenosis after renal transplantation is a rare complication; it can occur in the course of hypertension and renal dysfunction. We report a case of suspected renal allograft rejection with iliac artery stenosis proximal to a transplanted kidney. A 52-year-old man with a history of cadaveric kidney transplantation 26 years previously underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in the left iliac fossa because of graft failure 3 years before. In June 2012, the patient had progressive renal dysfunction. In July, a percutaneous needle biopsy was taken, and it showed no rejection; however, his renal function continued to get worse through September. A percutaneous allograft renal biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance and showed hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and renin granules. Magnetic resonance angiography was used to evaluate the arteries in the pelvis and showed left common iliac artery stenosis, and a stent was placed. After percutaneous intervention, the patient's ankle brachial pressure index was within the normal range and the allograft function had improved. PMID:24656037

  2. Should we perform kidney transplants on foreign nationals?

    PubMed

    Fortin, Marie-Chantal; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2014-12-01

    In Canada, there are currently no guidelines at either the federal or provincial level regarding the provision of kidney transplantation services to foreign nationals (FN). Renal transplant centres have, in the past, agreed to put refugee claimants and other FNs on the renal transplant waiting list, in part, because these patients (refugee claimants) had health insurance through the Interim Federal Health Programme to cover the costs of medication and hospital care. However, severe cuts recently made to this programme have forced clinicians to question whether they should continue with transplants for FNs, for financial and ethical reasons. This paper first examines different national policies (eg, in Canada, USA, France and the UK) to map the diversity of approaches regarding transplantation for FNs, and then works through different considerations commonly used to support or oppose the provision of organs to these patients: (1) the organ shortage; (2) the free-rider problem; (3) the risk of becoming a transplant destination; (4) the impact on organ donation rates; (5) physicians' duties; (6) economic concerns; (7) vulnerability. Using a Canadian case as a focus, and generalising through a review of various national policies, we analyse the arguments for and against transplantation for FNs with a view to bringing clarity to what is a sensitive political and clinical management issue. Our aim is to help transplant centres, clinicians and ethicists reflect on the merits of possible options, and the rationales behind them.

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection in immunosuppressed patients after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    LUSCALOV, SIMONA; LOGA, LUMINITA; DICAN, LUCIA; JUNIE, LIA MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The first kidney transplantation was performed in 1951 and ever since then living donor transplantation became a more and more important solution for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Renal transplantation is a life-saving procedure. Morbidity and mortality on waiting-lists are strongly correlated with the time of dialysis and end-stage renal disease is one of the most important causes of death; this is the reason why transplantation has to be performed as soon as possible in order to reduce the time of dialysis. Once the transplantation is performed, a number of complications may occur in post-transplant evolution, the most important of which is rejection. The rejection may appear through several mechanisms, but one of the most frequent causes of rejection is cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. It is very important to have a precocious and fast diagnosis of CMV infection in order to maintain the functionality and survival of the graft. PP65 CMV antigenemia has proven its effectiveness in detecting and monitoring the CMV infection in transplanted patients. In the laboratory of the Clinical Institute of Urology and Renal Transplantation (ICUTR) of Cluj Napoca the CMV infection is evidenced by two methods: PP65antigenemia and IgM antibody identification by chemiluminiscence. PMID:27547053

  4. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  5. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Romao, Elen A; Bolella, Valdes R; Nardin, Maria Estela P; Habib-Simao, Maria Lucia; Furtado, João Marcelo; Moyses-Neto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated.

  6. OCULAR SYPHILIS IN A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    ROMAO, Elen A.; BOLELLA, Valdes R.; NARDIN, Maria Estela P.; HABIB-SIMAO, Maria Lucia; FURTADO, João Marcelo; MOYSES-NETO, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of ocular syphilis after a renal transplantation involving progressive vision loss without clinically identifiable ocular disease. Electroretinography showed signs of ischemia, especially in the internal retina. A serological test was positive for syphilis. Lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic meningitis and a positive serologic test for syphilis in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated with penicillin, and had a quick vision improvement. In the case of transplant recipients, clinicians should always consider the diagnosis of ocular syphilis in cases with unexplained visual acuity decrement, as this condition may cause serious complications if not treated. PMID:27253748

  7. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (<1 year) and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (≥1 year) groups. Thirteen patients had the disorder, an incidence rate of 0.75% (13/1730). Early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 3) had not occurred for the last two decades. In the late-onset group (N = 10), the median time of onset was 108.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year overall survival rates were 76.9% and 95.4% in patients with and without the disorder, respectively (P = 0.0001). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder significantly affected transplant recipients' mortality. Late-onset occurred even > 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed.

  8. Kidneys at Higher Risk of Discard: Expanding the Role of Dual Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, B.; Mohan, S.; Cohen, D. J.; Radhakrishnan, J.; Nickolas, T. L.; Stone, P. W.; Tsapepas, D. S.; Crew, R. J.; Dube, G. K.; Sandoval, P. R.; Samstein, B.; Dogan, E.; Gaston, R. S.; Tanriover, J. N.; Ratner, L. E.; Hardy, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Half of the recovered expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys are discarded in the United States. A new kidney allocation system offers kidneys at higher risk of discard, Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) >85%, to a wider geographic area to promote broader sharing and expedite utilization. Dual kidney transplantation (DKT) based on the KDPI is a potential option to streamline allocation of kidneys which otherwise would have been discarded. To assess the clinical utility of the KDPI in kidneys at higher risk of discard, we analyzed the OPTN/UNOS Registry that included the deceased donor kidneys recovered between 2002 and 2012. The primary outcomes were allograft survival, patient survival and discard rate based on different KDPI categories (<80%, 80–90% and >90%). Kidneys with KDPI >90% were associated with increased odds of discard (OR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.74–2.29) compared to ones with KDPI <80%. DKTs of KDPI >90% were associated with lower overall allograft failure (HR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.62–0.89) and better patient survival (HR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64–0.98) compared to single ECD kidneys with KDPI >90%. Kidneys at higher risk of discard may be offered in the up-front allocation system as a DKT. Further modeling and simulation studies are required to determine a reasonable KDPI cutoff percentile. PMID:24472195

  9. Posttransplant Hyponatremia Predicts Graft Failure and Mortality in Kidney Transplantation Recipients: A Multicenter Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miyeun; Park, Jae Yoon; An, Jung Nam; Park, Seokwoo; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck-Jong; Na, Ki Young; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-01-01

    Although hyponatremia is related to poorer outcomes in several clinical settings, its significance remains unresolved in kidney transplantation. Data on 1,786 patients who received kidney transplantations between January 2000 and December 2011 were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to the corrected sodium values for serum glucose 3 months after their transplantations (<135 mmol/L vs. ≥135 mmol/L). Subsequently, the hazard ratios (HRs) for biopsy-proven acute rejection, graft failure, and all-cause mortality were calculated after adjustments for several immunological and non-immunological covariates. 4.0% of patients had hyponatremia. Patients with hyponatremia had higher risks for graft failure and all-cause mortality than did the counterpart normonatremia group; the adjusted HRs for graft failure and mortality were 3.21 (1.47–6.99) and 3.03 (1.21–7.54), respectively. These relationships remained consistent irrespective of heart function. However, hyponatremia was not associated with the risk of acute rejection. The present study addressed the association between hyponatremia and graft and patient outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Based on the study results, our recommendation is to monitor serum sodium levels after kidney transplantations. PMID:27214138

  10. Kidney transplantation in Brazil and its geographic disparity.

    PubMed

    Medina-Pestana, José O; Galante, Nelson Zocoler; Tedesco-Silva, Hélio; Harada, Kelly Miyuki; Garcia, Valter Duro; Abbud-Filho, Mário; Campos, Henry de Holanda; Sabbaga, Emil

    2011-12-01

    The Brazilian National Transplantation System coordinates and regulates perhaps the largest public transplantation program worldwide. Since its implementation in 1997, the number of kidney transplantations increased from 920 (5.8 pmp) in 1998, to 4,630 (24.1 pmp) in 2010. This growth was primarily due to the increased number of effective donors (from 1.8 pmp in 1998 to 9.3 pmp in 2010), with a corresponding increased number of kidneys transplanted from deceased donors (3.8 pmp in 1999 versus 9.9 pmp in 2010).The number of kidney transplantations from living donors has not increased significantly, from 1,065 (6.7 pmp) in 1998 to 1,641 (8.6 pmp) in 2010, either as a consequence of the observed increase in the deceased donor program or perhaps because of strict government regulations allowing only transplantations from related donors. From 2000 to 2009, the mean age of living donors increased from 40 to 45 years, while it increased from 33 to 41 years for deceased donors, of whom roughly 50% die of stroke. There are clear regional disparities in transplantation performance across the national regions. While the state of São Paulo is ranked first in organ donation and recovery (22.5 pmp), some states of the Northern region have much poorer performances. These disparities are directly related to different regional population densities, gross domestic product distribution, and number of trained transplantation physicians. The initial evaluation of the centers with robust outcomes indicates no clear differences in graft survival in comparison with centers in the USA and Europe. Ethnicity and time on dialysis, but not the type of immunosuppressive regimen, decisively influence the measured outcomes. Since the implementation of national clinical research regulations in 1996, Brazilian centers have participated in a number of national and international collaborative trials for the development of immunosuppressive regimens. Besides the challenge of reducing the regional

  11. Impact of immunofluorescence on the histological pattern of pediatric kidney biopsies from northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Ali, Mohammad Usman; Ali, Mahrukh Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Kidney biopsy is an investigation for diagnosis and prognosis of a variety of nephritides. It also influences therapeutic options. Immunofluorescence (IMF) greatly adds in identifying the pathologies which may not be obvious on light microscopy (L/M), such as IgM, IgA nephropathy, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis, and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. We present here data of 170 pediatric kidney biopsies from July 2005 to December 2009 from Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan. The study was undertaken to see whether IMF would alter the histological pattern of pediatric kidney biopsies and to compare these data with an earlier data from our department of 415 pediatric kidney biopsies done over 7-year period from 1998 to 2005, which were analyzed with L/M alone. Out of 170 kidney biopsies using L/M and IMF, IgM turns out to be most common pattern (20%), followed by minimal change disease (MCD) (17.05%), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) (15.88%), chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis (Chr. sclerosing GN) (12.35%), mesangio proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) (7.65%), mesangio capillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN) (6.47%), membranous glomerulonephritis (Mem. GN) (5.29%), IgA nephropathy (5.29%), cresentic glomerulonephritis (Cres. GN) (3.53%), lupus nephritis (2.96%), and others (3.53%). Comparing these results of 170 cases with 415 renal biopsies without IMF, IgM dominated the histological pattern in IMF group whereas MCD followed by FSGS and MPGN were prominent in group without IMF. Therefore, variation in the overall histological pattern with IMF technique proved statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Addition of IMF has altered the frequency of MCD, a change from 24% (100/415) to 17% (29/170), FSGS from 18.3% (76/415) to 15.88% (27/170), and MPGN from 17.35% (72/415) to 7.65% (13/170).

  12. [Rehabilitation after kidney transplantation: Old problems and new structures].

    PubMed

    Schiffer, L; Krautzig, S; Gerbig, D; Bintaro, P; Haller, H; Schiffer, M

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is currently the best therapeutic option for patients with end stage renal disease. Alternative treatment with hemo- or peritoneal dialysis is associated with higher comorbidities, higher morbidity/mortality, and reduced quality of life. Thus, a major aim in posttransplant care is to develop strategies to increase transplant survival and reduce known risk factors and comorbidities. In this overview, we propose a concept to include rehabilitation clinics in all aspects of the transplant process. This concept includes pretransplant care on the waiting list to prepare the patient for the transplant, the direct postoperative treatment phase, and repeated and risk adapted stays in rehabilitation clinics during long-term follow-up to address specific and individual problems.

  13. Pre-transplant antibody screening and anti-CD154 costimulation blockade promote long-term xenograft survival in a pig-to-primate kidney transplant model

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Laura; Mathews, Dave; Breeden, Cynthia A.; Song, Mingqing; Farris, Alton Brad; Larsen, Christian P.; Ford, Mandy L.; Lutz, Andrew J.; Tector, Matthew; Newell, Kenneth A.; Tector, A. Joseph; Adams, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation has the potential to alleviate the organ shortage that prevents many patients with end-stage renal disease from enjoying the benefits of kidney transplantation. Despite significant advances in other models, pig-to-primate kidney xenotransplantation has met limited success. Preformed anti-pig antibodies are an important component of the xenogeneic immune response. To address this, we screened a cohort of 34 rhesus macaques for anti-pig antibody levels. We then selected animals with both low and high titers of anti-pig antibodies to proceed with kidney transplant from galactose-α1,3-galactose knockout/CD55 transgenic pig donors. All animals received T-cell depletion followed by maintenance therapy with costimulation blockade (either anti-CD154 mAb or belatacept), mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid. The animal with the high titer of anti-pig antibody rejected the kidney xenograft within the first week. Low-titer animals treated with anti-CD154 antibody, but not belatacept exhibited prolonged kidney xenograft survival (>133 and >126 vs. 14 and 21 days, respectively). Long-term surviving animals treated with the anti-CD154-based regimen continue to have normal kidney function and preserved renal architecture without evidence of rejection on biopsies sampled at day 100. This description of the longest reported survival of pig-to-non-human primate kidney xenotransplantation, now >125 days, provides promise for further study and potential clinical translation. PMID:25847130

  14. Risk factors for fracture in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Lam, Ngan N; McArthur, Eric; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Knoll, Gregory A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Kim, S Joseph; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general and transplant-specific risk factors for fractures in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of all adults who received a kidney-only transplant (n = 2723) in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to determine general and transplant-specific risk factors for major fractures (proximal humerus, forearm, hip, and clinical vertebral). The final model was established using the backward elimination strategy, selecting risk factors with a P-value ≤ 0.2 and forcing recipient age and sex into the model. We also assessed risk factors for other fracture locations (excluding major fractures, and fractures involving the skull, hands or feet). RESULTS: There were 132 major fractures in the follow-up (8.1 fractures per 1000 person-years). General risk factors associated with a greater risk of major fracture were older recipient age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) per 5-year increase 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19] and female sex (aHR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.28-2.57). Transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of fracture included older donor age (5-year increase) (aHR = 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02-1.17) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by diabetes (aHR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.09-2.72) or cystic kidney disease (aHR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.08-2.78) (compared to glomerulonephritis as the reference cause). Risk factors across the two fracture locations were not consistent (major fracture locations vs other). Specifically, general risk factors associated with an increased risk of other fractures were diabetes and a fall with hospitalization prior to transplantation, while length of time on dialysis, and renal vascular disease and other causes of ESRD were the transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of other fractures. CONCLUSION: Both general and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with a higher risk of fractures in kidney transplant

  15. Pre-transplant Predictors of One Year Weight Gain After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cashion, AK; Hathaway, DK; Stanfill, A; Thomas, F; Ziebarth, JD; Cui, Y; Cowan, PA; Eason, J

    2015-01-01

    Clinically useful predictors of weight gain could be used to reduce the epidemic of post-kidney transplant obesity and resulting co-morbidities. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of weight gain at 12-months following kidney transplant in a cohort of 96 recipients. Demographic, clinical and environmental data were obtained at transplant and 12-months. Descriptive, correlational, and Bayesian network analysis were used to identify predictors. For the 52 (55.9%) recipients who gained weight, the average amount gained was 9.18 ± 6.59 kg. From the 15 baseline factors that met inclusion criteria, Bayesian network modeling identified 4 baseline predictors for weight gain: younger age, higher carbohydrate consumption, higher trunk fat percentage, and higher perception of mental health quality of life. Three are modifiable through either pre- or immediate post-transplant clinical intervention programs. PMID:25159302

  16. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  17. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  18. A Prospective Cohort Study of Mineral Metabolism After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Myles; Weir, Matthew R.; Kopyt, Nelson; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Von Visger, Jon; Deng, Hongjie; Yue, Susan; Vincenti, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation corrects or improves many complications of chronic kidney disease, but its impact on disordered mineral metabolism is incompletely understood. Methods We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of 246 kidney transplant recipients in the United States to investigate the evolution of mineral metabolism from pretransplant through the first year after transplantation. Participants were enrolled into 2 strata defined by their pretransplant levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), low PTH (>65 to ≤300 pg/mL; n = 112), and high PTH (>300 pg/mL; n = 134) and underwent repeated, longitudinal testing for mineral metabolites. Results The prevalence of posttransplant, persistent hyperparathyroidism (PTH >65 pg/mL) was 89.5%, 86.8%, 83.1%, and 86.2%, at months 3, 6, 9, and 12, respectively, among participants who remained untreated with cinacalcet, vitamin D sterols, or parathyroidectomy. The results did not differ across the low and high PTH strata, and rates of persistent hyperparathyroidism remained higher than 40% when defined using a higher PTH threshold greater than 130 pg/mL. Rates of hypercalcemia peaked at 48% at week 8 in the high PTH stratum and then steadily decreased through month 12. Rates of hypophosphatemia (<2.5 mg/dL) peaked at week 2 and then progressively decreased through month 12. Levels of intact fibroblast growth factor 23 decreased rapidly during the first 3 months after transplantation in both PTH strata and remained less than 40 pg/mL thereafter. Conclusions Persistent hyperparathyroidism is common after kidney transplantation. Further studies should determine if persistent hyperparathyroidism or its treatment influences long-term posttransplantation clinical outcomes. PMID:26177089

  19. Association between Kidney Transplant Center Performance and the Survival Benefit of Transplantation Versus Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Buccini, Laura D.; Goldfarb, David A.; Flechner, Stuart M.; Poggio, Emilio D.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Despite the benefits of kidney transplantation, the total number of transplants performed in the United States has stagnated since 2006. Transplant center quality metrics have been associated with a decline in transplant volume among low-performing centers. There are concerns that regulatory oversight may lead to risk aversion and lack of transplantation growth. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort study of adults (age≥18 years) wait-listed for kidney transplantation in the United States from 2003 to 2010 using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients was conducted. The primary aim was to investigate whether measured center performance modifies the survival benefit of transplantation versus dialysis. Center performance was on the basis of the most recent Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients evaluation at the time that patients were placed on the waiting list. The primary outcome was the time-dependent adjusted hazard ratio of death compared with remaining on the transplant waiting list. Results Among 223,808 waitlisted patients, 59,199 and 32,764 patients received a deceased or living donor transplant, respectively. Median follow-up from listing was 43 months (25th percentile=25 months, 75th percentile=67 months), and there were 43,951 total patient deaths. Deceased donor transplantation was independently associated with lower mortality at each center performance level compared with remaining on the waiting list; adjusted hazard ratio was 0.24 (95% confidence interval, 0.21 to 0.27) among 11,972 patients listed at high-performing centers, adjusted hazard ratio was 0.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.31 to 0.33) among 203,797 patients listed at centers performing as expected, and adjusted hazard ratio was 0.40 (95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.45) among 8039 patients listed at low-performing centers. The survival benefit was significantly different by center performance (P value for

  20. The Advantages of an Attenuated Total Internal Reflection Infrared Microspectroscopic Imaging Approach for Kidney Biopsy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gulley-Stahl, Heather J.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sommer, André J.

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of an ATR-FTIR imaging approach for kidney biopsy analysis are described. Biopsy sections collected from kidney stone formers are analyzed at the initial stages of stone development to provide insights into stone growth and formation. The majority of tissue analysis currently conducted with IR microspectroscopy is performed with a transflection method. The research presented in this manuscript demonstrates that ATR overcomes many of the disadvantages of transflection or transmission measurements for tissue analysis including an elimination of spectral artifacts. When kidney biopsies with small mineral inclusions are analyzed with a transflection approach, specular reflection, and the Christiansen effect (anomalous dispersion) can occur leading to spectral artifacts. Another effect specific to the analysis of mineral inclusions present in kidney biopsies is known as the reststrahlen effect where the inclusions become strong reflectors near an absorption band. ATR eliminates these effects by immersing the sample in a high index medium. Additionally, the focused beam size for ATR is decreased by a factor of four when a germanium internal reflection element is used, allowing the acquisition of spectra from small mineral inclusions several micrometers in diameter. If quantitative analysis of small mineral inclusions is ultimately desired, ATR provides the photometrically accurate spectra necessary for quantification. PMID:20132593

  1. Optimized donor management and organ preservation before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Heiko M; Yard, Benito A; Krämer, Bernhard K; Benck, Urs; Schnülle, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is a major medical improvement for patients with end-stage renal disease, but organ shortage limits its widespread use. As a consequence, the proportion of grafts procured from extended criteria donors (ECD) has increased considerably, but this comes along with increased rates of delayed graft function (DGF) and a higher incidence of immune-mediated rejection that limits organ and patient survival. Furthermore, most grafts are derived from brain dead organ donors, but the unphysiological state of brain death is associated with significant metabolic, hemodynamic, and pro-inflammatory changes, which further compromise patient and graft survival. Thus, donor interventions to preserve graft quality are fundamental to improve long-term transplantation outcome, but interventions must not harm other potentially transplantable grafts. Several donor pretreatment strategies have provided encouraging results in animal models, but evidence from human studies is sparse, as most clinical evidence is derived from single-center or nonrandomized trials. Furthermore, ethical matters have to be considered especially concerning consent from donors, donor families, and transplant recipients to research in the field of donor treatment. This review provides an overview of clinically proven and promising preclinical strategies of donor treatment to optimize long-term results after kidney transplantation.

  2. The outcome of commercial kidney transplant tourism in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Masin, Jelka; Rambabova-Busljetic, Irena; Pusevski, Vlado; Dohcev, Saso; Ivanovski, Ognen; Popov, Zivko

    2011-01-01

    The lack of cadaver organs for transplantation motivates some Balkan patients to go to developing countries to buy a kidney. We have followed 36 patients who received kidney transplants in Lahore and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The patients had not been cleared for transplantation with a standard pre-transplant work-up: 80% were hepatitis-C virus (HCV) or HBsAg positive. During follow-up, seven patients died. Sixteen patients experienced wound infections with post-operative hernias, and three patients developed peri-renal hematomas. Six abscesses and four lymphoceles occurred, and four urinary fistulas were surgically treated. Nephrectomy was performed in three patients because of renal artery thrombosis. Nine patients developed active hepatitis C, and four patients manifested cytomegalovirus disease. Three patients developed steroid diabetes, and three patients experienced acute myocardial infarction. Nine patients had one or more rejection episodes. Urinary tract infection with Pseudomonas or Escherichia occurred frequently. The one-yr patient and graft survival rates were 80% and 68%, respectively. Paid unregulated renal transplantation is not recommended for both ethical reasons and because of an association with excessive morbidity and mortality.

  3. Kidney transplant in pediatric patients with severe bladder pathology.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, María Consuelo; González, Gloria; Nome, Claudio; Pinilla, Cesar; Correa, Ramón; Mansilla, Juan; Rodríguez, Jorge; Delucchi, Angela; Ossandón, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare results in pediatric renal transplantation of patients with and without SBP. Between 2001 and 2013, a total of 168 kidney transplants were performed at our center. A retrospective analysis was performed and recipients were divided into two groups: NB and SBP. Incidence of surgical complications after procedure, and graft and patient survival were evaluated. A total of 155 recipients (92%) with complete data were analyzed, and 13 recipients that had had previous bladder surgeries were excluded (11 with VUR surgery and two with previous kidney transplants), of the 155 recipients: 123 (79%) patients had NB, and 32 (21%) patients had SBP, with a median follow-up of 60 (1-137) and 52 (1-144) months, respectively. Among post-transplant complications, UTI (68.8% vs. 23%, p < 0.0001) and symptomatic VUR to the graft (40.6% vs. 7.3%, p < 0.0001) were significantly higher in the SBP group. There was no significant difference in overall graft and patient survival between groups. Renal transplantation is safe in pediatric recipients with SBP; however, urologic complications such as UTI and VUR were significantly higher in this group. Graft and patient survival was similar in SBP and NB groups. PMID:26256468

  4. [Living donors for kidney transplantation: ethical and legal challenges].

    PubMed

    Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Fournier, Catherine; Legendre, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has developed very heterogeneously worldwide despite excellent results and without taking into account the context of global organ shortage. Such a heterogeneity highlights persistent ethical issues, whereas organ trafficking is emerging as an organized transplant tourism reinforcing the need for strong national legal frameworks. Despite its powerful regulation system, which ensures standardization, transparency and accountability of support for donation, France remains reluctant to enlarge the circle of legal donors, whereas it would be the first step to give a greater role to living organ donation. PMID:20510152

  5. Triple bridge to simultaneous heart and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M; Aftab, Muhammad; Singh, Steve K; Mallidi, Hari R; Frazier, Oscar H

    2014-08-01

    We report a 40-year-old man who presented with irreversible cardiogenic shock. The patient was treated with three consecutive stages of mechanical circulatory support as a triple bridge to cardiac transplantation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was used for 5 days, followed by Levitronix CentriMag biventricular assist devices for 39 days. This was escalated to implantation of the CardioWest temporary total artificial heart for 107 days. The patient experienced concurrent end-stage renal disease and subsequently underwent both heart and kidney transplantation. On postoperative day 18 the patient was discharged with good cardiac and renal function.

  6. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  7. Biopsy-verified bronchiolitis obliterans and other noninfectious lung pathologies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Andersen, Claus B; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Gormsen, Magdalena; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Buchvald, Frederik; Heilmann, Carsten; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann; Moser, Claus; Sengeløv, Henrik; Müller, Klaus Gottlob

    2015-03-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Lung biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis. This study describes the course of BO and assesses the congruity between biopsy-verified BO and a modified version of the National Institutes of Health's consensus criteria for BO syndrome (BOS) based exclusively on noninvasive measures. We included 44 patients transplanted between 2000 and 2010 who underwent lung biopsy for suspected BO. Of those, 23 were diagnosed with BO and 21 presented other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, such as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, interstitial pneumonia, and nonspecific interstitial fibrosis. Compared with patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, BO patients had significantly lower values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity, and maximal mid-expiratory flow throughout follow-up, but there was no difference in the change in pulmonary function from the time of lung biopsy. The BO diagnosis was not associated with poorer overall survival. Fifty-two percent of patients with biopsy-verified BO and 24% of patients with other noninfectious pulmonary pathology fulfilled the BOS criteria. Pathological BO diagnosis was not superior to BOS criteria in predicting decrease in pulmonary function beyond the time of biopsy. A lung biopsy may provide a characterization of pathological patterns that can extend our knowledge on the pathophysiology of HSCT-related lung diseases. PMID:25498923

  8. Associations of Pre-transplant Prescription Narcotic Use with Clinical Complications after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lentine, Krista L.; Lam, Ngan N.; Xiao, Huiling; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Axelrod, David; Brennan, Daniel C.; Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; Yuan, Hui; Nazzal, Mustafa; Zheng, Jie; Schnitzler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Associations of narcotic use before kidney transplantation with post-transplant clinical outcomes are not well described. Methods We examined integrated national transplant registry, pharmacy records, and Medicare billing claims to follow 16,322 kidney transplant recipients, of whom 28.3% filled a narcotic prescription in the year before transplantation. Opioid analgesic fills were normalized to morphine equivalents (ME) and expressed as mg/kg exposures (approximate quartiles: 0.1– 1.7, 1.8–5.4, 5.5–23.7, and ≥23.8 mg/kg, respectively). Post-transplant cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, accidents, substance abuse, and non-compliance events were identified using diagnosis codes on Medicare billing claims. Adjusted associations of ME level with post-transplant complications were quantified by multivariate Cox regression. Results The incidence of complications at 3 years post-transplant among those with the highest pre-transplant ME exposure compared to no use included: ventricular arrhythmias, 1.1% vs. 0.2% (p<0.001); cardiac arrest, 4.7% vs. 2.7% (p<0.05); hypotension, 14% vs. 8% (p<0.0001); hypercapnia, 1.6% vs. 0.9% (p<0.05); mental status changes, 5.3% vs. 2.7% (p<0.001); drug abuse/dependence, 7.0% vs. 1.7% (p<0.0001); alcohol abuse, 1.8% vs. 0.6% (p=0.0001); accidents, 0.9% vs. 0.3% (p<0.05); and non-compliance, 3.5% vs. 2.3% (p<0.05). In multivariate analyses, transplant recipients with the highest level of pre-transplant narcotic use had approximately 2-to-4-times the risks of post-transplant ventricular arrhythmias, mental status changes, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and accidents compared with non-users, and 35% to 45% higher risks of cardiac arrest and hypotension. Conclusion Although associations may reflect underlying conditions or behaviors, high-level prescription narcotic use before kidney transplantation predicts increased risk of clinical complications after transplantation. PMID:25832723

  9. [Early human transplants: 60th anniversary of the first successful kidney transplants].

    PubMed

    Gentili, Marc E

    2015-11-01

    First kidney transplant attempts begin with the 20th century: improving vascular sutures, understanding the phenomena of rejection or tolerance, then progress in HLA groups enable early success in the second half of the century. Definition of brain death, use of corticosteroids, radiotherapy and prime immunosuppressors promote the development of transplants. Discover of cyclosporine in the 1980s, and legislative developments augur a new era. Many advances are arising: use of stem cells from the donor, enhancement of Maastricht 3 donor or living donation. Finally organ transplantation remains an immense human adventure, but also scientific and ethic.

  10. Histiocytic Sarcoma in a Kidney Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pollen, Maressa; El Jamal, Siraj; Lewin, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is an aggressive neoplasm with only limited number of reported series of cases and rare case reports of occurrence as a posttransplant neoplastic disorder. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and the optimal treatment is still under investigation. We describe an unusual case of HS in a patient with a remote history of kidney transplant. Method and Results. A 54-year-old male with a remote history of renal transplantation under maintenance immunosuppression presented with features of sepsis. CT abdomen revealed multiple heterogeneous masses in bilateral native kidneys and liver and enlarged abdominal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Viral serology work-up was negative. Needle core biopsy revealed a highly undifferentiated neoplasm comprised of highly atypical large cells with eosinophilic to vacuolated cytoplasm and hemophagocytosis. Extended panel of immunohistochemistry proved histiocytic lineage for the tumor cells. The patient expired 2 weeks following the diagnosis. Conclusion. Our case along with three previously published case reports raised the possibility of HS as a treatment-related neoplasm or a posttransplantation neoplastic disorder in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:27795864

  11. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  12. Dialysis Facility Transplant Philosophy and Access to Kidney Transplantation in the Southeast

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Jennifer; Browne, Teri; Plantinga, Laura; Pastan, Stephen O; Sauls, Leighann; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the impact of dialysis facility treatment philosophy on access to transplant. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility-level access to kidney transplant waitlisting. Methods A 25-item questionnaire administered to Southeastern dialysis facilities (n=509) in 2012 captured facility transplant philosophy (categorized as “transplant is our first choice,” “transplant is a great option for some,” and “transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested”) .. Facility-level waitlisting and facility characteristics were obtained from the 2008-2011 Dialysis Facility Report. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examinethe association between dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility waitlisting performance (dichotomized using the national median), where low performance was defined as less than 21.7% of dialysis patients waitlisted within a facility. Results Fewer than 25% (n=124) of dialysis facilities reported “transplant is our first option.” A total of 131 (31.4%) dialysis facilities in the Southeast were high-performing with respect to waitlisting. Adjusted analysis showed that facilities who reported “transplant is our first option” were twice (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.9) as likely to have high waitlisting performance compared to facilities who reported “transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested.” Conclusions Facilities with staff who had a more positive transplant philosophy were more likely to have better facility waitlisting performance. Future prospective studies are needed to further transplantation. PMID:26278585

  13. Evaluation of the effect of tofacitinib exposure on outcomes in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, F; Silva, H T; Busque, S; O'Connell, P J; Russ, G; Budde, K; Yoshida, A; Tortorici, M A; Lamba, M; Lawendy, N; Wang, W; Chan, G

    2015-06-01

    Tofacitinib fixed-dose regimens attained better kidney function and comparable efficacy to cyclosporine (CsA) in kidney transplant patients, albeit with increased risks of certain adverse events. This post-hoc analysis evaluated whether a patient subgroup with an acceptable risk-benefit profile could be identified. Tofacitinib exposure was a statistically significant predictor of serious infection rate. One-hundred and eighty six kidney transplant patients were re-categorized to above-median (AME) or below-median (BME) exposure groups. The 6-month biopsy-proven acute rejection rates in AME, BME and CsA groups were 7.8%, 15.7% and 17.7%, respectively. Measured glomerular filtration rate was higher in AME and BME groups versus CsA (61.2 and 67.9 vs. 53.9 mL/min) at Month 12. Fewer patients developed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) at Month 12 in AME (20.5%) and BME (27.8%) groups versus CsA (48.3%). Serious infections occurred more frequently in the AME group (53.0%) than in BME (28.4%) or CsA (25.5%) groups. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) only occurred in the AME group. In kidney transplant patients, the BME group preserved the clinical advantage of comparable acute rejection rates, improved renal function and a lower incidence of IF/TA versus CsA, and with similar rates of serious infection and no PTLD.

  14. Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Tissue sampling ... biopsy is called a percutaneous biopsy. It removes tissue using a needle attached to a hollow tube ... The needle is passed several times through the tissue being examined. The doctor uses the needle to ...

  15. Kidney transplantation in an adult patient with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Cimen, Sertac; Nantais, Jordan; Guler, Sanem; Lawen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb birth defects (VACTERL) association is a rare, non-random constellation of congenital abnormalities among which urinary tract anomalies can be included. In the presence of these anomalies, patients are suspected to have a higher rate of renal failure than average. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with VACTERL association and consequent end stage renal failure. A live-related kidney transplant was carried out successfully and the postoperative course was uncomplicated. The patient had immediate graft function. Risk factors that may complicate kidney transplant surgery in this patient population as well as considerations relevant to peritransplant management are discussed. PMID:26106170

  16. [The first kidney block transplantation in the Czech Republic--results].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2001-04-01

    A case report of the fate of the first cadaveric pediatric kidney block transplantation into adult recipient in the Czech republic. The operation was done in Regional transplant centre in Faculty hospital Ostrava in February 1994. The whole postoperative period has been recapitulated since the operation to the end 2000. Pediatric kidney graft is functional 7 years after transplantation.

  17. [Skeletal changes in the kidney transplant patient].

    PubMed

    Orzincolo, C; Bagni, B; Bedani, P L; Ghedini, M; Scutellari, P N

    1994-06-01

    The skeletal status was investigated with noninvasive diagnostic procedures in 44 renal transplant patients (mean time since intervention: 5 to 195 months) treated with steroid and azathioprine (21 cases) or with steroid, azathioprine and cyclosporine (23 cases). 38.6% of the patients had reduced renal function (creatininemia: 1.6-3.0 mg/dl). Our patients underwent biochemical and hormonal tests of bone metabolism, digital radiographs of the skeleton and bone mineral density measurement with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, Hologic QDR 1000). All the patients exhibited moderate to severe osteopenia at both radiographic and densitometric investigations; the risk of fracture was high in 47% of cases. Radiographic signs of vertebral fractures were observed in 4.5% of cases. Other major radiographic patterns were the aseptic necrosis of femoral head (9%), of carpal bone (4.5%) and of humeral head (2.2%). Fibrous osteitis was demonstrated in three patients. Geodes in the wrist were also observed. The correlation of bone densitometry values and time since renal transplantation was statistically significant (r = 0.381; p < 0.01). Moreover, the grade of osteopenia correlated with serum levels of calcitonin and calcitriol--the latter especially in the patients with severe osteopenia.

  18. Desensitization and crossmatch conversion in deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bartel, G; Böhmig, G A

    2011-03-01

    Recipient allosensitization represents a major barrier to transplantation. Sensitized patients awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant often face unacceptably long waiting times and are more prone to rejection, even in the absence of a positive crossmatch (XM). Two major strategies have been shown to facilitate the access to transplantation: specific allocation programs designed to enhance the availability of a well-matched allograft; and recipient desensitization to decrease levels of humoral alloreactivity. Over the last two to three decades, a variety of desensitization strategies have been published. Such protocols are based on the use of apheresis for direct alloantibody removal from the circulation, or high dose intravenous immunoglobulin and/or CD20 antibody rituximab for modulation of B cell immunity. An attractive approach may be the application of apheresis for rapid desensitization, with or without XM conversion, immediately before transplantation, a particular challenge because of the short interval between the transplant offer and surgery. It was shown that with currently available treatment strategies many high risk patients can be successfully transplanted within an acceptable time period. However, there is still a need for further improvement, as rejection and graft loss rates may be considerably higher than those documented for non-sensitized patients. Future studies will have to establish more precise diagnostic criteria to optimize treatment allocation and monitoring. Moreover, systematic trials are needed to assess the efficiency of innovative treatment concepts, such as the use of agents that directly affect alloantibody-producing plasma cells.

  19. Ethical considerations on kidney transplantation from living donors.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P; Pretagostini, R; Poli, L; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2005-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from living donors is widely performed all over the world. Living nephrectomy for transplantation has no direct advantage for the donor other than increased self-esteem, but at least remains an extremely safe procedure, with a worldwide overall mortality rate of 0.03%. This theoretical risk to the donor seems to be justified by the socioeconomic advantages and increased quality of life of the recipient, especially in selected cases, such as pediatric patients, when living donor kidney transplantation can be performed in a preuremic phase, avoiding the psychological and physical stress of dialysis, which in children is not well tolerated and cannot prevent retarded growth. According to the Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society, commercialism must be prevented, not only for ethical but also medical reasons. The risks are too high not only for the donors, but also for the recipients, as a consequence of poor donor screening and evaluation with consequent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus or other infectious agents, as well as inappropriate medical and surgical management of donors and also of recipients, who are often discharged too early. Most public or private insurance companies are considering kidney donation a safe procedure without long-term impairment and, therefore, do not increase the premium, whereas recipient insurance of course should cover hospital fees for the donors. "Rewarded gifting" or other financial incentives to compensate for the inconvenience and loss of income related to the donation are not advisable, at least in our opinion. Our center does not perform anonymous living organ donation or "cross-over" transplantation. PMID:16182701

  20. Ethical considerations on kidney transplantation from living donors.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P; Pretagostini, R; Poli, L; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2005-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from living donors is widely performed all over the world. Living nephrectomy for transplantation has no direct advantage for the donor other than increased self-esteem, but at least remains an extremely safe procedure, with a worldwide overall mortality rate of 0.03%. This theoretical risk to the donor seems to be justified by the socioeconomic advantages and increased quality of life of the recipient, especially in selected cases, such as pediatric patients, when living donor kidney transplantation can be performed in a preuremic phase, avoiding the psychological and physical stress of dialysis, which in children is not well tolerated and cannot prevent retarded growth. According to the Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society, commercialism must be prevented, not only for ethical but also medical reasons. The risks are too high not only for the donors, but also for the recipients, as a consequence of poor donor screening and evaluation with consequent transmission of human immunodeficiency virus or other infectious agents, as well as inappropriate medical and surgical management of donors and also of recipients, who are often discharged too early. Most public or private insurance companies are considering kidney donation a safe procedure without long-term impairment and, therefore, do not increase the premium, whereas recipient insurance of course should cover hospital fees for the donors. "Rewarded gifting" or other financial incentives to compensate for the inconvenience and loss of income related to the donation are not advisable, at least in our opinion. Our center does not perform anonymous living organ donation or "cross-over" transplantation.

  1. Diagnostics and therapy of lymphoceles after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hamza, A; Fischer, K; Koch, E; Wicht, A; Zacharias, M; Loertzer, H; Fornara, P

    2006-04-01

    Lymphocele incidence after kidney transplantation is as high as 18%. We retrospectively studied the therapy of 42 lymphoceles that occurred in our clinic between 1990 and 2005, focusing on possible predisposing factors for their formation and the results of several therapy variants: conservative, operative, percutaneous puncture, and laparoscopic or open marsupialization. There was no connection between lymphocele formation and the following parameters: the extent to which the iliac vessels had been prepared, the materials used for the preparation, or whether clips or ligatures were applied. Lymphoceles may originate either from the lymphatic system of the recipient or the transplanted kidney. The most sensible measures to prevent their occurrence therefore seems to be to restrict the transplant bed to the smallest permissible level with careful ligature of the lymphatic vessels in the area of the kidney hilus. Treatment for lymphoceles should start with minimally invasive measures. We use the following algorithm in our clinic: puncture to differentiate between urinoma/lymphocele and to test for bacterial infection, sclerotization (200 mg doxycyclin), and finally marsupialization if persistent. The choice of operative technique depends on the location. This algorithm resulted in a relapse rate of 9.5% during the postoperative observation period of up to 15 years. PMID:16647449

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  3. Microsporidia Infection in a Mexican Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Oscar Xavier; Alvarez-Torres, Octavio; Ofelia Uribe-Uribe, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms of the microsporidia group are obligated intracellular protozoa that belong to the phylum Microspora; currently they are considered to be related or belong to the fungi reign. It is considered an opportunistic infection in humans, and 14 species belonging to 8 different genera have been described. Immunocompromized patients such as those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), also HIV serum-negative asymptomatic patients, with poor hygienic conditions, and recipients of bone marrow or solid organ transplantation are susceptible to develop deinfection. Sixty transplanted patients with renal microsporidia infection have been reported worldwide. The aim of this paper is to inform about the 2nd case of kidney transplant and microsporidia infection documented in Mexico. PMID:24558617

  4. De novo therapy with everolimus and reduced-exposure cyclosporine following pediatric kidney transplantation: a prospective, multicenter, 12-month study.

    PubMed

    Grushkin, Carl; Mahan, John D; Mange, Kevin C; Hexham, J Mark; Ettenger, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Prospective data regarding the de novo use of everolimus following kidney transplantation in children are sparse. In a prospective, 12-month, single-arm, open-label study, pediatric kidney transplant patients received everolimus (target trough concentration ≥3 ng/mL) with reduced-exposure CsA and corticosteroids, with or without basiliximab induction. Sixteen of the 18 patients completed the study on-treatment. Age range was 2-16 yr (mean 10.9 yr); eight patients received a living donor graft. Mean (s.d.) everolimus level was 7.4 (3.1) ng/mL during the first 12 months post-transplant. There were no cases of BPAR, graft loss, or death during the study. Protocol biopsies were performed at month 12 in seven patients, with subclinical (untreated) acute rejection diagnosed in one case. Mean (s.d.) estimated GFR (Schwartz formula) was 98 (34) mL/min/1.73 m(2) at month 12. Three patients experienced one or more serious adverse events with a suspected relation to study medication. One patient discontinued study medication due to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (5.6%). Everolimus with reduced-dose CsA and corticosteroids achieved good efficacy and renal function and was well tolerated in this small cohort of pediatric kidney transplant patients. Controlled trials are required to answer remaining questions about the optimal use of everolimus in this setting.

  5. ANTILYMPHOID ANTIBODY PRECONDITIONING AND TACROLIMUS MONOTHERAPY FOR PEDIATRIC KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Ron; Ellis, Demetrius; Tan, Henkie P.; Moritz, Michael L.; Basu, Amit; Vats, Abhay N.; Khan, Akhtar S.; Gray, Edward A.; Zeevi, Adrianna; McFeaters, Corde; James, Gerri; Grosso, Mary Jo; Marcos, Amadeo; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Heavy post-transplant immunosuppression may contribute to long-term immunosuppression dependence by subverting tolerogenic mechanisms; thus, we sought to determine if this undesirable consequence could be mitigated by pretransplant lymphoid depletion and minimalistic post-transplant monotherapy. Study design Lymphoid depletion in 17 unselected pediatric recipients of live (n = 14) or deceased donor kidneys (n = 3) was accomplished with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) (n = 8) or alemtuzumab (n = 9). Tacrolimus was begun post-transplantation with subsequent lengthening of intervals between doses (spaced weaning). Maintenance immunosuppression, morbidity, graft function, and patient/graft survival were collated. Results Steroids were added temporarily to treat rejection in two patients (both ATG subgroup) or to treat hemolytic anemia in two others. After 16 to 31 months (mean 22), patient and graft survival was 100% and 94%, respectively. The only graft loss was in a nonweaned noncompliant recipient. In the other 16, serum creatinine was 0.85 ± 0.35 mg/dL and creatinine clearance was 90.8 ± 22.1 mL/1.73 m2. All 16 patients are on monotherapy (15 tacrolimus, one sirolimus), and 14 receive every other day or 3 times per week doses. There were no wound or other infections. Two patients developed insulin-dependent diabetes. Conclusion The strategy of lymphoid depletion and minimum post-transplant immunosuppression appears safe and effective for pediatric kidney recipients. PMID:16769394

  6. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis: clinical and kidney biopsy correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Zand, Ladan; Nasr, Samih H.; Glassock, Richard J.; Fervenza, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a common glomerular disease in adults and ranks among the top causes of a primary glomerular disease causing end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Primary FSGS is, however, a diagnosis of exclusion and distinction between primary versus secondary FSGS is not always obvious, resulting in a number of patients with secondary FSGS undergoing unnecessary immunosuppressive therapy. Methods We reviewed the Mayo Clinic Renal Pathology Database for patients with a diagnosis of FSGS on native renal biopsy and divided the patients into nephrotic syndrome-associated (NS-associated) and non-nephrotic syndrome-associated (NNS-associated) FSGS as a first approximation followed by dividing the lesion according to the degree of foot process effacement (FPE) on electron microscopy (EM) examination. Results A total of 41 patients with FSGS with complete evaluation were identified. Of these, 18 were classified as having NS and 23 were classified as having NNS. Baseline characteristics (age, gender, body mass index, serum creatinine and hematuria) were not different between the groups. All of the patients with NS showed diffuse FPE ranging from 80 to 100% (mean 96%). On the other hand, of the 23 patients in the NNS group, 22 had segmental FPE and showed patchy effacement, with all cases showing 20–60% FPE (mean of 48%). Conclusion Adult patients presenting with NS, an FSGS lesion on LM, extensive FPE (≥80%) on EM examination and no risk factors associated with secondary FSGS are likely to have primary FSGS. Conversely, the absence of NS in a patient with segmental FPE on EM strongly suggests a secondary FSGS. Dividing FSGS into the presence or absence of NS together with the degree of FPE on EM examination is more helpful as it provides a more practical way to separate patients into cases of primary versus secondary FSGS. PMID:25503953

  7. Native kidney post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a non-renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Araya, Carlos E; Mehta, Mansi B; González-Peralta, Regino P; Hunger, Stephen P; Dharnidharka, Vikas R

    2009-06-01

    PTLD is an important post-transplant complication. Although PTLD affects kidney allografts after renal transplantation, it has not been reported in native kidneys of other solid organ recipients. Herein, we report a child who underwent an orthotropic liver transplant for cryptogenic cholestatic hepatitis and developed fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, chronic EBV viremia, and lymphatic PTLD. Subsequently, she also developed gross hematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria. Kidney histology revealed EBV-positive mononuclear infiltrates within the renal parenchyma consistent with PTLD. Electron microscopy examination demonstrated subepithelial electron-dense deposits consistent with a membranous glomerulopathy pattern. The PTLD was successfully treated with reduced immunosuppression and cyclic cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and prednisone, but the renal disease progressed to end-stage renal failure within two yr. Repeat kidney histology showed chronic nephropathy and membranous glomerulopathy without PTLD infiltrates or detectable EBV staining, although chronic viremia persisted. To our knowledge, this is the first such child to be reported and highlights the importance of remaining vigilant for renal PTLD even in non-kidney organ recipients.

  8. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  9. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  10. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  11. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  12. Autologous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Kidney Transplantation: A Pilot Study of Safety and Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Perico, Norberto; Casiraghi, Federica; Introna, Martino; Gotti, Eliana; Todeschini, Marta; Cavinato, Regiane Aparecida; Capelli, Chiara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cassis, Paola; Rizzo, Paola; Cortinovis, Monica; Marasà, Maddalena; Golay, Josee; Noris, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) abrogate alloimmune response in vitro, suggesting a novel cell-based approach in transplantation. Moving this concept toward clinical application in organ transplantation should be critically assessed. Design, setting, participants & measurements A safety and clinical feasibility study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00752479) of autologous MSC infusion was conducted in two recipients of kidneys from living-related donors. Patients were given T cell–depleting induction therapy and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. On day 7 posttransplant, MSCs were administered intravenously. Clinical and immunomonitoring of MSC-treated patients was performed up to day 360 postsurgery. Results Serum creatinine levels increased 7 to 14 days after cell infusion in both MSC-treated patients. A graft biopsy in patient 2 excluded acute graft rejection, but showed a focal inflammatory infiltrate, mostly granulocytes. In patient 1 protocol biopsy at 1-year posttransplant showed a normal graft. Both MSC-treated patients are in good health with stable graft function. A progressive increase of the percentage of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127− Treg and a marked inhibition of memory CD45RO+RA−CD8+ T cell expansion were observed posttransplant. Patient T cells showed a profound reduction of CD8+ T cell activity. Conclusions Findings from this study in the two patients show that MSC infusion in kidney transplant recipients is feasible, allows enlargement of Treg in the peripheral blood, and controls memory CD8+ T cell function. Future clinical trials with MSCs to look with the greatest care for unwanted side effects is advised. PMID:20930086

  13. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  14. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  15. Tacrolimus Dose Requirement in Iranian Kidney Transplant Recipients within the First Three Weeks after Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-Khavidaki, S.; Ghaffari, S.; Gohari, M.; Khatami, M. R.; Zahiri, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus is the main immunosuppressive agent in many kidney transplant protocols with an initial recommended daily dose of 0.2 mg/kg of ideal body weight (IBW). However, due to the high inter- and intra-patient variability in its pharmacokinetics, the required tacrolimus doses may differ markedly from patient to patient. Objective: To assess the required tacrolimus dose to achieve the desired whole blood concentration within the first three weeks after kidney transplantation among Iranian patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at kidney transplantation ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex where almost all patients receive thymoglobulin induction therapy and a calcineurin inhibitor, mainly tacrolimus, plus mycophenolate, and prednisolone as maintenance immnosuppressive drugs with the target tacrolimus whole blood concentration of 8–12 ng/mL for the first month after transplantation. Results: The mean±SD administered daily dose of tacrolimus during the first three weeks after transplantation was 0.085±0.024 mg/kg of IBW that resulted in a mean±SD whole blood concentration of 10.34±5.44 ng/mL. The required mean±SD dose of the drug to achieve the desired whole blood level of 8–10 ng/mL was 0.08±0.02 mg/kg. Only 27.4% of the assessed tacrolimus blood levels were within the desired range. Compared with males, females needed 19% more daily dose of tacrolimus to reach similar whole blood levels. Tacrolimus blood levels were significantly correlated with daily tacrolimus doses (r=0.307, p=0.001) and patients’ age (r=0.283, p=0.003). Conclusion: It seems that Iranian kidney transplant recipients need lower daily doses of tacrolimus to achieve the desired whole blood levels; compared with males, females need a higher dose.

  16. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  17. Hispanic/Latino Disparities in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Role of a Culturally Competent Transplant Program

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elisa J.; Lee, Jungwha; Kang, Raymond; Ladner, Daniela P.; Skaro, Anton I.; Holl, Jane L.; French, Dustin D.; Abecassis, Michael M.; Caicedo, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic Americans face disparities in access to kidney transplantation, particularly living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). This study compared characteristics of LDKT recipients before and after implementing the Hispanic Kidney Transplant Program (HKTP) at Northwestern Medicines (NM) and other centers. Methods The NM HKTP, initiated in December 2006, delivers culturally and linguistically competent and congruent care. Program-specific data were used to compare the mean ratios of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013), and to compare the characteristics of NM's adult LDKT patients between pre-HKTP and post-HKTP. The same ratio was calculated for transplant centers in regions with a significant Hispanic population (≥25%) and performing in the top tertile of total LDKT volume in the pre-HKTP period. The number of Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients added to the waiting list were compared between pre-HKTP (2001-2006) and post-HKTP (2008-2013) as a proxy for increased patient referrals and a pathway by which the HKTP may increase LDKTs. Results The ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs significantly increased by 70% after the implementation of NM's HKTP (pre-HKTP mean = 0.20, post-HKTP mean = 0.34; P= 0.001). None of the other transplant centers experienced a similar increase in their ratio of Hispanic to non-Hispanic white LDKTs. The NM waiting list additions grew by 91% among Hispanics, but grew only 4% for non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions These data suggest that the development and implementation of a culturally congruent transplant program can positively affect Hispanic LDKT and thereby reduce Hispanics disparities in LDKT rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively evaluate the generalizability of implementing such culturally competent interventions at other transplant programs. PMID:27500229

  18. Ethical implications of ethnic disparities in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Ross

    2004-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major epidemic in underserved and minority populations largely due to excess rates of hypertensive and diabetic kidney disease. Multiple complex socioeconomic barriers to early diagnosis and optimal therapies as well as delayed referral for kidney transplantation have created disparities in CKD care provided to ethnic minorities. Disparities exist in wait list time and kidney transplant rates for Native Americans and blacks, independent of insurance status. Moreover, independent of genetic matching, long-term transplant outcomes in blacks remain significantly lower than all other ethnic groups, suggesting that poorly understood social factors contribute to these survival differences. The existence of these disparities raises ethical concerns of equity and social justice in terms of the allocation of scarce resources. Although current changes in allocation policies will improve some disparities, more efforts are ultimately needed to improve access to care and the overall health and survival for all individuals at risk for CKD, independent of their race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Clinical Decision Aid to Improve Access to Kidney Transplantation: iChoose Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Rachel E.; Basu, Mohua; Mohan, Sumit; Smith, Kayla D.; Wolf, Michael; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John J.; Chiles, Mariana; Russell, Allison; McPherson, Laura; Gander, Jennifer; Pastan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, as it substantially increases a patient's survival and is cost saving compared to a lifetime of dialysis. However, transplantation is not universally chosen by patients with renal failure, and limited knowledge about the survival benefit of transplantation vs. dialysis may play a role. We created a mobile application clinical decision aid called iChoose Kidney to improve access to individualized prognosis information comparing dialysis and transplantation outcomes. We describe the iChoose Kidney study, a randomized controlled trial designed to test the clinical efficacy of a mobile health decision aid among end-stage renal disease patients referred for kidney transplantation at three large, diverse transplant centers across the U.S. Approximately 450 patients will be randomized to receive either: (1) standard of care or “usual” transplantation education, or (2) standard of care plus iChoose Kidney. The primary outcome is change in knowledge about the survival benefit of kidney transplantation vs. dialysis from baseline to immediate follow-up; secondary outcomes include change in treatment preferences, improved decisional conflict, and increased access to kidney transplantation. Analyses are also planned to examine effectiveness across subgroups of race, socioeconomic status, health literacy and health numeracy. Engaging patients in health care choices can increase patient empowerment and improve knowledge and understanding of treatment choices. If the effectiveness of iChoose Kidney has a greater impact on patients with low health literacy, lower socioeconomic status, and minority race, this decision aid could help reduce disparities in access to kidney transplantation. PMID:27610423

  20. Pediatric en bloc kidney transplantation into pediatric recipients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Keith K; Berg, Gerre M; Schjoneman, Yolanda G; Perez, Richard V; Butani, Lavjay

    2010-02-01

    As a result of the ongoing shortage in organ supply, en bloc renal transplantation from small donors has become more common for adult recipients with ESRD. However, because of concern for higher complication rates and sub-optimal outcomes, it is not being performed in every center, and data describing its use in pediatric recipients are even more limited. We retrospectively studied three patients who have undergone en bloc renal transplantation at our center. Median age at transplantation was 16.7 yr with a median follow-up of 1.2 yr. Donor age ranged from nine to 49 months with weight ranging from 10 to 22 kg. There were no post-operative thrombotic complications. All grafts showed increased renal size at follow-up by ultrasound. There was no clinical or histological rejection at last follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the outcomes of en bloc kidney transplantation from pediatric donors into pediatric recipients. Based on our experience, albeit very limited, we feel that en bloc renal transplantation from young donors is an acceptable and safe procedure with low complication rates in pediatric recipients and should be given consideration to minimize wait times on the wait list and to improve quality of life.

  1. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  2. Single-center experience in double kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Magoni Rossi, A; Gasloli, G; Santori, G; Giannone, A; Bertocchi, M; Piaggio, F; Bocci, E; Valente, Umberto

    2010-05-01

    Use of organs from marginal donors for transplantation is a current strategy to expand the organ donor pool. Its efficacy is universally accepted among data from multicenter studies. Herein, we have reviewed outcomes of double kidney transplantation (DKT) over an 9-year experience in our center. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible important differences between a monocenter versus multicenter studies. Between 1999 and 2008, we performed 59 DKT. Recipient mean age was 63 +/- 5 years. Mean HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches were 3.69 +/- 0.922. Donor mean age was 69 +/- 7 years and mean creatinine clearance was 69.8 +/- 30.8 mL/min. Proteinuria was detected in three donors (5%). Mean cold ischemia and warm ischemia times were 1130 +/- 216 and 48 +/- 11 minutes, respectively. The right and left kidney scores were 4.18 +/- 2 and 4.21 +/- 2, respectively. Thirty patients (51%) displayed good postoperative renal function; 22 (37%), acute tubular necrosis with postoperative dialysis; 3 (5%), acute rejection episodes; 4 (7%), single-graft transplantectomy due to vascular thrombosis; 1 (2%), a retransplantation; 5 (8%), a lymphocele; 3 (5%) vescicoureteral reflux or stenosis requiring surgical correction. Cytomegalovirus infection was detected in five patients (8%). In three patients (5%) displayed de novo neoplasia. Three patients showed chronic rejection (5%), whereas we observed a cyclosporine-related toxicity in 7 (12%). Nine patients (15%) developed iatrogenic diabetes. Patient and graft survivals after 3 years from DKT were 93% and 86.3%, respectively. In this study, we applied successfully a widespread score to allocate organs to single kidney transplantation or DKT. In our experience, the score is suitable for the organ allocation but it may be overprotective, excluding potentially suitable organs for a single transplantation. PMID:20534235

  3. Monitoring of kidney and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation rejection by release of donor-specific, soluble HLA class I.

    PubMed

    DeVito-Haynes, L D; Jankowska-Gan, E; Sollinger, H W; Knechtle, S J; Burlingham, W J

    1994-07-01

    Using an HLA-A2-specific ELISA we monitored daily pretransplantation and posttransplantation sera from five kidney and eight simultaneous pancreas-kidney HLA-A2-negative recipients of HLA-A2-positive transplants during hospitalization. We found that, unlike liver transplants, neither kidney nor simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants continuously secreted donor HLA proteins. However, three of four rejection episodes in kidney recipients and seven of seven rejection episodes in simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients were accompanied by elevated serum levels of donor sHLA-A2 (> 5 ng/ml). In only one kidney patient was there a release of donor antigen without evidence of rejection, but in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney group most patients had at least one time point of detectable sHLA-A2 without strong evidence of kidney rejection. While total sHLA levels were also elevated during rejection, the rise in donor-specific sHLA was more dramatic when compared to pretransplantation background levels. We hypothesized that the release of donor sHLA class I proteins by transplanted organs might be a systemic indication of rejection in both pancreas and kidney allografts. The detection of donor sHLA in recipient sera could be an important noninvasive monitor of rejection, especially in the pancreas, which is currently difficult to monitor as a single-organ transplant. PMID:7960963

  4. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  5. Lymphocyte Activation Markers in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Fatina I.; Elghoroury, Eman A.; Elshamaa, Manal F.; Bazaraa, Hafez M.; Salah, Doaa M.; Kassem, Neemat M. A.; Ibrahim, Mona H.; El-Saaid, Gamila S.; Nasr, Soha A.; Koura, Hala M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: The role of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) in immune tolerance in experimental transplantation is very important but the clinical significance of circulating Tregs in the peripheral blood is undetermined. We evaluated the association between the frequency of T cell activation markers CD25 and CD71 and clinical parameters that may affect the level of these T cell markers. Methods: In 47peditric kidney transplant (KT) recipients and 20 healthy controls, the frequency of T cell activation markers, CD25 and CD71 was measured with flow cytometry after transplantation. Two clinical protocols of induction immunosuppression were used: (1) anti-thymocyte globulin (THYMO) group (n =29) and Basiliximab (BSX) group (n=10). Results: The percentage of circulating CD25 after KT was significantly lower than that in the controls. There is no significant difference between KT and the controls s regard to circulating CD71. The percentage of CD25 was significantly increased in children with acute rejection compared with those without acute rejection. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) decreased the frequency of CD25 but mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor did not. The proportion of CD25 significantly decreased in THYMO group during the first year after transplantation. Conclusion: The frequency of circulating T cell activation marker CD25 in pediatric KT recipients is strongly affected by CNIs, and a high frequency of CD25 is associated with acute rejection during the early posttransplant period. The measurement of T cell activation markers, may become a useful immune monitoring tool after kidney transplantation. PMID:26508906

  6. Shortened Length of Stay Improves Financial Outcomes in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Manuel; Siskind, Eric; Sameyah, Emil; Alex, Asha; Blum, Mark; Tyrell, Richard; Fana, Melissa; Mishler, Marni; Godwin, Andrew; Kuncewitch, Michael; Alexander, Mohini; Israel, Ezra; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Calderon, Kellie; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Sachdeva, Mala; Bellucci, Alessandro; Mattana, Joseph; Fishbane, Steven; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred clinical and most cost-effective option for end-stage renal disease. Significant advances have taken place in the care of the transplant patients with improvements in clinical outcomes. The optimization of the costs of transplantation has been a constant goal as well. We present herein the impact in financial outcomes of a shortened length of stay after kidney transplant. PMID:24436592

  7. Gut microbiota and tacrolimus dosing in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Taur, Ying; Jenq, Robert R; Toussaint, Nora C; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2015-01-01

    Tacrolimus dosing to establish therapeutic levels in recipients of organ transplants is a challenging task because of much interpatient and intrapatient variability in drug absorption, metabolism, and disposition. In view of the reported impact of gut microbial species on drug metabolism, we investigated the relationship between the gut microbiota and tacrolimus dosing requirements in this pilot study of adult kidney transplant recipients. Serial fecal specimens were collected during the first month of transplantation from 19 kidney transplant recipients who either required a 50% increase from initial tacrolimus dosing during the first month of transplantation (Dose Escalation Group, n=5) or did not require such an increase (Dose Stable Group, n=14). We characterized bacterial composition in the fecal specimens by deep sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA V4-V5 region and we investigated the hypothesis that gut microbial composition is associated with tacrolimus dosing requirements. Initial tacrolimus dosing was similar in the Dose Escalation Group and in the Stable Group (4.2 ± 1.1 mg/day vs. 3.8 ± 0.8 mg/day, respectively, P=0.61, two-way between-group ANOVA using contrasts) but became higher in the Dose Escalation Group than in the Dose Stable Group by the end of the first transplantation month (9.6 ± 2.4 mg/day vs. 3.3 ± 1.5 mg/day, respectively, P<0.001). Our systematic characterization of the gut microbial composition identified that fecal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii abundance in the first week of transplantation was 11.8% in the Dose Escalation Group and 0.8% in the Dose Stable Group (P=0.002, Wilcoxon Rank Sum test, P<0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple hypotheses). Fecal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii abundance in the first week of transplantation was positively correlated with future tacrolimus dosing at 1 month (R=0.57, P=0.01) and had a coefficient ± standard error of 1.0 ± 0.6 (P=0.08) after multivariable linear regression

  8. Pre-transplant shedding of BK virus in urine is unrelated to post-transplant viruria and viremia in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, C S; Oliveira, R R; Pierrotti, L C; Fink, M C D S; Urbano, P R P; Nali, L H S; Luna, E J A; Romano, C M; David, D R; David-Neto, E; Pannuti, C S

    2016-07-01

    BK virus-(BKV) associated nephropathy (BKVN) is a major cause of allograft injury in kidney transplant recipients. In such patients, subclinical reactivation of latent BKV infection can occur in the pre-transplant period. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary BKV shedding in the immediate pre-transplant period is associated with a higher incidence of viruria and viremia during the first year after kidney transplantation. We examined urine samples from 34 kidney transplant recipients, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect BKV. Urine samples were obtained in the immediate pre-transplant period and during the first year after transplant on a monthly basis. If BKV viruria was detected, blood samples were collected and screened for BKV viremia. In the immediate pre-transplant period, we detected BKV viruria in 11 (32.3%) of the 34 recipients. During the first year after transplantation, we detected BKV viruria in all 34 patients and viremia in eight (23.5%). We found no correlation between pre-transplant viruria and post-transplant viruria or viremia (p = 0.2). Although reactivation of latent BKV infection in the pre-transplant period is fairly common among kidney transplant recipients, it is not a risk factor for post-transplant BKV viruria or viremia.

  9. Attainment of the Elusive: Attributions for Long-term Success in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matteson-Kome, Michelle L; Ruppar, Todd; Russell, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Survival of a kidney transplant recipient beyond 2 decades is a relatively rare event. No studies have been conducted to describe individuals' longevity attributions, who have had their kidney transplant for many years. The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to examine longevity attributions of kidney transplant recipients who have had a kidney transplant for 25 years or longer. The initial sample was obtained from an informal support group that includes only those who have had their kidney transplant >25 years. A semistructured 1-hour interview was conducted over the phone, audio-taped, and transcribed. Data were examined using thematic content analyses. The sample consisted of 19 participants (7 males and 12 females) ranging in age from 43 to 67 years, with a mean age of 52.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.82). Transplants were performed between 26 and 36 years prior to the interviews, with a mean of 30.7 years (SD = 3.2). Emerging attributions included maintaining a healthy lifestyle, social support, positive attitude, faith, normalcy, participation in decision making, and luck. Prior to transplantation, patients were engaging in self-management behaviors, which many attributed to their success posttransplant. The findings of this study may provide insight and understanding for health-care providers and other transplant recipients regarding longevity attributions of those who have had their kidney transplants for over a quarter century. Future research should explore the impact of supporting kidney transplant recipients in self-management prior to and after transplantation. PMID:27207405

  10. Pregnancy after kidney transplantation: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Mezza, E; Oggé, G; Attini, R; Rossetti, M; Soragna, G; Consiglio, V; Burdese, M; Vespertino, E; Tattoli, F; Gai, M; Motta, D; Segoloni, G P; Todros, T; Piccoli, G B

    2004-12-01

    Despite the relatively little space for transplantation in most medical schools, this issue is considered interesting by the students both for its clinical and ethical implications. The students were asked to choose a particular aspect of nephrology for a 2-hour case discussion. They chose the case of a 35-year-old female, kidney transplant recipient now 1.5 years postoperatively, who was coming to seek advice about pregnancy. The aim of the present work is to report an integration between narrative and evidence-based medicine (EBM) approaches. The search strategy was developed within a multidisciplinary working group, two of whose members were also masters in the methodology of systematic revisions. The first step in the discussion was the identification of ethical and methodological problem. In a rapidly developing field, books are unlikely to be able to give updated information. One needs to interact with electronic databases. In this context, no randomized controlled trial on pregnancy is expected. The evidence is likely to be heterogeneous. Prenatal care delivery differs around the world in part related to attitudes toward pregnancy, which depend upon religion and traditions. The second step was the definition of the search strategy. The third step, was selecting and cataloging the evidence. The titles and abstracts retrieved by the search strategy (272 items) were examined to identify full papers to be retrieved. The evidence retrieved was screened for the type of paper (reviews, primary studies, case reports, case series) and for the authors to give an indirect idea of duplicate publication bias. Teaching a complex and ever-changing subject, such as kidney transplantation, is a difficult task. The case of a young woman seeking information on the probability to undergo a successful pregnancy was particularly likely to exemplify the importance of being aware of the biases of the book-based information and on the need to interact with the internet. The search

  11. Heart and kidney transplantation using total lymphoid irradiation and donor bone marrow in mongrel dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, D.R.; Dufek, J.H.; Hong, R.; Caldwell, W.L.; Thomas, F.J.; Kolenda, D.R.; Swanson, D.K.; Struble, R.A.

    1980-07-01

    Heart and kidney allografts showed markedly prolonged survival in unrelated mongrel dogs following total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow without any other immunosuppression. In every animal the heart survived longer than the kidney. Placing the kidney allograft in the abdomen with the bone marrow given intraperitoneally doubled kidney survival over placement in the neck, but heart survival was equally prolonged in the abdomen or neck. Splenectomy before TLI or after TLI, but just before transplantation, almost completely eliminated the prolonged survival of both heart and kidney allografts. Thus there is suggestive evidence that TLI plus bone marrow from the donor may be valuable for transplantation in man, particularly heart transplantation.

  12. Re-transplants compared to primary kidney transplants recipients: a mate kidney paired analysis of the OPTN/UNOS database.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ali K; Slaven, James E; Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Yaqub, Muhammad S; Mishler, Dennis P; Taber, Tim E; Sharfuddin, Asif A

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes of kidney re-transplant recipients (RTR) were compared to primary recipients (FTR) from paired donor kidneys. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) database was used to identify deceased donors (n = 6266) who donated one kidney to an RTR and the mate kidney to an FTR between January 2000 to December 2010. As compared to FTR, RTR were younger (45 vs. 52 yr, p < 0.001) and had higher proportion of plasma reactive antibody >80 (25% vs 7%, p < 0.001). There were higher 0 mismatches in RTR (19% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). There were more pre-emptive transplants in RTR (24% vs. 21%, p = 0.002). Delayed graft function (28% vs. 25%, p = 0.007) was higher in RTR. Patient survival was similar in FTR and RTR groups at one, three, and five yr (95.7%, 90.2%, and 82.5% vs. 95.2%, 89.8% and 82.7%). Allograft survival rates were higher in FTR group compared to RTR group at one, three, and five yr (91.1%, 82.4%, and 70.9% vs. 87.8%, 77.4%, and 66.1% p < 0.001). Death-censored allograft survival rates were higher in FTR group at one, three, and five yr (91.3%, 82.7% and 71.4% vs. 88%, 77.7% and 66.5% p < 0.001). In today's era of modern immunosuppression, graft survival in RTR has improved but remains inferior to FTR when controlling for donor factors.

  13. Pre-transplant phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibody concentration is associated with clinically significant recurrence of membranous nephropathy post-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Fattah, Hasan; Ayalon, Rivka; Kidd, Jason; Gehr, Todd; Quintana, Luis F; Kimball, Pamela; Sadruddin, Salima; Massey, H Davis; Kumar, Dhiren; King, Anne L; Beck, Laurence H

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies that have assessed the association of pre-transplant antiphospholipase A2 receptor autoantibody (PLA2R-Ab) concentration with a recurrence of membranous nephropathy (rMN) post-kidney transplant have yielded variable results. We tested 16 consecutive transplant patients with a history of iMN for pre-transplant PLA2R-Ab. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers (Euroimmun, NJ, USA) >14 RU/mL were considered positive. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed after combining data from Quintana et al. (n = 21; Transplantation February 2015) to determine a PLA2R-Ab concentration which could predict rMN. Six of 16 (37%) patients had biopsy-proven rMN at a median of 3.2 yr post-transplant. Of these, five of six (83%) had a positive PLA2R-Ab pre-transplant with a median of 82 RU/mL (range = 31-1500). The only patient who had rMN with negative PLA2R-Ab was later diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma. One hundred percent (n = 10) of patients with no evidence of rMN (median follow-up = five yr) had negative pre-transplant PLA2R-Ab. In a combined ROC analysis (n = 37), a pre-transplant PLA2R-Ab > 29 RU/mL predicted rMN with a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 92%. Pre-transplant PLA2R-Ab could be a useful tool for the prediction of rMN. Patients with rMN in the absence of PLA2R-Ab should be screened for occult malignancy and/or alternate antigens.

  14. Variation in structure and delivery of care between kidney transplant centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Israni, Ajay; Dean, Carl E; Salkowski, Nicholas; Li, Suying; Ratner, Lloyd E; Rabb, Hamid; Powe, Neil R; Kim, S Joseph

    2014-09-15

    Although the United States possesses one of the most comprehensive transplant registries in the world, nationally representative data on how transplant care is structured and delivered is lacking. Therefore, we surveyed all 208 adult kidney transplant centers in the United States, excluding 37 pediatric and 58 inactive adult centers. Respondents were asked about the characteristics of their kidney transplant programs (25 items), the structure and process of care (18 items), coordination of care (10 items), and the characteristics of transplant physicians and surgeons (9 items). The survey was completed by directors of 156 transplant centers (75% response). The results demonstrated significant variation between centers in several domains. Sixty-five percent of transplant centers do not have a dedicated transplant pharmacist in outpatient care. Two thirds of transplant centers do not see the kidney transplant recipients at least monthly during the first year. Less than 30% of centers perform joint sit-down or walking rounds between nephrology and transplant surgery. There was significant variation in the structure and process of care in kidney transplantation. This implies variation in the use of resources at the transplant centers. This variation should be studied to determine best practices associated with optimal kidney allograft and patient survival.

  15. A Reassessment of the Survival Advantage of Simultaneous Kidney-Pancreas Versus Kidney-Alone Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Randall S.; Zhang, Min; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Shu, Xu; Magee, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Simultaneous kidney and pancreas (SPK) transplantation is an attractive option for end-stage renal disease patients with type 1 diabetes. Although SPK transplantation is superior to remaining on dialysis, the survival advantage for SPK recipients compared to kidney transplantation alone (KTA) is controversial. Methods Using data obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we compared patient and graft survivals for 7308 SPK and 4653 KTA adult patients with type I diabetes transplanted in 1998 to 2009. Because SPK and KTA recipients are differently selected, comparison groups were chosen to maximize overlap in the case mixes. Most previous studies contrasted (unadjusted) Kaplan-Meier survival curves or, if covariate-adjusted, reported hazard ratios (HRs). Using newer statistical methods, we avoid relying on hazard ratios (which are seldom of inherent interest) and directly compare covariate-adjusted survival curves. Specifically, we compare average covariate-adjusted SPK- and KTA-specific survival curves (and 10-year area under the curve; ie, restricted mean survival time) to emulate a randomized clinical trial. Results Mean restricted mean kidney graft survival time was significantly greater by 0.18 years (P = 0.045) for SPK compared to KTA. Similarly, patient survival was 0.17 years greater (P = 0.033) for SPK than KTA. Increased graft survival was primarily observed in younger SPK recipients. Supplementary analysis revealed that the SPK hazards were nonproportional, meaning that it would be difficult to quantify the cumulative effect of SPK through a standard Cox regression analysis. Conclusions Using this novel methodology, we demonstrate that SPK is associated with statistically but not clinically significant increases in graft and patient survival. PMID:25757212

  16. [A femoral neck fracture and a kidney transplantation in Egypt].

    PubMed

    Barnard, H

    1999-11-01

    The mother of an Egyptian friend of the author is admitted to Asyut University Hospital after breaking her hip. A number of direct relatives spend the night in her hospital room and discuss the situation with the surgeon the next day. They are subsequently sent out to buy an artificial joint, and to bring the fee for the operation. The 2000 Egyptian Pounds which is claimed for this is later, during the operation, increased by 500 Egyptian Pounds, equivalent to about 150 US dollars. This is relatively cheap compared with the kidney transplant of another relative, which amounted to 40,000 Egyptian Pounds. Most of this money was used to pay the donor, since Egyptian law only allows the transplantation of organs from living donors.

  17. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  18. [Kidney transplantation from paediatric cadaveric donors to adult recipients (review article)].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2003-01-01

    The basic problem of all developed transplant programs is organs deficiency available for transplantation. There is an effort within last 10 years to get each organ for transplantation that it is supposed to be functional for several years. These problems also occur in the program of kidney transplantation. Apart from realizing of kidney transplantations from donors alive, which have an increasing tendency in Czech Republic (in 2001 more than 5%, in 2002 more than 10%), there is the only another possibility to get kidney grafts from non-ideal (suboptimal, marginal) donors. Both short-term and long-term results of kidney transplantation from non-ideal donors are comparable with the transplantation results from ideal donors. The kidneys from very young paediatric cadaveric donors, especially up to five years are the typical example of non-ideal graft. The article introduces the international position of the Czech Republic in organ procurement from cadaveric donors as well as in kidney transplantations. It shortly summarizes the history of kidney transplantations and at the same time it deals with realizing of kidney transplantation from paediatric cadaveric donors to adult recipients. The new division of kidney grafts from paediatric cadaveric donors into four groups according to their age is introduced. All at once the present surgical technique is described and the problems of some post-operative complications are discussed, especially the higher occurrence of primary graft non-function. The principle that kidneys from donor up to three years should be transplanted as a block to the single recipient is emphasized. In conclusion the author recommends, on the basis of his own experiences, the realizing of these transplantations.

  19. Vitamin D in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Mechanisms and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, Giuseppe; Galassi, Andrea; Capelli, Irene; Angelini, Maria Laura; La Manna, Gaetano; Cozzolino, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is common in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), where secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH) and post-transplantation bone disease (PTBD) are potential effectors of both graft and vascular aging. Reduced 25(OH)D levels are highly prevalent in KTRs. Experimental and clinical evidence support the direct involvement of deranged vitamin D metabolism in CKD-MBD among KTRs. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of vitamin D derangement in KTRs and its fall out on patient and graft outcome, highlighting the roles of both nutritional and active vitamin D compounds to treat PTBD, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and graft dysfunction. Fibroblast growth factor-23-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-vitamin D axis, immunosuppressive therapy and previous bone status have been associated with PTBD. Although several studies reported reduced PTH levels in KTRs receiving nutritional vitamin D, its effects on bone mineral density (BMD) remain controversial. Active vitamin D reduced PTH levels and increased BMD after transplantation, but paricalcitol treatment was not accompanied by benefits on osteopenia. Vitamin D is considered protective against CVD due to the widespread pleiotropic effects, but data among KTRs remain scanty. Although vitamin deficiency is associated with lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and faster estimated GFR decline and data on the anti-proteinuric effects of vitamin D receptor activation (VDRA) in KTRs sound encouraging, reports on related improvement on graft survival are still lacking. Clinical data support the efficacy of VDRA against HPTH and show promising evidence of VDRA's effect in counteracting post-transplant proteinuria. New insights are mandatory to establish if the improvement of surrogate outcomes will translate into better patient and graft outcome. PMID:27229347

  20. Cancer Incidence among Heart, Kidney, and Liver Transplant Recipients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwai-Fong; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Ke, Hung-Yen; Lin, Yi-Chang; Lin, Feng-Yen; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Population-based evidence of the relative risk of cancer among heart, kidney, and liver transplant recipients from Asia is lacking. The Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a population-based cohort study of transplant recipients (n = 5396), comprising 801 heart, 2847 kidney, and 1748 liver transplant recipients between 2001 and 2012. Standardized incidence ratios and Cox regression models were used. Compared with the general population, the risk of cancer increased 3.8-fold after heart transplantation, 4.1-fold after kidney transplantation and 4.6-fold after liver transplantation. Cancer occurrence showed considerable variation according to transplanted organs. The most common cancers in all transplant patients were cancers of the head and neck, liver, bladder, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Male recipients had an increased risk of cancers of the head and neck and liver, and female kidney recipients had a significant risk of bladder and kidney cancer. The adjusted hazard ratio for any cancer in all recipients was higher in liver transplant recipients compared with that in heart transplant recipients (hazard ratio = 1.5, P = .04). Cancer occurrence varied considerably and posttransplant cancer screening should be performed routinely according to transplanted organ and sex. PMID:27196400

  1. [An unusual cause of ureteral obstruction in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Vigo, Valentina; Rossi, Luigi; Lisi, Piero; Antonelli, Maurizio; Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal herniation of the ureter in a kidney transplantation is a rare cause of late distal ureteral obstruction. Herniation is usually secondary to the implant of a long redundant ureter and to its course on the spermatic cord. This clinical condition can worsen graft function in the presence of ipsilateral hydroureteronephrosis. In this review, we describe the case of an asymptomatic 51-year-old man with a history of right iliac renal allotransplantation 12 years before. Kidney ultrasound showed moderate hydroureteronephrosis and ureteral kneeling at the upper third of the inguinal canal. The patient presented a mild increase in serum creatinine; physical examination revealed an ipsilateral inguinal hernia. A CT scan of the abdomen with no contrast medium confirmed middle-distal ureteral kneeling engaging in the sac of the right inguinal hernia. The patient underwent surgical hernia repair with no complications and his renal function recovered completely.

  2. Ethical issues with nondirected ("good samaritan") kidney donation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2011-05-01

    "Good samaritan" donation has been of great interest in Italy. At the request of the Presidency of the Council of Ministers, the National Committee on Bioethics expressed its opinion on the matter. While highlighting its controversial aspects, the assessment was favorable. The National Council for Health established working criteria. Yet eminent bioethicists sharing the same values have reached discordant conclusions. Legal developments leading to the authorization of living donor kidney transplants from blood relatives or emotionally close individuals may offer a path for ethical assessment of the practice. PMID:21620033

  3. Hospital Quality and Selective Contracting: Evidence from Kidney Transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    Howard, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Most private health insurers offer a limited network of providers to enrollees. Critics have questioned whether selective contracting benefits patients. Plans counter that they take quality into account when choosing providers. Using data on five plans’ networks for kidney transplant hospitals, this study shows that in-network hospitals have better outcomes than out-of-network facilities. Conditional logit estimates using patient level data confirm this result: compared to Medicare patients, privately-insured patients are more likely to register at hospitals with higher survival rates. Restricting choice has the potential to improve patient welfare if plans steer uninformed patients to high quality hospitals and physicians. PMID:19079762

  4. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  5. Impact of Maintenance Steroids versus Rapid Steroid Withdrawal in African-American Kidney Transplant Recipients: Comparison of Two Urban Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chon, W. James; Desai, Amishi; Wing, Coady; Arwindekar, Divya; Tang, Ignatius Y. S.; Josephson, Michelle A.; Akkina, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid steroid withdrawal (RSW) is used increasingly in kidney transplantation but long-term outcomes in African-American (AA) recipients are not well known. We compared 1 and 5 year transplant outcomes in a large cohort of AA patients who were maintained on continued steroid therapy (CST) to those who underwent RSW. Methods Post-transplant courses of A as receiving kidney allografts from 2003–2011 at two urban transplant centers in Chicago were followed. Prior to outcome analysis, we used Inverse Probability of Treatment Weights (IPTW) to match the two groups on a set of baseline risk factors. Graft and patient survival, GFR at 1 and 5 years, incidence and type of rejection, incidence of post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), delayed graft function, CMV and BK viremia were compared. Results There were 150 AA recipients in the CST analytic group and 157 in the RSW analytic group. Graft and patient survival was similar between the two groups. Rates of CMV viremia were higher in the RSW compared to the CST analytic group at 1 year. Biopsy-proven acute rejection and PTDM were similar between the RSW and CST groups. Conclusions In AA recipients, RSW has similar long-term outcomes to CST. PMID:27088051

  6. Chronic kidney disease, transplantation practices and transplantation law in Pakistan: opportunity for a global meditation.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Faheem

    2009-07-01

    The majority of countries have enacted edicts to regulate organ transplantation due to mounting recognition of its intricacies and increasing level of global disquiet. Frail national economy and status of health care infrastructure restricts access of the local population to both dialysis and transplantation in Pakistan. There is a surge in kidney transplantation activities, however. I have reported the enormity of organ crime in Pakistan. The number of commercial renal transplants range from 3000 to 4500. Foreign nationals share the marketplace. There are current attempts from the government to stop organ trade by strictly enforcing a recently sanctioned law on organ transplantation. Scarcity of comprehensive reliable data has hampered plausible assessments and indispensable modifications to facilitate designs for the future health care. Alternatives to organ transplantation will augment the choice of treatment modalities for a proliferating end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. The whole array of existing therapeutic modalities for ESRD has to be utilized. Promoting a fresh culture of organ donation by strengthening of the family institution may be another objective.

  7. Chronic kidney disease, transplantation practices and transplantation law in Pakistan: opportunity for a global meditation.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Faheem

    2009-07-01

    The majority of countries have enacted edicts to regulate organ transplantation due to mounting recognition of its intricacies and increasing level of global disquiet. Frail national economy and status of health care infrastructure restricts access of the local population to both dialysis and transplantation in Pakistan. There is a surge in kidney transplantation activities, however. I have reported the enormity of organ crime in Pakistan. The number of commercial renal transplants range from 3000 to 4500. Foreign nationals share the marketplace. There are current attempts from the government to stop organ trade by strictly enforcing a recently sanctioned law on organ transplantation. Scarcity of comprehensive reliable data has hampered plausible assessments and indispensable modifications to facilitate designs for the future health care. Alternatives to organ transplantation will augment the choice of treatment modalities for a proliferating end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. The whole array of existing therapeutic modalities for ESRD has to be utilized. Promoting a fresh culture of organ donation by strengthening of the family institution may be another objective. PMID:19566737

  8. [End-stage nephropathy in type 1-diabetes mellitus - kidney transplantation alone or combined with islet or pancreas transplantation?].

    PubMed

    Lehman, Roger; Gerber, Philippe A

    2011-12-01

    Due to the recent changes in reimbursement politics in islet and pancreas transplantation in Switzerland, the question, which patients with type 1-diabetes mellitus get which form of beta-cell replacement, is of utmost importance for referring physicians. As of July 1, 2010 all forms of islet- or pancreas-transplantations are reimbursed by the Swiss health care system. The limited availability of donor organs and the necessity of transplantation of the islets of several pancreata in order to achieve insulin independence has led to a change in paradigms in Switzerland, where insulin independence by multiple islet transplantations is not the key goal in islet transplantation any longer. The primary goal is achieving a good blood glucose control and avoidance of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. This goal can be achieved in 80 - 90 % of all patients. Only if this goal cannot be achieved by a single islet transplantation, a second or third islet transplantation is performed. By adapting this strategy more patients can benefit from this new therapy. Unlike the North American centers, the Swiss centers in Zurich and Geneva concentrated their efforts on islet after kidney and simultaneous islet kidney transplantation. Due to the organ donor shortage in Switzerland, 50 % of kidney transplants are nowadays living-organ donations, therefore this option has to be included in the decision tree of a beta cell replacement. The choice between islet and pancreas transplantation depends on the existence of diabetes complications (because the perioperative risk is considerably higher in pancreas transplantation) and the potential benefit of a pancreas- or islet transplantation. The first question in the decision tree is, therefore, whether the patient with type 1-diabetes and severe renal failure is a potential candidate for simultaneous pancreas-islet transplantation. If the perioperative risk is considered to be too high, or if revascularisation procedures cannot be done before

  9. [End-stage nephropathy in type 1-diabetes mellitus - kidney transplantation alone or combined with islet or pancreas transplantation?].

    PubMed

    Lehman, Roger; Gerber, Philippe A

    2011-12-01

    Due to the recent changes in reimbursement politics in islet and pancreas transplantation in Switzerland, the question, which patients with type 1-diabetes mellitus get which form of beta-cell replacement, is of utmost importance for referring physicians. As of July 1, 2010 all forms of islet- or pancreas-transplantations are reimbursed by the Swiss health care system. The limited availability of donor organs and the necessity of transplantation of the islets of several pancreata in order to achieve insulin independence has led to a change in paradigms in Switzerland, where insulin independence by multiple islet transplantations is not the key goal in islet transplantation any longer. The primary goal is achieving a good blood glucose control and avoidance of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. This goal can be achieved in 80 - 90 % of all patients. Only if this goal cannot be achieved by a single islet transplantation, a second or third islet transplantation is performed. By adapting this strategy more patients can benefit from this new therapy. Unlike the North American centers, the Swiss centers in Zurich and Geneva concentrated their efforts on islet after kidney and simultaneous islet kidney transplantation. Due to the organ donor shortage in Switzerland, 50 % of kidney transplants are nowadays living-organ donations, therefore this option has to be included in the decision tree of a beta cell replacement. The choice between islet and pancreas transplantation depends on the existence of diabetes complications (because the perioperative risk is considerably higher in pancreas transplantation) and the potential benefit of a pancreas- or islet transplantation. The first question in the decision tree is, therefore, whether the patient with type 1-diabetes and severe renal failure is a potential candidate for simultaneous pancreas-islet transplantation. If the perioperative risk is considered to be too high, or if revascularisation procedures cannot be done before

  10. Kidney biopsy in the Military Hospital of Morocco: Complications and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Zajjari, Yassir; Aatif, Taoufiq; Bahadi, Abdelali; Hassani, Kawtar; El Kabbaj, Driss; Benyahia, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological studies on renal biopsies are necessary to establish the pattern and trends of renal diseases in a particular geographic area. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records, histopathology findings and complications of renal biopsy in a region of Morocco. We studied a total of 130 native kidney biopsies taken between January 2008 and January 2012. All biopsies were examined by light microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. There were 86 males (66.2%) and 44 females (33.8%), with a mean patient age of 44.82 ± 17.86 (range 8-86) years. The most common indications of renal biopsy was nephritic syndrome (61.5%), followed by renal failure of unknown etiology (30.8%) and asymptomatic urinary abnormalities (5.4%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was found in 60 (46.2%) of the patients. Among the PGN cases, the most common one was membranous nephropathy (MN) (12.3%). Secondary glomerular disease (SGN) accounted for 48 (36.9%) of the cases. The most common SGN was lupus nephritis (LN) (10%). Tubulointerstitial disease [13 (10%)] and vascular disease [9 (6.9%)] were less common. The most common complications of the procedure were pain at the biopsy site in 12.3%, gross hematuria in 12.3%, perirenal hematoma in 7.7% and hematuria requiring nephrectomy in 0.8% of the patients. The most common indication for renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome, MN was the most frequent PGN and LN was the most frequent SGN in our report. PMID:26354589

  11. 77 FR 49447 - Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation... evaluate patient and allograft outcome in clinical trials of kidney transplantation. The meeting will... discussion and may serve to inform recommendations on potential endpoints in clinical trials of...

  12. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  13. The Two Kidney to One Kidney Transition and Transplant Glomerulopathy: A Podocyte Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Wang, Su Q.; Wickman, Larysa; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Nishizono, Ryuzoh; Kikuchi, Masao; Huang, Yihung; Samaniego, Milagros

    2015-01-01

    The attrition rate of functioning allografts beyond the first year has not improved despite improved immunosuppression, suggesting that nonimmune mechanisms could be involved. Notably, glomerulopathies may account for about 40% of failed kidney allografts beyond the first year of engraftment, and glomerulosclerosis and progression to ESRD are caused by podocyte depletion. Model systems demonstrate that nephrectomy can precipitate hypertrophic podocyte stress that triggers progressive podocyte depletion leading to ESRD, and that this process is accompanied by accelerated podocyte detachment that can be measured in urine. Here, we show that kidney transplantation “reverse nephrectomy” is also associated with podocyte hypertrophy and increased podocyte detachment. Patients with stable normal allograft function and no proteinuria had levels of podocyte detachment similar to levels in two-kidney controls as measured by urine podocyte assay. By contrast, patients who developed transplant glomerulopathy had 10- to 20-fold increased levels of podocyte detachment. Morphometric studies showed that a subset of these patients developed reduced glomerular podocyte density within 2 years of transplantation due to reduced podocyte number per glomerulus. A second subset developed glomerulopathy by an average of 10 years after transplantation due to reduced glomerular podocyte number and glomerular tuft enlargement. Reduced podocyte density was associated with reduced eGFR, glomerulosclerosis, and proteinuria. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that podocyte depletion contributes to allograft failure and reduced allograft half-life. Mechanisms may include immune-driven processes affecting the podocyte or other cells and/or hypertrophy-induced podocyte stress causing accelerated podocyte detachment, which would be amenable to nonimmune therapeutic targeting. PMID:25388223

  14. The impact of surveillance and rapid reduction in immunosuppression to control BK virus-related graft injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Flechner, Stuart M; Liu, Xiaobo; Schold, Jesse; Tian, Devin; Srinivas, Titte R; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B

    2013-08-01

    We prospectively screened 609 consecutive kidney (538) and kidney-pancreas (71) transplant recipients for BK viremia over a 4-year interval using polymerase chain reaction viral load detection and protocol kidney biopsies. We found that BK viremia is common at our center: total cases 26.7%, cases during first year 21.3% (mean 4 months), and recipients with ≥ 10 000 copies/ml 12.3%. We found few predictive clinical or demographic risk factors for any BK viremia or viral loads ≥ 10,000 copies/ml, other than prior treatment of biopsy confirmed acute rejection and/or higher immunosuppressive blood levels of tacrolimus (P = 0.001) or mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.007). Viral loads at diagnosis (<10 000 copies/ml) demonstrated little impact on graft function or survival. However, rising copy numbers demand early reductions in immunosuppressive drug doses of at least 30-50%. Viral loads >185 000 copies/ml at diagnosis were predictive of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN; OR: 113.25, 95% CI: 17.22-744.6, P < 0.001). Surveillance for BK viremia and rapid reduction of immunosuppression limited the incidence of BKVAN to 1.3%. The addition of leflunomide or ciprofloxacin to immunosuppressive dose reduction did not result in greater rates of viral clearance. These data support the role of early surveillance for BK viremia to limit the impact on transplant outcome, although the most effective schedule for screening awaits further investigation.

  15. The impact of surveillance and rapid reduction in immunosuppression to control BK virus-related graft injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Flechner, Stuart M; Liu, Xiaobo; Schold, Jesse; Tian, Devin; Srinivas, Titte R; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B

    2013-08-01

    We prospectively screened 609 consecutive kidney (538) and kidney-pancreas (71) transplant recipients for BK viremia over a 4-year interval using polymerase chain reaction viral load detection and protocol kidney biopsies. We found that BK viremia is common at our center: total cases 26.7%, cases during first year 21.3% (mean 4 months), and recipients with ≥ 10 000 copies/ml 12.3%. We found few predictive clinical or demographic risk factors for any BK viremia or viral loads ≥ 10,000 copies/ml, other than prior treatment of biopsy confirmed acute rejection and/or higher immunosuppressive blood levels of tacrolimus (P = 0.001) or mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.007). Viral loads at diagnosis (<10 000 copies/ml) demonstrated little impact on graft function or survival. However, rising copy numbers demand early reductions in immunosuppressive drug doses of at least 30-50%. Viral loads >185 000 copies/ml at diagnosis were predictive of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN; OR: 113.25, 95% CI: 17.22-744.6, P < 0.001). Surveillance for BK viremia and rapid reduction of immunosuppression limited the incidence of BKVAN to 1.3%. The addition of leflunomide or ciprofloxacin to immunosuppressive dose reduction did not result in greater rates of viral clearance. These data support the role of early surveillance for BK viremia to limit the impact on transplant outcome, although the most effective schedule for screening awaits further investigation. PMID:23763289

  16. The Critical Role of Innate Immunity in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cucchiari, David; Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    For a long time now, kidney transplant rejection has been considered the consequence of either cellular or antibody-mediated reaction as a part of adaptive immunity response. The role of innate immunity, on the other hand, had been unclear for many years and was thought to be only ancillary. There is now consistent evidence that innate immune response is a condition necessary to activate the machinery of rejection. In this setting, the communication between antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes is of major importance. Indeed, T cells are unable to cause rejection if innate immunity is not activated. This field is currently being explored and several experiments in animal models have proved that blocking innate immunity activation can promote tolerance of the graft instead of rejection. The aim of this review is to systematically describe all the steps of innate immunity response in kidney transplant rejection, from antigen recognition to T-cells activation, with a focus on clinical consequences and possible future perspectives.

  17. Plasma Nitration of High-Density and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Bakillah, Ahmed; Tedla, Fasika; Ayoub, Isabelle; John, Devon; Norin, Allen J.; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Brown, Clinton

    2015-01-01

    Background. Functional abnormalities of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) could contribute to cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. We measured a validated marker of HDL dysfunction, nitrated apolipoprotein A-I, in kidney transplant recipients to test the hypothesis that a functioning kidney transplant reduces serum nitrated apoA-I concentrations. Methods. Concentrations of nitrated apoA-I and apoB were measured using indirect sandwich ELISA assays on sera collected from each transplant subject before transplantation and at 1, 3, and 12 months after transplantation. Patients were excluded if they have history of diabetes, treatment with lipid-lowering medications or HIV protease inhibitors, prednisone dose > 15 mg/day, nephrotic range proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or active inflammatory disease. Sera from 18 transplanted patients were analyzed. Four subjects were excluded due to insufficient data. Twelve and eight patients had creatinine < 1.5 mg/dL at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, respectively. Results. Nitrated apoA-I was significantly reduced at 12 months after transplantation (p = 0.039). The decrease in apoA-I nitration was associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (p = 0.047). In contrast to apoA-I, nitrated apoB was not affected after kidney transplantation. Conclusions. Patients with well-functioning grafts had significant reduction in nitrated apoA-I 12 months after kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed in a large cohort to determine if nitrated apoA-I can be used as a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk stratification in chronic kidney disease. PMID:26648662

  18. Detection of cytomegalovirus and human herpesvirus-6 DNA in liver biopsy specimens and their correlation with rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guardia-Silva, A C; Stucchi, R S B; Sampaio, A M; Milan, A; Costa, S C B; Boin, I F S F

    2012-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) reactivation after transplantation put patients at an increased risk of graft rejection mainly among those who receive organs that are positive in their donor biopsies. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CMV and HHV-6 DNA in liver biopsy specimens from the donors and from their grafts for correlation with rejection after transplantation. We followed 41 liver transplantation patients whose samples were evaluated using nested-polymerase chain reactions (N-PCR). Twenty-one (51%) of the 41 studied patients experienced rejection; 4/21 (19%) were CMV positive in the donor biopsy specimens and remained positive; another 5 subjects became positive. The patients who received organs from donors with biopsies positive for CMV demonstrated a trend to develop graft rejection after transplantation (Fisher's exact test [P = .0591] with significant results on univariate and multivariate analysis [P = .042]). Eight of the 21 who experienced rejection episodes were HHV-6 positive in the donor biopsy but there was no statistical significance CMV DNA diagnosed in liver donor biopsies remained positive posttransplantation in liver biopsy recipients; it was considered a tendency to develop acute cellular rejection after transplantation.

  19. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  20. Nonadherence to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplant recipients: can technology help?

    PubMed

    Nerini, Erika; Bruno, Fulvio; Citterio, Franco; Schena, Francesco P

    2016-10-01

    End-stage kidney disease is a life-threatening condition that compels patients to accept either dialysis or transplant. Kidney transplantation is the best choice for patients with end-stage kidney disease because it ensures higher quality of life and longer survival rates than other choices, with less cost for the healthcare system. However, in order for renal recipients to maintain the functioning graft they must take lifelong immunosuppressive medications, with possible side effects and low medication adherence. It is known that low medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients may cause poor outcomes, chronic graft rejection, and graft failure. In this review, the authors give an overview of nonadherence in the transplant setting. In addition, they analyze the role of different technologies as an aid to improve adherence, with a focus on mobile-phone based solutions to monitor and enhance kidney transplant recipient compliance.

  1. Addressing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Live Donor Kidney Transplantation: Priorities for Research and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Amy D.; Rodrigue, James R.; Purnell, Tanjala S.; Ladin, Keren; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2009-01-01

    One potential mechanism for reducing racial/ethnic disparities in the receipt of kidney transplants is to enhance minorities’ pursuit of living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). Pursuit of LDKT is influenced by patients’ personal values, their extended social networks, the healthcare system, and the community at large. This review discusses research and interventions promoting LDKT, especially for minorities, including improving education for patients, donors, and providers, utilizing LDKT kidneys more efficiently, and reducing surgical and financial barriers to transplant. Future directions to increase awareness of LDKT for more racial/ethnic minorities are also discussed including developing culturally tailored transplant education, clarifying transplant-eligibility practice guidelines, strengthening partnerships between community kidney providers and transplant centers, and conducting general media campaigns and community outreach. PMID:20116653

  2. Late-onset BK viral nephropathy in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Mathew, J C; Holanda, D G; Figanbaum, T L; Fraer, M; Thomas, C P

    2014-09-01

    BK polyoma viral infection occurs as an asymptomatic infection in a high proportion of normal hosts without obvious sequelae. In the kidney transplant population, the virus is reactivated because of reduced immunity and, if not appropriately managed, can lead to BK viral nephropathy, which has emerged as a common cause of acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease in renal transplant recipients. BK viremia almost always occurs during the first 2 years after transplantation, when immunosuppressive therapy is high, or at other periods when immunosuppression is intensified. BK viremia is now detected by routine screening of transplant patients for the first few years, and BK viral nephropathy is considered to be high in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in recently transplanted patients. We report a case of BK viral nephropathy developing 10 years after transplantation and present the challenges of managing advanced disease.

  3. Kidney Transplantation in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Long-Term Prognosis for Patients and Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyang; Cheigh, Jhoong S.

    2001-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best therapeutic choice to improve survival and quality of life in patients with end-stage diabetic nephropathy. Long-term prognosis in diabetic patients who received kidney transplants, however, has not been delineated. We, therefore, studied patient and graft survival, graft function and cause of graft failure in 78 Type I diabetic kidney transplant recipients in The Rogosin Institute/The Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York who had functioning grafts for more than one year. The results were compared with 78 non-diabetic patients who had functioning grafts for more than one year and were matched for age, gender, donor source, time of transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy protocol. Cumulative patient survival rates for diabetic patients were significantly lower than those of non-diabetic patients (86% vs. 97% at 5 years and 74% vs. 95% at 10 years, respectively: p<0.05). The most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease. Graft survival rates for diabetic patients were also lower than that of non-diabetic patients (71% vs. 80% at 5 years and 58% vs. 72% at 10 years, respectively), but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Among the 22 failed grafts in diabetic patients, 7 (32%) were due to patient death rather than primary graft failure. If the patients who died with a functioning graft were censored, graft survival rates of diabetic patients approached those of non-diabetic patients (80% vs. 81% at 5 years and 65% vs. 73% at 10 years, respectively). Creatinine clearances in diabetic patients were lower than that in non-diabetic patients through the follow-up period, but the differences were significant only for the first few years. At no time was there a higher creatinine clearance for diabetic patients. Among the 16 patients who had transplant kidney biopsies two to seven years post-transplant, 6 showed morphological changes consistent with diabetic nephropathy. One patient lost graft function

  4. Simultaneous Native Nephrectomy and Kidney Transplantation in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Zerbo, Domenico; Basile, Giusi; Gozzo, Cecilia; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Sanfiorenzo, Angelo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy with kidney transplantation and to determine the effect of this procedure on perioperative morbidity and mortality and graft and patient survival. Methods Between January 2000 and May 2015, 145 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplantation. Of those, 40 (27.5%) underwent concurrent ipsilateral native nephrectomy (group NT). Patients in group NT were compared with patients with ADPKD not undergoing concurrent nephrectomy (group NT-) and asymptomatic patients undergoing pretransplant nephrectomy (group PNT). Results The average follow-up was 66 months. The graft survival rate at 1 and 5 years was 95% and 87.5% versus 93% and 76.2% in the NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .903 and P = .544, respectively); 1-year patient survival was 100% for NT and 97% for NT- patients (P = .288), whereas 5-year patient survival was 100% and 92% for NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .128). After propensity score matching (34 patients per group) no significant differences were observed in 1-year (97.1% in NT and 94.1%; P = 1) and 5-year (88.2% in NT and 91.2% in NT-; P = 1) graft survival, and in 1-year (100% for both groups; P = 1) and 5-year (100% in NT and 94.1% in NT-; P = 1) patient survival. Perioperative mortality was 0% among NT and 1.2% among NT- patients, whereas perioperative surgical complications were similar in both groups. One- and 5-year graft and patient survival were similar between the NT and PNT groups, but patients in the PNT group had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin and residual diuresis volumes at the time of transplant. Moreover, PNT patients had a longer pretransplant dialysis and a longer time on the waiting list. Conclusions Simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy does not have a negative effect on patient and graft survival in patients with ADPKD and is associated with low morbidity. Pretransplant nephrectomy should

  5. Renal transplantation induces mitochondrial uncoupling, increased kidney oxygen consumption, and decreased kidney oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Papazova, Diana A; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Joles, Jaap A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an acknowledged pathway to renal injury and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and is known to reduce renal oxygen tension (Po2). We hypothesized that renal I/R increases oxidative damage and induces mitochondrial uncoupling, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and hence kidney hypoxia. Lewis rats underwent syngenic renal transplantation (TX) and contralateral nephrectomy. Controls were uninephrectomized (1K-CON) or left untreated (2K-CON). After 7 days, urinary excretion of protein and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were measured, and after 14 days glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow, whole kidney Qo2, cortical Po2, kidney cortex mitochondrial uncoupling, renal oxidative damage, and tubulointerstitial injury were assessed. TX, compared with 1K-CON, resulted in mitochondrial uncoupling mediated via uncoupling protein-2 (16 ± 3.3 vs. 0.9 ± 0.4 pmol O2 · s(-1)· mg protein(-1), P < 0.05) and increased whole kidney Qo2 (55 ± 16 vs. 33 ± 10 μmol O2/min, P < 0.05). Corticomedullary Po2 was lower in TX compared with 1K-CON (30 ± 13 vs. 47 ± 4 μM, P < 0.05) whereas no significant difference was observed between 2K-CON and 1K-CON rats. Proteinuria, oxidative damage, and the tubulointerstitial injury score were not significantly different in 1K-CON and TX. Treatment of donors for 5 days with mito-TEMPO reduced mitochondrial uncoupling but did not affect renal hemodynamics, Qo2, Po2, or injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate increased mitochondrial uncoupling as an early event after experimental renal transplantation associated with increased oxygen consumption and kidney hypoxia in the absence of increases in markers of damage.

  6. Kidney transplantation trends from UCLA registry Data, 1975-1982.

    PubMed

    Perdue, S T; Terasaki, P I; Cats, S; Mickey, M R

    1983-12-01

    A total of 23,607 cases transplanted in 1975-1982 were analyzed for proportion and survival trends within eleven classification variables. Increases of up to 2% of total cases per year in proportions of registered transplants over the eight years are found in the following subcategories (with corresponding decreases in complementary subcategories): first grafts, cadaver donors, recipients with diabetes mellitus, and kidneys shipped more than 50 miles. Larger proportional increases of 3-7% per year are found for HLA-DR matching, cold ischemia times greater than 24 hr, cold storage, and pretransplant transfusions. Recipient population cross-sections are unchanged for age, race, HLA-A,B matching, and cytotoxic antibodies at transplant. Only the pretransplant transfusion classification has no increased graft survival in any subcategory; all other variables have one or more categories with increasing graft survival. It appears likely that the marked shift in transfusion policy nationwide has been the primary factor in increasing graft survival rates overall. PMID:6362142

  7. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  8. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  9. Attitudes among blacks toward donating kidneys for transplantation: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Callender, C O; Bayton, J A; Yeager, C; Clark, J E

    1982-08-01

    PATIENTS REQUIRING KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS HAVE THREE POSSIBLE SOURCES: (1) a kidney from an individual who dies suddenly (approval for the transplant must be given by the next-of-kin of the deceased); (2) a kidney from a relative; and (3) a kidney from one who "willed" it to be transplanted following his or her death. Each of these circumstances requires decision making. On the basis of this information, a research program designed to determine the nature of attitudes of blacks toward kidney donations was developed. Results disclosed a lack of knowledge about kidney transplantation; disassociation and lack of communication between blacks and the medical community; religious fears; fears of premature death; and racism.

  10. In vivo regeneration of renal vessels post whole decellularized kidneys transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, KeZhi; Yu, YaLing; Zhao, LiNa; Chu, TingGang; Wu, LiZhi; Alkhawaji, Ali; Li, MiaoZhong; Shao, YingKuan; Li, Ting; Lou, XinFa; Chen, ShiXin; Tang, MaoLin; Mei, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 50 million patients in China live with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and only about 4000 patients may receive kidney transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate regeneration of renal vessels post whole decellularized kidneys transplantation in vivo. We decellularized kidneys of donor rats by perfusing a detergent through the abdominal aorta, yielding feasible extracellular matrix, confirmed for acellularity before transplantation. Based on the concept of using the body as a bioreactor, we orthotopically transplanted the kidney and ureter scaffolds in recipient rats, and found the regeneration of vessels including artery and vein in the renal sinus following a spontaneous recanalization. Although the findings only represent an initial step toward the ultimate goal of the generation of fully functional kidneys in vivo, these findings suggest that the body itself, as the bioreactor, is a viable strategy for kidney regeneration. PMID:26575172

  11. Multifocal phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala xenobiotica in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, A; Morio, F; Le Pape, P; Degli Antoni, A M; Ricci, R; Zucchi, A; Vaglio, A; Piotti, G; Antoniotti, R; Cremaschi, E; Buzio, C; Maggiore, U

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, black fungi have been increasingly reported as causing opportunistic infections after solid organ transplantation. Here, we report a case of insidious, relentless, and multifocal Exophiala xenobiotica infection in a kidney transplant recipient that eventually required multiple surgical excisions along with oral and intravenous antifungal combination therapy using liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole. We compare the present case with all previously reported cases of Exophiala infection after kidney transplantation. PMID:25651934

  12. Patients’ experiences from their received education about the process of kidney transplant: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ghadami, Ahmad; Memarian, Robaba; Mohamadi, Esa; Abdoli, Samereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kidney transplant needs long term treatment, care and a follow up. Patients with kidney transplant need support in fields of knowledge, skills and motivations. Several researches showed existing challenges regarding education of these patients. A qualitative study was conducted to define patients’ experiences from their received education about the process of kidney transplant. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative study with a content analysis approach. Sampling was purposive up to data saturation. The participants aged 18-60 years, had experienced transplantation. The data were collected by semi-structural individual in-depth interviews with 18 participants. The interviews were analyzed by Graneheim and Lundman content analysis method. Findings: Three general themes of “educational experiences at the beginning of transplantation”, “educational experiences in post transplantation care”, and “patients’ struggle to enhance their awareness in order to preserve their transplanted kidney” were emerged. Conclusions: The findings showed that patients’ did not receive adequate knowledge about kidney transplant process. This issue reveals an unstructured and uncoordinated education given to kidney transplant patients by health team members during kidney transplant process. With regard to high motivation of the patients, designing such educational program based on self-management in the process of kidney transplant for these recipients is essential. Nurses in their educational role can enable the patients through educating them about problem solving methods and selection of the best solution to preserve their transplanted kidney and consider renal transplant recipient self-management as their first priority toward these patients. PMID:23833599

  13. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor Transplantation—Recommendations from a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Morgievich, Marie; Cohen, David J.; Butt, Zeeshan; Chakkera, Harini A.; Lindower, Carrie; Hays, Rebecca E.; Hiller, Janet M.; Lentine, Krista L.; Matas, Arthur J.; Poggio, Emilio D.; Rees, Michael A.; Rodrigue, James R.; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers better quality of life and clinical outcomes, including patient survival, compared with remaining on dialysis or receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant. Although LDKT education within transplant centers for both potential recipients and living donors is very important, outreach and education to kidney patients in settings other than transplant centers and to the general public is also critical to increase access to this highly beneficial treatment. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation’s Live Donor Community of Practice, with the support of 10 additional sponsors, convened a consensus conference to determine best practices in LDKT, including a workgroup focused on developing a set of recommendations for optimizing outreach and LDKT education outside of transplant centers. Members of this workgroup performed a structured literature review, conducted teleconference meetings, and met in person at the 2-day conference. Their efforts resulted in consensus around the following recommendations. First, preemptive transplantation should be promoted through increased LDKT education by primary care physicians and community nephrologists. Second, dialysis providers should be trained to educate their own patients about LDKT and deceased donor kidney transplantation. Third, partnerships between community organizations, organ procurement organizations, religious organizations, and transplant centers should be fostered to support transplantation. Fourth, use of technology should be improved or expanded to better educate kidney patients and their support networks. Fifth, LDKT education and outreach should be improved for kidney patients in rural areas. Finally, a consensus-driven, evidence-based public message about LDKT should be developed. Discussion of the effect and potential for implementation around each recommendation is featured, particularly regarding reducing racial and socioeconomic disparities in

  14. A Review of Transplantation Practice of the Urologic Organs: Is It Only Achievable for the Kidney?

    PubMed Central

    Donati-Bourne, Jack; Roberts, Harry W; Rajjoub, Yaseen; Coleman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a viable treatment option for failure of most major organs. Within urology, transplantation of the kidney and ureter are well documented; however, evidence supporting transplantation of other urologic organs is limited. Failure of these organs carries significant morbidity, and transplantation may have a role in management. This article reviews the knowledge, research, and literature surrounding transplantation of each of the urologic organs. Transplantation of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder is discussed. Transplantation attempts have been made individually with each of these organs. Penile transplantation has only been performed once in a human. Testicular transplantation research was intertwined with unethical lucrative pursuits. Interest in urethra, bladder, and vas deferens transplantation has decreased as a result of successful surgical reconstructive techniques. Despite years of effort, transplantations of the penis, testicle, urethra, vas deferens, and bladder are not established in current practice. Recent research has shifted toward techniques of reconstruction, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:27222642

  15. The Nature of Experimental Second-set Kidney Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dempster, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    The second-set reaction can be mimiced from a haemodynamic point of view by pharmacological vasopressors, warm and cold ischaemic factors producing vasocontriction and by the Shwartzman reaction. The second-set kidney transplant reaction is assumed to be due to antibodies which, if so, are not dependent for their cytotoxicity on complement fixation and are uninfluenced by antihistamine drugs, steroids, immunosuppression, incoagulable blood, adequate hydration and rheomacrodex. Once started, the reaction continues until the vasoconstriction is so severe that no blood enters the kidney and complete disorganization of kidney function and structure ensues. The deposition of fibrin in the vessels and glomeruli follows the severe vasomotor upset which evokes afferent vasoconstriction. Fibrin is not prevented from being deposited when the recipient of a second-set kidney is fully Arvinized so that the blood is rendered incoagulable. The second-set kidney reaction is first heralded by vasoconstriction in the outer cortex associated with acute renal failure and, as such, fits into the general phenomenon of acute renal failure associated with underperfusion of the outer cortex. There is no evidence that underperfusion of the outer cortex is due to a hyperreactivity of special vessels with a different structure from the other vessels supplying this area. There is the fact, however, that the outer cortical vessels are highly reactive to stimuli of many kinds besides angiotensin. Certain unexplained features of acute renal failure in general may be reasonably explained by reference to the effects of underperfusion of the outer cortex. Acute renal failure associated with mild signs of tubule necrosis, for example, may be explained by the fact that although there is afferent underperfusion of the outer cortex there is generally maintained a good venular collateral nutrient supply (maintained capacitance) sufficient for the oxygen requirements of tubules which are not pumping

  16. Acute rejection in the elderly recipient: influence of age in the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Rosa; Ruiz, Juan C; Zubimendi, José A; Cotorruelo, Julio G; de Francisco, Angel L M; Rodrigo, Emilio; Sanz, Saturnino; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Arias, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Since the immune response in older recipients is weaker they should be less likely to reject a transplanted organ and should need less aggressive immunosuppressive treatment. Our aim was to record the incidence and severity of episodes of acute rejection (AR), estimate the influence of these events on graft survival of elderly recipients (> or = 60) and to compare these with that in younger ones. We performed 363 kidney transplants between 1/94 and 12/98, and recorded clinical and immunological data, incidence-severity of AR and cause of graft loss. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the age at transplantation: A (<60, n = 281/77.4%) and B (> 60, n = 82/22.6%). The percentage of aging recipients and mean age of donors and recipients increased throughout the period. Although the incidence of ATN was higher in the older group (29% vs.19%, p < 0.0001) the number of graft biopsies was equal in both groups. The incidence of AR was similar, 33.4% vs. 26.8%, pNS. The number of AR episodes per patient was 0.44 and 0.41 respectively. The severity of AR was: Banff grade I: A (40.3%)/B (45.7%) pNS; grade II: A (44.1%)/B (48.57) pNS; grade III: A (15.5%)/B (5.7%) pNS. Younger recipients presented a higher level of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) (4.3% vs. 2.07%, p = 0.01). One-yearpatient survival was 96%/91% (p < 0.05) and graft survival was 81%/78% (pNS) respectively. The age of recipient does not seem to have influenced the incidence-severity of AR or the graft survival. Thus immunosuppression should be individualized for each patient and should not depend on the age at transplantation.

  17. Transbronchial biopsies provide longitudinal evidence for epithelial chimerism in children following sex mismatched lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, H; Rampling, D; Aurora, P; Bonnet, D; Hart, S; Jaffe, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent reports have shown evidence of host derived parenchymal engraftment in several human allografts including the lung, leading to speculation that stem cell therapy may be useful for lung repair in diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). To date, previous studies have looked at single surgical or autopsy specimens and no longitudinal studies have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess whether transbronchial biopsies could be used to study the time course of chimerism following lung transplantation. Methods: Specimens of archived transbronchial lung biopsies from five time points taken for clinical purposes from two boys who had received a sex mismatched heart-lung transplant for end stage CF were examined. Sections were dual stained for cytokeratin (epithelium) and a mixture of leucocyte common antigen and CD68 for inflammatory cells. Co-localisation of cells containing a Y chromosome was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation. Results: Evidence of chimerism was found in up to 6.6% of epithelial cells in bronchial (median 1.4% (range 0–6.6)) and alveolar (median 3.6% (range 2.3–5.5) tissue without apparent evidence of fusion. This engraftment was seen as early as 3 weeks and remained relatively constant up to 37 months. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated proof of principle for long term chimerism in lung epithelium. Transbronchial biopsies may provide a new method for studying the kinetics of stem cell engraftment in the lung. PMID:15618585

  18. Treatment of BK virus-associated nephropathy with CMX001 after kidney transplantation in a young child.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Lewis; Habib, Sabeen; McClure, Gloria B; Latiolais, Lisa S; Vanchiere, John A

    2014-11-01

    NC, with renal failure secondary to bilateral dysplastic kidneys, received an LRD renal transplant (tx) at 17 months of age. Her early post-tx course was complicated by persistently elevated blood polyoma BK virus DNA loads. A protocol biopsy at six months post-transplant revealed BKVAN. Blood viral loads did not respond to decreased immunosuppression or treatment with ciprofloxacin and leflunomide. Six months post-tx, her serum creatinine began to rise and we sought experimental therapy to prevent the loss of her graft. At seven months post-tx, with FDA approval under an eIND, the patient was started on a 36-wk course of treatment with the investigational drug. The patient is now more than 24 months after stopping treatment with CMX. BKV viral DNA loads remain at low, but still detectable levels. Urine viral loads have declined, but remain elevated. EBV DNA loads become undetectable. The patient's serum creatinine has declined back to a baseline of 0.5-0.7 mg/dL and has been stable for two yr. Renal function was preserved in association with the use of CMX001 to treat BKV nephropathy in a young pediatric kidney transplant recipient. There were no serious adverse events associated with the use of CMX001. This novel medication may be of value in the treatment of BKVAN in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  19. Can pre-implantation biopsies predict renal allograft function in pediatric renal transplant recipients?

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Ma, Alison L.; Dufek, Stephanie; Mohamed, Ismail; Mamode, Nizam; Sebire, Neil J.; Marks, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the utility of pre-implantation renal biopsy (PIB) to predict renal allograft outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients that underwent PIB from January 2003 to December 2011 at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, United Kingdom. Thirty-two male patients (56%) aged 1.5-16 years (median: 10.2) at the time of transplantation were included in the study and followed-up for 33 (6-78) months. The results were compared with 33 controls. Results: The PIB showed normal histopathological findings in 13 patients (41%), mild chronic vascular changes in 8 (25%), focal tubular atrophy in one, moderate to severe chronic vascular change in 3, mild to moderate acute tubular damage in 6, and tissue was inadequate in one subject. Delayed graft function (DGF) was observed in 3 patients; 2 with vascular changes in PIB, and one with normal histopathological findings. Two subjects with PIB changes lost their grafts. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at 3-, and 6-months post-transplantation was lower in children with abnormal PIB changes compared with those with normal PIB. There was one case of DGF in the control group, and 4 children lost their grafts including the one with DGF. Conclusion: Pre-implantation renal biopsy can provide important baseline information of the graft with implications on subsequent medical treatment for pediatric renal transplant recipients. PMID:26593162

  20. Successful staged kidney and liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease type Ib: A case report.

    PubMed

    Martin, A P; Bartels, M; Schreiber, S; Buehrdel, P; Hauss, J; Fangmann, J

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib is a rare metabolic disease caused by a defect of the G6P transporter. Patients suffer from hypoglycemic episodes; growth and developmental delay; osteoporosis; neutropenia; and tendency to infections, ovarian cysts, and liver adenomas. Terminal kidney disease is a rare complication. Liver transplantation has been performed to prevent malignant transformation of hepatic adenomas. We present the case of a female patient with glycogenosis type Ib who had severe hypoglycemic episodes and recurrent infections since early childhood. She became dialysis dependent at the age of 24 years. Kidney transplantation was performed at age 30, and liver transplantation 2 years later. The main indication for liver transplantation were the persistent, therapy-refractory hypoglycemic episodes. The transplanted kidney function is stable. The liver transplantation resulted in the disappearance of hypoglycemic episodes, with the patient leading a normal life and eating a normal diet. The neutropenia did not recover, but there were no more significant infectious episodes after liver transplantation. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first communication of a dual kidney and liver transplant performed in a patient with glycogenosis type Ib. It confirmed the beneficial effect of liver transplantation on the quality of life of patients with severe hypoglycemia. The transplantation should be attempted earlier in the course of the disease to reduce complications and allow catch-up growth. Hepatocyte transplantation may be considered; however, long-term results seem to be rather poor in the few documented cases. PMID:17175348

  1. Percutaneous renal biopsy of native kidneys: efficiency, safety and risk factors associated with major complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres Muñoz, Abel; Valdez-Ortiz, Rafael; González-Parra, Carlos; Espinoza-Dávila, Elvy; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E.; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of an automated biopsy device and real-time ultrasound (current technology) for percutaneous renal biopsies (PRBs) has improved the likelihood of obtaining adequate tissue for diagnosis and has reduced the complications associated with renal biopsies. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the current PRB procedure and identify possible risk factors for the development of major complications. Material and methods We collected all native kidney PRBs performed with current technology in our institute from January 1998 to April 2008. Studied variables were collected from the patient's chart at the time of the biopsy. Results We analyzed 623 (96.4%) of 646 renal biopsies performed with the current automated procedure guided by real-time ultrasound. Although the effectiveness was 97.6%, there were 110 complications. Fourteen (2.24%) of these complications were major: 9 cases of renal hematoma, 2 cases with macroscopic hematuria (which needed blood transfusion), 1 case of intestinal perforation (which required exploratory laparotomy), 1 nephrectomy and 1 case of a dissecting hematoma. The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for developing major complications: diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, RR 7.6 (95% CI 1.35-43); platelet count ≤ 120×103/µl; RR 7.0 (95% CI 1.9-26.2); and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) ≥ 60 mg/dl, RR 9.27 (95% CI 2.8-30.7). Conclusions The observed efficacy and safety of the current technique in the present study were similar to observations in previous studies. Diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, platelets ≤ 120×103/µl and BUN ≥ 60 mg/dl were independent risk factors for the development of major complications following PRB. PMID:22291827

  2. Analysis of histopathological pattern of kidney biopsy specimens in Kuwait: A single-center, five-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Emad; Al-Helal, Bassam; Asad, Reem; Kannan, Shreeram; Draz, Wael; Abdelgawad, Zeyad

    2015-11-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) varies in incidence in different geographical areas due to different socioeconomic conditions and ethnicity, genetic variability and environmental factors. Our study is aimed to determine the histopathological pattern of kidney biopsies in Kuwait over the preceding five years. In a prospective study, we analyzed the clinical and pathological data of 214 kidney biopsies that were performed during the period from November 2009 to November 2014 at the Al-Khezam Dialysis Center, Al-Adan Hospital, Kuwait. Kidney biopsies were performed percutaneously using an automated gun guided by ultrasound. The biopsy samples were processed for light microscopy and immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy was performed only in selected cases. Age, gender, serum creatinine, 24-h urinary protein, virology, immunology profiles, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological findings were recorded for analysis. Primary GN was reported in 46.7%, secondary GN was reported in 42.9% and tubulointerstitial disease was reported in 10.3% of the 214 kidney biopsies studied. Among primary GN, membranous GN (MGN) was the most common lesion (12.1%), followed by immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN, 11.7%), minimal change disease (9.8%), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (9.3%), membranoproliferative GN (1.9%), Alport's syndrome (1.4%) and fibrillary GN (0.46%). Among biopsies that showed secondary GN, lupus nephritis was the most common (11.7%), followed by hypertensive glomerulosclerosis (10.3%), crescentic GN (7.1%), diabetic nephropathy (3.3%), thrombotic microangiopathy (2.3%), amyloidosis (2.3%), post-infectious GN (1.4%) and myeloma kidney (0.9%). Among biopsies that showed tubulointerstitial disease, acute interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion (6.1%), followed by chronic interstitial nephritis (2.8%) and acute tubular necrosis (1.4%). Our study indicates that MGN was the most common primary GN, followed by IgAN, while lupus nephritis was the most

  3. Bortezomib in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nikki L; O'Connell, Philip; Chapman, Jeremy R; Nankivell, Brian; Kable, Kathy; Webster, A C; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    Positive B cell crossmatch accompanied by high levels of pre-transplant human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies are associated with adverse graft outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Targeting plasma cells, the main antibody producing cells, with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may be a promising desensitization strategy. We report using a combination of bortezomib and plasmapheresis to desensitize a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient for an ABO-incompatible living donor kidney transplant. The flow cytometric B cell crossmatch was positive on presentation. After treatment, the anti-A titres fell from 1:64 to 1:4, and a negative B flow cytometric crossmatch was achieved prior to transplantation. The combined approach of bortezomib to abrogate antibody production at the plasma cell level, followed by plasmapheresis and low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin to remove in-circulation alloantibodies, has proven to be effective in our case. Bortezomib may play a role in highly sensitized renal transplants.

  4. The Association Between Viral Infections and Co-stimulatory Gene Polymorphisms in Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ahmad; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Yaghobi, Ramin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Salehipour, Mehdi; Iravani, Mahdiyar

    2016-01-01

    Background The surveillance of kidney transplant patients depends on function of different immunologic markers like co-stimulatory molecules. These molecules may also be associated with post kidney transplant viral related outcomes. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the possible associations between co-stimulatory molecule gene polymorphisms and viral infections in kidney transplant patients. Patients and Methods In total, 172 kidney transplant patients were included in this study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in loci of co-stimulatory molecules including: PDCD.1, CD28, CTLA4 and ICOS, were analyzed in the studied patients by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Active Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were analyzed in each kidney transplant patient using the CMV antigenemia kit and HCV antibody assay, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results CMV active infection was found in 31 of 172 (18.02%) kidney transplant patients. HCV infection was only found in two of the 172 (1.16%) studied patients. Significant associations were found between TT and TC genotypes of CTLA4 -1722T/C and T allele with acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. A significant association was also found between the T allele of CD28 + 17 C/T genetic polymorphism and acute rejection in CMV infected kidney transplant patients. Significantly higher frequency of AA genotype and A allele of CTLA4 + 49AG polymorphism were found in CMV infected female patients. Also a significantly higher frequency of GG genotype and G allele of PDCD-1.3A/G polymorphisms were found in CMV infected female patients. Conclusions Based on these results, CTLA4 and CD28 genetic polymorphisms, which regulate T-cell activation, can influence active CMV infection in kidney transplant patients. These results should be confirmed by further investigations. PMID:27800130

  5. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  6. [Living kidney transplantation. A comparison of Scandinavian countries and Germany].

    PubMed

    Lück, R; Schrem, H; Neipp, M; Nashan, B; Klempnauer, J

    2003-06-01

    The discussion of compensating for shortages of cadaveric donation with increased living donation often reveals differences between the Scandinavian countries and Germany. Possible adoption of Scandinavian structures to improve the rate of living donations in Germany warrants analysis of the actual differences between these two regions. Close examination reveals that significantly higher rates of living donation are achieved only in Sweden and Norway. In Norway, a frequently postulated negative effect on cadaveric donation due to very high rates of living donation could not be confirmed. In contrast to Germany and as a consequence of Norwegian geography, kidney transplantation has been regarded in Norway as the first-line therapy for endstage renal disease for more than 35 years. Living donation has since been actively pursued and is traditionally the transplantation of first choice. In Germany, living donation is still regarded as the second choice after cadaveric donation, due to legal regulations. Significant improvements in living donation frequencies could be achieved there by adopting the active Norwegian approach to living donor identification.

  7. Diurnal blood pressure variation in kidney-pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Marx, M A; Gardner, S F; Ketel, B L

    1996-08-01

    Blood pressure normally follows a characteristic pattern throughout the 24 h cycle with daytime pressures higher than nighttime pressures. Patients lacking a nocturnal decrease in pressure have a higher incidence of end organ damage. This investigation was designed to characterize the diurnal pattern of blood pressure and to evaluate blood pressure load in patients who have received a combined kidney-pancreas (KP) transplant. Ten patients (mean 10 months posttransplant) underwent 48 h of noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring using a commercially available device (SpaceLabs 90202 or 90207). Blood pressure was measured every 15 min from 6 AM to 9 PM and every 30 min from 9 PM to 6 AM. Ambulatory monitoring revealed a markedly increased nocturnal blood pressure (up to 25% greater than daytime pressures). These patients were found to have a higher nocturnal blood pressure load than during the day. No relationship was demonstrated between diurnal blood pressure variation and immunosuppression regimen, elapsed time after transplantation, or antihypertensive treatment. These results indicate that close attention must be given to the nocturnal blood pressure of KP recipients and suggest that standard antihypertensive medication regimens do not adequately treat the nocturnal hypertension in these patients. This may predispose these patients to further cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications.

  8. Vitrification of kidney precursors as a new source for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marco-Jiménez, Francisco; Garcia-Dominguez, Ximo; Jimenez-Trigos, Estrella; Vera-Donoso, Cesar D; Vicente, Jose S

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased or living human donors has been limited by donor availability as opposed to the increasing demand, and by the risk of allograft loss rejection and immunosuppressive therapy toxicity. In recent years, xenotransplantation of developed kidney precursor cells has offered a novel solution for the unlimited supply of human donor organs. Specifically, transplantation of kidney precursors in adult hosts showed that intact embryonic kidneys underwent maturation, exhibiting functional properties, and averted humoural rejection post-transplantation from non-immunosuppressed hosts. Even if supply and demand could be balanced using xenotransplants or lab-grown organs from regenerative medicine, the future of these treatments would still be compromised by the ability to physically distribute the organs to patients in need and to produce these products in a way that allows adequate inventory control and quality assurance. Kidney precursors originating from fifteen-day old rabbit embryos were vitrified using Cryotop® as a device and VM3 as vitrification solution. After 3 months of storage in liquid nitrogen, 18 kidney precursors were transplanted into non-immunosuppressed adult hosts by laparoscopy surgery. Twenty-one days after allotransplantation, 9 new kidneys were recovered. All the new kidneys recovered exhibited significant growth and mature glomeruli. Having achieved these encouraging results, we report, for the first time, that it is possible to create a long-term biobank of kidney precursors as an unlimited source of organs for transplantation, facilitating the inventory control and distribution of organs.

  9. Localization of C-X-C and C-C chemokines to renal tubular epithelial cells in human kidney transplants is not confined to acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Sibbring, J S; Sharma, A; McDicken, I W; Sells, R A; Christmas, S E

    1998-12-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of leucocyte chemoattraction to inflammatory sites. Previous work has shown that the expression of some chemokines is upregulated during renal transplant rejection. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether chemokine expression is increased during renal transplant rejection. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize the C-X-C (alpha) chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the C-C (beta) chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) in 30 needle biopsies of human kidney transplants taken for diagnosis of renal dysfunction. Urine samples from transplant patients taken immediately prior to biopsy were assayed for chemokine content using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results from groups of patients having different clinicopathological diagnoses were then compared. All three chemokines were detected in most renal transplant biopsies showing acute cellular rejection but, although infiltrating leucocytes were often positive, staining was predominantly localized to renal tubular epithelium. Staining for MCP-1 was generally weaker than for the other chemokines, and collecting tubules were usually stained more strongly than proximal convoluted tubules. Tubular epithelial staining was also found in biopsies from patients without signs of acute cellular rejection. There were significantly higher amounts of IL-8 in the urine of patients with acute cellular rejection, even when patients with urinary tract infections were excluded, but mean titres of urinary MIP-1beta did not differ between patient groups. This was also found when titres were normalized for urine volume and creatinine levels. Production of IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1beta is not confined to kidney transplants showing acute cellular rejection, and may be a relatively nonspecific response of tubular epithelial cells to renal damage.

  10. Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation: A Global Initiative to Develop a Core Outcome Set for Trials in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Allison; Budde, Klemens; Gill, John; Josephson, Michelle A.; Marson, Lorna; Pruett, Timothy L.; Reese, Peter P.; Rosenbloom, David; Rostaing, Lionel; Warrens, Anthony N.; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C.; Crowe, Sally; Harris, Tess; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Tugwell, Peter; Van Biesen, Wim; Wheeler, David C.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Evangelidis, Nicole; Sautenet, Benedicte; Howell, Martin; Chapman, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although advances in treatment have dramatically improved short-term graft survival and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, long-term graft outcomes have not substantially improved. Transplant recipients also have a considerably increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infection, which all contribute to appreciable morbidity and premature mortality. Many trials in kidney transplantation are short-term, frequently use unvalidated surrogate endpoints, outcomes of uncertain relevance to patients and clinicians, and do not consistently measure and report key outcomes like death, graft loss, graft function, and adverse effects of therapy. This diminishes the value of trials in supporting treatment decisions that require individual-level multiple tradeoffs between graft survival and the risk of side effects, adverse events, and mortality. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation initiative aims to develop a core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation that is based on the shared priorities of all stakeholders. Methods This will include a systematic review to identify outcomes reported in randomized trials, a Delphi survey with an international multistakeholder panel (patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, members from industry) to develop a consensus-based prioritized list of outcome domains and a consensus workshop to review and finalize the core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation. Conclusions Developing and implementing a core outcome set to be reported, at a minimum, in all kidney transplantation trials will improve the transparency, quality, and relevance of research; to enable kidney transplant recipients and their clinicians to make better-informed treatment decisions for improved patient outcomes. PMID:27500269

  11. Strategies to increase the donor pool and access to kidney transplantation: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, Umberto; Oberbauer, Rainer; Pascual, Julio; Viklicky, Ondrej; Dudley, Chris; Budde, Klemens; Sorensen, Soren Schwartz; Hazzan, Marc; Klinger, Marian; Abramowicz, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In this position article, DESCARTES (Developing Education Science and Care for Renal Transplantation in European States) board members describe the current strategies aimed at expanding living and deceased donor kidney pools. The article focuses on the recent progress in desensitization and kidney paired exchange programmes and on the expanded criteria for the use of donor kidneys and organs from donors after circulatory death. It also highlights differences in policies and practices across different regions with special regard to European Union countries. Living donor kidney paired exchange, the deceased donor Acceptable Mismatch Programme and kidneys from donors after circulatory death are probably the most promising innovations for expanding kidney transplantation in Europe over the coming decade. To maximize success, an effort is needed to standardize transplant strategies, policies and legislation across European countries. PMID:24907023

  12. Simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplant for type I diabetes with renal failure: Anaesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Surendran, Sudhindran; Kesavan, Rajesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic grafts have been successfully used in patients with diabetes and are combined with kidney transplantation in patients with renal failure. The propagation of awareness in organ donation in India has increased the donor pool of transplantable organs in the last few years making multi visceral transplants feasible in our country. We present the anaesthetic management of a 32-year-old male with diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal failure who was successfully managed with a combined pancreas and kidney transplantation. PMID:27013753

  13. Reappraisal of HLA antibody analysis and crossmatching in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Chang; Ozawa, Miyuki

    2007-01-01

    It has been established that preformed IgG antibodies specific for donor HLA antigens may accelerate graft failure. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated adverse graft survival in patients who have anti-HLA antibodies, whether preformed or developed post-transplant. More recently, ELISA and flow cytometric techniques were introduced to overcome the limited sensitivity and specificity of the CDC assay. These emerging approaches can be reliably used to predict crossmatches in highly sensitized patients and also to monitor the development of clinically relevant anti-HLA antibody after transplantation. This retrospective study used LAT-M screening and Luminex HLA class I and II specificity assay to re-examine: (a), the impact of pre-transplant HLA antibody on long term graft survival; (b), the accuracy with which detection of HLA antibody and specificity by ELISA predicts pretransplant CDC crossmatch; (c), a comparison of Luminex and ELISA methods in detecting HLA antibodies. In this study, pre-transplant sera from 288 renal patients followed up at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method, LAT-M. The tests showed that 19% had HLA antibodies before transplantation. Among the 234 of the patients who did not have pre-transplant antibodies, 85% enjoyed 5-year functional graft survival, 76% 10-year, and 56% 15-year functional graft survival. The corresponding functional graft survival for the 54 patients who tested HLA antibody-positive was 65%, 53% and 28% (P=0.0021). Sera from 481 patients awaiting kidney transplantation at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method LAT-M and by CDC to determine how well HLA antibodies detected by ELISA predict the crossmatches shown by CDC. HLA antibodies found by ELISA ranged from 24% weak reactivity (OD "2") to 17% strongly reactive (OD "8"). The positive predictive value (PPV) of ELISA-detected antibodies for positive CDC crossmatch at the time of transplant was found to be 43-54%. The negative predictive value (NPV)-ELISA found

  14. Making a movie on kidney transplantation: a medical school graduation thesis to explain kidney transplantation from students to students.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, G B; Novaresio, C; Mezza, E; Soragna, G; Rossetti, M; Burdese, M; Putaggio, S; Dell'Olio, R; Bravin, M; Consiglio, V; Tattoli, F; Maddalena, E; Gai, M; Motta, D; Bonetto, A; Jeantet, A; Segoloni, G P

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the production and the opinions of a video movie on transplantation and organ donation. The video was developed by a medical school student with the help of the students and teachers of a high school for applied arts. For this task, the making of the video was included in the high school program of the participating class. The students were tutored by their photography teacher. The video movie lasts about 50 minutes. Each "scene" lasts no more than 5 minutes, to avoid reducing the attention level. The choice of a nonmedical frame helped to have some moments to digest the technical information and to stress the importance of the patient-physician relationship. The video was employed as a part of small-group lessons in the nephrology course. A semistructured anonymous questionnaire gathered the opinion of 65 students at the end of the lessons. Student satisfaction was high; the median score was the highest (8, range 6 to 10) for the lesson based upon the movie, as compared with the conventional ones on chronic kidney disease or dialysis (7, range 5 to 10). As far as the authors know, this is the first experiment of a multimedia approach, dedicated to medical and nonmedical targets, developed as a graduation thesis in an Italian Medical School. In conclusion, the positive opinions of the students, who highly appreciated the peer-developed message, may suggest implementing such nonconventional educational approaches to support human resources and enthusiasm for kidney transplantation among the new generations.

  15. Effect of tolerance versus chronic immunosuppression protocols on the quality of life of kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Spencer, Philip J.; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Crisalli, Kerry A.; Chang, David C.; Markmann, James F.; Elias, Nahel; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Sachs, David H.; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney transplant patients on tolerance protocols avoid the morbidity associated with the use of conventional chronic immunosuppressive regimens. However, the impact of tolerance versus conventional regimens on the quality of life (QOL) of kidney transplant patients is unknown. METHODS Five patients who achieved long-term immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival after combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (tolerant group) were compared with thirty-two comparable kidney transplant recipients on conventional immunosuppression (conventional group). QOL was compared with 16 conventional recipients using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL SF-36) and the Modified Transplant Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress Scale (MTSOSD-59R). RESULTS Patients in the tolerant group required significantly less treatment after transplant for hypertension and no medications for diabetes (P < 0.01). There was no incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, or malignancies in the tolerant group, while these were observed in 12.5%, 40.6%, and 11.8% of the conventional group, respectively. Tolerant patients experienced better overall health (P < 0.01) and scored higher on kidney transplant-targeted scales and healthy survey scales than patients in the conventional group according to the KDQOL SF-36 (P < 0.05). Tolerant patients were less likely to experience depression, dyspnea, excessive appetite/thirst, flatulence, hearing loss, itching, joint pain, lack of energy, muscle cramps, and lack of libido than conventional patients according to the MTSOSD-59R (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Kidney transplant recipients who achieved tolerance experience significantly fewer incidences of complications, improved QOL, and fewer comorbid symptoms compared with patients on conventional immunosuppression. These results support the expanded use of tolerance protocols in kidney transplantation. PMID:27336062

  16. Delayed Graft Function in Living-Donor Kidney Transplant: A Middle Eastern Perspective.

    PubMed

    Al Otaibi, Torki; Ahmadpoor, Pedram; Allawi, Ali Abdulmajid Dyab; Habhab, Wael Taher; Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Nafar, Mohsen; Glotz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    With an increased incidence of living-donor kidney transplants, in response to increasing unmet needs for renal transplant, a clear understanding of determinants of posttransplant outcomes is essential. The importance of delayed graft function in deceased-donor kidney transplant is now part of conventional medical wisdom, due to the large amount of evidence focused on this aspect. However, the same is not true for living-donor kidney transplant, partly due to lack of evidence on this crucial clinical question and partly due to lack of awareness about this issue. The current review aims to highlight the importance of delayed graft function as a crucial determinant of outcomes in living-donor kidney transplant. An exhaustive search of online medical databases was performed with appropriate search criteria to collect evidence about delayed graft function after living-donor kidney transplant, with a special focus on studies from the Middle East. Data on incidence, impact, risk factors, and possible prevention modalities of delayed graft function in patients undergoing living-donor kidney transplant are presented. A key finding of this review is that contemporary incidence rates reported from the Middle East are comparatively higher than those reported from outside the region. Although in absolute terms the incidence is lower than deceased donor kidney transplant, the effects of delayed graft function on graft rejection and graft and patient survival are sufficiently large to warrant the formulation of specific treatment protocols. Key to formulating prevention and treatment strategies is identifying discrete risk factors for delayed graft function. Although this evidence is scant, an overview has been provided. Further studies examining different aspects of delayed graft function incidence after living-donor kidney transplant are urgently needed to address a so far little known clinical question.

  17. Estimating the risks of acquiring a kidney abroad: a meta-analysis of complications following participation in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Anker, Ashley E; Feeley, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of odds ratios comparing the risks of participating in transplant tourism by acquiring a kidney abroad to the risks associated with domestic kidney transplant was undertaken. Comparison across 12 medical outcomes indicates transplant tourists are significantly more likely to contract cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B, HIV, post-transplantation diabetes mellitus, and wound infection than those receiving domestic kidney transplant. Results also indicate that domestic kidney transplant recipients experience significantly higher one-yr patient- and graft-survival rates. Analyses are supplemented by independent comparisons of outcomes and provide practitioners with weighted estimates of the proportion of transplant recipients experiencing 15 medical outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to caution patients of the medical risks associated with transplant tourism. Despite the illegal and unethical nature of transplant tourism, additional efforts are indicated to eliminate the organ trade and to educate wait-listed patients about the risks of transplant tourism.

  18. Endoscopic biopsy of islet transplants in the gastric submucosal space provides evidence of islet graft rejection in diabetic pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Fujita, Minoru; Bottino, Rita; Piganelli, Jon D; McGrath, Kevin; Li, Jiang; Lee, Whayoung; Iwase, Hayato; Wijkstrom, Martin; Bertera, Suzanne; Long, Cassandra; Landsittel, Douglas; Haruma, Ken; Cooper, David K C; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of islets into the gastric submucosal space (GSMS) has several advantages (e.g., avoidance of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory response [IBMIR], ability to biopsy). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoscopic biopsy of islet allografts transplanted into the GSMS in diabetic pigs can provide histopathological and immunohistochemical information that correlates with the clinical course (e.g.,, blood glucose level, insulin requirement). Islet allografts (Group1: 10,000 kIEq /kg [n = 4]; Group2: 15,000 kIEq /kg [n = 2]) were transplanted into the GSMS of diabetic pigs under immunosuppression. In Group2, the anti-oxidant, BMX-001 was applied during preservation, isolation, and culture of the islets, and at the time of transplantation. Endoscopic biopsies of the islet grafts were obtained one or 2 weeks after transplantation, and histopathological features were compared with the clinical course (e.g., blood glucose, insulin requirement). In Group1, in the absence of anti-oxidant therapy, most of the islets became fragmented, and there was no reduction in exogenous insulin requirement. In Group2, with an increased number of transplanted islets in the presence of BMX-001, more healthy insulin-positive islet masses were obtained at biopsy and necropsy (4 weeks), and these correlated with reductions in both blood glucose level and insulin requirement. In all cases, inflammatory cell infiltrates were present. After islet transplantation into the GSMS, endoscopic biopsy can provide information on graft rejection, which would be an immense advantage in clinical islet transplantation. PMID:26857703

  19. Increasing access to renal transplantation in India through our single-center kidney paired donation program: a model for the developing world to prevent commercial transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Shah, Priyadarshini S; Vanikar, Aruna V; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Syed Jamal; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-10-01

    Because access to transplantation with HLA-desensitization protocols and ABO incompatible transplantation is very limited due to high costs and increased risk of infections from more intense immunosuppression, kidney paired donation (KPD) promises hope to a growing number of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient in India. We present a government and institutional ethical review board approved study of 56 ESRD patients [25 two-way and 2 three-way pairs] who consented to participate in KPD transplantation at our center in 2013, performed to avoid blood group incompatibility (n = 52) or positive cross-match (n = 4). All patients had anatomic, functional, and immunologically comparable donors. The waiting time in KPD was short as compared to deceased donor transplantation. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy was performed in 54 donors. Donor relationships were spousal (n = 40), parental (n = 13), others (n = 3), with median HLA match of 1. Graft survival was 97.5%. Three patients died with functioning graft. 16% had biopsy-proven acute rejection. Mean serum creatinine was 1.2 mg/dl at 0.73 ± 0.32 months follow-up. KPD is a viable, legal, and rapidly growing modality for facilitating LDRT for patients who are incompatible with their healthy, willing living donor. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-center report from India.

  20. Polyomavirus JC Urinary Shedding in Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients Associated With Reduced Creatinine Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Kusne, Shimon; Vilchez, Regis A.; Zanwar, Preeti; Quiroz, Jorge; Mazur, Marek J.; Heilman, Raymond L.; Mulligan, David; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Polyomavirus reactivation can cause significant morbidity in solid organ transplant recipients, particularly BK virus (BKV) in kidney transplant patients. Less is known about dynamics of John Cunningham virus (JCV) in nonkidney organ transplant patients. Methods. We examined the frequency of urinary shedding of polyomaviruses BKV and JCV and their relationship to creatinine clearance (CrCl) in a longitudinal study of 41 kidney and 33 liver transplant recipients. Results. Any polyomavirus urinary shedding was more frequent in liver than kidney recipients (64% vs 39%; P = .03). JCV was excreted more frequently by liver than kidney recipients (71% vs 38%), whereas BKV was shed more often by kidney than liver patients (69% vs 52%). Mean JCV loads were significantly higher than those of BKV in both patient groups (P < .0001). Lower mean CrCl values were significantly associated with JCV shedding in both kidney and liver recipients (P < .001). Conclusions. These findings suggest that BKV and JCV display different patterns of reactivation and shedding in kidney and liver transplant patients and that JCV may have a role in renal dysfunction in some solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:22802433

  1. Genetic susceptibility of the donor kidney contributes to the development of renal damage after syngeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, E A; van Dokkum, R P; Marquet, R L; Heemann, U W; de Bruin, R W; IJzermans, J N; Provoost, A P

    1999-06-01

    Solitary kidneys, especially in rats, appear vulnerable to develop functional and structural damage. However, differences in susceptibility exist between strains. It is not clear whether this is intrinsic to the kidney or due to environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in genetic susceptibility for renal damage. By transplanting different rat donor kidneys into a normotensive, histocompatible recipient, the kidneys were exposed to the same blood pressure profiles, metabolic and hormonal environment. Kidneys from young adult hypertensive fawn-hooded (FHH) rats, a strain showing early onset renal damage, normotensive, renal damage-resistant August x Copenhagen-Irish (ACI), and (ACI x FHH) F1 donors were transplanted into male F1 recipients. The native kidneys of the recipients were removed 1 week after transplantation. The results were mutually compared and to their unilaterally nephrectomized littermates. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria (UaV) were determined at the time of transplantation and at 8 and 16 weeks. The histomorphologic analysis included the incidence of focal glomerulosclerosis (FGS), and determination of chronic transplant dysfunction according to the BANFF criteria. A negative impact of the transplantation technique in this syngeneic situation could not be detected as F1 transplants did not differ functionally and morphologically from their UNx controls. Transplanting an ACI kidney did not result in significant changes of SBP, UaV, and incidence of FGS compared to F1 transplants and ACI-UNx. In contrast, FHH kidneys did show a progressive increase of UaV and glomerulosclerosis and a significantly higher BANFF score, whereas the SBP did not differ from F1 transplants. The moderate hypertension seen in FHH did not travel with the kidney. Compared to the FHH-UNx rats, transplantation of a FHH kidney did significantly attenuate the increase of UaV and FGS. The susceptibility of

  2. The Financial Impact of Immunosuppressant Expenses on New Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elisa J.; Prohaska, Thomas R.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2008-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine kidney transplant recipients’ ability to afford transplant-related out-of-pocket expenses and the financial impact of these expenses on their lives. Participants and methods This cross-sectional study involved 77 kidney recipients. Variables analyzed were: ability to afford daily necessities; impact of immunosuppressant expenses on patients’ lives; awareness of Medicare support terminating 3 years post-transplant; and strategies used to pay for out-of-pocket transplant expenses. The Economic Strain Scale measured financial strain. Results Twenty-nine percent of kidney recipients experienced financial strain. Poor, less educated, and younger patients were more likely to report financial strain. Out-of-pocket expenses relating to kidney transplantation adversely affected patients’ ability to afford leisure activities (35%), a house (27%), and a car (26%). Thirty-one percent reported that immunosuppressant expenses have had somewhat to great (adverse) impact on their lives. Of those on Medicare and not disabled (n=41), 51% were unaware Medicare coverage will terminate, and 71% did not know how long coverage lasts. Conclusions Financial strain presents a considerable risk to kidney recipients’ ability to purchase immunosuppression. Socioeconomic disparities in recipients’ financial strain may be a source of disparities in graft survival. Transplant professionals should better inform transplant candidates about financial consequences of transplantation. PMID:18673373

  3. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  4. Addressing the shortage of kidneys for transplantation: purchase and allocation through chain auctions.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Lara; Vining, Aidan R; Weimer, David L

    2011-08-01

    Transplantation is generally the treatment of choice for those suffering from kidney failure. Not only does transplantation offer improved quality of life and increased longevity relative to dialysis, it also reduces end-stage renal disease program expenditures, providing savings to Medicare. Unfortunately, the waiting list for kidney transplants is long, growing, and unlikely to be substantially reduced by increases in the recovery of cadaveric kidneys. Another approach is to obtain more kidneys through payment to living "donors," or vendors. Such direct commodification, in which a price is placed on kidneys, has generally been opposed by medical ethicists. Much of the ethical debate, however, has been in terms of commodification through market exchange. Recognizing that there are different ethical concerns associated with the purchase of kidneys and their allocation, it is possible to design a variety of institutional arrangements for the commodification of kidneys that pose different sets of ethical concerns. We specify three such alternatives in detail sufficient to allow an assessment of their likely consequences and we compare these alternatives to current policy in terms of the desirable goals of promoting human dignity, equity, efficiency, and fiscal advantage. This policy analysis leads us to recommend that kidneys be purchased at administered prices by a nonprofit organization and allocated to the transplant centers that can organize the longest chains of transplants involving willing-but-incompatible donor-patient dyads. PMID:21940424

  5. Geographic variation in end-stage renal disease incidence and access to deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, A K; Ashby, V B; Sands, R L; Wolfe, R A

    2010-04-01

    The effect of demand for kidney transplantation, measured by end-stage renal disease (ESRD) incidence, on access to transplantation is unknown. Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (OPTN/SRTR) from 2000 to 2008, we performed donation service area (DSA) and patient-level regression analyses to assess the effect of ESRD incidence on access to the kidney waiting list and deceased donor kidney transplantation. In DSAs, ESRD incidence increased with greater density of high ESRD incidence racial groups (African Americans and Native Americans). Wait-list and transplant rates were relatively lower in high ESRD incidence DSAs, but wait-list rates were not drastically affected by ESRD incidence at the patient level. Compared to low ESRD areas, high ESRD areas were associated with lower adjusted transplant rates among all ESRD patients (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66-0.70). Patients living in medium and high ESRD areas had lower transplant rates from the waiting list compared to those in low ESRD areas (medium: RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66-0.69; high: RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.61-0.65). Geographic variation in access to kidney transplant is in part mediated by local ESRD incidence, which has implications for allocation policy development.

  6. Development of a robust protocol for gene expression analysis using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver transplant biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily; Burt, Alastair D; Barker, Catriona E; Kirby, John A; Brain, John G

    2013-09-01

    Liver transplant biopsies are routinely archived following formalin fixation and paraffin embedding and may provide an additional source of diagnostic information following transcriptomic biomarker analysis. This study was designed to compare gene transcription between resting and stressed biliary cells in culture, these cells after fixation and embedding and archival liver transplant biopsy tissue. The transcription of p21/WAF1 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 showed similar changes in the fresh and embedded liver cells. However, the expression of TGF-β2 was markedly different between the fresh and embedded samples, suggesting that fixation can produce sequence-specific artefacts. Sufficient quantities of pure RNA were recovered from all the liver transplant biopsies to allow complementary DNA production. Measurement of the transcription of all three genes showed variability between the cases. Although the results for individual transcripts should be interpreted with care, these data do suggest the feasibility of performing a larger biomarker discovery studies using archival tissue.

  7. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression. PMID:27695507

  8. Novel surgical techniques, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and innovative immunosuppression in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Tyloch, Dominik; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Tyloch, Janusz; Habib, Samy L.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the first successfully performed renal transplantation, we summarize the historical, current and potential future status of kidney transplantation. We discuss three different aspects with a potential significant influence on kidney transplantation progress: the development of surgical techniques, the influence of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and changes in immunosuppression. We evaluate the standard open surgical procedures with modern techniques and compare them to less invasive videoscopic as well as robotic techniques. The role of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a potential method for future kidney regeneration or replacement and the interesting search for novel solutions in the field of immunosuppression will be discussed. After 60 years since the first successfully performed kidney transplantation, we can conclude that the greatest achievements are associated with the development of surgical techniques and with planned systemic immunosuppression.

  9. [Analysis of contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil using the principal-agent model].

    PubMed

    Costa, Cassia Kely Favoretto; Balbinotto, Giácomo; Sampaio, Luciano Menezes Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil based on the principal-agent model. The approach assumes that the Brazilian Ministry of Health is the principal and the public hospitals accredited by the National Transplant System are the agent. The Ministry of Health's welfare depends on measures taken by hospitals in kidney uptake. Hospitals allocate administrative, financial, and management efforts to conduct measures in kidney donation, removal, uptake, and transplantation. Hospitals may choose the levels of effort that are consistent with the payments and incentives received in relation to transplantation costs. The solution to this type of problem lies in structuring an optimal incentives contract, which requires aligning the interests of both parties involved in the transplantation system. PMID:27626647

  10. Hypertension and Obesity after Pediatric Kidney Transplantation: Management Based on Pathophysiology: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    John, Eunice G.; Domingo, Liezl T.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension after pediatric renal transplant is a common and important risk factor for graft loss and patient survival. The mechanism of post kidney transplant hypertension is complex and multifactorial. Control of blood pressure in renal transplant patients is important but often times blood pressures remain uncontrolled. The management of hypertension and obesity in pediatric kidney transplant patients is based on the pathophysiology. Compared to the general pediatric hypertensive population, special attention needs to be focused on the additional impact of immunosuppressive medications side effects and interactions, recurrent disease, and donor and recipient comorbidities such as obesity on blood pressure control with thoughtful consideration of the risk of graft failure. In general, there is a need for prospective studies in pediatric kidney transplant patients to understand the pathophysiology of hypertension and obesity and the appropriate approach to achieve a balance between the primary need to avoid rejection and the need to lower blood pressure and prevent obesity. PMID:24791188

  11. [Analysis of contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil using the principal-agent model].

    PubMed

    Costa, Cassia Kely Favoretto; Balbinotto, Giácomo; Sampaio, Luciano Menezes Bezerra

    2016-09-12

    The aim of this article was to analyze contractual incentives for kidney transplants in Brazil based on the principal-agent model. The approach assumes that the Brazilian Ministry of Health is the principal and the public hospitals accredited by the National Transplant System are the agent. The Ministry of Health's welfare depends on measures taken by hospitals in kidney uptake. Hospitals allocate administrative, financial, and management efforts to conduct measures in kidney donation, removal, uptake, and transplantation. Hospitals may choose the levels of effort that are consistent with the payments and incentives received in relation to transplantation costs. The solution to this type of problem lies in structuring an optimal incentives contract, which requires aligning the interests of both parties involved in the transplantation system.

  12. Outcomes of kidney transplants and risk of infection transmission from increased infectious risk donors.

    PubMed

    Limkemann, Ashley J; Wolfe, Luke; Sharma, Amit; King, Anne L; Behnke, Martha; Shah, Mili Jay; Posner, Marc P; Cotterell, Adrian H; Bhati, Chandra S; Gupta, Ankur; Kumar, Dhiren; Gupta, Gaurav

    2016-08-01

    Concern over transmission of viral infections has been reported to result in higher discard rates of high infectious risk kidneys (HIR) although data on actual viral transmission rates are lacking. At our center, we performed 89 HIR and 533 non-HIR kidney transplants (KTs) between 2004 and 2011. Follow-up screening labs in recipients of HIR kidneys tested for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus did not reveal any cases of viral transmission over median follow-up of 4.3 years. Patient and graft outcomes were similar at 5 years between HIR and non-HIR KTs. An updated analysis of the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) registry of deceased-donor kidney transplants between 2008 and 2012 included 57 526 transplants was performed. Retrospective calculation of KDRI (kidney donor risk index) differed (P<.001) between all groups with median KDRI of 0.99 for HIR kidneys, 1.07 for non-HIR standard criteria donor kidneys, and 1.81 for non-HIR expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys. This was reflected in the significantly improved 5-year graft survival for HIR KTs when compared with non-HIR ECD KTs (84% vs 78%; P<.001). Our data can guide counseling of KT candidates about the safety and benefits of HIR kidneys.

  13. Mistrust, misperceptions, and miscommunication: A qualitative study of preferences about kidney transplantation among African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wachterman, Melissa W.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Ersek, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation rates in the United States are lower among African-Americans than among Whites. Well-documented racial disparities in access to transplantation explain some, but not all, of these differences. Prior survey-based research suggests that African-American dialysis patients are less likely than Whites to desire transplantation, but little research has focused on an in-depth exploration of preferences about kidney transplantation among African-Americans. Thus, the purpose of the study was to explore preferences, and compare patients’ expectations about transplantation with actual status on the transplant list. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with sixteen African-Americans receiving chronic hemodialysis. We analyzed the interviews using the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. We also reviewed the dialysis center's transplant list. Results Four dominant themes emerged: 1) Varied desire for transplant; 2) Concerns about donor source; 3) Barriers to transplantation; 4) Lack of communication with nephrologists and transplant team. A thread of mistrust about equity in the transplantation process flowed through themes 2-4. In 7/16 cases, patients’ understanding of their transplant listing status was discordant with their actual status. Conclusions Our study suggests that many African-Americans on hemodialysis are interested in kidney transplantation, but that interest is often tempered by concerns about transplantation, including misconceptions about the risks to recipients and donors. Mistrust about equity in the organ allocation process also contributed to ambivalence. The discordance between patients’ perceptions of listing status and actual status suggests communication gaps between African-American hemodialysis patients and physicians. Clinicians should avoid interpreting ambivalence about transplantation as lack of interest. PMID:25769556

  14. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  15. Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, John R.; Berger, Jonathan C.; Warren, Daniel S.; James, Nathan; Montgomery, Robert A.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2012-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation is an important modality to facilitate living donor transplant for incompatible pairs. To date, reports of the outcomes from this practice in the United States have been limited to single-center studies. Methods Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 738 patients who underwent live-donor ABOi kidney transplantation between January 1, 1995 and March 31, 2010. These were compared with matched controls that underwent ABO compatible (ABOc) live-donor kidney transplantation. Subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients were performed according to donor blood type, recipient blood type, and transplant center ABOi volume. Results When compared to ABOc matched controls, long-term patient survival of ABOi recipients was not significantly different between the cohorts (p=0.2). However, graft loss was significantly higher, particularly in the first 14 days post-transplant (SHR 2.34, 95% CI 1.43–3.84, p=0.001), with little to no difference beyond day 14 (SHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.99–1.54, p=0.058). In subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients, no differences in survival were seen by donor blood type, recipient blood type, or transplant center ABOi volume. Conclusions These results support the use and dissemination of ABOi transplantation when a compatible live donor is not available, but caution that the highest period of risk is immediately post-transplant. PMID:22290268

  16. Significance of isoagglutinin titer in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Dahae; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Hee-jung; Kwon, Seog-Woon; Han, Duck-Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2014-10-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABO-i) kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged for overcoming the shortage of organ donors. Although this technique initially achieved only low graft survival due to isoagglutinin, recently developed desensitization protocols have improved survival to levels that are comparable to ABO-compatible KT. However, isoagglutinin is still regarded as a major obstacle to ABO-i KT. In this study, we evaluate the impact of isoagglutinin titer on clinical outcomes as well as factors that may influence isoagglutinin titers. In total, data from 95 patients who underwent ABO-i KT were analyzed. Preoperatively, rituximab administration and plasmapheresis were performed until the titer was reduced to ≤1:4. Retrospective analysis included blood group; timing and dosage of rituximab; isoagglutinin titer; number of plasmapheresis; and clinical outcomes including graft survival and serum creatinine. Graft survival was 95.8% (n = 91) and average serum creatinine at 1- and 1.5-year post-ABOi-KT was 1.3. Three patients died of sepsis. The identified predictors of titer-rebound after transplant were short interval (<7 days) between rituximab and first plasmapheresis (P = 0.004); high initial titer (≥256) (P = 0.023); low titer-reduction rate (P < 0.001); and blood group O (P < 0.001). One patient who experienced a rebound developed antibody-mediated rejection. With low-dose (200 mg) rituximab, the change in isoagglutinin titer-rebound was not significant and the infection rate was significantly decreased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, isoagglutinin titer-rebound within the first 2 weeks after KT may be a risk factor for rejection. The factors identified as affecting titer-rebound after KT were high initial isoagglutinin titer, low titer-reduction rate, short interval, and blood group O.

  17. Frailty, Mycophenolate Reduction, and Graft Loss in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A.; Law, Andrew; Tan, Jingwen; Delp, Cassandra; King, Elizabeth A.; Orandi, Babak; Salter, Megan; Alachkar, Nada; Desai, Niraj; Grams, Morgan; Walston, Jeremy; Segev, Dorry L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) side effects often prompt dose reduction or discontinuation, and this MMF dose reduction (MDR) can lead to rejection and possibly graft loss. Unfortunately, little is known about what factors might cause or contribute to MDR. Frailty, a measure of physiologic reserve, is emerging as an important, novel domain of risk in kidney transplantation (KT) recipients. We hypothesized that frailty, an inflammatory phenotype, might be associated with MDR. Methods: We measured frailty (shrinking, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and slowed walking speed), other patient and donor characteristics, longitudinal MMF doses, and graft loss in 525 KT recipients. Time-to-MDR was quantified using an adjusted Cox proportional hazards model. Results: By 2 years post-transplant, 54% of frail recipients and 45% of non-frail recipients experienced MDR; by 4 years, incidence was 67% and 51%. Frail recipients were 1.29-times (95%CI:1.01-1.66; P=0.04) more likely to experience MDR, as were deceased donor recipients (aHR=1.92, 95%CI:1.44-2.54, P<0.001) and older adults (age≥65 vs. <65; aHR=1.47, 95%CI:1.10-1.96, P=0.01). MDR was independently associated with a substantially increased risk of death-censored graft loss (aHR=5.24, 95%CI:1.97-13.98, P=0.001). Conclusion: A better understanding of risk factors for MMF intolerance might help in planning alternate strategies to maintain adequate immunosuppression and prolong allograft survival. PMID:25393156

  18. Mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients: reversible, irreversible, and de novo abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hirukawa, Takashi; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Michio; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    Given the advances in medical technologies related to kidney transplantation, the post-transplant graft survival rate and quality of life have improved dramatically. Nevertheless, post-transplant mortality rate still remains high as compared to the general population due to the development of cardiovascular events. It has recently been widely recognized that chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) significantly contribute to such poor prognosis at least in part. In the majority of kidney recipients, abnormal serum parameters for mineral and bone disorder (MBD), such as phosphorus, calcium, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, gradually return toward acceptable levels following the re-establishment of kidney function after transplantation; however, some irreversible abnormalities, developed as the result of long-term dialysis, persist, require treatment, or even progress after kidney transplantation. Thus, better management of CKD-MBD during pre-dialysis and dialysis period as well as after kidney transplantation is highly appreciated. PMID:25931403

  19. POST-REPERFUSION LIVER BIOPSY AND ITS VALUE IN PREDICTING MORTALITY AND GRAFT DYSFUNCTION AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    ZANCHET, Marcos Vinícius; da SILVA, Larissa Luvison Gomes; MATIAS, Jorge Eduardo Fouto; COELHO, Júlio Cezar Uili

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The outcome of the patients after liver transplant is complex and to characterize the risk for complications is not always easy. In this context, the hepatic post-reperfusion biopsy is capable of portraying alterations of prognostic importance. Aim: To compare the results of liver transplantation, correlating the different histologic features of the hepatic post-reperfusion biopsy with graft dysfunction, primary non-function and patient survival in the first year after transplantation. Method: From the 377 transplants performed from 1996 to 2008, 164 patients were selected. Medical records were reviewed and the following clinical outcomes were registered: mortality in 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, graft dysfunction in varied degrees and primary graft non-function. The post-reperfusion biopsies had been examined by a blinded pathologist for the outcomes. The following histological variables had been evaluated: ischemic alterations, congestion, steatosis, neutrophilic exudate, monomorphonuclear infiltrate and necrosis. Results: The variables associated with increased mortality were: steatosis (p=0.02209), monomorphonuclear infiltrate (p=0.03935) and necrosis (p<0.00001). The neutrophilic exudate reduced mortality in this study (p=0.00659). The primary non-function showed significant association (p<0.05) with the necrosis, steatosis and the monomorphonuclear infiltrate. Conclusion: Post-reperfusion biopsy is useful tool to foresee complications after liver transplant. PMID:27759784

  20. Development of the National Kidney Transplantation Program in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, F; Orihuela, S; Alvarez, I; Dibello, N; Curi, L; Nin, M; Wimber, E; Mizraji, R; Bengochea, M; González, G; Manzo, L; Toledo, R; Silva, W; Chopitea, Á; Lopez, D; Balboa, O; Porto, D; Noboa, O

    2015-10-01

    The first kidney transplantation (KT) in Uruguay was performed in 1969. We report the rates of KT and survival of patients and grafts up to December 2014. The country has a surface of 176,215 km(2) and a population of 3,286,314 inhabitants (18.6 inhabitants per km(2)). Till December 31, 2014, 1,940 KT have been performed in Uruguay (41.8 pmp that year); 90.4% of them were from cadaveric donors (CD). Median age of recipients (R) was 44 ± 14 years; R older than 55 years increased from 0 to 27% during the period. Our pre-emptive KT program started in 2007. Optimal donors (D) decreased from 65.2% to 35.5%, and D older than 45 years old increased from 9% to 37%. Trauma as cause of death decreased from 49% to 32% and stroke as cause of death increased from 25% to 39%. Patient survival rates at 1, 5, and 8 years were 93%, 87%, and 78%, respectively for KT performed between 1980 and 1989; they were 98%, 93%, and 89%, respectively, for KT performed between 1990 and1999; they were 97%, 91%, and 90%, respectively, for KT performed between 2000 and 2010. In December 2013, there were 1098 patients pmp in renal replacement therapy, 758 pmp in dialysis, and 340 pmp (30.9%) with a functioning graft. Our national KT program is mainly based (90.6%) on cadaveric donation. Epidemiological changes in the characteristics of R and D followed the changes in aging that occurred in the general population and the dialysis population. The survival rates from patients and kidneys are similar to those reported by the European and the American registries.

  1. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  2. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  3. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  4. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  5. 42 CFR 413.202 - Organ procurement organization (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.202... (OPO) cost for kidneys sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. An OPO's total costs for all kidneys is reduced by the costs associated with procuring...

  6. Successful simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation from living-related donor against positive cross-match.

    PubMed

    Sammartino, Cinzia; Pham, Thuy; Panaro, Fabrizio; Bogetti, Diego; Jarzembowski, Tomasz; Sankary, Howard; Morelli, Nicola; Testa, Giuliano; Benedetti, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    A positive pretransplant flow cytometry cross-match (FC-XM) allows precise identification of high-risk recipients vulnerable to hyperacute or accelerated rejection after transplantation. Living donor kidney transplant recipient candidates with positive cross-match have been successfully treated with a combination of plasmapheresis (therapeutic plasma exchange, TPEX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), achieving conversion to negative cross-match and successful transplant. We report the first successful case of simultaneous pancreas kidney transplant (SPKT) from a living donor (LD) performed against an initially positive FC-XM, converted to negative using a protocol based on TPEX and IVIG in combination with antiCD20 monoclonal antibody. This strategy of overcoming the cross-match barriers in living donation may offer a chance of successful transplantation to highly sensitized candidates for SPKT, for whom cadaveric transplant is difficult to achieve.

  7. Outcomes of Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation in Type 2 Diabetic Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Marcelo Santos; Kuo, Hung-Tien

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease may receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant. However, outcomes are not well described. Risks for death and graft failure were examined in SPK type 2 diabetic recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using the United Network for Organ Sharing database, outcomes of SPK transplants were compared between type 2 and type 1 diabetic recipients. All primary SPK adult recipients transplanted between 2000 and 2007 (n = 6756) were stratified according to end-stage pancreas disease diagnosis (type 1: n=6141, type 2: n=582). Posttransplant complications and risks for death and kidney/pancreas graft failure were compared. Results Of the 6756 SPK transplants, 8.6% were performed in recipients with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Rates of delayed kidney graft function and primary kidney nonfunction were higher in the type 2 diabetics. Five-year overall and death-censored kidney graft survival were inferior in type 2 diabetics. After adjustment for other risk factors, including recipient (age, race, body weight, dialysis time, and cardiovascular comorbidities), donor, and transplant immune characteristics, type 2 diabetes was not associated with increased risk for death or kidney or pancreas failure when compared with type 1 diabetic recipients. Conclusions After adjustment for other risk factors, SPK recipients with type 2 diabetes diagnosis were not at increased risk for death, kidney failure, or pancreas failure when compared with recipients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21441123

  8. When, how, and why a bone biopsy should be performed in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pablo Ureña; Bover, Jordi; Mazzaferro, Sandro; de Vernejoul, Marie Christine; Cohen-Solal, Martine

    2014-11-01

    In chronic kidney disease the excessive production of parathyroid hormone increases the bone resorption rate and leads to histologic bone signs of secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, in other situations, the initial increase in parathyroid hormone and bone remodeling may be slowed down excessively by a multitude of factors including age, ethnic origin, sex, and treatments such as vitamin D, calcium salts, calcimimetics, steroids, and so forth, leading to low bone turnover or adynamic bone disease. Both high and low bone turnover diseases actually are observed equally in chronic kidney disease patients treated by dialysis, and all types of renal osteodystrophy are associated with an increased risk of skeletal fractures, reduced quality of life, and poor clinical outcomes. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of these bone abnormalities cannot be obtained correctly by current clinical, biochemical, and imaging methods. Therefore, bone biopsy has been, and still remains, the gold standard analysis for assessing the exact type of renal osteodystrophy. It is also the unique way to assess the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new bone-targeting therapies. PMID:25498380

  9. Feasibility and Acceptability of the TALK Social Worker Intervention to Improve Live Kidney Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePasquale, Nicole; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Darrell, Linda; Boyer, LaPricia Lewis; Ephraim, Patti; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Live kidney transplantation (LKT) is underused by patients with end-stage renal disease. Easily implementable and effective interventions to improve patients' early consideration of LKT are needed. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) social worker intervention (SWI) improved consideration and pursuit of LKT among patients with…

  10. Outcomes of combined liver-kidney transplantation in children: analysis of the scientific registry of transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Calinescu, A M; Wildhaber, B E; Poncet, A; Toso, C; McLin, V A

    2014-12-01

    Combined liver-kidney transplantation (CLKT) in children is uncommon and outcomes have not been well defined. Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, data were analyzed on 152 primary pediatric CLKTs performed from October 1987 to February 2011, to determine their outcome in the largest series reported to date. Patient survival was 86.8%, 82.1% and 78.9% at 1, 5 and 10 years, liver graft survival was 81.9%, 76.5% and 72.6%, and kidney graft survival was 83.4%, 76.5% and 66.8%. By way of comparison, the Registry was queried for pediatric patient survival following isolated liver transplantation (LT) during the same time frame: 86.7%, 81.2% and 77.4% and following isolated kidney transplant (KT): 98.2%, 95.4% and 90% at 1, 5 and 10 years. In patients having undergone CLKT, primary hyperoxaluria was associated with reduced patient (p = 0.01), liver graft (p = 0.01) and kidney graft survival (p = 0.01). Furthermore, graft outcome following CLKT improved over the past decade (p = 0.04 for liver, p = 0.02 for kidney), but this did not translate into improved patient outcome (p = 0.2). All in all, our results confirmed that survival following LT was less than following KT, and that CLKT offered similar patient survival to isolated LT.

  11. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells. PMID:26971403

  12. Multigene predictors of tacrolimus exposure in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pulk, Rebecca A; Schladt, David S; Oetting, William S; Guan, Weihua; Israni, Ajay K; Matas, Arthur J; Remmel, Rory P; Jacobson, Pamala A

    2015-01-01

    Aim Determine the effect of the genetic variants beyond CYP3A5*3 on tacrolimus disposition. Patients & methods We studied genetic correlates of tacrolimus trough concentrations with POR*28, CYP3A4*22 and ABCC2 haplotypes in a large, ethnically diverse kidney transplant cohort (n = 2008). Results Subjects carrying one or more CYP3A5*1 alleles had lower tacrolimus trough concentrations (p = 9.2 × 10−75). The presence of one or two POR*28 alleles was associated with a 4.63% reduction in tacrolimus trough concentrations after adjusting for CYP3A5*1 and clinical factors (p = 0.037). In subset analyses, POR*28 was significant only in CYP3A5*3/*3 carriers (p = 0.03). The CYP3A4*22 variant and the ABBC2 haplotypes were not associated. Conclusion This study confirmed that CYP3A5*1 was associated with lower tacrolimus trough concentrations. POR*28 was associated with decreased tacrolimus trough concentrations although the effect was small possibly through enhanced CYP3A4 enzyme activity. CYP3A4*22 and ABCC2 haplotypes did not influence tacrolimus trough concentrations. PMID:26067485

  13. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  14. Impact of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Isla Pera, P; Moncho Vasallo, J; Guasch Andreu, O; Ricart Brulles, MJ; Torras Rabasa, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few qualitative studies of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK Tx) have been published. The aims of this study were to explore from the perspective of patients, the experience of living with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM), suffering from complications, and undergoing SPK Tx with good outcome; and to determine the impact of SPK Tx on patients and their social and cultural environment. Methods: We performed a focused ethnographic study. Twenty patients were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison following the method proposed by Miles and Huberman. Results: A functioning SPK Tx allowed renal replacement therapy and insulin to be discontinued. To describe their new situation, patients used words and phrases such as “miracle”, “being reborn” or “coming back to life”. Although the complications of T1DM, its surgery and treatment, and associated psychological problems did not disappear after SPK Tx, these were minimized when compared with the pretransplantation situation. Conclusion: For patients, SPK Tx represents a recovery of their health and autonomy despite remaining problems associated with the complications of T1DM and SPK Tx. The understanding of patients’ existential framework and their experience of disease are key factors for planning new intervention and improvement strategies. PMID:22936846

  15. OSAKA Trial: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing Tacrolimus QD and BD in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Laetitia; Banas, Bernhard; Klempnauer, Juergen L.; Glyda, Maciej; Viklicky, Ondrej; Kamar, Nassim

    2013-01-01

    Background The once-daily (QD), prolonged-release formulation of tacrolimus has been shown to improve adherence versus twice-daily (BD) tacrolimus. Treatment nonadherence in transplant recipients has been associated with poor graft outcomes. Methods This open-label, parallel-group study randomized adults with end-stage renal disease undergoing primary kidney transplantation or retransplantation to an initial dose of tacrolimus BD 0.2 mg/kg per day (Arm 1; n=309), QD 0.2 mg/kg per day (Arm 2; n=302), QD 0.3 mg/kg per day (Arm 3; n=304) all with mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids (tapered) over 24 weeks, or tacrolimus QD 0.2 mg/kg per day with mycophenolate mofetil, basiliximab, and corticosteroids given only perioperatively (Arm 4; n=283). The primary composite endpoint (efficacy failure; per protocol set) was defined as graft loss, biopsy-confirmed acute rejection, or graft dysfunction at week 24. Graft dysfunction was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate Modification of Diet in Renal Disease-4 formula of less than 40 mL/min/1.73 m2. The prespecified noninferiority margin was 12.5%. Results The per protocol set included 976 patients: 237, 263, 246, and 230 patients in Arms 1 to 4, respectively. Noninferiority of the composite endpoint was demonstrated for Arm 2 versus Arm 1; Kaplan–Meier estimates of efficacy failure were 42.2% and 40.6%, respectively (difference, −1.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], −12.2% to 9.0%). Noninferiority to Arm 1 was not confirmed for Arm 3 (difference, −3.5%; 95% CI, −13.6% to 6.6%) or Arm 4 (difference, −7.1%; 95% CI, −16.1% to 1.9%). Graft dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <40 mL/min/1.73 m2) was the main determinant of composite-endpoint efficacy failure across all arms. Conclusions In patients representative of the European kidney transplant population, tacrolimus QD-based immunosuppression (0.2 mg/kg/day), without induction, showed similar efficacy to 0.2 mg/kg per day tacrolimus BD

  16. Transplantation of liver and kidney from donors with malignancy at the time of donation: an experience from a single centre.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Longbotham, David; Hostert, Lutz; Attia, Magdy; Baker, Richard; Menon, Krishna; Ahmad, Niaz

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of organs from donors with malignancy poses clinical and ethical questions regarding outcome, informed consent, immunosuppression and follow-up. We review our experience of kidney and liver transplantation from such donors. Our database was complemented by data from National Health Service Blood and Transplant. All patients who received a renal or liver transplant in our institution between April 2003 and January 2014 were included. About 2546 liver and kidney transplants were performed: 71 recipients received 53 kidney and 18 liver transplants. These included 51 (36 kidney, 15 liver) CNS malignancy, and six kidneys, three ipsilateral and three contralateral with RCC. One kidney recipient developed donor-transmitted lung cancer in the transplant kidney, and one liver transplant recipient developed donor-transmitted lymphoma; both subsequently died. Seven recipients developed donor-unrelated cancer. No recipient developed cancer, whereas the donor had a CNS or RCC. The 1-, 3- and 5-year patient survival was 96%, 93.3% and 75%, respectively, for kidneys and 83.3%, 75% and 50%, respectively, for liver. Where donor malignancy was known and assessed before transplantation, judicious use of kidney and liver for transplant achieved satisfactory outcome. The risk of transmission from donors with CNS and low-grade renal malignancy remains extremely low.

  17. Role of BK virus infection in end-stage renal disease patients waiting for kidney transplantation--viral replication dynamics from pre- to post-transplant.

    PubMed

    Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Tinti, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Umbro, Ilaria; Anzivino, Elena; Bellizzi, Anna; Zavatto, Assunta; Poli, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Taliani, Gloria

    2014-03-01

    We report the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection before renal transplantation and the dynamics of BKV viremia from pre- to post-transplantation. We assessed 60 kidney transplanted patients from a single cohort in Italy, treated with identical immunosuppressive therapy, for BK viremia at pre-transplantation, 12 h, and three and six months post-transplantation. Polymerase chain reaction showed that the prevalence of plasma BKV replication--considered a marker of infection--was 20% in pre-transplant patients. All pre-transplant-positive patients remained positive post-transplant, whereas the majority of pre-transplant-negative patients remained negative. Viremia dynamics classification revealed three clusters of patients: Cluster A++, pre-transplant-positive patients (20%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; Cluster B-+, pre-transplant-negative patients (28%) who tested positive at least once post-transplant; and Cluster C- -, pre-transplant-negative patients (52%) who remained negative throughout. These clusters presented significant differences related to the prevalence of substantially positive patients with high plasma viral load (>10(3) copies/mL) in cluster A, but not in donors' or grafts' characteristics. We suggest that pre-transplant viral status should be considered as an additional risk factor for post-transplant BKV replication. Therefore, pre-transplant BKV infection screening in kidney transplant patients should be performed for improving planning of personalized immunosuppressant schemes and specific post-transplant surveillance.

  18. [Transurethral prostate resection prior to kidney transplantation leading to urethral cicatricial tissue].

    PubMed

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine; Mohammad, Wael

    2015-01-26

    In Denmark, kidney transplantations in patients above 50 years have increased during the last decade. Consequently, the number of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to prostate hypertrophy increases accordingly. We describe two patients, who both had a resection of the prostate while having anuria and waiting for a kidney transplantation from a deceased donor. In both cases it was impossible to place a urethral catheter during the following transplantation due to total urethral occlusion, so a suprapubic catheter was inserted until the scar tissue was dilated or resected by a later transurethral intervention. PMID:25612989

  19. A compact formulation for maximizing the expected number of transplants in kidney exchange programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelos, Filipe; Klimentova, Xenia; Rais, Abdur; Viana, Ana

    2015-05-01

    Kidney exchange programs (KEPs) allow the exchange of kidneys between incompatible donor-recipient pairs. Optimization approaches can help KEPs in defining which transplants should be made among all incompatible pairs according to some objective. The most common objective is to maximize the number of transplants. In this paper, we propose an integer programming model which addresses the objective of maximizing the expected number of transplants, given that there are equal probabilities of failure associated with vertices and arcs. The model is compact, i.e. has a polynomial number of decision variables and constraints, and therefore can be solved directly by a general purpose integer programming solver (e.g. Cplex).

  20. Adequacy and complication rates with 14- vs. 16-gauge automated needles in percutaneous renal biopsy of native kidneys.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Svetha; Whittier, William L; Korbet, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    In performing percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) of native kidneys, an increasing use of 16-gauge automated biopsy needles has been observed. We compare the adequacy and safety of PRBs in adults performed with a 14-gauge (n = 82) vs. 16-gauge (n = 55) automated needle using real-time ultrasound (US) from 1/2010 to 12/2013. Baseline clinical and laboratory data along with outcome data (renal US 1-hour postbiopsy, biopsy adequacy, and safety) were collected prospectively. There was no difference in age, gender, blood pressure, serum creatinine, or pre-PRB hemoglobin at baseline for PRBs performed with a 14- vs. 16-gauge needle. The number of glomeruli obtained per biopsy was similar (29 ± 11 vs. 31 ± 14, p = 0.6) and adequate tissue for diagnosis was obtained in 99% and 100% of biopsies. The clinical complication (8.5% vs. 9.1%, p = 1.0), transfusion (7.3% vs. 7.2%, p = 1.0), and embolization (3.7% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.6) rates were not significantly different for 14- vs. 16-gauge needles, but by routine renal US 1-hour post-PRB, a perinephric hematoma was demonstrated more often in biopsies done with the 14-gauge needle (39% vs. 22%, P 0.04). Thus, while the success of PRB of native kidneys is similar for both needle gauges, the potential for complication may be less using a 16-gauge automated needle.

  1. Pancreas transplantation with enteroanastomosis to native duodenum poses technical challenges--but offers improved endoscopic access for scheduled biopsies and therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Horneland, R; Paulsen, V; Lindahl, J P; Grzyb, K; Eide, T J; Lundin, K; Aabakken, L; Jenssen, T; Aandahl, E M; Foss, A; Øyen, O

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate endoscopic access for rejection surveillance and stenting of the pancreas, we have abandoned the duodenojejunostomy (DJ) in favor of duodenoduodenostomy (DD) in pancreas transplantation (PTx). From September 2012 to September 2013 we performed 40 PTx with DD; 20 solitary-PTx (S-PTx) and 20 simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPK). We compared the outcomes with results from 40 PTx-DJ (10 S-PTx and 30 SPK) from the preceding era. The DD-enteroanastomoses were performed successfully. Endoscopic pancreas biopsies (endoscopic ultrasound examination [EUS]) yielded representative material in half of the cases. One exocrine fistula was treated by endoscopic stenting. PTxs-DD were associated with a higher rate of thrombosis compared to PTx-DJ (23% vs. 5%) and reoperations (48% vs. 30%), as well as inferior graft survival (80% vs. 88%). Time on waiting list, HLA A + B mismatches and reoperations were associated with graft loss. Only recipient age remained an independent predictor of patient death in multivariate analysis. PTx-DD showed a higher rate of thrombosis and inferior results, but facilitated a protocol biopsy program by EUS that was feasible and safe. Given that technical difficulties can be solved, the improved endoscopic access might confer long-term benefits, yet this remains to be proven.

  2. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Silverberg, Daniel Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  3. Exocrine contamination impairs implantation of pancreatic islets transplanted beneath the kidney capsule.

    PubMed

    Gray, D W; Sutton, R; McShane, P; Peters, M; Morris, P J

    1988-11-01

    The effect of exocrine contamination on islets implanted under the kidney capsule has been studied by histological examination of pure or exocrine-contamination human, monkey, or rat islets transplanted to the kidney capsule of the nude rat, monkey, or rat, respectively. Exocrine contamination resulted in an appearance suggestive of impaired islet implantation, due to tissue necrosis and subsequent fibrosis. The effect of exocrine contamination was examined quantitatively in a rat islet isograft model in which handpicked DA rat islets were transplanted under the kidney capsule of normal DA rats. The islets were either pure or deliberately recontaminated with exocrine tissue (50 or 90% contamination). Four hundred pure islets were placed under one kidney capsule and 400 islets (of similar size and from the same islet preparation) were contaminated and then placed under the contralateral kidney capsule. After 2 weeks the kidneys were removed and extracted for insulin content. The insulin content of kidneys bearing islets contaminated by either 50 or 90% exocrine tissue was significantly reduced when compared to the contralateral kidney bearing pure islets. These findings support the view that exocrine contamination of islets resulted in impaired islet implantation when transplanted to a confined site such as the kidney subcapsule.

  4. Kidney transplantation process in Brazil represented in business process modeling notation.

    PubMed

    Peres Penteado, A; Molina Cohrs, F; Diniz Hummel, A; Erbs, J; Maciel, R F; Feijó Ortolani, C L; de Aguiar Roza, B; Torres Pisa, I

    2015-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is considered to be the best treatment for people with chronic kidney failure, because it improves the patients' quality of life and increases their length of survival compared with patients undergoing dialysis. The kidney transplantation process in Brazil is defined through laws, decrees, ordinances, and resolutions, but there is no visual representation of this process. The aim of this study was to analyze official documents to construct a representation of the kidney transplantation process in Brazil with the use of business process modeling notation (BPMN). The methodology for this study was based on an exploratory observational study, document analysis, and construction of process diagrams with the use of BPMN. Two rounds of validations by specialists were conducted. The result includes the kidney transplantation process in Brazil representation with the use of BPMN. We analyzed 2 digital documents that resulted in 2 processes with 45 total of activities and events, 6 organizations involved, and 6 different stages of the process. The constructed representation makes it easier to understand the rules for the business of kidney transplantation and can be used by the health care professionals involved in the various activities within this process. Construction of a representation with language appropriate for the Brazilian lay public is underway. PMID:26036495

  5. New-onset diabetes after renal transplantation: a case series as seen in a Nigerian kidney transplant population.

    PubMed

    Adamu, B; Uloko, A E; Aliyu, A; A'isha, N

    2013-01-01

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is an important metabolic complication of transplantation because of its associated morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for NODAT include those known to cause diabetes mellitus in non-transplant patients as well as transplant-specific factors. This study was aimed at illustrating the presentation and management of NODAT in three kidney transplant recipients in our center and reviewing the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first report from Nigeria. Two of the patients were males of ages 60 and 36 years, respectively, while the third was a female aged 25 years. They were all receiving prednisolone, two were on tacrolimus, and one was on cyclosporine as part of their immunosuppressive regimens. They developed NODAT at varying times post transplant, ranging from 3 months to 6 years. Two patients were managed with oral hypoglycemic agents and one with insulin. One patient died of hemorrhagic stroke. We conclude that NODAT occurred in our kidney transplant recipients and recommend that physicians should have a high index of suspicion in order to make an early diagnosis and institute appropriate management to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:23563475

  6. Phospholipase A2 receptor positive membranous nephropathy long after living donor kidney transplantation between identical twins.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hisako; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Tojo, Akihiro; Shintani, Yukako; Shimizu, Akira; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-07-01

    Although membranous nephropathy (MN) is a commonly observed cause of post-transplant glomerulonephritis, distinguishing de novo from recurrent MN in kidney allograft is often difficult. Phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) staining is useful for diagnosing recurrent MN in allografts similarly to idiopathic MN in native kidney. No specific treatment strategy has been established for MN, especially when accompanied with HCV infection in kidney transplant recipients. This report describes a 66-year-old man who was diagnosed as having PLA2R positive membranous nephropathy accompanied with already-known IgA nephropathy and HCV infection 26 years after kidney transplantation conducted between identical twins. PLA2R was detected along capillary loops, implying that this patient is affected by the same pathogenic mechanism as idiopathic MN, not secondary MN associated with other disorders such as HCV infection. The patient successfully achieved clinical remission after steroid therapy.

  7. A case of benign retroperitoneal cyst of Müllerian type in kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Park, S C; Kim, T H; Moon, I S; Koh, Y B

    2006-09-01

    Müllerian cysts of the retroperitoneum, which considered to be a subtype of urogenital cysts, are extremely rare disease entities. Herein we have presented successful excision from a second kidney transplantation from a brain-dead donor to a 38-year-old woman with previous kidney graft failure. During the second cadaveric kidney transplantation operation, two fist-sized cysts were found in the left retroperitoneal pelvic space extending from the left common iliac artery to the prevesical region, which compromised the iliac vessels for vascular anastomosis. After complete cyst excision, vascular anastomoses were performed. Histologically, the cysts were lined with benign Müllerian-type epithelium. We report a rare case of benign retroperitoneal cyst of the Müllerian type, which was incidentally found during kidney transplant surgery.

  8. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Tushla, Lara; Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies.

  9. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Tushla, Lara; Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies. PMID:26002904

  10. Combined Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplantation for the Induction of Specific Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Kawai, Tatsuo; Spitzer, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The induction of specific tolerance, in order to avoid the detrimental effects of lifelong systemic immunosuppressive therapy after organ transplantation, has been considered the “Holy Grail” of transplantation. Experimentally, tolerance has been achieved through clonal deletion, through costimulatory blockade, through the induction or infusion of regulatory T-cells, and through the establishment of hematopoietic chimerism following donor bone marrow transplantation. The focus of this review is how tolerance has been achieved following combined bone marrow and kidney transplantation. Preclinical models of combined bone marrow and kidney transplantation have shown that tolerance can be achieved through either transient or sustained hematopoietic chimerism. Combined transplants for patients with multiple myeloma have shown that organ tolerance and prolonged disease remissions can be accomplished with such an approach. Similarly, multiple clinical strategies for achieving tolerance in patients without an underlying malignancy have been described, in the context of either transient or durable mixed chimerism or sustained full donor hematopoiesis. To expand the chimerism approach to deceased donor transplants, a delayed tolerance approach, which will involve organ transplantation with conventional immunosuppression followed months later by bone marrow transplantation, has been successful in a primate model. As combined bone marrow and organ transplantation become safer and increasingly successful, the achievement of specific tolerance may become more widely applicable. PMID:27239198

  11. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  12. Cognitive dysfunction and depression in adult kidney transplant recipients: baseline findings from the FAVORIT Ancillary Cognitive Trial (FACT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperhomocysteinemia and B-vitamin deficiency may be treatable risk factors for cognitive impairment and decline. Hyperhomocysteinemia, cognitive impairment and depression all are common in individuals with kidney disease, including kidney transplant recipient. Accordingly, we assessed the prevalenc...

  13. Survival Benefit with Kidney Transplants from HLA-Incompatible Live Donors

    PubMed Central

    Orandi, B.J.; Luo, X.; Massie, A.B.; Garonzik-Wang, J.M.; Lonze, B.E.; Ahmed, R.; Van Arendonk, K.J.; Stegall, M.D.; Jordan, S.C.; Oberholzer, J.; Dunn, T.B.; Ratner, L.E.; Kapur, S.; Pelletier, R.P.; Roberts, J.P.; Melcher, M.L.; Singh, P.; Sudan, D.L.; Posner, M.P.; El-Amm, J.M.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, M.; Lipkowitz, G.S.; Rees, M.A.; Marsh, C.L.; Sankari, B.R.; Gerber, D.A.; Nelson, P.W.; Wellen, J.; Bozorgzadeh, A.; Gaber, A.O.; Montgomery, R.A.; Segev, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A report from a high-volume single center indicated a survival benefit of receiving a kidney transplant from an HLA-incompatible live donor as compared with remaining on the waiting list, whether or not a kidney from a deceased donor was received. The generalizability of that finding is unclear. METHODS In a 22-center study, we estimated the survival benefit for 1025 recipients of kidney transplants from HLA-incompatible live donors who were matched with controls who remained on the waiting list or received a transplant from a deceased donor (waiting-list-or-transplant control group) and controls who remained on the waiting list but did not receive a transplant (waiting-list-only control group). We analyzed the data with and without patients from the highest-volume center in the study. RESULTS Recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors had a higher survival rate than either control group at 1 year (95.0%, vs. 94.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 89.6% for the waiting-list-only control group), 3 years (91.7% vs. 83.6% and 72.7%, respectively), 5 years (86.0% vs. 74.4% and 59.2%), and 8 years (76.5% vs. 62.9% and 43.9%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons with the two control groups). The survival benefit was significant at 8 years across all levels of donor-specific antibody: 89.2% for recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors who had a positive Luminex assay for anti-HLA antibody but a negative flow-cytometric cross-match versus 65.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 47.1% for the waiting-list-only control group; 76.3% for recipients with a positive flow-cytometric cross-match but a negative cytotoxic cross-match versus 63.3% and 43.0% in the two control groups, respectively; and 71.0% for recipients with a positive cytotoxic cross-match versus 61.5% and 43.7%, respectively. The findings did not change when patients from the highest-volume center were excluded. CONCLUSIONS This

  14. Ethical considerations regarding disparities pertaining to kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Yost, S E; Srinivas, T; Kaplan, B

    2011-08-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist throughout the US health-care system, including in the field of solid-organ transplant. There are disparities in access to health care, health outcomes, and access to transplant centers. Addressing this issue requires equity in pretransplant care, increased education and referral throughout the transplant process, and research funds targeted to the study of problems pertinent to transplantation in certain patient populations.

  15. "Nature versus nurture" study of deceased-donor pairs in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Louvar, Daniel W; Li, Na; Snyder, Jon; Peng, Yi; Kasiske, Bertram L; Israni, Ajay K

    2009-06-01

    Donor characteristics such as age and cause of death influence the incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) and graft survival; however, the relative influence of donor characteristics ("nature") versus transplant center characteristics ("nurture") on deceased-donor kidney transplant outcomes is unknown. We examined the risks for DGF and allograft failure within 19,461 recipient pairs of the same donor's kidneys using data from the US Renal Data System. For the 11,894 common-donor pairs transplanted at different centers, a recipient was twice as likely to develop DGF when the recipient of the contralateral kidney developed DGF (odds ratio [OR] 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82 to 2.30). Similarly, for 7567 common-donor pairs transplanted at the same center, the OR for DGF was 3.02 (95% CI 2.62 to 3.48). For pairs transplanted at the same center, there was an additional 42% risk for DGF compared with pairs transplanted at different centers. After adjustment for DGF, the within-pair ORs for allograft failure by 1 yr were 1.92 (95% CI 1.33 to 2.77) and 1.77 (95% CI 1.25 to 2.52) for recipients who underwent transplantation at the same center and different centers, respectively. These data suggest that both unmeasured donor characteristics and transplant center characteristics contribute to the risk for DGF and that the former also contribute significantly to allograft failure. PMID:19389849

  16. Nephrologists' likelihood of referring patients for kidney transplant based on hypothetical patient scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ankita; Wang, Ming; Roe, Kevin C.; Patel, Surju; Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background There is wide variation in referral for kidney transplant and preemptive kidney transplant (PKT). Patient characteristics such as age, race, sex and geographic location have been cited as contributing factors to this disparity. We hypothesize that the characteristics of nephrologists interplay with the patients' characteristics to influence the referral decision. In this study, we used hypothetical case scenarios to assess nephrologists' decisions regarding transplant referral. Methods A total of 3180 nephrologists were invited to participate. Among those interested, 252 were randomly selected to receive a survey in which nephrologists were asked whether they would recommend transplant for the 25 hypothetical patients. Logistic regression models with single covariates and multiple covariates were used to identify patient characteristics associated with likelihood of being referred for transplant and to identify nephrologists' characteristics associated with likelihood of referring for transplant. Results Of the 252 potential participants, 216 completed the survey. A nephrologist's affiliation with an academic institution was associated with a higher likelihood of referral, and being ‘>10 years from fellowship’ was associated with lower likelihood of referring patients for transplant. Patient age <50 years was associated with higher likelihood of referral. Rural location and smoking history/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were associated with lower likelihood of being referred for transplant. The nephrologist's affiliation with an academic institution was associated with higher likelihood of referring for preemptive transplant, and the patient having a rural residence was associated with lower likelihood of being referred for preemptive transplant. Conclusions The variability in transplant referral is related to patients' age and geographic location as well as the nephrologists' affiliation with an academic institution and time since completion

  17. Improvement in kidney transplantation in the Balkans after the Istanbul Declaration: where do we stand today?

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Busic, Mirela; Delmonico, Francis

    2016-02-01

    Due to the limited access to kidney transplantation (KTx) in developing countries, desperate patients have engaged in the purchase and sale of kidneys. In 2004, the World Health Assembly urged member states to protect the poor and vulnerable from being exploited through practices of illegal organ trafficking that had become widespread throughout the world. In 2008, the international transplant community convened a summit of transplant professionals, legal experts and ethicists to combat organ trafficking, transplant tourism and transplant commercialism that resulted in the Declaration of Istanbul (DOI). The South-Eastern Europe Health Network (SEEHN) represents a nine country multigovernmental collaboration on health systems. The Regional Health Development Centre on Organ Donation and Transplant Medicine (RHDC) was established in 2011 in Croatia to facilitate cooperation among south-eastern European countries to improve organ transplantation within the Balkan region. Since 2011, a collaboration between the RHDC, the Custodian Group of the DOI (DICG) and SEEHN professionals has enhanced strategic planning and definition of country-specific action plan priorities on organ donation and transplantation. Data of kidney transplantation provided in this report show a significant increase in transplantation activities in a 4-year period in Macedonia, Moldova, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Romania and Montenegro. The success of the donation and transplantation programmes was influenced by the engagement of key professionals and the establishment of organizational infrastructure with the implementation of an appropriate funding model. In conclusion, the DOI has provided an ethical framework for engagement of health professionals from south-eastern European countries. The newly established SEEHN RHDC as a technical coordinating body greatly contributed in building institutional capacity and strengthening regional collaboration between health authorities and professionals within

  18. Improvement in kidney transplantation in the Balkans after the Istanbul Declaration: where do we stand today?

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Busic, Mirela; Delmonico, Francis

    2016-02-01

    Due to the limited access to kidney transplantation (KTx) in developing countries, desperate patients have engaged in the purchase and sale of kidneys. In 2004, the World Health Assembly urged member states to protect the poor and vulnerable from being exploited through practices of illegal organ trafficking that had become widespread throughout the world. In 2008, the international transplant community convened a summit of transplant professionals, legal experts and ethicists to combat organ trafficking, transplant tourism and transplant commercialism that resulted in the Declaration of Istanbul (DOI). The South-Eastern Europe Health Network (SEEHN) represents a nine country multigovernmental collaboration on health systems. The Regional Health Development Centre on Organ Donation and Transplant Medicine (RHDC) was established in 2011 in Croatia to facilitate cooperation among south-eastern European countries to improve organ transplantation within the Balkan region. Since 2011, a collaboration between the RHDC, the Custodian Group of the DOI (DICG) and SEEHN professionals has enhanced strategic planning and definition of country-specific action plan priorities on organ donation and transplantation. Data of kidney transplantation provided in this report show a significant increase in transplantation activities in a 4-year period in Macedonia, Moldova, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Romania and Montenegro. The success of the donation and transplantation programmes was influenced by the engagement of key professionals and the establishment of organizational infrastructure with the implementation of an appropriate funding model. In conclusion, the DOI has provided an ethical framework for engagement of health professionals from south-eastern European countries. The newly established SEEHN RHDC as a technical coordinating body greatly contributed in building institutional capacity and strengthening regional collaboration between health authorities and professionals within

  19. Analysis of 4000 kidney transplantations in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Young Hoon; Choi, Ji Yoon; Sung, Shin; Jung, Joo Hee; Park, Su-Kil; Han, Duck Jong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kidney transplant (KT) is the optimal renal replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The demand for kidneys, however, continues to exceed the supply. To overcome this problem, efforts to extend the donor pool by including human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- and ABO-incompatible (ABOi) KTs are increasing. The aim of this article was to retrospectively review data on recipients, donor profiles, and clinical outcomes in 4000 cases of KT. In addition, we analyzed clinical outcomes in ABOi and flow-cytometric crossmatch (FCXM) positive KT in a subgroup analysis. This was a retrospective, observational study using data extracted from medical records. A total of 4000 consecutive patients who underwent KT at our institution from January 1990 to February 2015 were included in this study. KTs across immunological barriers such as ABO incompatible (276 cases, 6.9%), FCXM positive (97 cases, 2.4%), and positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) XM KT (16 cases, 0.4%) were included. From a Kaplan–Meier analysis, overall patient survival (PS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.9%, 95.1%, 92.0%, and 88.9%, respectively. The overall graft survival (GS) rates after KT at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years were 96.3%, 88.9%, 81.2%, and 67.4%, respectively. Our subgroup analysis suggested that overall PS, GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS in ABOi KT showed no significant differences in comparison with ABO-compatible KT if adequate immunosuppressive treatment was performed. The overall PS rate in patients who underwent FCXM positive KT did not differ significantly from that of the control group during the 3-year follow-up (P = 0.34). The overall GS, death-censored GS, and rejection-free GS also did not differ significantly between the FCXM KT and control groups (P = 0.99, 0.42, and 88). The outcomes of KTs continually improved during the study period, while the annual number of KTs increased. ABO or FCXM positive KTs can be

  20. Pre-transplant dialysis modality does not influence short- or long-term outcome in kidney transplant recipients: analysis of paired kidneys from the same deceased donor.

    PubMed

    Dipalma, Teresa; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Praga, Manuel; Polanco, Natalia; González, Esther; Gutiérrez-Solis, Elena; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Andrés, Amado

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have reported contradictory results regarding the effect of pre-transplant dialysis modality on the outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT). To minimize the confounding effect of donor-related variables, we performed a donor-matched retrospective comparison of 160 patients that received only one modality of pre-transplant dialysis (peritoneal dialysis [PD] and hemodialysis [HD] in 80 patients each) and that subsequently underwent KT at our center between January 1990 and December 2007. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association between pre-transplant dialysis modality and primary study outcomes (death-censored graft survival and patient survival). To control for imbalances in recipient-related baseline characteristics, we performed additional adjustments for the propensity score (PS) for receiving pre-transplant PD (versus HD). There were no significant differences according to pre-transplant dialysis modality in death-censored graft survival (PS-adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 0.65; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.25-1.68) or patient survival (aHR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.13-2.68). There were no differences in 10-year graft function or in the incidence of post-transplant complications either, except for a higher risk of lymphocele in patients undergoing PD (odds ratio: 4.31; 95% CI: 1.15-16.21). In conclusion, pre-transplant dialysis modality in KT recipients does not impact short- or long-term graft outcomes or patient survival.

  1. Role of socioeconomic status in kidney transplant outcome.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S; Koford, James K; Baird, Bradley C; Chelamcharla, Madhukar; Habib, Arsalan N; Wang, Ben-Jr; Lin, Shih-jui; Shihab, Fuad; Isaacs, Ross B

    2006-03-01

    There is controversy regarding the influence of genetic versus environmental factors on kidney transplant outcome in minority groups. The goal of this project was to evaluate the role of certain socioeconomic factors in allograft and recipient survival. Graft and recipient survival data from the United States Renal Data System were analyzed using Cox modeling with primary variables of interest, including recipient education level, citizenship, and primary source of pay for medical service. College (hazard ratio [HR] 0.93, P < 0.005) and postcollege education (HR 0.85, P < 0.005) improved graft outcome in the whole group and in patients of white race. Similar trends were observed for recipient survival (HR 0.9, P < 0.005 for college; HR 0.88, P = 0.09 for postcollege education) in the whole population and in white patients. Resident aliens had a significantly better graft outcome in the entire patient population (HR 0.81, P < 0.001) and in white patients in subgroup analysis (HR 0.823, P < 0.001) compared with US citizens. A similar effect was observed for recipient survival. Using Medicare as a reference group, there is a statistically significant benefit to graft survival from having private insurance in the whole group (HR 0.87, P < 0.001) and in the black (HR 0.8, P < 0.001) and the white (HR 0.89, P < 0.001) subgroups; a similar effect of private insurance is observed on recipient survival in the entire group of patients and across racial groups. Recipients with higher education level, resident aliens, and patients with private insurance have an advantage in the graft and recipient outcomes independent of racial differences. PMID:17699222

  2. Evidence for a need to mandate kidney transplant living donor registries.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mahmoud; Ragheb, Ahmed; Hassan, Abubaker; Shoker, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Kidney disease is a global public health problem of growing proportions. Currently the best treatment for end-stage renal failure is transplantation. Living organ donation remains a complex ethical, moral and medical issue. It is based on a premise that kidney donation is associated with short-term minimal risks to harm the donor, and is outweighed by the definite advantages to the recipient. A growing number of patients with end-stage renal disease and shortage of kidney donors poses a pressing need to expand the criteria needed to accept kidney donors. The current donor registries are structured and are driven to expand donor pool. As living kidney donation is not without risks, more attention should be given to protect the donor health. After kidney donation, mild to moderate renal insufficiency may occur. Renal insufficiency, even mild, is associated with increased risks of hypertension, proteinuria and cardiovascular morbidity. We, therefore, foresee a need to mandate the establishment of renal transplant donor registries at all transplanting programs as a prerequisite to protect the long-term well being of kidney donors. These registries can collect the database necessary to develop standards of practice and guidelines for future kidney donation. PMID:18549448

  3. First Robotic-Assisted Dual Kidney Transplant: Surgical Technique and Report of a Case With 24-month Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Frongia, Mauro; Cadoni, Rossano; Solinas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Open surgery is the gold standard procedure for kidney transplantation. There is a strong rationale for using minimally invasive surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease. A robotic-assisted dual kidney transplant was performed for the first time at our institution. Methods In August 2013, a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease and diabetes mellitus under pharmacological control received both kidneys from a 70-year-old marginal donor. Pretransplant donor biopsy demonstrated a bilateral Karpinski score greater than 5. The organs did not exhibit malformations and each had an artery and a vein. The procedure was carried out by a 7-port intraperitoneal approach using the da Vinci surgical system. The procedure was identical for the 2 kidneys except that mobilization of the sigmoid colon was required to introduce the left graft. The renal vessels were anastomosed to the left external iliac vessels. The novel aspect of the technique was the introduction of both grafts through a single, 7-cm upper midline incision. Results Total operative time was 400 minutes and blood loss was 120 mL. Both grafts immediately began functioning. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day with normal renal function. At 24 months, he is well and does not require hemodialysis. Conclusions Minimally invasive robotic-assisted technology is a promising technique that provides exceptional patient outcomes by reducing operative morbidity, immobilization, and time to recovery, while affording better esthetic results. Selected patients with multiple comorbidities benefit most. Grafts from marginal donors are an extremely valuable resource. PMID:27500234

  4. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... following early in life: blood-filtering treatments called dialysis a kidney transplant Children with dysplasia in only ... mild dysplasia of both kidneys may not need dialysis or a kidney transplant for several years. Kidney ...

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of Interleukin-18 are not associated with allograft function in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Wenna Gleyce Araújo; Cilião, Daiani Alves; Genre, Julieta; Gondim, Dikson Dibe; Alves, Renata Gomes; Hassan, Neife Deghaide; Lima, Francisco Pignataro; Pereira, Maurício Galvão; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; de Oliveira Crispim, Janaina Cristiana

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in host defense by upregulating both innate and acquired immune responses. Analysis of IL18 polymorphisms may be clinically important since their roles have been recognized in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, the role of this cytokine polymorphisms in kidney transplant still remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the associations between IL18 polymorphisms and graft function assessed by creatinine clearance in kidney transplant recipients. A total of 82 kidney transplant recipients and 183 healthy controls were enrolled, and frequencies of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes for IL18 polymorphisms were determined and compared with creatinine clearance. The -607C/A (rs1946518) and -137C/G (rs187238) variant alleles in the IL18 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction. In our study, no significant association was found between the IL18 variants and creatinine clearance (p > 0.05). Nonetheless, polymorphism analysis revealed an increase in the frequency of the IL18 major haplotype -607C/-137G in kidney transplant patients (odds ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.45-4.55, p = 0.0014). Finally, we found that IL18 polymorphisms did not influence the renal function and that IL18 haplotype -607C/-137G seems to be associated with kidney transplant recipients.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of Interleukin-18 are not associated with allograft function in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Wenna Gleyce Araújo; Cilião, Daiani Alves; Genre, Julieta; Gondim, Dikson Dibe; Alves, Renata Gomes; Hassan, Neife Deghaide; Lima, Francisco Pignataro; Pereira, Maurício Galvão; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; de Oliveira Crispim, Janaina Cristiana

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in host defense by upregulating both innate and acquired immune responses. Analysis of IL18 polymorphisms may be clinically important since their roles have been recognized in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, the role of this cytokine polymorphisms in kidney transplant still remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the associations between IL18 polymorphisms and graft function assessed by creatinine clearance in kidney transplant recipients. A total of 82 kidney transplant recipients and 183 healthy controls were enrolled, and frequencies of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes for IL18 polymorphisms were determined and compared with creatinine clearance. The -607C/A (rs1946518) and -137C/G (rs187238) variant alleles in the IL18 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction. In our study, no significant association was found between the IL18 variants and creatinine clearance (p > 0.05). Nonetheless, polymorphism analysis revealed an increase in the frequency of the IL18 major haplotype -607C/-137G in kidney transplant patients (odds ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.45–4.55, p = 0.0014). Finally, we found that IL18 polymorphisms did not influence the renal function and that IL18 haplotype -607C/-137G seems to be associated with kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25071398

  7. Early subclinical coronary artery calcification in young adults who were pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ishitani, Michael B; Milliner, Dawn S; Kim, Dean Y; Bohorquez, Humberto E; Heimbach, Julie K; Sheedy, Patrick F; Morgenstern, Bruce Z; Gloor, James M; Murphy, Joseph G; McBane, Robert D; Bielak, Lawrence F; Peyser, Patricia A; Stegall, Mark D

    2005-07-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in adults after successful kidney transplantation. Children who have undergone successful kidney transplantation are entering young adulthood; however, the prevalence and extent of CAD in this population is unknown. We conducted a pilot study in young adults with stable allograft function, who received kidney transplants as children to measure coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of coronary artery atherosclerosis and CAD. We evaluated 19 young adults after successful pediatric kidney transplantation for known CAD risk factors; these patients underwent noninvasive imaging with electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) for measurement of CAC. Prevalence and quantity of CAC were then compared to asymptomatic individuals from the community. All patients had multiple risk factors for CAD. Mean age at evaluation was 32 years (range: 21-48 years). CAC is uncommon in individuals in the community in this age range; however, nearly half of our patients had CAC detected with the quantity of CAC comparable to asymptomatic individuals from the community 10-40 years older. These data suggest young adults who received pediatric kidney transplants are at increased risk for developing early CAC and need close monitoring to detect early CAD so as to prevent premature cardiac morbidity and mortality. PMID:15943627

  8. Assessment of postoperative perfusion with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangzhu; Yu, Zexing; Guo, Ruijun; Yin, Hang; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to evaluate renal perfusion after kidney transplantation and investigate the clinical significance of CEUS in monitoring postoperative renal perfusion. Thirty-five patients who underwent kidney transplantations were included in this study and divided into two groups-normal and abnormal-based on their serum creatinine (SCr) levels. Conventional ultrasound and CEUS were used to monitor renal perfusion after kidney transplantation. The differences in the results between the two groups were then compared. Color doppler ultrasonography showed that there were significant differences in the resistance index (RI) and the pulsatility index (PI) of the interlobar artery between the groups. Furthermore, CEUS indicated a significant difference between the two groups regarding the slope rate of the cortical ascending curve (A1), the medullary ascending curve (A2), and the derived peak intensity (DPI1). CEUS precisely showed the characteristics of microcirculation in renal parenchyma after kidney transplantation. It also detected changes in the microcirculation, which was a new method of evaluating tissue perfusion in transplanted kidneys. PMID:26770444

  9. Assessment of postoperative perfusion with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangzhu; Yu, Zexing; Guo, Ruijun; Yin, Hang; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to evaluate renal perfusion after kidney transplantation and investigate the clinical significance of CEUS in monitoring postoperative renal perfusion. Thirty-five patients who underwent kidney transplantations were included in this study and divided into two groups-normal and abnormal-based on their serum creatinine (SCr) levels. Conventional ultrasound and CEUS were used to monitor renal perfusion after kidney transplantation. The differences in the results between the two groups were then compared. Color doppler ultrasonography showed that there were significant differences in the resistance index (RI) and the pulsatility index (PI) of the interlobar artery between the groups. Furthermore, CEUS indicated a significant difference between the two groups regarding the slope rate of the cortical ascending curve (A1), the medullary ascending curve (A2), and the derived peak intensity (DPI1). CEUS precisely showed the characteristics of microcirculation in renal parenchyma after kidney transplantation. It also detected changes in the microcirculation, which was a new method of evaluating tissue perfusion in transplanted kidneys.

  10. Infection with hepatitis E virus in kidney transplant recipients in southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Moal, Valérie; Legris, Tristan; Burtey, Stéphane; Morange, Sophie; Purgus, Raj; Dussol, Bertrand; Garcia, Stéphane; Motte, Anne; Gérolami, René; Berland, Yvon; Colson, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging cause of acute hepatitis in Europe, particularly in southern France, and HEV is a new causative agent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis in immunocompromised patients. However, the data regarding HEV infection after kidney transplantation are still scarce with respect to the clinical issues that have been raised, and no study has specifically focused on kidney transplant recipients. This study described the clinical features and outcomes of HEV infections in a cohort of kidney transplant recipients living in southeastern France. The epidemiological, clinical, and virological characteristics of HEV infections diagnosed by PCR over a 53-month period were retrospectively analyzed in a cohort of 1,350 kidney transplant recipients monitored at the Marseille University Hospital. Sixteen HEV infections were diagnosed, all of which were autochthonous and involved genotype 3 viruses (HEV-3). Chronic infections occurred in 80% of these patients and resolved in half of the cases after a median time of 39 months. The rate of HEV clearance was 54% after a decrease in the dose of immunosuppressants. One patient developed liver cirrhosis 14 months after infection and experienced acute rejection after a decrease in the dose of immunosuppressants. Autochthonous HEV-3 infections in kidney transplant recipients progress to chronicity in most cases and might be complicated by early liver cirrhosis. Chronic HEV infection can resolve following the reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, but ribavirin may be required if reduction of the immunosuppressant dose is not associated with HEV clearance or is inappropriate for the patient management. PMID:23239466

  11. Newly developed central diabetes insipidus following kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, K M; Kim, S M; Lee, J; Lee, S Y; Kwon, S K; Kim, H-Y

    2013-09-01

    Polyuria after kidney transplantation is a common, usually self-limiting disorder. However, persistent polyuria can cause not only patient discomfort, including polyuria and polydipsia, but also volume depletion that can produce allograft dysfunction. Herein, we have report a case of central diabetes insipidus newly diagnosed after kidney transplantation. A 45-year-old woman with end-stage kidney disease underwent deceased donor kidney transplantation. Two months after the transplantation, she was admitted for persistent polyuria, polydipsia, and nocturia with urine output of more than 4 L/d. Urine osmolarity was 100 mOsm/kg, which implied that the polyuria was due to water rather than solute diuresis. A water deprivation test was compatible with central diabetes insipidus; desmopressin treatment resulted in immediate symptomatic relief. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated diffuse thickening of the pituitary stalk, which was considered to be nonspecific finding. MRI 12 months later showed no change in the pituitary stalk, although the patient has been in good health without polyuria or polydipsia on desmopressin treatment. The possibility of central diabetes insipidus should be considered in patients presenting with persistent polyuria after kidney transplantation.

  12. Acute renal failure and volume overload syndrome secondary to a femorofemoral arteriovenous fistula angioplasty in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique; Desbuissons, Geoffroy; Pallet, Nicolas; Sartorius, Albane; Legendre, Christophe; Mamzer, Marie-France; Sberro Soussan, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies analyzing the impact of AVF on cardiovascular and renal parameters, as well as outcomes, in kidney transplant recipients are lacking. On the other hand, it is not known whether AVF ligation after transplantation modifies hemodynamic parameters and kidney function. We report a case of a renal transplant recipient who developed an acute congestive heart failure accompanied by renal failure, which were triggered by femorofemoral AVF angioplasty. Prompt AVF ligation rapidly reversed clinical symptoms and normalized cardiac and renal functions. This paper illustrates the potential deleterious consequences of high-output AVF after kidney transplantation and raises considerations regarding the impact of the fistula on cardiac status and kidney function after kidney transplantation and, consequently, the management AVF after transplantation. PMID:23533921

  13. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression.

  14. [Telomere length and transrenal DNA isolated from transplanted kidney recipients' urine].

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Karolina; Drozd, Arleta; Borowiecka, Ewa; Domański, Leszek

    2015-05-17

    Transplantation is the preferred method of end stage renal insufficiency treatment due to better quality of life and extended life of transplanted patients. Currently a non-invasive test, which evaluates the risk of acute or chronic rejection or deterioration of the transplanted organ's function, is being sought. An increase of the transrenal DNA concentration in the urine of urinary tract infection patients and in renal graft recipients during an episode of acute rejection was observed. There were also reports on shortening of telomeres in transplanted organ chromosomes, as the result of accelerated aging of cells, and its connection with the onset of chronic allograft nephropathy and the degree of its completion, and thus the deterioration of kidney function. The aim of this paper is to describe the urine genetic analysis through determining the length of the telomeres and the content of transrenal DNA to monitor kidney function and to evaluate the prevalence of acute and chronic rejection in patients after kidney transplantation. The genetic analysis of the biological material collected from patients relies on the determination of transrenal DNA content and length of DNA telomeres isolated from the urine of kidney recipients. The presented methods assume that the genetic profile of the transplanted organ recipient as well as kidney donor can be determined, so the source of the genetic material in the urine of the patient can be identified. A measurable effect of these methods' use would be to complement the evaluation of the prevalence of acute and chronic rejection and transplanted kidney function with a modern, non-invasive method, which is the analysis of telomere length from sediment of urine and the content of transrenal DNA in the urine.

  15. Ventricular arrhythmia in incident kidney transplant recipients: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Marcassi, Aline P; Yasbek, Daniel C; Pestana, Jose Osmar Medina; Fachini, Fernando Carlos; De Lira Filho, Edgar Bezerra; Cassiolato, José Luiz; Canziani, Maria Eugênia F

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular mortality in kidney transplant recipients has shown to be substantially elevated particularly in the first year of transplantation. Complex ventricular arrhythmia (VA) has been pointed as one of the etiologies of sudden death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of VA and to investigate the factors associated with their occurrence in incident kidney transplant recipients. A total of 100 incident kidney transplant recipients were included in the study (39.7 ± 10.1 years, 55% male, 43.6 ± 10.1 days of transplantation, 66% living donors). All the patients underwent 24 h electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and multi-slice computed tomography. Thirty percent of the patients had VA. Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in 57% of the patients while heart failure was found in 5%. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was observed in 26 patients, from which 31% had severe calcification. The group of patients with VA was predominantly male, had been on dialysis therapy for a longer time and had more coronary calcification. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, male gender and CAC score were independently associated with the presence of VA. In conclusion, kidney transplant recipients exhibited a high prevalence of VA and the factors associated with its occurrence were the male gender and the presence of CAC.

  16. Management of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Kidney Transplantation to Prevent Further Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Goto, Norihiko; Futamura, Kenta; Okada, Manabu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Tsujita, Makoto; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) among kidney transplant recipients is emerging worldwide. It is important to control nosocomial PJP infection. A delay in diagnosis and treatment increases the number of reservoir patients and the number of cases of respiratory failure and death. Owing to the large number of kidney transplant recipients compared to other types of organ transplantation, there are greater opportunities for them to share the same time and space. Although the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) as first choice in PJP prophylaxis is valuable for PJP that develops from infections by trophic forms, it cannot prevent or clear colonization, in which cysts are dominant. Colonization of P. jirovecii is cleared by macrophages. While recent immunosuppressive therapies have decreased the rate of rejection, over-suppressed macrophages caused by the higher levels of immunosuppression may decrease the eradication rate of colonization. Once a PJP cluster enters these populations, which are gathered in one place and uniformly undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation, an outbreak can occur easily. Quick actions for PJP patients, other recipients, and medical staff of transplant centers are required. In future, lifelong prophylaxis may be required even in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26609250

  17. Kidney Transplantation Among the Elderly: Challenges and Opportunities to Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Ng, Yue-Harn; Unruh, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>65 years old) represent the fastest growing population among the ESRD patients and those awaiting kidney transplantation. There is ample evidence to suggest that kidney transplant in the elderly population offers the best chance of survival and improves health-related quality of life compared to remaining on dialysis. Although all these emerging facts are encouraging, this population brings with them complex medical problems including frailty, cognitive impairment, and multiple comorbidities. These issues can be barriers to transplantation and threaten the well-being of the patients after transplantation. Furthermore, aging results in changes to the immune system and affects the pharmacokinetics of immunosuppressants. All these changes can increase risk of complications such as infections and malignancy. Because death with a functioning graft is a common cause of graft loss, the new kidney allocation system has been implemented in an attempt to maximize allograft utilization and minimize unrealized graft years. This may result in longer wait-times for the elderly. In this review, we will highlight the barriers to kidney transplant, characterize transplant-related issues in the elderly, and propose alternative strategies under the new allocation system.

  18. Competitive Market Analysis of Transplant Centers and Discrepancy of Wait-Listing of Recipients for Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, P. S.; Saidi, R. F.; Cutie, C. J.; Ko, D. S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are over 250 kidney transplant programs in the USA. Objective: To determine if highly competitive regions, defined as regions with a higher number of transplant centers, will approve and wait-list more end-stage renal disease (ESRD) candidates for transplant despite consistent incidence and prevalence of ESRD nationwide. Methods: ESRD Network and OPTN data completed in 2011 were obtained from all transplant centers including listing data, market saturation, market share, organs transplanted, and ESRD prevalence. Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) was used to measure the size of firms in relation to the industry to determine the amount of competition. Results: States were separated into 3 groups (HHI<1000 considered competitive; HHI 1000–1800 considered moderate competition; and HHI>1800 considered highly concentrated). The percentage of ESRD patients listed in competitive, moderate, and highly concentrated regions were 19.73%, 17.02%, and 13.75%, respectively. The ESRD listing difference between competitive versus highly concentrated was significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: When there is strong competition without a dominant center as defined by the HHI, the entire state tends to list more patients for transplant to drive up their own center’s market share. Our analysis of the available national data suggests a discrepancy in access for ESRD patient to transplantation due to transplant center competition. PMID:26576259

  19. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  20. Risk of cancer in retransplants compared to primary kidney transplants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Roberto S; Lynch, Charles F; Engels, Eric A

    2015-10-01

    Recipients of kidney transplantation have elevated risk of developing cancer. There are limited data on cancer risk in recipients of kidney retransplantation. We used data from the Transplant Cancer Match Study, which links the U.S. transplant registry with 15 cancer registries. Cancer incidence in recipients of kidney retransplantation and primary kidney transplants was compared utilizing Poisson regression, adjusting for demographic and medical characteristics. We assessed 109 224 primary recipients and 6621 retransplants. Compared to primary recipients, retransplants were younger (median age 40 vs. 46 yr), had higher PRA, and more often received induction with polyclonal antibodies (43% vs. 25%). A total of 5757 cancers were observed in primary recipients and 245 in retransplants. Overall cancer risk was similar in retransplants compared with primary recipients (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.06, 95% CI 0.93-1.20, adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, PRA, and use of polyclonal induction). However, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) occurred in excess among retransplants (adjusted IRR 2.03, 95% CI 1.45-2.77), based on 514 cases in primary recipients and 43 cases in retransplants. Overall cancer risk did not differ in retransplants compared to primary recipients. Increased risk of RCC may be explained by the presence of acquired cystic kidney disease, which is more likely to develop with additional time with kidney disease and time spent on dialysis waiting for retransplantation. PMID:26255999

  1. Disseminated adenoviral infection masquerading as lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Aboumohamed, Ahmed; Flechner, Stuart M; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres; Srinivas, Titte R; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-11-01

    Viral infections continue to cause significant morbidity in immunosuppressed kidney transplant patients. Although cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and polyoma "BK" virus are more frequently encountered, the Adenovirus can cause multi-organ system infections, and may be difficult to diagnose because it is not often considered in the initial work up in kidney transplant recipients. We present an unusual case of a kidney recipient 1 year post-transplant with disseminated adenoviral infection, who had an initial presentation of lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction with hematuria and sterile pyuria. This progressed to a severe tubulointerstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury that improved with reduction of immunosuppression. Serial blood viral loads are useful for monitoring the course of infection. Urinary adenoviral infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever a kidney transplant recipient presents with unexplained lower tract voiding dysfunction, hematuria, and sterile pyuria. The allograft kidney and bladder can be targets of viral proliferation. Early diagnosis with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy is essential to clear the virus and maintain allograft function. PMID:23816478

  2. The first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation: outcome at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Vouillarmet, J; Buron, F; Houzard, C; Carlier, M C; Chauvet, C; Brunet, M; Thivolet, C; Morelon, E; Badet, L

    2013-07-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but life-threatening disease. Replacement therapy sometimes fails to prevent an acute adrenal crisis and most often does not lead to restoration of well-being. We report here the 1-year outcome of the first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation in a 33-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes and concomitant autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. En bloc left adrenal gland and kidney grafts were anastomosed on the left iliac vessels in normal vascular conditions and the pancreas graft was anastomosed on the right iliac vessels. The immunosuppressive regimen was not modified by the addition of the adrenal gland. We observed no additional morbidity due to the adrenal gland transplantation, as there were no surgical complications. One-year kidney and pancreas graft functions were satisfactory (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 55 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and HbA1c: 4.8%). The adrenal graft functioned well at 12 months with a normalization of cortisol and aldosterone baseline levels. Functional imaging at 3 months showed good uptake of [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine by the adrenal graft. Transplantation of the adrenal gland en bloc with the left kidney appears to be a good therapeutic option in patients with adrenal insufficiency awaiting kidney or kidney-pancreas transplantation.

  3. Depression, Anxiety, Resilience and Coping Pre and Post Kidney Transplantation – Initial Findings from the Psychiatric Impairments in Kidney Transplantation (PI-KT)-Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Helge H.; Englbrecht, Matthias; Wiesener, Michael S.; Titze, Stephanie; Heller, Katharina; Groemer, Teja W.; Schett, Georg; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kornhuber, Johannes; Maler, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Depression/anxiety, impaired Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and coping and resilience structures, are associated with increased mortality/poor outcome in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before (CKD/pre-KT) and after kidney (CKD-T) transplantation. Less is known about prevalence rates of psychiatric symptoms and impaired HRQoL of non-transplanted compared with transplanted patients. Methods In a cross-sectional study comparing 101 CKD/pre-KT patients with 151 cadaveric-transplanted (CKD-T) patients, we examined prevalence of depression/anxiety (HADS questionnaire) and coping, resilience and HRQoL (SF-12, Resilience-Scale and FKV-questionnaire). Results The prevalence of both depressive and anxiety symptoms was not significantly different between different pre-/and CKD-T patient groups. In CKD-T no significant relations of coping strategies with kidney function were identified. Furthermore, the Resilience Scales for acceptance and competence did not suggest any differences between the CKD/pre-KT and CKD-T subgroup. In the CKD/pre-KT patients, significant correlations were identified between the acceptance subscale and partnership, as well as between the competence subscale and older age/partnership. Conclusions Both the CKD/pre-KT and CKD-T patients exhibited notable impairments in the HRQoL which which showed a comparable pattern of results. KT itself does not appear to be the main risk factor for the development of mental impairments. PMID:26559531

  4. Spanish validation of the "Kidney Transplant Questionnaire": a useful instrument for assessing health related quality of life in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Pablo; Ortega, Francisco; Ortega, Teresa; Valdés, Covadonga; García-Mendoza, Mónica; Gómez, Ernesto

    2003-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in the evaluation of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among patients undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy. In Spain, no specific questionnaire exists for kidney transplant patients. Here we present the Spanish validation of the first specific HRQoL assessment tool: the kidney transplant questionnaire (KTQ). Methods Prospective study of 31 patients on transplant waiting list who received the first kidney. Patients were evaluated before transplant and after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, using the KTQ and the SF-36 Health Survey. Feasibility, validity, reliability, and sensibility to change were evaluated. Results Mean time of administration of the KTQ was 12 minutes. Correlation coefficients among KTQ dimensions range between 0.32 and 0.72. Correlation coefficients of KTQ dimensions with SF-36 PCS were low (r<0.4), and with SF-36 MCS were moderate-high (r>0.4) except for Physical Symptom dimension (r = 0.33). Cronbach's Alpha was satisfactory for all KTQ dimensions (Physical Symptoms = 0.80; Fatigue = 0.93; Uncertainty/Fear = 0.81; Emotional= 0.90) except Appearance (0.69). Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.63 and 0.85, similar to those of the original KTQ version. Conclusions Results of validation study show that feasibility, validity, reliability and sensibility to change of the Spanish version of the KTQ are similar to those of the original version. PMID:14613566

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Overcoming Disparities in Live Kidney Donation in the US—Recommendations from a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, James R.; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Mandelbrot, Didier A.; Hays, Rebecca; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Despite its superior outcomes relative to chronic dialysis and deceased donor kidney transplantation, live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is less likely to occur in minorities, older adults, and poor patients than in those who are white, younger, and have higher household income. In addition, there is considerable geographic variability in LDKT rates. Concomitantly, in recent years, the rate of living kidney donation (LKD) has stopped increasing and is declining, after decades of consistent growth. Particularly noteworthy is the decline in LKD among black, younger, male, and lower-income adults. The Live Donor Community of Practice within the American Society of Transplantation, with financial support from 10 other organizations, held a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation in June 2014. The purpose of this meeting was to identify LKD best practices and knowledge gaps that might influence LDKT, with a focus on patient and donor education, evaluation efficiencies, disparities, and systemic barriers to LKD. In this article, we discuss trends in LDKT/LKD and emerging novel strategies for attenuating disparities, and we offer specific recommendations for future clinical practice, education, research, and policy from the Consensus Conference Workgroup focused on disparities. PMID:25883072

  6. Changing Attitudes Toward Influenza Vaccination in U.S. Kidney Transplant Programs Over the Past Decade

    PubMed Central

    Kadambi, Pradeep V.; Harland, Robert C.; Thistlethwaite, J. Richard; West, Bradford L.; Udani, Suneel; Poduval, Rajiv; Josephson, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Influenza infection in transplant recipients is often associated with significant morbidity. Surveys were conducted in 1999 and 2009 to find out if the influenza vaccination practices in the U.S. transplant programs had changed over the past 10 years. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In 1999, a survey of the 217 United Network for Organ Sharing-certified kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant centers in the U.S. was conducted regarding their influenza vaccination practice patterns. A decade later, a second similar survey of 239 transplant programs was carried out. Results: The 2009 respondents, compared with 1999, were more likely to recommend vaccination for kidney (94.5% versus 84.4%, P = 0.02) and kidney-pancreas recipients (76.8% versus 48.5%, P < 0.001), family members of transplant recipients (52.5% versus 21.0%, P < 0.001), and medical staff caring for transplant patients (79.6% versus 40.7%, P < 0.001). Physicians and other members of the transplant team were more likely to have been vaccinated in 2009 compared with 1999 (84.2% versus 62.3% of physicians, P < 0.001 and 91.2% versus 50.3% of nonphysicians, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests a greater adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza vaccination guidelines by U.S. transplant programs in vaccinating solid-organ transplant recipients, close family contacts, and healthcare workers. PMID:20595695

  7. Pancreatic Anastomosis Leak 15 Years after Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation from Late-Onset Allograft Cytomegalovirus Duodenal Ulcers Presenting with Gross Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Chung, Heath; Okado, Manami

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplantation. It can present with hematuria, the most common urological complication in the early post-simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplant period. In SPK transplantation, CMV infection usually occurs 1 month after transplantation. We report an instance of bladder-drained SPK transplant presenting with recurrent gross hematuria from CMV infected duodenal graft ulcers 15 years after preserved well-functioning grafts. Serum quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for CMV was negative. Postmortem duodenal graft staining for CMV was positive, and revealed the cause of the inciting ulcer. To our knowledge, our patient is the first reported case of very late onset invasive CMV disease causing duodenal graft ulcers 15 years after transplantation, as previously reported cases of posttransplant CMV disease occurred only as late as 18 months. In addition, the absence of correlation between CMV viremia and CMV-infected duodenal allograft in SPK transplant has not been reported. Our case demonstrates that CMV viral load is -unreliable to diagnose invasive CMV disease, and tissue biopsy should be obtained to avoid missed diagnosis causing high morbidity and mortality. PMID:24349888

  8. VITA-D: Cholecalciferol substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients: A randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the post-transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thiem, Ursula; Heinze, Georg; Segel, Rudolf; Perkmann, Thomas; Kainberger, Franz; Mühlbacher, Ferdinand; Hörl, Walter; Borchhardt, Kyra

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin D does not only regulate calcium homeostasis but also plays an important role as an immune modulator. It influences the immune system through the induction of immune shifts and regulatory cells resulting in immunologic tolerance. As such, vitamin D is thought to exert beneficial effects within the transplant setting, especially in kidney transplant recipients, considering the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in kidney transplant recipients. Methods/Design The VITA-D study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with two parallel groups including a total of 200 kidney transplant recipients, is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory and renoprotective effects of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) within the transplant setting. Kidney transplant recipients found to have vitamin D deficiency defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 < 50 nmol per liter will be randomly assigned to receive either oral cholecalciferol therapy or placebo and will be followed for one year. Cholecalciferol will be administered at a dose of 6800 International Units daily over a time period of one year. The objective is to evaluate the influence of vitamin D3 substitution in vitamin D deficient kidney transplant recipients on the post-transplant outcome. As a primary endpoint glomerular filtration rate calculated with the MDRD formula (modification of diet in renal disease) one year after kidney transplantation will be evaluated. Incidence of acute rejection episodes, and the number and severity of infections (analyzed by means of C-reactive protein) within the first year after transplantation will be monitored as well. As a secondary endpoint the influence of vitamin D3 on bone mineral density within the first year post-transplant will be assessed. Three DXA analyses will be performed, one within the first four weeks post-transplant, one five months and one twelve months after kidney transplantation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00752401 PMID

  9. Organ donation and pre-emptive kidney transplantation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that pre-emptive transplants have several clinical advantages. However, pre-emptive transplants raise a number of ethical issues. Pre-emptive transplants from living donors offer distinctly greater benefits than those from deceased donors and some pre-emptive transplantation programmes actively encourage living organ donations. Moreover, the offer of a pre-emptive transplant to a patient who is not yet on dialysis unquestionably penalises patients already on dialysis who may have been on the waiting list for a long time. Therefore preemptive transplants give rise to conflicts between justice and utility. Several factors should be considered: health conditions, clinical urgency, probability of imminent worsening of a patient's clinical condition, the future chances of finding a matching organ, and others. From the various values at stake, ethical issues are analysed in search of an acceptable synthesis. PMID:24045524

  10. Hypertension in a pediatric and adolescent population following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fennell, R S; Zalenski, R; Geary, D F; Iravani, A; Garin, E H; Pfaff, W W; Howard, R J; Brient, B W; Walker, D; Richard, G A

    1981-06-01

    The post-renal transplant courses of 53 children and adolescents were evaluated for the prevalence and the etiology of hypertension. The blood pressures were averaged over specific time periods following transplantation and converted to percentile ranks according to standards for age. The number of antihypertensives employed to control blood pressure was assessed. Factors such as sex, obesity, race, donor source, antigen match, steroid administration, rejection, recurrent glomerulonephritis, pre-transplant nephrectomy, renal function and proteinuria were assessed as to their importance in producing hypertension or normotension in the post-transplant period. The average blood pressure was well within acceptable range shortly after transplantation. The patients requiring antihypertensives to control blood pressure dropped by two years post transplant. Chronic rejection was by far the most important factor influencing average blood pressure and the need to employ antihypertensives. Alternate-day prednisone and good graft function were important in establishing the normotensive state. PMID:7042620

  11. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation—Recommendations from a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R.; Schold, Jesse D.; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation’s Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies. PMID:26002904

  12. Protection of the Transplant Kidney from Preservation Injury by Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Arcand, Steve; Lin, Han-Bin; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Sawicka, Jolanta; Banerjee, Tamalina; Luo, Yigang; Beck, Gavin R.; Luke, Patrick P.; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, play an important role in ischemic injury to the heart, yet it is not known if these MMPs are involved in the injury that occurs to the transplant kidney. We therefore studied the pharmacologic protection of transplant kidneys during machine cold perfusion. Methods Human kidney perfusates were analyzed for the presence of injury markers such as cytochrome c oxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, and neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), and MMP-2 and MMP-9 were measured. The effects of MMP inhibitors MMP-2 siRNA and doxycycline were studied in an animal model of donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD). Results Markers of injury were present in all analyzed perfusates, with higher levels seen in perfusates from human kidneys donated after controlled DCDD compared to brain death and in perfusate from kidneys with delayed graft function. When rat kidneys were perfused at 4°C for 22 hours with the addition of MMP inhibitors, this resulted in markedly reduced levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and analyzed injury markers. Conclusions Based on our study, MMPs are involved in preservation injury and the supplementation of preservation solution with MMP inhibitors is a potential novel strategy in protecting the transplant kidney from preservation injury. PMID:27327879

  13. Tragic Choices and Moral Compromise: The Ethics of Allocating Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmaster, Barry; Hooker, Cliff

    2013-01-01

    Context For almost a decade, the Kidney Transplantation Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing has been striving to revise its approach to allocating kidneys from deceased donors for transplantation. Two fundamental values, equality and efficiency, are central to distributing this scarce resource. The prevailing approach gives primacy to equality in the temporal form of first-come, first-served, whereas the motivation for a new approach is to redeem efficiency by increasing the length of survival of transplanted kidneys and their recipients. But decision making about a better way of allocating kidneys flounders because it is constrained by the amorphous notion of “balancing” values. Methods This article develops a more fitting, productive approach to resolving the conflict between equality and efficiency by embedding the notion of compromise in the analysis of a tragic choice provided by Guido Calabresi and Philip Bobbitt. For Calabresi and Bobbitt, the goals of public policy with respect to tragic choices are to limit tragedy and to deal with the irreducible minimum of tragedy in the least offensive way. Satisfying the value of efficiency limits tragedy, and satisfying the value of equality deals with the irreducible minimum of tragedy in the least offensive way. But both values cannot be completely satisfied simultaneously. Compromise is occasioned when not all the several obligations that exist in a situation can be met and when neglecting some obligations entirely in order to fulfill others entirely is improper. Compromise is amalgamated with the notion of a tragic choice and then used to assess proposals for revising the allocation of kidneys considered by the Kidney Transplantation Committee. Findings Compromise takes two forms in allocating kidneys: it occurs within particular approaches to allocating kidneys because neither equality nor efficiency can be fully satisfied, and it occurs over the course of sequential approaches to allocating

  14. A 25 year history of kidney transplantation at the Washington Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Light, J A

    1998-01-01

    The kidney and pancreas transplant programs at the Washington Hospital Center have been active participants in the evolution of transplantation over these past 25 years. Many things have come full cycle. Living donors are again becoming the dominant source of donor kidneys. The interest in non-heart beating donors has returned, which may expand the cadaver donor pool significantly. Pulsatile machine preservation of kidneys has resurfaced and is gaining popularity again. Notwithstanding these cycles, the dominant advance in the past 25 years has been the virtual elimination of early graft loss from acute rejection. We owe a great debt to all those who have perfected and made available to all of us more powerful and more specific immunosuppressive tools. For while tomorrow the algorithm for achieving graft acceptance may completely change, for today a successful transplant outcome depends entirely on the quality of immunosuppression, assuming the surgical procedure was also successful. PMID:10503094

  15. Diurnal blood pressure changes one year after kidney transplantation: relationship to allograft function, histology, and resistive index.

    PubMed

    Wadei, Hani M; Amer, Hatem; Taler, Sandra J; Cosio, Fernando G; Griffin, Matthew D; Grande, Joseph P; Larson, Timothy S; Schwab, Thomas R; Stegall, Mark D; Textor, Stephen C

    2007-05-01

    Loss of circadian BP change has been linked to target organ damage and accelerated kidney function loss in hypertensive patients with and without chronic kidney disease. Ambulatory BP-derived data from 119 consecutive kidney transplant recipients who presented for the first annual evaluation were examined in relation to allograft function, histology, and ultrasound findings. A total of 101 (85%) patients were receiving antihypertensive medications (median 2), and 85 (71%) achieved target awake average systolic BP (SBP) of <135 mmHg. A day-night change in SBP by 10% or more (dippers) was detected in 29 (24%). Dipping status was associated with younger recipient age, lack of diabetes, low chronic vascular score, and low resistive index. Nondippers and reverse dippers had lower GFR compared with dippers (P = 0.04). For every 10% nocturnal drop in SBP, GFR increased by 4.6 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (R = 0.3, P = 0.003). Nondippers and reverse dippers were equally common in recipients with normal histology and in those with pathologic findings on surveillance biopsy. On multivariate analysis, percentage of nocturnal fall in SBP and elevated resistive index independently correlated with GFR. This study indicates that lack of nocturnal fall in SBP is related to poor allograft function, high chronic vascular score, and high resistive index irrespective of allograft fibrosis. Further studies are needed to determine whether restoration of normal BP pattern will confer better allograft outcome.

  16. Kidney transplant access in the Southeastern United States: the need for a top-down transformation.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, T R

    2014-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and poverty are highly prevalent conditions in the Southeastern United States. The American Southeast also has some of the lowest attainments of health status among its constituents. Transplantation rates are particularly low in the Southeast compared with other regions of the United States. These low kidney transplantation rates in the Southeast likely reflect poor access to medical care. This disproportionate lack of access to medical care among ESRD patients in the Southeast reflects the convergence and interaction of socioeconomic and biologic forces at the patient level interacting with the financial and organizational structure of the health-care system. Improving kidney transplant access in the Southeast will take disruptive political, financial and health system changes whose scope transcends transplant centers and dialysis units.

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors and events in pancreas-kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Martins, L; Fonseca, I; Dias, L; Malheiro, J; Rocha, A; Azevedo, P; Silva, H; Almeida, R; Henriques, A C; Davide, J; Cabrita, A

    2013-04-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (CCVD) are major causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. Strict control of treatable risk factors that contribute to atherosclerosis is important to reduce the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and peripheral arterial disease. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) may significantly improve these risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied 103 SPKT from our center with both organs functioning for metabolic and hypertensive control; body mass index (BMI); immunosuppression; and CCVD events. The 53 females/50 males showed a mean age of 35 ± 6 years, diabetes for 24 ± 6 years, and on dialysis for 31 ± 23 months. The follow-up ranged from 6-142 months. Mean value of last creatinine clearance was 76 ± 24 mL/min, all 103 SPKT were insulin-independent with mean glycemia = 81 ± 10 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) = 5.3% ± 0.4%. All of them were under tacrolimus treatment; 9.7% also with sirolimus but 67% steroid-free. According to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel 3 criteria, 4 patients showed a fasting glucose > 100 mg/dL; only one, HbA1c > 5.6%. Hypertension was recorded in 38.5%; low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in 19.4%; hypertriglyceridemia in 7.8%; BMI > 30% in only 2 patients; 21.4% were prescribed statins. We registered cardiovascular events in 7 patients (6.8%). Patients with steroid treatment showed higher triglycerides (122 ± 53 vs 90 ± 36 mg/dL; P = .001) and more often tended to be hypertensive (41.2% vs 37.7%, P = .073) compared with those free of these drugs. Hypertension was associated with an higher BMI (24.1 ± 2.8 vs 22.3 ± 2.9 kg/m(2), P = .002). BMI > 25% was associated with higher total cholesterol (195 ± 47 vs 169 ± 28 mg/dL, P = .015) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (116 ± 40 vs 96 ± 27 mg/dL, P = .003). Among our SPKT the prevalences of CCVD and metabolic syndrome were low. Hypertension was

  18. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  19. Risk of de novo cancers after transplantation: results from a cohort of 7217 kidney transplant recipients, Italy 1997-2009.

    PubMed

    Piselli, Pierluca; Serraino, Diego; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Sandrini, Silvio; Piredda, Gian Benedetto; Scolari, Maria Piera; Rigotti, Paolo; Busnach, Ghil; Messa, Piergiorgio; Donati, Donato; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Maresca, Maria Cristina; Tisone, Giuseppe; Veroux, Massimiliano; Sparacino, Vito; Pisani, Francesco; Citterio, Franco

    2013-01-01

    To assess incidence and risk factors for de novo cancers (DNCs) after kidney transplant (KT), we carried out a cohort investigation in 15 Italian KT centres. Seven thousand two-hundred seventeen KT recipients (64.2% men), transplanted between 1997 and 2007 and followed-up until 2009, represented the study group. Person years (PY) were computed from 30 days after transplant to cancer diagnosis, death, return to dialysis or to study closure. The number of observed DNCs was compared to that expected in the general population of Italy through standardised incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). To identify risk factors, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed. Three-hundred ninety five DNCs were diagnosed during 39.598PYs, with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), particularly non-Hodgkin' lymphoma (NHL), lung, kidney and prostate as the most common types. The overall IR was 9.98/1.000PY, with a 1.7-fold augmented SIR (95% CI: 1.6-1.9). SIRs were particularly elevated for KS (135), lip (9.4), kidney carcinoma (4.9), NHL (4.5) and mesothelioma (4.2). KT recipients born in Southern Italy were at reduced risk of kidney cancer and solid tumors, though at a higher KS risk, than those born in Northern Italy. Use of mTOR inhibitors (mTORi) exerted, for all cancers combined, a 46% significantly reduced risk (95% CI: 0.4-0.7). Our study findings confirmed, in Italy, the increased risks for cancer following KT, and they also suggested a possible protective effect of mTORi in reducing the frequency of post transplant cancers.

  20. The relationship between serology of hepatitis E virus with liver and kidney function in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Zeraati, Abbas Ali; Nazemian, Fatemeh; Takalloo, Ladan; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Heidari, Elahe; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Although hepatitis E virus (HEV) is well known to cause acute hepatitis, there are reports showing that HEV may also be responsible for progression of acute to chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis in patients receiving organ transplantation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HEV in patients with kidney transplantation. In this study, 110 patients with kidney transplantation were recruited, and anti-HEV IgG, creatinine, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in the first, third and sixth months after renal transplantation were measured. The mean serum anti-HEV IgG titers in the study participants was 1.36 (range 0.23 to 6.3). Twenty-three patients were found to be seropositive for HEV Ab defined as anti-HEV IgG titer > 1.1. The difference in liver and renal function tests (creatinine, eGFR, AST, ALT and ALP) at different intervals was not significant between patients with HEV Ab titers higher and lower than 1.1 (p > 0.05). However, an inverse correlation was observed between HEV Ab and eGFR values in the first (p = 0.047, r = -0.21), third (p = 0.04, r = -0.20) and sixth (p = 0.04, r = -0.22) months after renal transplantation in patients with HEV Ab < 1.1 but not in the subgroup with HEV Ab > 1.1. Also, a significant correlation between age and HEV Ab levels was found in the entire study population (p = 0.001, r = 0.33). Our findings showed a high prevalence of seropositivity for anti-HEV IgG in patients receiving renal transplants. However, liver and renal functions were not found to be significantly different seropositive and seronegative patients by up to 6 months post-transplantation. PMID:27366144

  1. The relationship between serology of hepatitis E virus with liver and kidney function in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Zeraati, Abbas Ali; Nazemian, Fatemeh; Takalloo, Ladan; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Heidari, Elahe; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Although hepatitis E virus (HEV) is well known to cause acute hepatitis, there are reports showing that HEV may also be responsible for progression of acute to chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis in patients receiving organ transplantation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HEV in patients with kidney transplantation. In this study, 110 patients with kidney transplantation were recruited, and anti-HEV IgG, creatinine, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in the first, third and sixth months after renal transplantation were measured. The mean serum anti-HEV IgG titers in the study participants was 1.36 (range 0.23 to 6.3). Twenty-three patients were found to be seropositive for HEV Ab defined as anti-HEV IgG titer > 1.1. The difference in liver and renal function tests (creatinine, eGFR, AST, ALT and ALP) at different intervals was not significant between patients with HEV Ab titers higher and lower than 1.1 (p > 0.05). However, an inverse correlation was observed between HEV Ab and eGFR values in the first (p = 0.047, r = -0.21), third (p = 0.04, r = -0.20) and sixth (p = 0.04, r = -0.22) months after renal transplantation in patients with HEV Ab < 1.1 but not in the subgroup with HEV Ab > 1.1. Also, a significant correlation between age and HEV Ab levels was found in the entire study population (p = 0.001, r = 0.33). Our findings showed a high prevalence of seropositivity for anti-HEV IgG in patients receiving renal transplants. However, liver and renal functions were not found to be significantly different seropositive and seronegative patients by up to 6 months post-transplantation. PMID:27366144

  2. Accretion of biopsy specimens of vaginal adenosis from patients exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol, when transplanted to athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Pienkowski, M M; Mann, L C; Rosloniec, E F; Welsch, C W

    1979-03-01

    Vaginal adenosis biopsy specimens from 10 patients exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol were transplanted for 30 days into athymic (nude) mice. Almost all grafts were recovered, and they had morphologic features closely resembling those of the original biopsy specimens, i.e., cystic, complex, and simple occult glands covered mainly with an endocervical type of epithelium showing extensive squamous metaplasia. Autoradiographic analysis of these grafts after pulse administration of [3H]thymidine into the mice revealed extensive labeling of epithelial cells. These results imply that female athymic (nude) mice are compatible hosts for accretion of the human adenosis.

  3. The "House Calls" trial: a randomized controlled trial to reduce racial disparities in live donor kidney transplantation: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, James R; Pavlakis, Martha; Egbuna, Ogo; Paek, Matthew; Waterman, Amy D; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2012-07-01

    Despite a substantially lower rate of live donor kidney transplantation among Black Americans compared to White Americans, there are few systematic efforts to reduce this racial disparity. This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the comparative effectiveness of three different educational interventions for increasing live donor kidney transplantation in Black Americans. This trial is a single-site, urn-randomized controlled trial with a planned enrollment of 180 Black Americans awaiting kidney transplantation. Patients are randomized to receive transplant education in one of three education conditions: through group education at their homes (e.g., House Calls), or through group (Group-Based) or individual education (Individual Counseling) in the transplant center. The primary outcome of the trial is the occurrence of a live donor kidney transplant, with secondary outcomes including living donor inquiries and evaluations as well as changes in patient live donor kidney transplantation readiness, willingness, knowledge, and concerns. Sex, age, dialysis status, and quality of life are evaluated as moderating factors. Findings from this clinical trial have the potential to inform strategies for reducing racial disparities in live donor kidney transplantation. Similar trials have been developed recently to broaden the evaluation of House Calls as an innovative disparity-reducing intervention in kidney transplantation. PMID:22510472

  4. Comparison between doppler ultrasound resistive index, serum creatinine, and histopathologic changes in patients with kidney transplant dysfunction in early posttransplantation period: A single center study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal N; Patel, Nitin A; Gandhi, Shruti P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relationship between resistive index (RI) measured by Doppler ultrasound, serum creatinine (SCr), and histopathological changes on biopsy during kidney trans- plant dysfunction in early postoperative period, we studied 47 kidney transplant patients; 61% of the patients had acute transplant rejection, 19% had acute tubular necrosis, 4% had calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, 11% had normal morphology in biopsy, and 5% had changes compatible with pyelonephritis. None of the study patients had interstitial fibrosis or tubular atrophy on biopsy. We found that the sensitivity and specificity of RI in diagnosing transplant dysfunction was highly variable depending on the selected cutoff value. Sensitivity of RI decreased and its specificity increased with increasing the RI thresholds. Using an RI threshold of 0.7 resulted in a high sensitivity of 78% at a cost of very low specificity 40%, whereas using an RI threshold of 0.9 resulted in 100% specificity at a cost of very low sensitivity 16%. Acceptable specificity was only achieved at the expense of very low sensitivity, resulting in poor utility of RI as a screening tool for dysfunction. We found that there were no significant differences in the mean RI value between patients with and without biopsy-proven transplant dysfunction. However, we found a significant correlation between SCr value and RI of 0.383, P = 0.007.

  5. Comparison between doppler ultrasound resistive index, serum creatinine, and histopathologic changes in patients with kidney transplant dysfunction in early posttransplantation period: A single center study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal N; Patel, Nitin A; Gandhi, Shruti P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relationship between resistive index (RI) measured by Doppler ultrasound, serum creatinine (SCr), and histopathological changes on biopsy during kidney trans- plant dysfunction in early postoperative period, we studied 47 kidney transplant patients; 61% of the patients had acute transplant rejection, 19% had acute tubular necrosis, 4% had calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, 11% had normal morphology in biopsy, and 5% had changes compatible with pyelonephritis. None of the study patients had interstitial fibrosis or tubular atrophy on biopsy. We found that the sensitivity and specificity of RI in diagnosing transplant dysfunction was highly variable depending on the selected cutoff value. Sensitivity of RI decreased and its specificity increased with increasing the RI thresholds. Using an RI threshold of 0.7 resulted in a high sensitivity of 78% at a cost of very low specificity 40%, whereas using an RI threshold of 0.9 resulted in 100% specificity at a cost of very low sensitivity 16%. Acceptable specificity was only achieved at the expense of very low sensitivity, resulting in poor utility of RI as a screening tool for dysfunction. We found that there were no significant differences in the mean RI value between patients with and without biopsy-proven transplant dysfunction. However, we found a significant correlation between SCr value and RI of 0.383, P = 0.007. PMID:27215246

  6. Intrarenal abscess caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C Y; Chan, S Y; Yeung, C S; Kwok, P C; Chak, W L; Wu, T C; Chau, K F

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is important in solid organ transplant recipients, because it can jeopardize patient and graft survival. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are not rare in kidney transplant recipients. On the other hand, infections related to community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains are seldom reported in the literature. Herein, we report the first patient, to our knowledge, with CA-MRSA renal graft abscess who was successfully treated with drainage and parenteral antibiotics.

  7. Association of helicobacter pylori infection with serum magnesium in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Hafizi, Massoud; Mardani, Saeed; Borhani, Ali; Ahmadi, Ali; Nasri, Parto; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Few studies are available regarding the various promoting factors of H. pylori infection in kidney disease patients especially renal transplant individuals. Objectives: This study was therefore conducted to examine the association of serum magnesium with H. pylori infection among kidney transplant patients. This cross-sectional investigation was conducted on a group of stable kidney transplant patients. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis after an overnight fast, Also urea breath test (UBT) was conducted for patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 cases was enrolled to the study. Mean serum magnesium value of the patients was 1.98 ± 0.62 mg/dl. Serum magnesium level in positive H. pylori patients was more than negative H. pylori patients (p=0.0005). In this study population, there was no significant difference in serum intact PTH, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, albumin levels and body mass index (BMI) between males and females or H. pylori positive and H. pylori negative subjects (p>0.5). Conclusion: It is possible that, magnesium aggravates H. pylori infection in kidney transplant patients through the mechanisms like hemodialysis, which we had reported previously. However, more studies are necessary to prove the association of magnesium with H. pylori infection in renal transplant patients and finding the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:25610889

  8. Effect of Immigration Status on Outcomes in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    McEnhill, M E; Brennan, J L; Winnicki, E; Lee, M M; Tavakol, M; Posselt, A M; Stock, P G; Portale, A A

    2016-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for children with end-stage renal disease. For children with undocumented immigration status, access to kidney transplantation is limited, and data on transplant outcomes in this population are scarce. The goal of the present retrospective single-center study was to compare outcomes after kidney transplantation in undocumented children with those of US citizen children. Undocumented residency status was identified in 48 (17%) of 289 children who received a kidney transplant between 1998 and 2010. In undocumented recipients, graft survival at 1 and 5 years posttransplantation was similar, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate at 1 year was higher than that in recipients who were citizens. The risk of allograft failure was lower in undocumented recipients relative to that in citizens at 5 years posttransplantation, after adjustment for patient age, donor age, donor type, and HLA mismatch (p < 0.04). In contrast, nearly one in five undocumented recipients who reached 21 years of age lost their graft, primarily because they were unable to pay for immunosuppressive medications once their state-funded insurance had ended. These findings support the ongoing need for immigration policies for the undocumented that facilitate access to work-permits and employment-related insurance for this disadvantaged group.

  9. Relationship between Inpatient Hyperglycemia and Insulin Treatment after Kidney Transplantation and Future New Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, William C.; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E. Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L.; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C.; Reddy, Kunam S.; Moss, Adyr A.; Mekeel, Kristin L.; Mazur, Marek J.; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C.; Cook, Curtiss B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C ≥ 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. Results: The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT. PMID:20558559

  10. The Cost-Effectiveness of Using Payment to Increase Living Donor Kidneys for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Barnieh, Lianne; Gill, John S.; Klarenbach, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives For eligible candidates, transplantation is considered the optimal treatment compared with dialysis for patients with ESRD. The growing number of patients with ESRD requires new strategies to increase the pool of potential donors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using decision analysis modeling, this study compared a strategy of paying living kidney donors to waitlisted recipients on dialysis with the current organ donation system. In the base case estimate, this study assumed that the number of donors would increase by 5% with a payment of $10,000. Quality of life estimates, resource use, and costs (2010 Canadian dollars) were based on the best available published data. Results Compared with the current organ donation system, a strategy of increasing the number of kidneys for transplantation by 5% by paying living donors $10,000 has an incremental cost-savings of $340 and a gain of 0.11 quality-adjusted life years. Increasing the number of kidneys for transplantation by 10% and 20% would translate into incremental cost-savings of $1640 and $4030 and incremental quality-adjusted life years gain of 0.21 and 0.39, respectively. Conclusion Although the impact is uncertain, this model suggests that a strategy of paying living donors to increase the number of kidneys available for transplantation could be cost-effective, even with a transplant rate increase of only 5%. Future work needs to examine the feasibility, legal policy, ethics, and public perception of a strategy to pay living donors. PMID:24158797

  11. Association between serum resistin level and outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kristof; Ujszaszi, Akos; Czira, Maria E; Remport, Adam; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Mathe, Zoltan; Rhee, Connie M; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2016-03-01

    Resistin is an adipocytokine that is associated with inflammation, coronary artery disease, and other types of cardiovascular disease among patients with normal kidney function. However, little is known about the association of resistin with outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. We collected socio-demographic and clinical parameters, medical and transplant history, and laboratory data from 988 prevalent kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the Malnutrition-Inflammation in Transplant-Hungary Study (MINIT-HU study). Serum resistin levels were measured at baseline. Associations between serum resistin level and death with a functioning graft over a 6-year follow-up period were examined in unadjusted and adjusted models. The mean±SD age of the study population was 51 ± 13 years, among whom 57% were men and 21% were diabetics. Median serum resistin concentrations were significantly higher in patients who died with a functioning graft as compared to those who did not die during the follow-up period (median [IQR]: 22[15-26] vs. 19[14-22] ng/ml, respectively; P < 0.001). Higher serum resistin level was associated with higher mortality risk in both unadjusted and fully adjusted models: HRs (95% CI): 1.33(1.16-1.54) and 1.21(1.01-1.46), respectively. In prevalent kidney transplant recipients, serum resistin was an independent predictor of death with a functioning graft. PMID:26639524

  12. Oncologic issues and kidney transplantation: a review of frequency, mortality, and screening.

    PubMed

    Asch, William S; Bia, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for development of malignancy compared with the general population, and malignancies occur at an earlier age. This increased risk, as expressed by the standard incidence ratio (SIR), varies widely, but it is highest in malignancies triggered by oncogenic viruses. For other cancers, this increased risk is the direct consequence of immunosuppressants promoting tumor growth and lowering immune system tumor surveillance. In this review, we briefly discuss the common malignancies with increased risk after kidney transplantation, explore the pros and cons associated with screening, and summarize current prevention and treatment recommendations.

  13. Policy options for increasing the supply of transplantable kidneys in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jia Loon

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for eligible end-stage renal disease patients. However, the supply of donated kidneys has been consistently insufficient to meet the transplantation requirements of the population. In this paper, I discuss the feasibility of several policy options that engage potential donors or key individuals in a Singapore context, including financial and non-financial incentives for deceased/living organ donors and their families, improving actualisation rates of both donation after brain death, donation after cardiac death through quality improvement programmes and remuneration schemes, and a media platform for directed organ donation. I conclude by highlighting the most feasible policies to be considered. PMID:27779281

  14. [Prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies in chronic hemodialysis and kidney transplantation patients].

    PubMed

    Castillo, L; Díaz, P; Inostroza, J; Espinoza, R; Millaqueo, L; Calderara, M; Pinto, A; Behrens, C; Pereira, O

    1993-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus antibodies were measured in 26 chronic hemodialyzed patients and 43 kidney transplant recipients, using a second generation ELISA method. Fifty four percent of hemodialyzed had a longer duration of dialysis treatment compared with patients with negative antibodies (57.6 +/- 30.5 vs 15.4 +/- 7.3 months), and did not differ in the number of transfusions. Seven patients had elevated serum transaminase values, all with positive antibodies. Thirty five percent of kidney transplant recipients had positive antibodies. In these subjects, no relation was observed between the number of transfusions or length of dialysis treatment and the presence of positive hepatitis C antibodies. PMID:7514806

  15. Medical management of the kidney transplant recipient: a practical approach for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Fernando; Roth, David

    2014-12-01

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) commonly present with complex medical issues that are best managed jointly by both their primary care physician and the kidney transplant center. Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemias, and obesity are frequently present in the KTR population and the successful management of these comorbidities is essential in achieving excellent posttransplant outcomes. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in KTRs, and interventions that mitigate the risk factors that contribute to these adverse outcomes are an important part of the long-term management of a KTR.

  16. Quantitative and semi-quantitative histopathological examination of renal biopsies in healthy individuals, and associations with kidney function.

    PubMed

    Bar, Yael; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Wallin, Maria; Mölne, Johan

    2016-05-01

    This study assesed the prevalence of histopathological changes in renal biopsies from healthy individuals, and the association with age, sex and smoking. Donor biopsies from 109 subjects were obtained from living kidney donors, and blood and urine samples were collected together with medical history. All biopsies were scored according to the Banff '97 classification with some modifications. The parameters included in this study were tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, arteriolohyalinosis and a sclerosis score. An alternative scoring system for tubular atrophy was examined (using ≤5% rather than <1% as a cut-off for grade 0). Glomerular filtration rate was measured in most cases as chromium ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (Cr-EDTA) clearance. Age was a significant predictor for tubular atrophy, fibrosis and sclerosis. Pack-years of smoking increased the risk of tubular atrophy, fibrosis and arteriolohyalinosis. The alternative scoring of tubular atrophy showed a stronger association with smoking, but a weaker association with age, compared with the original one. Limited histopathological changes are common in healthy kidney donors around 50 years of age with normal kidney fun