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Sample records for kielmeyera cuspidata saddi

  1. Biological activities of extracts from Chenopodium ambrosioides Lineu and Kielmeyera neglecta Saddi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chenopodium ambrosioides and Kielmeyera neglecta are plants traditionally used in Brazil to treat various infectious diseases. The study of the biological activities of these plants is of great importance for the detection of biologically active compounds. Methods Extracts from these plants were extracted with hexane (Hex), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and ethanol (EtOH) and assessed for their antimicrobial properties, bioactivity against Artemia salina Leach and antifungal action on the cell wall of Neurospora crassa. Results Extracts from C. ambrosioides (Hex, DCM and EtOH) and K. neglecta (EtOAc and EtOH) showed high bioactivity against A. salina (LD50 < 1000 μg/mL), which might be associated with cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. C. ambrosioides Hex and DCM showed specific activity against yeasts, highlighting the activity of hexanic extract against Candida krusei (MIC = 100 μg/mL). By comparing the inhibitory concentration of 50% growth (IC 50%) with the growth control, extracts from K. neglecta EtOAc and EtOH have shown activities against multidrug-resistant bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 51299 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300), with IC 50% of 12.5 μg/mL The assay carried out on N. crassa allowed defining that extracts with antifungal activity do not have action through inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Conclusions Generally speaking, extracts from C. ambrosioides and K. neglecta showed biological activities that have made the search for bioactive substances in these plants more attractive, illustrating the success of their use in the Brazilian folk medicine. PMID:22839690

  2. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers for Japanese yew, Taxus cuspidata, and T. cuspidata var. nana (Taxaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Taxus cuspidata (Taxaceae), which is well known for the effective anticancer metabolite paclitaxel (e.g., taxol), is an evergreen needle-leaved tree widely distributed in eastern Eurasia including Japan. We developed 15 microsatellite markers from this species and confirmed their utility for the dwarf variety nana, which is common in alpine regions along the Sea of Japan. Methods and Results: Thirteen polymorphic loci were characterized for genetic variation in three populations of T. cuspidata. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 11 to 31, with an average of 18.5; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.78 to 0.95, with an average of 0.89. All loci were successfully amplified in T. cuspidata var. nana and showed high polymorphism. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for investigating speciation and range formation of T. cuspidata in Japan, and the results will provide crucial information for the conservation of Taxus species. PMID:27437172

  3. Triterpene Galloyl Esters from Edible Acorn of Castanopsis cuspidata.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Misaki; Saito, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Yosuke; Maeda, Hajime; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Polyphenols of edible acorns of Castanopsis cuspidata were examined and two triterpene galloyl esters were isolated. Based on two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic evidence the structures were determined to be 3,24-di-O-galloyl-2α,3β-23,24-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (1) and 3,24-di-O-galloyl- 2α,3β-23,24-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (2). The triterpene hexahydroxydiphenoyl esters, which had been found in the leaves, were not detected in the acorns.

  4. Antistaphylococcal Prenylated Acylphoroglucinol and Xanthones from Kielmeyera variabilis.

    PubMed

    Coqueiro, Aline; Choi, Young H; Verpoorte, Robert; Gupta, Karthick B S S; De Mieri, Maria; Hamburger, Matthias; Young, Maria C M; Stapleton, Paul; Gibbons, Simon; Bolzani, Vanderlan da S

    2016-03-25

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the EtOH extract of the branches of Kielmeyera variabilis led to the isolation of a new acylphoroglucinol (1), which was active against all the MRSA strains tested herein, with pronounced activity against strain EMRSA-16. Compound 1 displayed an MIC of 0.5 mg/L as compared with an MIC of 128 mg/L for the control antibiotic norfloxacin. The structure of the new compound was elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometry, and experimental and calculated ECD were used to determine the absolute configurations. The compounds β-sitosterol (2), stigmasterol (3), ergost-5-en-3-ol (4), and osajaxanthone (5) also occurred in the n-hexane fraction. The EtOAc fraction contained nine known xanthones: 3,6-dihydroxy-1,4,8-trimethoxyxanthone (6), 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxyxanthone (7), 3,4-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethoxyxanthone (8), 3,4-dihydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone (9), 5-hydroxy-1,3-dimethoxyxanthone (10), 4-hydroxy-2,3-dimethoxyxanthone (11), kielcorin (12), 3-hydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone (13), and 2-hydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone (14), which showed moderate to low activity against the tested MRSA strains. PMID:26900954

  5. Preliminary toxicity study of dichloromethane extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Obici, Simoni; Otobone, Fernanda Jacques; da Silva Sela, Vânia Ramos; Ishida, Kelly; da Silva, José Carlos; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Garcia Cortez, Diógenes Aparício; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. (Clusiaceae), known as "Pau Santo" or "Saco de Boi" in the central Brazilian plateau region, is used to treat several tropical diseases. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of dichloromethane (DcM) extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, administered to rodents. In the acute toxicity tests, mice receiving doses of this extract by the oral and intraperitoneal routes, showed reversible effects, with LD50 values of 1503.0 and 538.8 mg/kg, respectively. In the repeated-dose oral (90 days) toxicity tests, male and female Wistar rats were treated by gavage with different doses of DcM extract (5, 25 or 125 mg/kg). In biochemical and haematological evaluations, the results varied widely in respect to dose and sex, with no linear profile, and did not show clinical correlations. In the histopathological examinations, the groups exhibited some changes, but there were no significant differences between the groups compared to the controls. In conclusion, these investigations appeared to indicate the safety of acute and repeated oral administration of the DcM extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, which can therefore be continuously used with safety.

  6. Assessment of anxiolytic and panicolytic effects of dichloromethane fraction from stems of Kielmeyera coriacea.

    PubMed

    Biesdorf, C; Cortez, D A G; Audi, E A

    2012-02-15

    Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. (Calophyllaceae) is known popularly as "Pau Santo". The hydroethanolic extract (HE) of Kielmeyera coriacea stems and its semi-pure dichloromethane (DCM) constituent produced an antidepressant-like effect in rats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repeated administration (21 days) by gavage of the DCM fraction (5, 10 or 15mg/kg) in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM), a model of generalized anxiety and panic disorders. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (15mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Rat locomotion was assessed using the open field test (OFT) following each drug treatment. The 2-hydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone (1), aucuparin (2), swertinin (3), 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-xanthone (4) and 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-xanthone (5) were identified in DCM fraction, and suggest that the xanthone (4) is related with the antidepressant-like profile of this plant. Pharmacological evaluation showed that DCM fraction (10 and 15 mg/kg) decreased the inhibitory avoidance latency from the closed arm and increased the one-way escape latency from the open arm in the ETM, which is indicative of anxiolytic and panicolytic effects, respectively, as occurs with the positive control, imipramine (15 mg/kg), when compared to their control group (vehicle). Locomotor activity was not significantly altered by the different treatments. This study suggests that the DCM fraction from stems of Kielmeyera coriacea can be an important therapeutic alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety and panic disorders.

  7. A process optimization study on ultrasonic extraction of paclitaxel from Taxus cuspidata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujie; Li, Chun; Wang, Hujun; Zhong, Xiangmei; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the extraction rate of paclitaxel from Taxus cuspidata in order to determine the most effective combination of ultrasonic extraction and thin-layer chromatography-ultraviolet (TLC-UV) rapid separation method. The study was performed using the Box-Behnken test design to conduct single-factor experiments using ultrasonic extraction of paclitaxel from Taxus cuspidata. The study showed ethanol to be the best extraction solvent. When mixed with dichloromethane (1:1), the ratio of material to liquid was 1:50 when using an ultrasonic time of 1 hr at a power of 200 W. The correction coefficient K for the separation and detection of paclitaxel using the TLC-UV spectrophotometric method was 0.009152. Multifactor experiments determined the effect of the rate of liquid to material (X1), ultrasonic time (X2), and ultrasonic power (X3) on extraction using extraction volume as the dependent variable. Response surface analysis allowed a regression equation to be obtained, with the optimal conditions for extraction when the rate of liquid to material was 53.23 mL/g as an ultrasonic time of 1.11 hr and an ultrasonic power of 207.88 W. Using these parameters, the average amount of extracted paclitaxel was about 130.576 µg/g, which was significantly better than for other extraction methods. PMID:25830908

  8. Intra-specific genetic diversity in wild olives (Olea europaea ssp cuspidata) in Hormozgan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadi, Z; Samadi-Molayousefi, H; Sheidai, M

    2012-03-19

    Wild olive (O. europaea ssp cuspidata) plants grow in various regions of Iran and are expected to have considerable genetic diversity due to adaptation to the various environmental conditions. We examined the genetic diversity of four populations of wild olive growing in Hormozgan Province located in southern Iran by using 30 RAPDs and 10 ISSR markers. The mean value of polymorphism for RAPD loci was 73.71%, while the value for ISSR loci was 81.74%. The Keshar population had the highest value of intra-population polymorphism for both RAPD and ISSR loci (66.86 and 62.71%, respectively), while the Tudar population had the lowest values (20.35 and 28.81%, respectively). Similarly, the highest and lowest number of effective alleles, Shannon index and Nei's genetic diversity were also found for these two populations. The highest value of H(pop)/H(sp) within population genetic diversity for RAPD and ISSR loci was found for the Keshar population (H(pop) = 0.85 and H(sp) = 0.90). OPA04-750, OPA13-650 and OPA02-350 RAPD bands were specific for Tudar, Bondon and Keshar populations, respectively, while no specific ISSR bands were observed. Analysis of molecular variance as well as the pairwise F(ST) test showed significant differences for RAPD and ISSR markers among the populations. The NJ and UPGMA trees also separated the wild olive populations from each other, indicating their genetic distinctness. UPGMA clustering of the four wild olive populations placed the Tudar population far from the other populations; Keshar and Bokhoon population samples revealed more similarity and were grouped together. We conclude that there is high genetic diversity among O. europaea ssp cuspidata populations located in southern Iran. We also found RAPD and ISSR markers to be useful molecular tools to discriminate and evaluate genetic variations in wild olive trees.

  9. An abietane diterpene from Salvia cuspidata and some new derivatives are active against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Lozano, E S; Spina, R M; Tonn, C E; Sosa, M A; Cifuente, D A

    2015-12-01

    The Plant Kingdom is an excellent source for obtaining natural compounds with antiprotozoal activity. In the present work, we studied the effect of the diterpene 12-hydroxy-11,14-diketo-6,8,12-abietatrien-19,20-olide (HABTO) obtained from the aerial parts of Salvia cuspidata on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. This compound was found to inhibit parasite growth even at low concentrations (IC50 5 μg/mL) and with low toxicity on mammalian cells. In addition, this diterpene induced an intense vacuolization within the parasites. In order to obtain analogs with greater lipophilicity, chemical modifications on the enol moiety were carried out to obtain the acetyl (AABTO), the sylil (SABTO) and the allyl (ALLABTO) derivatives. We observed that the SABTO was the most effective one on the parasites, and the effect could be attributed to a greater lipophilicity of this compound. Taking into account these data we conclude that the increase of lipophilicity by chemical modifications is an adequate strategy for improving the trypanocidal activity of this kind abietane diterpenes.

  10. Expression of recombinant alpha and beta tubulins from the yew Taxus cuspidata and analysis of the microtubule assembly in the presence of taxol.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuma; Abe, Akihiro; Ito, Kumiko; Cho, Yuko; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Taxol was originally isolated from the yew Taxus brevifolia. Because taxol inhibits the depolymerization of microtubules, the presence of a self-resistance mechanism in Taxus spp. was hypothesized. The cloning of the cDNA for alpha and beta tubulins from Taxus cuspidata and those from the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T revealed that the (26)Asp, (359)Arg, and (361)Leu residues in the human beta tubulin, which are important for taxol binding, were replaced with Glu, Trp, and Met in the beta tubulin of T. cuspidata, respectively. The microtubule assembly of the recombinant alpha and beta tubulins was monitored turbidimetrically, and the results clearly demonstrated that the microtubule from T. cuspidata is less sensitive to taxol than that from HEK293T cells. The Taxus microtubule composed of the wild-type alpha tubulin and the beta tubulin with the E26D mutation restored the sensitivity to taxol. We thus postulated that the mutation identified in the beta tubulin of T. cuspidata plays a role in the self-resistance of this species against taxol.

  11. Antitumor Activity of Kielmeyera Coriacea Leaf Constituents in Experimental Melanoma, Tested in Vitro and in Vivo in Syngeneic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carlos Rogério; Matsuo, Alisson Leonardo; Massaoka, Mariana Hiromi; Girola, Natalia; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Rabaça, Aline Nogueira; Farias, Camyla Fernandes; Pereira, Felipe Valença; Matias, Natalia Silva; Silva, Luciana Pereira; Rodrigues, Elaine Guadelupe; Lago, João Henrique Guilardi; Travassos, Luiz Rodolpho; Silva, Regildo Márcio Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The antitumor activity of Kielmeyera coriacea (Clusiaceae), a medicinal plant used in the treatment of parasitic, as well as fungal and bacterial infections by the Brazilian Cerrado population, was investigated. Methods: A chloroform extract (CE) of K. coriacea was tested in the murine melanoma cell line (B16F10-Nex2) and a panel of human tumor cell lines. Tumor cell migration was determined by the wound-healing assay and the in vivo antitumor activity of CE was investigated in a melanoma cell metastatic model. 1H NMR and GC/MS were used to determine CE chemical composition. Results: We found that CE exhibited strong cytotoxic activity against murine melanoma cells and a panel of human tumor cell lines in vitro. CE also inhibited growth of B16F10-Nex2 cells at sub lethal concentrations, inducing cell cycle arrest at S phase, and inhibition of tumor cell migration. Most importantly, administration of CE significantly reduced the number of melanoma metastatic nodules in vivo. Chemical analysis of CE indicated the presence of the long chain fatty compounds, 1-eicosanol, 1-docosanol, and 2-nonadecanone as main constituents. Conclusion: These results indicate that K. coriacea is a promising medicinal plant in cancer therapy exhibiting antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo against different tumor cell lines. PMID:25364658

  12. Detection of Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata and Juniperus procera in the dry Afromontane forest of northern Ethiopia using subpixel analysis of Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishe, Hadgu; Giday, Kidane; Neka, Mulugeta; Soromessa, Teshome; Van Orshoven, Jos; Muys, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and less costly forest inventory approaches are required to monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of key species in forest ecosystems. Subpixel analysis using the earth resources data analysis system imagine subpixel classification procedure was tested to extract Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata and Juniperus procera canopies from Landsat 7 enhanced thematic mapper plus imagery. Control points with various canopy area fractions of the target species were collected to develop signatures for each of the species. With these signatures, the imagine subpixel classification procedure was run for each species independently. The subpixel process enabled the detection of O. europaea subsp. cuspidata and J. procera trees in pure and mixed pixels. Total of 100 pixels each were field verified for both species. An overall accuracy of 85% was achieved for O. europaea subsp. cuspidata and 89% for J. procera. A high overall accuracy level of detecting species at a natural forest was achieved, which encourages using the algorithm for future species monitoring activities. We recommend that the algorithm has to be validated in similar environment to enrich the knowledge on its capability to ensure its wider usage.

  13. Diagnosis and Repair of Negative Polarity Constructions in the Light of Symbolic Resonance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drenhaus, Heiner; beim Graben, Peter; Saddy, Douglas; Frisch, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    In a post hoc analysis, we investigate differences in event-related potentials of two studies (Drenhaus et al., 2004, to appear; Saddy et al., 2004) by using the symbolic resonance analysis (Beim Graben & Kurths, 2003). The studies under discussion, examined the failure to license a negative polarity item (NPI) in German: Saddy et al. (2004a)…

  14. Jasmonate-responsive expression of paclitaxel biosynthesis genes in Taxus cuspidata cultured cells is negatively regulated by the bHLH transcription factors TcJAMYC1, TcJAMYC2, and TcJAMYC4

    PubMed Central

    Lenka, Sangram K.; Nims, N. Ezekiel; Vongpaseuth, Kham; Boshar, Rosemary A.; Roberts, Susan C.; Walker, Elsbeth L.

    2015-01-01

    Taxus cell suspension culture is a sustainable technology for the industrial production of paclitaxel (Taxol®), a highly modified diterpene anti-cancer agent. The methyl jasmonate (MJ)-mediated paclitaxel biosynthetic pathway is not fully characterized, making metabolic engineering efforts difficult. Here, promoters of seven genes (TASY, T5αH, DBAT, DBBT, PAM, BAPT, and DBTNBT), encoding enzymes of the paclitaxel biosynthetic pathway were isolated and used to drive MJ-inducible expression of a GUS reporter construct in transiently transformed Taxus cells, showing that elicitation of paclitaxel production by MJ is regulated at least in part at the level of transcription. The paclitaxel biosynthetic pathway promoters contained a large number of E-box sites (CANNTG), similar to the binding sites for the key MJ-inducible transcription factor AtMYC2 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Three MJ-inducible MYC transcription factors similar to AtMYC2 (TcJAMYC1, TcJAMYC2, and TcJAMYC4) were identified in Taxus. Transcriptional regulation of paclitaxel biosynthetic pathway promoters by transient over expression of TcJAMYC transcription factors indicated a negative rather than positive regulatory role of TcJAMYCs on paclitaxel biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:25767476

  15. Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... year, domoic acid was also measured in razor clams collected on Washington State beaches. Since then, the ... multiseries California Mussel Rock crab Dungeness crab Razor clams Sand crab ( Emerita ) P. australis P. cuspidata Washington ...

  16. 78 FR 33300 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding and Proposed Endangered Listing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...: We, NMFS, have completed comprehensive status reviews under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of five... review on the remaining five species (Anoxypristis cuspidata; Pristis clavata; Pristis microdon; Pristis zijsron; and all non-listed population(s) of Pristis pectinata). During our status review, new...

  17. Populations of Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Its Parasitoids in Himalayan Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a biological control program against olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae Rossi, olives were collected in the Himalayan foothills (China, Nepal, India, and Pakistan) to discover new natural enemies. Wild olives, Olea europaea ssp. cuspidata (Wall ex. G. Don), were sparsely distributed and fly-infes...

  18. Populations of Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Its Parasitoids in Himalayan Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a biological control program against olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae Rossi, olives were collected in the Himalayan foothills (China, Nepal, India, and Pakistan) to discover new natural enemies. Wild olives, Olea europaea ssp. cuspidata (Wall ex. G. Don), were sparsely distributed and fly-infe...

  19. The Shannoniella sisters (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    Nihei, Silvio S; Andrade, Marcos R; Pape, Thomas; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Shannoniella cuspidata Townsend, 1939 is redescribed and S. setinervis sp. nov. (Brazil, State of Rio de Janeiro) is newly described as its putative sister taxon, thereby allowing for a strict definition of the genus Shannoniella Townsend, 1939 through explicit synapomorphies. An identification key is provided. PMID:27395483

  20. The Shannoniella sisters (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    Nihei, Silvio S; Andrade, Marcos R; Pape, Thomas; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Shannoniella cuspidata Townsend, 1939 is redescribed and S. setinervis sp. nov. (Brazil, State of Rio de Janeiro) is newly described as its putative sister taxon, thereby allowing for a strict definition of the genus Shannoniella Townsend, 1939 through explicit synapomorphies. An identification key is provided.

  1. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  2. Genetic Differentiation and Genetic Diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the Dominant Tree Species in Japanese Broadleaved Evergreen Forests, Revealed by Analysis of EST-Associated Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  3. Stimulation of adventitious rooting of Taxus species by thiamine.

    PubMed

    Chee, P P

    1995-10-01

    Results obtained from using root inducing compounds on Taxus species cuttings suggested that rooting could be significantly enhanced by the presence of thiamine. This observation was verified using a root inducing solution containing a set concentration of IBA (0.2%), NAA (0.1%), and supplemented with various concentrations of thiamine. The best rooting response for Taxus cuspidata stem cuttings was found using this solution supplemented with 0.08% thiamine. Rooted cuttings were easily established and developed into vigorous plants. In addition, Taxus brevifolia shoots obtained from tissue cultures via in vitro organogenesis also responded favorably to this 0.08% thiamine supplemented rooting solution. PMID:24186706

  4. Experimental investigation of submicron and ultrafine soot particle removal by tree leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hee-Jae; Yook, Se-Jin; Ahn, Kang-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Soot particles emitted from vehicles are one of the major sources of air pollution in urban areas. In this study, five kinds of trees were selected as Pinus densiflora, Taxus cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba, and the removal of submicron (<1 μm) and ultrafine (<0.1 μm) soot particles by tree leaves was quantitatively compared in terms of deposition velocity. Soot particles were produced by a diffusion flame burner using acetylene as the fuel. The sizes of monodisperse soot particles classified with the Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA) were 30, 55, 90, 150, 250, 400, and 600 nm. A deposition chamber was designed to simulate the omni-directional flow condition around the tree leaves. Deposition velocities onto the needle-leaf trees were higher than those onto the broadleaf trees. P. densiflora showed the greatest deposition velocity, followed by T. cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba. In addition, from the comparison of deposition velocity between two groups of Platanus occidentalis leaves, i.e. one group of leaves with front sides only and the other with back sides only, it was supposed in case of the broadleaf trees that the removal of airborne soot particles of submicron and ultrafine sizes could be affected by the surface roughness of tree leaves, i.e. the veins and other structures on the leaves.

  5. Water Hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laubach Dynamics and Succession in the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria (East Africa): Implications for Water Quality and Biodiversity Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Gichuki, John; Omondi, Reuben; Boera, Priscillar; Okorut, Tom; Matano, Ally Said; Jembe, Tsuma; Ofulla, Ayub

    2012-01-01

    This study, conducted in Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria, assessed ecological succession and dynamic status of water hyacinth. Results show that water hyacinth is the genesis of macrophyte succession. On establishment, water hyacinth mats are first invaded by native emergent macrophytes, Ipomoea aquatica Forsk., and Enydra fluctuans Lour., during early stages of succession. This is followed by hippo grass Vossia cuspidata (Roxb.) Griff. in mid- and late stages whose population peaks during climax stages of succession with concomitant decrease in water hyacinth biomass. Hippo grass depends on water hyacinth for buoyancy, anchorage, and nutrients. The study concludes that macrophyte succession alters aquatic biodiversity and that, since water hyacinth infestation and attendant succession are a symptom of broader watershed management and pollution problems, aquatic macrophyte control should include reduction of nutrient loads and implementing multifaceted approach that incorporates biological agents, mechanical/manual control with utilization of harvested weed for cottage industry by local communities. PMID:22619574

  6. Antiproliferative Constituents of Geopropolis from the Bee Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Franchin, Marcelo; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Ransom, Tanya; Beutler, John Albert

    2016-02-01

    Fractionation of geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris, guided by antiproliferative activity against two colon cancer cell lines (COLO205 and KM12), led to the isolation of two new cinnamic acid esters, mammea-type coumarins 5,7-dihydroxy-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-8-(4-cinnamoyl-3-methyl-1-oxobutyl)-4-propyl-coumarin (1) and 5,7-dihydroxy-6-(4-cinnamoyl-3-methyl-1-oxobutyl)-4-phenylcoumarin (2), along with five known coumarins, mammeigin (3), hydroxymammeigin (4), mammeisin (5), cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (6), and mammein (7), and the prenylated benzophenone ent-nemorosone (8). Among the isolated compounds, 5 and 7 showed the highest cell growth inhibition against COLO205 (GI50 9.7 and 10.7 µM, respectively) and KM12 (GI50 12.0 and 10.9 µM, respectively). The presence of these compounds suggests that plants of Clusiaceae family, especially the genera Kielmeyera and Clusia, are likely to be major sources of geopropolis produced by M. scutellaris.

  7. Evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra S; de Jesus, Aline M; dos Anjos, Charlene S; da Silva, Thanany B; Santos, Alan D C; de Jesus, Jemmyson R; Andrade, Moacir S; Sampaio, Tais S; Gomes, Wesley F; Alves, Péricles B; Carvalho, Adriana A; Pessoa, Claudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; Pinheiro, Maria L B; Prata, Ana Paula N; Blank, Arie F; Silva-Mann, Renata; Moraes, Valeria R S; Costa, Emmanoel V; Nogueira, Paulo Cesar L; Bezerra, Daniel P

    2012-09-01

    Plants are promising sources of new bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic potential of nine plants found in Brazil. The species studied were: Annona pickelii Diels (Annonaceae), Annona salzmannii A. DC. (Annonaceae), Guatteria blepharophylla Mart. (Annonaceae), Guatteria hispida (R. E. Fr.) Erkens & Maas (Annonaceae), Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae), Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae), Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae), Lippia gracilis Schauer (Verbenaceae), and Hyptis calida Mart. Ex Benth (Lamiaceae). Different types of extractions from several parts of plants resulted in 43 extracts. Their cytotoxicity was tested against HCT-8 (colon carcinoma), MDA-MB-435 (melanoma), SF-295 (glioblastoma), and HL-60 (promielocitic leukemia) human tumor cell lines, using the thiazolyl blue test (MTT) assay. The active extracts were those obtained from G. blepharophylla, G. hispida, J. curcas, K. rugosa, and L. gracilis. In addition, seven compounds isolated from the active extracts were tested; among them, β-pinene found in G. hispida and one coumarin isolated from K. rugora showed weak cytotoxic activity. In summary, this manuscript contributes to the understanding of the potentialities of Brazilian plants as sources of new anticancer drugs.

  8. Photosynthesis, growth, and decay traits in Sphagnum - a multispecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Fia; Granath, Gustaf; Rydin, Håkan

    2016-05-01

    Peat mosses (Sphagnum) largely govern carbon sequestration in Northern Hemisphere peatlands. We investigated functional traits related to growth and decomposition in Sphagnum species. We tested the importance of environment and phylogeny in driving species traits and investigated trade-offs among them. We selected 15 globally important Sphagnum species, representing four sections (subgenera) and a range of peatland habitats. We measured rates of photosynthesis and decomposition in standard laboratory conditions as measures of innate growth and decay potential, and related this to realized growth, production, and decomposition in their natural habitats. In general, we found support for a trade-off between measures of growth and decomposition. However, the relationships are not strong, with r ranging between 0.24 and 0.45 for different measures of growth versus decomposition. Using photosynthetic rate to predict decomposition in standard conditions yielded R (2) = 0.20. Habitat and section (phylogeny) affected the traits and the trade-offs. In a wet year, species from sections Cuspidata and Sphagnum had the highest production, but in a dry year, differences among species, sections, and habitats evened out. Cuspidata species in general produced easily decomposable litter, but their decay in the field was hampered, probably due to near-surface anoxia in their wet habitats. In a principal components analysis, PCA, photosynthetic capacity, production, and laboratory decomposition acted in the same direction. The species were imperfectly clustered according to vegetation type and phylogeny, so that some species clustered with others in the same section, whereas others clustered more clearly with others from similar vegetation types. Our study includes a wider range of species and habitats than previous trait analyses in Sphagnum and shows that while the previously described growth-decay trade-off exists, it is far from perfect. We therefore suggest that our species

  9. The cost of reinforcement: selection on flower color in allopatric populations of Phlox drummondii.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Robin; Rausher, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which increased reproductive isolation between incipient species evolves due to selection against maladaptive hybrids or costly hybrid mating. Reinforcement is predicted to create a pattern of greater prezygotic reproductive isolation in regions where the two species co-occur, sympatry, than in allopatry. Although most research on reinforcement focuses on understanding the evolutionary forces acting in sympatry, here we consider what prevents the alleles conferring greater reproductive isolation from spreading into allopatry. We investigate flower color divergence in the wildflower Phlox drummondii, which is caused by reinforcement in the regions sympatric with its congener Phlox cuspidata. Specifically, we performed common garden field experiments and pollinator observations to estimate selection acting on flower color variation in allopatry. We combine our estimates of maternal and paternal fitness using simulations and predict how flower color alleles migrating from sympatry will evolve in allopatry. Our results suggest that strong pollinator preference for the ancestral flower color in allopatry can maintain divergence between allopatric and sympatric populations.

  10. Microbiological Analyses of Traditional Alcoholic Beverage (Chhang) and its Starter (Balma) Prepared by Bhotiya Tribe of Uttarakhand, India.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Kailash N; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-03-01

    Present article depicts microbiology of starter (Balma) used in traditional solid-state fermentation of alcoholic beverage (Chhang) by Bhotiya tribe of Uttarakhand. It also highlights the importance of herbs in Balma preparation and kinetics of lactic acid and ethanol fermentation under Chhang preparation using Balma. Balma contains 214 × 10(6) cfu/g yeasts, 2.54 × 10(6) cfu/g lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and 1.4 × 10(6) cfu/g other mesophilic bacteria. ITS sequence analysis revealed a rich diversity of yeast comprising of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Saccharomycopsis malanga in Balma. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed Lactobacillus pentosus and Pediococcus pentosaceus among LAB, while amylolytic Bacillus subtilis and B. aerophilus among other bacteria in Balma. Based on the results, it is speculated that herbs such as Inula cuspidata, Micromeria biflora, Origanum vulgare, Rubus sp. and Thymus linearis used earlier by Bhotiya in Balma preparation contribute as a source of yeasts, LAB and amylolytic bacilli. Study also demonstrates that Bhotiya tribe is rational in preparation of starter as they have circumvented the need of plants by using previous year Balma as inoculum and possibility of deficient quality of Balma due to weak colonization of phyllosphere and rhizosphere microbiota. Results suggest that simultaneous saccharification and lactic acid-ethanol fermentation take place in traditional cereal based Chhang fermentation system of Bhotiya. PMID:26843694

  11. Unearthing microbial diversity of Taxus rhizosphere via MiSeq high-throughput amplicon sequencing and isolate characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Song, Si Meng; Mu, Jun; Hu, Wen Li; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2016-04-01

    The species variability and potential environmental functions of Taxus rhizosphere microbial community were studied by comparative analyses of 15 16S rRNA and 15 ITS MiSeq sequencing libraries from Taxus rhizospheres in subtropical and temperate regions of China, as well as by isolating laccase-producing strains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading strains. Total reads could be assigned to 2,141 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) belonging to 31 bacteria phyla and 2,904 OTUs of at least seven fungi phyla. The abundance of Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi was higher in T. cuspidata var. nana and T. × media rhizospheres than in T. mairei rhizosphere (NF), while Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, and unclassified bacteria were more abundant in the latter. Ascomycota and Zygomycota were predominant in NF, while two temperate Taxus rhizospheres had more unclassified fungi, Basidiomycota, and Chytridiomycota. The bacterial/fungal community richness and diversity were lower in NF than in other two. Three dye decolorizing fungal isolates were shown to be highly efficient in removing three classes of reactive dye, while two PAH-degrading fungi were able to degrade recalcitrant benzo[a]pyrene. The present studies extend the knowledge pedigree of the microbial diversity populating rhizospheres, and exemplify the method shift in research and development of resource plant rhizosphere.

  12. Taxane recovery from cells of taxus in micro- and hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durzan, D. J.; Ventimiglia, F.; Havel, L.

    Cell suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata produce taxanes that are released from the outer surface of cells into the culture medium as free and bound alkaloids. Paclitaxel (Taxol™), is an anti-cancer drug in short supply. It has a taxane ring derived from baccatin III and a C-13 phenylisoserine side-chain. This drug is produced over a wide range of gravitational forces. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to paclitaxel, baccatin III, and the C-13 phenylisoserine side chain were combined in multiple-labeling studies to localize taxanes and paclitaxel on cell surfaces or on particles released into the culture medium. Bioreactor vessel design altered the composition of taxanes recovered from cells in simulated microgravity. At 10 -2 and 2·10 -4.g, taxane recovery was reduced but biomass growth and percent paclitaxel was significantly increased. At 1 to 24·g, growth was reduced with a significant recovery of total taxanes with low percent paclitaxel. Bound paclitaxel was also localized in endonuclease-rich fragmenting nuclei of individual apoptotic cells. A model is presented comprising TCH (touch) genes encoding enzymes that modify taxane-bearing xylan residues in cell walls, the calcium-sensing of gravitational forces by the cytoplasm, and the predisposition of nuclei to apoptosis. This integrates the adaptive physiological and biochemical responses of drug-producing genomes with gravitational forces.

  13. A review of Pseudo-nitzschia, with special reference to the Skagerrak, North Atlantic, and adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasle, G. R.; Lange, C. B.; Syvertsen, E. E.

    1996-06-01

    The Pseudo-nitzschia flora of the Skagerrak, North Atlantic, and adjacent waters, comprising P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. seriata, P. fraudulenta, P. heimii, P. delicatissima, and P. pseudodelicatissima, has been examined. Except for P. australis, all Pseudo-nitzschia species shown to produce the toxin domoic acid are present in the area although an outbreak of amnesic shellfish poisoning has never been reported. For comparison of morphological and taxonomic characters, Pseudo-nitzschia seriata f. obtusa, P. australis, P. subfraudulenta, P. subpacifica, P. lineola, P. inflatula, and P. cuspidata have been included in this investigation. Fine details of band structure and poroid occlusions, previously ignored or unresolved, have proven to add to the morphological distinction between P. pungens and P. multiseries, P. seriata and P. fraudulenta, P. seriata and P. australis, and P. delicatissima and P. pseudodelicatissima. Additional information on the structure of the proximal mantle compared to that of the valve face has revealed similarities in most of the species but differences between P. pungens and P. multiseries. The species seasonal and long-term distributional patterns during the sampling period (October 1978 through September 1993) in the Skagerrak area are outlined. The greatest abundances of P. seriata, a cold-water species most likely restricted to the northern hemisphere, occurred in the spring, and those of the presumably cosmopolitan diatoms P. pungens, P. multiseries and P. pseudodelicatissima, in the autumn. Whereas P. multiseries seems to have decreased in abundance in the 1990s, P. pseudodelicatissima has apparently increased.

  14. Molecular characterization of Pseudo-nitzschia community structure and species ecology in a hydrographically complex estuarine system (Puget Sound, Washington, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katherine A.; Olson, Claire H.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Species within the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia coexist in coastal and estuarine waters globally and are difficult to distinguish by microscopy. Here, we describe a sensitive, high throughput PCR-based Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) approach to determine the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species within natural communities over space and time. The method was quantitatively validated using simplified mixtures of DNA or ITS1 standards from isolates of P. pungens, P. multiseries, and P. delicatissima. Relative abundance calculations based on ARISA profiles from these mixtures reflected input ratios, with minor deviations resulting from intraspecific variability. ARISA was used to identify and quantify at least eight species within Puget Sound and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington, USA: P. americana, P. australis/P. seriata, P. cuspidata, P. delicatissima, P. fraudulenta, P. fryxelliana, P. multiseries, and P. pungens; genotypes corresponding to P. pungens var. pungens and P. pungens var. cingulata were identified by environmental sequencing. The different species were significantly correlated with physical (temperature, salinity), biological (chlorophyll a fluorescence, oxygen), and/or chemical (ammonium, nutrient ratios) factors. The ability to determine shifts in the relative abundance of Pseudo-nitzschia species over spatial and temporal scales relevant to dispersion and selection facilitates dissection of the varied mechanisms driving vertical and horizontal species distribution patterns in hydrographically complex systems. PMID:27239082

  15. The nutritional value of indigenous fruits and vegetables in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Hoe, V B; Siong, K H

    1999-03-01

    The proximate composition including mineral and vitamin contents of 16 fruits and 46 vegetables (leaves, fruits, palm hearts and shoots) of indigenous origin in Sarawak are provided. Fruits like dabai (Canarium odontophyllum), kembayau (Dacryodes rostrata f. cuspidata), durian nyekak (Durio kutejensis) and durian kuning (Durio graveolens) are very nutritious with high values for energy, protein and potassium. Among the vegetables, the protein content of letup (Passiflora foetida), kepayang (Pangium edule) and tubu (Pycnarrhena tumetacta) is high, ranging from 6 to 7%. The range of nutrients among foods of indigenous origin are generally comparable with those of many cultivated species except for vitamin C, which is lower. Teh Kampung (Leucosyke capitellata) leaves are particularly high in magnesium (626 mg/100 g). Some of the indigenous vegetables contain antinutritional factors. Kepayang has very high levels of hydrogen cyanide (1834 µg/g on dry basis) but this poison can be completely evaporated by boiling. Indigenous fruits and vegetables which are pesticide residue free are important food sources for rural populations. Nutritious indigenous fruits and vegetables have the potential to be promoted for wider use, domestication and commercialization. PMID:24393732

  16. Taxane recovery from cells of Taxus in micro- and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durzan, D. J.; Ventimiglia, F.; Havel, L.

    1998-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidata produce taxanes that are released from the outer surface of cells into the culture medium as free and bound alkaloids. Paclitaxel (Taxol (TM)), is an anti-cancer drug in short supply. It has a taxane ring derived from baccatin III and a C-13 phenylisoserine side-chain. This drug is produced over a wide range of gravitational forces. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to paclitaxel, baccatin III, and the C-13 phenylisoserine side chain were combined in multiple-labeling studies to localize taxanes and paclitaxel on cell surfaces or on particles released into the culture medium. Bioreactor vessel design altered the composition of taxanes recovered from cells in simulated microgravity. At 10(-2) and 2x10(-4)g, taxane recovery was reduced but biomass growth and percent paclitaxel was significantly increased. At 1 to 24g, growth was reduced with a significant recovery of total taxanes with low percent paclitaxel. Bound paclitaxel was also localized in endonuclease-rich fragmenting nuclei of individual apoptotic cells. A model is presented comprising TCH (touch) genes encoding enzymes that modify taxane-bearing xylan residues in cell walls, the calcium-sensing of gravitational forces by the cytoplasm, and the predisposition of nuclei to apoptosis. This integrates the adaptive physiological and biochemical responses of drug-producing genomes with gravitational forces.

  17. Evaluation of French Guiana traditional antimalarial remedies.

    PubMed

    Bertani, S; Bourdy, G; Landau, I; Robinson, J C; Esterre, Ph; Deharo, E

    2005-04-01

    In order to evaluate the antimalarial potential of traditional remedies used in French Guiana, 35 remedies were prepared in their traditional form and screened for blood schizonticidal activity in vitro on Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine re4sistant strain (W2). Some of these extracts were screened in vivo against Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria. Ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test was also performed. Four remedies, widely used among the population as preventives, were able to inhibit more than 50% of the parasite growth in vivo at around 100 mg/kg: Irlbachia alata (Gentiananceae), Picrolemma pseudocoffea (Simaroubaceae), Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae), Tinospora crispa (Menispermaceae) and Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae). Five remedies displayed an IC50 in vitro < 10 microg/ml: Picrolemma pseudocoffea, Pseudoxandra cuspidata (Annonaceae) and Quassia amara leaves and stem, together with a multi-ingredient recipe. Two remedies were more active than a Cinchona preparation on the ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test: Picrolemma pseudocoffea and Quassia amara. We also showed that a traditional preventive remedy, made from Geissospermum argenteum bark macerated in rum, was able to impair the intrahepatic cycle of the parasite. For the first time, traditional remedies from French Guiana have been directly tested on malarial pharmacological assays and some have been shown to be active.

  18. Physiological basis of seasonal trend in leaf photosynthesis of five evergreen broad-leaved species in a temperate deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro

    2006-02-01

    The physiological basis of photosynthesis during winter was investigated in saplings of five evergreen broad-leaved species (Camellia japonica L., Cleyera japonica Thunb., Photinia glabra (Thunb.) Maxim., Castanopsis cuspidata (Thunb.) Schottky and Quercus glauca Thunb.) co-occurring under deciduous canopy trees in a temperate forest. We focused on temperature dependence of photosynthetic rate and capacity as important physiological parameters that determine light-saturated rates of net photosynthesis at low temperatures during winter. Under controlled temperature conditions, maximum rates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation and electron transport (Vcmax) and Jmax, respectively) increased exponentially with increasing leaf temperature. The temperature dependence of photosynthetic rate did not differ among species. In the field, photosynthetic capacity, determined as Vcmax and Jmax at a common temperature of 25 degrees C (Vcmax(25) and Jmax(25)), increased until autumn and then decreased in species-specific patterns. Values of Vcmax(25) and Jmax(25) differed among species during winter. There was a positive correlation of Vcmax(25) with area-based nitrogen concentration among leaves during winter in Camellia and Photinia. Interspecific differences in Vcmax(25) were responsible for interspecific differences in light-saturated rates of net photosynthesis during winter.

  19. Unearthing microbial diversity of Taxus rhizosphere via MiSeq high-throughput amplicon sequencing and isolate characterization

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Da Cheng; Song, Si Meng; Mu, Jun; Hu, Wen Li; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2016-01-01

    The species variability and potential environmental functions of Taxus rhizosphere microbial community were studied by comparative analyses of 15 16S rRNA and 15 ITS MiSeq sequencing libraries from Taxus rhizospheres in subtropical and temperate regions of China, as well as by isolating laccase-producing strains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading strains. Total reads could be assigned to 2,141 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) belonging to 31 bacteria phyla and 2,904 OTUs of at least seven fungi phyla. The abundance of Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi was higher in T. cuspidata var. nana and T. × media rhizospheres than in T. mairei rhizosphere (NF), while Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, and unclassified bacteria were more abundant in the latter. Ascomycota and Zygomycota were predominant in NF, while two temperate Taxus rhizospheres had more unclassified fungi, Basidiomycota, and Chytridiomycota. The bacterial/fungal community richness and diversity were lower in NF than in other two. Three dye decolorizing fungal isolates were shown to be highly efficient in removing three classes of reactive dye, while two PAH-degrading fungi were able to degrade recalcitrant benzo[a]pyrene. The present studies extend the knowledge pedigree of the microbial diversity populating rhizospheres, and exemplify the method shift in research and development of resource plant rhizosphere. PMID:27080869

  20. Evolution of genome size in Carex (Cyperaceae) in relation to chromosome number and genomic base composition

    PubMed Central

    Lipnerová, Ivana; Bureš, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Šmarda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Carex exhibits karyological peculiarities related to holocentrism, specifically extremely broad and almost continual variation in chromosome number. However, the effect of these peculiarities on the evolution of the genome (genome size, base composition) remains unknown. While in monocentrics, determining the arithmetic relationship between the chromosome numbers of related species is usually sufficient for the detection of particular modes of karyotype evolution (i.e. polyploidy and dysploidy), in holocentrics where chromosomal fission and fusion occur such detection requires knowledge of the DNA content. Methods The genome size and GC content were estimated in 157 taxa using flow cytometry. The exact chromosome numbers were known for 96 measured samples and were taken from the available literature for other taxa. All relationships were tested in a phylogenetic framework using the ITS tree of 105 species. Key Results The 1C genome size varied between 0·24 and 1·64 pg in Carex secalina and C. cuspidata, respectively. The genomic GC content varied from 34·8 % to 40·6 % from C. secalina to C. firma. Both genomic parameters were positively correlated. Seven polyploid and two potentially polyploid taxa were detected in the core Carex clade. A strong negative correlation between genome size and chromosome number was documented in non-polyploid taxa. Non-polyploid taxa of the core Carex clade exhibited a higher rate of genome-size evolution compared with the Vignea clade. Three dioecious taxa exhibited larger genomes, larger chromosomes, and a higher GC content than their hermaphrodite relatives. Conclusions Genomes of Carex are relatively small and very GC-poor compared with other angiosperms. We conclude that the evolution of genome and karyotype in Carex is promoted by frequent chromosomal fissions/fusions, rare polyploidy and common repetitive DNA proliferation/removal. PMID:23175591

  1. Species composition and bathymetric distribution of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) on the Southern Mexican Pacific coast.

    PubMed

    Abeytia, Rosalinda; Guzmán, Hector M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2013-09-01

    Gorgonians are important components of coastal ecosystems, as they provide niches, natural compounds with medical applications and are used as bioindicators. Species composition and assemblage structure of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) were studied along a bathymetric profile in the Southern Mexican Pacific coast. Species composition was based on specimens collected within a depth range of 0-70 m in 15 sites. The relative abundance of species was determined in six sites at four depths (5, 10, 20 and 25 m) using three 10 m2 transects at each depth level. Twenty-seven species of gorgonians belonging to six genera and three families were registered. The species composition varied with depth: 11 species were distributed between 0-25m depth, while 17 species were found between 40-70 m depth interval. The shallow zone is characterized by a relatively large abundance of gorgonians, dominated by colonies of Leptogorgia cuspidata and L. ena. In contrast, the deepest zone was characterized by relatively low abundance of gorgonians, dominated by L. alba, the only species observed in both depth intervals. The similarity analysis showed differences in the composition and abundance of species by depth and site, suggesting that the main factor in determining the assemblage structure is depth. Results of this study suggest that the highest richness of gorgonian species in the study area may be located at depths of 40-70 m, whereas the highest abundances are found between 5 and 10 m depth. This study represents a contribution to the poorly known eastern Pacific gorgonian biota.

  2. Seasonal fluctuations and temperature dependence of leaf gas exchange parameters of co-occurring evergreen and deciduous trees in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Yoshiko; Matsuo, Naoko

    2006-09-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in leaf gas exchange parameters were investigated in three evergreen (Quercus glauca Thunb., Cinnamomum camphora Sieb. and Castanopsis cuspidata Schottky) and one deciduous (Quercus serrata Thunb.) co-occurring, dominant tree species in a temperate broad-leaved forest. Dark respiration rate (Rn), maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and stomatal coefficient (m), the ratio of stomatal conductance to net assimilation rate after adjustment to the vapor pressure deficit and internal carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, were derived inversely from instantaneous field gas exchange data (one-point method). The normalized values of Rn and Vcmax at the reference temperature of 25 degrees C (Rn25, Vcmax25) and their temperature dependencies (Delta Ha(Rn), Delta Ha(Vcmax)) were analyzed. Parameter Vcmax25 ranged from 24.0-40.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and Delta Ha(Vcmax) ranged from 29.1- 67.0 kJ mol(-1). Parameter Rn25 ranged from 0.6-1.4 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and Delta Ha(Rn) ranged from 47.4-95.4 kJ mol(-1). The stomatal coefficient ranged from 7.2-8.2. For the three evergreen trees, a single set of Vcmax25 and Rn25 parameters and temperature dependence curves produced satisfactory estimates of carbon uptake throughout the year, except during the period of simultaneous leaf fall and leaf expansion, which occurs in April and May. In the deciduous oak, declines in Vcmax25 were observed after summer, along with changes in Vcmax25 and Rn25 during the leaf expansion period. In all species, variation in m during periods of leaf expansion and drought should be considered in modeling studies. We conclude that the changes in normalized gas exchange parameters during periods of leaf expansion and drought need to be considered when modeling carbon uptake of evergreen broad-leaved species.

  3. Phylogenetic or environmental control on the organo-chemical composition of Sphagnum mosses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limpens, Juul; Nilsson, Mats

    2014-05-01

    Decomposition of organic material is one of the key processes that determines the size of the soil-feedback to global warming, but it is also a process surrounded with one of the largest uncertainties, making understanding its mechanistic drivers of crucial importance. In organic soils decomposition is closely determined by the organo-chemical composition of the litter entering the soil. But what, in turn drives the organo-chemical composition? Is it an emergent feature of the environment the species producing the litter grow in, or is it an evolutionary trait that can be tracked through the species' phylogeny? We set out to answer this question for one of the most import peat-forming plants on earth: the genus Sphagnum. We sampled 18 Sphagnum species, about equally distributed over 6 sites spanning a wide range of environmental conditions: most species were collected at multiple sites. For all species we characterised the chemical composition, focussing on three functional chemistry groups: (i) mineral elements, (ii) carbohydrate polymers (iii) non-carbohydrate polymers (aromatic and aliphatic compounds) . For each group of compounds we used multivariate statistical techniques to derive the degree of variation explained by environment: (site, position within site) and phylogeny (sections within genus Sphagnum). We found that the variation in mineral element concentrations was mostly explained by environment, with the biggest differences in the concentrations of basic cat-ions calcium and magnesium. In contrast, the variation in carbohydrates was mostly explained by phylogeny, with clear associations between sections and monosaccharides. The monosaccharide rhamnose was associated with species from the Acutifolia section known for their poor degradability, whereas xylose and galactose were closely associated with degradable species from the Cuspidata section. The composition non-carbohydrate polymers took an intermediate position: both environment and phylogeny

  4. Ethnomedicinal study of plants used for human ailments in Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankober District has long been inhabited by people who have a long tradition of using medicinal plants to treat human ailments. Overexploitation of medicinal plants coupled with an ever-increasing population growth, deforestation and agricultural land expansion threatens plants in the area. Hence, this study aimed at documenting and analyzing the plant-based ethnomedicinal knowledge of the people in order to preserve the dwindling indigenous knowledge. Methods Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods. Quantitative approaches were used to determine Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) and Fidelity level (FL) values. Statistical tests were used to compare the indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants among different informant categories. Results A total of 135 medicinal plant species belonging to 128 genera and 71 botanical families were reported to treat human diseases in the District. Families Asteraceae (12 species, 9%) and Fabaceae (10, 7.4%) were found to be best represented in the area. About 44% of preparations were reported to be obtained from roots. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed on the mean number of medicinal plants reported by groups of respondents compared within age, literacy level and experience parameters. Highest ICF values were recorded for gastro-intestinal & parasitic and dermatological disease categories (0.70 each) indicating best agreement among informants knowledge on medicinal plants used to treat aliments in these categories. Highest fidelity level values were recorded for Zehneria scabra (95%) and Hagenia abyssinica (93.75%) showing conformity of knowledge on species of best healing potential. Podocarpus falcatus was ranked first in a direct matrix ranking exercise of multipurpose medicinal plants. The output of preference ranking exercise indicated that Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata was the most preferred species to

  5. Diversity and toxicity of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo in the Gulf of Maine, Northwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luciano F.; Hubbard, Katherine A.; Richlen, Mindy L.; Smith, Juliette; Bates, Stephen S.; Ehrman, James; Léger, Claude; Mafra, Luiz L.; Kulis, David; Quilliam, Michael; Libera, Katie; McCauley, Linda; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Multiple species in the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia have been identified in the Northwestern Atlantic region encompassing the Gulf of Maine (GOM), including the Bay of Fundy (BOF). To gain further knowledge of the taxonomic composition and toxicity of species in this region, Pseudo-nitzschia isolates (n=146) were cultured from samples collected during research cruises that provided broad spatial coverage across the GOM and the southern New England shelf, herein referred to as the GOM region, during 2007-2008. Isolates, and cells in field material collected at 28 stations, were identified using electron microscopy (EM). Eight species (P. americana, P. fraudulenta, P. subpacifica, P. heimii, P. pungens, P. seriata, P. delicatissima and P. turgidula), and a novel form, P. sp. GOM, were identified. Species identity was confirmed by sequencing the large subunit of the ribosomal rDNA (28S) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for six species (36 isolates). Phylogenetic analyses (including neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood estimates and ITS2 secondary structure analysis) and morphometric data supported the placement of P. sp. GOM in a novel clade that includes morphologically and genetically similar isolates from Australia and Spain and is genetically most similar to P. pseudodelicatissima and P. cuspidata. Seven species (46 isolates) were grown in nutrient-replete batch culture and aliquots consisting of cells and growth medium were screened by Biosense ASP ELISA to measure total domoic acid (DA) produced (intracellular+extracellular); P. americana and P. heimii were excluded from all toxin analyses as they did not persist in culture long enough for testing. All 46 isolates screened produced DA in culture and total DA varied among species (e.g., 0.04-320 ng ml-1 for P. pungens and P. sp. GOM isolates) and among isolates of the same species (e.g., 0.24-320 ng ml-1 for P. sp. GOM). The 15 most toxic isolates corresponded to

  6. Diversity and toxicity of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo in the Gulf of Maine, Northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luciano F; Hubbard, Katherine A; Richlen, Mindy L; Smith, Juliette; Bates, Stephen S; Ehrman, James; Léger, Claude; Mafra, Luiz L; Kulis, David; Quilliam, Michael; Libera, Katie; McCauley, Linda; Anderson, Donald M

    2014-05-01

    Multiple species in the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia have been identified in the Northwestern Atlantic region encompassing the Gulf of Maine (GOM), including the Bay of Fundy (BOF). To gain further knowledge of the taxonomic composition and toxicity of species in this region, Pseudo-nitzschia isolates (n=146) were isolated from samples collected during research cruises that provided broad spatial coverage across the GOM and the southern New England shelf, herein referred to as the GOM region, during 2007-2008. Isolates, and cells in field material collected at 38 stations, were identified using electron microscopy (EM). Eight species (P. americana, P. fraudulenta, P. subpacifica, P. heimii, P. pungens, P. seriata, P. delicatissima and P. turgidula), and a novel form, Pseudo-nitzschia sp. GOM, were identified. Species identity was confirmed by sequencing the large subunit of the ribosomal rDNA (28S) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for six species (36 isolates). Phylogenetic analyses (including neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood estimates and ITS2 secondary structure analysis) and morphometric data supported the placement of P. sp. GOM in a novel clade that includes morphologically and genetically similar isolates from Australia and Spain and is genetically most similar to P. pseudodelicatissima and P. cuspidata. Seven species (46 isolates) were grown in nutrient-replete batch culture and aliquots consisting of cells and growth medium were screened by Biosense ASP ELISA to measure total domoic acid (DA) produced (intracellular + extracellular); P. americana and P. heimii were excluded from all toxin analyses as they did not persist in culture long enough for testing. All 46 isolates screened produced DA in culture and total DA varied among species (e.g., 0.04 to 320 ng ml(-1) for P. pungens and P. sp. GOM isolates, respectively) and among isolates of the same species (e.g., 0.24 - 320 ng ml(-1) for P. sp. GOM). The

  7. Diversity and toxicity of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo in the Gulf of Maine, Northwestern Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luciano F.; Hubbard, Katherine A.; Richlen, Mindy L.; Smith, Juliette; Bates, Stephen S.; Ehrman, James; Léger, Claude; Mafra, Luiz L.; Kulis, David; Quilliam, Michael; Libera, Katie; McCauley, Linda; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple species in the toxic marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia have been identified in the Northwestern Atlantic region encompassing the Gulf of Maine (GOM), including the Bay of Fundy (BOF). To gain further knowledge of the taxonomic composition and toxicity of species in this region, Pseudo-nitzschia isolates (n=146) were isolated from samples collected during research cruises that provided broad spatial coverage across the GOM and the southern New England shelf, herein referred to as the GOM region, during 2007-2008. Isolates, and cells in field material collected at 38 stations, were identified using electron microscopy (EM). Eight species (P. americana, P. fraudulenta, P. subpacifica, P. heimii, P. pungens, P. seriata, P. delicatissima and P. turgidula), and a novel form, Pseudo-nitzschia sp. GOM, were identified. Species identity was confirmed by sequencing the large subunit of the ribosomal rDNA (28S) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for six species (36 isolates). Phylogenetic analyses (including neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood estimates and ITS2 secondary structure analysis) and morphometric data supported the placement of P. sp. GOM in a novel clade that includes morphologically and genetically similar isolates from Australia and Spain and is genetically most similar to P. pseudodelicatissima and P. cuspidata. Seven species (46 isolates) were grown in nutrient-replete batch culture and aliquots consisting of cells and growth medium were screened by Biosense ASP ELISA to measure total domoic acid (DA) produced (intracellular + extracellular); P. americana and P. heimii were excluded from all toxin analyses as they did not persist in culture long enough for testing. All 46 isolates screened produced DA in culture and total DA varied among species (e.g., 0.04 to 320 ng ml-1 for P. pungens and P. sp. GOM isolates, respectively) and among isolates of the same species (e.g., 0.24 – 320 ng ml-1 for P. sp. GOM). The 15