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Sample records for killer cell infusion

  1. Aspergillus fumigatus contamination of lymphokine-activated killer cells infused into cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arnow, P M; Houchins, S G; Richards, J M; Chudy, R

    1991-05-01

    Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, prepared by incubating autologous lymphocytes in cell culture medium with interleukin-2, selectively lyse tumor cells and are effective immunotherapy of some cancers. During a 3-month period, two patients at our center were infused with LAK cells subsequently found to have been contaminated by Aspergillus fumigatus. Each case was investigated by obtaining environmental cultures and assessing aseptic practices during LAK cell preparation. Investigation of the first case demonstrated a malfunction of the laminar air flow hood, under which interleukin-2 and the patient's lymphocytes had been added to cell culture medium, and showed heavy A. fumigatus contamination of the hood, adjacent countertop, and cell culture incubator. Despite repair of the laminar air flow hood and cleaning of the laboratory, a second case occurred, and cultures at that time implicated the humidified cell culture incubators as the source of A. fumigatus. Following incubator sterilization and removal of the humidification apparatus from the incubators, weekly environmental cultures in the LAK cell laboratory were negative, and none of the LAK cell cultures from the 20 patients treated during the ensuing 15 months grew A. fumigatus. Our findings show that growth of fungi in humidified incubators, which previously has caused contamination problems in tissue culture and clinical microbiology laboratories, can result in patient infections when humidified incubators are used to prepare cells for reinfusion.

  2. Aspergillus fumigatus contamination of lymphokine-activated killer cells infused into cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Arnow, P M; Houchins, S G; Richards, J M; Chudy, R

    1991-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, prepared by incubating autologous lymphocytes in cell culture medium with interleukin-2, selectively lyse tumor cells and are effective immunotherapy of some cancers. During a 3-month period, two patients at our center were infused with LAK cells subsequently found to have been contaminated by Aspergillus fumigatus. Each case was investigated by obtaining environmental cultures and assessing aseptic practices during LAK cell preparation. Investigation of the first case demonstrated a malfunction of the laminar air flow hood, under which interleukin-2 and the patient's lymphocytes had been added to cell culture medium, and showed heavy A. fumigatus contamination of the hood, adjacent countertop, and cell culture incubator. Despite repair of the laminar air flow hood and cleaning of the laboratory, a second case occurred, and cultures at that time implicated the humidified cell culture incubators as the source of A. fumigatus. Following incubator sterilization and removal of the humidification apparatus from the incubators, weekly environmental cultures in the LAK cell laboratory were negative, and none of the LAK cell cultures from the 20 patients treated during the ensuing 15 months grew A. fumigatus. Our findings show that growth of fungi in humidified incubators, which previously has caused contamination problems in tissue culture and clinical microbiology laboratories, can result in patient infections when humidified incubators are used to prepare cells for reinfusion. PMID:2056038

  3. NATURAL KILLER CELL ENRICHED DONOR LYMPHOCYTE INFUSIONS FROM A 3-6/6 HLA MATCHED FAMILY MEMBER FOLLOWING NON-MYELOABLATIVE ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Rizzieri, David A.; Storms, Robert; Chen, Dong-Feng; Long, Gwynn; Yang, Yiping; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Gasparetto, Cristina; Horwitz, Mitchell; Chute, John; Sullivan, Keith; Hennig, Therese; Misra, Debashish; Apple, Christine; Baker, Megan; Morris, Ashley; Green, Patrick G.; Hasselblad, Vic; Chao, Nelson J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Infusing Natural Killer (NK) cells following transplantation may allow less infections and relapse with little risk of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD). We delivered 51 total NK cell enriched donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) to 30 patients following a 3-6/6 HLA matched T cell depleted nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplant. The primary endpoint of this study was feasibility and safety. Methods Eight weeks following transplantation, donor NK cell enriched DLIs were processed using a CD56+ selecting column (@Miltenyi) with up to 3 fresh infusions allowed. Toxicity, relapse and survival were monitored. T cell phenotype, NK cell functional recovery, and KIR typing were assessed for association with outcomes. Results Fourteen matched and sixteen mismatched transplanted patients received a total of 51 NK cell enriched DLIs. Selection resulted in 96% (standard deviation (SD) 8%) purity and 83% (SD 21%) yield in the matched setting and 97% (SD 3%) purity and 77% (SD 24%) yield in the mismatched setting. The median number of CD3− CD56+ NK cells infused was 10.6 (SD 7.91) × 10e6 cells/kg and 9.21 (SD 5.6) × 10e6 cells/kg respectively. The median number of contaminating CD3+CD56− T cells infused was .53 (1.1) × 10e6 and .27 (.78) × 10e6 in the matched and mismatched setting respectively. Only 1 patient each in the matched (n=14) or mismatched (n=16) setting experienced severe aGVHD with little other toxicity attributable to the infusions. Long term responders with multiple NK cell enriched infusions and improved T cell phenotypic recovery had improved duration of responses (p=.0045) and overall survival (p=.0058). Conclusions A one step, high yield process is feasible and results in high doses of NK cells infused with little toxicity. NK cell enriched DLIs result in improved immune recovery and outcomes for some. Future studies must assess whether the improved outcomes are the direct result of the high doses and improved NK cell function or other

  4. Phase II Study of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Infusion for Treatment of Relapsed or Persistent Myeloid Malignancies Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Brian C; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoit; Forlenza, Christopher; Jakubowski, Ann A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Young, James W; Hsu, Katharine C

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study to determine the efficacy of HLA-haploidentical related donor natural killer (NK) cells after cyclophosphamide-based lymphodepletion in patients with relapsed or progressive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eight patients (2 with MDS and 6 with AML) were treated with cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg on day -3 and day -2 before infusion of NK cells isolated from a haploidentical related donor. One patient also received fludarabine 25 mg/m2/day for 4 days. Six doses of 1 million units of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were administered on alternating days beginning on day -1. The median number of NK cells infused was 10.6 × 10(6)/kg (range, 4.3 to 22.4 × 10(6)/kg), and the median number of CD3 cells infused was 2.1 × 10(3)/kg (range, 1.9 to 40 × 10(3)/kg). NK infusions were well tolerated, with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 19 days (range, 7 days to not achieved) and no incidence of graft-versus-host disease after NK infusion. One patient with AML and 1 patient with MDS achieved a complete response, but relapsed at 1.7 and 1.8 months, respectively. One patient with MDS experienced resolution of dysplastic features but persistence of clonal karyotype abnormalities; this patient was stable at 65 months after NK cell therapy. The median duration of survival was 12.9 months (range, 0.8 to 65.3 months). Chimerism analysis of CD3(-)/CD56(+) peripheral blood cells did not detect any circulating haploidentical NK cells after infusion. NK phenotyping was performed in 7 patients during and after IL-2 infusion. We found a slight trend toward greater expression of KIR2DL2/2DL3/2DS2 (5% versus 28%; P = .03) at 14 days in patients who survived longer than 6 months from NK cell infusion (n = 4) compared with those who died within 6 months of NK cell therapy (n = 3). In summary, our data support the safety of haploidentical NK cell infusion after allogeneic HCT.

  5. Killer cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Tin; Tipping, Peter; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alex

    2017-05-05

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (killer cells) play a critical role in host defence mechanisms, protecting against infections and in tumour surveillance. They can also exert detrimental effects in chronic inflammatory disorders and in autoimmune diseases. Tissue cell death and necrosis are prominent features of advanced atherosclerotic lesions including vulnerable/unstable lesions which are largely responsible for most heart attacks and strokes. Evidence for accumulation of killer cells in both human and mouse lesions together with their cytotoxic potential strongly suggest that these cells contribute to cell death and necrosis in lesions leading to vulnerable plaque development and potentially plaque rupture. Killer cells can be divided into two groups, adaptive and innate immune cells depending on whether they require antigen presentation for activation. Activated killer cells detect damaged or stressed cells and kill by cytotoxic mechanisms that include perforin, granzymes, TRAIL or FasL and in some cases TNF-α. In this review, we examine current knowledge on killer cells in atherosclerosis, including CD8 T cells, CD28- CD4 T cells, natural killer cells and γδ-T cells, mechanisms responsible for their activation, their migration to developing lesions and effector functions. We also discuss pharmacological strategies to prevent their deleterious vascular effects by preventing/limiting their cytotoxic effects within atherosclerotic lesions as well as potential immunomodulatory therapies that might better target lesion-resident killer cells, to minimise any compromise of the immune system, which could result in increased susceptibility to infections and reductions in tumour surveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alloreactivity and anti-tumor activity segregate within two distinct subsets of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells: implications for their infusion across major HLA barriers.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, Dario; Martinuzzi, Emanuela; Todorovic, Maja; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Vallario, Antonella; Jordaney, Noela; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Capaldi, Antonio; Geuna, Massimo; Casorzo, Laura; Nash, Richard A; Aglietta, Massimo; Cignetti, Alessandro

    2008-07-01

    Donor-derived cytokine-induced killer (CIK) can be infused as adoptive immunotherapy after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Promising results were recently reported in HLA-identical HCT, where mild grafts versus host (GVH) events were observed. To extend this strategy across major HLA barriers (e.g. HLA-haploidentical HCT), further studies on CIK cells' alloreactivity are needed. We hypothesized that alloreactivity and anti-tumor activity of CIK cells segregate within two different cell subsets and could consequently be separated according to CD56 and CD3 expression. We tested CIK cells expanded from seven patients who underwent HCT as treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. We found that CIK cells maintained their alloreactivity across major HLA barriers when tested as bulk population; after CD56-positive selection, anti-tumor activity was restricted to the CD3+/CD56+ cell fraction and alloreactivity versus HLA-mismatched PBMC was restricted to the CD3+/CD56- cell fraction. Bulk CIK cells from engrafted patients did not exhibit alloreactivity in response to host- or donor-derived PBMC, confirming their low potential for GVH across minor HLA barriers. Moreover, we tested if CIK cells expanded from engrafted patients after HCT were as effective as donor-derived ones and could be considered as an alternative option. The expansion rate and tumor cell killing was comparable to that observed in sibling donors. In conclusion, depletion of CD3+/CD56- cells might reduce the risk of GVH without affecting the tumor-killing capacity and could help extending CIK infusions across major HLA barriers. Engrafted patients after HCT could also be considered as an effective alternative option to donor-derived CIK cells.

  7. Natural Killer Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Timothy E.; Sun, Joseph C.; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner, and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity, and can acquire immunological memory in a similar manner to T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence for NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes. PMID:26488815

  8. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  9. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  10. Immunobiology of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book combines research from many disciplines into a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volumes include: Volume I: Assays for NK Cell Cytotoxicity; Their Values and Pitfalls. Separation and Characterization of Phenotypically Distinct Subsets of NK Cells. Ultrastructure and Cytochemistry of the Human Large Granular Lymphocytes. Phylogeny and Ontogeny of NK Cells. Tissue and Organ distribution of NK Cells. Genetic Control of NK Cell Activity in Rodents. Phenotype, Functional Heterogeneity, and Lineage of Natural Killer Cells. Target Cell Structures, Recognition Sites, and the Mechanism of NK Cytotoxicity. Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors (NKCF) Role in Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity. Characteristics of Cultured NK Cells. Lectin-Dependent Killer Cells. MLC-Induced Cytotoxicity as a Model for the Development and Regulation of NK Cytotoxicity. LGL Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Man and Experimental Animals: The Characteristics of These Cells and Their Potential Experimental Uses. Index.

  11. Efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell infusion as an adjuvant immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ruili; Yang, Bo; Chi, Xiaohua; Cai, Lili; Liu, Cui; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xueyan; He, Peifeng; Lu, Xuechun

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell-based immunotherapy as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Published studies were identified by searching Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases with the keywords: cytokine-induced killer cell, hepatocellular carcinoma, and immunotherapy. The outcomes of interest were overall survival, progression-free survival, and disease-free survival. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs), six prospective studies, and three retrospective studies were included. The overall analysis revealed that patients in the CIK cell-treatment group had a higher survival rate (pooled hazard ratio (HR) =0.594, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.501–0.703, P<0.001). Patients treated with CIK cells in non-RCTs had a higher progression-free survival rate (pooled HR =0.613, 95% CI =0.510–0.738, P<0.001). However, CIK cell-treated patients in RCTs had progression-free survival rates similar to those of the control group (pooled HR =0.700, 95% CI =0.452–1.084, P=0.110). The comparison between pooled results of RCTs and non-RCTs regarding the progression-free survival rate did not reach statistical significance. Patients in the CIK cell-treatment group had lower rates of relapse in RCTs (pooled HR =0.635, 95% CI =0.514–0.784, P<0.001). Similar results were found when non-RCT and RCTs were pooled (pooled HR =0.623, 95% CI =0.516–0.752, P<0.001). Adjuvant CIK cell-based immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach that can improve overall survival and reduce recurrence in patients with HCC. PMID:28360510

  12. Natural killer cells: remembrances of things past.

    PubMed

    Raulet, David H

    2009-04-14

    Recent work has revealed that natural killer cells exhibit a form of memory, previously considered an exclusive property of adaptive immunity. While protective, natural killer cell memory is probably hazier and more fleeting than T cell memory.

  13. Natural killer cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish

    2009-01-01

    A 42-year-old white woman, who was a general practitioner referral to the medical team, presented with a 3-day history of left upper quadrant pain; an urgent private ultrasound scan had showed splenomegaly. She was initially admitted with sepsis without an obvious cause but with a differential diagnosis of a haematological malignancy. Her admission blood tests showed a mildly reduced white cell count and low platelets. Her symptoms progressed and she developed right upper quadrant pain. Her blood counts deteriorated showing a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) picture and mildly deranged liver function tests. Blood films were non-diagnostic. A CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis showed splenomegaly and also hepatomegaly and ascites, not seen in her initial ultrasound scan. Multiple cultures of blood/urine/ascites and infective serology were unremarkable.She was transferred to a larger tertiary centre under the care of the surgeons with presumed abdominal sepsis and underwent an open laparotomy, which showed a big firm liver and spleen but no obvious cause for sepsis. The infectious disease team were unable to find a cause, and haematology became involved to investigate the possibility of a haematological malignancy. The patient underwent two bone marrow biopsies, a percutaneous liver biopsy and had flow cytometry of her ascitic fluid, which revealed the diagnosis of a natural killer cell leukaemia. After some slight improvement on steroids, the patient was given cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, rituximab (CHOP-R) chemotherapy. The patient had an initial response to chemotherapy, with reduction in ascitic volume and hepatosplenomegaly, and normalisation of her coagulation. This was accompanied by an overall improvement in her physical condition. She had a second cycle of CHOP-R, but unfortunately approximately 2 weeks after that, she deteriorated rapidly. She was too weak for salvage chemotherapy, so she was put on comfort care. She died

  14. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  15. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  16. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  17. Natural Killer Cells: Remembrances of things past

    PubMed Central

    Raulet, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exhibit a form of memory, previously considered an exclusive property of adaptive immunity. While protective, NK memory is probably hazier and more fleeting than T cell memory. PMID:19368874

  18. Human natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of human natural killer (NK) cell development lags far behind that of human B- or T-cell development. Much of our recent knowledge of this incomplete picture comes from experimental animal models that have aided in identifying fundamental in vivo processes, including those controlling NK cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and the generation of a diverse NK cell repertoire. However, it has been difficult to fully understand the mechanistic details of NK cell development in humans, primarily because the in vivo cellular intermediates and microenvironments of this developmental pathway have remained elusive. Although there is general consensus that NK cell development occurs primarily within the bone marrow (BM), recent data implicate secondary lymphoid tissues as principal sites of NK cell development in humans. The strongest evidence stems from the observation that the newly described stages of human NK cell development are naturally and selectively enriched within lymph nodes and tonsils compared with blood and BM. In the current review, we provide an overview of these recent findings and discuss these in the context of existing tenets in the field of lymphocyte development.

  19. Evolutionary vignettes of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Beck, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of novel immune receptors has led to a recent renaissance of research into the innate immune system, following decades of intense research of the adaptive immune system. Of particular interest has been the discovery of the natural killer (NK) cell receptors which, depending on type, interact with classical or non-classical MHC class I antigens of the adaptive immune system, thus functioning at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review recent progress with respect to two such families of NK receptors, the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLRs), and attempt to trace their evolution across vertebrates.

  20. The application of KillerRed for acute protein inactivation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy S.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Generating loss of protein function is a powerful investigatory tool particularly if carried out at a physiologically relevant timescale in a live-cell fluorescent imaging experiment. KillerRed mediated chromophore assisted light inactivation (CALI) uses genetic encoding for specificity and light for acute inactivation that can also be spatially restricted. This unit provides protocols for setting up and carrying out properly controlled KillerRed experiments during live-cell imaging of cultured cells. PMID:24984963

  1. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  2. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  3. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reduce the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer/natural killer cells in K562 NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qu, Yu-Hua; Wu, Yan-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wei, Jing; Huang, Wen-Ge; Zhou, Dun-Hua; Fang, Jianpei; Huang, Ke; Huang, Shao-Liang

    2011-08-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy is an important treatment to eliminate residual tumor cells after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have previously been shown to exert immunoregulation functions, including inhibition of proliferation and killing activities of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells in vitro and reduction of the graft-versus-host disease. MSC can survive in vivo for a long period of time, the influence of MSC on the antitumor activity of subsequently infused immune killer cells is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of MSC infused via different paths and at different times on the antitumor activities of cytokine-induced killer (CIK)/NK cells derived from umbilical cord blood in K562 NOD/SCID mice. The potential interaction mechanisms of MSC and CIK/NK cells infused through different paths using different intervals in vivo were subsequently explored. The results show that the antitumor activities of CIK/NK cells was inhibited by MSC when injected via the same path (tail vein), and the suppressive effect of MSC on CIK/NK cells were less pronounced when they were injected separately through different paths. There were no effects of MSC on the antitumor activities of CIK/NK cells if the MSC and CIK/NK cells were injected with a 48-h interval. Moreover, the suppressive effect continuous, even if MSC were infused 48 h earlier than CIK/NK cells. It suggests that pre-injected MSC can reduce the antitumor activities of CIK/NK cells in vivo. The probable mechanisms are that MSC and CIK/NK cells might have a greater opportunity to meet and interact if they are injected simultaneously via the same path. The suppression of MSC on CIK/NK cells in vivo mainly takes place in the reticuloendothelial system, including the lung and the liver.

  5. Killer cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy; Urbanowicz, Richard A; Corne, Jonathan; Lamb, Jonathan R

    2008-04-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a treatable and preventable disease state, characterized by progressive airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. It is a current and growing cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with the WHO (World Health Organization) projecting that total deaths attributed to COPD will increase by more than 30% in the next 10 years. The pathological hallmarks of COPD are destruction of the lung parenchyma (pulmonary emphysema), inflammation of the central airways (chronic bronchitis) and inflammation of the peripheral airways (respiratory bronchiolitis). The destructive changes and tissue remodelling observed in COPD are a result of complex interactions between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The focus of the present review is directed towards the role of CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, NK (natural killer) cells and NKT cells (NK T-cells). These three classes of killer cell could all play an important part in the pathogenesis of COPD. The observed damage to the pulmonary tissue could be caused in three ways: (i) direct cytotoxic effect against the lung epithelium mediated by the activities of perforin and granzymes, (ii) FasL (Fas ligand)-induced apoptosis and/or (iii) cytokine and chemokine release. The present review considers the role of these killer cells in COPD.

  6. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  7. Lysis of primary hepatic tumours by lymphokine activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, K H; Shu, S Y; Lee, C S; Chu, C T; Yang, C S; Chang, K J

    1987-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer cell is a newly described lytic system against a variety of solid tumours and is distinct in several respects from the classic cytolytic T cell and the natural killer systems. This study was conducted to evaluate the lytic activity of lymphokine activated killer cells against fresh autologous and allogeneic, as well as cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Lymphokine activated killer cell was generated by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with various concentrations of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2, Cetus, USA) for various periods of time. A four hour 51Cr release assay was used to measure cytotoxicity. The results show that fresh and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells were only slightly susceptible to natural killer cells. Normal hepatocytes were resistant to lymphokine activated killer-mediated lysis. Lymphokine activated killer cells could be generated from mononuclear cells of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and normal subjects with lytic activity against fresh autologous and allogeneic and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but lymphokine activated killer cells from the former was less efficient than that from the latter. It is concluded that the adoptive immunotherapy with combined rIL-2 and lymphokine activated killer may be worth trying in early cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:3030899

  8. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  9. Cytokine-induced killer cells: NK-like T cells with cytotolytic specificity against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Linn, Y C; Hui, Kam M

    2003-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a unique population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with the characteristic CD3+CD56+ phenotype. These cells have demonstrated higher proliferative and cytolytic activities in comparison to the reported CD3-CD56+ lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells that are essentially activated natural killer (NK) cells. CIK cells are non-MHC-restricted in target cell recognition and killing. We have shown the feasibility of generating CIK cells from a series of marrow samples of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) collected at diagnosis. At maturity, the CIK cells exhibit potent cytotoxicity against autologous AML targets as well as allogeneic myeloid leukemia cells, regardless of the HLA types of these targets. This observed cytotoxicity is not entirely due to NK cells as prior pre-absorption of the NK cells cytolytic activities does not abolish the subsequent cytotolytic activities against leukemic targets. It has also been reported by others that CIK cells are cytolytic against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, both in vitro and in the SCID mouse tumor model. In a mouse transplant model across MHC barrier, the CIK cells generated from the donor do not induce graft vs. host disease as observed for unfractionated donor splenocytes. In comparison to untreated control mice, the infusion of CIK cells results in the prolonged survival of murine leukemia-bearing mice. CIK cells also express CD94, part of the NK receptor comprising of CD94-NKG2 heterodimer. However, only low level of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are expressed by the CIK cells. In addition, as reported for the classical CTL, CIK cells could interact with dendritic cells (DC) to result in the enhancement of cytotolytic activities against tumor cells. The characteristic biological properties of the CIK cells would, therefore, enable them to be exploited for anti-leukemic therapy.

  10. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Modeling Natural Killer Cell Targeted Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Di Santo, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have extensively contributed to our understanding of human immunobiology and to uncover the underlying pathological mechanisms occurring in the development of diseases. However, mouse models do not reproduce the genetic and molecular complexity inherent in human disease conditions. Human immune system (HIS) mouse models that are susceptible to human pathogens and can recapitulate human hematopoiesis and tumor immunobiology provide one means to bridge the interspecies gap. Natural killer cells are the founding member of the innate lymphoid cell family. They exert a rapid and strong immune response against tumor and pathogen-infected cells. Their antitumor features have long been exploited for therapeutic purposes in the context of cancer. In this review, we detail the development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains and the models currently used in cancer research. We summarize the latest improvements in adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapies and the development of novel NK cell sources. Finally, we discuss the advantages of HIS mice to study the interactions between human NK cells and human cancers and to develop new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28405194

  12. Natural killer T cell based Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Sun, Wenji; East, James E.; Li, Junxin; Webb, Tonya J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important immunoregulatory role and are thought to bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses. Following activation through cognate interactions with lipid antigen presented in the context of CD1d molecules, NKT cells rapidly produce a plethora of cytokines and can also mediate cytotoxicity. Due to their potent effector functions, extensive research has been performed to increase our understanding on how to effectively modulate these cells. In fact, NKT cell agonists have been used as vaccine adjuvants to enhance antigen specific T and B cell responses to infections and malignancy. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in NKT cell-based vaccination strategies. Given the role that NKT cells play in autoimmune disease, infectious diseases, cancer, transplant immunology and dermatology, it is important to understand how to effectively guide their effector functions in order to develop novel immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:24089657

  13. Regulation of murine natural killer cell commitment

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, Nicholas D.; Nutt, Stephen L.; Carotta, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can derive from the same precursors as B and T cells, however, to achieve lineage specificity, several transcription factors need to be activated or annulled. While a few important transcription factors have been identified for NK genesis the mechanisms of how this is achieved is far from resolved. Adding to the complexity of this, NK cells are found and potentially develop in diverse locations in vivo and it remains to be addressed if a common NK cell precursor seeds diverse niches and how transcription factors may differentially regulate NK cell commitment in distinct microenvironments. Here we will summarize some recent findings in NK cell commitment and discuss how a NK cell transcriptional network might be organized, while addressing some misconceptions and anomalies along the way. PMID:23386852

  14. Natural killer cells: In health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arundhati; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute our bodies' frontline defense system, guarding against tumors and launching attacks against infections. The activities of NK cells are regulated by the interaction of various receptors expressed on their surfaces with cell surface ligands. While the role of NK cells in controlling tumor activity is relatively clear, the fact that they are also linked to various other disease conditions is now being highlighted. Here, we present an overview of the role of NK cells during normal body state as well as under diseased state. We discuss the possible utilization of these powerful cells as immunotherapeutic agents in combating diseases such as asthma, autoimmune diseases, and HIV-AIDS. This review also outlines current challenges in NK cell therapy.

  15. Natural killer cells in inflammatory heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, SuFey; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Despite of a multitude of excellent studies, the regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiac disease is greatly underappreciated. Clinical abnormalities in the numbers and functions of NK cells are observed in myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) as well as in cardiac transplant rejection [1-6]. Because treatment of these disorders remains largely symptomatic in nature, patients have little options for targeted therapies [7,8]. However, blockade of NK cells and their receptors can protect against inflammation and damage in animal models of cardiac injury and inflammation. In these models, NK cells suppress the maturation and trafficking of inflammatory cells, alter the local cytokine and chemokine environments, and induce apoptosis in nearby resident and hematopoietic cells [1,9,10]. This review will dissect each protective mechanism employed by NK cells and explore how their properties might be exploited for their therapeutic potential.

  16. Natural killer cells in human autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a critical role in early host defense against viruses. Through their cytolytic capacity and generation of cytokines and chemokines, NK cells modulate the activity of other components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and have been implicated in the initiation or maintenance of autoimmune responses. This review focuses on recent research elucidating a potential immunoregulatory role for NK cells in T-cell and B-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders in humans, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. A better understanding of the contributions of NK cells to the development of autoimmunity may lead to novel therapeutic targets in these diseases. PMID:23856014

  17. Natural killer cells, ageing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Elissaveta; Pawelec, Graham; Mihaylova, Anastasiya

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key components of innate immunity and substantially contribute to anti-tumor immune responses. The role of NK cells in immune surveillance is linked to many aspects of NK cell biology, but the age of the animal being studied or the human under treatment is rarely taken into account. The solicited reviews constituting a collection of papers presented here as a "Symposium-in-Writing" on the topic of NK cells, ageing and cancer were inspired by the increasing knowledge of NK cell biology and genetics, and emerging data on their impact in the clinic (disease associations and therapies), together with the realization that older individuals also differ from younger ones regarding innate as well as adaptive immunity.

  18. Benzodiazepines antagonize central corticotropin releasing hormone-induced suppression of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Irwin, M; Hauger, R L; Britton, K

    1993-12-17

    Benzodiazepines have anxiolytic properties and attenuate behavioral stress responses induced by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). To evaluate the effect of benzodiazepines on CRH-induced immune suppression, potent centrally acting benzodiazepines were administered prior to central infusion of CRH (i.c.v.; 1.0 microgram). CRH induced a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of splenic natural killer cell activity which was completely antagonized by pretreatment with either diazepam or alprazolam.

  19. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wilford; Huntington, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that are known for their ability to kill transformed and virus-infected cells. NK cells originate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and studies on mouse models have revealed that NK cell development is a complex, yet tightly regulated process, which is dependent on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The development of NK cells can be broadly categorized into two phases: lineage commitment and maturation. Efforts to better define the developmental framework of NK cells have led to the identification of several murine NK progenitor populations and mature NK cell subsets, each defined by a varied set of cell surface markers. Nevertheless, the relationship between some of these NK cell subsets remains to be determined. The classical approach to studying both NK cell development and function is to identify the transcription factors involved and elucidate the mechanistic action of each transcription factor. In this regard, recent studies have provided further insight into the mechanisms by which transcription factors, such as ID2, FOXO1, Kruppel-like factor 2, and GATA-binding protein 3 regulate various aspects of NK cell biology. It is also becoming evident that the biology of NK cells is not only transcriptionally regulated but also determined by epigenetic alterations and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNAs. This review summarizes recent progress made in NK development, focusing primarily on transcriptional regulators and their mechanistic actions. PMID:28261203

  20. Targeting natural killer cells and natural killer T cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie; Blaise, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Brossay, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Preface text Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells are subsets of lymphocytes that share some phenotypic and functional similarities. Both cell types can rapidly respond to the presence of tumour cells and participate in antitumour immune responses. This has prompted interest in the development of innovative anticancer therapies that are based on the manipulation of NK and NKT cells. Recent studies have highlighted how the immune reactivity of NK and NKT cells is shaped by the environment in which they develop. The rationale use of these cells for cancer immunotherapies awaits a better understanding of their effector functions, migratory patterns and survival properties in humans. PMID:22437937

  1. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation.

  2. Compromised natural killer cells in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Yuqin; Song, Haoming; Gong, Zhu; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The high morbidity, mortality and misdiagnosis rate render pulmonary embolism (PE) as a worldwide health problem. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease have not been well characterized. Increasing studies indicate infection and immunity play a crucial role in PE. Natural killer (NK) cells act as a bridge between the innate immune and acquired immune. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of NK cells in PE. Methods: Human cDNA microarray analysis was employed to detect genes associated with NK cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Random variance model corrected t-test was used for statistical analysis of differential gene expression. Flow cytometry was performed to detect the CD16+CD56+ NK cells. Results: In the present study, based on gene expression microarray analysis, we showed four inhibitory receptors (KLRB1, KLRD1, KLRF1, KLRG1) and four activating receptors (KLRC1, KLRC3, KLRK1 and NCR1) on NK cells were remarkably down-regulated and the cytological experiment demonstrated the proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells among PBMCs decreased in the PE group. Conclusions: We confirmed the presence of reduced expression of critical activating as well as inhibitory NK cell receptors and low proportion of CD16+CD56+ NK cells in PE. The consistence between genomic and cytological examination suggests compromised NK cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:26339393

  3. Manufacturing Natural Killer Cells as Medicinal Products.

    PubMed

    Chabannon, Christian; Mfarrej, Bechara; Guia, Sophie; Ugolini, Sophie; Devillier, Raynier; Blaise, Didier; Vivier, Eric; Calmels, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) with cytotoxic and regulatory properties. Their functions are tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activating receptors, and their mechanisms of activation strongly differ from antigen recognition in the context of human leukocyte antigen presentation as needed for T-cell activation. NK cells thus offer unique opportunities for new and improved therapeutic manipulation, either in vivo or in vitro, in a variety of human diseases, including cancers. NK cell activity can possibly be modulated in vivo through direct or indirect actions exerted by small molecules or monoclonal antibodies. NK cells can also be adoptively transferred following more or less substantial modifications through cell and gene manufacturing, in order to empower them with new or improved functions and ensure their controlled persistence and activity in the recipient. In the present review, we will focus on the technological and regulatory challenges of NK cell manufacturing and discuss conditions in which these innovative cellular therapies can be brought to the clinic.

  4. Manufacturing Natural Killer Cells as Medicinal Products

    PubMed Central

    Chabannon, Christian; Mfarrej, Bechara; Guia, Sophie; Ugolini, Sophie; Devillier, Raynier; Blaise, Didier; Vivier, Eric; Calmels, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) with cytotoxic and regulatory properties. Their functions are tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activating receptors, and their mechanisms of activation strongly differ from antigen recognition in the context of human leukocyte antigen presentation as needed for T-cell activation. NK cells thus offer unique opportunities for new and improved therapeutic manipulation, either in vivo or in vitro, in a variety of human diseases, including cancers. NK cell activity can possibly be modulated in vivo through direct or indirect actions exerted by small molecules or monoclonal antibodies. NK cells can also be adoptively transferred following more or less substantial modifications through cell and gene manufacturing, in order to empower them with new or improved functions and ensure their controlled persistence and activity in the recipient. In the present review, we will focus on the technological and regulatory challenges of NK cell manufacturing and discuss conditions in which these innovative cellular therapies can be brought to the clinic. PMID:27895646

  5. Immunosurveillance of senescent cancer cells by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Iannello, Alexandre; Raulet, David H

    2014-01-01

    We recently dissected how senescent tumors can trigger complementing signaling pathways that mobilize natural killer (NK) cells to eliminate malignant cells. In addition to cell-intrinsic effects on proliferation, senescence induces the production of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), which recruits NK cells to mediate direct tumoricidal effects. Hence, senescence activates a cancer cell-extrinsic oncosuppression program. PMID:24800169

  6. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  7. Natural killer cells and their receptors in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurman; Trowsdale, John

    2013-01-01

    The immune system has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. While the adaptive immune cell subsets, T and B cells, have been the main focus of immunological research in multiple sclerosis, it is now important to realize that the innate immune system also has a key involvement in regulating autoimmune responses in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells are innate lymphocytes that play vital roles in a diverse range of infections. There is evidence that they influence a number of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in multiple sclerosis and its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are starting to provide some understanding of the role of natural killer cells in regulating inflammation in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells express a diverse range of polymorphic cell surface receptors, which interact with polymorphic ligands; this interaction controls the function and the activation status of the natural killer cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for the role of natural killer cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We consider how a change in the balance of signals received by the natural killer cell influences its involvement in the ensuing immune response, in relation to multiple sclerosis. PMID:22734127

  8. Natural killer cells and their receptors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurman; Trowsdale, John; Fugger, Lars

    2013-09-01

    The immune system has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. While the adaptive immune cell subsets, T and B cells, have been the main focus of immunological research in multiple sclerosis, it is now important to realize that the innate immune system also has a key involvement in regulating autoimmune responses in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells are innate lymphocytes that play vital roles in a diverse range of infections. There is evidence that they influence a number of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in multiple sclerosis and its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are starting to provide some understanding of the role of natural killer cells in regulating inflammation in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells express a diverse range of polymorphic cell surface receptors, which interact with polymorphic ligands; this interaction controls the function and the activation status of the natural killer cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for the role of natural killer cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We consider how a change in the balance of signals received by the natural killer cell influences its involvement in the ensuing immune response, in relation to multiple sclerosis.

  9. The role of natural killer cells in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Wilensky, Asaf; Chaushu, Stella; Shapira, Lior

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of humans. The microbial etiology of the disease is well documented, as is the major role of the host response in disease pathogenesis. As natural killer cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity against bacteria and viruses, they can be expected to act as major players in the development of the disease. Through direct interaction with periodontal pathogens, natural killer cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that subsequently may lead to tissue destruction. Indeed, using a murine periodontitis model, such mechanisms have been shown to be involved in bacterial-induced alveolar bone loss. In the present review we document the available literature and evidence base regarding the origin, biology and characteristics of natural killer cells, and their interactions with periodontal pathogens. The potential role of natural killer cells in periodontal pathogenesis and the mechanisms involved are discussed.

  10. Natural Killer Cells Differentiate Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Modulate Their Adipogenic Potential.

    PubMed

    Rezzadeh, Kameron S; Hokugo, Akishige; Jewett, Anahid; Kozlowska, Anna; Segovia, Luis Andres; Zuk, Patricia; Jarrahy, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells are thought to represent more than 30 percent of all lymphocytes within the stromal vascular fraction of lipoaspirates. However, their physiologic interaction with adipocytes and their precursors has never been specifically examined. The authors hypothesized that natural killer cells, by means of cytokine secretion, are capable of promoting the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells. Human natural killer cells purified from healthy donors' peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated with a combination of interleukin-2 and anti-CD16 monoclonal antibody; natural killer cell supernatant was collected. Adipose-derived stem cells isolated from raw human lipoaspirates from healthy patients were treated with growth media, growth media with natural killer cell supernatant, adipogenic media, and adipogenic media with natural killer cells supernatant. Flow cytometric analysis was performed on cells using antibodies against B7H1, CD36, CD44, CD34, CD29, and MHC-1. Adipogenic-related gene expression (PPAR-γ, LPL, GPD-1, and aP2) was assessed. Oil Red O staining was performed as a functional assay of adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. Adipose-derived stem cells maintained in growth media with natural killer cell supernatant lost markers of "stemness," including CD44, CD34, and CD29; and expressed markers of differentiation, including B7H1 and MHC-1. Adipose-derived stem cells treated with natural killer cell supernatant accumulated small amounts of lipid after 10 days of natural killer cell supernatant treatment. Adipose-derived stem cells treated with natural killer cell supernatant showed altered expression of adipogenesis-associated genes compared with cells maintained in growth media. Adipose-derived stem cells maintained in adipogenic media with natural killer cell supernatant accumulated less lipid than those cells in adipogenic media alone. The authors demonstrate that, through secreted factors, natural killer cells are capable

  11. Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy - Advantages of the NK-92 Cell Line over Blood NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Klingemann, Hans; Boissel, Laurent; Toneguzzo, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent cytotoxic effector cells for cancer therapy and potentially for severe viral infections. However, there are technical challenges to obtain sufficient numbers of functionally active NK cells from a patient's blood since they represent only 10% of the lymphocytes and are often dysfunctional. The alternative is to obtain cells from a healthy donor, which requires depletion of the allogeneic T cells to prevent graft-versus-host reactions. Cytotoxic cell lines have been established from patients with clonal NK-cell lymphoma. Those cells can be expanded in culture in the presence of IL-2. Except for the NK-92 cell line, though, none of the other six known NK cell lines has consistently and reproducibly shown high antitumor cytotoxicity. Only NK-92 cells can easily be genetically manipulated to recognize specific tumor antigens or to augment monoclonal antibody activity through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. NK-92 is also the only cell line product that has been infused into patients with advanced cancer with clinical benefit and minimal side effects.

  12. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  13. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type.

    PubMed

    Chorianopoulos, Dimitrios; Samitas, Konstantinos; Vittorakis, Stylianos; Kiriazi, Vasiliki; Rondoyianni, Dimitra; Tsaousis, Georgios; Skoutelis, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    expressed the cytotoxic proteins T-cell intracellular antigen and granzyme B (Figure 3) They lacked TdT, CD34, CD7, CD8, TCL-1, and CD123. Findings from an in situ hybridization study for Epstein-Barr virus were negative. Give this result, molecular analysis ofT-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements was performed using polymerase chain reaction-based TCR-gamma gene, wit negative results. The morphology and the immunophenotype were consistent with natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type. Nasal involvement must be first excluded to proceed to the diagnosis of nasal-type natural killer-cell lymphoma. Indeed, histologic examination of the nasal mass revealed its polypoid nature. Thus, the authors were led to the diagnosis of extranodal extranasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type, CD56-positive, Ep stein-Barr virus-negative, TCR-negative. The patient received combination chemotherapy and completed 4 cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin vincristine, and prednisone every 14 days for 2 months. Skin lesions improved, and there was no fever soon after the initiation of therapy. Reevaluatio after the fourth cycle, however, disclosed pulmonary infiltrations as well as leukemic infiltration of the central nervous system. The patient had receive systemic salvage chemotherapy and intrathecal infusions of methotrexate. Although the lung lesions had diminished at that time, the patient develope paraplegia, his clinical course rapidly deteriorated, and he eventually died.

  14. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  15. Natural Killer Cell Adoptive Transfer Therapy: Exploiting the First Line of Defense Against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Felices, Martin; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute an important component of the initial immunological response against transformed cells. However, chronic exposure to the tumor microenvironment can fundamentally alter the ability of NK cells to sufficiently control tumor progression. Thus, the adoptive transfer of healthy, functional NK cells as an interventional therapy has been an area of great interest for improving patient outcomes. Recent developments in the field have provided a better understanding of what makes the NK compartment effective against malignant cells. Moreover, there are now multiple potential sources of NK cell products for infusion as well as techniques to manipulate these cells to enhance their antitumor functions. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of various sources of NK cells as well as prospective therapeutic enhancements to adoptively transferred NK cells.

  16. PERSUADING NATURAL KILLER CELLS TO ELIMINATE BAD B CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Clinical trials are underway infusing T cells genetically modified to be specific for B-cell malignancies using a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to redirect specificity for CD19. However, issues remain regarding whether the CAR can provide a fully-competent application signal and whether other lymphocytes with lytic capacity can target CD19+ tumors. PMID:19638468

  17. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  18. In vivo generation of decidual natural killer cells from resident hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Vacca, Paola; Orecchia, Paola; Croxatto, Daniele; Damonte, Patrizia; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Bottino, Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Decidual natural killer cells accumulate at the fetal-maternal interface and play a key role in a successful pregnancy. However, their origin is still unknown. Do they derive from peripheral natural killer cells recruited in decidua or do they represent a distinct population that originates in situ? Here, we identified natural killer precursors in decidua and uterus of pregnant mice. These precursors underwent rapid in situ differentiation and large proportions of proliferating immature natural killer cells were present in decidua and uterus as early as gestation day 4.5. Here, we investigated the origin of decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells by performing transfer experiments of peripheral mature natural killer cells or precursors from EGFP(+) mice. Results showed that mature natural killer cells did not migrate into decidua and uterus, while precursors were recruited in these organs and differentiated towards natural killer cells. Moreover, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells displayed unique phenotypic and functional features. They expressed high levels of the activating Ly49D receptor in spite of their immature phenotype. In addition, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells were poorly cytolytic and produced low amounts of IFN-γ, while they released factors (GM-CSF, VEGF, IP-10) involved in neo-angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Our data reveal in situ generation of decidual natural killer cells and provide an important correlation between mouse and human decidual natural killer cells, allowing further studies to be carried out on their role in pregnancy-related diseases.

  19. In vivo generation of decidual natural killer cells from resident hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Chiossone, Laura; Vacca, Paola; Orecchia, Paola; Croxatto, Daniele; Damonte, Patrizia; Astigiano, Simonetta; Barbieri, Ottavia; Bottino, Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer cells accumulate at the fetal-maternal interface and play a key role in a successful pregnancy. However, their origin is still unknown. Do they derive from peripheral natural killer cells recruited in decidua or do they represent a distinct population that originates in situ? Here, we identified natural killer precursors in decidua and uterus of pregnant mice. These precursors underwent rapid in situ differentiation and large proportions of proliferating immature natural killer cells were present in decidua and uterus as early as gestation day 4.5. Here, we investigated the origin of decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells by performing transfer experiments of peripheral mature natural killer cells or precursors from EGFP+ mice. Results showed that mature natural killer cells did not migrate into decidua and uterus, while precursors were recruited in these organs and differentiated towards natural killer cells. Moreover, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells displayed unique phenotypic and functional features. They expressed high levels of the activating Ly49D receptor in spite of their immature phenotype. In addition, decidua- and uterus-natural killer cells were poorly cytolytic and produced low amounts of IFN-γ, while they released factors (GM-CSF, VEGF, IP-10) involved in neo-angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Our data reveal in situ generation of decidual natural killer cells and provide an important correlation between mouse and human decidual natural killer cells, allowing further studies to be carried out on their role in pregnancy-related diseases. PMID:24179150

  20. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  1. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  2. Alloreactive Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From Stem Cell Transplantation to Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Parisi, Sarah; Urbani, Elena; Curti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express activating and inhibitory receptors, which recognize MHC class-I alleles, termed “Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors” (KIRs). Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched NK cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of NK cell infusion in AML patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. The aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts at exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against AML. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of AML. PMID:26528283

  3. Effect of spaceflight on natural killer cell activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykova, Marina P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lesniak, A. T.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Meshkov, Dimitrii O.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Medvedev, Andrei E.; Berry, Wallace D.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Konstantinova, Irina V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on immune cell function were determined in rats flown on Cosmos 2044. Control groups included vivarium, synchronous, and antiorthostatically suspended rats. The ability of natural killer cells to lyse two different target cell lines was determined. Spleen and bone marrow cells obtained from flight rats showed significantly inhibited cytotoxicity for YAC-1 target cells compared with cells from synchronous control rats. This could have been due to exposure of the rats to microgravity. Antiorthostatic suspension did not affect the level of cytotoxicity from spleen cells of suspended rats for YAC-1 cells. On the other hand, cells from rats flown in space showed no significant differences from vivarium and synchronous control rats in cytotoxicity for K-562 target cells. Binding of natural killer cells to K-562 target cells was unaffected by spaceflight. Antiorthostatic suspension resulted in higher levels of cytotoxicity from spleen cells for Cr-51-labeled K-562 cells. The results indicate differential effects of spaceflight on function of natural killer cells. This shows that spaceflight has selective effects on the immune response.

  4. Effect of spaceflight on natural killer cell activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykova, Marina P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lesniak, A. T.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Meshkov, Dimitrii O.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Medvedev, Andrei E.; Berry, Wallace D.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Konstantinova, Irina V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on immune cell function were determined in rats flown on Cosmos 2044. Control groups included vivarium, synchronous, and antiorthostatically suspended rats. The ability of natural killer cells to lyse two different target cell lines was determined. Spleen and bone marrow cells obtained from flight rats showed significantly inhibited cytotoxicity for YAC-1 target cells compared with cells from synchronous control rats. This could have been due to exposure of the rats to microgravity. Antiorthostatic suspension did not affect the level of cytotoxicity from spleen cells of suspended rats for YAC-1 cells. On the other hand, cells from rats flown in space showed no significant differences from vivarium and synchronous control rats in cytotoxicity for K-562 target cells. Binding of natural killer cells to K-562 target cells was unaffected by spaceflight. Antiorthostatic suspension resulted in higher levels of cytotoxicity from spleen cells for Cr-51-labeled K-562 cells. The results indicate differential effects of spaceflight on function of natural killer cells. This shows that spaceflight has selective effects on the immune response.

  5. Production of interferons by dendritic cells, plasmacytoid cells, natural killer cells, and interferon-producing killer dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Vremec, David; O'Keeffe, Meredith; Hochrein, Hubertus; Fuchsberger, Martina; Caminschi, Irina; Lahoud, Mireille; Shortman, Ken

    2007-02-01

    The capacity of mouse spleen conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or IFN-alpha was assessed, and compared with that of natural killer (NK) cells and the recently identified interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs), both of which are frequent contaminants in DC preparations. Fully developed cDCs or pDCs, if free of NK cells or IKDCs, showed little capacity for IFN-gamma production. However, an early developmental form of the CD4-8+ cDC subtype, and the Ly6C- Ly49Q- pDC subtype, both were able to produce moderate amounts of IFN-gamma, although less than IKDCs. In response to toll-like receptor 9 stimuli, both the Ly6C+ Ly49Q+ and the Ly6C- Ly49Q- pDC subtypes were effective producers of IFN-alpha. However, IKDCs, which efficiently produced IFN-gamma and showed immediate cytotoxicity on NK target cells, did not produce IFN-alpha under these conditions.

  6. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance.

  7. Uterine natural killer cell partnerships in early mouse decidua basalis.

    PubMed

    Felker, Allison M; Croy, B Anne

    2016-10-01

    The decidua basalis of developing mouse implantation sites is highly enriched in CD45(+) leukocytes. In intact, syngeneically mated C57BL/6 decidua basalis examined at gestation day 8.5 by whole-mount in situ immunohistochemistry, leukocyte, but not trophoblast, conjugations were reported. Nothing is known regarding time course, frequency, composition, or importance of physiologic decidual CD45(+) cell pairing. In this study, we confirmed the presence of anti-CD54(+)/anti-CD11a(+) immune synapses in CD45(+) decidual cell conjugates and characterized their cellular heterogeneity. Conjugated cell pairs were virtually absent before implantation (virgin and gestation days 3.5 and 4.5), were infrequent at gestation day 5.5, but involved 19% of all CD45(+) cells by gestation day 8.5, then declined. By gestation day 8.5, almost all CD45(+) cells coexpressed CD31, and 2 CD45(+)CD31(+) cells composed most conjugates. Conjugation partners were defined for 2 nonoverlapping uterine natural killer cell subsets (Ly49C/I (+)/Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(-) and Ly49C/I(-)/Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+)). Ly49C/I(+) uterine natural killer cells were the major subset from before mating up to gestation day 6.5. At gestation day 5.5/6.5, uterine natural killer cell conjugates involving Ly49C/I (+) cells were more abundant. By gestation day 8.5/9.5, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+) uterine natural killer cells were the dominant subset with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+)/Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+) homologous conjugates and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+)/Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(-) heterologous conjugates dominating uterine natural killer cell pairings. At gestation day 6.5, both Ly49C/I(+)/CD45(+) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin(+)/CD45(+) heterologous conjugate pairs strongly engaged antigen-presenting cells (CD11c(+), CD68(+), or major histocompatibility complex class II(+)). By gestation day 8.5, dominant partners of

  8. Effect of different levels of alcohol consumption on natural killer and lymphokine activated killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, L.W.; DeVasure, J.M.; Lemley-Gillespie, S.D.; Thiele, G.M. Omaha VA Hospital, NE )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of alcohol consumption on natural killer (NK) cell activity is controversial as both increased and decreased levels have been reported. It was the purpose of this study to determine the effects of feeding BDF1 mice different levels of alcohol on NK and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity. After four-six weeks of chronic alcohol feeding, mice were sacrificed, spleen cells obtained and assayed for NK and IL-2 boosted NK activity against YAC-1 cells in a traditional {sup 51}chromium release assay. Cells were also cultured in the presence of IL-2 for five days and tested for cytolytic activity using P815 cells as targets. Cells from each group were passed over a nylon wool column and the adherent (AD) and nonadherent (NAD) populations collected and tested as above. Increased NK, 24 hour IL-2 boosted NK and 5 day LAK activity were observed only in the spleen cells obtained from mice on 20% alcohol. Also, NAD populations had a 2-4 fold higher lytic unit values (LU{sub 20}) at all levels of alcohol consumption and in all assays, as compared with the unseparated spleen cells. Analysis of cell surface markers on these three populations of cells show that there were differences in MAC-2, Asialo GM-1, Thy 1.2, B220 and NK 1.1 that may correlate with the differences observed in the cytolytic assays. These data suggest that different levels of alcohol affect the cytolytic activity of NK and LAK cells and may result from alterations in the cell subset populations.

  9. Immune Surveillance of Unhealthy Cells by Natural Killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Iannello, Alexandre; Raulet, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic and oncogenic insults result in the induction of intrinsic defense mechanisms such as cell death pathways and senescence, and extrinsic pathways that mobilize immune responses to destroy unhealthy cells. Both protective mechanisms presumably evolved to limit the damage these insults could inflict on the host. After viral infection or malignant transformation, unhealthy cells can be directly sensed by natural killer (NK) and some T cells via the activating receptor NKG2D. All NK cells and subsets of T cells express NKG2D. The NKG2D/ligand system represents a major recognition mechanism for detection and elimination of unhealthy cells. Here we discuss different pathways, including stress pathways, that are responsible for cell surface display of ligands for NKG2D, which are self-proteins that are minimally expressed by normal cells. We also discuss new results indicating that efficient elimination of tumor cells that display NKG2D ligands depends on the recruitment of NK cells and other immune cells to the tumor, which can be regulated by distinct mechanisms, including the p53-dependent production of chemokines by senescent tumors. The cooperative effect of pathways that induce the display NKG2D ligands and distinct pathways that mobilize immune cells provides a higher degree of specificity to the NK cell response. PMID:24135717

  10. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luna, Jesus I; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Standard cytoreductive cancer therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are frequently resisted by a small portion of cancer cells with 'stem-cell' like properties including quiescence and repopulation. Immunotherapy represents a breakthrough modality for improving oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Since the success of immunotherapy is not contingent on target cell proliferation, it may also be uniquely suited to address the problem of resistance and repopulation exerted by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Areas covered: Natural killer (NK) cells have long been known for their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells, and there are increasing data demonstrating that NK cells can selectively identify and lyse CSCs. The authors review the current knowledge of CSCs and NK cells and highlight recent studies that support the concept that NK cells are capable of targeting CSC in solid tumors, especially in the context of combination therapy simultaneously targeting non-CSCs and CSCs. Expert opinion: Unlike cytotoxic cancer treatments, NK cells can target and eliminate quiescent/non-proliferating cells such as CSCs, and these enigmatic cells are an important source of relapse and metastasis. NK targeting of CSCs represents a novel and potentially high impact method to capitalize on the intrinsic therapeutic potential of NK cells.

  11. Natural Killer Cells to the Attack: Combination Therapy against Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Borrego, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    TGFβ in the tumor microenvironment diminishes natural killer (NK) cell-mediated anti-disialoganglioside (anti-GD2) mAb elimination of neuroblastoma cells. Consequently, blockade of TGFβ signaling with galunisertib in combination with the anti-GD2 mAb dinutuximab plus adoptively transferred NK cells is a promising tool for the treatment of neuroblastoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(3); 615-7. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Tran et al., p. 804.

  12. Newtonian cell interactions shape natural killer cell education.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, Jodie P; Önfelt, Björn; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-09-01

    Newton's third law of motion states that for every action on a physical object there is an equal and opposite reaction. The dynamic change in functional potential of natural killer (NK) cells during education bears many features of such classical mechanics. Cumulative physical interactions between cells, under a constant influence of homeostatic drivers of differentiation, lead to a reactive spectrum that ultimately shapes the functionality of each NK cell. Inhibitory signaling from an array of self-specific receptors appear not only to suppress self-reactivity but also aid in the persistence of effector functions over time, thereby allowing the cell to gradually build up a functional potential. Conversely, the frequent non-cytolytic interactions between normal cells in the absence of such inhibitory signaling result in continuous stimulation of the cells and attenuation of effector function. Although an innate cell, the degree to which the fate of the NK cell is predetermined versus its ability to adapt to its own environment can be revealed through a Newtonian view of NK cell education, one which is both chronological and dynamic. As such, the development of NK cell functional diversity is the product of qualitatively different physical interactions with host cells, rather than simply the sum of their signals or an imprint based on intrinsically different transcriptional programs.

  13. Efficient killing of radioresistant breast cancer cells by cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingming; Zhu, Danni; Bu, Xiaocui; Wei, Xiaofang; Li, Changyou; Gao, Daiqing; Wei, Xiaoqiang; Ma, Xuezhen; Zhao, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of breast cancer after radiotherapy may be partly explained by the presence of radioresistant cells. Thus, it would be desirable to develop an effective therapy against radioresistant cells. In this study, we demonstrated the intense antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against MCF-7 and radioresistant MCF-7 cells, as revealed by cytokine-induced killer-mediated cytotoxicity, tumor cell proliferation, and tumor invasion. Radioresistant MCF-7 cells were more susceptible to cytokine-induced killer cell killing. The stronger cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against radioresistant MCF-7 cells was dependent on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I polypeptide-related sequence A/B on radioresistant MCF-7 cells after exposure of cytokine-induced killer cells to sensitized targets. In addition, we demonstrated that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy via the downregulation of TK1, TYMS, and MDR1. These results indicate that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in combination with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may induce synergistic antitumor activities and represent a novel strategy for breast cancer.

  14. Ozone exposed epithelial cells modify cocultured natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) causes significant adverse health effects worldwide. Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are among the first sites within the respiratory system to be exposed to inhaled air pollutants. They recruit, activate, and interact with immune cells via soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contacts. Based on our recent observation demonstrating the presence of natural killer (NK) cells in nasal lavages, the goal of this study was to establish a coculture model of NECs and NK cells and examine how exposure to O3 modifies this interaction. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess immunophenotypes of NK cells cocultured with either air- or O3-exposed NECs. Our data show that coculturing NK cells with O3-exposed NECs decreased intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enhanced, albeit not statistically significant, IL-4, and increased CD16 expression on NK cells compared with air controls. Additionally, the cytotoxicity potential of NK cells was reduced after coculturing with O3-exposed NECs. To determine whether soluble mediators released by O3-exposed NECs caused this shift, apical and basolateral supernatants of air- and O3-exposed NECs were used to stimulate NK cells. While the conditioned media of O3-exposed NECs alone did not reduce intracellular IFN-γ, O3 enhanced the expression of NK cell ligands ULBP3 and MICA/B on NECs. Blocking ULBP3 and MICA/B reversed the effects of O3-exposed NECs on IFN-γ production in NK cells. Taken together, these data showed that interactions between NECs and NK cells in the context of O3 exposure changes NK cell activity via direct cell-cell interactions and is dependent on ULBP3/MICA/B expressed on NECs. PMID:23241529

  15. Location and cellular stages of natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    The identification of distinct tissue-specific natural killer (NK) cell populations that apparently mature from local precursor populations has brought new insight into the diversity and developmental regulation of this important lymphoid subset. NK cells provide a necessary link between the early (innate) and late (adaptive) immune responses to infection. Gaining a better understanding of the processes that govern NK cell development should allow us to harness better NK cell functions in multiple clinical settings, as well as to gain further insight into how these cells undergo malignant transformation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding sites and cellular stages of NK cell development in humans and mice.

  16. Natural Killer Cell Lymphoma: A Case with Classification Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jitani, Ankit Kumar; Khonglah, Yookarin; Kumar, Ritesh; Gogoi, Bidyut Bikash; Jajodia, Ekta

    2016-02-01

    Non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the Natural Killer (NK) cell type is rare. World Health Organisation recognises 3 NK-cell phenotypic entities; extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENK/TL); aggressive NK cell leukaemia (ANKL); and chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK) which is classified as a provisional entity. Though specific clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic criteria have been laid down to diagnose these conditions there may however, be considerable variations in the clinical presentation making diagnosis difficult. We present a case with contrasting clinical and haematopathological findings posing difficulty in its diagnosis and classification, and despite the aggressive presentation showing favourable response to treatment.

  17. Natural Killer Cell Lymphoma: A Case with Classification Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Jitani, Ankit Kumar; Kumar, Ritesh; Gogoi, Bidyut Bikash; Jajodia, Ekta

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the Natural Killer (NK) cell type is rare. World Health Organisation recognises 3 NK-cell phenotypic entities; extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENK/TL); aggressive NK cell leukaemia (ANKL); and chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK) which is classified as a provisional entity. Though specific clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic criteria have been laid down to diagnose these conditions there may however, be considerable variations in the clinical presentation making diagnosis difficult. We present a case with contrasting clinical and haematopathological findings posing difficulty in its diagnosis and classification, and despite the aggressive presentation showing favourable response to treatment. PMID:27042473

  18. Isolation and identification of normal killer cells from Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Matveeva, V.A.; Klyuchareva, T.E.

    1986-09-01

    This paper gives data on isolation of normal killer cells from the blood and various tissues of Syrian hamsters in a Percoll density gradient and their identification on the basis of morphologic criteria and cytotoxic activity (CTA). CTA of the isolated cells was studied in the cytotoxic test with target cells of a human MOLT-4 thymoma cell labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes from blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Syrian hamsters in Percoll density gradient is shown in the results of five experiments used for cells of each type.

  19. Influence of vancomycin infusion methods on endothelial cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity.

  20. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  1. Recycling and target binding capacity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    By combining a newly established single-cell cytotoxicity assay in agarose (16) with estimations of the maximum natural killer (NK) potential (Vmax) by 51Cr release that percentage of target-binding cells (TBC), the fraction of active killers among TBC, the kinetics of single-cell cytotoxicity, and the recycling of effector cells was studied. Using nylon wool-passed peripheral lymphocytes, approximately 10% of the cells will bind to NK- susceptible target cell lines. Most of these have receptors for IgG. Some 50% will go on to kill T cell targets and some 20% to kill the standard target cell K-562. As the individual NK cell is shown to have the capacity to recycle, i.e., to kill more than one target cell in the 3-h test period, and as recycling seems to vary between individuals, there is no consistent correlation between the number of TBC and 51Cr-release values. It seems as if the single-cell cytotoxicity assay, as presently performed in agarose, is a valuable complement to Vmax determinations by 51Cr-release to study the different steps involved in the cytolytic process: recognition, enzyme activation, and effector cell recycling. The discrimination between these steps will probably be necessary to define mechanisms influencing NK cells in different disease states as well as in learning more about the normal function and regulation of the human NK system. PMID:7252409

  2. Natural Killer Cells in the Orchestration of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Barbara; Tremolati, Marco; Gini, Elisabetta; Farronato, Giampietro; Bruno, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype, and functions are key features shared by diverse chronic diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Natural killer cells are innate lymphoid cells primarily involved in the immune system response to non-self-components but their plasticity is largely influenced by the pathological microenvironment. Altered NK phenotype and function have been reported in several pathological conditions, basically related to impaired or enhanced toxicity. Here we reviewed and discussed the role of NKs in selected, different, and “distant” chronic diseases, cancer, diabetes, periodontitis, and atherosclerosis, placing NK cells as crucial orchestrator of these pathologic conditions. PMID:28428965

  3. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as ‘pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity. PMID:26639736

  4. Regulatory Functions of Natural Killer Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Wiendl, Heinz; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio; Laroni, Alice

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that natural killer (NK) cells exhibit regulatory features. Among them, CD56bright NK cells have been suggested to play a major role in controlling T cell responses and maintaining homeostasis. Dysfunction in NK cell-mediated regulatory features has been recently described in untreated multiple sclerosis (MS), suggesting a contribution to MS pathogenesis. Moreover, biological disease-modifying treatments effective in MS apparently enhance the frequencies and/or regulatory function of NK cells, further pointing toward an immunoprotective role of NK cells in MS. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulatory functions of NK cells, based on their interactions with other cells belonging to the innate compartment, as well as with adaptive effector cells. We review the more recent data reporting disruption of NK cell/T cell interactions in MS and discuss how disease-modifying treatments for MS affect NK cells. PMID:28066417

  5. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as 'pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity.

  6. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  7. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    PubMed Central

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering. PMID:27189419

  8. Infused polymers for cell sheet release.

    PubMed

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L; Lin, Jennifer J; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-18

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  9. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  10. Ex vivo-expanded natural killer cells demonstrate robust proliferation in vivo in high-risk relapsed multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Szmania, Susann; Lapteva, Natalia; Garg, Tarun; Greenway, Amy; Lingo, Joshuah; Nair, Bijay; Stone, Katie; Woods, Emily; Khan, Junaid; Stivers, Justin; Panozzo, Susan; Campana, Dario; Bellamy, William T; Robbins, Molly; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Waheed, Sarah; Gee, Adrian; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Rooney, Cliona; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Highly activated/expanded natural killer (NK) cells can be generated by stimulation with the human leukocyte antigen-deficient cell line K562, genetically modified to express 41BB-ligand and membrane-bound interleukin (IL)15. We tested the safety, persistence, and activity of expanded NK cells generated from myeloma patients (auto-NK) or haploidentical family donors (allo-NK) in heavily pretreated patients with high-risk relapsing myeloma. The preparative regimen comprised bortezomib only or bortezomib and immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, and fludarabine. NK cells were shipped overnight either cryopreserved or fresh. In 8 patients, up to 1×10⁸ NK cells/kg were infused on day 0 and followed by daily administrations of IL2. Significant in vivo expansion was observed only in the 5 patients receiving fresh products, peaking at or near day 7, with the highest NK-cell counts in 2 subjects who received cells produced in a high concentration of IL2 (500 U/mL). Seven days after infusion, donor NK cells comprised >90% of circulating leukocytes in fresh allo-NK cell recipients, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic myeloma targets was retained in vitro. Among the 7 evaluable patients, there were no serious adverse events that could be related to NK-cell infusion. One patient had a partial response and in another the tempo of disease progression decreased; neither patient required further therapy for 6 months. In the 5 remaining patients, disease progression was not affected by NK-cell infusion. In conclusion, infusion of large numbers of expanded NK cells was feasible and safe; infusing fresh cells was critical to their expansion in vivo.

  11. Novel treatment strategy with autologous activated and expanded natural killer cells plus anti-myeloma drugs for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Leivas, Alejandra; Perez-Martinez, Antonio; Blanchard, María Jesús; Martín-Clavero, Estela; Fernández, Lucía; Lahuerta, Juan José; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This proof-of-concept single-arm open-label phase I clinical trial (NCT02481934) studied the safety and efficacy of multiple infusions of activated and expanded natural killer (NKAE) cells in combination with anti-myeloma drugs in multiple myeloma patients. It included five patients with relapsed or refractory MM who had received two to seven prior lines of therapy; NK cells were expanded for 3 weeks with K562-mb15-41BBL cells. Patients received four cycles of pharmacological treatment with two infusions of 7.5 × 106 NKAEs/kg per cycle. NKAE generation, expansion, and NK monitoring was assessed using flow cytometry. Eighteen clinical-grade NKAE cell GMP-grade products were generated to obtain 627 × 106 NKAEs (range: 315–919 × 106) for the first infusion and 943 × 106 (range: 471–1481 × 106) for the second infusion with 90% (±7%) purity. Neutropenia grade II occurred in two patients and was related to chemotherapy. Of the five patients, four showed disease stabilization before the end of NKAE treatment, and two showed a 50% reduction in bone marrow infiltration and a long-term (>1 y) response. The NKAE cells had a highly cytotoxic phenotype and high cytotoxicity in vitro. Infused NKAE cells were detected in bone marrow and peripheral blood after infusions. Ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells is feasible, NKAE cells are clinically active and the multiple infusions are well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma. PMID:28123890

  12. Restoration of Immune Surveillance in Lung Cancer by Natural Killer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0400 TITLE: Restoration of Immune Surveillance in Lung Cancer by Natural Killer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...related to natural killer (NK) cells . The goal of this application is to uncover how a microRNA, namely miR183, can disrupt the expression of a critical...molecule, DAP12, that controls tumoricidal function in human Natural Killer (NK) Cells and to understand how nicotine, contained in tobacco smoke

  13. Role of natural killer cells in antibacterial immunity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Ullrich, Evelyn; Bochennek, Konrad; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Bacteria are a significant cause of infectious complications, in particular in immunocompromised patients. There is an increasing understanding that Natural Killer (NK) cells not only exhibit direct activity against bacteria, but also exert indirect antibacterial activity through interaction with other immune cells via cytokines and interferons. Areas covered: This review seeks to give a global overview of in vitro and in vivo data how NK cells interact with bacteria. In this regard, the review describes how NK cells directly damage and kill bacteria by soluble factors such as perforin, the impact of NK cells on other arms of the immune system, as well as how bacteria may inhibit NK cell activities. Expert commentary: A better characterization of the antibacterial effects of NK cells is urgently needed. With a better understanding of the interaction of NK cells and bacteria, NK cells may become a promising tool to prevent or to combat bacterial infections, e.g. by adoptively transferring NK cells to immunocompromised patients.

  14. Roles of natural killer cells in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Stephen N; Reighard, Seth D; Gyurova, Ivayla E; Cranert, Stacey A; Mahl, Sarah E; Karmele, Erik P; McNally, Jonathan P; Moran, Michael T; Brooks, Taylor R; Yaqoob, Fazeela; Rydyznski, Carolyn E

    2016-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in immune defense against virus infections. This is predominantly considered a function of rapid, innate NK-cell killing of virus-infected cells. However, NK cells also prime other immune cells through the release of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and other cytokines. Additionally, NK cells share features with long-lived adaptive immune cells and can impact disease pathogenesis through the inhibition of adaptive immune responses by virus-specific T and B cells. The relative contributions of these diverse and conflicting functions of NK cells in humans are poorly defined and likely context-dependent, thereby complicating the development of therapeutic interventions. Here we focus on the contributions of NK cells to disease in diverse virus infections germane to human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of antimalarial drugs on human natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Chaicumpa, W; Roca, R V; Atthasishtha, N; Chongsuphajaisiddhi, T

    1983-09-01

    Separation of null cell fraction from the other cellular components of human peripheral blood obtained from normal healthy individuals was effected through the Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation, carbonyl iron phagocytosis-magnet application, E-rosette forming and binding to 19S-EAC respectively. The null cells were used as effector cells in the cytotoxic assay. The spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay was employed and the highly NK-sensitive K562 labelled with Na251 CrO4 were used as targets. The null cell fraction was divided into several portions to allow for normal control, diluent control and tests. The test portions were those exposed to the various antimalarial drugs employed. It was observed that the T cell, B cells and null cell fractions accounted for 72%, 18% and 10% of the total lymphocyte population respectively. The mean cytotoxicity generated by the natural killer subset was 63%. The antimalarial drugs/drug combination used were chloroquine, quinine, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination. Concentrations used were their respective minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and corresponding 5 X MIC. The inhibitory effects on natural killer cell activity of these drugs were observed. The possible reasons for these observations are discussed.

  16. [Natural killer cells: adaptation and memory in innate immunity].

    PubMed

    Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Ugolini, Sophie; Vivier, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that can kill tumor and infected cells. NK cells also secrete cytokines that participate in the shaping of the adaptive immune response. During the past few years, several studies have shown that the threshold of NK cell responsiveness is more adaptable than originally thought. NK cell reactivity is tuned by the environment and depends on the time of exposure of NK cells to their microenvironment. The impact of the NK cell response on immunity also depends on the intensity and the nature of the tumor or infections assaults. We review here how the local context impacts on NK cell responsiveness and shapes the outcome of NK cell activation. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  17. Natural killer cells in host defense against veterinary pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Yang, Xi

    2015-11-15

    Natural Killer (NK) cells constitute a major subset of innate lymphoid cells that do not express the T- and B-cell receptors and play an important role in antimicrobial defense. NK cells not only induce early and rapid innate immune responses, but also communicate with dendritic cells to shape the adaptive immunity, thus bridging innate and adaptive immunity. Although the functional biology of NK cells is well-documented in a variety of infections in humans and mice, their role in protecting domestic animals from infectious agents is only beginning to be understood. In this article, we summarize the current state of knowledge about the contribution of NK cells in pathogen defense in domestic animals, especially cattle and pigs. Understanding the immunobiology of NK cells will translate into strategies to manipulate these cells for preventive and therapeutic purposes.

  18. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enriched cells exhibited the most efficient bactericidal activity. Stimulation of NK cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B for 16 h produced a significant increase in the antibacterial activity of all NK cells tested. The antibacterial activity of monocyte-depleted cells and Leu-11-enriched cells was also enhanced after culturing in vitro for 16- 24 h without exogenous cytokines. Dependence of the antibacterial activity on the presence of serum in the culture medium was not found. Ultrastructural studies revealed close contact between NK cell membranes and bacteria, no evidence of phagocytosis, and extracellular bacterial ghosts, after incubation at 37 degrees C. Supernatants from purified NK cells exhibited potent bactericidal activity with kinetics and target specificity similar to that of effector cells. These results document the potent antibacterial activity of purified NK cells and suggest an extracellular mechanism of killing. PMID:2642532

  19. CAR-T cells are serial killers.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours.

  20. CAR-T cells are serial killers

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours. PMID:26587330

  1. Primate-Specific Regulation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Peter; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Matevosyan, Lilit; Moesta, Achim K.; Norman, Paul J.; Aguilar, Anastazia M. Older; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating lymphocytes that function in innate immunity and placental reproduction. Regulating both development and function of NK cells is an array of variable and conserved receptors that interact with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Families of lectin-like and immunoglobulin-like receptors are determined by genes in the natural killer (NKC) and leukocyte receptor (LRC) complexes, respectively. As a consequence of the strong, varying pressures on the immune and reproductive systems, NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands evolve rapidly, are highly diverse, and exhibit dramatic species-specific differences. The variable, polymorphic family of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that regulate human NK cell development and function evolved recently, from a single-copy gene during the evolution of simian primates. Our studies of KIR and MHC class I genes in representative species show how these two unlinked but functionally intertwined genetic complexes have co-evolved. In humans, combinations of KIR and HLA class I factors are associated with infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, autoimmunity, reproductive success and the outcome of therapeutic transplantation. The extraordinary, and unanticipated, divergence of human NK cell receptors and MHC class I ligands from their mouse counterparts can in part explain the difficulties experienced in finding informative mouse models for human diseases. Non-human primate models have far greater potential, but to realize their promise will first require more complete definition of the genetics and function of KIR and MHC variation in non-human primate species, at a level comparable to that achieved for the human species. PMID:20618586

  2. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  3. On The Role of Natural Killer Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maghazachi, Azzam A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exert important immunoregulatory functions by releasing several inflammatory molecules, such as IFN-γ and members of chemokines, which include CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL4/MIP-1β. These cells also express heptahelical receptors, which are coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins that guide them into inflamed and injured tissues. NK cells have been shown to recognize and destroy transformed cells and virally-infected cells, but their roles in neurodegenerative diseases have not been examined in detail. In this review, I will summarize the effects of NK cells in two neurodegenerative diseases, namely multiple sclerosis and globoid cell leukodystrophy. It is hoped that the knowledge obtained from these diseases may facilitate building rational protocols for treating these and other neurodegenerative or autoimmune diseases using NK cells and drugs that activate them as therapeutic tools. PMID:23430541

  4. Natural killer cells: role in local tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Langers, Inge; Renoux, Virginie M; Thiry, Marc; Delvenne, Philippe; Jacobs, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the name of natural killer (NK) cells came from their natural ability to kill tumor cells in vitro. From the 1970s to date, accumulating data highlighted the importance of NK cells in host immune response against cancer and in therapy-induced antitumor response. The recognition and the lysis of tumor cells by NK cells are regulated by a complex balance of inhibitory and activating signals. This review summarizes NK cell mechanisms to kill cancer cells, their role in host immune responses against tumor growth or metastasis, and their implications in antitumor immunotherapies via cytokines, antibodies, or in combination with other therapies. The regulatory role of NK cells in autoimmunity is also discussed. PMID:22532775

  5. Natural killer cells in the innate immunity network of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, Irene; De Pasquale, Claudia; Campana, Stefania; Barberi, Chiara; Cavaliere, Riccardo; Benedetto, Filippo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2015-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes which have recently been proposed to play an immunoregulatory role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. Although several studies have evaluated the frequency and the functions of NK cells both in human and in experimental animal models of atherosclerosis, it is yet not clear whether NK cells might behave as protective or pro-atherogenic effectors. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the role of NK cells in atherosclerosis and discuss the potential interactions that might occur in atherosclerotic lesions between NK cells and antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. A clearer depiction of the innate immune cell network operating in atherosclerosis might pave the way to novel interesting approaches for the prevention and treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alterations of natural killer cells in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiao-Dong; Bai, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wei, Hui-Jie; Jin, Wei-Na; Li, Min-Shu; Yan, Yaping; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between natural killer (NK) cells and traumatic brain injury (TBI), we tracked an established phenotype of circulating NK cells at several time points in patients with different grades of TBI. In serial peripheral blood samples, NK cells were prospectively measured by flow cytometry of CD3(-) CD56(+) lymphocytes. Compared to healthy controls, TBI patients had reductions in both the percentage and the absolute number of NK cells. Furthermore, the magnitude of NK cell reduction correlated with the degree of TBI severity at several time points. That is, NK cell population size was independently associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores. In addition, at some time points, a positive correlation was found between the NK cell counts and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. Our results indicate that TBI induces a reduction in the number of NK cells, and the magnitude of the reduction appears to parallel the severity of TBI.

  7. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  8. In vivo functions of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review focuses on recent experiments in which the natural killed (NK) compartment has been directly manipulated in vivo either by passive transfer of NK-enriched cell populations or by selection depletion of NK cells. These data have provided direct evidence for the role of NK cells in vivo. It is evident that even these experiments have inherent limitations due to the complexity of in vivo interactions. In the aggregate, however, these data build a compelling case for the in vivo activity of NK cells and for their biologic importance. Most of the experiments were carried out in mice. Although there is heterogeneity among NK cells, these studies deal mainly with classical NK cells defined as bone marrow-derived, non-B (Ig/sup -/), non-T (Lyt 1/sup -/2/sup -/) lymphocytes that are nonadherent and bear the NK-associated antigens NK-1 and asialo-GMl. A natural model which has been exploited to study NK cells in the intact host is also discussed.

  9. Putting the natural killer cell in its place

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Geraldine M; Hart, Orla M; Gardiner, Clair M

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were originally described as ‘null’ lymphocytes, but we have increasing evidence of their role in recognizing pathogen, and our knowledge of NK cell receptors continues to expand exponentially. Human NK cells have many receptors for human leucoctye antigen (HLA) class I. These killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and CD94/NKG2 receptors can signal in both positive and negative ways to regulate NK cell functions. The inhibitory receptors are the best characterized, but even in these cases much of their functional biology remains elusive. In this review, some recent advances in terms of the three-immunoglobulin (3Ig)-domain KIRs are discussed. Natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) are among the activatory receptors found on NK cells. While pathogen ligands for these receptors have been described, endogenous ligands remain elusive. NCRs and NKG2D, a receptor for stress-induced antigens, appear to play complementary functional roles in terms of NK cell activation. More recently described on NK cells are the Toll-like receptors. In particular, these receptors of the innate immune system allow NK cells to directly sense pathogen, and their ligation on accessory cells indirectly activates NK cells through cytokine production. It is becoming clear that none of these receptor systems functions in isolation and that it is the sum of the signals (which will reflect the pathogenic situation), in addition to the cytokine milieu, that will direct NK cell activation. The resulting cytotoxicity, cytokine production and direct cell–cell regulatory interactions with other cells of the immune system, for example dendritic cells, ultimately determine the role of the NK cell in the context of an overall immune response. PMID:16423035

  10. Memory-like Responses of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Megan A.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes with the capacity to produce cytokines and kill target cells upon activation. NK cells have long been categorized as members of the innate immune system and as such have been thought to follow the ‘rules’ of innate immunity, including the principle that they have no immunologic memory, a property thought to be strictly limited to adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have suggested that NK cells have the capacity to alter their behavior based on prior activation. This property is analogous to adaptive immune memory; however, some NK cell memory-like functions are not strictly antigen-dependent and can be demonstrated following cytokine stimulation. Here we discuss the recent evidence that NK cells can exhibit properties of immunologic memory, focusing on the ability of cytokines to non-specifically induce memory-like NK cells with enhanced responses to restimulation. PMID:20536571

  11. Subsets of human natural killer cells and their regulatory effects

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells have distinct functions as NKtolerant, NKcytotoxic and NKregulatory cells and can be divided into different subsets based on the relative expression of the surface markers CD27 and CD11b. CD27+ NK cells, which are abundant cytokine producers, are numerically in the minority in human peripheral blood but constitute the large population of NK cells in cord blood, spleen, tonsil and decidua tissues. Recent data suggest that these NK cells may have immunoregulatory properties under certain conditions. In this review, we will focus on these new NK cell subsets and discuss how regulatory NK cells may serve as rheostats or sentinels in controlling inflammation and maintaining immune homeostasis in various organs. PMID:24303897

  12. Understanding of molecular mechanisms in natural killer cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells and the immune system are closely related and thus influence each other. Although immune cells can suppress cancer cell growth, cancer cells can evade immune cell attack via immune escape mechanisms. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells by secreting perforins and granzymes. Upon contact with cancer cells, NK cells form immune synapses to deliver the lethal hit. Mature NK cells are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. They move to lymph nodes, where they are activated through interactions with dendritic cells. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a key molecule that activates mature NK cells. The adoptive transfer of NK cells to treat incurable cancer is an attractive approach. A certain number of activated NK cells are required for adoptive NK cell therapy. To prepare these NK cells, mature NK cells can be amplified to obtain sufficient numbers of NK cells. Alternatively, NK cells can be differentiated and amplified from hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, the selection of donors is important to achieve maximal efficacy. In this review, we discuss the overall procedures and strategies of NK cell therapy against cancer. PMID:25676064

  13. Reduced killer cell activity of lymphocytes from patients with asbestosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, M; Kagamimori, S; Yokoyama, K; Okada, A

    1985-01-01

    Immunological abnormalities in 30 patients with asbestosis were investigated by examining the cytoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity by killer (K) cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes; the effects of interferon on NK activity was also examined. Fifteen men and 15 women (mean age 58; range 40-72) with asbestosis but who were free of complications such as tuberculosis, carcinoma, or steroid treatment were the subjects for study. There were nine cases of type 1, 19 cases of type 2, and two cases of type 3 disease as described in the ILO classification of pneumoconiosis. They were all textile workers with a mean duration of 18 years (3-40 years) since first exposure to chrysotile. Controls matched for age and sex were selected from a population without occupational exposure to asbestos. The activity of the NK and K cells in patients with asbestosis was significantly lower than in the control group, but the populations of NK and K cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes were not significantly different in the two groups. An in vitro experiment showed that the increase in the cytotoxicity of the NK cell after treatment with interferon-alpha was significantly lower in the subjects than in the controls. These results indicate that one of the defence mechanisms in relation to cancer is deficient in patients with asbestosis. PMID:3978049

  14. Innate or adaptive immunity? The example of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Vivier, Eric; Raulet, David H; Moretta, Alessandro; Caligiuri, Michael A; Zitvogel, Laurence; Lanier, Lewis L; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Ugolini, Sophie

    2011-01-07

    Natural killer (NK) cells were originally defined as effector lymphocytes of innate immunity endowed with constitutive cytolytic functions. More recently, a more nuanced view of NK cells has emerged. NK cells are now recognized to express a repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors that is calibrated to ensure self-tolerance while allowing efficacy against assaults such as viral infection and tumor development. Moreover, NK cells do not react in an invariant manner but rather adapt to their environment. Finally, recent studies have unveiled that NK cells can also mount a form of antigen-specific immunologic memory. NK cells thus exert sophisticated biological functions that are attributes of both innate and adaptive immunity, blurring the functional borders between these two arms of the immune response.

  15. Immunotherapy with natural killer cells: a possible approach for the treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia also in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silla, Lúcia

    2016-10-01

    The allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can cure intermediate and high-risk acute myeloid leukemia. Even with the development of strategies to reduce HSCT toxicity, this is still a complex treatment with high morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of the graft versus leukemia effect of HSCT has prepared the way for the development of Adoptive Immunotherapy or in vitro expansion of activated lymphocytes without alloreactivity, with subsequent intravenous infusion. The infusion of genetically modified T lymphocytes and haploidentical natural killer cells has been tested as an alternative to HSCT with very interesting results worldwide and in Brazil, as we not only have the technology of in vitro expansion of clinical grade lymphocytes available, but also do it according to the Good Manufacturing Practices that have been determined internationally.

  16. Natural killer cell therapy and aerosol interleukin-2 for the treatment of osteosarcoma lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guma, Sergei R; Lee, Dean A; Yu, Ling; Gordon, Nancy; Hughes, Dennis; Stewart, John; Wang, Wei Lien; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2014-04-01

    Survival of patients with osteosarcoma lung metastases has not improved in 20 years. We evaluated the efficacy of combining natural killer (NK) cells with aerosol interleukin-2 (IL-2) to achieve organ-specific NK cell migration and expansion in the metastatic organ, and to decrease toxicity associated with systemic IL-2. Five human osteosarcoma cell lines and 103 patient samples (47 primary and 56 metastatic) were analyzed for NKG2D ligand (NKG2DL) expression. Therapeutic efficacy of aerosol IL-2 + NK cells was evaluated in vivo compared with aerosol IL-2 alone and NK cells without aerosol IL-2. Osteosarcoma cell lines and patient samples expressed various levels of NKG2DL. NK-mediated killing was NKG2DL-dependent and correlated with expression levels. Aerosol IL-2 increased NK cell numbers in the lung and within metastatic nodules but not in other organs. Therapeutic efficacy, as judged by tumor number, size, and quantification of apoptosis, was also increased compared with NK cells or aerosol IL-2 alone. There were no IL-2-associated systemic toxicities. Aerosol IL-2 augmented the efficacy of NK cell therapy against osteosarcoma lung metastasis, without inducing systemic toxicity. Our data suggest that lung-targeted IL-2 delivery circumvents toxicities induced by systemic administration. Combining aerosol IL-2 with NK cell infusions, may be a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with osteosarcoma lung metastasis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cytokine-induced killer cells eradicate bone and soft-tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, Dario; Mesiano, Giulia; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Leuci, Valeria; Todorovic, Maja; Giraudo, Lidia; Cammarata, Cristina; Dell'Aglio, Carmine; D'Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Pisacane, Alberto; Sarotto, Ivana; Miano, Sara; Ferrero, Ivana; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Pignochino, Ymera; Sassi, Francesco; Bertotti, Andrea; Piacibello, Wanda; Fagioli, Franca; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable metastatic bone sarcoma and soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are incurable due to the inability to eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem-like cells (sCSC) that are likely responsible for relapses and drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the preclinical activity of patient-derived cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against autologous bone sarcoma and STS, including against putative sCSCs. Tumor killing was evaluated both in vitro and within an immunodeficient mouse model of autologous sarcoma. To identify putative sCSCs, autologous bone sarcoma and STS cells were engineered with a CSC detector vector encoding eGFP under the control of the human promoter for OCT4, a stem cell gene activated in putative sCSCs. Using CIK cells expanded from 21 patients, we found that CIK cells efficiently killed allogeneic and autologous sarcoma cells in vitro. Intravenous infusion of CIK cells delayed autologous tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Further in vivo analyses established that CIK cells could infiltrate tumors and that tumor growth inhibition occurred without an enrichment of sCSCs relative to control-treated animals. These results provide preclinical proof-of-concept for an effective strategy to attack autologous sarcomas, including putative sCSCs, supporting the clinical development of CIK cells as a novel class of immunotherapy for use in settings of untreatable metastatic disease.

  18. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-07-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells.

  19. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  20. Adenovirus vector delivery stimulates natural killer cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tomasec, Peter; Wang, Eddie C. Y.; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; McSharry, Brian P.; Aicheler, Rebecca J.; Stanton, Richard J.; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.

    2007-01-01

    We report that delivery of first-generation replication-deficient adenovirus (RDAd) vectors into primary human fibroblasts is associated with the induction of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis in vitro. RDAd vector delivery induced cytolysis by a range of NK cell populations including the NK cell clone NKL, primary polyclonal NK lines and a proportion of NK clones (36 %) in autologous HLA-matched assays. Adenovirus-induced cytolysis was inhibited by antibody blocking of the NK-activating receptor NKG2D, implicating this receptor in this function. NKG2D is ubiquitously expressed on NK cells and CD8+ T cells. Significantly, γ-irradiation of the vector eliminated the effect, suggesting that breakthrough expression from the vector induces at least some of the pro-inflammatory responses of unknown aetiology following the application of RDAd vectors during in vivo gene delivery. PMID:17374753

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor mediated suppression of natural killer cell activity: identification of associated deacetylase and corepressor molecules.

    PubMed

    Bush, Kristin A; Krukowski, Karen; Eddy, Justin L; Janusek, Linda Witek; Mathews, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and psychological stressors reduce natural killer cell function. This reduction in cellular function results from stress-induced release of glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids act upon natural killer cells to deacetylate and transrepress immune response genes through epigenetic processes. However, other than the glucocorticoid receptor, the proteins that participate in this process are not well described in natural killer cells. The purpose of this study was to identify the proteins associated with the glucocorticoid receptor that are likely epigenetic participants in this process. Treatment of natural killer cells with the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, produced a significant time dependent reduction in natural killer cell activity as early as 8h post treatment. This reduction in natural killer cell activity was preceded by nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor with histone deacetylase 1 and the corepressor, SMRT. Other class I histone deacetylases were not associated with the glucocorticoid receptor nor was the corepressor NCoR. These results demonstrate histone deacetylase 1 and SMRT to associate with the ligand activated glucocorticoid receptor within the nuclei of natural killer cells and to be the likely participants in the histone deacetylation and transrepression that accompanies glucocorticoid mediated reductions in natural killer cell function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clearance of Giardia muris infection in mice deficient in natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, M F; Kung, J E; Eriksson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice and beige mice (which are deficient in natural killer cells) were infected with Giardia muris. Both types of mice cleared G. muris infection at similar rates. This observation suggests that clearance of G. muris parasites from the mouse intestine is not mediated by natural killer cells. PMID:3781631

  3. Ex Vivo Generated Natural Killer Cells Acquire Typical Natural Killer Receptors and Display a Cytotoxic Gene Expression Profile Similar to Peripheral Blood Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56dim NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:22571679

  4. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy.

  5. Fasting enhances TRAIL-mediated liver natural killer cell activity via HSP70 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Dang, Vu T A; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuka; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Misumi, Toshihiro; Saeki, Yoshihiro; Fujikuni, Nobuaki; Ohdan, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Acute starvation, which is frequently observed in clinical practice, sometimes augments the cytolytic activity of natural killer cells against neoplastic cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the enhancement of natural killer cell function by fasting in mice. The total number of liver resident natural killer cells in a unit weight of liver tissue obtained from C57BL/6J mice did not change after a 3-day fast, while the proportions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)+ and CD69+ natural killer cells were significantly elevated (n = 7, p <0.01), as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, we found that TRAIL- natural killer cells that were adoptively transferred into Rag-2-/- γ chain-/- mice could convert into TRAIL+ natural killer cells in fasted mice at a higher proportion than in fed mice. Liver natural killer cells also showed high TRAIL-mediated antitumor function in response to 3-day fasting. Since these fasted mice highly expressed heat shock protein 70 (n = 7, p <0.05) in liver tissues, as determined by western blot, the role of this protein in natural killer cell activation was investigated. Treatment of liver lymphocytes with 50 µg/mL of recombinant heat shock protein 70 led to the upregulation of both TRAIL and CD69 in liver natural killer cells (n = 6, p <0.05). In addition, HSP70 neutralization by intraperitoneally injecting an anti- heat shock protein 70 monoclonal antibody into mice prior to fasting led to the downregulation of TRAIL expression (n = 6, p <0.05). These findings indicate that acute fasting enhances TRAIL-mediated liver natural killer cell activity against neoplastic cells through upregulation of heat shock protein 70.

  6. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  7. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Cytotoxic Responses in the Tasmanian Devil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gabriella K.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  8. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D.; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S.; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:25729364

  9. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-28

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection.

  10. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection. PMID:26819513

  11. Advantages and applications of CAR-expressing natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Glienke, Wolfgang; Esser, Ruth; Priesner, Christoph; Suerth, Julia D; Schambach, Axel; Wels, Winfried S; Grez, Manuel; Kloess, Stephan; Arseniev, Lubomir; Koehl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are known to mediate anti-cancer effects without the risk of inducing graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In order to improve cytotoxicity against resistant cancer cells, auspicious efforts have been made with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T- and NK cells. These CAR-modified cells express antigen receptors against tumor-associated surface antigens, thus redirecting the effector cells and enhancing tumor-specific immunosurveillance. However, many cancer antigens are also expressed on healthy tissues, potentially leading to off tumor/on target toxicity by CAR-engineered cells. In order to control such potentially severe side effects, the insertion of suicide genes into CAR-modified effectors can provide a means for efficient depletion of these cells. While CAR-expressing T cells have entered successfully clinical trials, experience with CAR-engineered NK cells is mainly restricted to pre-clinical investigations and predominantly to NK cell lines. In this review we summarize the data on CAR expressing NK cells focusing on the possible advantage using these short-lived effector cells and discuss the necessity of suicide switches. Furthermore, we address the compliance of such modified NK cells with regulatory requirements as a new field in cellular immunotherapy.

  12. Cryopreservation has no effect on function of natural killer cells differentiated in vitro from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells offer the potential for a powerful cellular immunotherapy because they can target malignant cells without being direct effectors of graft-versus-host disease. We have previously shown that high numbers of functional NK cells can be differentiated in vitro from umbilical cord blood (CB) CD34(+) cells. To develop a readily available, off-the-shelf cellular product, it is essential that NK cells differentiated in vitro can be frozen and thawed while maintaining the same phenotype and functions. We evaluated the phenotype and function of fresh and frozen NK cells differentiated in vitro. We also assessed whether the concentration of NK cells at the time of freezing had an impact on cell viability. We found that cell concentration of NK cells at the time of freezing did not have an impact on their viability and on cell recovery post-thaw. Moreover, freezing of differentiated NK cells in vitro did not affect their phenotype, cytotoxicity and degranulation capacity toward K562 cells, cytokine production and proliferation. We are therefore able to generate large numbers of functional NK cells from CB CD34(+) cells that maintain the same phenotype and function post-cryopreservation, which will allow for multiple infusions of a highly cytotoxic NK cell product. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human natural killer cells: their origin, receptors and function.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina; Pende, Daniela; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Biassoni, Roberto; Moretta, Alessandro

    2002-05-01

    The term of "natural killer" (NK) cells was originally assigned on a merely functional basis to lymphoid cells capable of lysing certain tumors in the absence of prior stimulation. However, both their origin and the molecular mechanism(s) involved in their function remained a mystery for many years 1. Regarding their origin, clear evidence has now been provided both in mouse and in man that NK and T cells may derive from a common precursor 2-5. Thus, mature NK cells can be obtained in vitro from CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood, bone marrow (BM) and even human thymus 6 when cultured in the presence of appropriate feeder cells or IL-15. The molecular mechanism allowing NK cells to discriminate between normal and tumor cells, predicted by the "missing self hypothesis" 7, has been clarified only in recent years. Thus, NK cells recognize MHC class I molecules through surface receptors delivering signals that inhibit, rather than activate, NK cells. As a consequence, NK cells lyse target cells that have lost (or express insufficient amounts of) MHC class I molecules, as frequently occurs in tumors and in cells infected by certain viruses.

  14. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  15. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions.

  16. Cutaneous presentation of steroid responsive blastoid natural killer cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bower, C P; Standen, G R; Pawade, J; Knechtli, C J; Kennedy, C T

    2000-05-01

    CD56+ lymphomas derived from natural killer (NK) cell lineage are rarely encountered in Western populations and their clinical and pathological features have not been fully defined. The majority of reported cases are lymphomas of the nasal cavity, which are most commonly seen in Asia. A subtype of CD56+ lymphoma has recently been described (blastoid NK-cell lymphoma) which characteristically presents in older patients with cutaneous infiltrates and disease at other nodal and extranodal sites. We describe a case that correlates well with the clinicopathological features of blastoid NK-cell lymphoma. An unusual feature in our patient was that the cutaneous features of the lymphoma showed complete resolution shortly following commencement of oral steroid therapy.

  17. Type I Interferons and Natural Killer Cell Regulation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lena; Aigner, Petra; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are known to mediate antitumor effects against several tumor types and have therefore been commonly used in clinical anticancer treatment. However, how IFN signaling exerts its beneficial effects is only partially understood. The clinically relevant activity of type I IFNs has been mainly attributed to their role in tumor immune surveillance. Different mechanisms have been postulated to explain how type I IFNs stimulate the immune system. On the one hand, they modulate innate immune cell subsets such as natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, type I IFNs also influence adaptive immune responses. Here, we review evidence for the impact of type I IFNs on immune surveillance against cancer and highlight the role of NK cells therein. PMID:28408907

  18. Cytokine induced killer cells as adoptive immunotherapy strategy to augment graft versus tumor after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, D; Mesiano, G; Carnevale-Schianca, F; Piacibello, W; Aglietta, M; Cignetti, A

    2009-07-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is used to increase the graft versus tumor (GVT) effect after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The limited spectrum of activity and high risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD) remain major limitations of this approach. The finding of new cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy, with the ability to separate GVT from GVHD, would be useful. Here we review the main basic, preclinical and clinical research on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, highlighting the aspects of their antitumor and alloreactive potentials that might favourably affect the balance between GVT and GVHD. CIK cells are ex vivo-expanded T lymphocytes sharing NK markers and endowed with a potent MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity against haematological and solid malignancies. Studies in preclinical animal models have demonstrated their low GVHD potential when infused across MHC-barriers, and recent clinical studies seem to confirm these findings in patients with hematological malignancies relapsing after HCT. If consolidated with larger clinical trials, adoptive immunotherapy with CIK cells might represent an effective alternative to classic DLI, helping HCT to succesfully meet current challenges like the extension across major HLA-barriers and application to solid tumors.

  19. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting natural killer T cell responses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Shissler, Susannah C; Bollino, Dominique R; Tiper, Irina V; Bates, Joshua P; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while type I NKT cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Role of Distinct Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Fionda, Cinzia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the prototypic member of innate lymphoid cells, are important effectors of anticancer immune response. These cells can survey and control tumor initiation due to their capability to recognize and kill malignant cells and to regulate the adaptive immune response via cytokines and chemokines release. However, several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK cells associated with advanced disease can have profound functional defects and display protumor activity. This evidence indicates that NK cell behavior undergoes crucial alterations during cancer progression. Moreover, a further level of complexity is due to the extensive heterogeneity and plasticity of these lymphocytes, implying that different NK cell subsets, endowed with specific phenotypic and functional features, may be involved and play distinct roles in the tumor context. Accordingly, many studies reported the enrichment of selective NK cell subsets within tumor tissue, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. A malignant microenvironment can significantly impact NK cell activity, by recruiting specific subpopulations and/or influencing their developmental programming or the acquisition of a mature phenotype; in particular, neoplastic, stroma and immune cells, or tumor-derived factors take part in these processes. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recently acquired knowledge on the possible contribution of distinct NK cell subsets in the control and/or progression of solid and hematological malignancies. Moreover, we will address emerging evidence regarding the role of different components of tumor microenvironment on shaping NK cell response. PMID:28360915

  1. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Natural killer T cell responses in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shissler, Susannah C.; Bollino, Dominique R.; Tiper, Irina V.; Bates, Joshua; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where Type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while Type I NKT cells can enhance antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27393665

  2. Role of human natural killer cells in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, T L; Herberman, R B

    1994-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the CD3- CD56+ CD16+ subset of peripheral blood lymphocytes, have long been known to be involved in non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted natural immunity to virally infected and malignant target cells. The association of abnormalities in NK cell numbers or functions with a broad spectrum of human diseases has been more clearly defined in recent years as a result of the improved knowledge of NK cell physiology and advances in monitoring of NK cell functions in health and disease. The ability to reliably measure changes in NK activity and/or numbers during the course of disease or response to treatment has focused attention on the role of the NK cell in disease pathogenesis. The improved understanding of NK cell deficiency in disease has opened a way for therapies specifically designed to improve NK cell function. The therapeutic use of biologic response modifiers capable of augmenting NK cell activity in vivo and of adoptive transfer of highly enriched, activated autologous NK cells in diseases such as cancer and AIDS is being evaluated. The importance of NK cells in health and the consequences of NK cell deficiency or excess are likely to be more extensively monitored in the future. PMID:7496932

  3. Characterization of Circulating Natural Killer Cells in Neotropical Primates

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Evans, Tristan I.; Reeves, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive use of nonhuman primates as models for infectious diseases and reproductive biology, imprecise phenotypic and functional definitions exist for natural killer (NK) cells. This deficit is particularly significant in the burgeoning use of small, less expensive New World primate species. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we identified peripheral blood NK cells as CD3-negative and expressing a cluster of cell surface molecules characteristic of NK cells (i.e., NKG2A, NKp46, NKp30) in three New World primate species – common marmosets, cotton-top tamarins, and squirrel monkeys. We then assessed subset distribution using the classical NK markers, CD56 and CD16. In all species, similar to Old World primates, only a minor subset of NK cells was CD56+, and the dominant subset was CD56–CD16+. Interestingly, CD56+ NK cells were primarily cytokine-secreting cells, whereas CD56–CD16+ NK cells expressed significantly greater levels of intracellular perforin, suggesting these cells might have greater potential for cytotoxicity. New World primate species, like Old World primates, also had a minor CD56–CD16– NK cell subset that has no obvious counterpart in humans. Herein we present phenotypic profiles of New World primate NK cell subpopulations that are generally analogous to those found in humans. This conservation among species should support the further use of these species for biomedical research. PMID:24244365

  4. Natural killer cell distribution and trafficking in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the recirculation of natural killer (NK) cells among human organs. Earlier studies have been often impaired by the use of markers then proved to be either not sufficiently specific for NK cells (e.g., CD57, CD56) or expressed only by subsets of NK cells (e.g., CD16). At the present, available data confirmed that human NK cells populate blood, lymphoid organs, lung, liver, uterus (during pregnancy), and gut. Several studies showed that NK cell homing appears to be subset-specific, as secondary lymphoid organs and probably several solid tissues are preferentially inhabited by CD56brightCD16neg/dull non-cytotoxic NK cells. Similar studies performed in the mouse model showed that lymph node and bone marrow are preferentially populated by CD11bdull NK cells while blood, spleen, and lung by CD27dull NK cells. Therefore, an important topic to be addressed in the human system is the contribution of factors that regulate NK cell tissue homing and egress, such as chemotactic receptors or homeostatic mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on NK cell distribution in peripheral tissues and, based on recent acquisitions, we propose our view regarding the recirculation of NK cells in the human body. PMID:23230434

  5. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Henk S; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell-deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance.

  6. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  7. Enhancing cytokine-induced killer cell therapy of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Chen, Yun-Wen; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-06-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are in clinical testing against various tumor types, including multiple myeloma. In this study, we show that CIK cells have activity against subcutaneous and disseminated models of human myeloma (KAS-6/1), which can be enhanced by infecting the CIK cells with an oncolytic measles virus (MV) or by pretreating the myeloma cells with ionizing radiation (XRT). KAS-6/1 cells were killed by coculture with CIK or MV-infected CIK (CIK/MV) cells, and the addition of an anti-NKG2D antibody inhibited cytolysis by 50%. However, human bone marrow stromal cells can reduce CIK and CIK/MV mediated killing of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, JJN-3 and MM1). In vivo, CIK and CIK/MV prolonged the survival of mice with systemic myeloma, although CIK/MV showed enhanced antitumor activity compared with CIK. Irradiation of the KAS-6/1 cells induced mRNA and protein expression of NKG2D ligands, MICA, and MICB in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced delivery of CIK/MV to the irradiated tumors. In both subcutaneous and disseminated myeloma models, XRT at 2 Gy resulted in superior prolongation of the survival of mice given CIK/MV therapy compared with CIK/MV with no XRT. This study demonstrates the potential of CIK against myeloma and that the combination of virotherapy with radiation could be used to further enhance therapeutic outcome using CIK cells.

  8. Activation strategies for invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlgruber, Ayano C; Donado, Carlos A; LaMarche, Nelson M; Brenner, Michael B; Brennan, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialized T cell subset that plays an important role in host defense, orchestrating both innate and adaptive immune effector responses against a variety of microbes. Specific microbial lipids and mammalian self lipids displayed by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d can activate iNKT cells through their semi-invariant αβ T cell receptors (TCRs). iNKT cells also constitutively express receptors for inflammatory cytokines typically secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and they can be activated through these cytokine receptors either in combination with TCR signals, or in some cases even in the absence of TCR signaling. During infection, experimental evidence suggests that both TCR-driven and cytokine-driven mechanisms contribute to iNKT cell activation. While the relative contributions of these two signaling mechanisms can vary widely depending on the infectious context, both lipid antigens and PAMPs mediate reciprocal activation of iNKT cells and APCs, leading to downstream activation of multiple other immune cell types to promote pathogen clearance. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in iNKT cell activation during infection, focusing on the central contributions of both lipid antigens and PAMP-induced inflammatory cytokines, and highlight in vivo examples of activation during bacterial, viral, and fungal infections.

  9. Natural killer cell biology: an update and future directions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kerry S; Hasegawa, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a minor subset of normal lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses toward tumor and virus-infected cells. They can mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity toward these abnormal cells and rapidly secrete numerous cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. Significant progress has been made in the past 2 decades to improve our understanding of NK cell biology. Here we review recent discoveries, including a better comprehension of the "education" of NK cells to achieve functional competence during their maturation and the discovery of "memory" responses by NK cells, suggesting that they might also contribute to adaptive immunity. The improved understanding of NK cell biology has forged greater awareness that these cells play integral early roles in immune responses. In addition, several promising clinical therapies have been used to exploit NK cell functions in treating patients with cancer. As our molecular understanding improves, these and future immunotherapies should continue to provide promising strategies to exploit the unique functions of NK cells to treat cancer, infections, and other pathologic conditions.

  10. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell–cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of “immune surveillance.” Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  11. Beta 2-adrenergic stimulation causes detachment of natural killer cells from cultured endothelium.

    PubMed

    Benschop, R J; Oostveen, F G; Heijnen, C J; Ballieux, R E

    1993-12-01

    Physical exercise, mental stress, or infusion of beta-adrenergic agonists result in an increase in the number of natural killer (NK) cells in the peripheral circulation. In view of the specific migration pattern of NK cells in vivo, it has been suggested that these cells may be released from the marginating pool in blood vessels. In the present report, the in vitro effect of catecholamines on the adhesion of NK cells to unstimulated human endothelial cells (EC) was characterized. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were allowed to adhere to monolayers of EC, after which the adherent lymphocyte fraction was analyzed phenotypically by flow cytometry. NK cells were found to adhere preferentially to EC, a process that was reversed by the addition of various adrenergic agonists. Catecholamines selectively affected adhesion of NK cells and had no effect on T cell adhesion to EC, as was determined by the use of purified cell populations. Detachment of NK cells from EC could be achieved by short incubations (5 min) with epinephrine (EPI) and was concentration-dependent, with an ED50 of 2 x 10(-10)M. Using a panel of alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists, we show that the detachment of NK cells is mediated via beta 2-adrenergic receptors. In line with the lower affinity for beta 2-adrenergic receptors, norepinephrine was less effective than EPI in inducing detachment of NK cells from EC. Direct activation of adenylate-cyclase with forskolin gave similar results as observed with EPI, indicating that signaling through cAMP is necessary to induce detachment of NK cells from EC. The results of the present study lend support to the hypothesis that catecholamines, via beta 2-adrenergic receptors, can induce recruitment of NK cells from the marginating pool to the circulating pool, by changing the adhesive interactions between NK cells and EC.

  12. Depletion of natural killer cells increases mice susceptibility in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Broquet, Alexis; Roquilly, Antoine; Jacqueline, Cédric; Potel, Gilles; Caillon, Jocelyne; Asehnoune, Karim

    2014-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a clinically relevant infection involved in pneumonia in ICUs. Understanding the type of immune response initiated by the host during pneumonia would help defining new strategies to interfere with the bacteria pathogenicity. In this setting, the role of natural killer cells remains controversial. We assessed the role of systemic natural killer cells in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa mouse pneumonia model. Experimental study. Research laboratory from a university hospital. RjOrl:SWISS and BALB/cJ mice (weight, 20-24 g). Lung injuries were assessed by bacterial load, myeloperoxidase activity, endothelial permeability (pulmonary edema), immune cell infiltrate (histological analysis), proinflammatory cytokine release, and Ly6-G immunohistochemistry. Bacterial loads were assessed in the lungs and spleen. Natural killer cell number and status were assessed in spleen (flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Depletion of natural killer cells was achieved through an IV anti-asialo-GM1 antibody injection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tracheal instillation led to an acute pneumonia with a rapid decrease of bacterial load in lungs and with an increase of endothelial permeability, proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β), and myeloperoxidase activity followed by Ly6-G positive cell infiltrate in lungs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in the spleen. Membrane markers of activation and maturation (CD69 and KLRG1 molecules) were increased in splenic natural killer cells during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Splenic natural killer cells activated upon Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection produced interferon-γ but not interleukin-10. Ultimately, mice depleted of natural killer cells displayed an increased neutrophil numbers in the lungs and an increased mortality rate without bacterial load modifications in the lungs, indicating that mice depleted of natural killer cells were much more susceptible to

  13. Frequency and phenotype of natural killer cells and natural killer cell subsets in bovine lymphoid compartments and blood.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Carly A; Mahan, Suman; Bell, Charlotte R; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Charleston, Bryan; Entrican, Gary; Hope, Jayne C

    2017-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are widely distributed in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, but little is known about the recirculation of NK cells between blood and tissues. This is relevant to understanding recirculation in the steady-state and also for determining the roles for NK cells in vaccine-induced immunity and responses to infection. Therefore, the percentage of NK cells and their phenotype across peripheral blood, afferent lymph and lymph nodes in steady-state conditions was investigated in cattle using the pseudo-afferent lymphatic cannulation model. CD2(+) CD25(lo) NK cells were the predominant subset of NK cells within the blood. In contrast, CD2(-) CD25(hi) NK cells were the main subset present within the skin-draining afferent lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes, indicating that CD2(-) NK cells are the principal NK cell subset trafficking to lymph nodes via the afferent lymphatic vessel. Furthermore, a low percentage of NK cells were present in efferent lymph, which were predominantly of the CD2(-) subset, indicating that NK cells can egress from lymph nodes and return to circulation in steady-state conditions. These compartmentalization data indicate that NK cells represent a population of recirculating lymphocytes in steady-state conditions and therefore may be important during immune responses to vaccination or infection. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immunosenescence: limitations of natural killer cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, Raquel; Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Casas-Avilés, Ignacio; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Morgado, Sara; López-Sejas, Nelson; Hassouneh, Fakhri; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Durán, Esther; Labella, Fernando; Solana, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Cancer is primarily considered a disease of old age. Immunosenescence refers to the age-associated changes in the immune system, and its contribution to the increased risk of cancer in old individuals has been discussed for many years. Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic innate immune cells specialized in defence against tumour and virus-infected cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is the result of a fine balance between activating and inhibitory receptors. Several activating receptors have been identified that recognize different ligands frequently found over-expressed on tumour cells or virus-infected cells. The most important NK cell inhibitory receptors interact with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules expressed on almost all nucleated cells preventing NK cell-mediated lysis of healthy cells. NK cell immunosenescence is characterized by a redistribution of NK cell subsets, a diminished expression of several activating receptors and lower per-cell cytotoxicity. Altered expression of activating receptors has also been described in young and elderly cancer patients probably due to chronic exposure to ligands on tumour cells. Thus, the effect of both age and cancer may act synergistically to diminish NK cell-mediated tumour immunosurveillance. Different strategies harnessing the power of NK cells to target tumour cells have been designed including adoptive therapy with autologous or allogeneic expanded NK cells. In addition, checkpoint blockade of inhibitory receptors and the use of agonist antibodies to stimulate activating receptors are emerging areas of research. In this context, the effect of immunosenescence should be considered to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Emerging role of Natural killer cells in oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a subtype of lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses against tumors and virus-infected cells. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or to produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. Therapies with NK cells involve activation of endogenous NK cells and/or exogenous transfer by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/adoptive cell therapy. To exploit the diverse functional abilities of NK cells for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand NK cell biology and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. The state of immune suppression prevalent in malignancies creates the need for innovative therapies. Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents showing selective tropism for tumor cells and lacking pathogenicity in humans, but the use of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT) presents multiple challenges. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the host immune response may critically influence the outcome of OVT. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy through virus clearance mediated by innate immune effectors or through adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells. Effective strategies do need to be designed in OVT to circumvent the early antiviral activity of NK cells and to augment late NK-cell-mediated antitumor responses. The intrinsic immunostimulating capacity of oncolytic viruses and the possibility of engineering them to express heterologous immunostimulatory molecules (eg, cytokines) support the use of these agents to enhance antitumor immune responses besides inducing direct oncolytic effects. OVT has indeed shown promising therapeutic outcomes in various clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of NK cells, strategies involving NK cells for achieving cancer therapy, and, more particularly, the emerging role of NK cells in OVT.

  16. Emerging role of Natural killer cells in oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a subtype of lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses against tumors and virus-infected cells. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or to produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. Therapies with NK cells involve activation of endogenous NK cells and/or exogenous transfer by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/adoptive cell therapy. To exploit the diverse functional abilities of NK cells for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand NK cell biology and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. The state of immune suppression prevalent in malignancies creates the need for innovative therapies. Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents showing selective tropism for tumor cells and lacking pathogenicity in humans, but the use of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT) presents multiple challenges. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the host immune response may critically influence the outcome of OVT. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy through virus clearance mediated by innate immune effectors or through adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells. Effective strategies do need to be designed in OVT to circumvent the early antiviral activity of NK cells and to augment late NK-cell-mediated antitumor responses. The intrinsic immunostimulating capacity of oncolytic viruses and the possibility of engineering them to express heterologous immunostimulatory molecules (eg, cytokines) support the use of these agents to enhance antitumor immune responses besides inducing direct oncolytic effects. OVT has indeed shown promising therapeutic outcomes in various clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of NK cells, strategies involving NK cells for achieving cancer therapy, and, more particularly, the emerging role of NK cells in OVT. PMID:27471713

  17. MicroRNA regulation of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ryan P.; Leong, Jeffrey W.; Fehniger, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes critical for host defense against viral infection and surveillance against malignant transformation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent advances have highlighted the importance of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in NK cell development, maturation, and function. This review focuses on several facets of this regulatory mechanism in NK cells: (1) the expressed NK cell miRNA transcriptome; (2) the impact of total miRNA deficiency on NK cells; (3) the role of specific miRNAs regulating NK cell development, survival, and maturation; (4) the intrinsic role of miRNAs regulating NK cell function, including cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity; and (5) the role of NK cell miRNAs in disease. Currently our knowledge of how miRNAs regulate NK cell biology is limited, and thus we also explore key open questions in the field, as well as approaches and techniques to ascertain the role of individual miRNAs as important molecular regulators. PMID:23450173

  18. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Henk S.; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F.J.; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell–deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue–resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance. PMID:22863618

  19. Invariant natural killer T cell-based immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2009-01-01

    Human Valpha24 invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a distinct lymphocyte population, characterized by an invariant T-cell receptor Valpha24 chain paired mainly with Valpha11. Valpha24 iNKT cells are activated by a glycolipid ligand - alpha-galactosylceramide - and produce a large amount of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, thereby modulating the function of other cells. iNKT cells have the capability to control a wide variety of immune responses, including antitumor immunity. Abnormalities in the number and function of Valpha24 iNKT cells have been observed in patients with malignant diseases accompanied with a poor clinical outcome. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that focused on the restoration of Valpha24 iNKT cell population and function would be a reasonable rationale for the treatment of cancer. In this article, the progress to date in the clinical studies of iNKT cell-based immunotherapy is briefly reviewed and the role of Valpha24 iNKT cells in cancer immunotherapy is highlighted.

  20. Developmental and Functional Control of Natural Killer Cells by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are effective in combating infections and tumors and as such are tempting for adoptive transfer therapy. However, they are not homogeneous but can be divided into three main subsets, including cytotoxic, tolerant, and regulatory NK cells, with disparate phenotypes and functions in diverse tissues. The development and functions of such NK cells are controlled by various cytokines, such as fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL), kit ligand (KL), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, transforming growth factor-β, and common-γ chain family cytokines, which operate at different stages by regulating distinct signaling pathways. Nevertheless, the specific roles of each cytokine that regulates NK cell development or that shapes different NK cell functions remain unclear. In this review, we attempt to describe the characteristics of each cytokine and the existing protocols to expand NK cells using different combinations of cytokines and feeder cells. A comprehensive understanding of the role of cytokines in NK cell development and function will aid the generation of better efficacy for adoptive NK cell treatment. PMID:28824650

  1. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease.

  2. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states.

  3. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiencke, John. K.; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A.; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E. Andres; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  4. Natural killer cells in immunodefense against infective agents.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Crozat, Karine; Baranek, Thomas; Robbins, Scott H; Altfeld, Marcus; Dalod, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Following the discovery of innate immune receptors, the topics of innate immunity and its role in defense against infective agents have recently blossomed into very active research fields, after several decades of neglect. Among innate immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells are endowed with the unique ability to recognize and kill cells infected with a variety of pathogens, irrespective of prior sensitization to these microbes. NK cells have a number of other functions, including cytokine production and immunoregulatory activities. Major advances have recently been made in the understanding of the role of NK cells in the physiopathology of infectious diseases. The cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the acquisition of effector functions by NK cells and their triggering upon pathogenic encounters are being unraveled. The possibility that the power of NK cells could be harnessed for the design of innovative treatments against infections is a major incentive for biologists to further explore NK cell subset complexity and to identify the ligands that activate NK cell receptors.

  5. Natural killer cells in immunodefense against infective agents

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Crozat, Karine; Baranek, Thomas; Robbins, Scott H; Altfeld, Marcus; Dalod, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of innate immune receptors, the topics of innate immunity and its role in defense against infective agents have recently blossomed into very active research fields, after several decades of neglect. Among innate immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells are endowed with the unique ability to recognize and kill cells infected with a variety of pathogens, irrespective of prior sensitization to these microbes. NK cells have a number of other functions, including cytokine production and immunoregulatory activities. Major advances have recently been made in the understanding of the role of NK cells in the physiopathology of infectious diseases. The cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the acquisition of effector functions by NK cells and their triggering upon pathogenic encounters are being unraveled. The possibility that the power of NK cells could be harnessed for the design of innovative treatments against infections is a major incentive for biologists to further explore NK cell subset complexity and to identify the ligands that activate NK cell receptors. PMID:19053900

  6. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24176852

  7. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Communication between natural killer T cells and adipocytes in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Masashi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipose tissue contains various types of immunocompetent cells, and these cells of innate and adaptive immunity control adipose tissue inflammation that blunts insulin sensitivity. Recent studies have shown that adipocytes express CD1d and present lipid antigen(s) to activate natural killer T (NKT) cells. The function of adipocytes is in turn modulated by cytokines that NKT cells produce to alter the expression of anti-inflammatory adipokine(s) and the production of inflammatory and chemoattractant cytokines. These in vitro studies imply that the interaction between adipocytes and NKT cells might affect the development of not only obesity but also obesity-related diseases. To test the importance of the interaction between NKT cells and adipocytes, we examined whether an adipocyte-specific CD1d deletion affected the development of obesity, which had been demonstrated with B6.CD1d−/− (CD1d KO). We found that the interaction is indeed important to induce adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in response to lipid excess. In this commentary, the advances and controversies on NKT cells and obesity are discussed based on our recent report that NKT cells play a pivotal role in the regulation of adipose tissue by communicating with adipocytes via CD1d. PMID:27994954

  9. Uterine natural killer cells in patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Kuon, Ruben-J; Weber, Maja; Heger, Julia; Santillán, Isabel; Vomstein, Kilian; Bär, Christin; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R; Toth, Bettina

    2017-10-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells are major players during implantation and early pregnancy. The aim of our study was to analyze uNK cell concentration in the endometrium of idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (iRM) patients and fertile controls. Out of n=130 couples with ≥3 consecutive, clinical RM screened according to a standardized diagnostic protocol, n=58 patients with iRM were identified. Endometrial biopsies were investigated in patients and n=17 fertile women (controls) via immunohistochemistry. Compared to controls, the concentration of uNK cells was significantly higher in iRM patients (257±212 vs. 148±73 uNK cells/mm², P=.04). IRM patients showed a higher prevalence of >300 uNK cells/mm² than controls (34.5% vs. 5.9%, P=.02). In 88% of controls and 62% of iRM patients, uNK cells were detected within the range of 40-300/mm². Idiopathic recurrent miscarriage patients showed higher uNK cell levels than controls supporting the possible impact of uNK cells in the pathophysiology of miscarriage. Our cutoff levels might help to select RM patients which may benefit from immunomodulatory treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of murine natural killer cells on Cryptococcus neoformans

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavi Nouri, N.

    1985-01-01

    Previous data generated by Murphy and McDaniel indicate that normal murine nylon wool nonadherent splenic cells, with the characteristics of natural killer (NK) cells, effectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like pathogen. Nylon wood nonadherent cells from spleens of 7-8 week old mice were further fractionated on discontinuous Percoll gradients. The enrichment of NK cells in Percoll fractions 1 and 2 was confirmed by morphological examination, immunofluorescent staining, and by assessing the cytolytic activity of each Percoll cell fraction against YAC-1 targets in the 4 h /sup 51/Cr release assay. Cells isolated from each Percoll fraction were tested for growth inhibitory activity against C neoformans, using an in vitro 18 h growth inhibition assay. The results showed that NK cell enrichment was concomitant with the enrichment of anti-cryptococcal activity the Percoll fractions 1 and 2. An immunolabeling method combined with scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the effector cells attached to C. neoformans were asialo GM/sub 1/ positive and, therefore, had NK cell characteristics. NK cells have Fc receptors on their surfaces , and are capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against IgG-coated target cells. The author examined the effects of the IgG fraction of rabbit anti-cryptococcal antibody on the NK cell-mediated growth inhibition of C. neoformans. The data indicated that the effector cells involved in antibody-dependent growth inhibition of cryptococci are either NK cells or copurify and coexist in the same population with NK cells.

  11. Increased killer immunoglobulin-like receptor expression and functional defects in natural killer cells in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al Omar, Suliman Y; Marshall, Ernie; Middleton, Derek; Christmas, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    Frequencies of natural killer (NK) cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or small cell lung cancer (SCLC) did not differ from healthy controls. A higher proportion of NK cells from NSCLC patients expressed the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) CD158b than in controls (P = 0·0004), in the presence or absence of its ligand, HLA-C1. A similar result was obtained for CD158e in the presence of its ligand HLA-Bw4 in NSCLC patients (P = 0·003); this was entirely attributable to the Bw4I group of alleles in the presence of which a fivefold higher percentage of CD158e+ NK cells was found in NSCLC patients than controls. Proportions of CD158b+ NK cells declined with advancing disease in NSCLC patients. Expression of NKp46, CD25 and perforin A, and production of interferon-γ following stimulation with interleukin-12 and interleukin-18, were all significantly lower in NK cells from NSCLC patients than in controls. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and granzyme B expression were also reduced in lung cancer patients. Increased inhibitory KIR expression would decrease NK cell cytotoxic function against tumour cells retaining class I HLA expression. Furthermore, the reduced ability to produce interferon-γ would restrict the ability of NK cells to stimulate T-cell responses in patients with lung cancer. PMID:21342183

  12. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL.

  13. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  14. Inborn errors of the development of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Gineau, Laure; Cottineau, Julien; Béziat, Vivien; Vivier, Eric; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Inborn errors of human natural killer (NK) cells may affect the development of these cells, their function, or both. There are two broad categories of genetic defects of NK cell development, depending on whether the deficiency is apparently specific to NK cells or clearly affects multiple hematopoietic lineages. We review here recent progress in the genetic dissection of these NK deficiencies (NKDs). Patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies bearing mutations of adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase 2, interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain, and Janus kinase 3 genes present NKDs and are prone to a broad range of infections. Patients with GATA binding protein 2 deficiency are susceptible to both mycobacterial and viral infections, and display NKDs and a lack of monocytes. Rare patients with mini chromosomal maintenance 4 deficiency display an apparently selective NKD associated with viral infections, but they also display various nonhematopoietic phenotypes, including adrenal insufficiency and growth retardation. These studies have initiated a genetic dissection of the development of human NK cells. Further studies are warranted, including the search for genetic causes of NKD in particular. This research may lead to the discovery of molecules specifically controlling the development of NK cells and to improvements in our understanding of the hitherto elusive function of these cells in humans.

  15. Id2 regulates hyporesponsive invariant natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradner, Martin H; Cheung, Kitty P; Lasorella, Anna; Goldrath, Ananda W; D’Cruz, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    While the invariant natural killer T (iNKT)-cell response to primary stimulation with the glycolipid, α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), is robust, the secondary response to this stimulus is muted resulting in a hyporesponsive state characterized by anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production and high expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD1) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1). The E protein transcription factors and their negative regulators, the Id proteins, have previously been shown to regulate iNKT cell thymic development, subset differentiation and peripheral survival. Here, we provide evidence that the expression of the transcriptional regulator Id2 is downregulated upon stimulation of iNKT cells with their cognate antigen. Moreover, loss of Id2 expression by iNKT cells resulted in a hyporesponsive state, with splenic Id2-deficient iNKT cells expressing low levels of TBET, high levels of PD1 and NRP1 and production of IL-10 upon stimulation. We propose that downregulation of Id2 expression is an essential component of induction of the anti-inflammatory, hyporesponsive state in iNKT cells. PMID:26880074

  16. Neutrophil depletion impairs natural killer cell maturation, function, and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Baptiste N.; Donadieu, Jean; Cognet, Céline; Bernat, Claire; Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Barlogis, Vincent; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fenis, Aurore; Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Beaupain, Blandine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Bajénoff, Marc; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow (BM)–derived granular lymphocytes involved in immune defense against microbial infections and tumors. In an N-ethyl N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis strategy, we identified a mouse mutant with impaired NK cell reactivity both in vitro and in vivo. Dissection of this phenotype showed that mature neutrophils were required both in the BM and in the periphery for proper NK cell development. In mice lacking neutrophils, NK cells displayed hyperproliferation and poor survival and were blocked at an immature stage associated with hyporesponsiveness. The role of neutrophils as key regulators of NK cell functions was confirmed in patients with severe congenital neutropenia and autoimmune neutropenia. In addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, mature neutrophils are thus endowed with immunoregulatory functions that are conserved across species. These findings reveal novel types of cooperation between cells of the innate immune system and prompt examination of NK cell functional deficiency in patients suffering from neutropenia-associated diseases. PMID:22393124

  17. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field.

  18. Natural killer cells in patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carole; Baier, Céline; Colle, Julien G; Chelbi, Rabie; Rihet, Pascal; Le Treut, Thérèse; Imbert, Jean; Sébahoun, Gérard; Venton, Geoffroy; Costello, Régis T

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are pivotal cells of innate immunity. They are potent antileukemic cytotoxic effectors. A defect in their cytotoxicity has been described in some hematopoietic malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. This defect is at least partially linked to a decreased or absent expression of some activating NK cells molecules, more particularly the so-called natural cytotoxicity receptors. In the present study, we more particularly focused our attention on NK cells of polycythemia vera, a myeloproliferative disease characterized by the presence of mutated JAK2 tyrosine kinase. The polymerase chain reaction analysis of NK cells from patients showed that they expressed the mutated form of JAK2. In polycythemia vera the proportion of NK was increased compared to healthy donors. The proliferative and cytotoxic abilities of NK cells from patients were similar to healthy donors. Expression of activating or inhibitory receptors was comparable in patients and donors, with nonetheless an imbalance for the inhibitory form of the CD158a,h couple of receptors in patients. Finally, the transcriptomic profile analysis clearly identified a discriminant signature between NK cells from patients and donors that could putatively be the consequence of abnormal continuous activation of mutated JAK2.

  19. The anti-tumour activity of allogeneic cytokine-induced killer cells in patients who relapse after allogeneic transplant for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Linn, Y-C; Niam, M; Chu, S; Choong, A; Yong, H-X; Heng, K-K; Hwang, W; Loh, Y; Goh, Y-T; Suck, G; Chan, M; Koh, M

    2012-07-01

    We performed a Phase I/II clinical trial to study the feasibility, toxicity and efficacy of allogeneic cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell expansion, and treatment for patients with haematological malignancies who relapsed after allogeneic haemopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). Allogeneic CIK cells were successfully generated for a total of 24 patients, including those from patients' own leukapheresis products in 5 patients who had no access to further donor cells. The median CD3(+) T-cell expansion was 9.33 (1.3-38.97) fold, and CD3(+)CD56(+) natural killer (NK)-like T-cell expansion was 27.77 (2.59-438.93) fold. A total of 55 infusions were done for 16 patients who had either failed or progressed after initial response to various individualized chemotherapy regimens and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), at doses ranging from 10 to 200 million CD3(+) cells/kg. Response attributable to CIK cell infusion was observed in five patients. These included two with ALL, two with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and one with AML, and two of whom had a response sustained for more than 2 years. Acute GVHD occurred in three and was easily treatable. This study provides some evidence suggestive of the efficacy of allogeneic CIK cells even after failure of DLI in some cases.

  20. In vitro Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucia; Portugal, Raquel; Valentín, Jaime; Martín, Roberto; Maxwell, Hannah; González-Vicent, Marta; Díaz, Miguel Ángel; de Prada, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    How the immune system attacks medulloblastoma (MB) tumors effectively is unclear, although natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in immune defense against tumor cells. Interactions between receptors on NK cells and ligands expressed by tumor cells are critical for tumor control by immunotherapy. In this study, we analyzed tumor samples from 54 MB patients for expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A (MICA) and UL16 binding protein (ULPB-2), which are ligands for the NK group 2 member D activatory receptor (NKG2D). The percentage of MICA and ULBP-2 positive cells was higher than 25% in 68% and 6% of MB patients, respectively. A moderate-high intensity of MICA cytoplasmic staining was observed in 46% MB patients and weak ULBP-2 staining was observed in 8% MB patients. No correlation between MICA/ULBP-2 expression and patient outcome was found. We observed that HTB-186, a MB cell line, was moderately resistant to NK cell cytotoxicity in vitro. Blocking MICA/ULBP-2 on HTB-186, and NKG2D receptor on NK cells increased resistance to NK cell lysis in vitro. However, HLA class I blocking on HTB-186 and overnight incubation with IL-15 stimulated NK cells efficiently killed tumor cells in vitro. We conclude that although NKG2D/MICA-ULBP-2 interactions have a role in NK cell cytotoxicity against MB, high expression of HLA class I can protect MB from NK cell cytotoxicity. Even so, our in vitro data indicate that if NK cells are appropriately stimulated, they may have the potential to target MB in vivo. PMID:23626949

  1. Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Kill Chemo-surviving Melanoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gammaitoni, Loretta; Giraudo, Lidia; Macagno, Marco; Leuci, Valeria; Mesiano, Giulia; Rotolo, Ramona; Sassi, Francesco; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Zaccagna, Alessandro; Pisacane, Alberto; Senetta, Rebecca; Cangemi, Michela; Cattaneo, Giulia; Martin, Valentina; Coha, Valentina; Gallo, Susanna; Pignochino, Ymera; Sapino, Anna; Grignani, Giovanni; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: The MHC-unrestricted activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against chemo-surviving melanoma cancer stem cells (mCSC) was explored, as CSCs are considered responsible for chemoresistance and relapses.Experimental Design: Putative mCSCs were visualized by engineering patient-derived melanoma cells (MC) with a lentiviral vector encoding eGFP under expression control by stemness gene promoter oct4 Their stemness potential was confirmed in vivo by limiting dilution assays. We explored the sensitivity of eGFP(+) mCSCs to chemotherapy (CHT), BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) or CIK cells, as single agents or in sequence, in vitro First, we treated MCs in vitro with fotemustine or dabrafenib (BRAF-mutated cases); then, surviving MCs, enriched in mCSCs, were challenged with autologous CIK cells. CIK cell activity against chemoresistant mCSCs was confirmed in vivo in two distinct immunodeficient murine models.Results: We visualized eGFP(+) mCSCs (14% ± 2.1%) in 11 MCs. The tumorigenic precursor rate in vivo was higher within eGFP(+) MCs (1/42) compared with the eGFP(-) counterpart (1/4,870). In vitro mCSCs were relatively resistant to CHT and BRAFi, but killed by CIK cells (n = 11, 8/11 autologous), with specific lysis ranging from 95% [effector:tumor ratio (E:T), 40:1] to 20% (E:T 1:3). In vivo infusion of autologous CIK cells into mice bearing xenografts from three distinct melanomas demonstrated significant tumor responses involving CHT-spared eGFP(+) mCSCs (P = 0.001). Sequential CHT-immunotherapy treatment retained antitumor activity (n = 12, P = 0.001) reducing mCSC rates (P = 0.01).Conclusions: These findings are the first demonstration that immunotherapy with CIK cells is active against autologous mCSCs surviving CHT or BRAFi. An experimental platform for mCSC study and rationale for CIK cells in melanoma clinical study is provided. Clin Cancer Res; 23(9); 2277-88. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Analysis of invariant natural killer T cells in human paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Vanessa Gomes; Moreira-Teixeira, Lúcia; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria C; Benard, Gil

    2011-11-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of recognizing lipid antigens and secreting Th1/Th2 cytokines. Deficiency in iNKT cell number or function has been partially implicated in susceptibility to some infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. We evaluated iNKT cells in paracoccidioidomycosis, another chronic granulomatous disease endemic in Latin America. iNKT cells were detected using PBS57-loaded tetramer staining and flow cytometry. Circulating iNKT cell numbers were similar among healthy individuals who had previously been cured of paracoccidioidomycosis (susceptible individuals, n = 7) and healthy Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-infected (n = 5) and non-infected individuals (n = 5). iNKT from all three groups expanded similarly upon α-GalCer and a synthetic analog (OCH) stimulation. IFN-γ was the dominant cytokine produced both by ex vivo and by expanded iNKT cells, followed by IL-4 and IL-10, in the three groups. No deficit in the monocyte expression of CD1d was detected. In conclusion, individuals who had developed paracoccidioidomycosis in the past have no impairment in iNKT number, expansion capacity, and cytokine secretion.

  3. Heterogeneity of natural killer cells in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lust, J.A.; Kumar, V.; Burton, R.C.; Bartlett, S.P.; Bennett, M.

    1981-08-01

    Mice were treated with the bone-seeking isotope, 89Sr, cyclophosphamide, and short-term lethal irradiation in vivo, and murine spleen cells are treated with anti-Nk-1.2 plus complement (C) in vitro. Fresh spleen cell suspensions from the above groups and from beige and neonatal mice were subsequently tested for natural killer (NK) cell activity against a panel of lymphoid and nonlymphoid tumor cell target. NK cell reactivities against YAC-1, MPC-11, and Cl.18 tumors were markedly and consistently reduced in (a) mice treated with 89Sr, (b) spleen cells treated with anti-Nk-1.2 plus C, and (c) C57BL/6 bg/bg mice. In contrast, NK activities against FLD-3 and WEHI-164.1 tumors were usually normal in mice treated with 89Sr, in beige mutant mice, and in spleen cells after treatment with anti-Nk-1.2 antibody and C. It appears, therefore, that two major groups of NK cells exist in fresh mouse spleen cells suspensions. NK-A cells are marrow dependent, Nk antigen positive, and deficient in beige mice; these lyse YAC-1, MPC-11, and Cl.18 tumors. NK-B cells, which are responsible for the lysis of WEHI-164.1 and FLD-3, are Nk antigen negative, marrow independent, and unaffected by the bg/bg mutation. Other features of NK-B cells, suggest that these NK cells, although they share the characteristics mentioned above, differ among themselves especially with respect to age of maturation and susceptibility to cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. The NK-B group may therefore induce subsets that remain to be defined.

  4. Analysis of uterine natural killer cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Croy, B Anne; Zhang, Jianhong; Tayade, Chandrakant; Colucci, Francesco; Yadi, Hakim; Yamada, Aureo T

    2010-01-01

    The term uterine natural killer (uNK) cell is applied in mice to an abundant but transient NK cell population that undergoes unique, terminal differentiation within embryo implantation sites during endometrial decidualization and pregnancy. In mice, decidualization is induced by attachment and implantation of hatched, blastocyst-stage embryos. Within each implantation site, uNK cells proliferate and rapidly differentiate into highly restricted regions called decidua basalis and the mesometrial lymphoid aggregate of pregnancy (MLAp). uNK cells begin to die within healthy decidua basalis by day 8 of the 19-20 day pregnancy of mice. By gestation day 12, uNK cell numbers have peaked and most uNK cells show in situ nuclear fragmentation indicative of disintegration. Morphological studies (standard histology, ultrastructure, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and RNA analyses from laser capture microdissected uNK cells) have provided most of the current understanding regarding this cell lineage. These approaches identified the special angiogenic properties of uNK cells and their regulatory relationships with normal physiological changes to the uterine (endometrial) arterial tree that accompany successful pregnancy. This chapter highlights key information needed for successful dissection of the dynamically changing decidua basalis that is enriched in uNK cells and special morphological procedures used for uNK cell study. Preparation of viable mouse uNK cell suspensions is difficult but can be achieved. This chapter includes techniques for isolation of uterine leukocyte suspensions and their enrichment for uNK cells that permit immediate downstream applications such as culture, isolation of high quality RNA, or flow cytometry.

  5. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.; Sidell N.; Hagiwara, S.

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K/sup +/) current in NK cells. The K/sup +/ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd/sup 2 +/. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd/sup 2 +/, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K/sup +/ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K/sup +/ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process.

  6. Good manufacturing practices production of natural killer cells for immunotherapy: a six-year single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    McKenna, David H; Sumstad, Darin; Bostrom, Nancy; Kadidlo, Diane M; Fautsch, Susan; McNearney, Sarah; Dewaard, Rose; McGlave, Philip B; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Wagner, John E; McCullough, Jeffrey; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2007-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a subset of lymphocytes and part of the innate immune system, play a crucial role in defense against cancer and viral infection. Herein is a report on the experience of clinical-scale, good manufacturing practices (GMPs) production of NK cells to treat advanced cancer. Two types of NK cell enrichments were performed on nonmobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell apheresis collections with a cell selection system (CliniMACS, Miltenyi): CD3 cell depletion to enrich for NK cells and CD3 cell depletion followed by CD56 cell selection to obtain a more pure NK cell product. After overnight incubation with interleukin-2 (IL-2), cells were washed, resuspended in 5 percent human serum albumin, and then released for infusion. A total of 70 NK cell therapy products have been manufactured for patient infusion since 2000. For the CD3 cell-depleted NK cell products, the mean purity, recovery, and viability were 38, 79, and 86 percent, respectively. For the CD3 cell-depleted/CD56 cell-enriched NK cell products, the mean purity, recovery, and viability were 90, 19, and 85 percent, respectively. Gram stain, sterility, and endotoxin testing were all within acceptable limits for established lot release. Compared to the resting processed cells, IL-2 activation significantly increased the function of cells in cytotoxicity assays. Clinical-scale production of NK cells is efficient and can be performed under GMPs. The purified NK cell product results in high NK cell purity with minimal contamination by T cells, monocytes, and B cells, but it requires more time for processing and results in a lower NK cell recovery when compared to NK cell enrichment with CD3 cell depletion alone. Additional laboratory studies and results from clinical trials will identify the best source and type of NK cell product.

  7. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

    PubMed

    Song, Haifeng; Josleyn, Nicole; Janosko, Krisztina; Skinner, Jeff; Reeves, R Keith; Cohen, Melanie; Jett, Catherine; Johnson, Reed; Blaney, Joseph E; Bollinger, Laura; Jennings, Gerald; Jahrling, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV) infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation), followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8) of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  8. Monkeypox Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques Induces Massive Expansion of Natural Killer Cells but Suppresses Natural Killer Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haifeng; Josleyn, Nicole; Janosko, Krisztina; Skinner, Jeff; Reeves, R. Keith; Cohen, Melanie; Jett, Catherine; Johnson, Reed; Blaney, Joseph E.; Bollinger, Laura; Jennings, Gerald; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV) infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation), followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8) of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques. PMID:24147080

  9. Granule-Dependent Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity to Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Mody, Christopher H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill or inhibit the growth of a number of fungi including Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, and Paracoccidioides. Although many fungi are not dangerous, invasive fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, cause life-threatening disease in individuals with impaired cell-mediated immunity. While there are similarities to cell-mediated killing of tumor cells, there are also important differences. Similar to tumor killing, NK cells directly kill fungi in a receptor-mediated and cytotoxic granule-dependent manner. Unlike tumor cell killing where multiple NK cell-activating receptors cooperate and signal events that mediate cytotoxicity, only the NKp30 receptor has been described to mediate signaling events that trigger the NK cell to mobilize its cytolytic payload to the site of interaction with C. neoformans and Candida albicans, subsequently leading to granule exocytosis and fungal killing. More recently, the NKp46 receptor was reported to bind Candida glabrata adhesins Epa1, 6, and 7 and directly mediate fungal clearance. A number of unanswered questions remain. For example, is only one NK cell-activating receptor sufficient for signaling leading to fungal killing? Are the signaling pathways activated by fungi similar to those activated by tumor cells during NK cell killing? How do the cytolytic granules traffic to the site of interaction with fungi, and how does this process compare with tumor killing? Recent insights into receptor use, intracellular signaling and cytolytic granule trafficking during NK cell-mediated fungal killing will be compared to tumor killing, and the implications for therapeutic approaches will be discussed. PMID:28123389

  10. Decidual Cell Regulation of Natural Killer Cell–Recruiting Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Huang, S. Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F.; Schatz, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56brightCD16− decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell–derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell–recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56brightCD16− pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56dimCD16+ pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age–matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  11. Evolution of non-cytotoxic uterine natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kalkunte, Satyan; Chichester, Clinton O; Gotsch, Francesca; Sentman, Charles L; Romero, Roberto; Sharma, Surendra

    2008-05-01

    The immune tolerance and de novo vascularization are two highly intriguing processes at the maternal-fetal interface that appear to be central to normal pregnancy outcome. Immune tolerance occurs despite the local presence of an active maternal immune system including macrophages, dendritic cells and specialized CD56(bright)CD16(-) uterine natural killer (uNK) cells (65-70%). Recent observations indicate that the phenotypic and functional repertoire of uNK cells is distinct from peripheral blood NK and endometrial NK cells, challenging the understanding of their temporal occurrence and function. Origin and specialized programming of uNK cells continue to be debated. uNK cells, replete with an armamentarium to kill the foreign, tolerate the conceptus and facilitate pregnancy. Why do these uNK cells remain non-cytotoxic? Are these NK cells 'multitasking' in nature harboring beneficial and detrimental roles in pregnancy? Are there distinct subpopulations of NK cells that may populate the decidua? We propose that the endometrium/decidua functions as an 'inducible tertiary lymphoid tissue' that supports the recruitment and expansion of CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells and induces transcriptional up-regulation of angiogenic machinery in response to exposure to local hormonal factors, cytokine milieu and perhaps hypoxia. The angiogenic features of uNK cells could further result in a 'multitasking' phenotype that still remains to be characterized. This article discusses the factors and pathways that bridge the angiogenic and non-cytotoxic response machineries at the maternal-fetal interface.

  12. Cardif (MAVS) Regulates the Maturation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, LaTeira D.; Verma, Shilpi; McDonald, Bryan; Wu, Runpei; Tacke, Robert; Ekstein, Jennifer; Feuvrier, Ariana; Benedict, Chris A.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardif, also known as IPS-1, VISA and, MAVS, is an intracellular adaptor protein that functions downstream of the RIG-I family of pattern recognition receptors. Cardif is required for the production of type I-IFNs and other inflammatory cytokines after RIG-I like receptors recognize intracellular antigenic RNA. Studies have recently shown that Cardif may have other roles in the immune system in addition to its role in viral immunity. In this study, we find that the absence of Cardif alters normal natural killer cell development and maturation. Cardif−/− mice have a 35% loss of mature CD27−CD11b+ NK cells in the periphery. Additionally, Cardif−/− NK cells have altered surface marker expression, lower cytoxicity, decreased intracellular STAT1 levels, increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation compared to wild-type NK cells. Mixed chimeric mice revealed that the defective maturation and increased apoptotic rate of peripheral Cardif−/− NK cells is cell-intrinsic. However, Cardif−/− mice showed enhanced control of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV, a DNA β-herpesvirus) by NK cells, commensurate with increased activation and IFNγ production by these immature NK cell subsets. These results indicate that the skewed differentiation and altered STAT expression of Cardif−/− NK cells can result in their hyper-responsiveness in some settings, and support recent findings that Cardif-dependent signaling can regulate aspects of immune cell development and/or function distinct from its well characterized role in mediating cell-intrinsic defense to RNA viruses. PMID:26232430

  13. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T J; Cheent, K S; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J A; Jayaraman, J; Trowsdale, J; Alexander, G J; Little, A-M; McFarlane, H; Heneghan, M A; Purbhoo, M A; Khakoo, S I

    2017-01-01

    Objective Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Design Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using gene expression analysis and donor:recipient HLA typing. Results NK cells from non-HCV LT recipients were hypofunctional, with reduced expression of NKp46 (p<0.05) and NKp30 (p<0.001), reduced cytotoxicity (p<0.001) and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion (p<0.025). There was no segregation of this effect with HLA-C, and these functional changes were not observed in individuals with HCV. Microarray and RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated downregulation of STAT4 in NK cells from LT recipients (p<0.0001). Changes in the expression levels of the transcription factors Helios (p=0.06) and Hobit (p=0.07), which control NKp46 and IFNγ expression, respectively, were also detected. Hypofunctionality of NK cells was associated with impaired STAT4 phosphorylation and downregulation of the STAT4 target microRNA-155. Conversely in HCV-LT NK cell tolerance was reversed, consistent with the more aggressive outcome of LT for HCV. Conclusions LT is associated with transcriptional and functional changes in NK cells, resulting in reduced activation. NK cell tolerance occurs upstream of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I mediated education, and is associated with deficient STAT4 phosphorylation. STAT4 therefore represents a potential therapeutic target to induce NK cell tolerance in liver disease. PMID:26887815

  14. [Additive effect of marihuana and retrovirus in the anergy of natural killer cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Specter, S; Horváth, A; Friedman, H

    1999-01-10

    Among the immunosuppressive effects of marijuana, impairment of natural killer cell activity is significant. HIV also inhibits these cells. Friend leukemia virus complex and its helper component Rowson-Parr virus induce early immunosuppression in mice resembling human AIDS, and late leukemia, providing a small animal AIDS model. Leukemia susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice were infected with these viruses. At different time points, their natural killer cells separated from spleens were treated with 0 to 10 micrograms/ml tetrahydrocannabinol, subsequently mixed with Yac-1 target cells for 4 and 18 h. The natural killer cell activity in both mouse strains infected by either virus complex or helper virus weakened on days 2 to 4 postinfection, normalized by day 8 and enhanced on days 11 to 14. Natural killer cell activity upon the effect of low concentration (1.0 to 2.5 micrograms/ml) of tetrahydrocannabinol slightly increased in BALB/c, was unaffected in C57BL/6, especially in 18 h assays. In the combined effects of marijuana and retrovirus, damages by marijuana dominated over those of retroviruses. Inhibition or reactive enhancement of natural killer cell activity on the effect of viruses are similar to those of infected but marijuana-free counterparts, but on the level of uninfected cells treated with marijuana. The effects of marijuana and retrovirus are additive resulting in anergy of natural killer cells.

  15. Effect of Schlafen 2 on natural killer and T cell development from common T/natural killer progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S; Veinotte, L L

    2011-11-15

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are thought to develop from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow. Even though thymus is not essential for NK cell development, T-cell/natural killer-cell (T/NK) precursors, DN1 (CD44+CD25-) and DN2 (CD44+CD25+) when cultured on an OP9 stroma, give rise to some NK1.1 cells. Genes of the Schlafen (Slfn) family are involved in hematopoietic and immune processes. The contribution of the Slfn genes in NK cell development from Double Negative (DN) cells is unknown. We transduced DN1 and DN2 progenitors prepared from C57BL/6 (B6) mouse thymus with Schlafen 1 (Slfnl) and Schlafen 2 (Slfn2) genes using Mig retroviral vector containing the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene and cultured those transduced progenitors on OP9 and OP9 stroma expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (OP9-DL 1) with appropriate cytokines to see if they affect generating NK and T-cells differently. Maturation of both NK and T cells from immature T/NK thymocytes hampered by Slfn1 and Slfn2 transduction but we got a small number of Slfn1 and Slfn2 expressing cells upon culture of transduced DN progenitors on stroma cells. There was no difference between Slfn1 expressing (GFP+) and none expressing T cells regarding CD3 expression but all mature NK cells were from Slfn1 negative population. Slfn2 completely blocked maturation of T cells but there was no difference between Slfn2 expressing and none expressing NK cells. Based on our findings both Slfn1 and Slfn2 interfere with maturation of DN2 progenitors but T cell development is more sensitive to Slfn2 expression than NK cell.

  16. Natural killer cell function in trisomy-21 (Down's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Nurmi, T; Huttunen, K; Lassila, O; Henttonen, M; Säkkinen, A; Linna, S L; Tiilikainen, A

    1982-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) activity and antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against a human myeloid target cell line (K 562) was measured in adult patients with trisomy-21 (Down's syndrome) and in chromosomally normal age and sex matched control subjects. The effect of human leucocyte interferon (IFN-alpha) on the NK activity was also estimated. Spontaneous NK activity was stronger in the adult patients with trisomy-21 than in the healthy controls, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The augmentation of NK activity by IFN-alpha, measured using lymphocytes not depleted of monocytes as effector cells, was statistically significant in both the trisomic patients (P less than 0.004) and the healthy controls (P less than 0.0005). Using monocyte and macrophage depleted lymphocytes in the patients with trisomy-21 the NK activity proved stronger than in the healthy controls, but not significantly and IFN-alpha did not augment it as it did in the healthy controls (P = n.s., P less than 0.05), for augmentations respectively). These results support the view that monocytes and macrophages are connected with the NK cell system. ADCC correlated with NK activity in both groups. Since NK cells are important components of many immune processes, including tumour and virus and/or bacteria-infected cell elimination, and have regulatory functions in immune reactions, the deficient augmentation of trisomic NK cells shown in vitro with extrinsic human leucocyte interferon may, paradoxically be an explanation for the greater susceptibility of trisomic individuals to lymphatic leukaemia and virus and bacterial infections. In vivo, this could be explained by the more potent secondary suppression by the 'immune' interferon produced by the virus, bacteria and malignant cells. In other words, the potential of the 'fighting couple' of the immune system, NK cell/interferon, is perhaps disturbed genetically due to the chromosome 21. PMID:6177458

  17. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered cytokine-induced killer cells overcome treatment resistance of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and enhance survival.

    PubMed

    Oelsner, Sarah; Wagner, Juliane; Friede, Miriam E; Pfirrmann, Verena; Genßler, Sabrina; Rettinger, Eva; Buchholz, Christian J; Pfeifer, Heike; Schubert, Ralf; Ottmann, Oliver G; Ullrich, Evelyn; Bader, Peter; Wels, Winfried S

    2016-10-15

    Pre-emptive cancer immunotherapy by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may be beneficial to prevent relapse with a reduced risk of causing graft-versus-host-disease. CIK cells are a heterogeneous effector cell population including T cells (CD3(+) CD56(-) ), natural killer (NK) cells (CD3(-) CD56(+) ) and natural killer T (T-NK) cells (CD3(+) CD56(+) ) that exhibit non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity and are generated by ex vivo expansion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-CD3 antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-15 (IL-15). To facilitate selective target-cell recognition and enhance specific cytotoxicity against B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we transduced CIK cells with a lentiviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that carries a composite CD28-CD3ζ domain for signaling and a CD19-specific scFv antibody fragment for cell binding (CAR 63.28.z). In vitro analysis revealed high and specific cell killing activity of CD19-targeted CIK/63.28.z cells against otherwise CIK-resistant cancer cell lines and primary B-ALL blasts, which was dependent on CD19 expression and CAR signaling. In a xenograft model in immunodeficient mice, treatment with CIK/63.28.z cells in contrast to therapy with unmodified CIK cells resulted in complete and durable molecular remissions of established primary pre-B-ALL. Our results demonstrate potent antileukemic activity of CAR-engineered CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, and suggest this strategy as a promising approach for adoptive immunotherapy of refractory pre-B-ALL. © 2016 UICC.

  19. Role of cytolytic impairment of natural killer and natural killer T-cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ashish; Sharma, Aman; Bhatnagar, Archana

    2014-08-01

    Innate immunity has been widely accepted as one of the major cause for the alteration of immune system and progression of autoimmune diseases. Natural killer (NK) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells have not been explored in clinical studies for their cytolytic components in association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The literature available for these potential candidates is controversial in terms of their protective or pathogenic role in disease severity of RA. Present study explained the role of NK and NKT cell populations and intracellular expression of caspases, perforin, granzymes A and B in the pathogenesis of RA in patients. DAS28 score was measured as the disease severity. Immunochemical parameters were studied by using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different cell types in flow cytometry. Results indicated that that whatsoever is the change in percentage cell populations, ratio of NK and NKT cell populations always remained poised even in the disease state. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated with increased intracellular active caspase-3, perforin and granzyme expression in RA patients. Their elevated expressions were positively correlated with DAS28 suggesting the pathogenic role in RA. The expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines were enhanced while the anti-inflammatory cytokine expressions were diminished in the patients. Present study may point towards futuristic therapeutic targets which can fascinate the pharmaceutical industries to selectively target these molecules in designing the therapeutic strategy of RA patients.

  20. Stress, Coping, and Infectious Illness: Persistently Low Natural Killer Cell Activity as a Host Risk Factor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    Persistently Low Natural Killer Cell Activity as a Host Risk Factor " 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sandra M. Levy, Ph.D., Ronald B. Herberman, M.D., Theresa...killer (NK) cell activity. In this prevbus work, a subgroup of individuals characterized by persistently low NK activity, and self-reported depression and... depression and chronic anxiety. In a very preliminary fashion, we have also found a trend of association between this low NK activity pattern, and some

  1. Role of Natural Killer Cells in HIV-Associated Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Fabio E.; Premeaux, Thomas A.; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.

    2017-01-01

    Now in its fourth decade, the burden of HIV disease still persists, despite significant milestone achievements in HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care, and support. Even with long-term use of currently available antiretroviral therapies (ARTs), eradication of HIV remains elusive and now poses a unique set of challenges for the HIV-infected individual. The occurrence of HIV-associated non-AIDS-related comorbidities outside the scope of AIDS-defining illnesses, in particular non-AIDS-defining cancers, is much greater than the age-matched uninfected population. The underlying mechanism is now recognized in part to be related to the immune dysregulated and inflammatory status characteristic of HIV infection that persists despite ART. Natural killer (NK) cells are multifunctional effector immune cells that play a critical role in shaping the innate immune responses to viral infections and cancer. NK cells can modulate the adaptive immune response via their role in dendritic cell (DC) maturation, removal of immature tolerogenic DCs, and their ability to produce immunoregulatory cytokines. NK cells are therefore poised as attractive therapeutic targets that can be harnessed to control or clear both HIV and HIV-associated malignancies. To date, features of the tumor microenvironment and the evolution of NK-cell function among individuals with HIV-related malignancies remain unclear and may be distinct from malignancies observed in uninfected persons. This review intends to uncouple anti-HIV and antitumor NK-cell features that can be manipulated to halt the evolution of HIV disease and HIV-associated malignancies and serve as potential preventative and curative immunotherapeutic options. PMID:28377768

  2. Psychosocial resources, aging, and natural killer cell terminal maturity

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Lutz, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may influence aspects of immunological aging. The present study tested the hypothesis that psychosocial resources correlate with the expression of the cell surface maker CD57 on natural killer (NK) immune cells. CD57 is a marker of terminal maturation and senescence in this cell subset. The study further tested the relative contribution of specific resources in the social, psychological, financial, and status-skill domains, given the potential differential value of different resources for younger and older adults, and the contribution of relative vs. absolute resources. Younger (N=38) and older (N=34) women completed measures of relative and absolute resources and had blood drawn. Examined both between groups and within the older women, older age and fewer total relative resources were associated with more CD57 expression on NK cells. One SD in resources was the equivalent of 5 years of aging among the older women. Among the specific resource types, a preponderance of financial resources, both relative and absolute, was associated with less CD57 expression on NK cells, and these relationships did not significantly vary between younger and older women. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms mediated the effects of resources on CD57 expression on NK cells. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that the sense that one has substantial resources, particular with regard to finances and possessions, may retard age-associated aspects of the microenvironment in which NK cells develop and mature, independent of effects on distress, and this process may begin in younger adulthood. PMID:22708535

  3. Clinical study of autologous cytokine-induced killer cells for the treatment of elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue-chun; Yang, Bo; Yu, Rui-li; Chi, Xiao-hua; Tuo, Shuai; Tuo, Chao-wei; Zhu, Hong-li; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Chao-guang; Fu, Xiao-bing; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shan-qian; Dai, Han-ren; Cai, Lili; Li, Bing-jun; Han, Wei-dong

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from nine elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PBMCs were augmented by priming with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) followed by IL-2 and monoclonal antibody (mAb) against CD3. Autologous CIK cells (range 5 × 10(9)-1 × 10(10)) were then infused back to individual patients; infusion was repeated every 4 weeks for 32 weeks (eight cycles). Patients were assessed for changes in lymphocyte subgroup, tumor-related biological parameters, imaging characteristics, the condition of remission, quality of life (QOL), and survival. Prior to CIK infusion, two patients were in complete remission and seven patients were in partial remission. After autologous CIK cell transfusions, the proportion of CD3+, CD3+CD8+, and CD3+CD56+ cells were significantly increased compared with baseline (P < 0.05); whereas serum levels of β2-microglobulin and LDH were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The lymphoma symptoms were reduced and QOL was improved (P < 0.05) in all patients. All patients achieved complete remission at study endpoint. No adverse reactions were reported. Autologous CIK cell immunotherapy is safe and efficacious for the treatment of elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  4. Statins inhibit proliferation and cytotoxicity of a human leukemic natural killer cell line

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural killer cells comprise the body’s first line of defense against virus-infected cells. As is true of all lymphocytes, natural killer cell malignancies can develop, however natural killer cell leukemias can be very difficult to treat due to their intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. With the recent understanding that statin drugs may have anti-cancer properties, our investigations have focused on the ability of statins to inhibit the growth and cytotoxicity of the YT-INDY natural killer cell leukemia cell line. Results Our findings indicate that several statin compounds can inhibit YT-INDY proliferation disrupt cell cycle progression and abrogate natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Since natural killer cell leukemia cytotoxicity may play a role in the pulmonary damage seen in these patients, this is an important finding. Cytotoxicity, proliferation and cell cycle progression could be restored by the addition of mevalonate, signifying that the statin effects are brought about through HMG CoA reductase inhibition. The mevalonate pathway intermediate geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, but not other intermediates in the mevalonate pathway, partially reversed statin-induced inhibition of YT-INDY proliferation and cytotoxicity. These results suggest that blockage of products made in the latter part of the mevalonate pathway may account for the observed inhibitory effects on YT-INDY proliferation and cytotoxicity. However, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate could not reverse the statin-induced inhibition of the cell cycle. Conclusions These results suggest that the statin drugs should be investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy for human natural killer cell leukemias possibly in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24359683

  5. Human lymphokine-activated killer cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether human lymphokine- activated killer (LAK) cells are cytotoxic against cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Nylon wool nonadherent (NWNA) peripheral blood lymphocytes, as well as purified natural killer cell (NK) (CD3- CD16+ CD56+) and T (CD3+ CD16- CD56-) cells obtained from five healthy T. gondii seronegative volunteers exhibited minimal cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard LAK (S-LAK) cell preparations were induced by incubation of NWNA cells with recombinant interleukin 2, induction of remarkable cytotoxic activity against T. gondii-infected cells. When standard in LAK cell preparations from each of the volunteers. The phenotype of the LAK precursor and effector cells varied depending on the target cell used. Whereas the precursor and the effector cells of most of the LAK activity against K562 and Daudi cells were cells with NK phenotype, when T. gondii-infected cells were used as targets, both cells with NK and T cell phenotypes were precursors and effectors of the lysis. When cytotoxic activity of S-LAK cells was compared with the activity of adherent LAK (A-LAK) cells, A- LAK cells displayed higher cytotoxic activity against T. gondii- infected cells, as well as against K562 and Daudi cells. Cold target inhibition experiments suggested that there is a subset of LAK effector cells capable of lysing both T. gondii-infected cells and Daudi cells, whereas other subsets preferentially or exclusively lyse one of these target cells. PMID:1460415

  6. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  7. In vitro analysis of the proliferative capacity and cytotoxic effects of ex vivo induced natural killer cells, cytokine-induced killer cells, and gamma-delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Jin, Haofan; Li, Min; Xu, Jianting; Xu, Dongsheng; Hu, Jifan; He, Hua; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2015-10-12

    Recent studies have focused on the significant cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, and gamma-delta (γδ) T cells in tumor cells. Nevertheless, the therapeutic features of these cell types have not been compared in the literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of activation and expansion of NK, CIK, and γδ T cells from cancer patients in vitro, and to clarify the differences in their antitumor capacities. NK, CIK, and γδ T cells were induced from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 20 cancer patients by using specific cytokines. Expression of CD69, NKG2D, CD16, granzyme B, perforin, IFN-γ, and IL-2 was measured by flow cytometry. Cytokine production and cytotoxicity were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Calcein-AM methods. NK cell proliferation was superior to that of CIK cells, but lower than that of γδ T cells. NK cells had a much stronger ability to secrete perforin, granzyme B, IFN-γ, and IL-2 than did CIK and γδ T cells, and imparted significantly higher overall cytotoxicity. Expanded NK cells from cancer patients are the most effective immune cells in the context of cytokine secretion and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in comparison to CIK and γδ T cells, making them an optimal candidate for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

  8. Chromatin organization as an indicator of glucocorticoid induced natural killer cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Misale, Michael S; Witek Janusek, Linda; Tell, Dina; Mathews, Herbert L

    2017-09-12

    It is well-established that psychological distress reduces natural killer cell immune function and that this reduction can be due to the stress-induced release of glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids are known to alter epigenetic marks associated with immune effector loci, and are also known to influence chromatin organization. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of glucocorticoids on natural killer cell chromatin organization and to determine the relationship of chromatin organization to natural killer cell effector function, e.g. interferon gamma production. Interferon gamma production is the prototypic cytokine produced by natural killer cells and is known to modulate both innate and adaptive immunity. Glucocorticoid treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in a significant reduction in interferon gamma production. Glucocorticoid treatment also resulted in a demonstrable natural killer cell nuclear phenotype. This phenotype was localization of the histone, post-translational epigenetic mark, H3K27me3, to the nuclear periphery. Peripheral nuclear localization of H3K27me3 was directly related to cellular levels of interferon gamma. This nuclear phenotype was determined by direct visual inspection and by use of an automated, high through-put technology, the Amnis ImageStream. This technology combines the per-cell information content provided by standard microscopy with the statistical significance afforded by large sample sizes common to standard flow cytometry. Most importantly, this technology provides for a direct assessment of the localization of signal intensity within individual cells. The results demonstrate glucocorticoids to dysregulate natural killer cell function at least in part through altered H3K27me3 nuclear organization and demonstrate H3K27me3 chromatin organization to be a predictive indicator of glucocorticoid induced immune dysregulation of natural killer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Why natural killer cells are not enough: a further understanding of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen.

    PubMed

    Alecsandru, Diana; García-Velasco, Juan A

    2017-06-01

    The immune system's role in recurrent reproductive failure is a controversial issue in assisted reproduction. Most studies into immune system implication in reproduction have focused on finding markers of peripheral blood and less on the uterine environment. Peripheral blood natural killer cells have become an "immune study core" for women with recurrent miscarriage or recurrent implantation failure, based on the mistaken notion that they cause reproductive failure by killing or "rejecting" the embryo. Maternal-fetal tolerance begins at the uterine level, so successful adaptation to the fetus occurs after a complicated process. Insufficient uterine lining invasion by an invading extravillous trophoblast is the primary defect in pregnancy disorders such as recurrent miscarriage. This process is regulated by the interaction between maternal killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), expressed by uterine natural killer cells (uNK), and their ligand human leukocyte antigen (HLA) C, expressed by the extravillous trophoblast. Pregnancies are an increased risk of disorders in mothers with KIR AA when the fetus has paternal HLA-C2. A recent report has indicated that the expression of more than one paternal HLA-C by the extravillous trophoblast in assisted reproduction may affect placentation in mothers with KIR AA. This review provides insight into the immune system's role in assisted reproductive treatments. These insights can have an impact on the selection of single-embryo transfer and/or oocyte/sperm donor according to HLA-C in patients with recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage depending on their KIR haplotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood natural killer and natural killer T-like cells in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Papakosta, Despina; Manika, Katerina; Gounari, Evdoxia; Kyriazis, George; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Spyropoulos, George; Kontakioti, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells appear to be involved in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of NK and natural killer T (NKT)-like cells in two recognized cytotoxic ILD with systemic character, hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and peripheral blood (PBL) cells and lymphocyte subsets of 83 patients (26 with COP, 19 with HP and 38 with IPF) and 10 controls were prospectively studied by flow cytometry. The percentage of NK and NKT-like cells was lower in BALF than in PBL in all patient groups and controls. Patients with COP presented with statistically significantly higher NK and NKT-like cell counts in BALF compared with controls (P = 0.044 and P = 0.05 respectively) and IPF (P = 0.049 and P = 0.045 respectively). BALF NKT-like cell count correlated with PBL NKT-like cell count only in COP (r = 0.627, P = 0.002). In addition, a significant positive correlation between BALF NKT-like cell and PBL cytotoxic T CD8+ cell count was observed in COP (r = 0.562, P = 0.006) but not in HP, IPF or controls. Our study provides for the first time evidence for the implication of NKT-like cells in the pathogenesis of COP, as part of both localized and systemic cytotoxicity. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma: An Incidental Finding.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Ashley; Bibliowicz, Michael

    2017-05-19

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This neoplasm is more prevalent in regions of Asia and Latin America and most commonly involves the sinonasal tract, presenting with signs of nasal obstruction, epistaxis, or sinus infection. It is a locally destructive and angioinvasive neoplasm. The treatment of ENKTCL is dependent on the extent of the tumor. For localized disease, the treatment is chemoradiation. For disseminated disease, treatment is mainly chemotherapy-based. This report describes a case of a 41-year-old Hispanic woman who initially presented with signs of nasal congestion for four weeks and was subsequently diagnosed and treated for chronic sinusitis. The patient underwent endoscopic surgery for persistent chronic sinusitis, with a presumptive diagnosis of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis based on clinical and radiographic presentation. The pathologic exam revealed a diagnosis of ENKTCL. The patient underwent three cycles of chemotherapy comprised of steroid (hydrocortisone), methotrexate, ifosfamide, pre-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) followed by radiation, resulting in clinical and radiographic remission. On review of the literature, ENKTCL is very rare in the United States and diagnosis is commonly delayed due to non-specific signs. We report this case to increase awareness of this disease entity and remind clinicians to include this in the differential diagnosis of nasal obstruction.

  12. Effect of millimeter waves on natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Makar, V R; Logani, M K; Bhanushali, A; Kataoka, M; Ziskin, M C

    2005-01-01

    Millimeter wave therapy (MMWT) is being widely used for the treatment of many diseases in Russia and other East European countries. MMWT has been reported to reduce the toxic effects of chemotherapy on the immune system. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether millimeter waves (MMWs) can modulate the effect of cyclophosphamide (CPA), an anticancer drug, on natural killer (NK) cell activity. NK cells play an important role in the antitumor response. MMWs were produced with a Russian-made YAV-1 generator. The device produced modulated 42.2 +/- 0.2 GHz radiation through a 10 x 20 mm rectangular output horn. Mice, restrained in plastic tubes, were irradiated on the nasal area. Peak SAR at the skin surface and peak incident power density were measured as 622 +/- 100 W/kg and 31 +/- 5 mW/cm2, respectively. The maximum temperature elevation, measured at the end of 30 min, was 1 degrees C. The animals, restrained in plastic tubes, were irradiated on the nasal area. CPA injection (100 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally on the second day of 3-days exposure to MMWs. All the irradiation procedures were performed in a blinded manner. NK cell activation and cytotoxicity were measured after 2, 5, and 7 days following CPA injection. Flow cytometry of NK cells showed that CPA treatment caused a marked enhancement in NK cell activation. The level of CD69 expression, which represents a functional triggering molecule on activated NK cells, was increased in the CPA group at all the time points tested as compared to untreated mice. However, the most enhancement in CD69 expression was observed on day 7. A significant increase in TNF-alpha level was also observed on day 7 following CPA administration. On the other hand, CPA caused a suppression of the cytolytic activity of NK cells. MMW irradiation of the CPA treated groups resulted in further enhancement of CD69 expression on NK cells, as well as in production of TNF-alpha. Furthermore, MMW irradiation restored CPA

  13. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand induces the migration of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Seishi; Muramatsu, Mayumi; Gokoh, Maiko; Oka, Saori; Waku, Keizo; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2005-02-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Evidence is gradually accumulating which shows that 2-arachidonoylglycerol plays important physiological roles in several mammalian tissues and cells, yet the details remain ambiguous. In this study, we first examined the effects of 2-arachidonoylglycerol on the motility of human natural killer cells. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol induces the migration of KHYG-1 cells (a natural killer leukemia cell line) and human peripheral blood natural killer cells. The migration of natural killer cells induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol was abolished by treating the cells with SR144528, a CB2 receptor antagonist, suggesting that the CB2 receptor is involved in the 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. In contrast to 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, did not induce the migration. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major psychoactive constituent of marijuana, also failed to induce the migration; instead, the addition of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol together with 2-arachidonoylglycerol abolished the migration induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol. It is conceivable that the endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, that is, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, affects natural killer cell functions such as migration, thereby contributing to the host-defense mechanism against infectious viruses and tumor cells.

  14. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia A; O'Connell, Jean M; Kwasnik, Anna K; Cawood, Thomas J; O'Farrelly, Cliona; O'Shea, Donal B

    2009-03-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells suppressing activation of allogeneic cytokine-induced killer/natural killer cells either by direct or indirect interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qu, Yu H; Wu, Yan F; Liu, Ling; Lin, Xiang H; Huang, Ke; Wei, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were recently found to be associated with some special immunological characteristics, the immunoregulatory effect of MSC was dose-dependent. Low amount of MSC was associated with mild immunosuppression or even immune activation, while the high amount of that was associated with significant immunosuppressive effect. In this study, by using a transwell system, we explored the effect of MSC on the cell cycle, apoptosis rate and the expression of CD69, an activation marker, on the allogeneic cord blood derived cytokine-induced killer(CIK)/natural killer(NK) cells. The results showed that either by transwell or mixed cell-cell co-culture, the MSC can effect CIK/NK cells on the cell cycle, such as arrested in the G0/G1 phase, diminished the ratio of cells in S, G2/M phase, and increased the apoptosis of them. MSC can also depress the expression of CD69 on these killer cells, as well as increased the ratio of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T regulatory (Treg) cells in the CIK/NK cell culture system. We draw conclusions that either by transwell or mixed co-culture, the MSC can suppress activation of allogeneic CB-CIK/NK cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type: 'midline lethal granuloma.' A case report.

    PubMed

    Tlholoe, Martha M; Kotu, Monica; Khammissa, Razia A G; Bida, Meschack; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2013-01-17

    Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma, most commonly affecting the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses and nasopharynx. Clinically it is characterised by destruction of facial tissues, commencing in the midline. In most cases it arises from malignant transformation of natural killer cells (NK); sometimes from malignant transformation of cytotoxic T cells.Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is rare, but even more rare in black persons. The purpose of this article is to report a severe case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, in an elderly black male.

  17. Activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sangiolo, Dario; Mesiano, Giulia; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are T lymphocytes expanded ex vivo that are endowed with MHC-independent tumoricidal activity. We have recently demonstrated, in a preclinical setting, that CIK cells are active against autologous bone and soft tissue sarcomas. In particular, CIK cells killed a putative sarcoma stem cell population that may underlie disease relapse and chemoresistance. PMID:25050197

  18. Super natural killer cells that target metastases in the tumor draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Chan, Maxine F; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor draining lymph nodes are the first site of metastasis in most types of cancer. The extent of metastasis in the lymph nodes is often used in staging cancer progression. We previously showed that nanoscale TRAIL liposomes conjugated to human natural killer cells enhance their endogenous therapeutic potential in killing cancer cells cultured in engineered lymph node microenvironments. In this work, it is shown that liposomes decorated with apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and an antibody against a mouse natural killer cell marker are carried to the tumor draining inguinal lymph nodes and prevent the lymphatic spread of a subcutaneous tumor in mice. It is shown that targeting natural killer cells with TRAIL liposomes enhances their retention time within the tumor draining lymph nodes to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. It is concluded that this approach can be used to kill cancer cells within the tumor draining lymph nodes to prevent the lymphatic spread of cancer.

  19. Importance of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Danilo Santana Alessio; de Souza, Cármino Antonio; Aranha, Francisco José Penteado; Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma, bone marrow aplasia and leukemia. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is an important tool to prevent post-transplant complications such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease, but the high rates of relapse limit the survival of transplant patients. Natural Killer cells, a type of lymphocyte that is a key element in the defense against tumor cells, cells infected with viruses and intracellular microbes, have different receptors on their surfaces that regulate their cytotoxicity. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are the most important, interacting consistently with human leukocyte antigen class I molecules present in other cells and thus controlling the activation of natural killer cells. Several studies have shown that certain combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens (in both donors and recipients) can affect the chances of survival of transplant patients, particularly in relation to the graft-versusleukemia effect, which may be associated to decreased relapse rates in certain groups. This review aims to shed light on the mechanisms and effects of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors - human leukocyte antigen associations and their implications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to critically analyze the results obtained by the studies presented herein. PMID:23284260

  20. Acquisition of enhanced natural killer cell activity under anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, C M; Lorden, J F; Hiramoto, R N; Ghanta, V K

    1992-01-01

    An increase in natural killer (NK) cell activity can be conditioned with a one trial learning paradigm to demonstrate the interaction between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. In order to demonstrate learning possibilities during 'non-conscious' state, mice were anesthetized with a ketamin/rompun mixture and underwent one trial learning with odor cue as the conditioned stimulus (CS) preceding the unconditioned stimulus (US). The results indicated that mice that were exposed to camphor odor cue under the influence of anesthesia can associate the signal with the poly I:C unconditioned stimulus and were able to recall the conditioned response upon reexposure to the CS. Secondly, the conditioned association made in a conscious state can be recalled by exposure to the same olfactory odor cue in a 'non-conscious' state. The increase in the conditioned change in NK cell activity of both situations was significantly higher than the control group. The results demonstrate that learning can take place and the learned response can be recalled under the reduced awareness caused by anesthesia. The findings we report are unusual and novel in that they demonstrate that the CNS can learn new associations under conditions where the host is apparently unaware of the signals being linked. Anesthesia combined with the long interstimulus interval indicates that certain neuronal pathways in the CNS are receptive to second signals (elicited by the US) even when the second signal is separated by one day. This means the conditioned learning of a physiological response can take place unconsciously at a separate level and under situations where the host is totally unaware of the events which the brain is processing and linking as incoming information.

  1. Decreased non-MHC-restricted (CD56+) killer cell cytotoxicity after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Grimm, E. A.; Smid, C.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted (CD56+) (NMHC) killer cells and cell surface marker expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined before and after spaceflight. Ten astronauts (9 men, 1 woman) from two space shuttle missions (9- and 10-day duration) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected 10 days before launch, within 3 h after landing, and 3 days after landing. All peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations were cryopreserved and analyzed simultaneously in a 4-h cytotoxicity (51)Cr release assay using K562 target cells. NMHC killer cell lytic activity was normalized per 1,000 CD56+ cells. When all 10 subjects were considered as one study group, NMHC killer cell numbers did not change significantly during the three sampling periods, but at landing lytic activity had decreased by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) from preflight values. Nine of ten astronauts had decreased lytic activity immediately after flight. NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity of only three astronauts returned toward preflight values by 3 days after landing. Consistent with decreased NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity, urinary cortisol significantly increased after landing compared with preflight levels. Plasma cortisol and ACTH levels at landing were not significantly different from preflight values. No correlation of changes in NMHC killer cell function or hormone levels with factors such as age, gender, mission, or spaceflight experience was found. After landing, expression of the major lymphocyte surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD56), as determined by flow cytometric analysis, did not show any consistent changes from measurements made before flight.

  2. Decreased non-MHC-restricted (CD56+) killer cell cytotoxicity after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Grimm, E. A.; Smid, C.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted (CD56+) (NMHC) killer cells and cell surface marker expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined before and after spaceflight. Ten astronauts (9 men, 1 woman) from two space shuttle missions (9- and 10-day duration) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected 10 days before launch, within 3 h after landing, and 3 days after landing. All peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations were cryopreserved and analyzed simultaneously in a 4-h cytotoxicity (51)Cr release assay using K562 target cells. NMHC killer cell lytic activity was normalized per 1,000 CD56+ cells. When all 10 subjects were considered as one study group, NMHC killer cell numbers did not change significantly during the three sampling periods, but at landing lytic activity had decreased by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) from preflight values. Nine of ten astronauts had decreased lytic activity immediately after flight. NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity of only three astronauts returned toward preflight values by 3 days after landing. Consistent with decreased NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity, urinary cortisol significantly increased after landing compared with preflight levels. Plasma cortisol and ACTH levels at landing were not significantly different from preflight values. No correlation of changes in NMHC killer cell function or hormone levels with factors such as age, gender, mission, or spaceflight experience was found. After landing, expression of the major lymphocyte surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD56), as determined by flow cytometric analysis, did not show any consistent changes from measurements made before flight.

  3. Enhanced cytotoxic function of natural killer and CD3+CD56+ cells in cord blood after culture.

    PubMed

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Leung, Wing H; Dallas, Mari H

    2015-01-01

    Rate of immune reconstitution directly correlates with the number of hematopoietic stem cells infused and is particularly delayed in patients undergoing cord blood (CB) transplantation (CBT). Methods to increase the number of CB natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to improve immune reconstitution after CBT. NK cells are the first lymphocyte population to recover after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation and are central to preventing early relapse and infection. CB NK cells are low in number and are known to be incomplete in maturation and require activation for effective function. Here, we report a clinically relevant ex vivo expansion method that increases the number of activated CB NK cells. We report a multilog increase in NK cell number when CB mononuclear cells are cocultured with IL-2 and IL-15. Furthermore, NK cells expressing activating receptors and adhesion molecules responsible for cytotoxicity increased throughout culture, whereas inhibitory receptor expression remained low. Additionally, cytotoxic function against various malignancies was significantly enhanced in cultured NK cells but not CD3(+)CD56(+) cells. These data suggest that ex vivo expansion and activation of CB NK cells is a clinically feasible and relevant approach to prevent early infection and relapse after CBT.

  4. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  5. Hydrocortisone prevents immunosuppression by interleukin-10+ natural killer cells after trauma-hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cédric; Masson, Damien; Segain, Jean Pierre; Braudeau, Cecile; Vourc'h, Mickael; Caillon, Jocelyne; Altare, Frédéric; Josien, Regis; Retière, Christelle; Villadangos, Jose; Asehnoune, Karim

    2014-12-01

    Trauma induces a state of immunosuppression, which is responsible for the development of nosocomial infections. Hydrocortisone reduces the rate of pneumonia in patients with trauma. Because alterations of dendritic cells and natural killer cells play a central role in trauma-induced immunosuppression, we investigated whether hydrocortisone modulates the dendritic cell/natural killer cell cross talk in the context of posttraumatic pneumonia. Experimental study. Research laboratory from an university hospital. Bagg Albino/cJ mice (weight, 20-24 g). First, in an a priori substudy of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of hydrocortisone (200 mg/d for 7 d) in patients with severe trauma, we have measured the blood levels of five cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, interleukin-12, interleukin-17) at day 1 and day 8. In a second step, the effects of hydrocortisone on dendritic cell/natural killer cell cross talk were studied in a mouse model of posttraumatic pneumonia. Hydrocortisone (0.6 mg/mice i.p.) was administered immediately after hemorrhage. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus (7 × 10 colony-forming units). Using sera collected during a multicenter study in patients with trauma, we found that hydrocortisone decreased the blood level of interleukin-10, a cytokine centrally involved in the regulation of dendritic cell/natural killer cell cluster. In a mouse model of trauma-hemorrhage-induced immunosuppression, splenic natural killer cells induced an interleukin-10-dependent elimination of splenic dendritic cell. Hydrocortisone treatment reduced this suppressive function of natural killer cells and increased survival of mice with posthemorrhage pneumonia. The reduction of the interleukin-10 level in natural killer cells by hydrocortisone was partially dependent on the up-regulation of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-ligand (TNFsf18) on

  6. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further.

  7. Invariant natural killer T cells in children with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Jyonouchi, S; Smith, C L; Saretta, F; Abraham, V; Ruymann, K R; Modayur-Chandramouleeswaran, P; Wang, M-L; Spergel, J M; Cianferoni, A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an atopic disease characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in which dietary antigens (in particular, milk) play a major role. EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction in which overexpression of Th2 cytokines, particularly IL-13, play a major role; however, the cells responsible for IL-13 overexpression remain elusive. Th2-cytokines are secreted following the ligation of invariant natural killer T cell receptors to sphingolipids (SLs). Sphingolipids (SLs) are presented via the CD1d molecule on the INKTs surface. Cow's milk-derived SL has been shown to activate iNKTs from children with IgE-mediated food allergies to milk (FA-MA) to produce Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE pathogenesis is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 children with active EoE (EoE-A), 10 children with controlled EoE (EoE-C) and 16 healthy controls (non-EoE) were measured ex vivo and then incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal) and milk-SL. INKTs from peripheral blood (PB) and oesophageal biopsies were studied. EoE-A children had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs with a greater Th2-response to αGal and milk-SM compared with iNKTs of EoE-C and non-EoE children. Additionally, EoE-A children had increased iNKT levels in oesophageal biopsies compared with EoE-C children. Milk-SLs are able to activate peripheral blood iNKTs in EoE-A children to produce Th2 cytokines. Additionally, iNKT levels are higher at the site of active oesophageal eosinophilic inflammation. This study suggests that sphingolipids (SLs) contained in milk may drive the development of EoE by promoting an iNKT-cell-mediated Th2-type cytokine response that facilitates eosinophil-mediated allergic inflammation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Preconditioning chemotherapy with cisplatin enhances the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Huang, Xiang; Huang, Guichun; Chen, Yitian; Chen, Longbang; Song, Haizhu

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that preconditioning chemotherapy could eliminate the suppressive factors in antitumor immune response, thereby leading to the full release of the efficacy of the subsequent immunotherapy. In this study, a single subtoxic dose (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) of cisplatin was chosen as the preconditioning chemotherapy in combination with cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells (4×10(6), intravenously) to treat the murine B16 melanoma xenografts. It was found that cisplatin pretreatment could enhance the antitumor activity of CIK cells. To explore the potential mechanisms underlying the efficacy-enhancing effect of cisplatin, the in vivo trafficking and distribution of the infused CIK cells were traced. It was found that cisplatin could augment the homing ability of CIK cells into the tumor, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs), and spleen tissues. The endogenous effector cells, CD3(+) T lymphocytes also had an increased accumulation in the tumor and TDLNs after cisplatin precondition. Moreover, cisplatin could also modulate the percentages of myeloid cells, thus encouraging immune responses by increasing the percentages of dendritic cells and relieving the immunosuppression by preferentially eliminating the myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In conclusion, our findings suggested that cisplatin preconditioning chemotherapy could enhance the antitumor activity of CIK cells in a murine melanoma model, and this efficacy-enhancing effect was attributed to the augmented homing ability of exogenous and endogenous effector cells and the modulation of the myeloid cells.

  9. MICA/IL-12: A novel bifunctional protein for killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tietje, Ashlee; Yang, Xi; Yu, Xianzhong; Wei, Yanzhang

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to be effective killers of tumor cells. They are governed by inhibitory and activating receptors such as NKG2D, whose ligands are normally upregulated in cells that are stressed, like cancer cells. Advanced cancer cells, however, have ways to reduce the expression of these ligands, leaving them less detectable by NK cells. Along with these receptors, NK cells also require activating cytokines, such as IL-12. A previous study in our laboratory showed that a fusion protein of the extracellular domain of mouse UL-16 binding protein-like transcript 1 (MULT1E) and mouse interleukin 12 (IL-12) can effectively activate mouse NK cells by in vitro assays and in vivo in animal tumor models. The aim of the present study was to expand the concept of developing a novel bifunctional fusion protein for enhanced NK cell activation to human killer cells. The proposed protein combines the extracellular domain of a human NKG2D ligand, MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) and IL-12. It is hypothesized that when expressed by tumor cells, the protein will activate human NK and other killer cells using the NKG2D receptor, and deliver IL-12 to the NK cells where it can interact with the IL-12R and enhance cytotoxicity. The fusion protein, when expressed by engineered tumor cells, indeed activated NK92 cells as measured by an increase in interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production and an increase in cytotoxicity of tumor cells. The fusion protein was also able to increase the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and augment their production of IFN-γ. This study along with the data from the previous mouse studies suggest that the MICA/IL-12 bifunctional fusion protein represents an effective activator of killer cells for cancer treatment.

  10. Ocular presentation of natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in a Caucasian man.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emily; Fogarty, Helen; Fortune, Anne; Keegan, David

    2016-04-26

    Natural killer/T-cell (NK/T-cell) lymphoma-nasal subtype, is a rare form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, most common in South East Asia, and can have an ophthalmological presentation. This report describes a 51-year-old Caucasian man with uveitis, recurrent retinal detachment and paraneoplastic features subsequently diagnosed as NK/T-cell lymphoma.

  11. Natural killer T cells: innate lymphocytes positioned as a bridge between acute and chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lisa; Hegde, Subramanya

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T cells are an innate population of T lymphocytes that recognize antigens derived from host lipids and glycolipids. In this review, we focus on how these unique T cells are positioned to influence both acute and chronic inflammatory processes through their early recruitment to sites of inflammation, interactions with myeloid antigen presenting cells, and recognition of lipids associated with inflammation. PMID:20850561

  12. Natural killer cell dysfunction during acute infection with foot-and-mouth diseaase virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural killer cells (NK) provide one of the initial barriers of cellular host defense against pathogens, in particular intracellular pathogens. The role of these cells in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection is unknown. Previously, we characterized the phenotype and function of NK cells fr...

  13. Rapid reuptake of granzyme B leads to emperitosis: an apoptotic cell-in-cell death of immune killer cells inside tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; He, M-f; Chen, Y-h; Wang, M-y; Yu, X-M; Bai, J; Zhu, H-y; Wang, Y-y; Zhao, H; Mei, Q; Nie, J; Ma, J; Wang, J-f; Wen, Q; Ma, L; Wang, Y; Wang, X-n

    2013-10-10

    A cell-in-cell process refers to the invasion of one living cell into another homotypic or heterotypic cell. Different from non-apoptotic death processes of internalized cells termed entosis or cannibalism, we previously reported an apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurring during heterotypic cell-in-cell formation. In this study, we further demonstrated that the apoptotic cell-in-cell death occurred only in internalized immune killer cells expressing granzyme B (GzmB). Vacuole wrapping around the internalized cells inside the target cells was the common hallmark during the early stage of all cell-in-cell processes, which resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent mitochondrial injury of encapsulated killer or non-cytotoxic immune cells. However, internalized killer cells mediated rapid bubbling of the vacuoles with the subsequent degranulation of GzmB inside the vacuole of the target cells and underwent the reuptake of GzmB by killer cells themselves. The confinement of GzmB inside the vacuole surpassed the lysosome-mediated cell death occurring in heterotypic or homotypic entosis processes, resulting in a GzmB-triggered caspase-dependent apoptotic cell-in-cell death of internalized killer cells. On the contrary, internalized killer cells from GzmB-deficient mice underwent a typical non-apoptotic entotic cell-in-cell death similar to that of non-cytotoxic immune cells or tumor cells. Our results thus demonstrated the critical involvement of immune cells with cytotoxic property in apoptotic cell-in-cell death, which we termed as emperitosis taken from emperipolesis and apoptosis. Whereas entosis or cannibalism may serve as a feed-on mechanism to exacerbate and nourish tumor cells, emperitosis of immune killer cells inside tumor cells may serve as an in-cell danger sensation model to prevent the killing of target cells from inside, implying a unique mechanism for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance.

  14. The influence of prophylactic immunosuppressive regimens on natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cells in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alamartine, E; Sabido, O; Berthoux, F C

    1990-12-01

    We investigated natural-killer cells in 81 renal transplant recipients (RTR) in order to define what kind of in vivo prophylactic immunosuppression could be responsible of the impairment of these NK cells. Cell-surface phenotyping was performed by direct immunofluorescence with Leu7 (CD57), Leu11 (CD16), and Leu19 (CD56) antibodies, in one- and two-color stainings. Functional properties were analyzed with freshly isolated nonadherent mononuclear cells (NK activity) and after in vitro activation with r-IL-2 (LAK activity), in cytotoxicity assays using K562 and Daudi tumor lines as specific targets. A flow cytometry technique using carboxy-Fluorodiacetate was applied to monitor the cytotoxicity of NK cells. Our data emphasize the already known deficiency of NK cells: both NK subsets (CD16+ and/or CD56+) and NK activity were decreased in RTR. Moreover, we demonstrated that the in vitro IL-2-induced LAK cytotoxicity was also diminished in RTR. NK cells and functions were normal in RTR treated with cyclosporine only, decreased in RTR treated with both cyclosporine and azathioprine, and at the lowest level in RTR treated with azathioprine without cyclosporine. A multivariate statistical analysis found a negative linear regression between the doses of azathioprine and the number of functions of NK cells, confirming that azathioprine was responsible for the deficiency of NK cells in our RTR.

  15. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  16. Natural killer cells: the journey from puzzles in biology to treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Madhana, Rajaram Mohan Rao; Sriram, Chandra Shaker

    2015-02-28

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune effectors that are primarily involved in immunosurveillance to spontaneously eliminate malignantly transformed and virally infected cells without prior sensitization. NK cells trigger targeted attack through release of cytotoxic granules, and secrete various cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. NK cells selectively attack target cells with diminished major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression. This "Missing-self" recognition by NK cells at first puzzled researchers in the early 1990s, and the mystery was solved with the discovery of germ line encoded killer immunoglobulin receptors that recognize MHC-I molecules. This review summarizes the biology of NK cells detailing the phenotypes, receptors and functions; interactions of NK cells with dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. Further we discuss the various strategies to modulate NK cell activity and the practice of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy employing NK cell lines, autologous, allogeneic and genetically engineered cell populations.

  17. Rare aggressive natural killer cell leukemia presented with bone marrow fibrosis - a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Dina S; Sabbagh, Ahmad Al; Omri, Halima El; Ibrahim, Firyal A; Amer, Aliaa M; Otazu, Ivone B

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia is an extraordinary rare aggressive malignant neoplasm of natural killer cells. Although its first recognition as a specific entity was approximately 20 years ago, this leukemia has not yet been satisfactorily characterized as fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature and up to our knowledge, this is the first case report in Qatar. Reaching a diagnosis of aggressive natural killer leukemia was a challenging experience, because in addition to being a rare entity, the relative scarcity of circulating neoplastic cells, failure to obtain an adequate aspirate sample sufficient to perform flow cytometric analysis, together with the absence of applicable method to prove NK clonality (as it lack specific clonal marker); our case had atypical confusing presentation of striking increase in bone marrow fibrosis that was misleading and complicated the case further. The bone marrow fibrosis encountered may be related to the neoplastic natural killer cells' chemokine profile and it may raise the awareness for considering aggressive natural killer leukemia within the differential diagnosis of leukemia with heightened marrow fibrosis.

  18. Combined IL-15 and IL-12 drives the generation of CD34(+)-derived natural killer cells with superior maturation and alloreactivity potential following adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Cany, Jeannette; van der Waart, Anniek B; Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Schaap, Nicolaas M; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-07-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells represents a promising treatment approach against cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, we reported a cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cell products with high cell number and purity. In this system, CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) were expanded and differentiated into NK cells under stroma-free conditions in the presence of IL-15 and IL-2. We show that combining IL-15 with IL-12 drives the generation of more mature and highly functional NK cells. In particular, replacement of IL-2 by IL-12 enhanced the cytolytic activity and IFNγ production of HPC-NK cells toward cultured and primary AML cells in vitro, and improved antileukemic responses in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing human AML cells. Phenotypically, IL-12 increased the frequency of HPC-NK cells expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), which were more responsive to target cell stimulation. In addition, NK15/12 cell products demonstrated superior maturation potential, resulting in >70% positivity for CD16 and/or KIR within 2 weeks after infusion into NSG mice. We predict that higher functionality and faster in vivo maturation will favor HPC-NK cell alloreactivity toward malignant cells in patients, making this cytokine combination an attractive strategy to generate clinical HPC-NK cell products for cancer adoptive immunotherapy.

  19. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-06-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour /sup 51/Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient.

  20. Peripheral killer cells do not differentiate between asthma patients with or without fixed airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Tubby, Carolyn; Negm, Ola H; Harrison, Timothy; Tighe, Patrick J; Todd, Ian; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2017-06-01

    The three main types of killer cells - CD8(+) T cells, NK cells and NKT cells - have been linked to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, their role in a small subset of asthma patients displaying fixed airway obstruction (FAO), similar to that seen in COPD, has not been explored. The objective of the present study was to investigate killer cell numbers, phenotype and function in peripheral blood from asthma patients with FAO, asthma patients without FAO, and healthy individuals. Peripheral CD8(+) T cells (CD8(+)CD3(+)CD56(-)), NK cells (CD56(+)CD3(-)) and NKT-like cells (CD56(+)CD3(+)) of 14 asthma patients with FAO (post-bronchodilator FEV/FVC <0.7, despite clinician-optimised treatment), 7 asthma patients without FAO (post-bronchodilator FEV/FVC ≥ 0.7), and 9 healthy individuals were studied. No significant differences were seen between the number, receptor expression, MAPK signalling molecule expression, cytotoxic mediator expression, and functional cytotoxicity of peripheral killer cells from asthma patients with FAO, asthma patients without FAO and healthy individuals. Peripheral killer cell numbers or functions do not differentiate between asthma patients with or without fixed airway obstruction.

  1. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  2. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer. PMID:27141211

  3. Deciphering the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor system at super-resolution for natural killer and T-cell biology.

    PubMed

    Béziat, Vivien; Hilton, Hugo G; Norman, Paul J; Traherne, James A

    2017-03-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are components of two fundamental biological systems essential for human health and survival. First, they contribute to host immune responses, both innate and adaptive, through their expression by natural killer cells and T cells. Second, KIR play a key role in regulating placentation, and hence reproductive success. Analogous to the diversity of their human leucocyte antigen class I ligands, KIR are extremely polymorphic. In this review, we describe recent developments, fuelled by methodological advances, that are helping to decipher the KIR system in terms of haplotypes, polymorphisms, expression patterns and their ligand interactions. These developments are delivering deeper insight into the relevance of KIR in immune system function, evolution and disease.

  4. Functional impairment of natural killer cells in active ulcerative colitis: reversion of the defective natural killer activity by interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, L; Alvarez-Mon, M; Abreu, L; Antonio Vargas, J; de la Morena, E; Corugedo, F; Duràntez, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the functional characteristics and clinical importance of the natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from patients with ulcerative colitis. Normal NK activity was observed in PBMNC from patients with inactive disease, but a pronounced decrease was found in those with active disease. Clinical change from active to inactive disease was associated with enhancement of the depressed NK activity. The impairment of NK cytotoxicity found in patients with active disese could not be ascribed to a deficient number of NK cells as the amounts of HNK-1+, CD16+ (Leu 11), and CD11b (OKM1) cells in PBMNC were within normal ranges. This defective cytotoxic PBMNC activity was normalised by short term (18 hour) incubation with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2). Moreover, long term (5 day) incubation of these effector cells with rIL-2 induced strong cytotoxic activity against NK resistant and NK sensitive target cells in patients with active and inactive disease. We also found that both precursors and effectors of cytotoxic activity promoted by short term and long term incubation with rIL-2 of PBMNC from the patients showed the phenotype of NK cells (CD16+, CD3-). Taken together, these results show that active ulcerative colitis is associated with a defective function of NK cells that is found to be normal in the inactive stage of the disease. The possible pathogenic and therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1541421

  5. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy induced fall in natural killer cell activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Beyer, J M; Rasmussen, A; Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B N; Helin, P

    1984-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity was studied in 8 patients with classic or definite rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by investigating the killing of K 562 cells by peripheral blood lymphocytes before, during, and after intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT). MPPT produced a considerable fall in NK activity and after 3 months NK activity was less than half that before MPPT.

  6. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions

    PubMed Central

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R.; Verkman, A. S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica. PMID:23108041

  7. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  8. High folic acid intake reduces natural killer cell cytotoxicity in aged mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Presence of unmetabolized folic acid in plasma, which is indicative of folic acid intake beyond the metabolic capacity of the body, is associated with reduced natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity in post-menopausal women >/= 50 years. NK cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that are part of the innate i...

  9. Liver natural killer and natural killer T cells: immunobiology and emerging roles in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Radaeva, Svetlana; Park, Ogyi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic lymphocytes are enriched in NK and NKT cells that play important roles in antiviral and antitumor defenses and in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease. In this review, we discuss the differential distribution of NK and NKT cells in mouse, rat, and human livers, the ultrastructural similarities and differences between liver NK and NKT cells, and the regulation of liver NK and NKT cells in a variety of murine liver injury models. We also summarize recent findings about the role of NK and NKT cells in liver injury, fibrosis, and repair. In general, NK and NKT cells accelerate liver injury by producing proinflammatory cytokines and killing hepatocytes. NK cells inhibit liver fibrosis via killing early-activated and senescent-activated stellate cells and producing IFN-γ. In regulating liver fibrosis, NKT cells appear to be less important than NK cells as a result of hepatic NKT cell tolerance. NK cells inhibit liver regeneration by producing IFN-γ and killing hepatocytes; however, the role of NK cells on the proliferation of liver progenitor cells and the role of NKT cells in liver regeneration have been controversial. The emerging roles of NK/NKT cells in chronic human liver disease will also be discussed. Understanding the role of NK and NKT cells in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease may help us design better therapies to treat patients with this disease. PMID:19542050

  10. Reciprocal Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christian W.; Freigang, Stefan; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T cells carrying a highly conserved, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) [invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells] are a subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d molecules. Although CD1d is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are key presenters of glycolipid antigen in vivo. When stimulated through their TCR, iNKT cells rapidly secrete copious amounts of cytokines and induce maturation of DCs, thereby facilitating coordinated stimulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The bidirectional crosstalk between DCs and iNKT cells determines the functional outcome of iNKT cell-targeted responses and iNKT cell agonists are used and currently being evaluated as adjuvants to enhance the efficacy of antitumor immunotherapy. This review illustrates mechanistic underpinnings of reciprocal DCs and iNKT cell interactions and discusses how those can be harnessed for cancer therapy. PMID:28596767

  11. Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with various forms of systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Majewski, S; Blaszczyk, M; Wasik, M; Jablonska, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 63 patients with systemic scleroderma, including incipient or prodromal acrosclerosis, and from 20 healthy individuals were tested for natural killer (NK) cell activity and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity in a 4 h 51Cr release assay using K562 and L1210 cell lines respectively. In patients with systemic scleroderma natural killer cell activity was significantly decreased compared with the controls. NK cell activity was markedly lowered in patients with diffuse scleroderma and in transitional form acrosclerosis-diffuse scleroderma, and was normal in cases of acrosclerosis and/or CREST syndrome and in cases of prodromal or incipient scleroderma. Antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity of mononuclear cells from the systemic scleroderma patients was within the normal range. The lowered natural killer cell activity correlated with the severity of systemic scleroderma, in terms of the extent of skin and organ involvement.

  12. Generation of natural killer cells from hematopoietic stem cells in vitro for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Luevano, Martha; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and are an alluring option for immunotherapy due to their ability to kill infected cells or cancer cells without prior sensitization. Throughout the past 20 years, different groups have been able to reproduce NK cell development in vitro, and NK cell ontogeny studies have provided the basis for the establishment of protocols to produce NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy. Here, we briefly discuss NK cell development and NK cell immunotherapy approaches. We review the factors needed for NK cell differentiation in vitro, which stem cell sources have been used, published protocols, challenges and future directions for Good Manufacturing Practice protocols. PMID:22705914

  13. Tim-3 expression by peripheral natural killer cells and natural killer T cells increases in patients with lung cancer--reduction after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Yun; Chen, Dong-Dong; He, Jian-Ying; Lu, Chang-Chang; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Le, Han-Bo; Wang, Chao-Ye; Zhang, Yong-Kui

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Tim-3 expression on peripheral CD3-CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells and CD3+CD56+ natural killer T (NKT) cells in lung cancer patients. We analyzed Tim-3+CD3-CD56+ cells, Tim-3+CD3-CD56dim cells, Tim-3+CD3-CD56bright cells, and Tim- 3+CD3+CD56+ cells in fresh peripheral blood from 79 lung cancer cases preoperatively and 53 healthy controls by flow cytometry. Postoperative blood samples were also analyzed from 21 members of the lung cancer patient cohort. It was showed that expression of Tim-3 was significantly increased on CD3-CD56+ cells, CD3- CD56dim cells and CD3+CD56+ cells in lung cancer patients as compared to healthy controls (p=0.03, p=0.03 and p=0.04, respectively). When analyzing Tim-3 expression with cancer progression, results revealed more elevated Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ cells, CD3-CD56dim cells and CD3+CD56+ cells in cases with advanced stages (III/IV) than those with stage I and II (p=0.02, p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively). In addition, Tim-3 expression was significantly reduced on after surgical resection of the primary tumor (p<0.01). Tim-3 expression in natural killer cells from fresh peripheral blood may provide a useful indicator of disease progression of lung cancer. Furthermore, it was indicated that Tim-3 might be as a therapeutic target.

  14. Assessment of human natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity against Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and brain cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dannemann, B.R.; Morris, V.A.; Araujo, F.G.; Remington, J.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in the absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.

  15. Functional invariant natural killer T-cell and CD1d axis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Weinkove, Robert; Brooks, Collin R; Carter, John M; Hermans, Ian F; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-03-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells recognize glycolipid antigens such as α-galactosylceramide presented by CD1d. In preclinical models of B-cell malignancies, α-galactosylceramide is an adjuvant to tumor vaccination, enhancing tumor-specific T-cell responses and prolonging survival. However, numerical and functional invariant natural killer T-cell defects exist in patients with some cancers. Our aim was to assess this axis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The numbers of circulating invariant natural killer T cells and the expression of CD1d on antigen-presenting cells were evaluated in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and age-matched controls. Cytokine profile and in vitro proliferative capacity were determined. Patient- and control-derived invariant natural killer T-cell lines were generated and characterized, and allogeneic and autologous responses to α-galactosylce-ramide-treated leukemia cells were assessed. Absolute numbers and phenotype of invariant natural killer T cells were normal in patients with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and cytokine profile and proliferative capacity were intact. Chemotherapy-treated patients had reduced numbers of invariant natural killer T cells and myeloid dendritic cells, but α-galactosylceramide-induced proliferation was preserved. Invariant natural killer T-cell lines from patients lysed CD1d-expressing targets. Irradiated α-galactosylceramide-treated leukemic cells elicited allogeneic and autologous invariant natural killer T-cell proliferation, and α-galactosylceramide treatment led to increased proliferation of conventional T cells in response to tumor. In conclusion, the invariant natural killer T-cell and CD1d axis is fundamentally intact in patients with early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia and, despite reduced circulating numbers, function is retained in fludarabine-treated patients. Immunotherapies exploiting the adjuvant effect of α-galactosylceramide may be feasible.

  16. Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells As Pharmacological Tools for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xingchun; Mi, Yajing; Guo, Na; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian; Gou, Xingchun; Jin, Weilin

    2017-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD3+CD56+ natural killer T cells, which can be easily expanded in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CIK cells work as pharmacological tools for cancer immunotherapy as they exhibit MHC-unrestricted, safe, and effective antitumor activity. Much effort has been made to improve CIK cells cytotoxicity and treatments of CIK cells combined with other antitumor therapies are applied. This review summarizes some strategies, including the combination of CIK with additional cytokines, dendritic cells, check point inhibitors, antibodies, chemotherapeutic agents, nanomedicines, and engineering CIK cells with a chimeric antigen receptor. Furthermore, we briefly sum up the clinical trials on CIK cells and compare the effect of clinical CIK therapy with other immunotherapies. Finally, further research is needed to clarify the pharmacological mechanism of CIK and provide evidence to formulate uniform culturing criteria for CIK expansion. PMID:28729866

  17. Analysis of GzmbCre as a Model System for Gene Deletion in the Natural Killer Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiying; Evaristo, Cesar; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Kee, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of gene function in mature and activated natural killer cells has been hampered by the lack of model systems for Cre-mediated recombination in these cells. Here we have investigated the utility of GzmbCre for recombination of loxp sequences in these cells predicated on the observation that Gzmb mRNA is highly expressed in mature and activated natural killer cells. Using two different reporter strains we determined that gene function could be investigated in mature natural killer cells after GzmbCre mediated recombination in vitro in conditions that lead to natural killer cell activation such as in the cytokine combination of interleukin 2 and interleukin 12. We demonstrated the utility of this model by creating GzmbCre;Rosa26IKKbca mice in which Cre-mediated recombination resulted in expression of constitutively active IKKβ, which results in activation of the NFκB transcription factor. In vivo and in vitro activation of IKKβ in natural killer cells revealed that constitutive activation of this pathway leads to natural killer cell hyper-activation and altered morphology. As a caveat to the use of GzmbCre we found that this transgene can lead to recombination in all hematopoietic cells the extent of which varies with the particular loxp flanked allele under investigation. We conclude that GzmbCre can be used under some conditions to investigate gene function in mature and activated natural killer cells.

  18. The correlation of lymphocyte subsets, natural killer cell, and Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sen; Gao, Hua; Luo, Qin; Wang, Pengfei; Yang, Xinling

    2017-08-01

    The correlation between immunity and Parkinson's disease was presented in many papers, which also discussed lymphocyte and natural killer cell. But these studies have yielded inconsistent results. To systematically review the relationship between the lymphocyte subsets/natural killer cell and the risk of Parkinson's disease, we electronically searched the SpringerLink, Web of Science, Ebsco-medline with full text, Pubmed, Elsevier-ScienceDirect, Ovid-lww-oup, Wanfang Data for case-control trials on comparing the number of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and natural killer cell in Parkinson's patients and healthy controls. According to the Cochrane methods, the reviewers selected literature, extracted data, and assessed the quality. Then, a meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.2. Finally, 21 case-control trials including 943 cases of Parkinson's disease were fit into our data analysis. Meta-analysis showed that the decreased numbers of CD3+, CD4+ lymphocyte subsets and the increased number of natural killer cell were found in Parkinson's disease patients. In the intermediate and late stage of PD, CD8+ lymphocyte subsets had a significant decrement. However, the number of B lymphocyte subsets had no significant association with Parkinson's disease. The lymphocyte subsets and NK cell may be associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Liaison between natural killer cells and dendritic cells in human gestation

    PubMed Central

    Leno-Durán, Ester; Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; García Olivares, Enrique; Tirado-González, Irene

    2014-01-01

    A successful pregnancy relies on immunological adaptations that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus, despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Among several immunocompetent cell types present within the human maternal/fetal interface, DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) and CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells are of major importance for early pregnancy maintenance, not only generating maternal immunological tolerance but also regulating stromal cell differentiation. Previous reports show the presence of NK–DC cell conjugates in first trimester human decidua, suggesting that these cells may play a role in the modulation of the local immune response within the uterus. While effective immunity is necessary to protect the mother from harmful pathogens, some form of tolerance must be activated to avoid an immune response against fetal antigens. This review article discusses current evidence concerning the functions of DC and NK cells in pregnancy and their liaison in human decidua. PMID:24954224

  20. Liaison between natural killer cells and dendritic cells in human gestation.

    PubMed

    Leno-Durán, Ester; Muñoz-Fernández, Raquel; Olivares, Enrique García; Tirado-González, Irene

    2014-09-01

    A successful pregnancy relies on immunological adaptations that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus, despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Among several immunocompetent cell types present within the human maternal/fetal interface, DC-SIGN(+) dendritic cells (DCs) and CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells are of major importance for early pregnancy maintenance, not only generating maternal immunological tolerance but also regulating stromal cell differentiation. Previous reports show the presence of NK-DC cell conjugates in first trimester human decidua, suggesting that these cells may play a role in the modulation of the local immune response within the uterus. While effective immunity is necessary to protect the mother from harmful pathogens, some form of tolerance must be activated to avoid an immune response against fetal antigens. This review article discusses current evidence concerning the functions of DC and NK cells in pregnancy and their liaison in human decidua.

  1. Suicide gene-modified killer cells as an allogeneic alternative to autologous cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Leboeuf, Céline; Durand, Sarah; Su, Bin; Deschamps, Marina; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ferrand, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells reduces the recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in association with transarterial chemoembolization or radiofrequency. However, a large‑scale development of this immunotherapy remains difficult to consider in an autologous setting, considering the logistical hurdles associated with the production of this cell therapy product. A previous study has provided the in vitro and in vivo proof‑of‑concept that allogeneic suicide gene‑modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) from healthy blood donors (a cell therapy product previously demonstrated to provide anti‑leukemic effects to patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation) may exert a potent anti‑tumor effect towards HCC. Therefore, the development of a bank of 'ready‑for‑use' aSGMKCs was proposed as an approach allowing for the development of immunotherapies that are more convenient and on a broader scale than that of autologous therapies. In the present study, aSGMKCs were compared with CIK cells generated according to three different protocols. Similar to CIK cells, the cytotoxic activity of aSGMKCs toward the Huh‑7 HCC cell line was mediated by tumor necrosis factor‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand, tumor necrosis factor‑α and interferon‑γ. Furthermore, the frequency of natural killer (NK), NK‑like T and T cells, and their in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity activities were similar between aSGMKCs and CIK cells. Thus, the present study demonstrated that aSGMKCs are similar to CIK cells, further suggesting the possibility for future use of aSGMKCs in the treatment of solid tumors, including HCC.

  2. Curative Effects of Dendritic Cells Combined with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells in Patients with Malignant Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmin; Cui, Yuzhong; Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Rusen; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine the effects of dendritic cells (DCs) and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in patients with malignant pericardial effusion. Material/Methods All patients underwent pericardial puncture and indwelling catheter insertion. After pericardial drainage, the 16 patients in the treatment group received an infusion of 20 mL DCs and CIK cells (>1.0×1010 cells) and 500,000 U interleukin (IL)-2 for 3 successive days. The 15 control-group patients received 30 mg/m2 cisplatin and 500,000 U IL-2 for 3 successive days. The treatment effects were assessed using imaging data. Results The total efficiency and complete remission rates were higher in the treatment group than in the control group at 4 weeks (total efficiency: 87.50% vs. 73.33%; complete remission: 62.50% vs. 46.67%) and 3 months after the treatment (total efficiency: 81.25% vs. 66.67%; complete remission: 50.00% vs. 40.00%; P<0.05 for all). In both groups, the Karnofsky scores for quality of life improved after treatment. However, the curative effects were better in the treatment group than in the control group (P<0.05). The following adverse reactions occurred: fever, 6 treatment-group patients and 3 control-group patients; chest pain, 2 treatment-group patients and 7 control-group patients; gastrointestinal reactions, 1 treatment-group patient and 6 control-group patients; and bone marrow suppression, 1 treatment-group patient and 5 control-group patients. The between-group differences in adverse reactions were significant (P<0.05). Conclusions The combination of DCs and CIK cells effectively treated malignant pericardial effusion, produced few side effects, and improved the patients’ quality of life. PMID:27806024

  3. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Luevano, Martha; Derniame, Sophie; Querol, Sergio; Blundell, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian; Soria, Bernat; Cooper, Nichola; Bonnet, Dominique; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT). However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK) cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC) functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU) after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT. PMID:26465138

  4. Natural killer cells: can they be useful as adoptive immunotherapy for cancer?

    PubMed

    Arai, Sally; Klingemann, Hans-G

    2005-02-01

    As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK) cells form the first line of defence against pathogens or transformed/cancerous host cells. Recent experimental and clinical data show the possibility of exploiting NK activity as a cell-based immunotherapy to treat cancer. This review discusses the recent knowledge on NK cell biology that has impacted on its development as a treatment for cancer.

  5. Noninvasive Imaging of Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Apoptosis in a Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that induce apoptosis in cancer cells infected with viruses and bacteria through a caspase-3-dependent pathway. Effective NK cell-based immunotherapy requires highly sensitive imaging tools for in vivo monitoring of the dynamic events involved in apoptosis. Here, we describe a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging approach to determine the antitumor effects of NK cell-based therapy by serial imaging of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in a mouse model of human glioma.

  6. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on NK cells: the how, where and why.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Clair M

    2008-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that recognize and interact with HLA class I antigen. The KIRs are a multigene family and its members are often highly polymorphic. Evidence is emerging from disease-association studies that KIR receptors can play beneficial roles in viral infections, such as HIV, HCV, but may also predispose to certain autoimmune diseases. Knowledge regarding expression and function of KIR on human NK cells is lagging behind the rapid expansion of sequencing and genetic data already generated. This review focuses on recent discoveries that have been made, which help bridge this gap. We now appreciate the importance of phenotypic diversity of KIR receptor expression in NK cells and are starting to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding control of their complex expression patterns. In particular, the role that HLA ligand contributes to KIR receptor expression will be discussed. It is also becoming increasingly clear that genetic factors, such as promoters and epi-genetic mechanisms such as methylation, are hugely important in controlling NK cell receptor expression and function. The relevance of phenotypic diversity of NK cell receptors will be discussed in light of these recent findings.

  7. Human NK cells maintain licensing status and are subject to killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and KIR-ligand inhibition following ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Alderson, Kory A; Phillips, Emily; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Gan, Jacek; Campana, Dario; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Infusion of allogeneic NK cells is a potential immunotherapy for both hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. Interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) on human NK cells and KIR-ligands on tumor cells influence the magnitude of NK function. To obtain sufficient numbers of activated NK cells for infusion, one potent method uses cells from the K562 human erythroleukemia line that have been transfected to express activating 41BB ligand (41BBL) and membrane-bound interleukin 15 (mbIL15). The functional importance of KIRs on ex vivo expanded NK cells has not been studied in detail. We found that after a 12-day co-culture with K562-mbIL15-41BBL cells, expanded NK cells maintained inhibition specificity and prior in vivo licensing status determined by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions. Addition of an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) induced NK-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and augmented killing of CD20+ target cells. However, partial inhibition induced by KIR/KIR-ligand interactions persisted. Finally, we found that extended co-cultures of NK cells with stimulatory cells transduced to express various KIR-ligands modified both the inhibitory and activating KIR repertoires of the expanded NK cell product. These studies demonstrate that the licensing interactions known to occur during NK ontogeny also influence NK cell function following NK expansion ex vivo with HLA-null stimulatory cells.

  8. Neural stem cells sustain natural killer cells that dictate recovery from brain inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Sanai, Nader; Jin, Wei-Na; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Recovery from organ-specific autoimmune diseases largely relies on the mobilization of endogenous repair mechanisms and local factors that control them. Natural killer (NK) cells are swiftly mobilized to organs targeted by autoimmunity and typically undergo numerical contraction when inflammation wanes. We report the unexpected finding that NK cells are retained in the brain subventricular zone (SVZ) during the chronic phase of multiple sclerosis in humans and its animal model in mice. These NK cells were found preferentially in close proximity to SVZ neural stem cells (NSCs) that produce interleukin-15 and sustain functionally competent NK cells. Moreover, NK cells limited the reparative capacity of NSCs following brain inflammation. These findings reveal that reciprocal interactions between NSCs and NK cells regulate neurorepair. PMID:26752157

  9. Phenotypic modulation of porcine CD14+ monocytes, natural killer/natural killer T cells and CD8αβ+ T cell subsets by an antibody-derived killer peptide (KP).

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luca; Borghetti, Paolo; Ferrarini, Giulia; De Angelis, Elena; Canelli, Elena; Ogno, Giulia; Catella, Alessia; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Martelli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    An engineered killer peptide (KP) based on a recombinant anti-idiotypic antibody representing the functional image of a yeast killer toxin (KT) was demonstrated to mediate antimicrobial effects against fungi and viruses. KP binds to murine dendritic cells and macrophages and up-regulate co-receptor expression, thus sustaining CD4+ lymphocyte activation. No immunological data are available in domestic animals thus KP-induced immunomodulation was evaluated in porcine monocyte and lymphocyte subsets. PBMC from healthy adult pigs were stimulated with KP or a scramble peptide (SP), or kept unstimulated for 24, 48 and 72h, and subsequently analyzed by flow cytometry. In monocytes, KP induced a strong dose-dependent shift from a major fraction of CD172α+CD14+(low) cells to a predominant fraction of CD172α+CD14+(high) cells, known to sustain leukocyte activation/differentiation and inflammatory responses. The CD16+ cell percentages, specifically the CD3+CD16+ natural killer T (NKT) cell fraction and CD16 expression showed an intense and stable dose-dependent increase while the CD3-CD16+ NK cell fraction decreased. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased and CD8α and CD8β expression were up-regulated. CD8β+ cytotoxic T cells and CD16+ cells comparably increased. A marked stimulation of activated CD16+CD25+ and CD8β+CD25+ cells was observed at 24h. The increase of CD8α+ cells and CD8α expression were due to increased CD4+CD8α+ (memory T helper) cells, also showing a CD8α+(high) phenotype. Concomitantly, the CD4+CD8α- T helper lymphocyte fraction significantly decreased. Overall, KP induced a wide modulation of innate immune and T cells that can exert regulatory and cytotoxic functions, which are fundamental for an efficient Th1 response.

  10. Innate immune responses involving natural killer and natural killer T cells promote liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Satoko; Ikejima, Kenichi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Arai, Kumiko; Ishikawa, Sachiko; Yamagata, Hisafumi; Aoyama, Tomonori; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Watanabe, Sumio

    2013-02-01

    To clarify the roles of innate immune cells in liver regeneration, here, we investigated the alteration in regenerative responses after partial hepatectomy (PH) under selective depletion of natural killer (NK) and/or NKT cells. Male, wild-type (WT; C57Bl/6), and CD1d-knockout (KO) mice were injected with anti-NK1.1 or anti-asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide (GM1) antibody and then underwent the 70% PH. Regenerative responses after PH were evaluated, and hepatic expression levels of cytokines and growth factors were measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. Phosphorylation of STAT3 was detected by Western blotting. Depletion of both NK and NKT cells with an anti-NK1.1 antibody in WT mice caused drastic decreases in bromodeoxyuridine uptake, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and cyclin D1, 48 h after PH. In mice given NK1.1 antibody, increases in hepatic TNF-α, IL-6/phospho-STAT3, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) levels following PH were also blunted significantly, whereas IFN-γ mRNA levels were not different. CD1d-KO mice per se showed normal liver regeneration; however, pretreatment with an antiasialo GM1 antibody to CD1d-KO mice, resulting in depletion of both NK and NKT cells, also blunted regenerative responses. Collectively, these observations clearly indicated that depletion of both NK and NKT cells by two different ways results in impaired liver regeneration. NK and NKT cells most likely upregulate TNF-α, IL-6/STAT3, and HGF in a coordinate fashion, thus promoting normal regenerative responses in the liver.

  11. The role of natural killer cells in tumor control--effectors and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Morgan E; Smyth, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the primary effector cells of the innate immune system and have a well-established role in tumor rejection in a variety of spontaneous and induced cancer models. NK cell function is regulated by a complex balance of inhibitory and activating signals that allow them to selectively target and kill cells that display an abnormal pattern of cell surface molecules, while leaving normal healthy cells unharmed. In this review we discuss NK cell function, the role of NK cells in cancer therapies, the emerging concept of bi-directional cross-talk between NK cells and dendritic cells, and the implications of these interactions for tumor immunotherapy.

  12. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA(+)RO(+) phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA(+)RO(-) phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA(+)RO(+) cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias.

  13. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA+RO+ phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA+RO− phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA+RO+ cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias. PMID:26629531

  14. Interleukin-22-producing natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer-like cells in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Marco

    2009-07-17

    Blood, lymphoid tissues, and placenta contain diverse subpopulations of natural killer (NK) cells that possess distinct immune functions. Recent studies have shown that human and mouse gut-associated lymphoid tissues harbor a unique NK cell subset that specializes in production of interleukin (IL)-22. This cytokine plays a role in host defense of mucosal barriers, although dysregulated secretion may cause autoimmune disease. In parallel, human fetal lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and mouse adult LTi-like cells in secondary lymphoid tissues were found to release IL-22, as well as IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates host defense against extracellular pathogens. Here, we compare these recently identified immune cells, reviewing what is known about their anatomical location, differentiation requirements, function, and potential involvement in host defense and autoimmunity. Finally, we discuss the challenges faced in furthering our understanding of the developmental relationships and role of NK and LTi-like cells in mucosal immune responses.

  15. Growth and activation of natural killer cells ex vivo from children with neuroblastoma for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Wu, Hong-Wei; Sheard, Michael A; Sposto, Richard; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Cooper, Laurence J N; Lee, Dean A; Seeger, Robert C

    2013-04-15

    Adoptive transfer of natural killer (NK) cells combined with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has therapeutic potential for malignancies. We determined if large numbers of activated NK (aNK) cells can be grown ex vivo from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of children with high-risk neuroblastoma using artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). Irradiated K562-derived Clone 9.mbIL21 aAPC were cocultured with PBMC, and propagated NK cells were characterized with flow cytometry, cytotoxicity assays, Luminex multicytokine assays, and a nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse model of disseminated neuroblastoma. Coculturing patient PBMC with aAPC for 14 days induced 2,363- ± 443-fold expansion of CD56(+)CD3(-)CD14(-) NK cells with 83% ± 3% purity (n = 10). Results were similar to PBMC from normal donors (n = 5). Expression of DNAM-1, NKG2D, FcγRIII/CD16, and CD56 increased 6- ± 3-, 10- ± 2-, 21- ± 20-, and 18- ± 3-fold, respectively, on day 14 compared with day 0, showing activation of NK cells. In vitro, aNK cells were highly cytotoxic against neuroblastoma cell lines and killing was enhanced with GD2-specific mAb ch14.18. When mediating cytotoxicity with ch14.18, release of TNF-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-γ, sCD40L, CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL9/MIG, and CXCL11/I-TAC by aNK cells increased 4-, 5-, 6-, 15-, 265-, 917-, and 363-fold (151-9,121 pg/mL), respectively, compared with aNK cells alone. Survival of NOD/SCID mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma improved when treated with thawed and immediately intravenously infused cryopreserved aNK cells compared with untreated mice and was further improved when ch14.18 was added. Propagation of large numbers of aNK cells that maintain potent antineuroblastoma activities when cryopreserved supports clinical testing of adoptive cell therapy with ch14.18.

  16. Virus-Infected Human Mast Cells Enhance Natural Killer Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Haidl, Ian D; Lee, Patrick W; Marshall, Jean S

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are protected from infection by both structural and sentinel cells, such as mast cells. The mast cell's role in antiviral responses is poorly understood; however, they selectively recruit natural killer (NK) cells following infection. Here, the ability of virus-infected mast cells to enhance NK cell functions was examined. Cord blood-derived human mast cells infected with reovirus (Reo-CBMC) and subsequent mast cell products were used for the stimulation of human NK cells. NK cells upregulated the CD69 molecule and cytotoxicity-related genes, and demonstrated increased cytotoxic activity in response to Reo-CBMC soluble products. NK cell interferon (IFN)-γ production was also promoted in the presence of interleukin (IL)-18. In vivo, SCID mice injected with Reo-CBMC in a subcutaneous Matrigel model, could recruit and activate murine NK cells, a property not shared by normal human fibroblasts. Soluble products of Reo-CBMC included IL-10, TNF, type I and type III IFNs. Blockade of the type I IFN receptor abrogated NK cell activation. Furthermore, reovirus-infected mast cells expressed multiple IFN-α subtypes not observed in reovirus-infected fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Our data define an important mast cell IFN response, not shared by structural cells, and a subsequent novel mast cell-NK cell immune axis in human antiviral host defense.

  17. Mechanisms of Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation in Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    immunoregulatory phenotype. Specifically, three non-mutually exclusive hypothesis will be tested –1) that a lipid antigen derived from 4T1 tumor cells can be...made significant progress in demonstrating that lipid antigen/s derived from 4T1 tumors can differentially modulate the maturational markers in...4 INTRODUCTION Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a unique group of immune cells that specifically recognize lipid antigens

  18. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  19. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  20. Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer (Nk) Cells in Vivo Determined by the Target Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Rickard; Franksson, Lars; Une, Clas; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Öhlén, Claes; Örn, Anders; Kärre, Klas

    2000-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target cells. We show here that infiltration of activated NK cells into the peritoneal cavity in response to tumor cells is controlled by the tumor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I phenotype. Tumor cells lacking appropriate MHC class I expression induced NK cell infiltration, cytotoxic activation, and induction of transcription of interferon γ in NK cells. The induction of these responses was inhibited by restoration of tumor cell MHC class I expression. The NK cells responding to MHC class I–deficient tumor cells were ∼10 times as active as endogenous NK cells on a per cell basis. Although these effector cells showed a typical NK specificity in that they preferentially killed MHC class I–deficient cells, this specificity was even more distinct during induction of the intraperitoneal response. Observations are discussed in relation to a possible adaptive component of the NK response, i.e., recruitment/activation in response to challenges that only NK cells are able to neutralize. PMID:10620611

  1. Type 1 Innate Lymphoid Cell Biology: Lessons Learnt from Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuhao; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Seillet, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) comprise the natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s that reside within peripheral tissues. Several different ILC1 subsets have recently been characterized; however, no unique markers have been identified that uniquely define these subsets. Whether ILC1s and NK cells are in fact distinct lineages, or alternately exhibit transitional molecular programs that allow them to adapt to different tissue niches remains an open question. NK cells are the prototypic member of the Group 1 ILCs and have been historically assigned the functions of what now appears to be a multi-subset family that are distributed throughout the body. This raises the question of whether each of these populations mediate distinct functions during infection and tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we review the diversity of the Group 1 ILC subsets in their transcriptional regulation, localization, mobility, and receptor expression, and highlight the challenges in unraveling the individual functions of these different populations of cells. PMID:27785129

  2. Type 1 Innate Lymphoid Cell Biology: Lessons Learnt from Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuhao; Huntington, Nicholas D; Belz, Gabrielle T; Seillet, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) comprise the natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s that reside within peripheral tissues. Several different ILC1 subsets have recently been characterized; however, no unique markers have been identified that uniquely define these subsets. Whether ILC1s and NK cells are in fact distinct lineages, or alternately exhibit transitional molecular programs that allow them to adapt to different tissue niches remains an open question. NK cells are the prototypic member of the Group 1 ILCs and have been historically assigned the functions of what now appears to be a multi-subset family that are distributed throughout the body. This raises the question of whether each of these populations mediate distinct functions during infection and tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we review the diversity of the Group 1 ILC subsets in their transcriptional regulation, localization, mobility, and receptor expression, and highlight the challenges in unraveling the individual functions of these different populations of cells.

  3. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Umbilical Cord Blood Natural Killer Cells, Their Characteristics, and Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sarvaria, Anushruti; Jawdat, Dunia; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system able to kill different targets such as cancer cells and virally infected cells without prior activation making then attractive candidates for cancer immunotherapy. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has become a source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation but as we gain a better understanding of the characteristics of each immune cell that UCB contains, we will also be able to develop new cell therapies for cancer. In this review, we present what is currently known of the phenotype and functions of UCB NK cells and how these cells could be used in the future for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28386260

  5. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  6. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  7. In vivo kinetics of human natural killer cells: the effects of ageing and acute and chronic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wallace, Diana L; de Lara, Catherine M; Ghattas, Hala; Asquith, Becca; Worth, Andrew; Griffin, George E; Taylor, Graham P; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L; Macallan, Derek C

    2007-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells form a circulating population in a state of dynamic homeostasis. We investigated NK cell homeostasis by labelling dividing cells in vivo using deuterium-enriched glucose in young and elderly healthy subjects and patients with viral infection. Following a 24-hr intravenous infusion of 6,6-D2-glucose, CD3– CD16+ NK cells sorted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) were analysed for DNA deuterium content by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to yield minimum estimates for proliferation rate (p). In healthy young adults (n = 5), deuterium enrichment was maximal ∼10 days after labelling, consistent with postmitotic maturation preceding circulation. The mean (± standard deviation) proliferation rate was 4·3 ± 2·4%/day (equivalent to a doubling time of 16 days) and the total production rate was 15 ± 7·6 × 106 cells/l/day. Labelled cells disappeared from the circulation at a similar rate [6·9 ± 4·0%/day; half-life (T½) <10 days]. Healthy elderly subjects (n = 8) had lower proliferation and production rates (P = 2·5 ± 1·0%/day and 7·3 ± 3·7 × 106 cells/l/day, respectively; P = 0·04). Similar rates were seen in patients chronically infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) (P = 3·2 ± 1·9%/day). In acute infectious mononucleosis (n = 5), NK cell numbers were increased but kinetics were unaffected (P = 2·8 ± 1·0%/day) a mean of 12 days after symptom onset. Human NK cells have a turnover time in blood of about 2 weeks. Proliferation rates appear to fall with ageing, remain unperturbed by chronic HTLV-I infection and normalize rapidly following acute Epstein–Barr virus infection. PMID:17346281

  8. NK-92: an 'off-the-shelf therapeutic' for adoptive natural killer cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Seidl, Christian; Wels, Winfried S; Klingemann, Hans G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly considered as immunotherapeutic agents in particular in the fight against cancers. NK cell therapies are potentially broadly applicable and, different from their T cell counterparts, do not cause graft-versus-host disease. Efficacy and clinical in vitro or in vivo expansion of primary NK cells will however always remain variable due to individual differences of donors or patients. Long-term storage of clinical NK cell lots to allow repeated clinical applications remains an additional challenge. In contrast, the established and well-characterized cell line NK-92 can be easily and reproducibly expanded from a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant cryopreserved master cell bank. Moreover, no cost-intensive cell purification methods are required. To date, NK-92 has been intensively studied. The cells displayed superior cytotoxicity against a number of tumor types tested, which was confirmed in preclinical mouse studies. Subsequent clinical testing demonstrated safety of NK-92 infusions even at high doses. Despite the phase I nature of the trials conducted so far, some efficacy was noted, particularly against lung tumors. Furthermore, to overcome tumor resistance and for specific targeting, NK-92 has been engineered to express a number of different chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), including targeting, for example, CD19 or CD20 (anti-B cell malignancies), CD38 (anti-myeloma) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ErbB2; anti-epithelial cancers). The concept of an NK cell line as an allogeneic cell therapeutic produced 'off-the-shelf' on demand holds great promise for the development of effective treatments.

  9. Expression of natural killer cell regulatory microRNA by uveal melanoma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Kooshki, Mitra; Aldrich, Wayne; Varghai, Daniel; Zborowski, Maciej; Singh, Arun D; Triozzi, Pierre L

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in the control of metastasis in uveal melanoma, a process that has been ascribed to its cancer stem cell subpopulation. NK cell activation is regulated by specific microRNA (miR). The NK cell sensitivity and regulatory miR production of uveal melanoma cancer stem cells was examined. Cancer stem cells enriched from aggressively metastatic MUM2B uveal melanoma cells by selecting CD271(+) cells or propagating as non-adherent spheres in stem-cell supportive were more resistant to NK cell cytolysis than cancer stem cells enriched from less aggressively metastatic OCM1 uveal melanoma cells. Both MUM2B and OCM1 cells expressed and secreted NK cell regulatory miRs, including miR 146a, 181a, 20a, and 223. MUM2B cells expressed and secreted miR-155; OCM1 cells did not. Transfecting MUM2B cells with anti-miR-155 increased NK cell sensitivity. CD271(+) cells were identified in the blood of patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and were characterized by low expression of melanocyte differentiation determinants and by the ability to form non-adherent spheres in stem-cell supportive media. These cells also expressed NK cell regulatory miRs, including miR-155. These results indicate that uveal melanoma cancer stem cells can vary in their sensitivity to NK cell lysis and their expression of NK cell regulatory miRs. Circulating CD271(+) cells from patients with metastatic uveal melanoma manifest cancer stem cell features and express miRs associated with NK cell suppression, including miR-155, that may contribute to metastatic progression.

  10. IMPAIRED NATURAL KILLER CELL LYSIS IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS WITH HIGH LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED EXPRESSION OF KILLER IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Varker, Kimberly A.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Welt, Marilyn; Suleiman, Samer; Thornton, Lisa; Andersen, Barbara L.; Carson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Background We previously reported that cancer-related psychological stress is associated with reduced natural killer (NK) cell lysis. We hypothesized that reduced NK cell cytotoxicity in patients with increased levels of stress would correlate with alterations in the expression of inhibitory NK cell receptors (killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, or KIRs). The specific aim of this study was to examine KIR expression in patients with high or low levels of psychologic stress and correlate alterations in KIR expression with NK cell function. Materials and Methods 227 patients underwent baseline evaluation of cancer-related psychological stress and were randomized to psychosocial intervention versus observation. From this population, two groups were defined based on pre-treatment measurements of NK lytic activity, stress levels, and the availability of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Group I (n = 9) had low stress by the Impact of Events Scale (IES), and high NK cell lysis at the 50:1 effector: target ratio (NK50 = 52–89%). Group II (n = 8) had high stress and low NK50 (27–52%). Lymphokine activated killer (LAK) activity, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and expression of cytokine receptors, adhesion molecules, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) were assessed in PBMC. Results Incubation of PBMC with NK-stimulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, or IL-15) led to significant increases in cytotoxic activity regardless of IES/NK50 scores. There were no significant group differences in NK cell surface expression of the IL-2 receptor components CD25 and CD122, antibody-dependent lysis of HER2/neu-positive SKBr3 cells treated with an anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibody, expression of adhesion molecules (CD2, CD11a, CD18) and markers of activation (CD69), or expression of the KIRs CD158a, NKG2a, NKB1, and CD161. However, levels of CD158b were significantly higher in Group I after incubation in media alone or with IL-2, and CD94

  11. Impaired liver regeneration is associated with reduced cyclin B1 in natural killer T cell-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Meir, Hadar; Zolotaryova, Lydia; Ilan, Yaron; Shteyer, Eyal

    2017-03-23

    It has been shown that the proportion of natural killer T cells is markedly elevated during liver regeneration and their activation under different conditions can modulate this process. As natural killer T cells and liver injury are central in liver regeneration, elucidating their role is important. The aim of the current study is to explore the role of natural killer T cells in impaired liver regeneration. Concanvalin A was injected 4 days before partial hepatectomy to natural killer T cells- deficient mice or to anti CD1d1-treated mice. Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were used to measure hepatocytes proliferation. Expression of hepatic cyclin B1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were evaluated by Western Blot and liver injury was assessed by ALT and histology. Natural killer T cells- deficient or mice injected with anti CD1d antibodies exhibited reduced liver regeneration. These mice were considerably resistant to ConA-induced liver injury. In the absence of NKT cells hepatic proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin B1 decreased in mice injected with Concanvalin A before partial hepatectomy. This was accompanied with reduced serum interleukin-6 levels. Natural killer T cells play an important role in liver regeneration, which is associated with cyclin B1 and interleukin-6.

  12. Hematopoietic and nature killer cell development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhenya; Knorr, David A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key effectors of the innate immune system, protecting the host from a variety of infections, as well as malignant cells. Recent advances in the field of NK cell biology have led to a better understanding of how NK cells develop. This progress has directly translated to improved outcomes in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants to treat potentially lethal malignancies. However, key differences between mouse and human NK cell development and biology limits the use of rodents to attain a more in depth understanding of NK cell development. Therefore, a readily accessible and genetically tractable cell source to study human NK cell development is warranted. Our lab has pioneered the development of lymphocytes, specifically NK cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This chapter describes a reliable method to generate NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs using murine stromal cell lines. Additionally, we include an updated approach using a spin-embryoid body (spin-EB) differentiation system that allows for human NK cell development completely defined in vitro conditions.

  13. [Natural killer cells and the innate immune system in infectious pathology].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, C; Puente, J

    2000-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form a unique third group of lymphocytes that differs from T and B cells in surface phenotype, target cell recognition and function. NK cells have two relevant functions, related to the innate immune response against pathogens microorganisms. One is cytotoxicity, mediated by the recognition and lysis of target cells such as virus and bacteria infected-cells. The second NK cell function is to produce cytokines, mainly IFN-gamma, that can modulate innate and specific immune responses. Cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion contribute to host resistance against microorganisms and both functions are significantly altered in infectious diseases.

  14. [Effects of infusion media on human red blood cell morphology].

    PubMed

    Burova, O O; Gusev, A A; Petrikov, S S; Gusev, S A; Basyreva, L Iu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of various infusion media on the structure of human red blood cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro experiments used 10% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, 10% glucose solution, 20% albumin solution, Rheopolyglucin, HyperHAES solution (18 g of NaCl in combination with 60 g of hydroxyethylstarch (HES), 200/0.5), Voluven (HES 130/0.4/9:1), and a combination of hypertensive NaCl solution and Rheopolyglucin. The morphofunctional response of red blood cells was studied in the clinical setting when 6% Voluven solution (HES 130/0.4/ 9:1) and hypertensive NaCl and glucose solutions were used. It was established that 10% NaCl solution caused considerable changes in the morphology of red blood cells both in the experiment and in patients with severe brain injury. The magnitude of structural changes increased as blood NaCl concentrations became higher. 10% glucose solution, Voluven, Rheopolyglucin, and albumin did not virtually affect the structure of red blood cells. Infusion of Voluven (500 ml of 6% solution for 40 minutes) induced no changes in the morphology of red blood cells in the clinical setting. Among the test solutions used to correct intracranial hypertension (HyperHAES, 10% NaCl, a combination of rheopolyglucin and 10% NaCl), HyperHAES exerted the least effect on the morphology of red blood cells.

  15. Cytokine-induced killer cells/dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells immunotherapy for the treatment of esophageal cancer in China: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Mu, Ying; Zhang, Anqi; Ren, Shaoda; Wang, Weihua; Xie, Jiaping; Zhang, Yingxin; Zhou, Changhui

    2017-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy based on cytokine-induced killer cells or combination of dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK/DC-CIK) showed promising clinical outcomes for treating esophageal cancer (EC). However, the clinical benefit varies among previous studies. Therefore, it is necessary to systematically evaluate the curative efficacy and safety of CIK/DC-CIK immunotherapy as an adjuvant therapy for conventional therapeutic strategies in the treatment of EC. Materials and methods Clinical trials published before October 2016 and reporting CIK/DC-CIK immunotherapy treatment responses or safety for EC were searched in Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Wanfang and China National Knowledge Internet databases. Research quality and heterogeneity were evaluated before analysis, and pooled analyses were performed using random- or fixed-effect models. Results This research covered 11 trials including 994 EC patients. Results of this meta-analysis indicated that compared with conventional therapy, the combination of conventional therapy with CIK/DC-CIK immunotherapy significantly prolonged the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate, overall response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) (1-year OS: P=0.0005; ORR and DCR: P<0.00001). Patients with combination therapy also showed significantly improved quality of life (QoL) (P=0.02). After CIK/DC-CIK immunotherapy, lymphocyte percentages of CD3+ and CD3−CD56+ subsets (P<0.01) and cytokines levels of IFN-γ, -2, TNF-α and IL-12 (P<0.00001) were significantly increased, and the percentage of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+CD25+CD127− subset was significantly decreased, whereas analysis of CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ did not show significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusion The combination of CIK/DC-CIK immunotherapy and conventional therapy is safe and markedly prolongs survival time, enhances immune function and improves the treatment efficacy for EC. PMID:28408841

  16. Lidocaine Stimulates the Function of Natural Killer Cells in Different Experimental Settings.

    PubMed

    Cata, Juan P; Ramirez, Maria F; Velasquez, Jose F; Di, A I; Popat, Keyuri U; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Black, Dahlia M; Lewis, Valerae O; Vauthey, Jean N

    2017-09-01

    One of the functions of natural killer (NK) cells is to eliminate cancer cells. The cytolytic activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by inhibitory and activation receptors located in the surface membrane. Lidocaine stimulates the function of NK cells at clinically relevant concentrations. It remains unknown whether this effect of lidocaine has an impact on the expression of surface receptors of NK cells, can uniformly stimulate across different cancer cell lines, and enhances the function of cells obtained during oncological surgery. NK cells from healthy donors and 43 patients who had undergone surgery for cancer were isolated. The function of NK cells was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release assay. NK cells were incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of lidocaine. By flow cytometry, we determined the impact of lidocaine on the expression of galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein3-beta-glucuronosytranferase 1, marker of cell maturation (CD57), killer cell lectin like receptor A, inhibitory (NKG2A) receptors and killer cell lectin like receptor D, activation (NKG2D) receptors of NK cells. Differences in expression at p<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Lidocaine increased the expression of NKG2D receptors and stimulated the function of NK cells against ovarian, pancreatic and ovarian cancer cell lines. Lidocaine also increased the cytolytic activity of NK cells from patients who underwent oncological surgery, except for those who had orthopedic procedures. Lidocaine showed an important stimulatory activity on NK cells. Our findings suggest that lidocaine might be used perioperatively to minimize the impact of surgery on NK cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. [Clinical study of autologous cytokine induced killer cells combined with IL-2 for therapy of elderly patients with B-cell malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Lu, Xue-Chun; Zhu, Hong-Li; Han, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yao; Fan, Hui; Li, Su-Xia; Liu, Yang; Dai, Han-Ren; Yao, Shan-Qian

    2010-10-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of autologous cytokine induced killer (CIK) cells combined with IL-2 in treatment of elderly patients with B-cell malignant lymphoma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from 9 elderly patients with B-cell malignant lymphoma, and then induced into CIK cells by IFN-γ, IL-2 and monoclonal antibody (mAb) against CD3. The autologous CIK cells [(2-3)×10(9)] thus obtained were infused back to individual patients, then followed by subcutaneous injection of IL-2 at single daily dose of 1×10(4) U/day for 10 consecutive days. The regimen was repeated every 4 weeks and total 64 cycles of CIK cell transfusion were completed. The changes in cellular immune function, tumor-related biological parameters, imaging characteristics, the condition of remission, quality of life and survival time were assessed. 7 patients received 8 cycles of CIK cell infusion, and 4 cycles were completed in 2 patients. The results showed that no adverse reaction was observed in all above mentioned patients. The percentages of CD3+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ increased significantly (p<0.05), and serum levels of β2-microglobulin and LDH were markedly decreased (p<0.05) after autologous CIK cell transfusion. The lymphoma symptoms were relieved with quality of life obviously elevated (p<0.01) in all patients. Complete remission was seen in 8 patients. Though one patient received 8 cycles of CIK cell transfusion therapy and achieved transient very good partial remission, but he died of acute large-area myocardial infarction and persistent progression of lymphoma. In conclusion, regimen of autologous CIK cells combined with IL-2 is safe and effective for the therapy of elderly patients with B-cell malignant lymphoma.

  18. Action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cheknev, S.B.; Saidov, M.Z.; Koval'chuk, L.V.; Pavlyuk, A.S.; Arion, V.Ya.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a study of the action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells (NKC) in vitro. The K-562 chronic human myeloid leukemia cells, cultured in vitro, used as targets were labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine. The experimental results indicate that T-activin can depress NKC activity but under certain conditions, it can also stimulate NKC. T-activin possesses immunoregulatory properties relative to NKC activity in vitro.

  19. Targeting Natural Killer cells to Acute Myeloid Leukemia in vitro with a CD16x33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) and ADAM17 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wiernik, Andres; Foley, Bree; Zhang, Bin; Verneris, Michael R.; Warlick, Erica; Gleason, Michelle K.; Ross, Julie A.; Luo, Xianghua; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Walcheck, Bruce; Vallera, Daniel A; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect by Natural Killer (NK) cells prevents relapse following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We determined whether a novel bi-specific killer cell engager (BiKE) signaling through CD16 and targeting CD33 could activate NK cells at high potency against AML targets. Experimental Design We investigated the ability of our fully humanized CD16x33 BiKE to trigger in vitro NK cell activation against HL60 (CD33+), RAJI (CD33−), and primary AML targets (de novo, refractory and post transplant) to determine whether treatment with CD16x33 BiKE in combination with an ADAM17 inhibitor could prevent CD16 shedding (a novel inhibitory mechanism induced by NK cell activation) and overcome inhibition of class I MHC recognizing inhibitory receptors. Results NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine release were specifically triggered by the CD16x33 BiKE when cells were cultured with HL60 targets, CD33+ de novo and refractory AML targets. Combination treatment with CD16x33 BiKE and ADAM17 inhibitor resulted in inhibition of CD16 shedding in NK cells, and enhanced NK cell activation. Treatment of NK cells from double umbilical cord blood transplant (UCBT) recipients with the CD16x33 BiKE resulted in activation, especially in those recipients with CMV reactivation. Conclusion CD16x33 BiKE can overcome self inhibitory signals and effectively elicit NK cell effector activity against AML. These in vitro studies highlight the potential of CD16x33 BiKE ± ADAM17 inhibition to enhance NK cell activation and specificity against CD33+ AML, which optimally could be applied in patients with relapsed AML or for adjuvant anti-leukemic therapy post-transplantation. PMID:23690482

  20. Cell cycle progression dictates the requirement for BCL2 in natural killer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Viant, Charlotte; Guia, Sophie; Hennessy, Robert J; Rautela, Jai; Pham, Kim; Bernat, Claire; Goh, Wilford; Jiao, Yuhao; Delconte, Rebecca; Roger, Michael; Simon, Vanina; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Grabow, Stephanie; Belz, Gabrielle T; Kile, Benjamin T; Strasser, Andreas; Gray, Daniel; Hodgkin, Phillip D; Beutler, Bruce; Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells with antitumor functions. Using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutagenesis screen in mice, we identified a strain with an NK cell deficiency caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the Bcl2 (B cell lymphoma 2) gene. Analysis of these mice and the conditional deletion of Bcl2 in NK cells revealed a nonredundant intrinsic requirement for BCL2 in NK cell survival. In these mice, NK cells in cycle were protected against apoptosis, and NK cell counts were restored in inflammatory conditions, suggesting a redundant role for BCL2 in proliferating NK cells. Consistent with this, cycling NK cells expressed higher MCL1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1) levels in both control and BCL2-null mice. Finally, we showed that deletion of BIM restored survival in BCL2-deficient but not MCL1-deficient NK cells. Overall, these data demonstrate an essential role for the binding of BCL2 to BIM in the survival of noncycling NK cells. They also favor a model in which MCL1 is the dominant survival protein in proliferating NK cells.

  1. Cell cycle progression dictates the requirement for BCL2 in natural killer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Viant, Charlotte; Guia, Sophie; Hennessy, Robert J.; Rautela, Jai; Pham, Kim; Bernat, Claire; Goh, Wilford; Jiao, Yuhao; Delconte, Rebecca; Roger, Michael; Simon, Vanina; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Grabow, Stephanie; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Strasser, Andreas; Gray, Daniel; Hodgkin, Phillip D.; Beutler, Bruce; Vivier, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells with antitumor functions. Using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)–induced mutagenesis screen in mice, we identified a strain with an NK cell deficiency caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the Bcl2 (B cell lymphoma 2) gene. Analysis of these mice and the conditional deletion of Bcl2 in NK cells revealed a nonredundant intrinsic requirement for BCL2 in NK cell survival. In these mice, NK cells in cycle were protected against apoptosis, and NK cell counts were restored in inflammatory conditions, suggesting a redundant role for BCL2 in proliferating NK cells. Consistent with this, cycling NK cells expressed higher MCL1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1) levels in both control and BCL2-null mice. Finally, we showed that deletion of BIM restored survival in BCL2-deficient but not MCL1-deficient NK cells. Overall, these data demonstrate an essential role for the binding of BCL2 to BIM in the survival of noncycling NK cells. They also favor a model in which MCL1 is the dominant survival protein in proliferating NK cells. PMID:28057804

  2. Connecting the Dots: Artificial Antigen Presenting Cell-Mediated Modulation of Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; East, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells constitute an important subset of T cells that can both directly and indirectly mediate antitumor immunity. However, we and others have reported that cancer patients have a reduction in both NKT cell number and function. NKT cells can be stimulated and expanded with α-GalCer and cytokines and these expanded NKT cells retain their phenotype, remain responsive to antigenic stimulation, and display cytotoxic function against tumor cell lines. These data strongly favor the use of ex vivo expanded NKT cells in adoptive immunotherapy. NKT cell based-immunotherapy has been limited by the use of autologous antigen-presenting cells, which can vary substantially in their quantity and quality. A standardized system that relies on artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) could produce the stimulating effects of dendritic cell (DC) without the pitfalls of allo- or xenogeneic cells. In this review, we discuss the progress that has been made using CD1d-based aAPC and how this acellular antigen presenting system can be used in the future to enhance our understanding of NKT cell biology and to develop NKT cell-specific adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:23050947

  3. Toll-like receptor-4 agonist in post-haemorrhage pneumonia: role of dendritic and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cedric; Gautreau, Laetitia; Segain, Jean Pierre; de Coppet, Pierre; Caillon, Jocelyne; Altare, Frédéric; Josien, Regis; Asehnoune, Karim

    2013-11-01

    Haemorrhage-induced immunosuppression has been linked to nosocomial infections. We assessed the impact of monophosphoryl lipid A, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-biased Toll-like receptor-4 agonist currently used as a vaccine adjuvant in humans, on post-haemorrhage susceptibility to infection. We used a mouse model of post-haemorrhage pneumonia induced by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Monophosphoryl lipid A was administered intravenously after haemorrhage and before pneumonia onset. Haemorrhage altered survival rate, increased lung damage (neutrophil accumulation, oedema and cytokine release) and altered the functions of dendritic and natural killer cells. Here, we show that monophosphoryl lipid A decreased systemic dissemination of S. aureus and dampened inflammatory lung lesions. Monophosphoryl lipid A partially restored the capacity for antigen presentation and the transcriptional activity in dendritic cells. Monophosphoryl lipid A did not restore the interferon-γ mRNA but prevented interleukin-10 mRNA overexpression in natural killer cells compared with untreated mice. Ex vivo monophosphoryl lipid A-stimulated dendritic cells or natural killer cells harvested from haemorrhaged animals were adoptively transferred into mice undergoing post-haemorrhage pneumonia. Stimulated dendritic cells (but not stimulated natural killer cells) improved the survival rate compared with mice left untreated. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells decreased survival rate of monophosphoryl lipid A-treated mice. Dendritic and natural killer cells are critically involved in the beneficial effects of monophosphoryl lipid A within post-haemorrhage pneumonia.

  4. Natural Killer Cells in Graft-versus-Host-Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Simonetta, Federico; Alvarez, Maite; Negrin, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a well-established therapeutic modality effective for a variety of hematological malignancies but, unfortunately, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to cancer relapse as well as to transplant-related complications including graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). Natural killer (NK) cells are the first donor-derived lymphocyte subset to recover after HCT, and their crucial role in protection against cancer relapse and infections is well established. Conversely, the role played by NK cells in GvHD is still controversial. Early studies suggested a participation of NK cells in GvHD induction or exacerbation. Subsequently, experimental evidence obtained in mice as well observational studies performed in humans led to a model in which NK cells play a regulatory role in GvHD by repressing alloreactive T cell responses. This widely accepted model has been recently challenged by clinical evidence indicating that NK cells can in some cases promote GvHD. In this review, we summarize available knowledge about the role of NK cells in GVHD pathogenesis. We review studies uncovering cellular mechanisms through which NK cells interact with other immune cell subsets during GvHD leading to a model in which NK cells naturally suppress GvHD through their cytotoxic ability to inhibit T cell activation unless exogenous hyperactivation lead them to produce proinflammatory cytokines that can conversely sustain T cell-mediated GvHD induction. PMID:28487696

  5. Characterization of natural killer cells cultured from human bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoda, Y.; Kawakami, Z.; Shibuya, A.; Abe, T.

    1988-09-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) cells, depleted of nylon wool-adherent cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, were cultured in medium containing recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL2). After 21 or 24 days in culture, numerous lymphoid cells with multiple azurophilic granules and a morphology similar to large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were found. Two-color analysis of surface phenotype showed many of these cells to be NKH1-positive and a limited number of cells had other NK markers such as CD16, CD2, or CD8. The CD3 antigen was not coexpressed with NKH1. The cultured BM cells were cytotoxic for K562, Daudi, and Raji cell lines. The NKH1+, CD2-, CD3-, CD16- cells were sorted and, in addition to having the LGL morphology, were found to be cytotoxic for K562 cells (NK (K562)). The generation of NK(K562) activity was significantly suppressed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine plus ultraviolet light treatment, indicating that DNA synthesis is required. These experiments suggest that the described culture conditions allow differentiation of progenitor cells, into immature, but functionally active, NK cells.

  6. Glucocorticoid cell reception in mice of different strains with natural killer cell activity depressed during immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashko, V.N.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study differences in stress-induced depression of natural killer cell activity in mice of different inbred lines, depending on parameters of glucocorticoid binding with glucorticoid receptors of spleen cells and on the hormonal status of the animals. In determining the parameters of glucocorticoid binding on intact splenocytes, aliquots of a suspension of washed splenocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled dexamethasone.

  7. Mechanism of pentoxifylline mediated down-regulation of killer lineage cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, P.; Sheth, K.; Einspenner, M.; Al-Sedairy, S.

    1993-01-01

    The authors reported recently that endotoxaemia mediated elevated levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) were involved in the pathophysiology of acute heat stroke patients. Pentoxifylline (PTX) is known to modulate neutrophil functions. In the present study the effects of PTX on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cytokine induced T-cell and macrophage (ΦM) activation, and on natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell mediated cytotoxicity were examined. Finally, the effect of PTX on the expression of adhesion molecules (LFA-1, Mac-1 and ICAM-1), and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ) production and their surface receptor expression in response to LPS activation was investigated. PTX free cultures served as a control. Results revealed that PTX can down-regulate all the above-mentioned immunological parameters in a dosedependent manner. These findings might have far reaching clinical implications. PMID:18475549

  8. Possible damage to immune-privileged sites in natural killer cell therapy in cancer patients: side effects of natural killer cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bolourian, Alireza; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells target the cells losing MHC-I in cancer, a phenotype that is similar to certain cells in immune-privileged sites whose milieus are separated from peripheral blood. NK cells are reported to be quantitatively and qualitatively different in immune-privileged sites from those cytotoxic ones in the blood. We hypothesize that cytotoxic and expanded NK cells induced in cancer patients may be turned into pathogenic factors if they enter immune-privileged microenvironments in susceptible individuals, such as, patients with brain cancer or a blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Therefore, in susceptible individuals, different levels of caution should be taken based on the seriousness of the side effect as discussed in this perspective.

  9. Avian influenza virus directly infects human natural killer cells and inhibits cell activity.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huawei; Liu, Yinping; Sia, Sin Fun; Peiris, J S Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell is a key component of innate immunity and plays an important role in host defense against virus infection by directly destroying infected cells. Influenza is a respiratory disease transmitted in the early phase of virus infection. Evasion of host innate immunity including NK cells is critical for the virus to expand and establish a successful acute infection. Previously, we showed that human influenza H1N1 virus infects NK cells and induces cell apoptosis, as well as inhibits NK cell activity. In this study, we further demonstrated that avian influenza virus also directly targeted NK cells as an immunoevasion strategy. The avian virus infected human NK cells and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, avian influenza virion and HA protein inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity. This novel strategy has obvious advantages for avian influenza virus, allowing the virus sufficient time to expand and subsequent spread before the onset of the specific immune response. Our findings provide an important clue for the immunopathogenesis of avian influenza, and also suggest that direct targeting NK cells may be a common strategy used by both human and avian influenza viruses to evade NK cell immunity.

  10. Carbamate pesticide-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Kobayashi, M; Kawada, T

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that ziram, a carbamate fungicide, significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis in human NK-92MI, a natural killer cell line. To investigate whether other carbamate pesticides also induce apoptosis and necrosis in human natural killer cell, we conducted further experiments with NK-92CI, a human natural killer cell line using a more sensitive assay. NK-92CI cells were treated with ziram, thiram, maneb or carbaryl at 0.031-40 microM for 2-24 h in the present study. Apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. To explore the mechanism of apoptosis, intracellular levels of active caspases 3 and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release were determined by flow cytometry. We found that ziram and thiram also induced apoptosis and necrosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner; however, maneb and carbaryl induced apoptosis and necrosis only at higher doses in NK-92CI cells. The strength of the apoptosis-inducing effect differed among the pesticides, and the order was as follows: thiram > ziram greater than maneb greater than carbaryl. NK-92CI was more sensitive to ziram than NK-92MI. Moreover, ziram and thiram significantly increased the intracellular level of active caspase 3 in NK-92CI and caspase inhibitor significantly inhibited the apoptosis. Ziram and thiram significantly caused mitochondrial cytochrome-c release in NK-92CI. These findings indicate that carbamate pesticides can induce apoptosis in natural killer cells, and the apoptosis is mediated by both the caspase-cascade and mitochondrial cytochrome-c pathways.

  11. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity toward neuroblastoma enhanced by activated invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Mise, Naoko; Takami, Mariko; Suzuki, Akane; Kamata, Toshiko; Harada, Kazuaki; Hishiki, Tomoro; Saito, Takeshi; Terui, Keita; Mitsunaga, Tetsuya; Nakata, Mitsuyuki; Ikeuchi, Takayuki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Yoshida, Hideo; Motohashi, Shinichiro

    2016-03-01

    Anti-ganglioside GD2 antibodies mainly work through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and have demonstrated clinical benefit for children with neuroblastoma. However, high-risk neuroblastoma still has a high recurrence rate. For further improvement in patient outcomes, ways to maximize the cytotoxic effects of anti-GD2 therapies with minimal toxicity are required. Activated invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells enhance both innate and type I acquired anti-tumor immunity by producing several kinds of cytokines. In this report, we investigated the feasibility of combination therapy using iNKT cells and an anti-GD2 antibody. Although some of the expanded iNKT cells expressed natural killer (NK) cell markers, including FcγR, iNKT cells were not directly associated with ADCC. When co-cultured with activated iNKT cells, granzyme A, granzyme B and interferon gamma (IFNγ) production from NK cells were upregulated, and the cytotoxicity of NK cells treated with anti-GD2 antibodies was increased. Not only cytokines produced by activated iNKT cells, but also NK-NKT cell contact or NK cell-dendritic cell contact contributed to the increase in NK cell cytotoxicity and further IFNγ production by iNKT cells and NK cells. In conclusion, iNKT cell-based immunotherapy could be an appropriate candidate for anti-GD2 antibody therapy for neuroblastoma.

  12. Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response.

    PubMed

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Olofsson, Per E; Forslund, Elin; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Pacouret, Simon; Guldevall, Karolin; Enqvist, Monika; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Mehr, Ramit; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-02-21

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  13. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  14. Differential loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Wen, Siwan; Duan, Qianglin; Huang, Feifei; Tang, Yu; Liu, Xiaohong; Chai, Yongyan; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the activity of natural killer cells through their inhibitory and activating receptors and quantity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells extracted from patients with acute myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris and the controls. 100 patients with myocardial infarction, 100 with stable angina, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. 20 randomly chosen people per group were examined for the whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the gene expressions of all 40 inhibitory and activating natural killer cell receptors. Flow cytometry analysis was applied to all 200 patients to measure the quantity of natural killer cells. In myocardial infarction group, the mRNA expressions of six inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2, KIR3DL3, CD94, NKG2A, KLRB1, KLRG1, and eight activating receptors KIR2DS3, KIR2DS5, NKp30, NTB-A, CRACC, CD2, CD7 and CD96 were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) compared with both angina patients and the controls. There was no statistical difference in receptor expressions between angina patients and control group. The quantity of natural killer cells was significantly decreased in both infarction and angina patients compared with normal range (P<0.001). The significant mRNAs down-regulation of several receptors in myocardial infarction group and reduction in the quantity of natural killer cells in both myocardial infarction and angina patients showed a quantitative loss and dysfunction of natural killer cells in myocardial infarction patients.

  15. Interleukin-21 activates cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells to generate antitumor response in mouse renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Masafumi; Hara, Isao; Furukawa, Junya; Oniki, Shuntaro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the antitumor effects of IL-21 gene transfer into mouse RenCa renal cell carcinoma cells, so that cells could spontaneously secrete IL-21. We also investigated the mechanisms underlying this antitumor effect. The IL-21 gene was introduced into RenCa cells by the liposome mediated method using Lipofectamine. The in vivo antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells was assessed by subcutaneous injection into syngeneic BALB/c mice. Mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects were investigated in syngeneic mice in which CD8 T, CD4 T or natural killer cells had been depleted using the corresponding antibody. The cytotoxic activity of splenocytes in mice injected with IL-21 secreting RenCa cells was determined using the CytoTox 96 nonradioactive cytotoxicity assay. Immunohistochemical examinations were performed to investigate infiltrating cells around tumor sites in vivo. Tumor vaccine study was also performed. IL-21 secreting RenCa cells were almost all rejected following subcutaneous injection into syngeneic mice. The antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells remained in mice in which CD4 T cells had been depleted but it was totally abrogated in mice depleted of CD8 T cells or natural killer cells. Cytotoxic activities of splenocytes were higher in IL-21 secreting RenCa cell rejected mice than in parental RenCa mice. Immunohistochemical study also supported the involvement of CD8 T cells and natural killer cells in the antitumor effect of IL-21 secreting RenCa cells. Moreover, mitomycin C treated IL-21 secreting RenCa cells inhibited the growth of parental RenCa at distant site. IL-21 secreting RenCa could be rejected in syngeneic mice by the activation of CD8 T cells and natural killer cells. Moreover, mitomycin C treated IL-21 secreting RenCa cells could work as a tumor vaccine for parental RenCa.

  16. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results.

  17. Diversification of both KIR and NKG2 natural killer cell receptor genes in macaques - implications for highly complex MHC-dependent regulation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, Lutz; Petersen, Beatrix

    2017-02-01

    The killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) as well as their MHC class I ligands display enormous genetic diversity and polymorphism in macaque species. Signals resulting from interaction between KIR or CD94/NKG2 receptors and their cognate MHC class I proteins essentially regulate the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Macaque and human KIR share many features, such as clonal expression patterns, gene copy number variations, specificity for particular MHC class I allotypes, or epistasis between KIR and MHC class I genes that influence susceptibility and resistance to immunodeficiency virus infection. In this review article we also annotated publicly available rhesus macaque BAC clone sequences and provide the first description of the CD94-NKG2 genomic region. Besides the presence of genes that are orthologous to human NKG2A and NKG2F, this region contains three NKG2C paralogues. Hence, the genome of rhesus macaques contains moderately expanded and diversified NKG2 genes in addition to highly diversified KIR genes. The presence of two diversified NK cell receptor families in one species has not been described before and is expected to require a complex MHC-dependent regulation of NK cells.

  18. Natural killer cell activity in cigarette smokers and asbestos workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ginns, L.C.; Ryu, J.H.; Rogol, P.R.; Sprince, N.L.; Oliver, L.C.; Larsson, C.J.

    1985-06-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of cigarette smoking and asbestos exposure on cellular immunity, the authors tested a group of cigarette smokers and asbestos workers for natural killer (NK) activity in the peripheral blood. The mean NK activity in cigarette smokers was lower than in normal subjects (13.7 +/- 1.6 versus 29.0 +/- 3%; p less than 0.05). As a group, the mean NK activity for the asbestos-exposed group was also reduced compared with that of the nonsmoking control group (22.6 +/- 3.2%; p less than 0.05). When divided according to the smoking status, the asbestos workers who were nonsmokers or ex-smokers showed similar decreases in NK activity compared with normal subjects (19.5 +/- 6.2 and 21.2 +/- 4.5%, respectively; p less than 0.05). A subgroup of asbestos-exposed subjects who currently smoked showed no decrease in NK activity. The data show that NK activity is reduced in the peripheral blood of cigarette smokers and asbestos workers. The relatively normal NK activity found in asbestos workers who also smoked is unexplained. Impairment of NK activity is a potential mechanism for the increased incidence of infection and cancer in smokers and neoplasia in asbestos workers.

  19. Regulatory T Cells Suppress Natural Killer Cell Immunity in Patients With Human Cervical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chun; Li, Chao-Hsu; Chu, Ling-Hui; Huang, Pei-Shen; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Huang, Su-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    To determine the functional attributes of CD4 CD25 regulatory T (Treg) cells by suppressing natural killer (NK) cell activity in human cervical cancer (CC). Triple-color flow cytometry was used to study the phenotypic expression of CD4 CD25 Treg cells and NK cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In vitro coculture assays were performed to illustrate the cytokine immunoregulations between Treg cells and NK cells. Significantly lower expression ratio of NK cells and higher expression ratio of Treg cells in TILs than PBLs were found. The NK cells displayed significantly higher expression ratio of inhibitory NK receptors (CD158a, CD158b, and NKG2A) and lower expression ratio of activating NK receptors (NKG2D, NKp46, and NKp30) as well as perforin in TILs than PBLs, suggesting the suppressed cytotoxicity of the NK cells in the CC tumor milieu. The expression ratio of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on Treg cells as well as TGF-βRII on Treg cells and NK cells was significantly higher in TILs than PBLs. Further functional in vitro assays demonstrated that NK cell function was suppressed by Treg cells, mimicking the inhibition of TGF-β on NK cells, and interleukin-2/interleukin-15 stimulation was able to restore the NK cell activity. These findings indicate that Treg cells in TILs may abrogate NK cell cytotoxicity through TGF-β pathway, and therefore, Treg cell elimination may enhance NK cell activity and be a novel therapeutic strategy for CC.

  20. Decreased Iron in Cancer Cells and Their Microenvironment Improves Cytolysis of Breast Cancer Cells by Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xian-Peng; Elliott, Robert L

    2017-05-01

    The association of iron with anticancer immunity is unclear. In order to determine the role of iron in anticancer immunity, we manipulated intracellular iron levels of the human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and measured cytolysis of breast cancer cells by the natural killer cell line NK-92MI, nitric oxide (NO) production, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production and gene expression of ferritin heavy chain (FTH1). We found that NK-92MI increased synthesis and release of NO and TNFα into the medium during co-culturing of NK-92MI cells with MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells. Addition of iron inhibited the cytolysis of the breast cancer cell lines. The iron chelator deferoxamine (DFOM) increased NK-92MI cytolysis to MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells. Iron reversed cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells induced by NO, released from S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (NO donor). Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that iron up-regulated the expression of FTH1 and iron chelator DFOM reduced FTH1 expression of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, increased iron in cancer cells and their microenvironment protects cancer cells from natural killer cell cytolysis by antagonizing NO- and TNFα-associated cytotoxicity and by up-regulation of ferritin expression in breast cancer cells. Conversely, a decrease in iron concentration caused by DFOM improves natural killer cytolysis of tumor cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Luca; Sarina, Barbara; Bramanti, Stefania; Perseghin, Paolo; Mariotti, Jacopo; Morabito, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is considered the cornerstone in the treatment of several malignant and not malignant hematological diseases. However, relapse of hematological disease after allo-SCT is considered the most challenging point in the field. The risk can be reduced through optimal patients, donor and disease selection before allo-SCT, but harnessing donor immune system is an appealing way to treat or avoid disease relapse. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a simple and effective therapy after allo-SCT. In this paper, the efficacy of DLI will be analyzed in different hematological diseases, focusing also on their therapeutic or pre-emptive use.

  2. Interactive effects of Na and K in killing by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.C.; MacCoubrey, I.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Contact-mediated lysis by human natural killer cells is inhibited by a number of drugs that block the predominant K channel. In this study the authors have further examined the role of the K channel and the interactions between passive K and Na transport in killing. Low external Na-inhibited killing and inhibition were not due to reduced inward current through the Na channels in the target cell. A role for the Na/H antiport is suggested since amiloride inhibited killing in a dose-dependent manner that was competitive with external Na. Depolarizing the killer cell with elevated external K did not inhibit killing. On the contrary, high K{sub 0} reduced the inhibition caused by low Na{sub 0} and by the K-channel blockers quinidine, verapamil, and retinoic acid. Hyperpolarizing the killer cell with low K{sub 0} or valinomycin inhibited killing. Hence, the primary role of the K channels during killing is not to maintain the negative membrane potential. On the contrary, depolarization may promote killing under conditions where killing is submaximal.

  3. Reproduction, infection and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor haplotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Penman, Bridget S; Moffett, Ashley; Chazara, Olympe; Gupta, Sunetra; Parham, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are encoded by one of the most polymorphic families in the human genome. KIRs are expressed on natural killer (NK) cells, which have dual roles: (1) in fighting infection and (2) in reproduction, regulating hemochorial placentation. Uniquely among primates, human KIR genes are arranged into two haplotypic combinations: KIR A and KIR B. It has been proposed that KIR A is specialized to fight infection, whilst KIR B evolved to help ensure successful reproduction. Here we demonstrate that a combination of infectious disease selection and reproductive selection can drive the evolution of KIR B-like haplotypes from a KIR A-like founder haplotype. Continued selection to survive and to reproduce maintains a balance between KIR A and KIR B.

  4. Modeling Human Natural Killer Cell Development in the Era of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, their developmental pathways in mice and humans have not yet been completely deciphered. Accumulating evidence indicates that NK cells can develop in multiple tissues throughout the body. Moreover, detailed and comprehensive models of NK cell development were proposed soon after the turn of the century. However, with the recent identification and characterization of other subtypes of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which show some overlapping functional and phenotypic features with NK cell developmental intermediates, the distinct stages through which human NK cells develop from early hematopoietic progenitor cells remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to reassess and refine older models of NK cell development in the context of new data and in the era of ILCs. Our group has focused on elucidating the developmental pathway of human NK cells in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs), including tonsils and lymph nodes. Here, we provide an update of recent progress that has been made with regard to human NK cell development in SLTs, and we discuss these new findings in the context of contemporary models of ILC development.

  5. Modeling Human Natural Killer Cell Development in the Era of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Steven D.; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, their developmental pathways in mice and humans have not yet been completely deciphered. Accumulating evidence indicates that NK cells can develop in multiple tissues throughout the body. Moreover, detailed and comprehensive models of NK cell development were proposed soon after the turn of the century. However, with the recent identification and characterization of other subtypes of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which show some overlapping functional and phenotypic features with NK cell developmental intermediates, the distinct stages through which human NK cells develop from early hematopoietic progenitor cells remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to reassess and refine older models of NK cell development in the context of new data and in the era of ILCs. Our group has focused on elucidating the developmental pathway of human NK cells in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs), including tonsils and lymph nodes. Here, we provide an update of recent progress that has been made with regard to human NK cell development in SLTs, and we discuss these new findings in the context of contemporary models of ILC development. PMID:28396671

  6. Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 infection drives spontaneous proliferation of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirschkorn, Dale F; DeVita, Deborah A; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Murphy, Eedward L

    2010-01-01

    Most human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infected subjects remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, with a few individuals developing HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukemia. Lymphocytes from about half of HTLV-1 infected subjects spontaneously proliferate in vitro, and how this phenomenon relates to symptomatic disease outcome and viral burden is poorly understood. Spontaneous proliferation was measured in lymphocyte subsets, and these findings were correlated with HTLV-1 proviral load and Tax expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that in addition to previously described vigorous CD8+ T cell spontaneous proliferation, natural killer (NK) cells spontaneously proliferated to a similar high level, resulting in expansion of CD56-expressing NK cells. Spontaneous NK cell proliferation positively correlated with HTLV-1 proviral load but not with Tax expression or the presence of HAM/TSP. The strongest correlate with clinical outcome in this cohort was the ability of cells to express Tax, while HTLV-1 proviral load was more closely related to spontaneous NK cell proliferation. These results demonstrate that spontaneous proliferation, Tax expression, and proviral load are inter-related but not equivalent, and that spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation is not restricted to T cells, the targets of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:20640055

  7. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  8. High-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell rescue in blastoid natural killer cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mukai, H Y; Kojima, H; Suzukawa, K; Hori, M; Komeno, T; Hasegawa, Y; Ninomiya, H; Mori, N; Nagasawa, T

    1999-02-01

    A 25-year-old man was referred because of skin rash, lymphadenopathy and anemia. Laboratory examinations revealed severe anemia (Hb, 4.8 g/dl) and elevated levels of GOT, GPT, LDH and soluble interleukin-2 receptor. Work-up studies disclosed the involvement of lymphoma cells in lymph nodes, skin, bilateral kidneys and bone marrow. Lymph node biopsy revealed diffuse proliferation of medium- to large-sized lymphoblastic cells. Bone marrow aspiration showed massive infiltration of large blastic cells with no cytoplasmic granules. The lymphoma cells in bone marrow and lymph node showed surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3epsilon+, CD4+, CD8-, CD56+, CD57-, CD16- and CD43 (MT-1)+ phenotype. Analyses of T cell receptor beta and gamma genes showed germ line configurations. EBER-1 was not detectable in the lymphoma cells. He was diagnosed as having blastoid natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma. In spite of several courses of combination chemotherapy, the lymphoma was progressive. He was then treated with high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell rescue, achieving remission which has now lasted for more than 12 months. We consider that blastoid NK cell lymphoma is an extremely aggressive subtype of CD56-positive lymphomas, and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell rescue should be included for the choice of the treatment.

  9. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M; Molenaar, Jan J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-11-03

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses.

  10. The Molecular Mechanism of Natural Killer Cells Function and Its Importance in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sourav; Lal, Girdhari

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells that show strong cytolytic function against physiologically stressed cells such as tumor cells and virus-infected cells. NK cells show a broad array of tissue distribution and phenotypic variability. NK cells express several activating and inhibitory receptors that recognize the altered expression of proteins on target cells and control the cytolytic function. NK cells have been used in several clinical trials to control tumor growth. However, the results are encouraging only in hematological malignancies but not very promising in solid tumors. Increasing evidence suggests that tumor microenvironment regulate the phenotype and function of NK cells. In this review, we discussed the NK cell phenotypes and its effector function and impact of the tumor microenvironment on effector and cytolytic function of NK cells. We also summarized various NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies used in the past and the possibilities to improve the function of NK cell for the better clinical outcome. PMID:28955340

  11. Tributyltin and dibutyltin alter secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha from human natural killer cells and a mixture of T cells and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Kelsi; Hurd-Brown, Tasia; Whalen, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    Butyltins (BTs) have been in widespread use. Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in a variety of applications and is found in human blood samples. Dibutyltin (DBT) has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride plastics and as a de-worming agent in poultry. DBT, like TBT, is found in human blood. Human natural killer (NK) cells are the earliest defense against tumors and viral infections and secrete the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an important regulator of adaptive and innate immune responses. TNF-α promotes inflammation and an association between malignant transformation and inflammation has been established. Previously, we have shown that TBT and DBT were able to interfere with the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor target cells. Here we show that BTs alter cytokine secretion by NK cells as well as a mixture of T and NK lymphocytes (T/NK cells). We examined 24-, 48-h and 6-day exposures to TBT (200-2.5 nM) and DBT (5-0.05 μM) on TNF-α secretion by highly enriched human NK cells and T/NK cells. The results indicate that TBT (200-2.5 nM) decreased TNF-α secretion from NK cells. In the T/NK cells, 200 nM TBT decreased secretion whereas 100-5 nM TBT increased secretion of TNF-α. NK cells or T/NK cells exposed to higher concentrations of DBT showed decreased TNF-α secretion whereas lower concentrations showed increased secretion. The effects of BTs on TNF-α secretion are seen at concentrations present in human blood.

  12. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  13. Membrane nanotubes facilitate long-distance interactions between natural killer cells and target cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, Anne; Aucher, Anne; Eissmann, Philipp; Vivier, Eric; Davis, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane nanotubes are membranous tethers that physically link cell bodies over long distances. Here, we present evidence that nanotubes allow human natural killer (NK) cells to interact functionally with target cells over long distances. Nanotubes were formed when NK cells contacted target cells and moved apart. The frequency of nanotube formation was dependent on the number of receptor/ligand interactions and increased on NK cell activation. Most importantly, NK cell nanotubes contained a submicron scale junction where proteins accumulated, including DAP10, the signaling adaptor that associates with the activating receptor NKG2D, and MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA), a cognate ligand for NKG2D, as occurs at close intercellular synapses between NK cells and target cells. Quantitative live-cell fluorescence imaging suggested that MICA accumulated at small nanotube synapses in sufficient numbers to trigger cell activation. In addition, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and Vav-1 accumulated at such junctions. Functionally, nanotubes could aid the lysis of distant target cells either directly or by moving target cells along the nanotube path into close contact for lysis via a conventional immune synapse. Target cells moving along the nanotube path were commonly polarized such that their uropods faced the direction of movement. This is the opposite polarization than for normal cell migration, implying that nanotubes can specifically drive target cell movement. Finally, target cells that remained connected to an NK cell by a nanotube were frequently lysed, whereas removing the nanotube using a micromanipulator reduced lysis of these target cells. PMID:20212116

  14. Differential effects of BCNU on T cell, macrophage, natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities in mice bearing a syngeneic tumor.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, M; Nagarkatti, P S; Kaplan, A M

    1988-01-01

    Chloroethylnitrosoureas have been used widely to treat human and experimental animal tumors. We have earlier observed that greater than 90% of the mice transplanted with syngeneic tumors survive following treatment with nitrosoureas such as 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and furthermore, they resist subsequent challenge with the same tumor. The present investigation was initiated to determine the mechanism by which BCNU brings about this effect. Treatment of tumor cell targets in vivo or in vitro with BCNU, increased their susceptibility to macrophage (M luminal diameter)-mediated cytotoxicity as measured in a direct cytotoxicity assay or in an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. In contrast, the antitumor cytotoxicity caused by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), natural killer (NK) cells, or lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, was not altered following BCNU treatment of tumor targets. Studies were also conducted to investigate the direct effect of BCNU in vivo on various cytotoxic effector cells. For this purpose, M luminal diameter, NK, LAK, and CTL activities from BCNU-treated-tumor-bearing mice were screened for cytotoxicity against untreated tumor targets in vitro. It was observed that tumor-specific CTL and LAK cell activity increased in BCNU-treated tumor-bearing mice when compared to untreated controls while the cytotoxic potential of NK cells and M luminal diameters was not altered. The present study suggests that antitumor drugs such as BCNU are not only tumoricidal but also selectively act in a variety of ways at both the effector and target cell level, leading to overall enhanced antitumor immunity and high rate of cures from the syngeneic tumor challenge.

  15. HPV16E7 silencing enhances susceptibility of CaSki cells to natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huimin; Hu, Ruili; Guan, Xinlei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xueying

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells to CaSki cells following knockdown of the E7 protein of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16E7). Recombinant adenovirus-short hairpin-E7 protein of the human panillomavirus type 16 (Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7) was constructed and used to infect CaSki cells. The expression of HPV16E7 in CaSki cells was assessed using western blot analysis. The expression of cell surface molecule major histocompatibility complex‑I (MHC‑I) in CaSki cells infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was examined using flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of NK cells isolated and expanded from healthy volunteers on Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7‑infected CaSki cells was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7 was successfully constructed and able to inhibit HPV16E7 the expression in CaSki cells. The expression of major histocompa-tibility complex I (MHC‑I), a surface molecule, in CaSki cells was increased after infection with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7. Compared with the controls, the cytotoxicity of NK cells on CaSki cells, which were infected with Ad‑sh‑HPV16E7, was decreased (p<0.05). In conclusion, HPV16E7 suppresses the expression of MHC‑I on CaSki cells to evade cytotoxic T‑cell (CTL) response. However, it was possible to enhance the cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells to cervical cancer cells or HPV16‑infected cells in vitro, indicating that NK cells may be used for immunotherapy of cervical cancer.

  16. Phosphatidylinositol turnover is associated with human natural killer cell activation by tumor target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.A.; Brahmi, Z.

    1986-03-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity has been shown to be a binding-dependent event leading to the destruction of various targets. This suggests a possible role for plasma membrane phospholipid turnover in coupling a receptor-mediated binding event with transduction of a intracellular signal to result in the activation of the effector cell. Currently, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is implicated in several immune cell systems. Therefore, in this study, the authors examined phospholipid turnover in human NK cells upon exposure to a sensitive (K562) and a resistant (YAC-1) target cell (TC). NK cell membrane phospholipids were labelled with Phosphorus-32 (/sup 32/P) and, following stimulation, were extracted and run on silica gel thin-layer chromatography. Labelled phospholipids were visualized by autoradiography then scraped and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. A 2.5 fold increase in label incorporation into PI relative to controls was shown to occur when NK cells were stimulated by K562 for 2 hours. In contrast, no increased labelling of PI relative to controls was noted when NK cells were stimulated by YAC-1 for the same period of time. No change in incorporation of /sup 32/P into phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine occurred in either set of conditions. These results suggest that PI turnover may be an early activation event in NK cells following binding of K562.

  17. Natural Killer Cells and Mast Cells from gp49B Null Mutant Mice Are Functional

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Susana; Stebbins, Christopher C.; Peterson, Mary E.; Dombrowicz, David; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Long, Eric O.

    2000-01-01

    Immune responses are controlled by a combination of positive and negative cellular signals. Effector cells in the immune system express inhibitory receptors that serve to limit effector cell expansion and to protect the host from autoreactivity. gp49B is a receptor of unknown function that is expressed on activated mast cells and natural killer (NK) cells and whose cytoplasmic tail endows it with inhibitory potential. To gain insight into the function of gp49B in mice, we disrupted the gp49B gene by homologous recombination. gp49B0 mice were born at expected ratios, were healthy and fertile, and displayed normal long-term survival rates. gp49B0 mice showed no defect in NK or mast cell development. Furthermore, NK and mast cells from the gp49B0 mice showed activation properties in vitro similar to those of cells isolated from wild-type mice. Therefore, gp49B is not critical for the development, expansion, and maturation of mast cells and NK cells in vivo. The healthy status of gp49B0 mice makes them suitable for testing the role of gp49B in immune responses to infectious agents. PMID:10982834

  18. Natural killer cell-mediated lysis of autologous cells modified by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, C; Capanni, M; Albi, N; Volpi, I; Urbani, E; Ruggeri, L; Mencarelli, A; Grignani, F; Velardi, A

    1999-06-21

    This study investigated the role of natural killer (NK) cells as effectors of an immune response against autologous cells modified by gene therapy. T lymphocytes were transduced with LXSN, a retroviral vector adopted for human gene therapy that carries the selectable marker gene neo, and the autologous NK response was evaluated. We found that (i) infection with LXSN makes cells susceptible to autologous NK cell-mediated lysis; (ii) expression of the neo gene is responsible for conferring susceptibility to lysis; (iii) lysis of neo-expressing cells is clonally distributed and mediated only by NK clones that exhibit human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-Bw4 specificity and bear KIR3DL1, a Bw4-specific NK inhibitory receptor; and (iv) the targets are cells from HLA-Bw4(+) individuals. Finally, neo peptides anchoring to the Bw4 allele HLA-B27 interfered with KIR3DL1-mediated recognition of HLA-B27, i.e., they triggered NK lysis. Moreover, neo gene mutations preventing translation of two of the four potentially nonprotective peptides reduced KIR3DL1(+) NK clone-mediated autologous lysis. Thus, individuals expressing Bw4 alleles possess an NK repertoire with the potential to eliminate autologous cells modified by gene therapy. By demonstrating that NK cells can selectively detect the expression of heterologous genes, these observations provide a general model of the NK cell-mediated control of viral infections.

  19. Identification of a cell-surface antigen selectively expressed on the natural killer cell

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the cell-surface phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells of NZB and B6 mice which react to an MuLV+ lymphoid tumor. (a) NK cells do not express Thy1, Ly2, or Ig surface markers. (b) NK cells express an antigen recognized by C3H anti-CE antiserum ('anti-Ly1.2 antiserum'). Inasmuch as NK activity of spleen cells from B6 and B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains were both equally sensitive to C3H anti-CE antiserum, the NK antigen is distinct from Ly1.2. This point was confirmed by the observation that alphaNK activity was removed by absorption of C3H anti-CE antiserum with spleen cells from either B6 or B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains. Absorption of C3H alphaCE serum with BALB/c thymocytes and spleen cells (which are Ly1.2+NK-) removed anti-Ly1.2 activity and left anti-NK activity intact. This absorption step could be circumvented by inserting the BALB/c genotype into the recipient immunized to CE cells (i.e., (C3H X BALB/c)F1 alphaCE spleen cells). This antiserum, provisionally termed 'anti-NK', defines a new subclass of lymphocytes which may play a central role in the immunosurveillance against tumors. PMID:187714

  20. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  1. Inhibition of human natural killer cell activity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, B K; Kharazmi, A

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease (AP) and elastase (Ela) on human natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro. AP and Ela were found to inhibit NK cell function. Addition of alpha interferon and interleukin-2 did not abolish this inhibition of NK cell activity. Adhesion of effector to target cells was studied in a single-cell agarose assay of monocyte-depleted NK-cell-enriched cell populations. AP and Ela were shown to inhibit effector/target cell conjugate formation. Furthermore, AP and Ela inhibited the binding of the monoclonal antibody Leu-11, which reacts with the Fc receptor of NK cells. The inhibition of NK cell binding to the target cell by P. aeruginosa proteases is most likely due to proteolytic cleavage of the surface receptors involved in the binding of the effector cell to the target cell. PMID:3030937

  2. Use of a SCID mouse/human lymphoma model to evaluate cytokine-induced killer cells with potent antitumor cell activity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    infusion. The SCID mouse provides a useful in vivo model for evaluation of new therapeutic approaches for lymphoma treatment. The cytokine- induced killer cells generated as described here could have an important impact on bone marrow purging for autologous bone marrow transplantation as well as for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:1711560

  3. A biodegradable killer microparticle to selectively deplete antigen-specific T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Kun; Li, Miao-Chen; Chang, Di; Shahzad, Khawar Ali; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Ning; Shen, Chuan-Lai

    2016-01-01

    The specific eradication of pathogenic T cells for the treatment of allograft rejections and autoimmune disorders without impairment of overall immune function is a fundamental goal. Here, cell-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (PLGA MPs) were prepared as a scaffold to co-display the peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC, target antigen) and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (apoptosis-inducing molecule) for the generation of biodegradable killer MPs. Ovalbumin (OVA) antigen-targeted killer MPs significantly depleted OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner, both in vitro and in OT-1 mice. After intravenous administration, the killer MPs predominantly accumulated in the liver, lungs, and gut of OT-1 mice with a retention time of up to 48 hours. The killing effects exerted by killer MPs persisted for 4 days after two injections. Moreover, the H-2Kb alloantigen-targeted killer MPs were able to eliminate low-frequency alloreactive T cells and prolong alloskin graft survival for 41.5 days in bm1 mice. Our data indicate that PLGA-based killer MPs are capable of specifically depleting pathogenic T cells, which highlights their therapeutic potential for treating allograft rejection and autoimmune disorders. PMID:26910923

  4. A biodegradable killer microparticle to selectively deplete antigen-specific T cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Kun; Li, Miao-Chen; Chang, Di; Shahzad, Khawar Ali; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Ning; Shen, Chuan-Lai

    2016-03-15

    The specific eradication of pathogenic T cells for the treatment of allograft rejections and autoimmune disorders without impairment of overall immune function is a fundamental goal. Here, cell-sized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (PLGA MPs) were prepared as a scaffold to co-display the peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC, target antigen) and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (apoptosis-inducing molecule) for the generation of biodegradable killer MPs. Ovalbumin (OVA) antigen-targeted killer MPs significantly depleted OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner, both in vitro and in OT-1 mice. After intravenous administration, the killer MPs predominantly accumulated in the liver, lungs, and gut of OT-1 mice with a retention time of up to 48 hours. The killing effects exerted by killer MPs persisted for 4 days after two injections. Moreover, the H-2Kb alloantigen-targeted killer MPs were able to eliminate low-frequency alloreactive T cells and prolong alloskin graft survival for 41.5 days in bm1 mice. Our data indicate that PLGA-based killer MPs are capable of specifically depleting pathogenic T cells, which highlights their therapeutic potential for treating allograft rejection and autoimmune disorders.

  5. Carbohydrate affects natural killer cell redistribution but not activity after running.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Henson, D A; Garner, E B; Butterworth, D E; Warren, B J; Utter, A; Davis, J M; Fagoaga, O R; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S L

    1997-10-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to determine the influence of carbohydrate supplementation on the natural killer cell response to 2.5 h of high-intensity running (76.7 +/- 0.4% VO2max). Thirty experienced marathon runners (VO2max 53.4 +/- 1.0 mL x kg[-1] x min[-1], age 41.5 +/- 1.4 yr) were randomized into carbohydrate supplement (N = 17) and placebo (N = 13) groups. Subjects rested for 10-15 min before a blood sample at 0715, and then ingested 0.75 L of carbohydrate beverage (Gatorade) or placebo. At 0730, subjects began running at 75-80% VO2max for 2.5 h and drank 0.25 L of carbohydrate or placebo fluid every 15 min. Immediately after the 2.5 h run (1000), another blood sample was taken, followed by 1.5 h, 3 h, and 6-h recovery samples. Carbohydrate supplementation versus placebo had a significant effect on the pattern of change in glucose, cortisol, and the blood concentration of natural killer cells ([F (4,25) = 3.79, P = 0.015], but not natural killer cell activity following 2.5 h of intensive running.

  6. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon. Lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by interleukin 2-activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.A.; Mazumder, A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-06-01

    Activation in lectin-free interleukin 2 (IL-2) containing supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) from cancer patients or normal individuals resulted in expression of cytotoxicity toward 20 of 21 natural killer (NK)-resistant fresh solid tumor cells tested. Fresh solid tumor cells were resistant to NK-mediated lysis in 10 autologous patients' PBL-tumor interactions, and from 17 normal individuals tested against 13 allogeneic fresh tumors. Culture of PBL in IL-2 for 2-3 d was required for the lymphokine activated killers (LAK) to be expressed, and lytic activity toward a variety of NK-resistant fresh and cultured tumor targets developed in parallel. Autologous IL-2 was functional in LAK activation, as well as interferon-depleted IL-2 preparations. Irradiation of responder PBL before culture in IL-2 prevented LAK development. Precursors of LAK were present in PBL depleted of adherent cells and in NK-void thoracic duct lymphocytes, suggesting that the precursor is neither a monocyte nor an NK cell. LAK effectors expressed the serologically defined T cell markers of OKT.3, Leu-1, and 4F2, but did not express the monocyte/NK marker OKM-1. Lysis of autologous fresh solid tumors by LAK from cancer patients' PBL was demonstrated in 85% of the patient-fresh tumor combinations. Our data present evidence that the LAK system is a phenomenon distinct from either NK or CTL systems that probably accounts for a large number of reported nonclassical cytotoxicities. The biological role of LAK cells is not yet known, although it is suggested that these cells may be functional in immune surveillance against human solid tumors.

  7. Clinical applications of adoptive natural killer cell immunotherapy for cancer: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongfeng; Qian, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic and cytokine-producing lymphocytes involved in the immune defense against viral infections and tumors. NK cells activated with cytokines, such as interleukin-2, have been used since the 1980s as adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. NK cell alloreactivity has been demonstrated to enhance control of acute myeloid leukemia relapse and greatly reduce the risk of graft-versus-host disease in HLA haplotype-mismatched hematopoietic transplantation, and has been explored as a tool for adoptive immunotherapy for cancer patients. Future manipulation to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signaling is being explored.

  8. Clinical utility of natural killer cells in cancer therapy and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David; Bachanova, Veronika; Verneris, Michael R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize deranged cells that display stress receptors or loss of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. During development, NK cells become “licensed” only after they encounter cognate human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I, leading to the acquisition of effector function. NK cells can be exploited for cancer therapy in several ways. These include targeting within monoclonal antibodies alone or combined with ex vivo and in vivo NK cell activation to facilitate adoptive immunotherapy using donor-derived NK cell products to induce graft-vs-tumor effects. In the adoptive transfer setting, persistence and in vivo expansion requires lymphodepleting chemotherapy to prevent rejection and provide homeostatic cytokines (such as IL-15) that activate NK cells. IL-15 has the advantage of avoiding regulatory T-cell expansion. Clinical applications are currently being tested. To enhance in vivo expansion, IL-2 has been used at low doses. However, low dose administration also leads to the stimulation of regulatory T cells. Monoclonal antibodies and bispecific killer engagers (BiKEs) may enhance specificity by targeting CD16 on NK cells to tumor antigens. Inhibition of CD16 shedding may also promote enhanced cytotoxicity. Future strategies include exploiting favorable donor immunogenetics or ex vivo expansion of NK cells from blood, progenitors, or pluripotent cells. Comparative clinical trials are needed to test these approaches. PMID:24618042

  9. Invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Simone, Anna Maria; Ferraro, Diana; Sola, Patrizia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, and in several countries is a leading cause of permanent neurological disability in young adults, particularly women. MS is considered an autoimmune disease, caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible subjects. However, the contribution of the innate or of the adaptive immune system to the development and progression of the disease has not yet been fully elucidated. Innate-like T lymphocytes are unconventional T cells that bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, because they use a T cell receptor to sense external ligands, but behave like innate cells when they rapidly respond to stimuli. These cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. Here, we focus on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and we review the current knowledge on their biology and possible involvement in MS. Although several studies have evaluated the frequency and functions of iNKT and MAIT cells both in MS patients and in experimental mouse models, contradictory observations have been reported, and it is not clear whether they exert a protective or a pro-inflammatory and harmful role. A better understanding of how immune cells are involved in MS, and of their interactions could be of great interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  10. Clinical-Scale Derivation of Natural Killer Cells From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Ni, Zhenya; Hermanson, David; Hexum, Melinda K.; Bendzick, Laura; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Lee, Dean A.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antitumor lymphocytes has gained intense interest in the field of cancer therapeutics over the past two decades. Human natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of lymphocytes for anticancer immunotherapy. NK cells are part of the innate immune system and exhibit potent antitumor activity without need for human leukocyte antigen matching and without prior antigen exposure. Moreover, the derivation of NK cells from pluripotent stem cells could provide an unlimited source of lymphocytes for off-the-shelf therapy. To date, most studies on hematopoietic cell development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have used incompletely defined conditions and been on a limited scale. Here, we have used a two-stage culture system to efficiently produce NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs in the absence of cell sorting and without need for xenogeneic stromal cells. This novel combination of embryoid body formation using defined conditions and membrane-bound interleukin 21-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells allows production of mature and functional NK cells from several different hESC and iPSC lines. Although different hESC and iPSC lines had varying efficiencies in hematopoietic development, all cell lines tested could produce functional NK cells. These methods can be used to generate enough cytotoxic NK cells to treat a single patient from fewer than 250,000 input hESCs/iPSCs. Additionally, this strategy provides a genetically amenable platform to study normal NK cell development and education in vitro. PMID:23515118

  11. Natural killer cell subsets differentially reject embryonic stem cells based on licensing.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Ames, Erik; Smith, Rachel C; Peter, Anna K; Naidu, Ridhima; Nolta, Jan A; Murphy, William J

    2014-05-27

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells provide great promise to the future of medicine. Because immune rejection represents a major obstacle to the success of all stem cell-based therapies, many recent studies have sought to determine the key immune mediators involved in ESC rejection. The role of natural killer (NK) cells and specifically the role of NK cell licensing is not well understood in ESC rejection. Mouse or human ESCs were subjected to cytotoxicity assays involving their respective species-matched activated NK cells. Mouse ESCs were then transplanted to allogeneic recipients after depletion of NK cell subsets in the host. ESC engraftment was analyzed by bioluminescent imaging. Depletion of all NK cells in vivo resulted in the greatest amount of ESC engraftment, confirming a role for NK cells in ESC rejection. Importantly, depletion of the Ly49C/I or Ly49G2 NK cell subsets resulted in differential ESC engraftment and rejection. This indicates that NK cell rejection of allogeneic ESC is highly differential based on the presence of licensed NK cells. Blocking NKG2D in vitro resulted in less killing of mESC by allogeneic NK cells, indicating NKG2D is a likely mechanism for NK-mediated killing of mESC. In this study, we show that expression of inhibitory Ly49s correlates with the ability of NK cells to kill murine ESC in an NKG2D-dependent manner. This further suggests that the rejection of similar stem cell transplants in humans will be dependent upon the presence of licensed NK cells.

  12. Human natural killer cell committed thymocytes and their relation to the T cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mature natural killer (NK) cells can be grown from human triple negative (TN; CD3-, CD4-, CD8-) thymocytes, suggesting that a common NK/T cell precursor exists within the thymus that can give rise to both NK cells and T cells under appropriate conditions. In the present study, we have investigated human fetal and postnatal thymus to determine whether NK cells and their precursors exist within this tissue and whether NK cells can be distinguished from T cell progenitors. Based on the surface expression of CD56 (an NK cell-associated antigen) and CD5 (a T cell-associated antigen), three phenotypically distinctive populations of TN thymocytes were identified. CD56+, CD5-; CD56-, CD5-, and CD56-, CD5+. The CD56+, CD5- population of TN thymocytes, although displaying a low cytolytic function against NK sensitive tumor cell targets, were similar in antigenic phenotype to fetal liver NK cells, gave rise to NK cell clones, and were unable to generate T cells in mouse fetal thymic organ cultures (mFTOC). This population of thymocytes represents a relatively mature population of lineage-committed NK cells. The CD56-, CD5- population of TN thymocytes were similar to thymic NK cells in antigenic phenotype and NK cell clonogenic potential. Clones derived from this population of TN thymocytes acquired CD56 surface expression and NK cell cytolytic function. CD56-, CD5- TN thymocytes thus contain a novel population of NK cell-committed precursors. The CD56-, CD5- population of TN thymocytes also contains a small percentage of CD34+ cells, which demonstrate no in vitro clonogenic potential, but possess T cell reconstituting capabilities in mFTOC. The majority of TN thymocytes do not express CD56, but coexpress CD34 and CD5. These CD56- , CD5+, CD34+ cells demonstrate no NK or T cell clonogenic potential, but are extremely efficient in repopulating mFTOC and differentiating into CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ T cells. The results of this investigation have

  13. Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Deficiency and Functional Impairment in Sleep Apnea: Links to Cancer Comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Gaoatswe, Gadintshware; Kent, Brian D; Corrigan, Michelle A; Nolan, Geraldine; Hogan, Andrew E; McNicholas, Walter T; O'Shea, Donal

    2015-10-01

    Emerging evidence links obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with increased cancer incidence and mortality. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play an important role in cancer immunity. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have low number of circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which may also be functionally impaired. This study aims to evaluate the frequency of circulating iNKT cells in OSA. We evaluated the frequency of circulating iNKT cells by flow cytometry in 33 snorers being assessed for possible OSA. Using iNKT cell lines, we also evaluated the effect of exposure to hypoxia over 24 hours on apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and cytokine production. Teaching hospital based sleep unit and research laboratory. Thirty-three snorers were evaluated: 9 with no OSA (apnea-hypopnea frequency [AHI] < 5/h), 12 with mild-moderate OSA (AHI 5-30) and 12 with severe OSA (AHI > 30). Patients with severe OSA had considerably fewer iNKT cells (0.18%) compared to patients with mild-moderate (0.24%) or no OSA (0.35%), P = 0.0026. The frequency of iNKT cells correlated negatively with apnea-hypopnea index (r = -0.58, P = 0.001), oxygen desaturation index (r = -0.58, P = 0.0003), and SpO2% < 90% (r = -0.5407, P = 0.005). The frequency of iNKT cells increased following 12 months of nCPAP therapy (P = 0.015). Hypoxia resulted in increased apoptosis (P = 0.016) and impaired cytotoxicity (P = 0.035). Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have significantly reduced levels of circulating invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and hypoxia leads to impaired iNKT cell function. These observations may partly explain the increased cancer risk reported in patients with OSA. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Ocular anatomy, ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution of a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Y; Abramov, Andrey V; Mukhametov, Lev M; Rozanova, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    Retinal topography, cell density and sizes of ganglion cells in the killer whale (Orcinus orca) were analyzed in retinal whole mounts stained with cresyl violet. A distinctive feature of the killer whale's retina is the large size of ganglion cells and low cell density compared to terrestrial mammals. The ganglion cell diameter ranged from 8 to 100 µm, with the majority of cells within a range of 20-40 µm. The topographic distribution of ganglion cells displayed two spots of high cell density located in the temporal and nasal quadrants, 20 mm from the optic disk. The high-density areas were connected by a horizontal belt-like area passing below the optic disk of the retina. Peak cell densities in these areas were evaluated. Mean peak cell densities were 334 and 288 cells/mm(2) in the temporal and nasal high-density areas, respectively. With a posterior nodal distance of 19.5 mm, these high-density data predict a retinal resolution of 9.6' (3.1 cycles/deg.) and 12.6' (2.4 cycles/deg.) in the temporal and nasal areas, respectively, in water. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Fractalkine Expression Induces Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Dilyana; Sabatier, Florence; Doria, Evelyne; Lyonnet, Luc; Vacher Coponat, Henri; Robert, Stéphane; Despoix, Nicolas; Legris, Tristan; Moal, Valérie; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Berland, Yvon; George, Francoise Dignat; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Background Circulating CD34+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN) could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK) cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that CD34+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC) can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. Conclusions Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients. PMID:22039526

  16. Natural Killer Cells Promote Early CD8 T Cell Responses against Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Bessou, Gilles; Cornillon, Amélie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Rupp, Brigitte; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Sacher, Torsten; Tomasello, Elena; Vivier, Eric; Koszinowski, Ulrich H; Dalod, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that help promote protective immune responses to pathogens is a major challenge in biomedical research and an important goal for the design of innovative therapeutic or vaccination strategies. While natural killer (NK) cells can directly contribute to the control of viral replication, whether, and how, they may help orchestrate global antiviral defense is largely unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the well-defined molecular interactions involved in the recognition of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) by NK cells. By using congenic or mutant mice and wild-type versus genetically engineered viruses, we examined the consequences on antiviral CD8 T cell responses of specific defects in the ability of the NK cells to control MCMV. This system allowed us to demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that NK cells accelerate CD8 T cell responses against a viral infection in vivo. Moreover, we identify the underlying mechanism as the ability of NK cells to limit IFN-α/β production to levels not immunosuppressive to the host. This is achieved through the early control of cytomegalovirus, which dramatically reduces the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) for cytokine production, preserves the conventional dendritic cell (cDC) compartment, and accelerates antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Conversely, exogenous IFN-α administration in resistant animals ablates cDCs and delays CD8 T cell activation in the face of NK cell control of viral replication. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the ability of NK cells to respond very early to cytomegalovirus infection critically contributes to balance the intensity of other innate immune responses, which dampens early immunopathology and promotes optimal initiation of antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Thus, the extent to which NK cell responses benefit the host goes beyond their direct antiviral effects and extends to the prevention of innate cytokine shock and to the

  17. Generation of cellular immune memory and B-cell immunity is impaired by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rydyznski, Carolyn; Daniels, Keith A; Karmele, Erik P; Brooks, Taylor R; Mahl, Sarah E; Moran, Michael T; Li, Caimei; Sutiwisesak, Rujapak; Welsh, Raymond M; Waggoner, Stephen N

    2015-02-27

    The goal of most vaccines is the induction of long-lived memory T and B cells capable of protecting the host from infection by cytotoxic mechanisms, cytokines and high-affinity antibodies. However, efforts to develop vaccines against major human pathogens such as HIV and HCV have not been successful, thereby highlighting the need for novel approaches to circumvent immunoregulatory mechanisms that limit the induction of protective immunity. Here, we show that mouse natural killer (NK) cells inhibit generation of long-lived virus-specific memory T- and B cells as well as virus-specific antibody production after acute infection. Mechanistically, NK cells suppressed CD4 T cells and follicular helper T cells (T(FH)) in a perforin-dependent manner during the first few days of infection, resulting in a weaker germinal centre (GC) response and diminished immune memory. We anticipate that innovative strategies to relieve NK cell-mediated suppression of immunity should facilitate development of efficacious new vaccines targeting difficult-to-prevent infections.

  18. Linking CD11b+ Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells to Plaque Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Miche; Ammi, Rachid; Van Brussel, Ilse; Roth, Lynn; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Vercauteren, Sven R.; Hendriks, Jeroen M. H.; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Fransen, Erik; Cools, Nathalie; Schrijvers, Dorien M.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death and disability in our Western society. To investigate whether the dynamics of leukocyte (sub)populations could be predictive for plaque inflammation during atherosclerosis, we analyzed innate and adaptive immune cell distributions in blood, plaques, and lymphoid tissue reservoirs in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice and in blood and plaques from patients undergoing endarterectomy. Firstly, there was predominance of the CD11b+ conventional dendritic cell (cDC) subset in the plaque. Secondly, a strong inverse correlation was observed between CD11b+ cDC or natural killer T (NKT) cells in blood and markers of inflammation in the plaque (including CD3, T-bet, CCR5, and CCR7). This indicates that circulating CD11b+ cDC and NKT cells show great potential to reflect the inflammatory status in the atherosclerotic plaque. Our results suggest that distinct changes in inflammatory cell dynamics may carry biomarker potential reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression. This not only is crucial for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis but also bares therapeutic potential, since immune cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising novel strategy in the battle against atherosclerosis and its associated comorbidities. The cDC-NKT cell interaction in atherosclerosis serves as a good candidate for future investigations. PMID:27051078

  19. Natural killer cell immunosenescence in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: new targets for immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Morgado, Sara; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2016-04-01

    Several age-associated changes in natural killer (NK) cell phenotype have been reported that contribute to the defective NK cell response observed in elderly patients. A remodelling of the NK cell compartment occurs in the elderly with a reduction in the output of immature CD56(bright) cells and an accumulation of highly differentiated CD56(dim) NK cells. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is generally a disease of older adults. NK cells in AML patients show diminished expression of several activating receptors that contribute to impaired NK cell function and, in consequence, to AML blast escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. In AML patients, phenotypic changes in NK cells have been correlated with disease progression and survival. NK cell-based immunotherapy has emerged as a possibility for the treatment of AML patients. The understanding of age-associated alterations in NK cells is therefore necessary to define adequate therapeutic strategies in older AML patients.

  20. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  1. Stage-dependent gene expression profiles during natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Sanggyu; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Lee, Young-Cheol; Kim, Sangsoo; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Wang, San Ming; Choi, Inpyo

    2005-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells develop from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow. To understand the molecular regulation of NK cell development, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to HSCs, NK precursor (pNK) cells, and mature NK cells (mNK) cultured without or with OP9 stromal cells. From 170,464 total individual tags from four SAGE libraries, 35,385 unique genes were identified. A set of genes was expressed in a stage-specific manner: 15 genes in HSCs, 30 genes in pNK cells, and 27 genes in mNK cells. Among them, lipoprotein lipase induced NK cell maturation and cytotoxic activity. Identification of genome-wide profiles of gene expression in different stages of NK cell development affords us a fundamental basis for defining the molecular network during NK cell development.

  2. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay.

  3. Recognition of tumors by the innate immune system and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Assaf; Gowen, Benjamin G; Thompson, Thornton W; Iannello, Alexandre; Ardolino, Michele; Deng, Weiwen; Wang, Lin; Shifrin, Nataliya; Raulet, David H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, roles of the immune system in immune surveillance of cancer have been explored using a variety of approaches. The roles of the adaptive immune system have been a major emphasis, but increasing evidence supports a role for innate immune effector cells such as natural killer (NK) cells in tumor surveillance. Here, we discuss some of the evidence for roles in tumor surveillance of innate immune cells. In particular, we focus on NK cells and other immune cells that express germline-encoded receptors, often labeled NK receptors. The impact of these receptors and the cells that express them on tumor suppression is summarized. We discuss in detail some of the pathways and events in tumor cells that induce or upregulate cell-surface expression of the ligands for these receptors, and the logic of how those pathways serve to identify malignant, or potentially malignant cells. How tumors often evade tumor suppression mediated by innate killer cells is another major subject of the review. We end with a discussion on some of the implications of the various findings with respect to possible therapeutic approaches. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recognition of tumors by the innate immune system and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Assaf; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Thornton W.; Iannello, Alexandre; Ardolino, Michele; Deng, Weiwen; Wang, Lin; Shifrin, Nataliya; Raulet, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, roles of the immune system in immune surveillance of cancer have been explored using a variety of approaches. The roles of the adaptive immune system have been a major emphasis, but increasing evidence supports a role for innate immune effector cells such as natural killer (NK) cells in tumor surveillance. Here, we discuss some of the evidence for roles in tumor surveillance of innate immune cells, particularly NK cells and other immune cells that express germline-encoded receptors that are often labeled NK receptors. The impact of these receptors and the cells that express them on tumor suppression are summarized. We discuss in detail some of the pathways and events in tumor cells that induce or upregulate cell surface expression of the ligands for these receptors, and the logic of how those pathways serve to identify malignant, or potentially malignant cells. How tumors often evade tumor suppression mediated by innate killer cells is another major subject of the review. We end with a discussion of some of the implications of the various findings with respect to possibly therapeutic approaches. PMID:24507156

  5. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  6. PD1 blockade enhances cytotoxicity of in vitro expanded natural killer cells towards myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Feng, Xiaoli; Jiang, Yang; Shi, Xiaoyun; Xing, Xiangling; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Nailin; Fadeel, Bengt; Zheng, Chengyun

    2016-01-01

    Aiming for an adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy, we have developed a novel protocol to expand NK cells from peripheral blood. With this protocol using anti-human CD16 antibody and interleukin (IL)-2, NK (CD3−CD56+) cells could be expanded about 4000-fold with over 70% purity during a 21-day culture. The expanded NK (exNK) cells were shown to be highly cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI8226) at low NK-target cell ratios. Furthermore, NK cells expanded in the presence of a blocking antibody (exNK+PD1-blockage) against programmed cell death protein-1 (PD1), a key counteracting molecule for NK and T cell activity, demonstrated more potent cytolytic activity against the RPMI8226 than the exNK cells without PD1 blocking. In parallel, the exNK cells showed significantly higher expression of NK activation receptors NKG2D, NKp44 and NKp30. In a murine model of MM, transfusion of exNK cells, exNK+PD1-blockage, and exNK plus intratumor injection of anti-PD-L2 antibody (exNK+PD-L2 blockage) all significantly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of the myeloma mice. Importantly, exNK+PD1-blockage presented more efficient therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that the NK cell expansion protocol with PD1 blockade presented in this study has considerable potential for the clinical application of allo- and auto-NK cell-based therapies against malignancies. PMID:27356741

  7. Interleukin-7 receptor alpha is essential for the development of gamma delta + T cells, but not natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mice that lack a functional gamma c subunit of the receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15 display profound defects in lymphoid development. The IL-7/IL-7R system represents a critical interaction for conventional T and B cell development. In this report, the role of IL-7R alpha in the development of lymphoid lineages other than conventional T and B cells was examined. We demonstrate that gamma delta + T cells were absent in IL-7R alpha-deficient mice, whereas the development and function of natural killer cells were normal. Thus, IL-7R alpha function is required for the development of gamma delta + T cells but not natural killer cells. PMID:8691145

  8. Increase in natural killer cell activity during diethylcarbamazine treatment of patients with filariasis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I C; Svenson, M

    1987-09-01

    Two patients, one with Bancroftian filariasis and the other with onchocerciasis, and two healthy controls were treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC). The natural killer (NK) cell activity of the two patients increased during DEC treatment to 2.5 and 2.8 times, respectively, while that of the controls remained unchanged. We conclude that the augmentation of baseline NK cell activity, as well as interferon- and interleukin-2-enhanced NK cell activity seen in the patients, is not a direct effect of DEC, but is related to the reaction to DEC in lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

  9. Evasion of natural killer cells by influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hailong; Kumar, Pawan; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2011-02-01

    NK cells are important innate immune effectors during influenza virus infection. However, the influenza virus seems able to use several tactics to counter NK cell recognition for immune evasion. In this review, we will summarize and discuss recent advances regarding the understanding of NK cell evasion mechanisms manipulated by the influenza virus to facilitate its rapid replication inside the respiratory epithelial cells.

  10. ACCUMULATION OF DIBUTYLTIN IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes capable of killing tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody coated cells. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBT) is a butyltin that has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics and also as a deworming product in poultry. DBT...

  11. ACCUMULATION OF DIBUTYLTIN IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes capable of killing tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody coated cells. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBT) is a butyltin that has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics and also as a deworming product in poultry. DBT...

  12. Cell-based Immunotherapy for Colorectal Cancer with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cancer worldwide. Although incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer are gradually decreasing in the US, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have poor prognosis with an estimated 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Over the past decade, advances in combination chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer have led to significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival. However, patients with metastatic disease gain little clinical benefit from conventional therapy, which is associated with grade 3~4 toxicity with negative effects on quality of life. In previous clinical studies, cell-based immunotherapy using dendritic cell vaccines and sentinel lymph node T cell therapy showed promising therapeutic results for metastatic colorectal cancer. In our preclinical and previous clinical studies, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells treatment for colorectal cancer showed favorable responses without toxicities. Here, we review current treatment options for colorectal cancer and summarize available clinical studies utilizing cell-based immunotherapy. Based on these studies, we recommend the use CIK cell therapy as a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27162526

  13. Enhanced mesenchymal stromal cell recruitment via natural killer cells by incorporation of inflammatory signals in biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Vasconcelos, Daniela P.; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2012-01-01

    An exacerbated inflammatory response questions biomaterial biocompatibility, but on the other hand, inflammation has a central role in the regulation of tissue regeneration. Therefore, it may be argued that an ‘ideal’ inflammatory response is crucial to achieve efficient tissue repair/regeneration. Natural killer (NK) cells, being one of the first populations arriving at an injury site, can have an important role in regulating bone repair/regeneration, particularly through interactions with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Here, we studied how biomaterials designed to incorporate inflammatory signals affected NK cell behaviour and NK cell–MSC interactions. Adsorption of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to chitosan films led to a 1.5-fold increase in adhesion of peripheral blood human NK cells, without an increase in cytokine secretion. Most importantly, it was found that NK cells are capable of stimulating a threefold increase in human bone marrow MSC invasion, a key event taking place in tissue repair, but did not affect the expression of the differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Of significant importance, this NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment was modulated by Fg adsorption. Designing novel biomaterials leading to rational modulation of the inflammatory response is proposed as an alternative to current bone regeneration strategies. PMID:21752807

  14. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  16. Abnormalities of quantities and functions of natural killer cells in severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyan; Li, Zhishang; Sheng, Weiwei; Fu, Rong; Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Tian; Wu, Yuhong; Xing, Limin; Song, Jia; Wang, Huaquan; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a rare disease characterized by severe pancytopenia and bone marrow failure. Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). They play a key role in n the innate immunity and adaptive immune. In this study, the quantitative and functional changes of natural killer (NK) cell subsets in peripheral blood of severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients before and after immunosuppressive therapy (IST) were investigated. Results showed that the percentage of NK cells and its subsets in peripheral blood lymphocytes was decreased in SAA patients. After IST, the percentage of NK cells and their subsets increased dramatically. The median expressions of CD158a, NKG2D and NKp46 on NK cells were higher in SAA patients compared to that in normal controls, and the expressions of perforin in newly diagnosed and recovery SAA patients were higher than that in controls. Therefore, we concluded that the decrease of total NK cells, and CD56(bright), CD56(dim) NK cell subsets and the higher expressions of NKp46 and perforin on NK cells may cause the over-function of T lymphocytes and thus lead to hematopoiesis failure in SAA.

  17. Identification of a potent microbial lipid antigen for diverse Natural Killer T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Almeida, Catarina F.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Bhowruth, Veemal; Johnson, Darryl; Uldrich, Adam P.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Brigl, Manfred; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a well-characterized CD1d-restricted T cell subset. The availability of potent antigens and tetramers for iNKT cells has allowed this population to be extensively studied and has revealed their central roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. In contrast, diverse Natural Killer T (dNKT) cells are poorly understood because the lipid antigens they recognize are largely unknown. We sought to identify dNKT cell lipid antigen(s) by interrogating a panel of dNKT mouse cell hybridomas with lipid extracts from the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We identified Listeria phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as a microbial antigen that was significantly more potent than a previously characterized dNKT cell antigen, mammalian PG. Further, while mammalian PG loaded CD1d tetramers did not stain dNKT cells, the Listeria-derived PG loaded tetramers did. The structure of Listeria PG was distinct from mammalian PG since it contained shorter, fully-saturated anteiso fatty acid lipid tails. CD1d binding lipid displacement studies revealed that the microbial PG antigen binds significantly better to CD1d than counterparts with the same headgroup. These data reveal a highly-potent microbial lipid antigen for a subset of dNKT cells and provide an explanation for its increased antigen potency compared to the mammalian counterpart. PMID:26254340

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Canine Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Helen; Ito, Daisuke; McCullar, Valarie; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells are non-T, non-B lymphocytes that kill target cells without previous activation. The immunophenotype and function of these cells in humans and mice are well defined, but canine NK cells remain incompletely characterized. Our objectives were to isolate and culture canine peripheral blood NK cells, and to define their immunophenotype and killing capability. PBMC were obtained from healthy dogs and T cells were depleted by immunomagnetic separation. The residual cells were cultured in media supplemented with IL-2, IL-15 or both, or with mouse embryonic liver (EL) feeder cells. Non-T, non-B lymphocytes survived and expanded in these cultures. IL-2 was necessary and sufficient for survival; the addition of IL-15 was necessary for expansion, but IL-15 alone did not support survival. Culture with EL cells and IL-2 also fostered survival and expansion. The non-T, non-B lymphocytes uniformly expressed CD45, MHC I, and showed significant cytotoxic activity against CTAC targets. Expression of MHC II, and of CD11/18 was restricted to subsets of these cells. The data show that cells meeting the criteria for NK cells in other species, i.e., non-T, non-B lymphocytes with cytotoxic activity, can be expanded from canine PBMC by T-cell depletion and culture with cytokines or feeder cells. PMID:23876304

  19. Innate Valpha14(+) natural killer T cells mature dendritic cells, leading to strong adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Steinman, Ralph M

    2007-12-01

    The observation that the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a potent stimulator of natural killer T (NKT) cells has provided an important means for investigating NKT cell biology. alpha-GalCer is presented on CD1d to the invariant NKT receptor, leading to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production by dendritic cells (DCs) and to NK cell activation. We review our research on the tumor-protective properties of alpha-GalCer, particularly the major role played by DCs. We compared administration of alpha-GalCer on mature DCs with soluble glycolipid and found that DCs induced more prolonged interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by NKT cells and better protection against B16 melanoma. Human alpha-GalCer-loaded DCs also expanded NKT cell numbers in cancer patients. alpha-GalCer-activated NKT cells were then found to induce DC maturation in vivo. The maturing DCs produced IL-12, upregulated co-stimulatory molecules, and induced adaptive immunity to captured cellular antigens, including prolonged, combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell immunity to dying tumor cells. Surprisingly, co-stimulator-poor tumor cells, if directly loaded with alpha-GalCer ('tumor/Gal') and injected intravenously, also induced strong NKT- and NK-cell responses. The latter killed the tumor/Gal, which were subsequently cross presented by CD1d on DCs to elicit DC maturation and prolonged adaptive T-cell immunity, which lasted 6-12 months. These findings help explain tumor protection via alpha-GalCer and urge development of the DC-NKT axis to provide innate and adaptive immunity to human cancers.

  20. Natural killer cell immunotherapy for cancer: a new hope.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Lundqvist, A; Childs, R W

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been a substantial gain in our understanding of the role NK-cells play in mediating innate host immune responses. Although NK cells have long been known to mediate antigen independent tumor cytotoxicity, the therapeutic potential of NK cell-based immunotherapy has yet to be realized. Manipulating the balance between inhibitory and activating NK receptor signals, sensitization of tumor target cells to NK cell-mediated apoptosis, and recent discoveries in NK-cell receptor biology have fueled translational research that has led to clinical trials investigating a number of novel methods to potentiate NK cytotoxicity against human malignancies.

  1. Terminal Differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) Natural Killer Cells Is Associated with Increase in Natural Killer Cell Frequencies After Antiretroviral Treatment in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fareed; Tufa, Dejene Milkessa; Mishra, Neha; Jacobs, Roland; Schmidt, Reinhold E

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 infection results in immunological abnormalities of natural killer (NK) cells such as disturbed distribution of NK cell subsets and downmodulation of activating and upregulation of inhibitory receptors thereby diminishing NK cell killing capacity and cytokine secretion. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) is known to restore phenotype and functions of NK cells. However, the effects of ART on NK cell terminal differentiation, activation, and disturbed distribution have not been studied yet longitudinally. Here, we analyzed the effects of ART on these parameters of peripheral blood NK cells in a longitudinal as well as in a cross-sectional study. We observed that expanded CD56(-)CD16(+) NK cell frequency is inversely correlated with the frequency of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells in treatment-naive HIV-1 patients. Loss of CD56(dim)CD16(+) and expansion of CD56(-)CD16(+) NK cells again restore to the levels of healthy controls after ART. Enhanced immune activation of different NK cell subsets is partially restored after ART. Terminal differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells is enhanced after ART as measured by CD57 expression. Frequencies of CD57(+)CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells are directly correlated with the frequencies of total NK cells suggesting that an increase in the frequencies of CD57(+)CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells is reflected by increased frequencies of total NK cells after ART. Taken together these data demonstrate that ART has an effect on the immune restoration of NK cells and is enhanced in the terminal differentiation of CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells, which is associated with increased frequencies of total NK cells after ART.

  2. T-cell receptor-negative natural killer cells display antigen-specific cytotoxicity for microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, J R; Pardi, R; Engleman, E

    1990-09-01

    Based upon prior demonstrations that human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) could serve as natural killer (NK) cell targets, we established NK cell lines and clones by repeated stimulation of highly purified CD16-positive, CD3/T-cell receptor (Ti)-negative cells with allogeneic ECs. After 3 weeks in culture these lymphoid cells, which neither expressed surface CD3/Ti molecules nor rearranged Ti beta- or gamma-chain genes and which lysed K562 human erythroleukemia cells, displayed specific cytotoxicity for the stimulating ECs. Furthermore, freshly isolated NK cells bound and then removed from each of several allogeneic EC lines displayed selective cytotoxicity for the adsorbing EC line. These results provide evidence for alloantigen-specific recognition of microvascular ECs by NK cells that appears to be determined, at least in part, at the level of adherence. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

  3. Opportunities and limitations of natural killer cells as adoptive therapy for malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Davies, James O J; Stringaris, Kate; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-11-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells can be readily generated for adoptive therapy with current techniques, their optimal application to treat malignant diseases requires an appreciation of the dynamic balance between signals that either synergize with or antagonize each other. Individuals display wide differences in NK function that determine their therapeutic efficacy. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. The selection of NK cells with a predominant activating profile is critical for delivering successful anti-tumor activity. This can be achieved through selection of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-mismatched NK donors and by use of blocking molecules against inhibitory pathways. Optimum NK cytotoxicity may require licensing or priming with tumor cells. Recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of NK cells inform in the design of new strategies, including adjuvant therapies, to maximize the cytotoxic potential of NK cells for adoptive transfer to treat human malignancies.

  4. Interactions between natural killer cells, cortisol and prolactin in malaria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mavoungou, Elie

    2006-03-01

    Natural killer cells derived from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells are important cells of the immune system that have two main functions: a cytolytic activity and a cytokine-producing capacity. These functions are tightly regulated by numerous activating and inhibitory receptors, including newly discovered receptors that selectively trigger the cytolytic activity in a major histocompatibility complex independent manner. Based on their defining function of spontaneous cytotoxicity without prior immunization, natural killer (NK) cells have been thought to play a critical role in immune surveillance and cancer therapy. New insights into NK cell biology have suggested their major roles in the control of infections, particularly in Plasmodium falciparum infection and in fetal implantation. P. falciparum is the main protozoan parasite responsible for malaria causing 200-300 million clinical cases and killing over 3 million people each year. This review provides an update on NK cell function, ontogeny and biology in order to better understand the role of NK cells in pregnancy in regions where malaria is endemic. Understanding mechanisms of NK cell functions may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human disease, in general, and particularly in the fight against malaria.

  5. Candida pyralidae killer toxin disrupts the cell wall of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red grape juice.

    PubMed

    Mehlomakulu, N N; Prior, K J; Setati, M E; Divol, B

    2017-03-01

    The control of the wine spoilage yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis using biological methods such as killer toxins (instead of the traditional chemical methods, e.g. SO2 ) has been the focus of several studies within the last decade. Our previous research demonstrated that the killer toxins CpKT1 and CpKT2 isolated from the wine yeast Candida pyralidae were active and stable under winemaking conditions. In this study, we report the possible mode of action of CpKT1 on B. bruxellensis cells in red grape juice. Brettanomyces bruxellensis cells were exposed to CpKT1 either directly or through co-inoculation with C. pyralidae. This exposure yielded a temporary or permanent decline of the spoilage yeast population depending on the initial cell concentration. Scanning electron microscopy revealed cell surface abrasion while propidium iodide viability staining showed that CpKT1 caused plasma membrane damage on B. bruxellensis cells. Our data show that the exposure to CpKT1 resulted in increased levels of β-glucan, suggesting a compensatory response of the sensitive cells. The toxin CpKT1 causes cell membrane and cell wall damage in B. bruxellensis. Candida pyralidae shows potential to be used as a biocontrol agent against B. bruxellensis in grape juice/wine. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. A new self: MHC-class-I-independent natural-killer-cell self-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; McNerney, Megan E

    2005-05-01

    A fundamental tenet of the immune system is the requirement for lymphocytes to respond to transformed or infected cells while remaining tolerant of normal cells. Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between self and non-self by monitoring the expression of MHC class I molecules. According to the 'missing-self' hypothesis, cells that express self-MHC class I molecules are protected from NK cells, but those that lack this self-marker are eliminated by NK cells. Recent work has revealed that there is another system of NK-cell inhibition, which is independent of MHC class I molecules. Newly discovered NK-cell inhibitory receptors that have non-MHC-molecule ligands broaden the definition of self as seen by NK cells.

  7. Natural Killers Are Made Not Born: How to Exploit NK Cells in Lung Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, progress has been made in the characterization of natural killer (NK) cells in lung malignancies, and we have now gained a better understanding of the frequency, localization, phenotype, and functional status of NK cells infiltrating these tumors. NK cell subset recruited in lung cancer is mainly capable of producing relevant cytokines rather than exerting direct cancer cell killing. Thus, the relevance of NK cells in tumor microenvironment might also go beyond the killing of tumor cells, being NK cells endowed with regulatory functions toward an ample array of immune effectors. Nevertheless, boosting their cytotoxic functions and redirecting the migration of cytotoxic NK cell subset to the tumor site might open new therapeutic avenues for lung cancer. Also, we believe that a deeper investigation into the impact of both conventional (e.g., chemotherapy) or new therapies (e.g., anti-immune checkpoints mAbs) on NK cell homeostasis in lung cancer patients is now required. PMID:28348567

  8. Inhibition of hematopoietic recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantel, K.; Boertman, J.; Nakeff, A. )

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the role of natural killer (NK) cells in situ in the recovery of marrow hematopoiesis in B6D2F1 mice receiving various doses of total-body irradiation (TBI) as a well-characterized model for treatment-induced myelosuppression. Applying an in situ cytotoxic approach for ablating NK 1.1 cells, we have demonstrated that NK 1.1 cells differentially inhibit the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and their progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage differentiation from a sublethal dose of TBI (9 Gy) while not affecting the recovery of progenitor cells committed to either erythroid or megakaryocyte differentiation from TBI. However, recoveries of CFU-S and progenitor cells were unaffected by the ablation of NK cells prior to a moderate dose of TBI (2 Gy). These findings provide in situ evidence that NK cells are potential inhibitors of hematopoietic recovery from treatment-induced myelosuppression.

  9. Natural killer cells eradicate galectin-1-deficient glioma in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Doherty, Robert; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2014-09-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells safeguard against early tumor formation by destroying transformed target cells in a process referred to as NK immune surveillance. However, the immune escape mechanisms used by malignant brain tumors to subvert this innate type of immune surveillance remain unclear. Here we show that malignant glioma cells suppress NK immune surveillance by overexpressing the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1. Conversely, galectin-1-deficient glioma cells could be eradicated by host NK cells before the initiation of an antitumor T-cell response. In vitro experiments demonstrated that galectin-1-deficient GL26-Cit glioma cells are ∼3-fold more sensitive to NK-mediated tumor lysis than galectin-1-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 suppression in human glioma could improve patient survival by restoring NK immune surveillance that can eradicate glioma cells. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5079-90. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Transcription factor Foxo1 is a negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-03-17

    Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes by upregulating CD62L expression and inhibited late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21(+/-) mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions.

  11. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a promising treatment for natural killer-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Naoko; Kami, Masahiro; Kishi, Yukiko; Kim, Sung-Won; Takeuchi, Masami; Matsue, Kosei; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Hirokawa, Makoto; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Matsumura, Tomoko; Kusumi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Noriyuki; Nagafuji, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Takeuchi, Kengo; Oshimi, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    The efficacy of allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for natural killer (NK)-cell neoplasms is unknown. We investigated the results of allo-HSCT for NK-cell neoplasms between 1990 and 2003 through questionnaires. After reclassification by a haematopathologist, of 345 patients who underwent allo-HSCT for malignant lymphoma, 28 had NK-cell neoplasms (World Health Organization classification): extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (n=22), blastic NK-cell lymphoma (n=3), and aggressive NK-cell leukaemia (n=3). Twelve were chemosensitive and 16 chemorefractory. Twenty-two had matched-related donors. Stem-cell source was bone marrow in eight and mobilised peripheral blood in 20. Conditioning regimens were myeloablative (n=23) and non-myeloablative (n=5). Grade 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD developed in 12 and 8 respectively. Eight died of disease progression, three of infection, two of acute GVHD, one of veno-occlusive disease, one of interstitial pneumonitis, and one of thrombotic microangiopathy. Two-year progression-free and overall survivals were 34% and 40% respectively (median follow-up, 34 months). All patients who did not relapse/progress within 10 months achieved progression-free survival (PFS) during the follow-up. In multivariate analysis, stem cell source (BM versus peripheral blood; relative risk 3.03), age (>or=40 years vs. <40 years; relative risk 2.85), and diagnoses (extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma versus others; relative risk 3.94) significantly affected PFS. Allo-HSCT is a promising treatment for NK-cell neoplasms.

  12. Ex vivo expansion of natural killer cells for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Klingemann, H-G; Martinson, J

    2004-01-01

    Immunotherapy with NK cells has been limited by the inability to obtain sufficient numbers of pure NK cells suitable for manipulation and expansion. The goal of this study was to isolate CD56(+) cells (CD3(-)/CD56(+), CD3(+)/CD56(+)) and expand them under culture conditions compliant with current good manufacturing practices. Magnetic cell-selection technology, using paramagnetic CD56 microbeads and cell selection columns, was used to isolate a CD56(+) population containing both CD3(-)/56(+) NK (60.6+/-10.8%) and CD3(+)/56(+) NK T cells (30.4+/-8.6%) to initiate the expansion studies. The isolated CD56(+) cells were cultured in X-Vivo10 serum-free media supplemented with 10% human AB serum and 500 U/mL recombinant human IL-2 or 500 U/mL IL-2 plus 10 ng/mL recombinant human IL-15 for 14 days. Cultures were fed fresh media and cytokines every 3-4 days, and were evaluated for cell expansion, phenotype, and cytotoxicity at the end of the culture period. Significant expansion of CD56 cells occurred only during the second week of culture. Although an average of two log expansions was observed, there was substantial cell-expansion variability, depending on the donor, and even when the same donor was tested on different occasions. The cytotoxicity of selected and expanded CD56(+) cells at a low E:T ratio was significantly higher than the starting population, but was comparable to non-separated PBMC expanded for 2 weeks under the same conditions. IL-15 (in combination with IL-2) induced higher killing at the 1:1 E:T ratio than IL-2 alone. Since CD3 cells were not depleted upfront, the expansion of CD3(+)CD56(+) cells was 2-3 times that of CD3(-)CD56(+) cells. NK cells that express the FcgammaRIII (CD16) can mediate Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and can contribute to enhanced efficacy of MAb treatment. Under the given culture conditions, only moderate expansion of CD56(+)/CD3(-)/CD16(+) cells occurred, with the majority of cells being CD56(+)/CD3(+)/CD16(+) cells. Our

  13. Studies on the mechanism of natural killer cytotoxicity. III. Activation of NK cells by interferon augments the lytic activity of released natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF).

    PubMed

    Wright, S C; Bonavida, B

    1983-06-01

    The mechanism by which interferon (IFN) pretreatment of effector cells augments natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was examined by determining whether IFN has any effect on the production of natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF). NKCF are released into the supernatant of co-cultures of murine spleen cells and YAC-1 stimulator cells, and their lytic activity is measured against YAC-1 target cells. It was demonstrated that pretreatment of effector cells with murine fibroblast IFN or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (pIC) resulted in the release of NKCF with augmented lytic activity. Evidence indicated that the IFN-induced augmentation of NKCF activity required protein synthesis during the IFN pretreatment period, because concurrent pretreatment with both IFN and cycloheximide abrogated the IFN effect. Protein synthesis, however, is not required for the production of base levels of NKCF because emetine pretreatment of normal spleen cells did not result in a decrease in NKCF production. Furthermore, substantial levels of NKCF activity could be detected in freeze-thaw lysates of freshly isolated spleen cells. Cell populations enriched for NK effector cells, such as nylon wool-nonadherent nude mouse spleen cells, produced lysates with high levels of NKCF activity, whereas lysates of CBA thymocytes were devoid of NKCF activity. Pretreatment of spleen cells with either IFN or pIC resulted in an augmentation of the NKCF activity present in their cell lysates. Taken altogether, these findings suggest that freshly isolated NK cells contain preformed pools of NKCF. Pretreatment of these cells with IFN causes de novo synthesis of additional NKCF and/or activation of preexisting NKCF. According to our model for the mechanism of NK CMC, target cell lysis is ultimately the result of transfer of NKCF from the effector cell to the target cell. The evidence presented here suggests that the IFN-induced augmentation of NK activity could be accounted for by an

  14. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Impair Natural Killer Cell Function and Exhibit Low Susceptibility to Natural Killer-Mediated Lysis

    PubMed Central

    DelaRosa, Olga; Sánchez-Correa, Beatriz; Morgado, Sara; Ramírez, Cristina; del Río, Borja; Menta, Ramón; Lombardo, Eleuterio

    2012-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have been successfully used in treating numerous diseases. However, several aspects need to be considered, particularly in the context of allogeneic cell therapy. To better understand hASCs-host interactions, we studied the phenotype of hASCs and their modulatory effect on natural killer (NK) cells by using bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) as a reference. The hASCs displayed a lower susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis and a lower expression of ligands for DNAM-1 when compared with hBM-MSCs. Moreover, here we demonstrated that hASCs and hBM-MSCs can modulate NK cells through the action of soluble factors such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Altogether, these results suggest that for an adoptive cell therapy based on the transfer of allogeneic hASCs, the NK-hASCs crosstalk will not result in an immediate recognition of the transferred cells. Thus, hASCs may remain in the tissue long enough to balance the immune response before being cleared. PMID:21867426

  15. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  16. Cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells in vitro under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, O. V.; Buravkova, L. B.; Rykova, M. P.

    2005-08-01

    Changes in the immune response during space flight are close relation to functions of NK lymphocytes and their ability to interact with target cells. The aim of this research was to study NK cells cytotoxic activity and their ability to produce cytokines under microgravity in vitro. The modification of the method to study NK cells cytotoxic activity with the use of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and myeloblasts K-562 (as target cells) proved highly effective (Buravkova et al., 2004). The flight experiment "Cell-to-cell interaction" with the use of the special device "Fibroblast-1" was carried out by Russian cosmonauts within the first two days after the docking when a new crew was taking over on International Space Station (ISS 8 - 10). The data collected on board ISS revealed that NK lymphocytes cytotoxic activity in vitro can increase under microgravity. The ground-based simulation experiments showed that long-term changes in gravity vector direction clinorotation resulted in a smaller increase of NK cells cytotoxic activity than it did in microgravity. As lymphocytes produce cytokines while interacting with target cells, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL- 2, IL-6 in cell-conditioned medium were assessed. The data showed that microgravity has varied effects on cytokines production level.

  17. Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells provide a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Camie W; Crafton, Emily; Fan, Hong-Ni; Flook, James; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Skarica, Mario; Brockstedt, Dirk; Dubensky, Thomas W; Stins, Monique F; Lanier, Lewis L; Pardoll, Drew M; Housseau, Franck

    2006-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) are, respectively, central components of innate and adaptive immune responses. We describe here a third DC lineage, termed interferon-producing killer DCs (IKDCs), distinct from conventional DCs and plasmacytoid DCs and with the molecular expression profile of both NK cells and DCs. They produce substantial amounts of type I interferons (IFN) and interleukin (IL)-12 or IFN-gamma, depending on activation stimuli. Upon stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, IKDCs kill typical NK target cells using NK-activating receptors. Their cytolytic capacity subsequently diminishes, associated with the loss of NKG2D receptor (also known as Klrk1) and its adaptors, Dap10 and Dap12. As cytotoxicity is lost, DC-like antigen-presenting activity is gained, associated with upregulation of surface major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and costimulatory molecules, which formally distinguish them from classical NK cells. In vivo, splenic IKDCs preferentially show NK function and, upon systemic infection, migrate to lymph nodes, where they primarily show antigen-presenting cell activity. By virtue of their capacity to kill target cells, followed by antigen presentation, IKDCs provide a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  18. HLA-C levels impact natural killer cell subset distribution and function.

    PubMed

    Sips, Magdalena; Liu, Qingquan; Draghi, Monia; Ghebremichael, Musie; Berger, Christoph T; Suscovich, Todd J; Sun, Yongtao; Walker, Bruce D; Carrington, Mary; Altfeld, Marcus; Brouckaert, Peter; De Jager, Philip L; Alter, Galit

    2016-12-01

    Differences in HLA-C expression are inversely correlated with HIV viral load set-point and slower progression to AIDS, linked to enhanced cytotoxic T cell immunity. Yet, beyond T cells, HLA-C serves as a dominant ligand for natural killer (NK) cell killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Thus, we speculated that HLA-C expression levels may also impact NK activity, thereby modulating HIV antiviral control. Phenotypic and functional profiling was performed on freshly isolated PBMCs. HLA-C expression was linked to changes in NK subset distribution and licensing, particularly in HLA-C1/C1, KIR2DL3+2DL2-individuals. Moreover, high levels of HLA-C, were associated with reduced frequencies of anergic CD56(neg) NKs and lower frequencies of KIR2DL1/2/3+ NK cells, pointing to an HLA-C induced influence on the NK cell development in the absence of disease. In HIV infection, several spontaneous controllers, that expressed higher levels of HLA-C demonstrated robust NK-IFN-γ secretion in response to target cells, highlighting a second disease induced licensing phenotype. Thus this population study points to a potential role for HLA-C levels both in NK cell education and development.

  19. Maternal uterine natural killer cells nurture fetal growth: in medio stat virtus.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Francesco; Kieckbusch, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Much research in reproductive immunology is preoccupied with maternal tolerance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. This inevitably leads to the assumption that the maternal immune system should be suppressed, similarly to the immunosuppression needed to avoid rejection of an allograft. However, the parallels with transplantation immunology are misleading, and we discuss how interactions between variable immune system genes expressed on maternal natural killer (NK) cells and on the fetal trophoblast modulate fetal growth. Exaggerated suppression or activation of maternal NK cells associates with both extremes of birth weight. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  1. A long noncoding RNA positively regulates CD56 in human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Binqing; Wu, Yang; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes that play critical roles in host defense against viral infection and surveillance against malignant transformation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important immune system regulators. Here, we analyzed human primary lymphocyte lncRNA expression profiles to identify NK-lncRNA signatures. We detected numerous novel NK-specific lncRNAs with potential roles in regulating human NK cell differentiation and function. Expression of lnc-CD56, an NK-specific lncRNA, was positively correlated with that of CD56, a classical human NK cell surface marker. We showed that lnc-CD56 may function as a positive regulator of CD56 in primary human NK cells and differentiated NK cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Our data provide an annotated human NK cell lncRNA expression catalog and demonstrate a key role for lncRNAs in NK cell biology. PMID:27713137

  2. Gene deregulation and chronic activation in natural killer cells deficient in the transcription factor ETS1.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Kevin; Chandler, Katherine J; Spaulding, Christina; Zandi, Sasan; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Graves, Barbara J; Kee, Barbara L

    2012-06-29

    Multiple transcription factors guide the development of mature functional natural killer (NK) cells, yet little is known about their function. We used global gene expression and genome-wide binding analyses combined with developmental and functional studies to unveil three roles for the ETS1 transcription factor in NK cells. ETS1 functions at the earliest stages of NK cell development to promote expression of critical transcriptional regulators including T-BET and ID2, NK cell receptors (NKRs) including NKp46, Ly49H, and Ly49D, and signaling molecules essential for NKR function. As a consequence, Ets1(-/-) NK cells fail to degranulate after stimulation through activating NKRs. Nonetheless, these cells are hyperresponsive to cytokines and have characteristics of chronic stimulation including increased expression of inhibitory NKRs and multiple activation-associated genes. Therefore, ETS1 regulates a broad gene expression program in NK cells that promotes target cell recognition while limiting cytokine-driven activation.

  3. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs.

    PubMed

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus 'imprints' distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions.

  4. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus ‘imprints’ distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions. PMID:27089380

  5. Uterine Natural Killer Cells: Functional Distinctions and Influence on Pregnancy in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, Louise M.; Colucci, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of development and function of natural killer (NK) cells has progressed significantly in recent years. However, exactly how uterine NK (uNK) cells develop and function is still unclear. To help investigators that are beginning to study tissue NK cells, we summarize in this review our current knowledge of the development and function of uNK cells, and what is yet to be elucidated. We compare and contrast the biology of human and mouse uNK cells in the broader context of the biology of innate lymphoid cells and with reference to peripheral NK cells. We also review how uNK cells may regulate trophoblast invasion and uterine spiral arterial remodeling in human and murine pregnancy. PMID:28484462

  6. Interleukin-17D mediates tumor rejection through recruitment of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Timothy; Saddawi-Konefka, Robert; Gross, Emilie; Tran, Miller; Mayfield, Stephen P.; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Bui, Jack D.

    2014-01-01

    The process of cancer immunoediting generates a repertoire of cancer cells that can persist in immune competent hosts. In its most complex form, this process begins with the elimination of highly immunogenic unedited tumor cells followed by the escape of less immunogenic, edited cells. Although edited tumors can release immunosuppressive factors, it is unknown whether unedited tumors produce cytokines that enhance antitumor function. Utilizing gene microarray analysis, we found the cytokine interleukin 17D (IL-17D) was highly expressed in certain unedited tumors but not edited mouse tumor cell lines. Moreover, forced expression of IL-17D in edited tumor cells induced rejection by stimulating CCL2 production from tumor endothelial cells leading to the recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells promoted M1 macrophage development leading to adaptive immune responses. IL-17D expression was also decreased in certain high-grade and metastatic human tumors, suggesting that it can be targeted for tumor immune therapy. PMID:24794441

  7. Hidden talents of natural killers: NK cells in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Megan A; Colonna, Marco; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2009-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes capable of killing target cells and producing immunoregulatory cytokines. Herein, we discuss recent studies that indicate that NK cells span the conventional boundaries between innate and adaptive immunity. For example, it was recently discovered that NK cells have the capacity for memory-like responses, a property that was previously thought to be limited to adaptive immunity. NK cells have also been identified in multiple tissues, and a subset of cells that specialize in the production of the T(H)17 cytokine IL-22, NK-22s, was recently described in mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue. Finally, we review work that shows that NK cells develop at sites that were traditionally thought to be occupied only by adaptive immune cells, including the thymus and lymph nodes.

  8. [HMGB1 as metabolic weapon in the arsenal of natural killer cells].

    PubMed

    Gdynia, G

    2016-11-01

    The German Nobel Prize winner Otto Warburg discovered the importance of glycolysis in cancer cells in the 1920s. Nearly one century later the inhibition of tumor glycolysis in cancer cells could literally be the Achilles Heel in cancer therapy. Surprisingly, we could show that Natural Killer (NK) cells pursue this strategy. They employ specific metabolic weapons to eliminate cancer cells by targeting tumor glycolysis. In colon cancer cells a specifically modified form of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein released by NK cells induced a previously unknown form of cell death. This new link between the killing of cancer cells and the innate immune system opened up new perspectives for immunotherapy in oncology.

  9. Inflammatory infiltrates and natural killer cell presence in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Klöter, I; Roggendorf, W

    1988-02-15

    Immunohistochemical analysis of subpopulations of inflammatory cells in 81 primary and secondary human brain tumors was done. Natural killer (NK) cells, representing non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted, spontaneous cytotoxicity and monocytic cells are virtually absent in infiltrates of gliomas and account only for a minor percentage of inflammatory cells in brain metastases of carcinoma and in craniopharyngeomas. Infiltrates in gliomas consist almost exclusively of T-cells of the suppressor/cytotoxic type whereas infiltrates in carcinoma metastases and craniopharyngeomas contain considerable numbers of T-helper/inducer cells and B-cells. From this the authors conclude (1) that NK cells do not play a major role in tumor rejection, and (2) that the kind of inflammatory reaction does not depend upon the tumor site but more likely on the tumor type. No correlation between tumor differentiation and infiltrate composition is evident.

  10. Natural Killer Cell Recognition of Melanoma: New Clues for a More Effective Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona, Raquel; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In this scenario, NK cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of MHC class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g., cytokine induction of activating receptors) has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma. PMID:26779186

  11. Intravenous apoptotic cell infusion as a cell-based therapy toward improving hematopoietic cell transplantation outcome.

    PubMed

    Saas, Philippe; Gaugler, Béatrice; Perruche, Sylvain

    2010-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is an efficient therapy for different malignant and nonmalignant hematological diseases. However, the use of this therapeutic approach is still limited by some severe toxic side effects, mainly graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Today, the risk of fatal GvHD restrains the wider application of AHCT to many patients in need of an effective therapy for their high-risk hematologic malignancies. Thus, new strategies, including cell-based therapy approaches, are required. We propose to use intravenous donor apoptotic leukocyte infusion to improve AHCT outcome. In experimental AHCT models, we demonstrated that intravenous apoptotic leukocyte infusion, simultaneously with allogeneic bone marrow grafts, favors hematopoietic engraftment, prevents allo-immunization, and delays acute GvHD onset. Here, we review the different mechanisms and the potential beneficial effects associated with the immunomodulatory properties of apoptotic cells in the AHCT setting. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Dietary gluten increases natural killer cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jesper; Dall, Morten; Antvorskov, Julie Christine; Weile, Christian; Engkilde, Kåre; Josefsen, Knud; Buschard, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    Dietary gluten influences the development of type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and biobreeding rats, and has been shown to influence a wide range of immunological factors in the pancreas and gut. In the present study, the effects of gluten on NK cells were studied in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that gliadin increased direct cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion from murine splenocytes and NK cells toward the pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 cells. Additionally, stimulation of MIN6 cells led to a significantly increased proportion of degranulating C57BL/6 CD107a(+) NK cells. Stimulation of C57BL/6 pancreatic islets with gliadin significantly increased secretion of IL-6 more than ninefold. In vivo, the gluten-containing diet led to a higher expression of NKG2D and CD71 on NKp46(+) cells in all lymphoid organs in BALB/c and NOD mice compared with the gluten-free diet. Collectively, our data suggest that dietary gluten increases murine NK-cell activity against pancreatic beta cells. This mechanism may contribute to development of type 1 diabetes and explain the higher disease incidence associated with gluten intake in NOD mice.

  13. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Jennifer A; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Yang, Yanwen; Aquino-Lopez, Arianexys; Bishop, Erin E; Lee, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans - including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma - offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46), the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3(-)/NKp46(+) cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3(-)/NKp46(+) NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3(-)/NKp46(+) cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as measured by Luminex. Similar to human NK cells, CD3(-)/NKp46(+) cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median = 20,283-fold in 21 days). Furthermore, we identify a minor Null population (CD3(-)/CD21(-)/CD14(-)/NKp46(-)) with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3(-)/NKp46(+) cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46(+) NK cells and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46(-) subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. Natural killer cells after altaïr mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Rykova, M.; Meshkov, D.; Peres, C.; Husson, D.; Schmitt, D. A.

    Reduced in vitro NK cytotoxic activity have routinely been observed after both prolonged and short-term space flights. This study investigated the effects of space flight on NK cell functions, NK cell counts and the production of IL-2 and TNF by lymphocytes of French-Russian crew members. In the French cosmonaut, after 21 days space flight, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells, the capacity the NK cells to bind and lyse the individual target cells and the percentage of NK cells were decreased. In this cosmonaut a twofold reduction TNF production in cultures of lymphocytes stimulated with PMA and with the mixture of PHA and PMA was observed on the first day after landing. However, the activity of the production of TNF in 48-hour PHA-cultures of lymphocytes was unchanged and the biological activity of IL-2 was not reduced. The immunological examination did not detecte any substantial deviations from the norm in both russian cosmonauts after 197 days space flight. Various explanations for decreased cytotoxicity in cosmonauts after space flight can be proposed, and these include the defective function of NK cells and reduced numbers of circulating effector cells.

  15. In vivo distribution of recombinant interleukin-2-activated autologous lymphocytes administered by intra-arterial infusion in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Yonese, Y.; Minato, N.

    1987-03-01

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (RIL 2)-activated autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were infused directly into the renal arteries of 3 patients with renal cell carcinoma, and the in vivo distribution of the infused cells was investigated. In vitro studies to define the optimal culture conditions indicated that maximal lymphokine-activated killer activity was observed at around 10-20 days in culture, as judged by the cytotoxicity against fresh allogenic tumor cells. Maximal expression of the interleukin-2 receptor was also obtained at around 10 days. PBL collected by leukopheresis from each patient were thus cultured for 10 days with RIL 2, labeled with /sup 111/In-oxine, and then infused directly into the renal artery of the affected kidney via a catheter. Radioactivity in the infused side of the kidneys increased immediately after the infusion but then gradually decreased. Radioactivity in the lungs also rapidly increased within the first hour but then cleared gradually, whereas that in the liver and spleen tended to increase steadily. Nevertheless, at 48 hours, the infused side of the kidneys retained levels of radioactivity comparable to those seen in the liver and spleen, while the levels seen in the lungs were already close to background levels. The radioactivity in the areas corresponding to tumors remained consistently higher than that in the normal parts of the affected kidneys. The direct comparison of the radioactivity distribution pattern with the macroscopic appearance of surgically resected kidneys indicated that the accumulation of radioactivity was indeed selectively associated with the tumor tissues in the kidneys, except for a case in which the tumor was quite necrotic and hypovascular.

  16. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Randomized phase II and III trials on CIK cell-based therapy were identified by electronic searches using a combination of "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "cytokine-induced killer cells". Results The analysis showed significant survival benefit (one-year survival, p < 0.001; two-year survival, p < 0.001; median overall survival, p < 0.001) in favor of CIK-based therapy. Comparison of CIK group versus non-CIK group resulted in a significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) (p < 0.01). A favored disease control rate (DCR) and overall response rate (ORR) were also observed in patients receiving CIK cell therapy (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, patients in the CIK group showed better quality of life (QoL), diminished HBV-DNA content and AFP level (p < 0.01). Comparing T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, the analysis showed the ratio of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells significantly increased in the CIK group, compared with the non-CIK group (p < 0.01). Conclusions CIK cell therapy demonstrated a significant superiority in prolonging the median overall survival, PFS, DCR, ORR and QoL of HCC patients. These results support further larger scale randomized controlled trials for HCC patients with or without the combination of other therapeutic methods. PMID:23210562

  17. Large-Scale Culture and Genetic Modification of Human Natural Killer Cells for Cellular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Natalia; Parihar, Robin; Rollins, Lisa A; Gee, Adrian P; Rooney, Cliona M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in methods for the ex vivo expansion of human natural killer (NK) cells have facilitated the use of these powerful immune cells in clinical protocols. Further, the ability to genetically modify primary human NK cells following rapid expansion allows targeting and enhancement of their immune function. We have successfully adapted an expansion method for primary NK cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or from apheresis products in gas permeable rapid expansion devices (G-Rexes). Here, we describe an optimized protocol for rapid and robust NK cell expansion as well as a method for highly efficient retroviral transduction of these ex vivo expanded cells. These methodologies are good manufacturing practice (GMP) compliant and could be used for clinical-grade product manufacturing.

  18. Glutathione diminishes tributyltin- and dibutyltin-induced loss of lytic function in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeralyn J; Davis, McLisa V; Whalen, Margaret M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether reduced glutathione (GSH) was able to alter the negative effects of tributyltin (TBT) or dibutyltin (DBT) on the lytic function of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). The results indicated that the presence of GSH during the exposure of NK cells to TBT or DBT diminished the negative effect of the butyltin on the lytic function of NK cells. This suggests that the interaction of TBT and DBT with functionally relevant sulfhydryl groups in NK cells may be part of the mechanism by which they decrease NK lytic function.

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of Viscum album extracts on natural killer cells: review of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Braedel-Ruoff, Sibylla

    2010-04-01

    Extracts produced from Viscum album L. (mistletoe) are widely used in complementary medicine for the treatment of cancer. In many preclinical and clinical studies, Viscum album extracts were shown to exert immunomodulatory functions. Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells. This article reviews clinical trials that address the influence of the mistletoe extract Iscador on NK cells and discusses the results with regard to the NK cell functions assayed, to putative underlying mechanisms, and to the role of different mistletoe components. Although many trials demonstrated a positive effect of Iscador treatment on NK cell function, further dedicated studies with optimized treatment schedules and comparable mistletoe doses are necessary to confirm these results regarding involvement of NK cells on the immunomodulatory functions of Iscador therapy and to investigate the clinical relevance of these findings. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  1. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    PubMed Central

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  2. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    PubMed

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  3. The dual-functional capability of cytokine-induced killer cells and application in tumor immunology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Xin-feng; Zhao, Lin; Long, Fei; Liu, Zhuang-kai; Wang, En-hua

    2015-05-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a heterogeneous cell population, including a large majority of CD3+CD56+ cells, a relatively minor fractions of typical T cells (CD3+CD56-), and natural killer (NK) cells (CD3-CD56+). In order to elucidate the tumor killing mechanism of these three subpopulations of CIK cells, this review summarized the concordances and differences among CD3+CD56+ CIK cells, CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD3+CD56- T cells to the following aspects: the effects of cell surface molecules, mechanisms of tumor killing, and clinical applications of these cells in immunotherapy. NK cells can be classified into CD56brightCD16- NK cells, which produce cytokines in response to monokine co-stimulation, and the CD56dimCD16+ NK cells, which contribute to lysing susceptible target. Also, the immunity of NK cells is mainly regulated by several immune-receptors, such as ACR, ICR, NCR and KIRs. T cells require TCR and co-stimulatory molecules for initiation of T cell activation. The CD3+CD56+ CIK cells co-express with T-cell marker CD3 and NK cell marker CD56 to appear the most potent cytotoxicity and high impact on adoptive cellular immunotherapy. These CIK subpopulations share some similar tumor killing mechanisms. LFA-1 not only mediates the binding of NK cells to target cells through its ligand ICAM-1 to localize actin accumulation but also acts as a co-stimulatory receptor on NK cells. LFA-1 also functions as co-stimulatory receptor for T cells to transmit intracellular signals from the TCR to LFA-1. Furthermore, cytotoxic effect of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells is blocked by antibodies directly against LFA-1 and its counter receptor, ICAM-1. Clinically, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is shown in both NK cells and T cells for tumor killing while dendritic cells are another main regulator for the activation of three subpopulations. In summary, CD3+CD56+ CIK cells have dual-functional capability as T-cell subsets which acquire NK cells function

  4. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Jennifer A.; Somanchi, Srinivas S.; Yang, Yanwen; Aquino-Lopez, Arianexys; Bishop, Erin E.; Lee, Dean A.

    2016-01-01

    Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans – including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma – offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46), the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3−/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3−/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3−/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as measured by Luminex. Similar to human NK cells, CD3−/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median = 20,283-fold in 21 days). Furthermore, we identify a minor Null population (CD3−/CD21−/CD14−/NKp46−) with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3−/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46− subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27933061

  5. Immunotherapy with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and recombinant interleukin 2: stimulation of molecular programs of cytotoxic killer cells and induction of tumor regression.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, F; Khanna, A; Xu, G; Lagman, M; Haschemeyer, R; Mouradian, J; Wang, J C; Stenzel, K H; Rubin, A L; Suthanthiran, M

    1994-01-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy, infusions of interleukin 2 (IL-2) in conjunction with in vitro-activated killer cells, has brought new hope to patients with cancer. The broad application of this strategy, however, is constrained by the need for repeated leukapheresis and by the labor-intensive process of in vitro activation of cells. Also, current protocols generally use nonphysiological and toxic concentrations of IL-2. Identification of an in vivo stimulant that renders T cells responsive to physiologic concentrations of IL-2 represents a potential improvement over existing approaches. We have determined whether in vivo administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed at the T-cell surface protein CD3 induces T-cell responsiveness to IL-2, stimulates cytolytic molecular programs of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, and induces tumor regression. These hypotheses were explored in a murine hepatic MCA-102 fibrosarcoma model. We report that in vivo administration of anti-CD3 mAbs plus IL-2 results in intrahepatic expression of mRNA-encoding perforin, cytotoxic T-cell-specific serine esterase, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Anti-CD3 mAbs alone or IL-2 alone failed to induce or induced minimal expression of these molecular mediators of cytotoxicity. The anti-CD3 mAbs plus IL-2 regimen also resulted in a significantly smaller number of hepatic metastases and a significantly longer survival time of tumor-bearing mice, compared to treatment with anti-CD3 mAbs alone or IL-2 alone. Our findings suggest that a regimen of anti-CD3 mAbs plus IL-2 is a more effective antitumor regimen compared with anti-CD3 mAbs alone or IL-2 alone and advance an alternative immunotherapy strategy of potential value for the treatment of cancer in humans. Images PMID:8058730

  6. High frequency of activated natural killer and natural killer T-cells in patients with new onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Xu, Bingchuan; Gao, Lichao; Sun, Xiguang; Qu, Xiaozhang; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Shumei; Feng, Junyan; Wang, Juan; Tang, Ying; Yan, Guoqiang; Gao, Xiuzhu; Jiang, Yanfang

    2012-05-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is crucial for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and immunocompetent cells, such as T-cells, B-cells, mast cells and macrophages, regulate the pathogenesis of T2DM. However, little is known about the role of natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells in the pathogenic process of T2DM. A total of 16 patients with new onset T2DM and nine healthy subjects were recruited, and the frequency of peripheral blood activated and inhibitory NK and NKT cells in individual subjects was determined by flow cytometry. The frequency of spontaneous and inducible interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and CD107a(+) NK cells was further examined, and the potential association of the frequency of NK cells with clinical measures was analyzed. While there was no significant difference in the frequency of peripheral blood NK and NKT cells between patients and controls, the frequency of NKG2D(+) NK and NKT cells in patients was significantly higher than those in the controls (P = 0.011). In contrast, the frequency of NKG2A(+) and KIR2DL3(+) inhibitory NK and NKT cells in patients was significantly lower than those in the controls (P = 0.002, P < 0.0001, respectively). Furthermore, the frequencies of NKG2D(+) NK cells were correlated significantly with the values of body mass index in patients. Moreover, the frequencies of spontaneous and inducible CD107a(+), but not IFN-γ-secreting, NK cells in patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.004, P < 0.0001). Our data indicated that a higher frequency of activated NK cells may participate in the obesity-related chronic inflammation involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  7. Follicular lymphoma: in vitro effects of combining lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab- and obinutuzumab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, Ricardo; López-Díaz-de-Cerio, Ascensión; Feliu, Jesus; Panizo, Angel; Giraldo, Pilar; Rodríguez-Calvillo, Mercedes; Grande, Carlos; Pena, Esther; Olave, Mayte; Panizo, Carlos; Inogés, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a disease of paradoxes-incurable but with a long natural history. We hypothesized that a combination of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and monoclonal antibodies might provide a robust synergistic treatment and tested this hypothesis in a phase II clinical trial (NCT01329354). In this trial, in addition to R-CHOP, we alternated the administration of only rituximab with rituximab and autologous LAK cells that were expanded ex vivo. Our objective was to determine the in vitro capability of LAK cells generated from FL patients to produce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines and to determine rituximab- and obinutuzumab-induced cytotoxicity via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. We analyzed the LAK cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab (R)- and obinutuzumab (GA101)-induced ADCC activity. We show that LAK cells generated from FL patients induce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines. R and GA101 enhance cytolysis through ADCC activity of LAK cells. Impaired LAK cell cytotoxicity and ADCC activity were detected in 50 % of patients. Percentage of NK cells in LAK infusions were correlated with the R- and GA101-induced ADCC. Our results indicate that the combination of R or GA101 and LAK cells should be an option as frontline maintenance therapy in patients with FL.

  8. Innate immune natural killer cells and their role in HIV and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Bostik, Pavel; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Mayne, Ann E; Ansari, Aftab A

    2010-01-01

    The findings that early events during HIV-1 and SIV infection of Asian rhesus macaques dictate the levels of viremia and rate of disease progression prior to the establishment of mature and effective adaptive immune responses strongly suggest an important role for innate immune mechanisms. In addition, the fact that the major target of HIV and SIV during this period of acute infection is the gastrointestinal tissue suggests that whatever role the innate immune system plays must either directly and/or indirectly focus on the GI tract. The object of this article is to provide a general overview of the innate immune system with a focus on natural killer (NK) cells and their role in the pathogenesis of lentivirus infection. The studies summarized include our current understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity, the putative functions ascribed to the subsets, the maturation/differentiation of NK cells, the mechanisms by which their function is mediated and regulated, the studies of these NK-cell subsets, with a focus on killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in nonhuman primates and humans, and finally, how HIV and SIV infection affects these NK cells in vivo. Clearly much has yet to be learnt on how the innate immune system influences the interaction between lentiviruses and the host within the GI tract, knowledge of which is reasoned to be critical for the formulation of effective vaccines against HIV-1. PMID:20730028

  9. Natural Killer-like B Cells Prime Innate Lymphocytes against Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Chen, Yi; Huang, Guanling; Xiong, Zhen; Liu, Jing; Li, Chong; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing group I innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) produce large amounts of IFN-γ and cause activation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, how NKs and ILC1s are primed during infection remains elusive. Here we have shown that a lymphocyte subpopulation natural killer-like B (NKB) cells existed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). NKBs had unique features that differed from T and B cells, and produced interleukin-18 (IL-18) and IL-12 at an early phase of infection. NKB cells played a critical role in eradication of microbial infection via secretion of IL-18 and IL-12. Moreover, IL-18 deficiency abrogated the antibacterial effect of NKBs. Upon bacterial challenge, NKB precursors (NKBPs) rapidly differentiated to NKBs that activated NKs and ILC1s against microbial infection. Our findings suggest that NKBs might be exploited to develop effective therapies for treatment of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Receptor systems controlling natural killer cell function are genetically stratified in Europe.

    PubMed

    Guinan, K J; Cunningham, R T; Meenagh, A; Dring, M M; Middleton, D; Gardiner, C M

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are components of the innate immune system that function in identifying and destroying aberrant or pathogen-infected cells. These functions are largely controlled by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). KIRs inhibit and activate NK cell functions through interactions with their ligands, epitopes encoded by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes (HLA-C1, C2 and Bw4). Genes that encode KIR and their HLA ligands vary in frequency across human populations. Here, we characterize two Irish populations for KIR and HLA and determine the spatial distribution of functionally important KIR:HLA systems in Europe, a region known for its considerable underlying genetic stratification. We find that Southern Europe is a region characterized by higher frequencies of activatory KIR and strong inhibitory HLA ligand systems (2DL1:HLA-C2 and 3DL1:Bw4). A lower frequency of activatory KIR and the predominance of a comparatively weaker inhibitory ligand system (2DL3:HLA-C1) are observed northwards. Despite contrasting KIR:HLA systems in Northern and Southern Europe, there is a clear balance between inhibitory and activatory repertoires, and their ligands in both regions. These findings show 'functional stratification' of the epistatic KIR:HLA receptor system in Europe, the presence of which will likely affect NK cell-mediated immunity across different populations.

  11. Tentative and transient natural killer cell polarization balances the requirements for discriminatory recognition and cytolytic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sinai, Parisa; Roybal, Kole T; Wülfing, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that lyse virally infected and tumor cells. Initially, their cytolytic capability is induced by cytokines. Subsequently, in their decision whether to kill a potential target cell, NK cells have to distinguish between small differences in the expression of ligands that report on the viral infection or transformation of the target. NK killing requires tight coupling to the target cell and extensive NK cell polarization. Here we discuss, often in contrast to the second cytolytic immune cell type, cytotoxic T cells, how NK cell polarization is shaped by three constraints of their activation. First, NK cell have to respond to cytokines: Different priming cytokines yield dramatically divergent NK cell polarization. Second, NK cells have to distinguish small differences in ligand expression: NK cell polarization is tentative, likely to allow discriminatory recognition close to the NK cell activation threshold. A critical contributor to the tentative nature of NK cell polarization may be poorly developed spatiotemporal organization of NK cell signaling. Third, NK cells have to kill effectively: NK cell polarization is transient, allowing for efficient killing by sequential interactions of a single NK cell with numerous target cells.

  12. Novel strategies of adoptive immunotherapy: How natural killer cells may change the treatment of elderly patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lemoli, Roberto M; Parisi, Sarah; Curti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Although many attempts have been made to identify novel molecular-targeted therapies for patients with acute myeloid leukemia, their translation into the clinic have had limited impact. In particular, the question of effective and curative treatments for elderly patients, who are not eligible for stem cell transplantation, remains an unmet medical need. To answer this question, a wide range of immunologic therapeutic strategies, mostly T cell based, have been proposed and investigated. At present, however, the clinical results have been largely unsatisfactory. Natural killer cells have recently been used as a means of adoptive immunotherapy with promising clinical results. On the basis of recent clinical reports and moving from the basic immunobiology of natural killer cells, here we discuss some open issues in the clinical translation of natural killer-based adoptive immunotherapy for the management of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. Developmental programming of natural killer and innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Vosshenrich, Christian A J; Di Santo, James P

    2013-04-01

    In recent years we have witnessed a blooming interest in innate lymphoid cell (ILC) biology thanks to the discovery of novel lineages of ILC that are phenotypically and functionally distinct from NK cells. While the importance of these novel ILC subsets as essential functional components of the early immune responses are now clearly established, many questions remain as to how early ILC developmental fates are determined and how specific effector functions associated with individual ILC subsets are achieved. As the founding member of the ILC family, properties of NK cells have defining attributes that characterize this group of innate effectors. Analysing their developmental rules may provide clues to principles that guide ILC development in general.