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Sample records for killer yeast strains

  1. Killer toxin from several food-derived Debaryomyces hansenii strains effective against pathogenic Candida yeasts.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2016-04-02

    Candida yeasts are the dominant fungi in the healthy human microbiome, but are well-known for causing disease following a variety of perturbations. Evaluation of fungal populations from the healthy human gut revealed a significant negative correlation between the foodborne yeast, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Candida species. D. hansenii is reported to produce killer toxins (mycocins) effective against other yeast species. In order to better understand this phenomenon, a collection of 42 D. hansenii isolates was obtained from 22 cheeses and evaluated for killer activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis over a range of temperatures and pH values. Twenty three strains demonstrated killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, which was pH- and temperature-dependent, with no killer activity observed for any strain at pH6.5 or higher, or at ≥ 35 °C (physiological conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract). A cell-free mycocin preparation showed transient killer activity against C. albicans at 35 °C and a cheese sample containing a killer D. hansenii strain demonstrated sustained killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Together, these observations raise the possibility that D. hansenii could influence Candida populations in the gut.

  2. Experimental tests of host-virus coevolution in natural killer yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Pieczynska, M D; Korona, R; De Visser, J A G M

    2017-04-01

    Fungi may carry cytoplasmic viruses that encode anticompetitor toxins. These so-called killer viruses may provide competitive benefits to their host, but also incur metabolic costs associated with viral replication, toxin production and immunity. Mechanisms responsible for the stable maintenance of these endosymbionts are insufficiently understood. Here, we test whether co-adaptation of host and killer virus underlies their stable maintenance in seven natural and one laboratory strain of the genus Saccharomyces. We employ cross-transfection of killer viruses, all encoding the K1-type toxin, to test predictions from host-virus co-adaptation. These tests support local adaptation of hosts and/or their killer viruses. First, new host-virus combinations have strongly reduced killing ability against a standard sensitive strain when compared with re-constructed native combinations. Second, viruses are more likely to be lost from new than from original hosts upon repeated bottlenecking or the application of stressful conditions. Third, host fitness is increased after the re-introduction of native viruses, but decreased after the introduction of new viruses. Finally, rather than a trade-off, original combinations show a positive correlation between killing ability and fitness. Together, these results suggest that natural yeast killer strains and their viruses have co-adapted, allowing the transition from a parasitic to a mutualistic symbiosis.

  3. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  4. The occurrence of killer, sensitive, and neutral yeasts in Brazilian Riesling Italico grape must and the effect of neutral strains on killing behaviour.

    PubMed

    da Silva, G A

    1996-09-01

    The occurrence of killer toxins amongst yeast in Brazilian Riesling Italico grape must was investigated by using the sensitive strain EMBRAPA-26B as a reference strain at 18 degrees C and 28 degrees C. From a total of 85 previously isolated yeasts, 21 strains showed ability to kill the sensitive strain on unbuffered grape must/agar (MA-MB) and 0.1 M citrate/phosphate-buffered yeast extract/peptone/dextrose/agar (YEPD-MB) media both supplemented with 30 mg/l methylene blue. The killer activity of only four yeasts depended on the incubation temperature rather than the medium used. At 28 degrees C, the strains 11B and 53B were not able to show killer action. On the other hand, strains 49B and 84B did not kill the sensitive yeast at 18 degrees C. The killer strain EMBRAPA-91B and a commercial wine killer yeast K-1 were employed to examine the sensitivity of the isolated yeasts on YEPD-MB and MA-MB at 18 degrees C. The sensitivity and neutral characteristics of yeasts were shown to be dependent on the medium and the killer strain. Interactions, including K-R-, K-R+ and K+R+ strains, simultaneously, have revealed that some K-R+ strains appear to protect the K-R- strain against the killer toxin. Sensitive dead cells, although to a less extent, also exhibited similar protection. Kinetic studies have shown that the maximum specific growth rates were higher for the 20B YEPD-MB-sensitive strains (mu(max) = 0.517 h-1) than for both the 91B (mu(max) = 0.428 h-1) and K-1 (mu(max) = 0.466 h-1) killer strains. The protective capacity of neutral or sensitive cells that contaminate a fermentation, as well as the higher maximum specific growth rate of sensitive yeasts, besides other factors, may preclude the dominance of a killer strain. This protective capacity may also reduce the risk of a sensitive inoculum being killed by wild-type killer yeasts in open non-sterile fermentation.

  5. The occurrence of killer activity in yeasts isolated from natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Monika; Kordowska-Wiater, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Yeast's ability to restrict the growth and kill other yeasts, fungi and bacteria has been known for over 50 years. Killer activity was detected in yeasts deposited in the world collections or isolated from natural habitats. In this study, isolates from the forest environment, leaves of fruit trees, flower petals, cereals and frozen fruit have been screened in terms of their killer activities. Killer activity was tested on strains belonging to six yeast species: Candida, Rhodotorula, Pichia, Pachysolen, Yarrowia, Trichosporon. The reference strains were Kluyveromyces lactis Y-6682 and Kluyveromyces marxinanus Y-8281, well-known to be sensitive to yeast killer toxins. Among one hundred and two tested strains, 24 (23.5% of isolates) showed positive killer action, and 10 (9.8% of the isolates) a weak killer action against at least one sensitive reference strain. The highest killer activity was observed among isolates from forest soil and flowers.

  6. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa.

  7. Killer yeasts inhibit the growth of the phytopathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of Witches’ Broom disease

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Cabral, Anderson; de Carvalho, Patricia Maria Barroso; Pinotti, Tatiana; Hagler, Allen Norton; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda Cristina Santana; Macrae, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Fruit and soil yeasts isolated from the Amazon, Atlantic Rainforests and an organic farm were screened for killer activity against yeasts. Killer yeasts were then tested against the phytopathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa (syn. Crinipellis perniciosa) and a Dipodascus capitatus strain and a Candida sp strain inhibited its growth. PMID:24031327

  8. Killer yeasts inhibit the growth of the phytopathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of Witches' Broom disease.

    PubMed

    de Souza Cabral, Anderson; de Carvalho, Patricia Maria Barroso; Pinotti, Tatiana; Hagler, Allen Norton; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda Cristina Santana; Macrae, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Fruit and soil yeasts isolated from the Amazon, Atlantic Rainforests and an organic farm were screened for killer activity against yeasts. Killer yeasts were then tested against the phytopathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa (syn. Crinipellis perniciosa) and a Dipodascus capitatus strain and a Candida sp strain inhibited its growth.

  9. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  10. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  11. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling. PMID:24031519

  12. Yeast killer toxins, molecular mechanisms of their action and their applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhe; Wang, Guang-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Li, Yang; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Killer toxins secreted by some yeast strains are the proteins that kill sensitive cells of the same or related yeast genera. In recent years, many new yeast species have been found to be able to produce killer toxins against the pathogenic yeasts, especially Candida albicans. Some of the killer toxins have been purified and characterized, and the genes encoding the killer toxins have been cloned and characterized. Many new targets including different components of cell wall, plasma membrane, tRNA, DNA and others in the sensitive cells for the killer toxin action have been identified so that the new molecular mechanisms of action have been elucidated. However, it is still unknown how some of the newly discovered killer toxins kill the sensitive cells. Studies on the killer phenomenon in yeasts have provided valuable insights into a number of fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology and interactions of different eukaryotic cells. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of their action will be helpful to develop the strategies to fight more and more harmful yeasts.

  13. A population study of killer viruses reveals different evolutionary histories of two closely related Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shang-Lin; Leu, Jun-Yi; Chang, Tien-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    Microbes have evolved ways of interference competition to gain advantage over their ecological competitors. The use of secreted killer toxins by yeast cells through acquiring double-stranded RNA viruses is one such prominent example. Although the killer behaviour has been well studied in laboratory yeast strains, our knowledge regarding how killer viruses are spread and maintained in nature and how yeast cells co-evolve with viruses remains limited. We investigated these issues using a panel of 81 yeast populations belonging to three Saccharomyces sensu stricto species isolated from diverse ecological niches and geographic locations. We found that killer strains are rare among all three species. In contrast, killer toxin resistance is widespread in Saccharomyces paradoxus populations, but not in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Saccharomyces eubayanus populations. Genetic analyses revealed that toxin resistance in S. paradoxus is often caused by dominant alleles that have independently evolved in different populations. Molecular typing identified one M28 and two types of M1 killer viruses in those killer strains. We further showed that killer viruses of the same type could lead to distinct killer phenotypes under different host backgrounds, suggesting co-evolution between the viruses and hosts in different populations. Taken together, our data suggest that killer viruses vary in their evolutionary histories even within closely related yeast species.

  14. Incidence of symbiotic dsRNA 'killer' viruses in wild and domesticated yeast.

    PubMed

    Pieczynska, Magdalena D; de Visser, J Arjan G M; Korona, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Viruses are found in almost all organisms and physical habitats. One interesting example is the yeast viral 'killer system'. The virus provides the host with a toxin directed against strains that do not carry it, while the yeast cell enables its propagation. Although yeast viruses are believed to be common, they have been actually described only for a limited number of yeast isolates. We surveyed 136 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus strains of known origin and phylogenetic relatedness. Of these, 14 (c. 10%) were infected by killer viruses of one of the three types: K1, K2 or K28. As many as 34 strains (c. 25%) were not sensitive to at least one type of the killer toxin. In most cases, resistance did not disappear after attempts to cure the host strains from their viruses, suggesting that it was encoded in the host's genome. In terms of phylogeny, killer strains appear to be more related to each other than to nonkiller ones. No such tendency is observed for the phenotype of toxin resistance. Our results suggest that even if the killer toxins are not always present, they do play significant role in yeast ecology and evolution.

  15. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation.

  16. Optimization of killer assays for yeast selection protocols.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C A; Sangorrín, M P

    2010-01-01

    A new optimized semiquantitative yeast killer assay is reported for the first time. The killer activity of 36 yeast isolates belonging to three species, namely, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Wickerhamomyces anomala and Torulaspora delbrueckii, was tested with a view to potentially using these yeasts as biocontrol agents against the wine spoilage species Pichia guilliermondii and Pichia membranifaciens. The effectiveness of the classical streak-based (qualitative method) and the new semiquantitative techniques was compared. The percentage of yeasts showing killer activity was found to be higher by the semiquantitative technique (60%) than by the qualitative method (45%). In all cases, the addition of 1% NaCl into the medium allowed a better observation of the killer phenomenon. Important differences were observed in the killer capacity of different isolates belonging to a same killer species. The broadest spectrum of action was detected in isolates of W. anomala NPCC 1023 and 1025, and M. pulcherrima NPCC 1009 and 1013. We also brought experimental evidence supporting the importance of the adequate selection of the sensitive isolate to be used in killer evaluation. The new semiquantitative method proposed in this work enables to visualize the relationship between the number of yeasts tested and the growth of the inhibition halo (specific productivity). Hence, this experimental approach could become an interesting tool to be taken into account for killer yeast selection protocols.

  17. Killer phenotype of indigenous yeasts isolated from Argentinian wine cellars and their potential starter cultures for winemaking.

    PubMed

    de Ullivarri, Miguel Fernández; Mendoza, Lucía M; Raya, Raúl R; Farías, Marta E

    2011-11-01

    Of 31 yeasts, from different surfaces of two cellars from the northwest region of Argentina, 11 expressed killer activity against the sensitive strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae P351. Five of these killer yeasts were identified as S. cerevisiae by phenotypic tests and PCR-RFLP analysis. Two S. cerevisiae killer strains, Cf5 and Cf8, were selected based on their excellent kinetic and enological properties as potential autochthonous mixed starter cultures to be used during wine fermentation. They could dominate the natural microbiota in fermentation vats and keep the typical sensorial characteristics of the wine of this region.

  18. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons.

    PubMed

    Perez, María Florencia; Contreras, Luciana; Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry.

  19. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry. PMID:27792761

  20. Killer activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: partial characterization and strategies to improve the biocontrol efficacy in winemaking.

    PubMed

    de Ullivarri, Miguel Fernández; Mendoza, Lucía M; Raya, Raúl R

    2014-11-01

    Killer yeasts are considered potential biocontrol agents to avoid or reduce wine spoilage by undesirable species. In this study two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (Cf8 and M12) producing killer toxin were partially characterized and new strategies to improve their activity in winemaking were evaluated. Killer toxins were characterized by biochemical tests and growth inhibition of sensitive yeasts. Also genes encoding killer toxin were detected in the chromosomes of both strains by PCR. Both toxins showed optimal activity and production at conditions used during the wine-making process (pH 3.5 and temperatures of 15-25 °C). In addition, production of both toxins was higher when a nitrogen source was added. To improve killer activity different strategies of inoculation were studied, with the sequential inoculation of killer strains the best combination to control the growth of undesired yeasts. Sequential inoculation of Cf8-M12 showed a 45 % increase of killer activity on sensitive S. cerevisiae and spoilage yeasts. In the presence of ethanol (5-12 %) and SO2 (50 mg/L) the killer activity of both toxins was increased, especially for toxin Cf8. Characteristics of both killer strains support their future application as starter cultures and biocontrol agents to produce wines of controlled quality.

  1. TdKT, a new killer toxin produced by Torulaspora delbrueckii effective against wine spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Villalba, María Leticia; Susana Sáez, Julieta; Del Monaco, Silvana; Lopes, Christian Ariel; Sangorrín, Marcela Paula

    2016-01-18

    Microbiological spoilage is a major concern throughout the wine industry, and control tools are limited. This paper addresses the identification and partial characterization of a new killer toxin from Torulaspora delbrueckii with potential biocontrol activity of Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica and Pichia membranifaciens wine spoilage. A panel of 18 different wine strains of T. delbrueckii killer yeasts was analysed, and the strain T. delbrueckii NPCC 1033 (TdKT producer) showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of all different spoilage yeasts evaluated. The TdKT toxin was then subjected to a partial biochemical characterization. Its estimated molecular weight was N30 kDa and it showed glucanase and chitinase enzymatic activities. The killer activity was stable between pH 4.2 and 4.8 and inactivated at temperature above 40 °C. Pustulan and chitin — but not other cell wall polysaccharides — prevented sensitive yeast cells from being killed by TdKT, suggesting that those may be the first toxin targets in the cell wall. TdKT provoked an increase in necrosis cell death after 3 h treatment and apoptotic cell death after 24 h showing time dependence in its mechanisms of action. Killer toxin extracts were active at oenological conditions, confirming their potential use as a biocontrol tool in winemaking.

  2. Williopsis saturnus yeast killer toxin does not kill Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ochigava, Irma; Collier, Phillip J; Walker, Graeme M; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human bacterial pathogen, and the increase in antibiotic resistance demands the development of new antimicrobial compounds. Several reports have suggested that yeast killer toxins show activity against bacteria and we therefore investigated the activity of K9 killer toxin from the yeast Williopsis saturnus var. mrakii NCYC 500 against S. pneumoniae. However, no inhibition of bacterial growth was observed with concentrated K9 preparations in agar diffusion assays and in liquid culture. Although cell morphology was slightly affected by K9 treatment, no effect on cellular viability was detectable, and K9 had no stimulatory effect on cell lysis induced by β-lactams or Triton X-100. This indicated that K9 did not contribute to cell wall damage. Moreover, flow cytometry was used as a sensitive assessment of integrity of cells exposed to killer toxin. No significant damage of S. pneumoniae cells was evident, although minor changes in fluorescence suggested that K9 killer toxin may interact with bacterial surface components.

  3. Characterization, Ecological Distribution, and Population Dynamics of Saccharomyces Sensu Stricto Killer Yeasts in the Spontaneous Grape Must Fermentations of Southwestern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Maqueda, Matilde; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L.

    2012-01-01

    Killer yeasts secrete protein toxins that are lethal to sensitive strains of the same or related yeast species. Among the four types of Saccharomyces killer yeasts already described (K1, K2, K28, and Klus), we found K2 and Klus killer yeasts in spontaneous wine fermentations from southwestern Spain. Both phenotypes were encoded by medium-size double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses, Saccharomyces cerevisiae virus (ScV)-M2 and ScV-Mlus, whose genome sizes ranged from 1.3 to 1.75 kb and from 2.1 to 2.3 kb, respectively. The K2 yeasts were found in all the wine-producing subareas for all the vintages analyzed, while the Klus yeasts were found in the warmer subareas and mostly in the warmer ripening/harvest seasons. The middle-size isotypes of the M2 dsRNA were the most frequent among K2 yeasts, probably because they encoded the most intense K2 killer phenotype. However, the smallest isotype of the Mlus dsRNA was the most frequent for Klus yeasts, although it encoded the least intense Klus killer phenotype. The killer yeasts were present in most (59.5%) spontaneous fermentations. Most were K2, with Klus being the minority. The proportion of killer yeasts increased during fermentation, while the proportion of sensitive yeasts decreased. The fermentation speed, malic acid, and wine organoleptic quality decreased in those fermentations where the killer yeasts replaced at least 15% of a dominant population of sensitive yeasts, while volatile acidity and lactic acid increased, and the amount of bacteria in the tumultuous and the end fermentation stages also increased in an unusual way. PMID:22101056

  4. Characterization, ecological distribution, and population dynamics of Saccharomyces sensu stricto killer yeasts in the spontaneous grape must fermentations of southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Maqueda, Matilde; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Killer yeasts secrete protein toxins that are lethal to sensitive strains of the same or related yeast species. Among the four types of Saccharomyces killer yeasts already described (K1, K2, K28, and Klus), we found K2 and Klus killer yeasts in spontaneous wine fermentations from southwestern Spain. Both phenotypes were encoded by medium-size double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses, Saccharomyces cerevisiae virus (ScV)-M2 and ScV-Mlus, whose genome sizes ranged from 1.3 to 1.75 kb and from 2.1 to 2.3 kb, respectively. The K2 yeasts were found in all the wine-producing subareas for all the vintages analyzed, while the Klus yeasts were found in the warmer subareas and mostly in the warmer ripening/harvest seasons. The middle-size isotypes of the M2 dsRNA were the most frequent among K2 yeasts, probably because they encoded the most intense K2 killer phenotype. However, the smallest isotype of the Mlus dsRNA was the most frequent for Klus yeasts, although it encoded the least intense Klus killer phenotype. The killer yeasts were present in most (59.5%) spontaneous fermentations. Most were K2, with Klus being the minority. The proportion of killer yeasts increased during fermentation, while the proportion of sensitive yeasts decreased. The fermentation speed, malic acid, and wine organoleptic quality decreased in those fermentations where the killer yeasts replaced at least 15% of a dominant population of sensitive yeasts, while volatile acidity and lactic acid increased, and the amount of bacteria in the tumultuous and the end fermentation stages also increased in an unusual way.

  5. A Wickerhamomyces anomalus Killer Strain in the Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Valzano, Matteo; Damiani, Claudia; Epis, Sara; Gabrielli, Maria Gabriella; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano; Bandi, Claudio; Favia, Guido; Ricci, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus has been investigated for several years for its wide biotechnological potential, especially for applications in the food industry. Specifically, the antimicrobial activity of this yeast, associated with the production of Killer Toxins (KTs), has attracted a great deal of attention. The strains of W. anomalus able to produce KTs, called “killer” yeasts, have been shown to be highly competitive in the environment. Different W. anomalus strains have been isolated from diverse habitats and recently even from insects. In the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi these yeasts have been detected in the midgut and gonads. Here we show that the strain of W. anomalus isolated from An. stephensi, namely WaF17.12, is a killer yeast able to produce a KT in a cell-free medium (in vitro) as well as in the mosquito body (in vivo). We showed a constant production of WaF17.12-KT over time, after stimulation of toxin secretion in yeast cultures and reintroduction of the activated cells into the mosquito through the diet. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of WaF17.12-KT has been demonstrated in vitro against sensitive microbes, showing that strain WaF17.12 releases a functional toxin. The mosquito-associated yeast WaF17.12 thus possesses an antimicrobial activity, which makes this yeast worthy of further investigations, in view of its potential as an agent for the symbiotic control of malaria. PMID:24788884

  6. Killer system: a simple method for differentiating Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, L; Archibusacci, C; Sestito, M; Morace, G

    1983-01-01

    The killer effect of 37 species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Hansenula, Pichia, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon on 100 Candida albicans isolates of human and animal origin was studied. All of the C. albicans cultures were sensitive to one or more killer yeasts. The factors affecting the killer phenomenon on C. albicans were investigated for realizing a simple system for the differentiation of the 100 C. albicans isolates. By using this system, it was possible to differentiate up to 512 isolates of C. albicans according to their susceptibility to the killer effect of nine selected killer yeasts. The use of this method as an epidemiological marker in the case of presumptive nosocomial infections due to C. albicans is also reported. Images PMID:6345575

  7. TpBGL2 codes for a Tetrapisispora phaffii killer toxin active against wine spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oro, Lucia; Zara, Severino; Fancellu, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Ciani, Maurizio; Comitini, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Tetrapisispora phaffii produces a killer toxin known as Kpkt that has extensive anti-Hanseniaspora/Kloeckera activity under winemaking conditions. Kpkt has a β-glucanase activity and induces ultrastructural modifications in the cell wall of sensitive strains, with a higher specific cytocidal activity and a selective action towards target yeast cells. In this study, a two-step PCR-based approach was used to isolate the gene coding β-glucanase of T. phaffii. Initially, a fragment of the open reading frame was isolated by degenerate PCR, with primers designed on the NH2 -terminal sequence of the protein and on conserved motifs of Bgl2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. Subsequently, the entire sequence of the gene was obtained by inverse PCR. blast analyses of TpBGL2 highlight high identity with homologous genes in other yeast species, in which TpBGL2p shows no killer activity. However, gene disruption resulted in complete loss of the glucanase activity and the killer phenotype, thus confirming that TpBgl2p has a killer activity.

  8. Biotyping of Candida albicans and other fungi by yeast killer toxins sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Conti, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Intraspecific differentiation of pathogenic microorganisms is a major need in epidemiological studies concerning the source and spread of infections. This requirement is paramount for those etiologic agents of infectious diseases, which are mainly grouped into one species within the genus, such as Candida albicans. Ideally, laboratory methods for biotyping purposes should be sensitive, reproducible, easy, and economical to perform. In addition, the methods should be flexible in their application to taxonomically unrelated pathogens. We have shown that the toxins produced by a selected panel of killer yeasts, each characterized by a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, may be used to discriminate strains belonging to the species of the genus Candida and to other species of eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogenic microorganisms. The "yeast killer system," which may be sharply increased in sensitivity by addition of further standardized killer yeasts, has proven to be of value in the resolution of many cases of clinical and nosocomial fungal infections. Owing to its reliability, economy, and versatility, this phenotypic system can be used as an alternative biotyping method in laboratories lacking the financial and training resources necessary to perform more sophisticated and expensive molecular approaches.

  9. Killer toxin for sake yeast: properties and effects of adenosine 5'-diphosphate and calcium ion on killing action.

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, H; Shinmyo, A; Enatsu, T

    1977-01-01

    The killer character of strain isolated from the main mash of sake brewing which produces a killer substance for sake yeast was transmitted to hybrids of the strain and a standard strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a cytoplasmic determinant. The character was eliminated at 41 degrees C by incubation followed by growth at 30 degrees C. The killer strain produced the killer toxin in a growth-associated manner. A preparation of crude killer toxin extract showed first-order inactivation and a linear Arrhenius plot between 25 and 40 degrees C, with an activation of energy of 55.0 kcal/mol. Addition of 1% of synthetic polymer protected the toxin from inactivation by agitation but not by heat. Enhancement of the killer action toward sensitive yeast cells by only the nucleotide adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was observed after plating on agar medium as well as after incubation in liquid medium. The addition of CaCl2 reversed the enhancing effect of ADP on killing activity. This action of CaCl2 was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting that protein synthesis is required for recovery of toxin-induced cells in the presence of CaCl2. Further, CaCl2 overcame the decrease in the intracellular level of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) enhanced by ADP in killer-treated cells and also inhibited leakage of ATP from the cells with immediate response. The mode of killing action is discussed in terms of a transient state of the cells and the action of ADP and CaCl2. PMID:14107

  10. Characterization of novel killer toxins secreted by wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeasts and their action on Brettanomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Mehlomakulu, Ngwekazi N; Setati, Mathabatha E; Divol, Benoit

    2014-10-01

    Wine spoilage associated with Brettanomyces bruxellensis is a major concern for winemakers. An effective and reliable method to control the proliferation of this yeast is therefore of utmost importance. To achieve this purpose, sulphur dioxide (SO2) is commonly employed but the efficiency of this chemical compound is subject to wine composition and it can elicit allergic reactions in some consumers. Biological alternatives are therefore actively sought. The current study focused on identifying and characterizing killer toxins which are antimicrobial compounds that show potential in inhibiting B. bruxellensis in wine. Two killer toxins, CpKT1 and CpKT2, from the wine isolated yeast Candida pyralidae were identified and partially characterized. The two proteins had a molecular mass above 50kDa and exhibited killer activity against several B. bruxellensis strains especially in grape juice. They were active and stable at pH3.5-4.5, and temperatures between 15 and 25°C which are compatible with winemaking conditions. Furthermore, the activity of these killer toxins was not affected by the ethanol and sugar concentrations typically found in grape juice and wine. In addition, these killer toxins inhibited neither the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nor the lactic acid bacteria strains tested. These preliminary results indicated that the application of these toxins will have no effect on the main microbial agents that drive alcoholic and malolactic fermentations and further highlight the potential of using these toxins as agents to control the development of B. bruxellensis in grape juice or wine.

  11. Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, Manuel; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine.

  12. Efficacy of killer yeasts in the biological control of Penicillium digitatum on Tarocco orange fruits (Citrus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Platania, Claudia; Restuccia, Cristina; Muccilli, Serena; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2012-05-01

    Killer Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus yeast strains were tested as biocontrol agents against Penicillium digitatum, one the most important causes of postharvest decay in orange fruits. W. anomalus, grown on acidified medium, demonstrated micocinogenic activity against P. digitatum, as indicated by large inhibition halos and hyphal damage resulting from β-glucanase activity. Oranges that had been deliberately inoculated with pathogens were protected from decay by W. anomalus. Inoculation of oranges with W. anomalus strains BS 91 and BS 92 reduced disease severity to 1 and 4%, respectively, for up to 10 days in storage.

  13. Hsp12p and PAU genes are involved in ecological interactions between natural yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Damaríz; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Baruffini, Enrico; Bergerat, Agnes; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of different yeasts in a single vineyard raises the question on how they communicate and why slow growers are not competed out. Genetically modified laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are extensively used to investigate ecological interactions, but little is known about the genes regulating cooperation and competition in ecologically relevant settings. Here, we present evidences of Hsp12p-dependent altruistic and contact-dependent competitive interactions between two natural yeast isolates. Hsp12p is released during cell death for public benefit by a fast-growing strain that also produces a killer toxin to inhibit growth of a slow grower that can enjoy the benefits of released Hsp12p. We also show that the protein Pau5p is essential in the defense against the killer effect. Our results demonstrate that the combined action of Hsp12p, Pau5p and a killer toxin is sufficient to steer a yeast community.

  14. An extranuclear expression system for analysis of cytoplasmic promoters of yeast linear killer plasmids.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Meinhardt, F

    1995-03-01

    Based on the cytoplasmically localized killer plasmids pGKL1 and pGKL2 of Kluyveromyces lactis two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed which consist of pGKL1, into which in addition to the previously developed cytoplasmically expressible LEU2* selectable marker a glucose dehydrogenase-encoding bacterial gene (gdh A) has been integrated. One of the hybrid plasmids carries the bacterial gene preceded by an arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter (upstream conserved sequence) in front of the coding region (pRKL121). The other plasmid was constructed in such a way that the ATG start codon of the gdh A gene was fused in frame to the ATG start codon of the killer plasmid's open reading frame 5 (pRKL122). The structures of both linear hybrid plasmids were confirmed by restriction analysis, Southern hybridization, and sequencing of the junction sites. Yeast strains carrying either of the plasmids expressed the glucose dehydrogenase gene; however, expression of the in phase fused gene was 40-fold higher compared to the arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter. In general, an in phase fusion was not required for expression, but efficiency is dramatically enhanced when the 5' noncoding sequences in front of the heterologous genes are the same as those found on the native killer plasmids. The developed system can serve as a reporter for determining the efficiency of the different cytoplasmic promoters present on both linear plasmids. Hybrid plasmids were stably maintained without selective pressure in K. lactis and they were transferred and expressed also in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. The influence of Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast on the fermentation and chemical composition of apple wines.

    PubMed

    Satora, Pawel; Tarko, Tomasz; Sroka, Pawel; Blaszczyk, Urszula

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of two different Wickerhamomyces anomalus strains, CBS 1982 and CBS 5759, on the chemical composition and sensory characteristics of Gloster apple wines. They were inoculated into unpasteurized as well as pasteurized apple musts together with a S. cerevisiae strain as a mixed culture. Fermentation kinetics, basic enological parameters, antioxidant properties as well as selected polyphenol, volatile compound, and organic acid contents were analyzed during the experiments. Apple wines obtained after spontaneous fermentation were characterized by high volatile acidity, increased concentrations of acetaldehyde, and volatile esters, as well as the lowest amounts of ethyl alcohol and higher alcohols compared with other samples. Addition of 0.05 g L(-1) W. anomalus killer strains to the unpasteurized must significantly changed the fermentation kinetics and chemical composition of apple wines. The value of volatile acidity was highly decreased, while the amount of higher alcohols and titratable acidity increased. Pasteurization of must improved the fermentation efficiency. Higher amounts of polyphenol compounds and lower amounts of malic acid were also detected. Application of W. anomalus strains together with S. cerevisiae yeast as a mixed culture positively influenced the chemical composition and sensory features of produced apple wines.

  16. Discrimination between Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Species of the Genus Candida by Their Differential Sensitivities to Toxins of a Panel of Killer Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Buzzini, P.; Martini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The differential sensitivities to toxins produced by a short panel of four killer yeasts allowed discrimination between 91 strains of the yeast Candida albicans and 223 non-C. albicans Candida strains. One hundred percent of C. albicans isolates exhibited negative results to the toxin panel, while 100% of non-C. albicans cultures gave well-defined and reproducible positive results to at least one of the four killer toxins. Among C. albicans strains only 96 and 87% gave germ tube (GT)- and chlamydospore-positive results, respectively. In addition a few GT-false-positive strains were detected among non-C. albicans isolates. Susceptibility to the toxin panel is apparently expressed more consistently than either GT or chlamydospore production and may constitute a promising basis for a new simple and easy-to-use procedure for routine discrimination between the species C. albicans and other species of the genus Candida. PMID:11526179

  17. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L; Hernández, Luis M; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii-dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odor descriptors, including those with the greatest odor activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate), were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii-dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odors. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S. cerevisiae.

  18. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L.; Hernández, Luis M.; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odor descriptors, including those with the greatest odor activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate), were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae–dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odors. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S. cerevisiae. PMID

  19. Structure and expression of the M2 genomic segment of a type 2 killer virus of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Hannig, E M; Leibowitz, M J

    1985-01-01

    The M2 double-stranded (ds) RNA species encodes toxin and resistance functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with the K2 killer specificity. RNA sequence analysis reveals the presence of a large open reading frame on the larger heat-cleavage product of M2 dsRNA, which is translated in vitro to yield a 28 kd polypeptide as a major product. The postulated translation initiator AUG triplet is located within a stem and loop structure near the 5' terminus of the positive strand, which also contains plausible 18S and 5.8S ribosomal RNA binding sites. These features may serve to regulate the translation of the K2 toxin precursor. The M1 (from type 1 yeast killers) and M2 dsRNA species lack extensive sequence homology, although specific features are shared, which may represent structural elements required for gene expression and replication. Images PMID:3892487

  20. Postharvest biocontrol ability of killer yeasts against Monilinia fructigena and Monilinia fructicola on stone fruit.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    The antagonistic effects of Debaryomyces hansenii KI2a, D. hansenii MI1a and Wickerhamomyces anomalus BS91 were tested against Monilinia fructigena and Monilinia fructicola in in vitro and in vivo trials. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species, strain and pathogen. D hansenii KI2a and W. anomalus BS91 showed the highest biocontrol activity in vitro; the production of hydrolytic enzymes, killer toxins and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were hypothesized as their main mechanisms of action against pathogens. D hansenii KI2a and W. anomalus BS91 significantly reduced brown rot incidence and severity on peach and plum fruits artificially inoculated with M. fructigena and M. fructicola, especially when applied 24 h before pathogen inoculation. On the opposite, D. hansenii MI1a exhibited weak antagonistic activity towards M. fructigena on peach and plum fruits and was ineffective against M. fructicola. The noticeable ability of W. anomalus BS91 to control brown rot could be also correlated with its high capacity to colonize the wound tissue and to increase its population density. Accordingly, the antagonistic strains of D. hansenii and W. anomalus could be proposed as active ingredients for the development of biofungicides against Monilinia species that are responsible for considerable economic losses in stone fruit crops.

  1. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  2. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  3. Therapeutic potential of yeast killer toxin-like antibodies and mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Salati, Antonella; Vaccari, Simona; Ravanetti, Lara; Maffei, Domenico L; Polonelli, Luciano

    2004-10-01

    This review focuses on the potential of yeast killer toxin (KT)-like antibodies (KTAbs), that mimic a wide-spectrum KT through interaction with specific cell wall receptors (KTR) and their molecular derivatives (killer mimotopes), as putative new tools for transdisease anti-infective therapy. KTAbs are produced during the course of experimental and natural infections caused by KTR-bearing micro-organisms. They have been produced by idiotypic vaccination with a KT-neutralizing mAb, also in their monoclonal and recombinant formats. KTAbs and KTAbs-derived mimotopes may exert a strong therapeutic activity against mucosal and systemic infections caused by eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogenic agents, thus representing new potential wide-spectrum antibiotics.

  4. Technological properties of indigenous wine yeast strains isolated from wine production regions of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bağder Elmacı, Simel; Özçelik, Filiz; Tokatlı, Mehmet; Çakır, İbrahim

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the important technological and fermentative properties of wine yeast strains previously isolated from different wine producing regions of Turkey. The determination of the following important properties was made: growth at high temperatures; fermentative capability in the presence of high sugar concentration; fermentation rate; hydrogen sulfide production; killer activity; resistance to high ethanol and sulfur dioxide; foam production; and enzymatic profiles. Ten local wine yeast strains belonging to Saccharomyces, and one commercial active dry yeast as a reference strain were evaluated. Fermentation characteristics were evaluated in terms of kinetic parameters, including ethanol yield (YP/S), biomass yield (YX/S), theoretical ethanol yield (%), specific ethanol production rate (qp; g/gh), specific glucose uptake rate (qs; g/gh), and the substrate conversion (%). All tested strains were able to grow at 37 °C and to start fermentation at 30° Brix, and were resistant to high concentrations of sulfur dioxide. 60 % of the strains were weak H2S producers, while the others produced high levels. Foam production was high, and no strains had killer activity. Six of the tested strains had the ability to grow and ferment at concentrations of 14 % ethanol. Except for one strain, all fermented most of the media sugars at a high rate, producing 11.0-12.4 % (v/v) ethanol. Although all but one strain had suitable characteristics for wine production, they possessed poor activities of glycosidase, esterase and proteinase enzymes of oenological interest. Nine of the ten local yeast strains were selected for their good oenological properties and their suitability as a wine starter culture.

  5. Inhibition by yeast killer toxin-like antibodies of oral Streptococci adhesion to tooth surfaces in an ex vivo model.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Arseni, Simona; Frazzi, Raffaele; Salati, Antonella; Ravanetti, Lara; Polonelli, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monoclonal (KTmAb) and recombinant (KTscFv) anti-idiotypic antibodies, representing the internal image of a yeast killer toxin, proved to be microbicidal in vitro against important eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogens such as Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, S. haemolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, including multidrug-resistant strains. KTmAb and KTscFv exerted a strong therapeutic effect in well-established animal models of candidiasis and pneumocystosis. Streptococcus mutans is the most important etiologic agent of dental caries that might result from the metabolic end products of dental plaque. Effective strategies to reduce the disease potential of dental plaque have considered the possibility of using antibiotics or antibodies against oral streptococci in general and S. mutans in particular. In this study, the activity of KTmAb and KTscFv against S. mutans and the inhibition and reduction by KTmAb of dental colonization by S. mutans and other oral streptococci in an ex vivo model of human teeth were investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: KTscFv and KTmAb were used in a conventional colony forming unit (CFU) assay against a serotype C strain of S. mutans, and other oral streptococci (S. intermedius, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius). An ex vivo model of human teeth submerged in saliva was used to establish KTmAb potential of inhibiting or reducing the adhesion to dental surfaces by S. mutans and other oral streptococci. RESULTS: KTmAb and KTscFv kill in vitro S. mutans and other oral streptococci. KTmAb inhibit colonization of dental surfaces by S. mutans and oral streptococci in the ex vivo model. CONCLUSIONS: Killer antibodies with antibiotic activity or their engineered derivatives may have a potential in the prevention of dental caries in vivo. PMID:12428062

  6. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  7. Localization of genes for the double-stranded RNA killer virus of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J D; Leibowitz, M J

    1982-01-01

    The M double-stranded RNA (ds RNA) genome segment of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of yeast codes for two polypeptides when denatured and translated in vitro: a previously known 32,000-dalton peptide and a newly discovered 19,000-dalton peptide (NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). An internal 190-base-pair region of the ds RNA is selectively degraded by S1 nuclease treatment at 65 degrees C, resulting in two ds RNA fragments which contain the termini of the original ds RNA. The larger fragment codes for the 32,000-dalton polypeptide and the smaller fragment codes for the 19,000-dalton polypeptide. Thus, the two gene products of M are encoded by distinct regions of this ds RNA. Images PMID:7038685

  8. Inventions on baker's yeast strains and specialty ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Baker's yeast is one of the oldest food microbial starters. Between 1927 and 2008, 165 inventions on more than 337 baker's yeast strains were patented. The first generation of patented yeast strains claimed improved biomass yield at the yeast plant, higher gassing power in dough or better survival to drying to prepare active dry baker's yeast. Especially between 1980 and 1995, a major interest was given to strains for multiple bakery applications such as dough with variable sugar content and stored at refrigeration (cold) or freezing temperatures. During the same period, genetically engineered yeast strains became very popular but did not find applications in the baking industry. Since year 2000, patented baker's yeast strains claimed aroma, anti-moulding or nutritive properties to better meet the needs of the baking industry. In addition to patents on yeast strains, 47 patents were issued on baker's yeast specialty ingredients for niche markets. This review shows that patents on baker's yeast with improved characteristics such as aromatic or nutritive properties have regularly been issued since the 1920's. Overall, it also confirms recent interest for a very wide range of tailored-made yeast-based ingredients for bakery applications.

  9. Isolation and characterization of ethanol tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Chiranjeevi; Osuru, Hari Prasad; Atluri, Navya; Raghavulu, Praveen Chakravarthi Veera; yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Mannur, Ismail Shaik; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Aluru, Sudheer; K, Narasimha Varma; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains are commonly associated with sugar rich environments. Various fruit samples were selected as source for isolating yeast cells. The isolated cultures were identified at Genus level by colony morphology, biochemical characteristics and cell morphological characters. An attempt has been made to check the viability of yeast cells under different concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol tolerance of each strain was studied by allowing the yeast to grow in liquid YEPD (Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose) medium having different concentrations of ethanol. A total of fifteen yeast strains isolated from different samples were used for the study. Seven strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from different fruit sources were screened for ethanol tolerance. The results obtained in this study show a range of tolerance levels between 7%-12% in all the stains. Further, the cluster analysis based on 22 RAPD (Random Amplified polymorphic DNA) bands revealed polymorphisms in these seven Saccharomyces strains. PMID:23750092

  10. A new wine Torulaspora delbrueckii killer strain with broad antifungal activity and its toxin-encoding double-stranded RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; Maqueda, Matilde; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Ribas, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Wine Torulaspora delbrueckii strains producing a new killer toxin (Kbarr-1) were isolated and selected for wine making. They killed all the previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains, in addition to other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The Kbarr-1 phenotype is encoded by a medium-size 1.7 kb dsRNA, TdV-Mbarr-1, which seems to depend on a large-size 4.6 kb dsRNA virus (TdV-LAbarr) for stable maintenance and replication. The TdV-Mbarr-1 dsRNA was sequenced by new generation sequencing techniques. Its genome structure is similar to those of S. cerevisiae killer M dsRNAs, with a 5′-end coding region followed by an internal A-rich sequence and a 3′-end non-coding region. Mbarr-1 RNA positive strand carries cis acting signals at its 5′ and 3′ termini for transcription and replication respectively, similar to those RNAs of yeast killer viruses. The ORF at the 5′ region codes for a putative preprotoxin with an N-terminal secretion signal, potential Kex2p/Kexlp processing sites, and N-glycosylation sites. No relevant sequence identity was found either between the full sequence of Mbarr-1 dsRNA and other yeast M dsRNAs, or between their respective toxin-encoded proteins. However, a relevant identity of TdV-Mbarr-1 RNA regions to the putative replication and packaging signals of most of the M-virus RNAs suggests that they are all evolutionarily related. PMID:26441913

  11. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Fellenberg, Kurt; Gil, Rosario; Bastuck, Sonja; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 and the standard laboratory background in S288c. Our analysis shows that even under normal conditions, logarithmic growth in YPD medium, the two strains have expression patterns that differ significantly in more than 40 genes. Subsequent studies indicated that these differences correlate with small changes in promoter regions or variations in gene copy number. Blotting copy numbers vs. transcript levels produced patterns, which were specific for the individual strains and could be used for a characterization of unknown samples. PMID:18628902

  12. A Simple and Reliable Method for Hybridization of Homothallic Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Peréz, Francisco; Regodón, José A.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the hybridization and improvement of homothallic industrial wine yeasts. Killer cycloheximide-sensitive strains were crossed with killer-sensitive cycloheximide-resistant strains to get killer cycloheximide-resistant hybrids, thereby enabling hybrid selection and identification. This procedure also allows backcrossing of spore colonies from the hybrids with parental strains. PMID:9835605

  13. Biodiversity of brewery yeast strains and their fermentative activities.

    PubMed

    Berlowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Rajkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the genetic, biochemical, fermentative and physiological characteristics of brewery yeast strains and performed a hierarchical cluster analysis to evaluate their similarity. We used five different ale and lager yeast strains, originating from different European breweries and deposited at the National Collection of Yeast Cultures (UK). Ale and lager strains exhibited different genomic properties, but their assimilation profiles and pyruvate decarboxylase activities corresponded to their species classifications. The activity of another enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase, varied between different brewing strains. Our results confirmed that ATP and glycogen content, and the activity of the key metabolic enzymes succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase, may be good general indicators of cell viability. However, the genetic properties, physiology and fermentation capacity of different brewery yeasts are unique to individual strains.

  14. Using Microsatellites to Identify Yeast Strains in Beer

    PubMed Central

    Bruke, Alexandria; Van Brocklin, Jennifer; Rivest, Jason; Prenni, Jessica E.; Ibrahim, Hend

    2012-01-01

    Yeast is an integral part of the brewing process and is responsible for much of the taste and characteristics of beer. During the brewing process, yeast is subject to ageing and stress factors that can result in growth inhibition, decreased genetic stability, and changes in cell membrane stability. Characterization of yeast species used in industrial fermentation (e.g. S. cerevisiae) is of great importance to the brewing industry. The objective of this study was to develop an assay to identify yeast strains commonly used in the production of beer. Six microsatellite regions of DNA (comprised of AAT) were used as sequence tagged site markers (STR) to identify and compare yeast samples and to determine strain within a species. Labeled primers ScATT (1-6) targeting these six microsatellite regions were designed using 6-FAM, VIC, NED and PET 5′-fluorescent labels. The six regions were amplified, in a single reaction, from extracted yeast genomic DNA using a modified multiplex-PCR protocol and the labeled PCR products were analyzed on an ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer. Using this approach 6 STR markers were amplified in a single multiplex reaction from a commercially utilized yeast strain provided by Odell Brewing. Different alleles were distinguished based on the size of each STR and the labeling fluorophore. The procedures developed in this study will provide an invaluable tool for the quality control of yeast strains in the brewing industry.

  15. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Nicolino, Martina Picca; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as ‘global transcription machinery engineering’ (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity. PMID:24724938

  16. Differential growth inhibition as a tool to increase the discriminating power of killer toxin sensitivity in fingerprinting of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Buzzini, P; Martini, A

    2000-12-01

    A panel of 27 cell-free crude killer toxin preparations were used in fingerprinting 45 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 11 Saccharomyces exiguus strains. The differential sensitivity to different mycocins was evaluated both as binary data matrix (presence-absence of killing effect), and by considering the growth inhibition areas (measured by agar diffusion well bioassay). The first approach gave an individual fingerprinting of 68% of sensitive strains, whereas the second gave a total and reproducible (P<0.01) discrimination of all tested strains.

  17. Genetic Analysis of Haploids from Industrial Strains of Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Ouchi, K

    1989-07-01

    Strains of baker's yeast conventionally used by the baking industry in Japan were tested for the ability to sporulate and produce viable haploid spores. Three isolates which possessed the properties of baker's yeasts were obtained from single spores. Each strain was a haploid, and one of these strains, YOY34, was characterized. YOY34 fermented maltose and sucrose, but did not utilize galactose, unlike its parental strain. Genetic analysis showed that YOY34 carried two MAL genes, one functional and one cryptic; two SUC genes; and one defective gal gene. The genotype of YOY34 was identified as MATalpha MAL1 MAL3g SUC2 SUC4 gall. The MAL1 gene from this haploid was constitutively expressed, was dominant over other wild-type MAL tester genes, and gave a weak sucrose fermentation. YOY34 was suitable for both bakery products, like conventional baker's yeasts, and for genetic analysis, like laboratory strains.

  18. A laboratory yeast strain suitable for spirit production.

    PubMed

    Schehl, Beatus; Müller, Christine; Senn, Thomas; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2004-12-01

    Yeast strains of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae currently in use for the production of consumable alcohols such as beer, wine and spirits are genetically largely undefined. This prevents the use of standard genetic manipulations, such as crossings and tetrad analysis, for strain improvement. Furthermore, it complicates the application of the majority of modern methods developed in yeast molecular biology. Here we used two haploid laboratory strains with suitable auxotrophic markers for the construction of a genetically well defined, prototrophic diploid production strain. This strain was tested for its fermentative and sensory performances in comparison to commercially available yeasts. Three different fruit mashes (cherries, plums and pears) were fermented in a 90 kg scale. These were then subjected to distillation and used for the production of spirits with a final ethanol content of 40% (v/v). Fermentation parameters assayed included growth, sugar utilization, ethanol production and generation of volatile compounds, higher alcohols and glycerol. The spirits were also tested for their sensory performances and the data obtained statistically consolidated. Our results clearly demonstrate that this laboratory strain does not display any disadvantage compared with commercial yeasts in spirit production for any of the parameters tested, yet it offers the potential to apply both classical breeding and modern molecular genetic techniques for adjusting yeast physiology to special production schemes.

  19. A novel killer protein from Pichia kluyveri isolated from an Algerian soil: purification and characterization of its in vitro activity against food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Labbani, Fatima-Zohra Kenza; Turchetti, Benedetta; Bennamoun, Leila; Dakhmouche, Scheherazad; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Meraihi, Zahia; Buzzini, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    A novel killer protein (Pkkp) secreted by a Pichia kluyveri strain isolated from an Algerian soil was active against food and beverage spoilage yeasts of the genera Dekkera, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Wickerhamomyces and Zygosaccharomyces. After purification by gel filtration chromatography Pkkp revealed an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa with SDS-PAGE. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of purified Pkkp exhibited a high in vitro activity against Dekkera bruxellensis (MICs from 64,000- to 256,000-fold lower than that exhibited by potassium metabisulphite) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MICs from 32,000- to 64,000- fold lower than potassium sorbate). No in vitro synergistic interactions (calculated by FIC index - Σ FIC) were observed when Pkkp was used in combination with potassium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, or ethanol. Pkkp exhibited a dose-response effect against D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae in a low-alcoholic drink and fruit juice, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that Pkkp could be proposed as a novel food-grade compound useful for the control of food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

  20. Breeding an amylolytic yeast strain for alcoholic beverage production.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-Chung; Chang, Rei-Chu; Dent, Der-Feng; Hsieh, Pao-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    A starch-utilizing, yeast-like fusant was successfully created from fused protoplasts of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Monascus anka, and the feasibility of using this fusant as a new strain for alcoholic beverage development was reported. The new fusant utilized various carbon sources more efficiently than its parent cells did. Rice koji prepared separately by cultivating the fusant and its parental strains on rice was compared to explore the effect of yeast strain on the production of α-amylase, glucoamylase, and acid protease that are crucial in wine making using cereal grains. It was found that the fusant produced greater levels of the above-mentioned enzymes than its parental strain does. Consequently, the usage of this fusant in the alcoholic fermentation of polished rice was found to reduce approximately 50% consumption of added glucoamylase than when its parental strain was used. Besides, at the end of fermentation, the fusant yeast resulted in a mash with distribution of flavor components very different from that produced by its parental strains. Thus, the fusant can be used as a new yeast strain for creating novel alcoholic beverages.

  1. Genomics and Biochemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains.

    PubMed

    Eldarov, M A; Kishkovskaia, S A; Tanaschuk, T N; Mardanov, A V

    2016-12-01

    Saccharomyces yeasts have been used for millennia for the production of beer, wine, bread, and other fermented products. Long-term "unconscious" selection and domestication led to the selection of hundreds of strains with desired production traits having significant phenotypic and genetic differences from their wild ancestors. This review summarizes the results of recent research in deciphering the genomes of wine Saccharomyces strains, the use of comparative genomics methods to study the mechanisms of yeast genome evolution under conditions of artificial selection, and the use of genomic and postgenomic approaches to identify the molecular nature of the important characteristics of commercial wine strains of Saccharomyces. Succinctly, data concerning metagenomics of microbial communities of grapes and wine and the dynamics of yeast and bacterial flora in the course of winemaking is provided. A separate section is devoted to an overview of the physiological, genetic, and biochemical features of sherry yeast strains used to produce biologically aged wines. The goal of the review is to convince the reader of the efficacy of new genomic and postgenomic technologies as tools for developing strategies for targeted selection and creation of new strains using "classical" and modern techniques for improving winemaking technology.

  2. Screening wild yeast strains for alcohol fermentation from various fruits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Yu-Ri; Lee, So-Young; Park, Jong-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Kim, Jung-Wan

    2011-03-01

    Wild yeasts on the surface of various fruits including grapes were surveyed to obtain yeast strains suitable for fermenting a novel wine with higher alcohol content and supplemented with rice starch. We considered selected characteristics, such as tolerance to alcohol and osmotic pressure, capability of utilizing maltose, and starch hydrolysis. Among 637 putative yeast isolates, 115 strains exhibiting better growth in yeast-peptone-dextrose broth containing 30% dextrose, 7% alcohol, or 2% maltose were selected, as well as five α-amylase producers. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA gene classified the strains into 13 species belonging to five genera; Pichia anomala was the most prevalent (41.7%), followed by Wickerhamomyces anomalus (19.2%), P. guilliermondii (15%), Candida spp. (5.8%), Kodamaea ohmeri (2.5%), and Metschnikowia spp. (2.5%). All of the α-amylase producers were Aureobasidium pullulans. Only one isolate (NK28) was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NK28 had all of the desired properties for the purpose of this study, except α-amylase production, and fermented alcohol better than commercial wine yeasts.

  3. Screening Wild Yeast Strains for Alcohol Fermentation from Various Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Yu-Ri; Lee, So-Young; Park, Jong-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Wild yeasts on the surface of various fruits including grapes were surveyed to obtain yeast strains suitable for fermenting a novel wine with higher alcohol content and supplemented with rice starch. We considered selected characteristics, such as tolerance to alcohol and osmotic pressure, capability of utilizing maltose, and starch hydrolysis. Among 637 putative yeast isolates, 115 strains exhibiting better growth in yeast-peptone-dextrose broth containing 30% dextrose, 7% alcohol, or 2% maltose were selected, as well as five α-amylase producers. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA gene classified the strains into 13 species belonging to five genera; Pichia anomala was the most prevalent (41.7%), followed by Wickerhamomyces anomalus (19.2%), P. guilliermondii (15%), Candida spp. (5.8%), Kodamaea ohmeri (2.5%), and Metschnikowia spp. (2.5%). All of the α-amylase producers were Aureobasidium pullulans. Only one isolate (NK28) was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NK28 had all of the desired properties for the purpose of this study, except α-amylase production, and fermented alcohol better than commercial wine yeasts. PMID:22783070

  4. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  5. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a carotenoid producing yeast strain from a Patagonian high-altitude lake.

    PubMed

    Libkind, D; Brizzio, S; van Broock, M

    2004-01-01

    The red yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain CRUB 0138 (previously identified as R. lactosa) was isolated from a high-altitude Patagonian Lake Toncek (1700 m a.s.l.), and assigned with mucilaginosa species. Its biochemical, physiological and molecular features were assessed and compared to R. mucilaginosa PYCC 5166 type strain using a polyphasic approach; in addition, biomass and carotenoid pigment production at different C/N ratios were determined in an incubator shaker. Phenetic characterization by means of 70 current physiological tests including assimilation of aldaric acids and aromatic compounds, and also the ability to grow with amino acids as sole carbon sources, was carried out. According to numerical taxonomy calculations, similarity indexes between R. mucilaginosa CRUB 0138 and PYCC 5166 type strain were 0.86 and 0.77, corresponding to a complete set of physiological tests and MSP-PCR (Mini/Micro Satellite Primed PCR; (GTG)5, M13 and (GAC)5 primers were employed) fingerprinting. Killer activity against 2 native strains, Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae and R. mucilaginosa was detected. Maximum biomass-glucose conversion efficiency (87%) and maximum carotenoid yield (2.32 mg/L) were obtained at C/N = 5 in culture medium containing 10 and 40 g/L glucose, respectively. Different C/N ratios did not influence carotenoid pigment production but low C/N enhanced biomass yield.

  6. The Biology of Pichia membranifaciens Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Alonso, Alejandro; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2017-03-23

    The killer phenomenon is defined as the ability of some yeast to secrete toxins that are lethal to other sensitive yeasts and filamentous fungi. Since the discovery of strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of secreting killer toxins, much information has been gained regarding killer toxins and this fact has substantially contributed knowledge on fundamental aspects of cell biology and yeast genetics. The killer phenomenon has been studied in Pichia membranifaciens for several years, during which two toxins have been described. PMKT and PMKT2 are proteins of low molecular mass that bind to primary receptors located in the cell wall structure of sensitive yeast cells, linear (1→6)-β-d-glucans and mannoproteins for PMKT and PMKT2, respectively. Cwp2p also acts as a secondary receptor for PMKT. Killing of sensitive cells by PMKT is characterized by ionic movements across plasma membrane and an acidification of the intracellular pH triggering an activation of the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) pathway. On the contrary, our investigations showed a mechanism of killing in which cells are arrested at an early S-phase by high concentrations of PMKT2. However, we concluded that induced mortality at low PMKT2 doses and also PMKT is indeed of an apoptotic nature. Killer yeasts and their toxins have found potential applications in several fields: in food and beverage production, as biocontrol agents, in yeast bio-typing, and as novel antimycotic agents. Accordingly, several applications have been found for P. membranifaciens killer toxins, ranging from pre- and post-harvest biocontrol of plant pathogens to applications during wine fermentation and ageing (inhibition of Botrytis cinerea, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, etc.).

  7. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Cavalheiro, A.; Monteiro, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products) has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast. PMID:24516432

  8. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Cavalheiro, A; Monteiro, G

    2013-01-01

    The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products) has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast.

  9. Disruption of ubiquitin-related genes in laboratory yeast strains enhances ethanol production during sake brewing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Watanabe, Tomoko; Araki, Yoshio; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Sake yeast can produce high levels of ethanol in concentrated rice mash. While both sake and laboratory yeast strains belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the laboratory strains produce much less ethanol. This disparity in fermentation activity may be due to the strains' different responses to environmental stresses, including ethanol accumulation. To obtain more insight into the stress response of yeast cells under sake brewing conditions, we carried out small-scale sake brewing tests using laboratory yeast strains disrupted in specific stress-related genes. Surprisingly, yeast strains with disrupted ubiquitin-related genes produced more ethanol than the parental strain during sake brewing. The elevated fermentation ability conferred by disruption of the ubiquitin-coding gene UBI4 was confined to laboratory strains, and the ubi4 disruptant of a sake yeast strain did not demonstrate a comparable increase in ethanol production. These findings suggest different roles for ubiquitin in sake and laboratory yeast strains.

  10. Strain-specific morphologies of yeast prion amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; King, Chih-Yen; Wall, Joseph; Simon, Martha; Caspar, Donald L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Mass per length (mpl) measurements on single amyloid fibrils that specifically propagate the [VH], [VK], and [VL] strains of the yeast prion [PSI] reveal unanticipated differences in their structures. Many fibrils have ≈1.0 prion molecule per 4.7-Å cross-β repeat period, which is consistent with a self-replicating model built by parallel β-sheet hydrogen-bonding of like prion peptide segments, but other fibrils are definitely heavier. The predominantly straight fibrils of the dominant [VH] strain have a bimodal mpl distribution, corresponding to components with ≈1.0 and 1.2 prions per repeat. Fibrils of the weaker [VK] strain, which are almost all wavy, have a monodisperse mpl distribution with a mean of 1.15 prions per repeat. The recessive [VL] strain sample has ≈1.05 prions per repeat in single fibrils and includes ≈10% double fibrils, which are rare in the duplicate [VH] and [VK] samples. All of these samples were assembled from purified recombinant Sup35 prion protein by seeded growth on nuclei extracted from yeast bearing the three [PSI] strains. Infectious and noninfectious spontaneously assembled fibrils of the recombinant prion protein also display different heterogeneous morphologies. The strain-specific morphological differences we have observed directly confirm the structural prediction of the protein-only prion theory but do not have an obvious molecular explanation. PMID:16006506

  11. Selection of a yeast strain for sweet sorghum fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Seven natural and eight commercial yeast strains were tested for fermenting the high sugar content of sweet sorghum juice with a high yield of alcohol and a high pecentage utilization of the sugar within a ten day period. The sorghum juice pH was adjusted to range between 4 and 5. A comparison was made with and without an added nitrogen source. Fermentation temperatures were maintained at 27/sup 0/C. The American Type Culture Collection number 918, a Saccharomyces species fermented the sorghum juice at the 26 and 18 to 20 balling (brix). No yeast strain was found to ferment the 30 balling juice within a ten day period at 90% utilization.

  12. Selection of yeast strains for bioethanol production from UK seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Kostas, Emily T; White, Daniel A; Du, Chenyu; Cook, David J

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are a promising feedstock for the production of third generation bioethanol, since they have high carbohydrate contents, contain little or no lignin and are available in abundance. However, seaweeds typically contain a more diverse array of monomeric sugars than are commonly present in feedstocks derived from lignocellulosic material which are currently used for bioethanol production. Hence, identification of a suitable fermentative microorganism that can utilise the principal sugars released from the hydrolysis of macroalgae remains a major objective. The present study used a phenotypic microarray technique to screen 24 different yeast strains for their ability to metabolise individual monosaccharides commonly found in seaweeds, as well as hydrolysates following an acid pre-treatment of five native UK seaweed species (Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus, Chondrus crispus, Palmaria palmata and Ulva lactuca). Five strains of yeast (three Saccharomyces spp, one Pichia sp and one Candida sp) were selected and subsequently evaluated for bioethanol production during fermentation of the hydrolysates. Four out of the five selected strains converted these monomeric sugars into bioethanol, with the highest ethanol yield (13 g L(-1)) resulting from a fermentation using C. crispus hydrolysate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPS128. This study demonstrated the novel application of a phenotypic microarray technique to screen for yeast capable of metabolising sugars present in seaweed hydrolysates; however, metabolic activity did not always imply fermentative production of ethanol.

  13. An indirect assay for volatile compound production in yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Davide; Walther, Andrea; Trost, Kajetan; Vrhovsek, Urska; Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Traditional flavor analysis relies on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods. Here we describe an indirect method coupling volatile compound formation to an ARO9-promoter-LacZ reporter gene. The resulting β-galactosidase activity correlated well with headspace solid phase micro extraction (HS/SPME) GC-MS data, particularly with respect to the formation of rose flavor. This tool enables large-scale screening of yeast strains and their progeny to identify the most flavor active strains. PMID:24424137

  14. Relationships and Evolution of Double-Stranded RNA Totiviruses of Yeasts Inferred from Analysis of L-A-2 and L-BC Variants in Wine Yeast Strain Populations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cousiño, Nieves; Esteban, Rosa

    2017-02-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains secrete a protein toxin active on nonkiller strains of the same (or other) yeast species. Different killer toxins, K1, K2, K28, and Klus, have been described. Each toxin is encoded by a medium-size (1.5- to 2.3-kb) M double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) located in the cytoplasm. M dsRNAs require L-A helper virus for maintenance. L-A belongs to the Totiviridae family, and its dsRNA genome of 4.6 kb codes for the major capsid protein Gag and a minor Gag-Pol protein, which form the virions that separately encapsidate L-A or the M satellites. Different L-A variants exist in nature; on average, 24% of their nucleotides are different. Previously, we reported that L-A-lus was specifically associated with Mlus, suggesting coevolution, and proposed a role of the toxin-encoding M dsRNAs in the appearance of new L-A variants. Here we confirm this by analyzing the helper virus in K2 killer wine strains, which we named L-A-2. L-A-2 is required for M2 maintenance, and neither L-A nor L-A-lus shows helper activity for M2 in the same genetic background. This requirement is overcome when coat proteins are provided in large amounts by a vector or in ski mutants. The genome of another totivirus, L-BC, frequently accompanying L-A in the same cells shows a lower degree of variation than does L-A (about 10% of nucleotides are different). Although L-BC has no helper activity for M dsRNAs, distinct L-BC variants are associated with a particular killer strain. The so-called L-BC-lus (in Klus strains) and L-BC-2 (in K2 strains) are analyzed.

  15. Yeast strains as potential aroma enhancers in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mónica; Corral, Sara; Cano-García, Liliana; Salvador, Ana; Belloch, Carmela

    2015-11-06

    Actual healthy trends produce changes in the sensory characteristics of dry fermented sausages therefore, new strategies are needed to enhance their aroma. In particular, a reduction in the aroma characteristics was observed in reduced fat and salt dry sausages. In terms of aroma enhancing, generally coagulase-negative cocci were selected as the most important group from the endogenous microbiota in the production of flavour compounds. Among the volatile compounds analysed in dry sausages, ester compounds contribute to fruity aroma notes associated with high acceptance of traditional dry sausages. However, the origin of ester compounds in traditional dry sausages can be due to other microorganisms as lactic acid bacteria, yeast and moulds. Yeast contribution in dry fermented sausages was investigated with opposite results attributed to low yeast survival or low activity during processing. Generally, they affect sausage colour and flavour by their oxygen-scavenging and lipolytic activities in addition to, their ability to catabolize fermentation products such as lactate increasing the pH and contributing to less tangy and more aromatic sausages. Recently, the isolation and characterization of yeast from traditional dry fermented sausages made possible the selection of those with ability to produce aroma active compounds. Molecular methods were used for genetic typing of the isolated yeasts whereas their ability to produce aroma compounds was tested in different systems such as in culture media, in model systems and finally on dry fermented sausages. The results revealed that the appropriate selection of yeast strains with aroma potential may be used to improve the sensory characteristics of reformulated fermented sausages.

  16. L-A-lus, a new variant of the L-A totivirus found in wine yeasts with Klus killer toxin-encoding Mlus double-stranded RNA: possible role of killer toxin-encoding satellite RNAs in the evolution of their helper viruses.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cousiño, Nieves; Gómez, Pilar; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-08-01

    Yeast killer viruses are widely distributed in nature. Several toxins encoded in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) satellites of the L-A totivirus have been described, including K1, K2, K28, and Klus. The 4.6-kb L-A genome encodes the Gag major structural protein that forms a 39-nm icosahedral virion and Gag-Pol, a minor fusion protein. Gag-Pol has transcriptase and replicase activities responsible for maintenance of L-A (or its satellite RNAs). Recently we reported a new killer toxin, Klus. The L-A virus in Klus strains showed poor hybridization to known L-A probes, suggesting substantial differences in their sequences. Here we report the characterization of this new L-A variant named L-A-lus. At the nucleotide level, L-A and L-A-lus showed only 73% identity, a value that increases to 86% in the amino acid composition of Gag or Gag-Pol. Two regions in their genomes, however, the frameshifting region between Gag and Pol and the encapsidation signal, are 100% identical, implying the importance of these two cis signals in the virus life cycle. L-A-lus shows higher resistance than L-A to growth at high temperature or to in vivo expression of endo- or exonucleases. L-A-lus also has wider helper activity, being able to maintain not only Mlus but also M1 or a satellite RNA of L-A called X. In a screening of 31 wine strains, we found that none of them had L-A; they carried either L-A-lus or a different L-A variant in K2 strains. Our data show that distinct M killer viruses are specifically associated with L-As with different nucleotide compositions, suggesting coevolution.

  17. Evaluation of yeast strains for production of fuel ethanol from biomass hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust industrial yeast strains are needed for profitable production of fuel ethanol from mixed biomass waste. USDA, ARS, NCAUR, RPT has been evaluating ethanol-producing yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered GMAX Saccharomyces cerevisiae, irradiated Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pi...

  18. Mutagenizing brewing yeast strain for improving fermentation property of beer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengran; Zhang, Guangyi; Sun, Yunping

    2008-07-01

    A brewing yeast mutant with perfect sugar fermentation capacity was isolated by mutagenizing the Saccharomyces pastorianus transformant, which carries an integrated glucoamylase gene and has one copy of non-functional alpha-acetolactate synthase gene. The mutant was able to utilize maltotriose efficiently, and the maltotriose fermentability in YNB-2% maltotriose medium increased from 32.4% to 72.0% after 5 d in shaking culture. The wort fermentation test confirmed that the sugar fermentation property of the mutant was greatly improved, while its brewing performances were analogous to that of the wild-type strain and the characteristic trait of shortened beer maturation period was retained. Therefore, we believe that the brewing yeast mutant would benefit the beer industry and would be useful for low caloric beer production.

  19. Phytase from antarctic yeast strain Cryptococcus laurentii AL27.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, K; Gargova, S; Hristozova, T; Tankova, Z

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcus laurentii strain AL27 demonstrating significant potential for intracellular phytase production was selected by 2-step screening of Antarctic yeasts. The strain showed increased phytase activity in a culture medium with 40 g/L sucrose, KH2PO4 providing 5 mg/L phosphorus, and cultivation temperature of 24 degrees C, which relates it to psychrotrophic microorganisms. The enzyme kinetic characteristics according to sodium phytate were Km = 0.98 mmol/L, vlim = 33.3 micromol g(-1) min(-1). The enzyme had maximum activity at 40 degrees C and acted within a wide pH range: from 2.0 to 5.5, which is of positive significance for its direct inclusion into the feed of monogastric animals.

  20. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  1. In vitro activity of monoclonal and recombinant yeast killer toxin-like antibodies against antibiotic-resistant gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, S.; Magliani, W.; Arseni, S.; Dieci, E.; Frazzi, R.; Salati, A.; Varaldo, P. E.; Polonelli, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monoclonal (mAbKT) and recombinant single-chain (scFvKT) anti-idiotypic antibodies were produced to represent the internal image of a yeast killer toxin (KT) characterized by a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, including gram-positive cocci. Pathogenic eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms, such as Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, and a multidrug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, presenting specific, although yet undefined, KT-cell wall receptors (KTR), have proven to be killed in vitro by mAbKT and scFvKT. mAbKT and scFvKT exert a therapeutic effect in vivo in experimental models of candidiasis and pneumocystosis by mimicking the functional activity of protective antibodies naturally produced in humans against KTR of infecting microorganisms. The swelling tide of concern over increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotic drugs gives the impetus to develop new therapeutic compounds against microbial threat. Thus, the in vitro bactericidal activity of mAbKT and scFvKT against gram-positive, drug-resistant cocci of major epidemiological interest was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: mAbKT and scFvKT generated by hybridoma and DNA recombinant technology from the spleen lymphocytes of mice immunized with a KT-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb KT4) were used in a conventional colony forming unit (CFU) assay to determine, from a qualitative point of view, their bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. haemolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. These bacterial strains are characterized by different patterns of resistance to antibiotics, including methicillin, vancomycin, and penicillin. RESULTS: According to the experimental conditions adopted, no bacterial isolate proved to be resistant to the activity of mAbKT and scFvKT. CONCLUSIONS: scFvKT exerted a microbicidal activity against multidrug resistant bacteria, which may represent the basis for the drug modeling

  2. Yeast Killer Toxin-Like Candidacidal Ab6 Antibodies Elicited through the Manipulation of the Idiotypic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Beninati, Concetta; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Passo, Carla Lo; Pernice, Ida; Domina, Maria; Arigò, Milena; Papasergi, Salvatore; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A mouse anti-anti-anti-idiotypic (Id) IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb K20, Ab4), functionally mimicking a Wyckerhamomyces anomalus (Pichia anomala) killer toxin (KT) characterized by fungicidal activity against yeasts presenting specific cell wall receptors (KTR) mainly constituted by β-1,3-glucan, was produced from animals presenting anti-KT Abs (Ab3) following immunization with a rat IgM anti-Id KT-like mAb (mAb K10, Ab2). MAb K10 was produced by immunization with a KT-neutralizing mAb (mAb KT4, Ab1) bearing the internal image of KTR. MAb K20, likewise mAb K10, proved to be fungicidal in vitro against KT-sensitive Candida albicans cells, an activity neutralized by mAb KT4, and was capable of binding to β-1,3-glucan. MAb K20 and mAb K10 competed with each other and with KT for binding to C. albicans KTR. MAb K20 was used to identify peptide mimics of KTR by the selection of phage clones from random peptide phage display libraries. Using this strategy, four peptides (TK 1-4) were selected and used as immunogen in mice in the form of either keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) conjugates or peptide-encoding minigenes. Peptide and DNA immunization could induce serum Abs characterized by candidacidal activity, which was inhibited by laminarin, a soluble β-1,3-glucan, but not by pustulan, a β-1,6-glucan. These findings show that the idiotypic cascade can not only overcome the barrier of animal species but also the nature of immunogens and the type of technology adopted. PMID:25162681

  3. Separation of similar yeast strains by IEF techniques.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2009-06-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of the etiological agents of infectious diseases, especially species that are hardly distinguishable by routinely used laboratory methods, e.g. Candida albicans from C. dubliniensis, is necessary for early administration of an appropriate therapy. Similarly, the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative yeast strains is necessary for the choice of a therapeutic strategy due to higher resistance of the biofilm-positive strains to antifungals. In this study rapid separation and identification of similar strains of Candida, cells and/or their lysates, based on IEF are outlined. The isoelectric points of the monitored "similar pairs" of Candidas, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and the biofilm-positive C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and their biofilm-negative strains were determined by CIEF with UV detection in the acidic pH gradient. The differences between their isoelectric points were up to 0.3 units of pI. Simultaneously, a fast and a simple technique was developed for the lysis of the outer membrane cell and characteristic fingerprints were found in lysate electrophoreograms and in gels from the capillary or the gel IEF, respectively.

  4. Production of fermentation aroma compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts: effects of yeast assimilable nitrogen on two model strains.

    PubMed

    Carrau, Francisco M; Medina, Karina; Farina, Laura; Boido, Eduardo; Henschke, Paul A; Dellacassa, Eduardo

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of yeast fermentation metabolites to the aromatic profile of wine is well documented; however, the biotechnological application of this knowledge, apart from strain selection, is still rather limited and often contradictory. Understanding and modeling the relationship between nutrient availability and the production of desirable aroma compounds by different strains must be one of the main objectives in the selection of industrial yeasts for the beverage and food industry. In order to overcome the variability in the composition of grape juices, we have used a chemically defined model medium for studying yeast physiological behavior and metabolite production in response to nitrogen supplementation so as to identify an appropriate yeast assimilable nitrogen level for strain differentiation. At low initial nitrogen concentrations, strain KU1 produced higher quantities of esters and fatty acids whereas M522 produced higher concentrations of isoacids, gamma-butyrolactone, higher alcohols and 3-methylthio-1-propanol. We propose that although strains KU1 and M522 have a similar nitrogen consumption profile, they represent useful models for the chemical characterization of wine strains in relation to wine quality. The differential production of aroma compounds by the two strains is discussed in relation to their capacity for nitrogen usage and their impact on winemaking. The results obtained here will help to develop targeted metabolic footprinting methods for the discrimination of industrial yeasts.

  5. Increasing alcohol yield by selected yeast fermentation of sweet sorghum. I. Evaluation of yeast strains for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    de Mancilha, I.M.; Pearson, A.M.; Waller, J.; Hogaboam, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted for the purpose of evaluating and selecting yeast strains for their ability to produce ethanol using sweet sorghum juice as the substrate. Stalks of sweet sorghum were obtained by cutting off the tops and stripping away the leaves. Fermentation media were prepared by diluting or adding dextrose to the sorghum juice to give a sugar concentration of either 10% (w/v) or 20% (w/v). All yeast strains were first tested in 10% (w/v) total sugar medium. Those strains showing more than 90% sugar conversion efficiency were further tested in 20% (w/v) total sugar medium. Active cultures for inoculation were prepared by growing the yeast strains on the fermentation medium (10% (w/v) total sugar) for 24 h. Then the cultures were added to the fermentation media at a rate of 2%.

  6. Patagonian wines: the selection of an indigenous yeast starter.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Christian A; Rodríguez, María E; Sangorrín, Marcela; Querol, Amparo; Caballero, Adriana C

    2007-08-01

    The use of selected yeasts for winemaking has clear advantages over the traditional spontaneous fermentation. The aim of this study was to select an indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast isolate in order to develop a regional North Patagonian red wine starter culture. A two-step selection protocol developed according to physiological, technological and ecological criteria based on killer interactions was used. Following this methodology, S. cerevisiae isolate MMf9 was selected among 32 indigenous yeasts previously characterized as belonging to different strains according to molecular patterns and killer biotype. This isolate showed interesting technological and qualitative features including high fermentative power and low volatile acidity production, low foam and low sulphide production, as well as relevant ecological characteristics such as resistance to all indigenous and commercial S. cerevisiae killer strains assayed. Red wines with differential volatile profiles and interesting enological features were obtained at laboratory scale by using this selected indigenous strain.

  7. Occurrence of hydrogen sulfide in wine and in fermentation: influence of yeast strain and supplementation of yeast available nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Ugliano, Maurizio; Kolouchova, Radka; Henschke, Paul A

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) is a powerful aroma compound largely produced by yeast during fermentation. Its occurrence in wines and other fermented beverages has been associated with off-odors described as rotten egg and/or sewage. While the formation of hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) during fermentation has been extensively studied, it is the final H₂S content of wine that is actually linked to potential off-odors. Nevertheless, factors determining final H₂S content of wine have received little attention, and it is commonly assumed that high H₂S-forming fermentations will result in high final concentrations of H₂S. However, a clear relationship has never been established. In this report, we investigated the contribution of yeast strain and nitrogen addition to H₂S formation during fermentation and its consequent occurrence the resulting wines. Five commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains were used to ferment a Chardonnay juice containing 110 mg/l of YAN (yeast assimilable nitrogen), supplemented with di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) to increase YAN concentration to moderate (260 mg/l) and high (410 mg/l) levels. In contrast to the widely reported decrease in H₂S production in response to DAP addition, a non-linear relationship was found such that moderate DAP supplementation resulted in a remarkable increase in H₂S formation by each of the five wine yeasts. H₂S content of the finished wine was affected by yeast strain, YAN, and fermentation vigor. However, we did not observe a correlation between concentration of H₂S in the finished wines and H₂S produced during fermentation, with low-forming fermentations often having relatively high final H₂S and vice versa. Management of H₂S in wine through nitrogen supplementation requires knowledge of initial YAN and yeast H₂S characteristics.

  8. Variable flocculation profiles of yeast strains isolated from cachaça distilleries.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Florencia; Correa, Lygia Fátima da Mata; Araújo, Thalita Macedo; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; da Conceição, Luís Eduardo F Ribeiro; Castro, Ieso de Miranda; Brandão, Rogelio Lopes

    2014-11-03

    In cachaça production, the use of yeast cells as starters with predictable flocculation behavior facilitates the cell recovery at the end of each fermentation cycle. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explain the behavior of cachaça yeast strains in fermentation vats containing sugarcane through the determination of biochemical and molecular parameters associated with flocculation phenotypes. By analyzing thirteen cachaça yeast strains isolated from different distilleries, our results demonstrated that neither classic biochemical measurements (e.g., percentage of flocculation, EDTA sensitivity, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sugar residues on the cell wall) nor modern molecular approaches, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (q-PCR), were sufficient to distinctly classify the cachaça yeast strains according to their flocculation behavior. It seems that flocculation is indeed a strain-specific phenomenon that is difficult to explain and/or categorize by the available methodologies.

  9. Selection of yeast starter culture strains for the production of marula fruit wines and distillates.

    PubMed

    Fundira, M; Blom, M; Pretorius, I S; van Rensburg, P

    2002-03-13

    Juice of the Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra (marula) fruit was fermented by indigenous microflora and different commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains at different temperatures, namely, 15 and 30 degrees C. Volatile acids, esters, and higher alcohols were quantified in the wine and distillates, and the results were interpreted using a multivariate analysis of variance and an average linkage cluster analysis. Significant differences between 15 and 30 degrees C and also among yeasts with respect to volatile compounds were observed. Yeast strains VIN7 and FC consistently produced wines and final distillates significantly different from the other strains. A panel of tasters and marula and brandy producers was asked to select wines and distillates that had an acceptable and typical marula "nose". They were also asked to detect the differences among wines and distillates fermented with the same yeast strain at different temperatures.

  10. Non-Conventional Yeast Strains Increase the Aroma Complexity of Bread

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Steensels, Jan; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used yeast in food fermentations because it combines several key traits, including fermentation efficiency and production of desirable flavors. However, the dominance of S. cerevisiae in industrial fermentations limits the diversity in the aroma profiles of the end products. Hence, there is a growing interest in non-conventional yeast strains that can help generate the diversity and complexity desired in today’s diversified and consumer-driven markets. Here, we selected a set of non-conventional yeast strains to examine their potential for bread fermentation. Here, we tested ten non-conventional yeasts for bread fermentation, including two Saccharomyces species that are not currently used in bread making and 8 non-Saccharomyces strains. The results show that Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces bayanus combine satisfactory dough fermentation with an interesting flavor profile. Sensory analysis and HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis confirmed that these strains produce aroma profiles that are very different from that produced by a commercial bakery strain. Moreover, bread produced with these yeasts was preferred by a majority of a trained sensory panel. These results demonstrate the potential of T. delbrueckii and S. bayanus as alternative yeasts for bread dough leavening, and provide a general experimental framework for the evaluation of more yeasts and bacteria. PMID:27776154

  11. Production of ethanol from mannitol by the yeast strain Saccharomyces paradoxus NBRC 0259.

    PubMed

    Ota, Anri; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Oda, Hiroshi; Iohara, Keishi; Murata, Kousaku

    2013-09-01

    Mannitol is a promising marine macroalgal carbon source. However, organisms that produce ethanol from mannitol are limited; to date, only the yeast Pichia angophorae and the bacterium Escherichia coli KO11 have been reported to possess this capacity. In this study, we searched a yeast strain with a high capacity to produce ethanol from mannitol and selected Saccharomyces paradoxus NBRC 0259 for its ability to produce ethanol from mannitol. This ability was enhanced after a 3-day cultivation of this strain in medium containing mannitol; the enhanced strain was renamed S. paradoxus NBRC 0259-3. We compared the ability of strain NBRC 0259-3 to produce ethanol from mannitol and glucose, under several conditions, with those of P. angophorae and E. coli KO11. As a result, we concluded that S. paradoxus NBRC 0259-3 strain is the most suitable yeast strain for the production of ethanol from mannitol.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  14. Comparison of melibiose utilizing baker's yeast strains produced by genetic engineering and classical breeding.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S F; Bell, P J; Bissinger, P; Nevalainen, K M

    1999-02-01

    Yeast strains currently used in the baking industry cannot fully utilize the trisaccharide raffinose found in beet molasses due to the absence of melibiase (alpha-galactosidase) activity. To overcome this deficiency, the MEL1 gene encoding melibiase enzyme was introduced into baker's yeast by both classical breeding and recombinant DNA technology. Both types of yeast strains were capable of vigorous fermentation in the presence of high levels of sucrose, making them suitable for the rapidly developing Asian markets where high levels of sugar are used in bread manufacture. Melibiase expression appeared to be dosage-dependent, with relatively low expression sufficient for complete melibiose utilization in a model fermentation system.

  15. Brewing characteristics of haploid strains isolated from sake yeast Kyokai No. 7.

    PubMed

    Katou, Taku; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2008-11-01

    Sake yeast exhibit various characteristics that make them more suitable for sake brewing compared to other yeast strains. Since sake yeast strains are Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterothallic diploid strains, it is likely that they have heterozygous alleles on homologous chromosomes (heterozygosity) due to spontaneous mutations. If this is the case, segregation of phenotypic traits in haploid strains after sporulation and concomitant meiosis of sake yeast strains would be expected to occur. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated 100 haploid strains from Kyokai No. 7 (K7), a typical sake yeast strain in Japan, and compared their brewing characteristics in small-scale sake-brewing tests. Analyses of the resultant sake samples showed a smooth and continuous distribution of analytical values for brewing characteristics, suggesting that K7 has multiple heterozygosities that affect brewing characteristics and that these heterozygous alleles do segregate after sporulation. Correlation and principal component analyses suggested that the analytical parameters could be classified into two groups, indicating fermentation ability and sake flavour.

  16. New amylolytic yeast strains for starch and dextrin fermentation. [Schwanniomyces alluvius, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus

    SciTech Connect

    Laluce, C.; Bertolini, M.C.; Ernandes, J.R. ); Martini, A.V.; Martini, A. )

    1988-10-01

    Yeast strains capable of fermenting starch and dextrin to ethanol were isolated from samples collected from Brazilian factories in which cassava flour is produced. Considerable alcohol production was observed for all the strains selected. One strain (DI-10) fermented starch rapidly and secreted 5 times as much amylolytic enzyme than that observed for Schwanniomyces alluvius UCD 54-83. This strain and three other similar isolates were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus by morphological and physiological characteristics and molecular taxonomy.

  17. Potential of two Metschnikowia pulcherrima (yeast) strains for in vitro biodegradation of patulin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K R N; Spadaro, D; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2011-01-01

    Patulin contamination of apple and other fruit-based foods and beverages is an important food safety issue, as consumption of these commodities throughout the world is great. Studies are therefore necessary to reduce patulin levels to acceptable limits or undetectable levels to minimize toxicity. This study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of two Metschnikowia pulcherrima strains (MACH1 and GS9) on biodegradation of patulin under in vitro conditions. These yeast strains were tested for their abilities to degrade patulin in liquid medium amended with 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 μg/ml patulin and a yeast cell concentration of 1 × 10(8) cells per ml at 25°C. Of the two strains tested, MACH1 completely (100%) reduced patulin levels within 48 h, and GS9 within 72 h, at all concentrations of patulin. MACH1 effectively degraded the patulin within 24 h by 83 to 87.4%, and GS9 by 73 to 75.6% at 48 h, regardless of concentration. Patulin was not detected in yeast cell walls. This indicates that yeast cell walls did not absorb patulin, and that they completely degraded the toxin. Patulin had no influence on yeast cell concentration during growth. Therefore, these yeast strains could potentially be used for the reduction of patulin in naturally contaminated fruit juices. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the potential of M. pulcherrima strains for patulin biodegradation.

  18. Evaluation of Fermentation Efficiency of Yeast Strains and their Effect on Quality of Young Wines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K; Singh, Pranay Nath; Sawant, S D

    2012-09-01

    The yeast has important role in fermentation of wine grapes and wine quality. The fermentation of wine grapes affect by efficiency of particular yeast strain, sugar content, pH, available temperature, etc. To evaluate the efficiency of yeast strains (Premier Cuvee, RS-1, RS-2, RS-3 and natural), present study was conducted on two wine grape varieties viz.; Sauvignon Blanc (White) and Cabernet Sauvignon (Red). Efficiency of yeast strains was evaluated in terms of conversion rate of sugar into alcohol. As per recorded data, strain RS-3 (Pichia kudriavzevii) was found more efficient than other strains in fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon with efficiency of 84.4 per cent but in case of Sauvignon Blanc, the commercial culture Premier Cuevee was found superior over RS-3. The quality parameters of young wines of both the varieties were also affected by the used strains. Considering the efficiency and impact on various parameters of wines, local strain, i.e., RS-3 was found at par with commercial culture (Premier Cuvee). The RS-3 strain has potential to produce quality wines. However, studies on effects of RS-3 strain on some specific quality parameters of wines like varietal aroma compounds, flavours etc. are needed.

  19. Relationship of trehalose accumulation with ethanol fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Du, Feng-Guang; Sun, Pei-Yong; Qu, Ai-Min; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The protective effect and the mechanisms of trehalose accumulation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated during ethanol fermentation. The engineered strains with more intercellular trehalose achieved significantly higher fermentation rates and ethanol yields than their wild strain ZS during very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, while their performances were not different during regular fermentation. The VHG fermentation performances of these strains were consistent with their growth capacity under osmotic stress and ethanol stress, the key stress factors during VHG fermentation. These results suggest that trehalose accumulation is more important for VHG fermentation of industrial yeast strains than regular one. The differences in membrane integrity and antioxidative capacity of these strains indicated the possible mechanisms of trehalose as a protectant under VHG condition. Therefore, trehalose metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving the VHG fermentation performance of industrial yeast strains.

  20. Population dynamics of Oenococcus oeni strains in a new winery and the effect of SO2 and yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Reguant, Cristina; Carreté, Ramon; Constantí, Magda; Bordons, Albert

    2005-05-01

    The effects of different yeast starters and SO(2) addition on malolactic fermentation in a new winery were evaluated by a molecular approach in three vintages. Alcoholic fermentations with 40 and 100mgl(-1) SO(2) were carried out, followed by uninoculated malolactic fermentations. Isolated colonies of Oenococcus oeni obtained from samples throughout the vinification were identified and typified by multiplex RAPD-PCR. This made it possible to monitor the population dynamics and follow the proportion of as many as 29 different indigenous strains. In one of the vintages, O. oeni strains were more inhibited when a specific yeast starter was used.

  1. Mitochondrial-morphology-targeted breeding of industrial yeast strains for alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2009-05-29

    Since mitochondrial genes are repressed under high glucose and low O2, and these conditions correspond to the conditions in which yeast cells are exposed during alcohol fermentation, the existence and structure of yeast mitochondria during alcohol fermentation have not been elucidated. Yeast mitochondria can be observed throughout brewing of sake (Japanese rice wine) and fragment during brewing. Furthermore, it has been revealed that Fis1 [fission 1 (mitochondrial outer membrane) homologue (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)], which is a transmembrane protein with its C-terminal anchor embedded in the outer membrane of mitochondria, is required for fragmentation of yeast mitochondria during sake brewing. By utilizing this knowledge, a fis1 disruptant of a sake yeast strain has been generated that has a networked mitochondrial structure throughout sake brewing. It transpired that this strain produces a high content of malate, which imparts a crisp acidic taste, during sake brewing. This strategy is a useful and a completely novel strategy towards developing a new yeast strain which produces a high content of malate in sake, and mitochondrial morphology has now emerged as a promising target for the breeding of practical industrial strains.

  2. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  3. The temperature dependence of maltose transport in ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vidgren, Virve; Multanen, Jyri-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2010-01-01

    Lager beers are traditionally made at lower temperatures (6–14 °C) than ales (15–25 °C). At low temperatures, lager strains (Saccharomyces pastorianus) ferment faster than ale strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Two lager and two ale strains had similar maltose transport activities at 20 °C, but at 0 °C the lager strains had fivefold greater activity. AGT1, MTT1 and MALx1 are major maltose transporter genes. In nine tested lager strains, the AGT1 genes contained premature stop codons. None of five tested ale strains had this defect. All tested lager strains, but no ale strain, contained MTT1 genes. When functional AGT1 from an ale strain was expressed in a lager strain, the resultant maltose transport activity had the high temperature dependence characteristic of ale yeasts. Lager yeast MTT1 and MALx1 genes were expressed in a maltose-negative laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae. The resultant Mtt1 transport activity had low temperature dependence and the Malx1 activity had high temperature dependence. Faster fermentation at low temperature by lager strains than ale strains may result from their different maltose transporters. The loss of Agt1 transporters during the evolution of lager strains may have provided plasma membrane space for the Mtt1 transporters that perform better at a low temperature. PMID:20402791

  4. The temperature dependence of maltose transport in ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Multanen, Jyri-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2010-06-01

    Lager beers are traditionally made at lower temperatures (6-14 degrees C) than ales (15-25 degrees C). At low temperatures, lager strains (Saccharomyces pastorianus) ferment faster than ale strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Two lager and two ale strains had similar maltose transport activities at 20 degrees C, but at 0 degrees C the lager strains had fivefold greater activity. AGT1, MTT1 and MALx1 are major maltose transporter genes. In nine tested lager strains, the AGT1 genes contained premature stop codons. None of five tested ale strains had this defect. All tested lager strains, but no ale strain, contained MTT1 genes. When functional AGT1 from an ale strain was expressed in a lager strain, the resultant maltose transport activity had the high temperature dependence characteristic of ale yeasts. Lager yeast MTT1 and MALx1 genes were expressed in a maltose-negative laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae. The resultant Mtt1 transport activity had low temperature dependence and the Malx1 activity had high temperature dependence. Faster fermentation at low temperature by lager strains than ale strains may result from their different maltose transporters. The loss of Agt1 transporters during the evolution of lager strains may have provided plasma membrane space for the Mtt1 transporters that perform better at a low temperature.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Conventional Natural Killer Cell Responses to Acute Infection with Toxoplasma gondii Strains of Different Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Daria L.; Fatima, Rida; Gigley, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional natural killer (cNK) cells, members of group 1 innate lymphoid cells, are a diverse cell subpopulation based on surface receptor expression, maturation, and functional potential. cNK cells are critical for early immunity to Toxoplasma gondii via IFNγ production. Acute cNK cell responses to infection with different strains of T. gondii have not yet been characterized in detail. Here, we comprehensively performed this analysis with Type I virulent RH, Type II avirulent ME49, and fully attenuated Type I cps1-1 strains. In response to these three parasite strains, murine cNK cells produce IFNγ and become cytotoxic and polyfunctional (IFNγ+CD107a+) at the site of infection. In contrast to virulent RH and avirulent ME49 T. gondii strains, attenuated cps1-1 induced only local cNK cell responses. Infections with RH and ME49 parasites significantly decreased cNK cell frequency and numbers in spleen 5 days post infection compared with cps1-1 parasites. cNK cell subsets expressing activating receptors Ly49H, Ly49D, and NKG2D and inhibitory receptors Ly49I and CD94/NKG2A were similar when compared between the strains and at 5 days post infection. cNK cells were not proliferating (Ki67−) 5 days post infection with any of the strains. cNK cell maturation as measured by CD27, CD11b, and KLRG1 was affected after infection with different parasite strains. RH and ME49 infection significantly reduced mature cNK cell frequency and increased immature cNK cell populations compared with cps1-1 infection. Interestingly, KLRG1 was highly expressed on immature cNK cells after RH infection. After RH and ME49 infections, CD69+ cNK cells in spleen were present at higher frequency than after cps1-1 infection, which may correlate with loss of the mature cNK cell population. Cytokine multiplex analysis indicated cNK cell responses correlated with peritoneal exudate cell, spleen, and serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, including IL-12. qPCR analysis of parasite

  6. Selection of Yarrowia lipolytica strains with high protein content from yeasts isolated from different marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhenming; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin; Li, Jing; Wang, Xianghong

    2007-10-01

    A total of 78 Yarrowia lipolytica yeast strains from seawater, sediments, mud of salterns, the guts of marine fish, and marine algae were obtained. After the crude protein of the yeasts was estimated by the method of Kjehldahl, we found that seven strains of the marine yeasts grown in soy bean cake hydrolysate with 20 g L-1 of glucose for 48 h at 28°C contained more than 41.0 g protein per 100 g of cell dry weight and the cell dry weight was more than 4.4 g per L of the culture. Among them, strain SWJ-1b contained the highest crude protein. The results of Biolog identification and molecular methods further confirmed that they indeed belonged to Y. lipolytica.

  7. The effect of Debina grapevine indigenous yeast strains of Metschnikowia and Saccharomyces on wine flavour.

    PubMed

    Parapouli, Maria; Hatziloukas, Efstathios; Drainas, Constantin; Perisynakis, Angelos

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous alcoholic fermentation of grape must is a complex microbiological process involving a large number of various yeast species, to which the flavour of every traditional wine is largely attributed. Whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily responsible for the conversion of sugar to alcohol, the activities of various non-Saccharomyces species enhance wine flavour. In this study, indigenous yeast strains belonging to Metschnikowia pulcherrima var. zitsae as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated and characterized from Debina must (Zitsa, Epirus, Greece). In addition, these strains were examined for their effect on the outcome of the wine fermentation process when used sequentially as starter cultures. The resulting wine, as analyzed over three consecutive years, was observed to possess a richer, more aromatic bouquet than wine from a commercial starter culture. These results emphasize the potential of employing indigenous yeast strains for the production of traditional wines with improved flavour.

  8. PCR differentiation of commercial yeast strains using intron splice site primers.

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Lopes, M; Soden, A; Henschke, P A; Langridge, P

    1996-01-01

    The increased use of pure starter cultures in the wine industry has made it necessary to develop a rapid and simple identification system for yeast strains. A method based upon the PCR using oligonucleotide primers that are complementary to intron splice sites has been developed. Since most introns are not essential for gene function, introns have evolved with minimal constraint. By targeting these highly variable sequences, the PCR has proved to be very effective in uncovering polymorphisms in commercial yeast strains. The speed of the method and the ability to analyze many samples in a single day permit the monitoring of specific yeast strains during fermentations. Furthermore, the simplicity of the technique, which does not require the isolation of DNA, makes it accessible to industrial laboratories that have limited molecular expertise and resources. PMID:8953723

  9. Selection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains for reducing alcohol levels in wine by sugar respiration.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Rojas, Virginia; Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar

    2014-07-02

    Respiration of sugars by non-Saccharomyces yeasts has been recently proposed for lowering alcohol levels in wine. Development of industrial fermentation processes based on such an approach requires, amongst other steps, the identification of yeast strains which are able to grow and respire under the relatively harsh conditions found in grape must. This work describes the characterization of a collection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in order to identify candidate yeast strains for this specific application. It involved the estimation of respiratory quotient (RQ) values under aerated conditions, at low pH and high sugar concentrations, calculation of yields of ethanol and other relevant metabolites, and characterization of growth responses to the main stress factors found during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Physiological features of some strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima or two species of Kluyveromyces, suggest they are suitable for lowering ethanol yields by respiration. The unsuitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for this purpose was not due to ethanol yields (under aerated conditions they are low enough for a significant reduction in final ethanol content), but to the high acetic acid yields under these growth conditions. According to results from controlled aeration fermentations with one strain of M. pulcherrima, design of an aeration regime allowing for lowering ethanol yields though preserving grape must components from excessive oxidation, would be conceivable.

  10. Different commercial yeast strains affecting the volatile and sensory profile of cava base wine.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Jordi; Urpí, Pilar; Riu-Aumatell, Montserrat; Vichi, Stefania; López-Tamames, Elvira; Buxaderas, Susana

    2008-05-10

    36 semi-industrial fermentations were carried out with 6 different yeast strains in order to assess differences in the wines' chemical and volatile profile. Two of the tested strains (Y3 and Y6) showed the fastest fermentation rates throughout 3 harvests and on 2 grape varieties. The wines fermented by three of the tested strains (Y5, Y3 and Y4) stand out for their high amounts of esters and possessed the highest fruity character. Wines from strains producing low amounts of esters and high concentrations of medium chain fatty acids, higher alcohols and six-carbon alcohols were the least appreciated at the sensory analysis. The data obtained in the present study show how the yeast strain quantitatively affects the final chemical and volatile composition of cava base wines and have repercussions on their sensory profile, independently of must variety and harvest year.

  11. Relationship between ethanol and oxidative stress in laboratory and brewing yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Bleoanca, Iulia; Silva, Ana Rita Courelas; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Menezes, Regina de Andrade

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol is a chemical stress factor that inhibits cellular growth and determines metabolic changes leading to reduction of cell viability during fermentation and yeast storage. To determine the effect of time, temperature and ethanol during storage of brewing yeasts we have monitored viability of cells stored for 72 h, at 6 °C or 12 °C, in the presence of various ethanol concentrations. Under the conditions tested, 6 °C is the most favourable temperature to store brewing yeast creams emphasizing the importance of a tight temperature control in the storage vessels. Because W210 is less resistant to storage in the presence of ethanol than W34/70, the optimal storage parameters obtained under our laboratory conditions vary significantly. The ale strain is sensitive to storage under ethanol concentrations higher than 5% (v/v) for more than 48 h at 6 °C whereas at the same temperature the lager strain tolerates ethanol up to 7.5% (v/v) for 72 h. Also, the viability assays indicate that the antioxidant protein Yap1 is an important factor to storage resistance of BY4741 laboratory strain. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance of brewing yeast strains to ethanol, we have performed phenotypic analysis, localization studies and have monitored the activation of antioxidant and protection genes as well as the intracellular contents of glycogen and trehalose. Overall, our data suggest that the ale strain W210 has a defective antioxidant defence system and that ethanol may induce the antioxidant defences as well as glycogen and trehalose protection mechanisms in laboratory and brewing yeast strains.

  12. GPCR production in a novel yeast strain that makes cholesterol-like sterols.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Susan M; Mullen, William; Cogdell, Richard J; Bill, Roslyn M; Fraser, Niall J

    2011-12-01

    The activities of many mammalian membrane proteins including G-protein coupled receptors are cholesterol-dependent. Unlike higher eukaryotes, yeast do not make cholesterol. Rather they make a related molecule called ergosterol. As cholesterol and ergosterol are biologically non-equivalent, the potential of yeast as hosts for overproducing mammalian membrane proteins has never been fully realised. To address this problem, we are trying to engineer a novel strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway of mammalian cells has been fully reconstituted. Thus far, we have created a modified strain that makes cholesterol-like sterols which has an increased capacity to make G-protein coupled receptors compared to control yeast.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Dimorphic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Strain W29

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, Kyle R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-11-25

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the dimorphic ascomycete yeastYarrowia lipolyticastrain W29 (ATCC 20460).Y. lipolyticais a commonly employed model for the industrial production of lipases, small molecules, and more recently for its ability to accumulate lipids.

  14. Effect of Agave tequilana age, cultivation field location and yeast strain on tequila fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Pinal, L; Cornejo, E; Arellano, M; Herrera, E; Nuñez, L; Arrizon, J; Gschaedler, A

    2009-05-01

    The effect of yeast strain, the agave age and the cultivation field location of agave were evaluated using kinetic parameters and volatile compound production in the tequila fermentation process. Fermentations were carried out with Agave juice obtained from two cultivation fields (CF1 and CF2), as well as two ages (4 and 8 years) and two Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (GU3 and AR5) isolated from tequila fermentation must. Sugar consumption and ethanol production varied as a function of cultivation field and agave age. The production of ethyl acetate, 1-propanol, isobutanol and amyl alcohols were influenced in varying degrees by yeast strain, agave age and cultivation field. Methanol production was only affected by the agave age and 2-phenylethanol was influenced only by yeast strain. This work showed that the use of younger Agave tequilana for tequila fermentation resulted in differences in sugar consumption, ethanol and volatile compounds production at the end of fermentation, which could affect the sensory quality of the final product.

  15. (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach for understanding the fermentation behaviors of wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Son, Hong-Seok; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Ki Myong; Kim, Eun-Young; van den Berg, Frans; Park, Won-Mok; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-02-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes in musts during alcoholic fermentation and wines during aging. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (RC-212, KIV-1116, and KUBY-501) were also evaluated for their impacts on the metabolic changes in must and wine. Pattern recognition (PR) methods, including PCA, PLS-DA, and OPLS-DA scores plots, showed clear differences for metabolites among musts or wines for each fermentation stage up to 6 months. Metabolites responsible for the differentiation were identified as valine, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), pyruvate, succinate, proline, citrate, glycerol, malate, tartarate, glucose, N-methylnicotinic acid (NMNA), and polyphenol compounds. PCA scores plots showed continuous movements away from days 1 to 8 in all musts for all yeast strains, indicating continuous and active fermentation. During alcoholic fermentation, the highest levels of 2,3-BD, succinate, and glycerol were found in musts with the KIV-1116 strain, which showed the fastest fermentation or highest fermentative activity of the three strains, whereas the KUBY-501 strain showed the slowest fermentative activity. This study highlights the applicability of NMR-based metabolomics for monitoring wine fermentation and evaluating the fermentative characteristics of yeast strains.

  16. Effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen on the synthesis of phenolic aroma compounds by Hanseniaspora vineae strains.

    PubMed

    Martin, Valentina; Boido, Eduardo; Giorello, Facundo; Mas, Albert; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    In several grape varieties, the dominating aryl alkyl alcohols found are the volatile group of phenylpropanoid-related compounds, such as glycosylated benzyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohol, which contribute to wine with floral and fruity aromas after being hydrolysed during fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is largely recognized as the main agent in grape must fermentation, but yeast strains belonging to other genera, including Hanseniaspora, are known to predominate during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Although non-Saccharomyces yeast strains have a well-recognized genetic diversity, understanding of their impact on wine flavour richness is still emerging. In this study, 11 Hansenisapora vineae strains were used to ferment a chemically defined simil-grape fermentation medium, resembling the nutrient composition of grape juice but devoid of grape-derived secondary metabolites. GC-MS analysis was performed to determine volatile compounds in the produced wines. Our results showed that benzyl alcohol, benzyl acetate and 2-phenylethyl acetate are significantly synthesized by H. vineae strains. Levels of these compounds found in fermentations with 11 H. vineae different strains were one or two orders of magnitude higher than those measured in fermentations with a known S. cerevisiae wine strain. The implications for winemaking in response to the negative correlation of benzyl alcohol, benzyl acetate and 2-phenylethyl acetate production with yeast assimilable nitrogen concentrations are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effect of yeast strain and fermentation conditions on the release of cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Giovanna; Canuti, Valentina; Rosi, Iolanda

    2010-02-28

    To improve our understanding of the factors involved in polysaccharide release during alcoholic fermentation, we investigated three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in fermentation trials conducted at two temperatures (25 degrees C and 32 degrees C) and three sugar concentrations (20%, 23.5%, and 27%), with or without supplementation of grape juice with diammonium phosphate (DAP) or microcrystalline cellulose. In two yeast strains, the release of cell wall polysaccharides increased significantly with an increase in fermentation temperature and sugar concentration of the grape juice; the polysaccharide release was greater in stressed conditions, in which the cells were less viable and less metabolically active. In the third strain, the average amount of polysaccharides released into the medium decreased significantly at 32 degrees C with 27% sugar, and increased in grape juice supplemented with DAP. Thus, this strain released more polysaccharides when conditions were nearer to optimal and the yeast cells were more viable and metabolically active. Our results suggest that the yeast strains released cell wall polysaccharides via different mechanisms, and that the cell wall integrity pathway may account for some of the differences in polysaccharide release among the strains.

  18. Contribution of the fermenting yeast strain to ethyl carbamate generation in stone fruit spirits.

    PubMed

    Schehl, Beatus; Senn, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2007-03-01

    Fermented fruit and beverages frequently contain ethyl carbamate (EC), a potentially carcinogenic compound that can be formed by the reaction of urea with ethanol. Both are produced by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with ethanol as the major end product of hexose fermentation and urea as a by-product in arginine catabolism. In spirit production, EC can also be derived from cyanide introduced by stone fruit. To determine the relative contribution of yeast metabolism to EC production, we genetically engineered a diploid laboratory strain to reduce the arginase activity, thus blocking the pathway to urea production. For this purpose, strains with either a heterozygous CAR1/car1 deletion or a homozygous defect (car1/car1) were constructed. These strains were compared to the parental wild type and to an industrial yeast strain in cherry mash fermentations and spirit production. The strain with the homozygous car1 deletion showed a significant reduction of EC in the final spirits in comparison to the non-engineered controls. Nevertheless, using this strain for fermentation of stoneless cherry mashes did not completely impede EC formation. This indicates another, as yet unidentified, source for this compound.

  19. Characteristics of the high malic acid production mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain No. 28.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Tabata, Ken; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Mitsuiki, Shinji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2012-09-01

    We characterized a high malic acid production mechanism in sake yeast strain No. 28. No considerable differences in the activity of the enzymes that were involved in malic acid synthesis were observed between strain No. 28 and its parent strain, K1001. However, compared with strain K1001, which actively took up rhodamine 123 during staining, the cells of strain No. 28 were only lightly stained, even when cultured in high glucose concentrations. In addition, malic acid production by the respiratory-deficient strain of K1001 was 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type K1001 and wild-type No. 28. The findings of this study demonstrated that the high malic acid production by strain No. 28 is attributed to the suppression of mitochondrial activity.

  20. Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Tonomura, K

    1996-10-01

    The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking strains has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously hybridized were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the strains tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six strains, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three strains and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one strain. The number of MAL loci in baking strains was comparable to those of brewing strains.

  1. Metabolic engineering of a haploid strain derived from a triploid industrial yeast for producing cellulosic ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Rin; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Kong, In Iok; Kim, Heejin; Maurer, Matthew J; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Peng, Dairong; Wei, Na; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Many desired phenotypes for producing cellulosic biofuels are often observed in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, many industrial yeast strains are polyploid and have low spore viability, making it difficult to use these strains for metabolic engineering applications. We selected the polyploid industrial strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 4124 exhibiting rapid glucose fermentation capability, high ethanol productivity, strong heat and inhibitor tolerance in order to construct an optimal yeast strain for producing cellulosic ethanol. Here, we focused on developing a general approach and high-throughput screening method to isolate stable haploid segregants derived from a polyploid parent, such as triploid ATCC 4124 with a poor spore viability. Specifically, we deleted the HO genes, performed random sporulation, and screened the resulting segregants based on growth rate, mating type, and ploidy. Only one stable haploid derivative (4124-S60) was isolated, while 14 other segregants with a stable mating type were aneuploid. The 4124-S60 strain inherited only a subset of desirable traits present in the parent strain, same as other aneuploids, suggesting that glucose fermentation and specific ethanol productivity are likely to be genetically complex traits and/or they might depend on ploidy. Nonetheless, the 4124-60 strain did inherit the ability to tolerate fermentation inhibitors. When additional genetic perturbations known to improve xylose fermentation were introduced into the 4124-60 strain, the resulting engineered strain (IIK1) was able to ferment a Miscanthus hydrolysate better than a previously engineered laboratory strain (SR8), built by making the same genetic changes. However, the IIK1 strain showed higher glycerol and xylitol yields than the SR8 strain. In order to decrease glycerol and xylitol production, an NADH-dependent acetate reduction pathway was introduced into the IIK1 strain. By consuming 2.4g/L of acetate, the resulting strain (IIK1A

  2. Near-freezing effects on the proteome of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2016-03-10

    At near-freezing temperatures (0-4°C), the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae stops or is severely limited, and viability decreases. Under these conditions, yeast cells trigger a biochemical response, in which trehalose and glycerol accumulate and protect them against severe cold and freeze injury. However, the mechanisms that allow yeast cells to sustain this response have been not clarified. The effects of severe cold on the proteome of S. cerevisiae have been not investigated and its importance in providing cell survival at near-freezing temperatures and upon freezing remains unknown. Here, we have compared the protein profile of two industrial baker's yeast strains at 30°C and 4°C. Overall, a total of 16 proteins involved in energy-metabolism, translation and redox homeostasis were identified as showing increased abundance at 4°C. The predominant presence of glycolytic proteins among those upregulated at 4°C, likely represents a mechanism to maintain a constant supply of ATP for the synthesis of glycerol and other protective molecules. Accumulation of these molecules is by far the most important component in enhancing viability of baker's yeast strains upon freezing. Overexpression of genes encoding certain proteins associated with translation or redox homeostasis provided specifically protection against extreme cold damage, underlying the importance of these functions in the near-freezing response.

  3. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  4. The impact of different ale brewer’s yeast strains on the proteome of immature beer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation, by ale brewer’s yeast strains with different abilities to degrade fermentable sugars were investigated. Results Beers were fermented from standard hopped wort (13° Plato) using two ale brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains with different attenuation degrees. Both immature beers had the same alcohol and protein concentrations. Immature beer and unfermented wort proteins were analysed by 2-DE and compared in order to determine protein changes arising from fermentation. Distinct protein spots in the beer and wort proteomes were identified using Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and MS/MS and revealed common beer proteins, such as lipid transfer proteins (LTP1 and LTP2), protein Z and amylase-protease inhibitors. During fermentation, two protein spots, corresponding to LTP2, disappeared, while three protein spots were exclusively found in beer. These three proteins, all derived from yeast, were identified as cell wall associated proteins, that is Exg1 (an exo-β-1,3-glucanase), Bgl2 (an endo-β-1,2-glucanase), and Uth1 (a cell wall biogenesis protein). Conclusion Yeast strain dependent changes in the immature beer proteome were identified, i.e. Bgl2 was present in beer brewed with KVL011, while lacking in WLP001 beer. PMID:24079909

  5. Characterization of genome-reduced fission yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mayumi; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tohda, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome is one of the smallest among the free-living eukaryotes. We further reduced the S. pombe gene number by large-scale gene deletion to identify a minimal gene set required for growth under laboratory conditions. The genome-reduced strain has four deletion regions: 168.4 kb in the left arm of chromosome I, 155.4 kb in the right arm of chromosome I, 211.7 kb in the left arm of chromosome II and 121.6 kb in the right arm of chromosome II. The deletions corresponded to a loss of 223 genes of the original ∼5100. The quadruple-deletion strain, with a total deletion size of 657.3 kb, showed a decreased ability to uptake glucose and some amino acids in comparison with the parental strain. The strain also showed increased gene expression of the mating pheromone M-factor precursor and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate -specific glutamate dehydrogenase. There was also a 2.7-fold increase in the concentration of cellular adenosine triphosphate, and levels of the heterologous proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein and secreted human growth hormone were increased by 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively. The transcriptome data from this study have been submitted to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) under the accession number GSE38620 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?token=vjkxjewuywgcovc&acc=GSE38620). PMID:23563150

  6. Transcriptional Regulation and the Diversification of Metabolism in Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, Debra; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors and their binding sites have been proposed as primary targets of evolutionary adaptation because changes to single transcription factors can lead to far-reaching changes in gene expression patterns. Nevertheless, there is very little concrete evidence for such evolutionary changes. Industrial wine yeast strains, of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are a geno- and phenotypically diverse group of organisms that have adapted to the ecological niches of industrial winemaking environments and have been selected to produce specific styles of wine. Variation in transcriptional regulation among wine yeast strains may be responsible for many of the observed differences and specific adaptations to different fermentative conditions in the context of commercial winemaking. We analyzed gene expression profiles of wine yeast strains to assess the impact of transcription factor expression on metabolic networks. The data provide new insights into the molecular basis of variations in gene expression in industrial strains and their consequent effects on metabolic networks important to wine fermentation. We show that the metabolic phenotype of a strain can be shifted in a relatively predictable manner by changing expression levels of individual transcription factors, opening opportunities to modify transcription networks to achieve desirable outcomes. PMID:22042577

  7. Effects of penconazole on two yeast strains: growth kinetics and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Jawich, Dalal; Lteif, Roger; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Strehaiano, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study consisted to evaluate the impact of a pesticide (penconazole) on the growth kinetics and genotoxicity on two yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima). When the penconazole was added at different phases of the growth of M. pulcherrima, no effect was noticed on the kinetics of yeast growth but DNA adducts were observed when penconazole was added in the exponential phase. Increasing doses (1-15 maximum residue limit) of the pesticide added at the beginning of the fermentation did not induce DNA adducts while kinetics were affected.

  8. Isolation of omnipotent suppressors in an [eta+] yeast strain.

    PubMed

    All-Robyn, J A; Kelley-Geraghty, D; Griffin, E; Brown, N; Liebman, S W

    1990-03-01

    Omnipotent suppressors decrease translational fidelity and cause misreading of nonsense codons. In the presence of the non-Mendelian factor [eta+], some alleles of previously isolated omnipotent suppressors are lethal. Thus the current search was conducted in an [eta+] strain in an effort to identify new suppressor loci. A new omnipotent suppressor, SUP39, and alleles of sup35, sup45, SUP44 and SUP46 were identified. Efficiencies of the dominant suppressors were dramatically reduced in strains that were cured of non-Mendelian factors by growth on guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type alleles of SUP44 and SUP46 were cloned and these clones were used to facilitate the genetic analyses. SUP44 was shown to be on chromosome VII linked to cyh2, and SUP46 was clearly identified as distinct from the linked sup45.

  9. Isolation of omnipotent suppressors in an (eta sup + ) yeast strain

    SciTech Connect

    All-Robyn, J.A.; Kelley-Geraghty, D.; Griffin, E.; Brown, N.; Liebman, S.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Omnipotent suppressors decrease translational fidelity and cause misreading of nonsense codons. In the presence of the non-Mendelian factor (eta{sup +}), some alleles of previously isolated omnipotent suppressors are lethal. Thus the current search was conducted in an (eta{sup +}) strain in an effort to identify new suppressor loci. Revertants were isolated using UV irradiation. A new omnipotent suppressor, SUP39, and alleles of sup35, sup45, SUP44 and SUP46 were identified. Efficiencies of the dominant suppressors were dramatically reduced in strains that were cured of non-Mendelian factors by growth on guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type alleles of SUP44 and SUP46 were cloned and these clones were used to facilitate the genetic analyses. SUP44 was shown to be on chromosome VII linked to cyh2, and SUP46 was clearly identified as distinct from the linked sup45.

  10. Association of Constitutive Hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p with a Defective Ethanol Stress Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sake Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Modern sake yeast strains, which produce high concentrations of ethanol, are unexpectedly sensitive to environmental stress during sake brewing. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated a well-characterized yeast stress response mediated by a heat shock element (HSE) and heat shock transcription factor Hsf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast. The HSE-lacZ activity of sake yeast during sake fermentation and under acute ethanol stress was severely impaired compared to that of laboratory yeast. Moreover, the Hsf1p of modern sake yeast was highly and constitutively hyperphosphorylated, irrespective of the extracellular stress. Since HSF1 allele replacement did not significantly affect the HSE-mediated ethanol stress response or Hsf1p phosphorylation patterns in either sake or laboratory yeast, the regulatory machinery of Hsf1p is presumed to function differently between these types of yeast. To identify phosphatases whose loss affected the control of Hsf1p, we screened a series of phosphatase gene deletion mutants in a laboratory strain background. Among the 29 mutants, a Δppt1 mutant exhibited constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p, similarly to the modern sake yeast strains, which lack the entire PPT1 gene locus. We confirmed that the expression of laboratory yeast-derived functional PPT1 recovered the HSE-mediated stress response of sake yeast. In addition, deletion of PPT1 in laboratory yeast resulted in enhanced fermentation ability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p caused by loss of the PPT1 gene at least partly accounts for the defective stress response and high ethanol productivity of modern sake yeast strains. PMID:22057870

  11. Association of constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p with a defective ethanol stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Modern sake yeast strains, which produce high concentrations of ethanol, are unexpectedly sensitive to environmental stress during sake brewing. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated a well-characterized yeast stress response mediated by a heat shock element (HSE) and heat shock transcription factor Hsf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast. The HSE-lacZ activity of sake yeast during sake fermentation and under acute ethanol stress was severely impaired compared to that of laboratory yeast. Moreover, the Hsf1p of modern sake yeast was highly and constitutively hyperphosphorylated, irrespective of the extracellular stress. Since HSF1 allele replacement did not significantly affect the HSE-mediated ethanol stress response or Hsf1p phosphorylation patterns in either sake or laboratory yeast, the regulatory machinery of Hsf1p is presumed to function differently between these types of yeast. To identify phosphatases whose loss affected the control of Hsf1p, we screened a series of phosphatase gene deletion mutants in a laboratory strain background. Among the 29 mutants, a Δppt1 mutant exhibited constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p, similarly to the modern sake yeast strains, which lack the entire PPT1 gene locus. We confirmed that the expression of laboratory yeast-derived functional PPT1 recovered the HSE-mediated stress response of sake yeast. In addition, deletion of PPT1 in laboratory yeast resulted in enhanced fermentation ability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p caused by loss of the PPT1 gene at least partly accounts for the defective stress response and high ethanol productivity of modern sake yeast strains.

  12. Biocontrol ability and action mechanism of food-isolated yeast strains against Botrytis cinerea causing post-harvest bunch rot of table grape.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Strains belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans, isolated from different food sources, were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic mold Botrytis cinerea. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species and medium. Killer strains of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae showed the highest biocontrol in vitro activity, as demonstrated by largest inhibition halos. The competition for iron and the ability to form biofilm and to colonize fruit wounds were hypothesized as the main action mechanisms for M. pulcherrima. The production of hydrolytic enzymes and the ability to colonize the wounds were the most important mechanisms for biocontrol activity in A. pullulans and W. anomalus, which also showed high ability to form biofilm. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was observed for the species W. anomalus, S. cerevisiae and M. pulcherrima. Our study clearly indicates that multiple modes of action may explain as M. pulcherrima provide excellent control of postharvest botrytis bunch rot of grape.

  13. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    PubMed

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation.

  14. Differential Proteome Analysis of a Flor Yeast Strain under Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2017-03-28

    Several Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (flor yeasts) form a biofilm (flor velum) on the surface of Sherry wines after fermentation, when glucose is depleted. This flor velum is fundamental to biological aging of these particular wines. In this study, we identify abundant proteins in the formation of the biofilm of an industrial flor yeast strain. A database search to enrich flor yeast "biological process" and "cellular component" according to Gene Ontology Terminology (GO Terms) and, "pathways" was carried out. The most abundant proteins detected were largely involved in respiration, translation, stress damage prevention and repair, amino acid metabolism (glycine, isoleucine, leucine and arginine), glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and biosynthesis of vitamin B9 (folate). These proteins were located in cellular components as in the peroxisome, mitochondria, vacuole, cell wall and extracellular region; being these two last directly related with the flor formation. Proteins like Bgl2p, Gcv3p, Hyp2p, Mdh1p, Suc2p and Ygp1p were quantified in very high levels. This study reveals some expected processes and provides new and important information for the design of conditions and genetic constructions of flor yeasts for improving the cellular survival and, thus, to optimize biological aging of Sherry wine production.

  15. Biomarkers for detecting nitrogen deficiency during alcoholic fermentation in different commercial wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Chiva, Rosana; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Nitrogen deficiencies in grape musts are one of the main causes of stuck or sluggish wine fermentations. Several putative biomarkers were tested in order to analyze their appropriateness to detect nitrogen stress in the yeast. To this aim, four commercial wine strains (PDM, ARM, RVA and TTA) were grown in a synthetic grape must with different nitrogen concentrations. Trehalose accumulation, arginase activity and the expression of eleven genes were tested in these wine strains, known to have different nitrogen requirements. The overall response of the four strains was similar, with differences in response intensity (PDM and RVA with higher intensity) and response time (which was also related with nitrogen consumption time). Trehalose response was mostly related to entry into the stationary phase, whereas arginase activity was responsive to nitrogen depletion, although its measurement is too complicated to be used for routine monitoring during winemaking. The expression of the genes DAL4, DAL5, DUR3 and GAP1 was clearly related to nitrogen depletion and thus, GAP1 and DAL4 were selected as markers of nitrogen deficiency. In order to adapt expression analysis to winemaking conditions, the original strains were transformed into reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the promoters for GAP1 and DAL4. The transformants had a similar fermentative capacity to the parental strains and were able to detect alterations in yeast physiological status due to nitrogen limitations.

  16. Computational Models for Prediction of Yeast Strain Potential for Winemaking from Phenotypic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Umek, Lan; Fonseca, Elza; Drumonde-Neves, João; Dequin, Sylvie; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of different strains. The objective of the present work was to use data mining approaches to identify those phenotypic tests that are most useful to predict a strain's potential for winemaking. We have constituted a S. cerevisiae collection comprising 172 strains of worldwide geographical origins or technological applications. Their phenotype was screened by considering 30 physiological traits that are important from an oenological point of view. Growth in the presence of potassium bisulphite, growth at 40°C, and resistance to ethanol were mostly contributing to strain variability, as shown by the principal component analysis. In the hierarchical clustering of phenotypic profiles the strains isolated from the same wines and vineyards were scattered throughout all clusters, whereas commercial winemaking strains tended to co-cluster. Mann-Whitney test revealed significant associations between phenotypic results and strain's technological application or origin. Naïve Bayesian classifier identified 3 of the 30 phenotypic tests of growth in iprodion (0.05 mg/mL), cycloheximide (0.1 µg/mL) and potassium bisulphite (150 mg/mL) that provided most information for the assignment of a strain to the group of commercial strains. The probability of a strain to be assigned to this group was 27% using the entire phenotypic profile and increased to 95%, when only results from the three tests were considered. Results show the usefulness of computational approaches to simplify strain selection

  17. Computational models for prediction of yeast strain potential for winemaking from phenotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Inês; Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Fonseca, Elza; Drumonde-Neves, João; Dequin, Sylvie; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from diverse natural habitats harbour a vast amount of phenotypic diversity, driven by interactions between yeast and the respective environment. In grape juice fermentations, strains are exposed to a wide array of biotic and abiotic stressors, which may lead to strain selection and generate naturally arising strain diversity. Certain phenotypes are of particular interest for the winemaking industry and could be identified by screening of large number of different strains. The objective of the present work was to use data mining approaches to identify those phenotypic tests that are most useful to predict a strain's potential for winemaking. We have constituted a S. cerevisiae collection comprising 172 strains of worldwide geographical origins or technological applications. Their phenotype was screened by considering 30 physiological traits that are important from an oenological point of view. Growth in the presence of potassium bisulphite, growth at 40 °C, and resistance to ethanol were mostly contributing to strain variability, as shown by the principal component analysis. In the hierarchical clustering of phenotypic profiles the strains isolated from the same wines and vineyards were scattered throughout all clusters, whereas commercial winemaking strains tended to co-cluster. Mann-Whitney test revealed significant associations between phenotypic results and strain's technological application or origin. Naïve Bayesian classifier identified 3 of the 30 phenotypic tests of growth in iprodion (0.05 mg/mL), cycloheximide (0.1 µg/mL) and potassium bisulphite (150 mg/mL) that provided most information for the assignment of a strain to the group of commercial strains. The probability of a strain to be assigned to this group was 27% using the entire phenotypic profile and increased to 95%, when only results from the three tests were considered. Results show the usefulness of computational approaches to simplify strain selection

  18. Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strain Engineered to Convert Glucose, Mannose, Arabinose, and Xylose (GMAX) to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology for engineering an industrial yeast strain for production of ethanol from glucose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose (GMAX-yeast) using both corn starch and cellulosic feedstocks with simultaneous production of valuable coproducts, including biodiesel, will be discussed. A stable industrial...

  19. Enhanced biotransformation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural by newly developed ethanologenic yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis; Slininger, Patricia J; Gorsich, Steve W

    2005-01-01

    Furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are representative inhibitors among many inhibitive compounds derived from biomass degradation and saccharification for bioethanol fermentation. Most yeasts, including industrial strains, are susceptible to these inhibitory compounds, especially when multiple inhibitors are present. Additional detoxification steps add cost and complexity to the process and generate additional waste products. To promote efficient bioethanol production, we studied the mechanisms of stress tolerance, particularly to fermentation inhibitors such as furfural and HMF. We recently reported a metabolite of 2,5-bis-hydroxymethylfuran as a conversion product of HMF and characterized a dose-dependent response of ethanologenic yeasts to inhibitors. In this study, we present newly adapted strains that demonstrated higher levels of tolerance to furfural and HMF. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 307-12H60 and 307-12H120 and Pichia stipitis 307 10H60 showed enhanced biotransformation ability to reduce HMF to 2,5-bis-hydroxymethylfuran at 30 and 60 mM, and S. cerevisiae 307-12-F40 converted furfural into furfuryl alcohol at significantly higher rates compared to the parental strains. Strains of S. cerevisiae converted 100% of HMF at 60 mM and S. cerevisiae 307-12-F40 converted 100% of furfural into furfuryl alcohol at 30 mM. The results of this study suggest a possible in situ detoxification of the inhibitors by using more inhibitor-tolerant yeast strains for bioethanol fermentation. The development of such tolerant strains provided a basis and useful materials for further studies on the mechanisms of stress tolerance.

  20. Quantification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeast strains during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Giovanna; Rosi, Iolanda; Bertuccioli, Mario

    2012-11-15

    In order to improve knowledge about the oenological characteristics of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains, and to reconsider their contribution to wine quality, we studied the release of polysaccharides by 13 non-Saccharomyces strains of different species (three wine yeasts, six grape yeasts, and three spoilage yeasts) during alcoholic fermentation in synthetic must. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were included for comparison. All of the non-Saccharomyces strains released polysaccharides into fermentation medium; the amount released depended on the yeast species, the number of cells formed and their physiological conditions. Normalizing the quantity of macromolecules released to the cell biomass revealed that most non-Saccharomyces strains produced a greater quantity of polysaccharides compared to S. cerevisiae strains after 7 and 14days of fermentation. This capacity was particularly expressed in the studied wine spoilage yeasts (Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis). Chemical characterization of exocellular polysaccharides produced by non-Saccharomyces yeasts revealed them to essentially be mannoproteins with high mannose contents, ranging from 93% for S'codes. ludwigii to 73-74% for Pichia anomala and Starmerella bombicola. Protein contents varied from 9% for P. anomala to 29% for Z. bailii. These compositions were very similar to those of the S. cerevisiae strains, and to the chemical composition of the cell wall mannoproteins of different yeast species. The presence of galactose, in addition to mannose and glucose, in the exocellular polysaccharides released by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, confirmed the parietal nature of the polysaccharides released by non-Saccharomyces yeasts; only this species has a galactomannan located in the outer layer of the cell wall.

  1. Killer behavior within the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Leal, Efrén; Elizondo-Zertuche, Mariana; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; García-Maldonado, Nancy; Adame-Rodríguez, Juan M; González, Gloria M

    2014-11-01

    A group of 29 isolates of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, 29 of Candida orthopsilosis, and 4 of Candida metapsilosis were assayed for the presence of killer activity using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26609 as a sensitive strain. All C. metapsilosis isolates showed killer activity at 25 °C while strains of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto or C. orthopsilosis did not exhibit this activity. Sensitivity to killer toxins was evaluated using a set of previously reported killer strains of clinical origin. Only 11 isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex were inhibited by at least one killer isolate without resulting in any clear pattern, except for C. parapsilosis sensu stricto ATCC 22019, which was inhibited by every killer strain with the exception of C. parapsilosis and Candida utilis. The lack of sensitivity to killer activity among isolates of the genus Candida suggests that their toxins belong to the same killer type. Differentiation of species within the C. parapsilosis complex using the killer system may be feasible if a more taxonomically diverse panel of killer strains is employed.

  2. Identification of Wild Yeast Strains and Analysis of Their β-Glucan and Glutathione Levels for Use in Makgeolli Brewing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Kim, Tae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Makgeolli, also known as Takju, is a non-filtered traditional Korean alcoholic beverage that contains various floating matter, including yeast cells, which contributes to its high physiological functionality. In the present study, we assessed the levels of β-glucan and glutathione in various yeast strains isolated from traditional Korean Nuruk and selected a β-glucan- and glutathione-rich yeast strain to add value to Makgeolli by enhancing its physiological functionality through increased levels of these compounds. Yeast β-glucan levels ranged from 6.26% to 32.69% (dry basis) and were strongly species-dependent. Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Nuruk contained 25.53 µg/mg glutathione, 0.70 µg/mg oxidized glutathione, and 11.69 µg/g and 47.85 µg/g spermidine and L-ornithine monohydrochloride, respectively. To produce functional Makgeolli, a β-glucan- and glutathione-rich yeast strain was selected in a screening analysis. Makgeolli fermented with the selected yeast strain contained higher β-glucan and glutathione levels than commercial Makgeolli. Using the selected yeast strain to produce Makgeolli with high β-glucan and glutathione content may enable the production of functional Makgeolli. PMID:25606008

  3. Melanin production by a yeast strain XJ5-1 of Aureobasidium melanogenum isolated from the Taklimakan desert and its role in the yeast survival in stress environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhe; Wang, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Ly-Ly; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The yeast strain XJ5-1 isolated from the Taklimakan desert soil was identified to be a strain of Aureobasdium melanogenum and could produce a large amount of melanin when it was grown in the PDA medium, but its melanin biosynthesis and expression of the PKS gene responsible for the melanin biosynthesis was significantly repressed in the presence of (NH4)2SO4. However, A. melanogenum P5 strain isolated from a mangrove ecosystem grown in both the presence and the absence of (NH4)2SO4 did not produce any melanin. The cell size of A. melanogenum XJ5-1 strain was much higher than that of A. melanogenum P5 strain. The melanized cells of the yeast strain XJ5-1 had higher tolerance to UV radiation, oxidation (200.0 mM H2O2), heat treatment (40 °C), salt shock (200.0 g/L NaCl), desiccation and strong acid hydrolysis (6.0 M HCl) at high temperature (80 °C) than the non-melanized cells of the same yeast strain XJ5-1. At the same time, the melanized cells of the yeast strain XJ5-1 also had higher tolerance to UV radiation, oxidation (200.0 mM H2O2), desiccation and strong acid hydrolysis (6.0 M HCl) at high temperature (80 °C) than A. melanogenum P5 strain, but had similar resistance to heat treatment (40 °C) and salt shock (200.0 g/L NaCl) compared to those of A. melanogenum P5 strain. All the results revealed that many characteristics of A. melanogenum XJ5-1 isolated from the Taklimakan desert soil was different from those of A. melanogenum P5 strain isolated from the mangrove ecosystem.

  4. Melatonin and derived l-tryptophan metabolites produced during alcoholic fermentation by different wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, E; Álvarez-Fernández, M A; Valero, E; Troncoso, A M; García-Parrilla, M C

    2017-02-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms in humans. Evidence has recently been found of its occurrence in wines and its role in the winemaking process. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is consequently thought to be important in Melatonin synthesis, but limited data and reference texts are available on this synthetic pathway. This paper aims to elucidate whether the synthetic pathway of Melatonin in Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains involves these intermediates. To this end, seven commercial strains comprising Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Red Fruit, ES488, Lalvin QA23, Uvaferm BC, and Lalvin ICV GRE) and non-Saccharomyces (Torulaspora delbrueckii and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) were monitored, under controlled fermentation conditions, in synthetic must, for seven days. Samples were analysed using a UHPLC-HRMS system (Qexactive). Five out of the seven strains formed Melatonin during the fermentation process: three S. cerevisiae strains and the two non-Saccharomyces. Additionally, other compounds derived from l-tryptophan occurred during fermentation.

  5. Glucocorticoid cell reception in mice of different strains with natural killer cell activity depressed during immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashko, V.N.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study differences in stress-induced depression of natural killer cell activity in mice of different inbred lines, depending on parameters of glucocorticoid binding with glucorticoid receptors of spleen cells and on the hormonal status of the animals. In determining the parameters of glucocorticoid binding on intact splenocytes, aliquots of a suspension of washed splenocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled dexamethasone.

  6. Nitrogen requirements of commercial wine yeast strains during fermentation of a synthetic grape must.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Chiva, Rosana; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Nitrogen deficiencies in grape musts are one of the main causes of stuck or sluggish wine fermentations. Currently, the most common method for dealing with nitrogen-deficient fermentations is adding supplementary nitrogen (usually ammonium phosphate). However, it is important to know the specific nitrogen requirement of each strain, to avoid excessive addition that can lead to microbial instability and ethyl carbamate accumulation. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of increasing nitrogen concentrations of three different nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance in four industrial wine yeast strains. This task was carried out using statistical modeling techniques. The strains PDM and RVA showed higher growth-rate and maximum population size and consumed nitrogen much more quickly than strains ARM and TTA. Likewise, the strains PDM and RVA were also the greatest nitrogen demanders. Thus, we can conclude that these differences in nitrogen demand positively correlated with higher growth rate and higher nitrogen uptake rate. The most direct effect of employing an adequate nitrogen concentration is the increase in biomass, which involves a higher fermentation rate. However, the impact of nitrogen on fermentation rate is not exclusively due to the increase in biomass because the strain TTA, which showed the worst growth behavior, had the best fermentation activity. Some strains may adapt a strategy whereby fewer cells with higher metabolic activity are produced. Regarding the nitrogen source used, all the strains showed the better and worse fermentation performance with arginine and ammonium, respectively.

  7. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xianglin; Zheng, Daoqiong; Liu, Tianzhe; Wang, Pinmei; Zhao, Wenpeng; Zhu, Muyuan; Jiang, Xinhang; Zhao, Yuhua; Wu, Xuechang

    2012-01-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition) and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2) with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes.

  8. A Novel Strategy to Construct Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Very High Gravity Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianzhe; Wang, Pinmei; Zhao, Wenpeng; Zhu, Muyuan; Jiang, Xinhang; Zhao, Yuhua; Wu, Xuechang

    2012-01-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition) and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2) with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes. PMID:22363590

  9. [Influence of yeast extract on the fermentation of glucose by the demulsifying strain Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Kai; Li, Ming-Xia; Wang, Cai-Lin; Lu, Li-Jun; Liu, Jia

    2013-04-01

    The demulsifying strain Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1, isolated from oil contaminated soil, was cultivated with glucose as the carbon source. The influences of yeast extract on the growth, demulsifying ability and the element composition of the strain were investigated. The results showed that the yeast extract could increase the biomass and enhance the glucose utilization of Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1. When the concentration of the yeast extract was 5 g x L(-1), the biomass was increased up to 3.0 g x L(-1), and the glucose utilization achieved 58%. The demulsifying ability of the strain was improved with increasing yeast extract concentration. When the concentration of the yeast extract was 10 g x L(-1), the demulsification ratio of the obtained cell was 76%. While the C/N ratio of the cells decreased with the increasing concentration of yeast extract. The proteins of cells were extracted and measured. The results showed that the proteins of the obtained cell increased with the increasing concentration of yeast extract, in accordance with the increased concentrations of proteins on the surface of the cells as measured by FTIR. It is estimated that the increase of the proteins leads to the improvement of the demulsifying ability of the demulsifying strain and theses proteins play essential roles in the demulsifying process.

  10. Conditional lethality of a yeast strain expressing human RHOA in place of RHO1.

    PubMed Central

    Qadota, H; Anraku, Y; Botstein, D; Ohya, Y

    1994-01-01

    The yeast RHO1 GTPase, which has 72% amino acid sequence identity with its human counterpart, RHOA, is essential for growth, although the reason has not been investigated. We report here that yeast strains that rely solely on expression of human RHOA in place of RHO1 are able to grow at 23 degrees C but grow neither at 37 degrees C nor in the presence of 300 mM CaCl2 even at 23 degrees C. Measurements of steady-state protein levels indicate that inability to grow at the restrictive temperature is not due to instability of the protein. Homolog scanning with the two GTPases identified a small, 27-residue region of RHO1 which, when substituted into RHOA, confers full function in yeast. This region corresponds to the alpha 3-helix loop 7 region of RAS; the same region was reported to determine specificity of function between GTPases of the RAB family, Sec4p and Ypt1p. By examining the phenotype of RHOA substitution strains at nonpermissive temperature, we found evidence suggesting that the normal function of RHO1 is to maintain osmotic integrity. Images PMID:7937763

  11. Identification of yeast strains isolated from marcha in Sikkim, a microbial starter for amylolytic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tsuyoshi, Naoko; Fudou, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Shigeru; Kozaki, Michio; Tamang, Namrata; Thapa, Saroj; Tamang, Jyoti P

    2005-03-15

    Marcha or murcha is a traditional amylolytic starter used to produce sweet-sour alcoholic drinks, commonly called jaanr in the Himalayan regions of India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet (China). The aim of this study was to examine the microflora of marcha collected from Sikkim in India, focusing on yeast flora and their roles. Twenty yeast strains were isolated from six samples of marcha and identified by genetic and phenotypic methods. They were first classified into four groups (Group I, II, III, and IV) based on physiological features using an API test. Phylogenetic, morphological, and physiological characterization identified the isolates as Saccharomyces bayanus (Group I); Candida glabrata (Group II); Pichia anomala (Group III); and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Saccharomycopsis capsularis, and Pichia burtonii (Group IV). Among them, the Group I, II, and III strains produced ethanol. The isolates of Group IV had high amylolytic activity. Because all marcha samples tested contained both starch degraders and ethanol producers, it was hypothesized that all four groups of yeast (Group I, II, III, and IV) contribute to starch-based alcohol fermentation.

  12. Analysis and Dynamics of the Chromosomal Complements of Wild Sparkling-Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Dolors; Carro, David; Fernández-Larrea, Juan; Piña, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains that are able to carry out the second fermentation of sparkling wine from spontaneously fermenting musts in El Penedès (Spain) by specifically designed selection protocols. All of them (26 strains) showed one of two very similar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction patterns, whereas their karyotypes differed. These strains showed high rates of karyotype instability, which were dependent on both the medium and the strain, during vegetative growth. In all cases, the mtDNA restriction pattern was conserved in strains kept under the same conditions. Analysis of different repetitive sequences in their genomes suggested that ribosomal DNA repeats play an important role in the changes in size observed in chromosome XII, whereas SUC genes or Ty elements did not show amplification or transposition processes that could be related to rearrangements of the chromosomes showing these sequences. Karyotype changes also occurred in monosporidic diploid derivatives. We propose that these changes originated mainly from ectopic recombination between repeated sequences interspersed in the genome. None of the rearranged karyotypes provided a selective advantage strong enough to allow the strains to displace the parental strains. The nature and frequency of these changes suggest that they may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the genetic diversity observed in S. cerevisiae wild populations. PMID:10103269

  13. Glycerol production by Oenococcus oeni during sequential and simultaneous cultures with wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Ale, Cesar E; Farías, Marta E; Strasser de Saad, Ana M; Pasteris, Sergio E

    2014-07-01

    Growth and fermentation patterns of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kloeckera apiculata, and Oenococcus oeni strains cultured in grape juice medium were studied. In pure, sequential and simultaneous cultures, the strains reached the stationary growth phase between 2 and 3 days. Pure and mixed K. apiculata and S. cerevisiae cultures used mainly glucose, producing ethanol, organic acids, and 4.0 and 0.1 mM glycerol, respectively. In sequential cultures, O. oeni achieved about 1 log unit at 3 days using mainly fructose and L-malic acid. Highest sugars consumption was detected in K. apiculata supernatants, lactic acid being the major end-product. 8.0 mM glycerol was found in 6-day culture supernatants. In simultaneous cultures, total sugars and L-malic acid were used at 3 days and 98% of ethanol and glycerol were detected. This study represents the first report of the population dynamics and metabolic behavior of yeasts and O. oeni in sequential and simultaneous cultures and contributes to the selection of indigenous strains to design starter cultures for winemaking, also considering the inclusion of K. apiculata. The sequential inoculation of yeasts and O. oeni would enhance glycerol production, which confers desirable organoleptic characteristics to wines, while organic acids levels would not affect their sensory profile.

  14. Comparison of the MTT1- and MAL31-like maltose transporter genes in lager yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Judith; Walsh, Mike C; van Heusden, G Paul H; Steensma, H Yde

    2010-09-01

    Maltose transporter genes were isolated from four lager yeast strains and sequenced. All four strains contain at least two different types of maltose transporter genes, MTT1 and MAL31. In addition, 'long' 2.7 kb, and 'short' 2.4 kb, versions of each type exist. The size difference is caused by the insertion of two repeats of 147 bp into the promoter regions of the long versions of the genes. As a consequence of the insertion, two Mal63-binding sites move 294 bp away from the transcription initiation site. The 2.4- and 2.7-kb versions are further highly similar. Only the 2.4-kb versions and not the 2.7-kb versions of MTT1 could restore the rapid growth of lager yeast strain A15 on maltotriose in the presence of antimycin A. These results suggest that insertion of the two repeats into the promoter region of the 'long versions' of MTT1 genes led to a diminished expression of these genes. None of the tested long and short versions of the MAL31 genes were able to restore this growth. As the promoter regions of the MTT1 and MAL31 genes are identical, small differences in the protein sequence may be responsible for the different properties of these genes.

  15. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  16. Effects of GPD1 Overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Commercial Wine Yeast Strains Lacking ALD6 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cambon, Brigitte; Monteil, Virginie; Remize, Fabienne; Camarasa, Carole; Dequin, Sylvie

    2006-01-01

    The utilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overproducing glycerol and with a reduced ethanol yield is a potentially valuable strategy for producing wine with decreased ethanol content. However, glycerol overproduction is accompanied by acetate accumulation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the overexpression of GPD1, coding for glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in three commercial wine yeast strains in which the two copies of ALD6 encoding the NADP+-dependent Mg2+-activated cytosolic acetaldehyde dehydrogenase have been deleted. Under wine fermentation conditions, the engineered industrial strains exhibit fermentation performance and growth properties similar to those of the wild type. Acetate was produced at concentrations similar to that of the wild-type strains, whereas sugar was efficiently diverted to glycerol. The ethanol yield of the GPD1 ald6 industrial strains was 15 to 20% lower than that in the controls. However, these strains accumulated acetoin at considerable levels due to inefficient reduction to 2,3-butanediol. Due to the low taste and odor thresholds of acetoin and its negative sensorial impact on wine, novel engineering strategies will be required for a proper adjustment of the metabolites at the acetaldehyde branch point. PMID:16820460

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Basidiomycetous Yeast Cryptococcus sp. Strain Mo29 Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus sp. strain Mo29 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this basidiomycetous yeast strain, which has highlighted its biotechnological potential as revealed by the presence of genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites and biotechnologically important enzymes. PMID:27389259

  18. Influence of preserved brewing yeast strains on fermentation behavior and flocculation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Chul; Wackerbauer, Karl; Beckmann, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Preservation methods on the physiological and brewing technical characters in bottom and top brewing yeast strains were investigated. The preserved yeasts were reactivated after 24 months storage and grown up to stationary phase. The samples of filter paper storage indicated a higher cell growth and viability during propagation than those of nitrogen and lyophilization storage independent on propagation temperature. In addition, the filter paper storage demonstrated a faster absorption of free amino nitrogen and a highest level of higher aliphatic alcohols production during propagation than other preservation methods, which can be attributed to intensive cell growth during propagation. Moreover, the filter paper storage showed a faster accumulation for glycogen and trehalose during propagation, whereas, in particular, lyophilization storage noted a longer adaptation time regarding synthesis of glycogen and trehalose with delayed cell growth. In beer analysis, the filter paper storage formed an increased higher aliphatic alcohols than control. In conclusion, the preservation of filter paper affected positively on yeast growth, viability and beer quality independent on propagation temperature. In addition, in this study, it was obtained that the HICF and Helm-test can be involved as rapid methods for determination of flocculation capacity. PMID:20368948

  19. Metabolomics-based prediction models of yeast strains for screening of metabolites contributing to ethanol stress tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Z.; Fukusaki, E.

    2016-06-01

    The increased demand for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources has driven the development of various microbial systems to produce biofuels. One of such systems is the ethanol-producing yeast. Although yeast produces ethanol naturally using its native pathways, production yield is low and requires improvement for commercial biofuel production. Moreover, ethanol is toxic to yeast and thus ethanol tolerance should be improved to further enhance ethanol production. In this study, we employed metabolomics-based strategy using 30 single-gene deleted yeast strains to construct multivariate models for ethanol tolerance and screen metabolites that relate to ethanol sensitivity/tolerance. The information obtained from this study can be used as an input for strain improvement via metabolic engineering.

  20. Fluorescence and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to characterize yeast strains by autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, H.; Goldys, E. M.; Ma, J.

    2006-02-01

    We characterised populations of wild type baking and brewing yeast cells using intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime microscopy, in order to obtain quantitative identifiers of different strains. The cell autofluorescence was excited at 405 nm and observed within 440-540 nm range where strong cell to cell variability was observed. The images were analyzed using customised public domain software, which provided information on cell size, intensity and texture-related features. In light of significant diversity of the data, statistical methods were utilized to assess the validity of the proposed quantitative identifiers for strain differentiation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied to confirm that empirical distribution functions for size, intensity and entropy for different strains were statistically different. These characteristics were followed with culture age of 24, 48 and 72 h, (the latter corresponding to a stationary growth phase) and size, and to some extent entropy, were found to be independent of age. The fluorescence intensity presented a distinctive evolution with age, different for each of the examined strains. The lifetime analysis revealed a short decay time component of 1.4 ns and a second, longer one with the average value of 3.5 ns and a broad distribution. High variability of lifetime values within cells was observed however a lifetime texture feature in the studied strains was statistically different.

  1. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major challenge for the production of ethanol from biomass-derived feedstocks is to develop yeasts that can sustain growth under the variety of inhibitory conditions present in the production process, e.g., high osmolality, high ethanol titers, and/or elevated temperatures (≥40°C). Using adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40°C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses. Thermotolerant yeast strains showed horizontal displacement of their thermal reaction norms to higher temperatures. Hence, their optimal and maximum growth temperatures increased by about 3°C, whereas they showed a growth trade-off at temperatures below 34°C. Computational analysis of the physical properties of proteins showed that the lethal temperature for yeast is around 49°C, as a large fraction of the yeast proteins denature above this temperature. Our analysis also indicated that the number of functions involved in controlling the growth rate decreased in the thermotolerant strains compared with the number in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures. In combination with altered sterol composition of cellular membranes, glycerol overproduction was also associated with yeast osmotolerance and improved tolerance of high concentrations of glucose and ethanol. Our study shows that thermal adaptation of yeast is suitable for improving yeast resistance to inhibitory conditions found in industrial ethanol production processes. PMID:26199325

  2. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-04

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days.

  3. The wine yeast strain-dependent expression of genes implicated in sulfide production in response to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Barbosa, Catarina; Jimenez-Marti, Elena; Del Olmo, Marcel Li; Mendes-Faia, Arlete

    2010-09-01

    Sulfur metabolism in S. cerevisiae is well established, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of sulfide remain obscure. Here we investigated by real time RT-PCR the dependence of expression levels of MET3, MET5/ECM17, MET10, MET16 and MET17 along with SSU1 on nitrogen availability in two wine yeast strains that produce divergent sulfide profiles. MET3 was the most highly expressed of the genes studied in strain PYCC4072, and SSU1 in strain UCD522. Strains behaved differently according to the sampling times, with UCD522 and PYCC4072 showing the highest expression levels at 120h and 72h, respectively. In the presence of 267mg assimilable N/l, the genes were more highly expressed in strain UCD522 than in PYCC4072. MET5/ECM17 and MET17 were only weakly expressed in both strains under any condition tested. MET10 and SSU1 in both strains, but MET16 only in PYCC4072, were consistently up-regulated when sulfide production was inhibited. This study illustrates that strain genotype could be important in determining enzyme activities and therefore the rate of sulfide liberation. This linkage, for some yeast strains, of sulfide production to expression levels of genes associated to sulfate assimilation and sulfur amino acid biosynthesis could be relevant for defining new strategies for genetic improvement of wine yeasts.

  4. Mechanisms of yeast flocculation: comparison of top- and bottom-fermenting strains.

    PubMed

    Dengis, P B; Nélissen, L R; Rouxhet, P G

    1995-02-01

    The flocculation of two brewing yeast strains, top-fermenting strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae MUCL 38485 and bottom-fermenting strain Saccharomyces carlsbergensis MUCL 28285, has been investigated by means of a turbidimetric test. The two strains showed different electrical properties, a different hydrophobicity, and a different surface chemical composition. They flocculated according to completely different mechanisms; however, no correlation between the cell physicochemical properties and the onset of flocculation was found for either strain. Flocculation of the bottom strain was governed by a lectin-mediated mechanism. It was inhibited by mannose and some other sugars, required calcium specifically, occurred in a narrow pH range different from the isoelectric point, and was not influenced by ethanol. The onset of flocculation at the end of the exponential phase was controlled both by the appearance of "active" lectins at the cell surface and by the decrease in sugar concentration in the solution. Flocculation of the top strain was not inhibited by mannose, did not require the addition of calcium, and took place at the cell isoelectric point. Low concentrations of ethanol broadened the pH range in which the cells flocculated, and flocculation was favored by an increase of ionic strength. Adsorbed ethanol may induce flocculation by reducing the electrostatic repulsion between cells, by decreasing steric stabilization, and/or by allowing the protrusion of polymer chains into the liquid phase. The onset of flocculation was controlled by both a change of the cell surface and an increase in ethanol concentration. The only evidence for an adhesin-mediated mechanism was the specific requirement for a small amount of calcium.

  5. Mechanisms of yeast flocculation: comparison of top- and bottom-fermenting strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dengis, P B; Nélissen, L R; Rouxhet, P G

    1995-01-01

    The flocculation of two brewing yeast strains, top-fermenting strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae MUCL 38485 and bottom-fermenting strain Saccharomyces carlsbergensis MUCL 28285, has been investigated by means of a turbidimetric test. The two strains showed different electrical properties, a different hydrophobicity, and a different surface chemical composition. They flocculated according to completely different mechanisms; however, no correlation between the cell physicochemical properties and the onset of flocculation was found for either strain. Flocculation of the bottom strain was governed by a lectin-mediated mechanism. It was inhibited by mannose and some other sugars, required calcium specifically, occurred in a narrow pH range different from the isoelectric point, and was not influenced by ethanol. The onset of flocculation at the end of the exponential phase was controlled both by the appearance of "active" lectins at the cell surface and by the decrease in sugar concentration in the solution. Flocculation of the top strain was not inhibited by mannose, did not require the addition of calcium, and took place at the cell isoelectric point. Low concentrations of ethanol broadened the pH range in which the cells flocculated, and flocculation was favored by an increase of ionic strength. Adsorbed ethanol may induce flocculation by reducing the electrostatic repulsion between cells, by decreasing steric stabilization, and/or by allowing the protrusion of polymer chains into the liquid phase. The onset of flocculation was controlled by both a change of the cell surface and an increase in ethanol concentration. The only evidence for an adhesin-mediated mechanism was the specific requirement for a small amount of calcium. PMID:7574609

  6. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-10-15

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces' metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  7. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains. PMID:28231223

  8. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Pretreated Lignocellulosic Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to util...

  9. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Sucrose, Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically with Concurrent Coproduct Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially. Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to uti...

  10. Using RFLP-mtDNA for the rapid monitoring of the dominant inoculated yeast strain in industrial wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Esther; Infante, Juan José; Molina, Montse; Rebordinos, Laureana; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2011-01-31

    The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-RFLP) has been applied as a test to monitor the abundance of the starter yeast strain during industrial wine fermentations without previous isolation of yeast colonies. For white wine fermentations, we performed a rapid assay consisting in taking a sample of fermenting must, purifying the DNA from harvested cells, and obtaining the restriction patterns by digestion with the endonuclease HinfI. The same protocol, but adding an overnight cultivation step before DNA purification, was also applied to red wine fermentations. The results were compared with those obtained from the subsequent characterisation of strains, for the same samples, by analysis of the electrophoretic karyotype of isolated yeast colonies. In all cases, when the inoculated strain was dominant within the yeast population, the rapid assay anticipated the result by showing the coincidence between the restriction profiles obtained from both total cells and the inoculated strain. The results were obtained at 11 or 23 h after sampling for white- or red-wine fermentations respectively. This method allows a rapid intervention of the wine-producer if the presence of the inoculated yeasts has suffered a sudden decrease in any phase of the fermentation process.

  11. Three different targets for the genetic modification of wine yeast strains resulting in improved effectiveness of bentonite fining.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-09-23

    Bentonite fining is used in the clarification of white wines to prevent protein haze. This treatment results in the loss of a significant portion of the wine itself, as well as aroma compounds important for the quality of white wines. Among other interesting effects on wine quality, yeast cell wall mannoproteins have been shown to stabilize wine against protein haze. A previous work showed that wine yeast strains engineered by deletion of KNR4 release increased amounts of mannoproteins and produce wines showing attenuated responses in protein haze tests. This paper describes the technological properties of several new recombinant wine yeast strains, deleted for genes involved in cell-wall biogenesis, as well as the regulatory gene KNR4. Stabilization of wines produced by three of the six recombinant strains analyzed required 20-40% less bentonite than those made with their nonrecombinant counterparts. The availability of multiple targets for genetically improving yeast mannoprotein release, as shown in this work, is relevant not only for genetic engineering of wine yeast but especially for the feasibility of genetically improving this character by classical methods of strain development such as random mutagenesis or sexual hybridization.

  12. Decreased ethyl carbamate generation during Chinese rice wine fermentation by disruption of CAR1 in an industrial yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianhui; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Chao; Lu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Xie, Guangfa

    2014-06-16

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolizes arginine to ornithine and urea during wine fermentations. In the fermentation of Chinese rice wine, yeast strains of S. cerevisiae do not fully metabolize urea, which will be secreted into the spirits and spontaneously reacts with ethanol to form ethyl carbamate, a potential carcinogenic agent for humans. To block the pathway of urea production, we genetically engineered two haploid strains to reduce the arginase (encoded by CAR1) activity, which were isolated from a diploid industrial Chinese rice wine strain. Finally the engineered haploids with opposite mating type were mated back to diploid strains, obtaining a heterozygous deletion strain (CAR1/car1) and a homozygous defect strain (car1/car1). These strains were compared to the parental industrial yeast strain in Chinese rice wine fermentations and spirit production. The strain with the homozygous CAR1 deletion showed significant reductions of urea and EC in the final spirits in comparison to the parental strain, with the concentration reductions by 86.9% and 50.5% respectively. In addition, EC accumulation was in a much lower tempo during rice wine storage. Moreover, the growth behavior and fermentation characteristics of the engineered diploid strain were similar to the parental strain.

  13. What do we know about the yeast strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry?

    PubMed

    Della-Bianca, Bianca Eli; Basso, Thiago Olitta; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Basso, Luiz Carlos; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2013-02-01

    The production of fuel ethanol from sugarcane-based raw materials in Brazil is a successful example of a large-scale bioprocess that delivers an advanced biofuel at competitive prices and low environmental impact. Two to three fed-batch fermentations per day, with acid treatment of the yeast cream between consecutive cycles, during 6-8 months of uninterrupted production in a nonaseptic environment are some of the features that make the Brazilian process quite peculiar. Along the past decades, some wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated, identified, characterized, and eventually, reintroduced into the process, enabling us to build up knowledge on these organisms. This information, combined with physiological studies in the laboratory and, more recently, genome sequencing data, has allowed us to start clarifying why and how these strains behave differently from the better known laboratory, wine, beer, and baker's strains. All these issues are covered in this minireview, which also presents a brief discussion on future directions in the field and on the perspectives of introducing genetically modified strains in this industrial process.

  14. Genomic Libraries and a Host Strain Designed for Highly Efficient Two-Hybrid Selection in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    James, P.; Halladay, J.; Craig, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    The two-hybrid system is a powerful technique for detecting protein-protein interactions that utilizes the well-developed molecular genetics of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the full potential of this technique has not been realized due to limitations imposed by the components available for use in the system. These limitations include unwieldy plasmid vectors, incomplete or poorly designed two-hybrid libraries, and host strains that result in the selection of large numbers of false positives. We have used a novel multienzyme approach to generate a set of highly representative genomic libraries from S. cerevisiae. In addition, a unique host strain was created that contains three easily assayed reporter genes, each under the control of a different inducible promoter. This host strain is extremely sensitive to weak interactions and eliminates nearly all false positives using simple plate assays. Improved vectors were also constructed that simplify the construction of the gene fusions necessary for the two-hybrid system. Our analysis indicates that the libraries and host strain provide significant improvements in both the number of interacting clones identified and the efficiency of two-hybrid selections. PMID:8978031

  15. Overexpression of csc1-1. A plausible strategy to obtain wine yeast strains undergoing accelerated autolysis.

    PubMed

    Cebollero, Eduardo; Martinez-Rodriguez, Adolfo; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2005-05-01

    The potential of several alternative genetic engineering based strategies in order to accelerate Saccharomyces cerevisiae autolysis for wine production has been studied. Both constitutively autophagic and defective in autophagy strains have been studied. Although both alternatives lead to impaired survival under starvation conditions, only constitutively autophagic strains, carrying a multicopy plasmid with the csc1-1 allele under the control of the TDH3 promoter, undergo accelerated autolysis in the experimental conditions tested. Fermentation performance is impaired in the autolytic strains, but industrial strains carrying the above-mentioned construction are still able to complete second fermentation of a model base wine. We suggest the construction of industrial yeasts showing a constitutive autophagic phenotype as a way to obtain second fermentation yeast strains undergoing accelerated autolysis.

  16. Differing effects of 2 active dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains on ruminal acidosis and methane production in nonlactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-H; Walker, N D; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2011-05-01

    Fifteen ruminally cannulated, nonlactating Holstein cows were used to measure the effects of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed as active dried yeasts, on ruminal pH and fermentation and enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions. Nonlactating cows were blocked by total duration (h) that their ruminal pH was below 5.8 during a 6-d pre-experimental period. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to control (no yeast), yeast strain 1 (Levucell SC), or yeast strain 2 (a novel strain selected for enhanced in vitro fiber degradation), with both strains (Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Montréal, QC, Canada) providing 1 × 10(10) cfu/head per day. Cows were fed once daily a total mixed ration consisting of a 50:50 forage to concentrate ratio (dry matter basis). The yeast strains were dosed via the rumen cannula daily at the time of feeding. During the 35-d experiment, ruminal pH was measured continuously for 7 d (d 22 to 28) by using an indwelling system, and CH(4) gas was measured for 4 d (d 32 to 35) using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique (with halters and yokes). Rumen contents were sampled on 2 d (d 22 and 26) at 0, 3, and 6h after feeding. Dry matter intake, body weight, and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients were not affected by yeast feeding. Strain 2 decreased the average daily minimum (5.35 vs. 5.65 or 5.66), mean (5.98 vs. 6.24 or 6.34), and maximum ruminal pH (6.71 vs. 6.86 or 6.86), and prolonged the time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (7.5 vs. 3.3 or 1.0 h/d) compared with the control or strain 1, respectively. The molar percentage of acetate was lower and that of propionate was greater in the ruminal fluid of cows receiving strain 2 compared with cows receiving no yeast or strain 1. Enteric CH(4) production adjusted for intake of dry matter or gross energy, however, did not differ between either yeast strain compared with the control but it tended to be reduced by 10% when strain 2 was compared with strain 1. The study shows that

  17. Potential Role of Yeast Strains Isolated from Grapes in the Production of Taurasi DOCG.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Maria; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Twelve samples of Aglianico grapes, collected in different locations of the Taurasi DOCG (Appellation of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin) production area were naturally fermented in sterile containers at room temperature. A total of 70 yeast cultures were isolated from countable WL agar plates: 52 in the middle of the fermentation and 18 at the end. On the basis of ITS-RFLP analysis and ITS sequencing, all cultures collected at the end of fermentations were identified as Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae; while, the 52 isolates, collected after 1 week, could be referred to the following species: Metschnikowia (M.) pulcherrima; Starmerella (Star.) bacillaris; Pichia (P.) kudriavzevii; Lachancea (L.) thermotolerans; Hanseniaspora (H.) uvarum; Pseudozyma (Pseud.) aphidis; S. cerevisiae. By means of Interdelta analysis, 18 different biotypes of S. cerevisiae were retrieved. All strains were characterized for ethanol production, SO2 resistance, H2S development, β-glucosidasic, esterasic and antagonistic activities. Fermentation abilities of selected strains were evaluated in micro-fermentations on Aglianico must. Within non-Saccharomyces species, some cultures showed features of technological interest. Antagonistic activity was expressed by some strains of M. pulcherrima, L. thermotolerans, P. kudriavzevii, and S. cerevisiae. Strains of M. pulcherrima showed the highest β-glucosidase activity and proved to be able to produce high concentrations of succinic acid. L. thermotolerans produced both succinic and lactic acids. The lowest amount of acetic acid was produced by M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans; while the highest content was recorded for H. uvarum. The strain of Star. bacillaris produced the highest amount of glycerol and was able to metabolize all fructose and malic acid. Strains of M. pulcherrima and H. uvarum showed a low fermentation power (about 4%), while, L. thermotolerans, Star. Bacillaris, and P. kudriavzevii of about 10%. Significant differences were

  18. Potential Role of Yeast Strains Isolated from Grapes in the Production of Taurasi DOCG

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Maria; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Twelve samples of Aglianico grapes, collected in different locations of the Taurasi DOCG (Appellation of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin) production area were naturally fermented in sterile containers at room temperature. A total of 70 yeast cultures were isolated from countable WL agar plates: 52 in the middle of the fermentation and 18 at the end. On the basis of ITS-RFLP analysis and ITS sequencing, all cultures collected at the end of fermentations were identified as Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae; while, the 52 isolates, collected after 1 week, could be referred to the following species: Metschnikowia (M.) pulcherrima; Starmerella (Star.) bacillaris; Pichia (P.) kudriavzevii; Lachancea (L.) thermotolerans; Hanseniaspora (H.) uvarum; Pseudozyma (Pseud.) aphidis; S. cerevisiae. By means of Interdelta analysis, 18 different biotypes of S. cerevisiae were retrieved. All strains were characterized for ethanol production, SO2 resistance, H2S development, β-glucosidasic, esterasic and antagonistic activities. Fermentation abilities of selected strains were evaluated in micro-fermentations on Aglianico must. Within non-Saccharomyces species, some cultures showed features of technological interest. Antagonistic activity was expressed by some strains of M. pulcherrima, L. thermotolerans, P. kudriavzevii, and S. cerevisiae. Strains of M. pulcherrima showed the highest β-glucosidase activity and proved to be able to produce high concentrations of succinic acid. L. thermotolerans produced both succinic and lactic acids. The lowest amount of acetic acid was produced by M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans; while the highest content was recorded for H. uvarum. The strain of Star. bacillaris produced the highest amount of glycerol and was able to metabolize all fructose and malic acid. Strains of M. pulcherrima and H. uvarum showed a low fermentation power (about 4%), while, L. thermotolerans, Star. Bacillaris, and P. kudriavzevii of about 10%. Significant differences were

  19. Biodiversity and safety aspects of yeast strains characterized from vineyards and spontaneous fermentations in the Apulia Region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Tristezza, Mariana; Vetrano, Cosimo; Bleve, Gianluca; Spano, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vittorio; Logrieco, Antonio; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    This work is the first large-scale study on vineyard-associated yeast strains from Apulia (Southern Italy). Yeasts were identified by Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) ribotyping and bioinformatic analysis. The polymorphism of interdelta elements was used to differentiate Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Twenty different species belonging to 9 genera were identified. Predominant on the grape surface were Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Aureobasidium pullulans, whereas M. pulcherrima and H. uvarum were dominant in the early fermentation stage. A total of 692 S. cerevisiae isolates were identified and a number of S. cerevisiae strains, ranging from 26 to 55, was detected in each of the eight fermentations. The strains were tested for biogenic amines (BAs) production, either in synthetic media or grape must. Two Pichia manshurica, an Issatchenkia terricola and a M. pulcherrima strains were able to produce histamine and cadaverine, during must fermentation. The production of BAs in wine must was different than that observed in the synthetic medium. This feature indicate the importance of an "in grape must" assessment of BAs producing yeast. Overall, our results suggest the importance of microbiological control during wine-making to reduce the potential health risk for consumer represented by these spoilage yeasts.

  20. Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for identification and strain discrimination of the wine spoilage yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2013-10-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%.

  1. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for Identification and Strain Discrimination of the Wine Spoilage Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and Brettanomyces bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Mark A.; Thornton, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    The yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Dekkera bruxellensis (anamorph, Brettanomyces bruxellensis), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the major spoilage agents of finished wine. A novel method using Raman spectroscopy in combination with a chemometric classification tool has been developed for the identification of these yeast species and for strain discrimination of these yeasts. Raman spectra were collected for six strains of each of the yeasts Z. bailii, B. bruxellensis, and S. cerevisiae. The yeasts were classified with high sensitivity at the species level: 93.8% for Z. bailii, 92.3% for B. bruxellensis, and 98.6% for S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between strains of these species. These yeasts were classified at the strain level with an overall accuracy of 81.8%. PMID:23913433

  2. Flocculation and transcriptional adaptation to fermentation conditions in a recombinant wine yeast strain defective for KNR4/SMI1.

    PubMed

    Penacho, Vanessa; Blondin, Bruno; Valero, Eva; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    KNR4 defective recombinant wine yeast strains were previously shown to oversecrete mannoproteins during alcoholic fermentation and, depending on the genetic background, to contribute to protein stability of white wines. We have tried to get a deeper insight into the consequences of KNR4 deletion in a wine yeast strain, from both a biological and an enological standpoint, and to understand the mechanisms leading to improved mannoprotein release. In fermentation experiments, followed by aging on lees, and compared to the parent strain, the recombinant strain shows increased release of mannoproteins during the fermentation but little increase during aging. Mannoprotein release by the recombinant strain takes place mainly during the fermentation step. In contrast, autolysis of the recombinant strain keeps going after aging for 78 days. In addition, the recombinant strain is moderately flocculent, which would be interesting for the production of sparkling wines. This might be related to changes in the expression of Flo1p-regulated genes. The new biological processes affected by KNR4 deletion in wine yeasts, as revealed by this transcriptomic study are flocculation, adaptation to anaerobiosis, oxidative stress response, and ethanol tolerance, as well as FKS1 overexpression; but no overexpression was detected for genes coding for major structural mannoproteins of the cell wall.

  3. Auxacolor, a new commercial system for yeast identification: evaluation of 182 strains comparatively with ID 32C.

    PubMed

    Fricker-Hidalgo, H; Lebeau, B; Kervroedan, P; Faure, O; Ambroise-Thomas, P; Grillot, R

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of deep candidiasis, particularly in immunocompromised patients, and the emergence of less sensitive yeast species to new antifungal agents explain the interest of their rapid identification. A new identification system, Auxacolor (Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur), has been evaluated, comparatively to ID 32C strip taken in reference (bioMérieux SA). These systems include respectively 13 and 29 carbohydrate assimilation tests. One hundred and sixty-nine strains belonging to 17 common yeast species isolated from biological specimens were identified. Moreover, 13 strains belonging to seven species rarely isolated and not included in the Auxacolor data base were tested. Correct biochemical profiles were obtained with 95.2% of the strains from the first panel. These profiles alone permit correct identification of 62.7% of them (n = 106). The remainders (Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida guilliermondii, Candida inconspicua and Candida lipolytica) require time consuming additional morphological observations for a definitive identification. However, the time needed to obtain the biochemical profiles of these 106 strains was shorter when using Auxacolor: 77.4% of the strains were identified at 24 h with Auxacolor and 47.1% were identified at 24 h with ID 32C. Species from the second panel were not identified (seven strains) or incorrectly identified (six strains). The Auxacolor system was found to be reliable when performed in conjunction with morphological tests and easy to use for the identification of most medically important yeasts.

  4. Selection from Industrial Lager Yeast Strains of Variants with Improved Fermentation Performance in Very-High-Gravity Worts▿

    PubMed Central

    Huuskonen, Anne; Markkula, Tuomas; Vidgren, Virve; Lima, Luis; Mulder, Linda; Geurts, Wim; Walsh, Michael; Londesborough, John

    2010-01-01

    There are economic and other advantages if the fermentable sugar concentration in industrial brewery fermentations can be increased from that of currently used high-gravity (ca. 14 to 17°P [degrees Plato]) worts into the very-high-gravity (VHG; 18 to 25°P) range. Many industrial strains of brewer's yeast perform poorly in VHG worts, exhibiting decreased growth, slow and incomplete fermentations, and low viability of the yeast cropped for recycling into subsequent fermentations. A new and efficient method for selecting variant cells with improved performance in VHG worts is described. In this new method, mutagenized industrial yeast was put through a VHG wort fermentation and then incubated anaerobically in the resulting beer while maintaining the α-glucoside concentration at about 10 to 20 g·liter−1 by slowly feeding the yeast maltose or maltotriose until most of the cells had died. When survival rates fell to 1 to 10 cells per 106 original cells, a high proportion (up to 30%) of survivors fermented VHG worts 10 to 30% faster and more completely (residual sugars lower by 2 to 8 g·liter−1) than the parent strains, but the sedimentation behavior and profiles of yeast-derived flavor compounds of the survivors were similar to those of the parent strains. PMID:20081007

  5. Nasal natural killer/T‐cell lymphoma and its association with type “i”/XhoI loss strain Epstein–Barr virus in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, M E; Eizuru, Y; Itoh, T; Koriyama, C; Tashiro, Y; Ding, S; Rey, S; Akiba, S; Corvalan, A

    2007-01-01

    Background Nasal T/natural killer (NK)‐cell lymphoma is an aggressive type of non‐Hodking's lymphoma associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and striking geographical variations worldwide. Aim To characterise nasal NK/T‐cell lymphoma associated with genotypes of EBV in Chile, a Latin American country, where multiple strains of EBV, including two new recombinant strains, in healthy individuals were recently found. Methods Cases with diagnosis of primary nasal lymphoma were selected for histological and immunohistochemical analysis (CD3, CD3e, CD4, CD8, CD79a, CD56, CD57 and TIA‐1) and in‐situ hybridisation, serology and genotyping analysis for EBV. Results Out of 22 cases, 9 (41%) cases fulfilled the World Health Organization criteria for nasal NK/T‐cell lymphoma; of these 7 (78%) cases were positive for EBV. Genotyping analysis revealed 6 cases of type 1 EBV and wildtype F at the BamHI‐F region, 4 cases type “i” EBV at the BamHI‐W1/I1 region; XhoI wild type was found in 2 and XhoI loss in 4 cases, respectively. Cosegregation analysis of the BamHI‐W1/I1 region and XhoI restriction site showed the new recombinant strain type “i”/XhoI loss in 3 cases and type “i”/XhoI wild‐type strain in 1 case. Most patients were treated with combined anthracycline‐containing regimens. Half of the cases attained complete remission. Conclusion Although nasal NK/T‐cell lymphomas from Chile share similar clinicopathological features, high association with EBV and unfavourable prognosis with those described elsewhere, genotype analysis shows that the new recombinant type “i”/XhoI loss strain might contribute to explain the intermediate incidence of nasal NK/T‐cell lymphomas in Latin America. PMID:16775124

  6. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development. PMID:23792743

  7. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  8. [Identification and susceptibility against fluconazole and albaconazole of 100 yeasts' strains isolated from vaginal discharge].

    PubMed

    Arechavala, Alicia I; Bianchi, Mario H; Robles, Ana María; Santiso, Gabriela; Negroni, Ricardo

    2007-12-31

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a condition that affects a great number of fertile women. It is considered the second cause of genital infection after vaginosis due to GAM complex. Candida albicans is the most frequent isolated species from vaginal discharge. However, sometimes more than one yeast species could be found in the same clinical sample that are more resistant to antifungal drugs. Nowadays, it is necessary to identify properly up to species level the isolated microorganism and to determine the antifungal susceptibility profile. One hundred strains obtained from vaginal discharge of 94 patients suffering acute vulvovaginal candidiasis were studied. The identification of the isolates showed: C. albicans 86%, Candida glabrata 6%, Candida inconspicua 3%, Candida krusei 2% and Candida intermedia, Candida holmii and Trichosporon asahii one case each. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of all the yeasts against fluconazole and albaconazole were performed. C. glabrata, C. krusei and C. inconspicua were the most resistant against fluconazole, on the other hand albicans was susceptible to this drug. All the isolates presented MIC against albaconazole much lower than fluconazole.

  9. The influence of presaccharification, fermentation temperature and yeast strain on ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos J A; Costa, Daniela A; Rodrigues, Marina Q R B; dos Santos, Ancély F; Lopes, Mariana R; Abrantes, Aline B P; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Silveira, Wendel Batista; Passos, Flávia M L; Fietto, Luciano G

    2012-04-01

    Ethanol can be produced from cellulosic biomass in a process known as simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The presence of yeast together with the cellulolytic enzyme complex reduces the accumulation of sugars within the reactor, increasing the ethanol yield and saccharification rate. This paper reports the isolation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae LBM-1, a strain capable of growth at 42 °C. In addition, S. cerevisiae LBM-1 and Kluyveromyces marxianus UFV-3 were able to ferment sugar cane bagasse in SSF processes at 37 and 42 °C. Higher ethanol yields were observed when fermentation was initiated after presaccharification at 50°C than at 37 or 42° C. Furthermore, the volumetric productivity of fermentation increased with presaccharification time, from 0.43 g/L/h at 0 h to 1.79 g/L/h after 72 h of presaccharification. The results suggest that the use of thermotolerant yeasts and a presaccharification stage are key to increasing yields in this process.

  10. Physicochemical characterization of pomegranate wines fermented with three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, María; Vegara, Salud; Barrajón, Enrique; Saura, Domingo; Valero, Manuel; Martí, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains: Viniferm Revelación, Viniferm SV and Viniferm PDM were evaluated for the production of pomegranate wine from a juice coupage of the two well-known varieties Mollar and Wonderfull. Further malolactic fermentation was carried out spontaneously. The same fermentation patterns were observed for pH, titratable acidity, density, sugar consumption, and ethanol and glycerol production. Glucose was exhausted while fructose residues remained at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A high ethanol concentration (10.91 ± 0.27% v/v) in combination with 1.49 g/L glycerol was achieved. Citric acid concentration increased rapidly a 31.7%, malic acid disappeared as result of malolactic fermentation and the lactic acid levels reached values between 0.40 and 0.96 g/L. The analysis of CIEa parameter and total anthocyanin content highlights a lower degradation of monomeric anthocyanins during winemaking with Viniferm PDM yeast. The resulting wine retains a 34.5% of total anthocyanin content of pomegranate juice blend.

  11. Mediated microbial biosensor using a novel yeast strain for wastewater BOD measurement.

    PubMed

    Trosok, S P; Driscoll, B T; Luong, J H

    2001-08-01

    Two new yeast strains (SPT1 and SPT2) were isolated and immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes to form microbial biosensors for estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Ferricyanide was proven to be the most efficient mediator to shuttle electrons from the redox center of reduced microbial enzymes to the electrode in the presence of excess glucose/glutamic acid (GGA). With a 3-fold greater metabolic assimilation capability and greater responses to various effluent samples, SPT1 was selected for sensor-BOD measurements. BOD estimations for the GGA standard resulted in an extended linear range: 2-100 mg/l. Response reproducibility was +/-10% for a GGA standard containing 10 mg BOD/l. For analysis of pulp mill effluents, the BOD detection limit was 2 mg/l with a response time of 5 min.

  12. Novel strategies to improve co-fermentation of pentoses with D-glucose by recombinant yeast strains in lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Oreb, Mislav; Dietz, Heiko; Farwick, Alexander; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Economically feasible production of second-generation biofuels requires efficient co-fermentation of pentose and hexose sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates under very harsh conditions. Baker's yeast is an excellent, traditionally used ethanol producer but is naturally not able to utilize pentoses. This is due to the lack of pentose-specific transporter proteins and enzymatic reactions. Thus, natural yeast strains must be modified by genetic engineering. Although the construction of various recombinant yeast strains able to ferment pentose sugars has been described during the last two decades, their rates of pentose utilization is still significantly lower than D-glucose fermentation. Moreover, pentoses are only fermented after D-glucose is exhausted, resulting in an uneconomical increase in the fermentation time. In this addendum, we discuss novel approaches to improve utilization of pentoses by development of specific transporters and substrate channeling in enzyme cascades.

  13. Creating libraries for commercial yeast strains through miniaturization of cloning and transformations using the BioRAPTR FRD Microfluidic workstation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to miniaturize molecular reactions can lead to significant cost savings when creating libraries of thousands of clones. For this application Beckman Coulter partnered with the USDA to provide a low-volume automated solution for library cloning for use in the development of yeast strains...

  14. Cutinase-like enzyme from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 hydrolyzes polylactic acid and other biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Kazuo; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-11-01

    A purified lipase from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 exhibited remote homology to proteins belonging to the cutinase family rather than to lipases. This enzyme could effectively degrade the high-molecular-weight compound polylactic acid, as well as other biodegradable plastics, including polybutylene succinate, poly (epsilon-caprolactone), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

  15. Pilot-scale evaluation the enological traits of a novel, aromatic wine yeast strain obtained by adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Cadière, Axelle; Aguera, Evelyne; Caillé, Soline; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Dequin, Sylvie

    2012-12-01

    In the competitive context of the wine market, there is a growing interest for novel wine yeast strains that have an overall good fermentation capacity and that contribute favorably to the organoleptic quality of wine. Using an adaptive evolution strategy based on growth on gluconate as sole carbon source, we recently obtained wine yeasts with improved characteristics in laboratory-scale fermentations. The characteristics included enhanced fermentation rate, decreased formation of acetate and greater production of fermentative aroma. We report an evaluation of the potential value of the evolved strain ECA5™ for winemaking, by comparing its fermentation performance and metabolite production to those of the parental strain in pilot-scale fermentation trials, with various grape cultivars and winemaking conditions. We show that the evolved strain has outstanding attributes relative to the parental wine yeast strain, and in particular the production of less volatile acidity and greater production of desirable volatile esters, important for the fruity/flowery character of wines. This study highlights the potential of evolutionary engineering for the generation of strains with a broad range of novel properties, appropriate for rapid application in the wine industry.

  16. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts.

  17. Identification of oleaginous yeast strains able to accumulate high intracellular lipids when cultivated in alkaline pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Jin, Mingjie; Fernandez, J. Enrique; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Balan, Venkatesh; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial oil is a potential alternative to food/plant-derived biodiesel fuel. Our previous screening studies identified a wide range of oleaginous yeast species, using a defined laboratory medium known to stimulate lipid accumulation. In this study, the ability of these yeasts to grow and accumulate lipids was further investigated in synthetic hydrolysate (SynH) and authentic ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). Most yeast strains tested were able to accumulate lipids in SynH, but only a few were able to grow and accumulate lipids in ACSH medium. Cryptococcus humicola UCDFST 10-1004 was able to accumulate as high as 15.5 g/L lipids, out of a total of 36 g/L cellular biomass when grown in ACSH, with a cellular lipid content of 40% of cell dry weight. This lipid production is among the highest reported values for oleaginous yeasts grown in authentic hydrolysate. Pre-culturing in SynH media with xylose as sole carbon source enabled yeasts to assimilate both glucose and xylose more efficiently in the subsequent hydrolysate medium. This study demonstrates that ACSH is a suitable medium for certain oleaginous yeasts to convert lignocellullosic sugars to triacylglycerols for production of biodiesel and other valuable oleochemicals. PMID:25052467

  18. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY) production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Kehui; Liu, Zewei; Zhang, Xing; Li, Ou; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Du, Fengguang; Sun, Peiyong; Qu, Aimin; Wu, Xuechang

    2013-01-01

    The application of active dry yeast (ADY) in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS) process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  19. Construction of a recombinant autolytic wine yeast strain overexpressing the csc1-1 allele.

    PubMed

    Cebollero, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    During the aging step of sparkling wines and wines aged on lees, yeast cells kept in contact with the wine finally die and undergo autolysis, releasing cellular compounds with a positive effect on the wine quality. In view of the interest of autolysis for wine properties, biotechnologists have tried to improve autolytic yield during winemaking. In this work we used genetic engineering techniques to construct an autolytic industrial strain by expressing the csc1-1 allele from the RDN1 locus. The expression of this mutant allele, that causes a "constitutive in autophagy phenotype," resulted in accelerated autolysis of the recombinant strain. Although autophagic phenotype due to csc1-1 expression has been reported to require the mutant allele in multicopy, autolytic acceleration was achieved by expressing only one or two copies of the gene under the control of the constitutive promotor pTDH3. The acceleration of autolysis together with the unaltered fermentative capacity, strongly supported the overexpression of csc1-1 allele as a strategy to obtain wines with aged-like properties in a shortened time.

  20. Comparative physiology and fermentation performance of Saaz and Frohberg lager yeast strains and the parental species Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian R; Storgårds, Erna; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve

    2013-07-01

    Two distinct genetic groups (Saaz and Frohberg) exist within the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus) taxon. However, physiological/technological differences that exist between the two groups are not known. Fermentative capability of the parental S. eubayanus has likewise never been studied. Here, 58 lager strains were screened to determine which hybrid group they belonged to, and selected strains were characterized to determine salient characteristics. In 15 °P all-malt wort fermentations at 22 °C, Frohberg strains showed greater growth and superior fermentation (80% apparent attenuation, 6.5% alcohol by volume in 3-4 days) compared to all other strains and maintained highest viability values (>93%). Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at the same temperature (33% apparent attenuation, 2.7% alcohol by volume at 6 days and viability reduced to 75%). Saaz strains and S. eubayanus were the least sensitive to cold (10 °C), though this did not translate to greater fermentation performance. Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at 10 °C but equal to or greater than that of the Saaz strains. Performance of Saaz yeast/S. eubayanus was limited by an inability to use wort maltotriose. [(14)C]-Maltotriose transport assays also showed negligible activity in these strains (≤0.5 µmol min(-1) g(-1) dry yeast). Beers from Saaz fermentations were characterized by two- to sixfold lower production of the flavour compounds methyl butanol, ethyl acetate and 3-methylbutyl acetate compared to Frohberg strains. Higher alcohol and ester production by S. eubayanus was similar to that of Frohberg strains.

  1. Co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose using beta-glucosidase displaying diploid industrial yeast strain OC-2.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Satoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2010-08-01

    The co-utilization of sugars, particularly xylose and glucose, during industrial fermentation is essential for economically feasible processes with high ethanol productivity. However, the major problem encountered during xylose/glucose co-fermentation is the lower consumption rate of xylose compared with that of glucose fermentation. Here, we therefore attempted to construct high xylose assimilation yeast by using industrial yeast strain with high beta-glucosidase activity on the cell surface. We first constructed the triple auxotrophic industrial strain OC2-HUT and introduced four copies of the cell-surface-displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL) gene and two copies of a xylose-assimilating gene into its genome to generate strain OC2-ABGL4Xyl2. It was confirmed that the introduction of multiple copies of the BGL gene increased the cell-surface BGL activity, which was also correlated to the observed increase in xylose-assimilating ability. The strain OC2-ABGL4Xyl2 was able to consume xylose during cellobiose/xylose co-fermentation (0.38 g/h/g-DW) more rapidly than during glucose/xylose co-fermentation (0.18 g/h/g-DW). After 48 h, 5.77% of the xylose was consumed despite the co-fermentation conditions, and the observed ethanol yield was 0.39 g-ethanol/g-total sugar. Our results demonstrate that a BGL-displaying and xylose-assimilating industrial yeast strain is capable of efficient xylose consumption during the co-fermentation with cellobiose. Due to its high performance for fermentation of mixtures of cellobiose and xylose, OC2-ABGL4Xyl2 does not require the addition of beta-glucosidase and is therefore a promising yeast strain for cost-effective ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass.

  2. Improvement of multiple stress tolerance in yeast strain by sequential mutagenesis for enhanced bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rajni; Pramanik, Krishna

    2012-12-01

    The present work deals with the improvement of multiple stress tolerance in a glucose-xylose co-fermenting hybrid yeast strain RPR39 by sequential mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, near and far ultraviolet radiations. The mutants were evaluated for their tolerance to ethanol, temperature and fermentation inhibitors. Among these mutants, mutant RPRT90 exhibited highest tolerance to 10% initial ethanol concentration, 2 g L(-1) furfural and 8 g L(-1) acetic acid. The mutant also showed good growth at high temperature (39-40°C). A study on the combined effect of multiple stresses during fermentation of glucose-xylose mixture (3:1 ratio) was performed using mutant RPRT90. Under the combined effect of thermal (39°C) and inhibitor stress (0.25 g L(-1) vanillin, 0.5 g L(-1) furfural and 4 g L(-1) acetic acid), the mutant produced ethanol with a yield of 0.379 g g(-1), while under combined effect of ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitor stress the ethanol yield obtained was 0.43 g g(-1). Further, under the synergistic effect of sugar (250 g L(-1)), thermal (39°C), ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitors stress, the strain produced a maximum of 47.93 g L(-1) ethanol by utilizing 162.42 g L(-1) of glucose-xylose mixture giving an ethanol yield of 0.295 g g(-1) and productivity of 0.57 g L(-1) h(-1). Under same condition the fusant RPR39 produced a maximum of 30.0 g L(-1) ethanol giving a yield and productivity of 0.21 g g(-1) and 0.42 g L(-1) h(-1) respectively. The molecular characterization of mutant showed considerable difference in its genetic profile from hybrid RPR39. Thus, sequential mutagenesis was found to be effective to improve the stress tolerance properties in yeast.

  3. Short communication: Identification and technological characterization of yeast strains isolated from samples of water buffalo Mozzarella cheese.

    PubMed

    Aponte, M; Pepe, O; Blaiotta, G

    2010-06-01

    Sixty yeast cultures were isolated from samples of water buffalo Mozzarella, a popular "pasta filata" cheese, originating on 16 farms located in the provinces of Salerno, Caserta, and Frosinone (Italy). Strains were identified by means of 5.8S internal transcribed spacer rDNA PCR-RFLP combined with 26S rRNA gene partial sequencing and characterized for their ability to exert biochemical properties of technological interest. The recorded dominance of fermenting yeasts such as the lactose-fermenting Kluyveromyces marxianus (38.3% of the total isolates) and the galactose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae (21.6% of the total isolates) suggests that these yeasts contribute to the organoleptic definition of the water buffalo Mozzarella. The speciographic analysis revealed the presence of 7 other species rarely or never reported in a dairy environment belonging to the genera Pichia and Candida, whose role in Mozzarella cheese organoleptic properties need to be further investigated.

  4. Occurrence of 20S RNA and 23S RNA replicons in industrial yeast strains and their variation under nutritional stress conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Victoria; Gil, Rosario; Vicente Carbonell, José; Navarro, Alfonso

    2002-04-01

    We have characterized industrial yeast strains used in the brewing, baking, and winemaking industries for the presence or absence of cytoplasmic single-stranded 20S and 23S RNAs. Furthermore, the variation of intracellular concentrations of these replicons in brewing and laboratory strains under nutritional stress conditions was determined. Our results show a correlation between the relative abundance of these replicons and exposure of yeast to nutritionally stressful conditions, indicating that these RNAs could be employed as molecular probes to evaluate the exposure of 20S(+) and/or 23S(+) yeast strains to stress situations during industrial manipulation. During this study, several 20S(-)23S(+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated and identified. This is the first time that a yeast strain containing only 23S RNA has been reported, demonstrating that 20S RNA is not required for 23S RNA replication.

  5. Biodegradation of lindane using a novel yeast strain, Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 isolated from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Abdul Salam, Jaseetha; Lakshmi, V; Das, Devlina; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-03-01

    Lindane is a notorious organochlorine pesticide due to its high toxicity, persistence in the environment and its tendency to bioaccumulate. A yeast strain isolated from sorghum cultivation field was able to use lindane as carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. With molecular techniques, it was identified and named as Rhodotorula strain VITJzN03. The effects of nutritional and environmental factors on yeast growth and the biodegradation of lindane was investigated. The maximum production of yeast biomass along with 100 % lindane mineralization was noted at an initial lindane concentration of 600 mg l(-1) within a period of 10 days. Lindane concentration above 600 mg l(-1) inhibited the growth of yeast in liquid medium. A positive relationship was noted between the release of chloride ions and the increase of yeast biomass as well as degradation of lindane. The calculated degradation rate and half life of lindane were found to be 0.416 day(-1) and 1.66 days, respectively. The analysis of the metabolites using GC-MS identified the formation of seven intermediates including γ-pentachlorocyclohexane(γ-PCCH), 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene(1,4-TCCHdiene), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4 TCB), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB), chloro-cis-1,2-dihydroxycyclohexadiene (CDCHdiene), 3-chlorocatechol (3-CC) and maleylacetate (MA) derivatives indicating that lindane degradation follows successive dechlorination and oxido-reduction. Based on the results of the present study, the possible pathway for lindane degradation by Rhodotorula sp. VITJzN03 has been proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on lindane degradation by yeast which can serve as a potential agent for in situ bioremediation of medium to high level lindane-contaminated sites.

  6. Apple Aminoacid Profile and Yeast Strains in the Formation of Fusel Alcohols and Esters in Cider Production.

    PubMed

    Eleutério Dos Santos, Caroline Mongruel; Pietrowski, Giovana de Arruda Moura; Braga, Cíntia Maia; Rossi, Márcio José; Ninow, Jorge; Machado Dos Santos, Tâmisa Pires; Wosiacki, Gilvan; Jorge, Regina Maria Matos; Nogueira, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The amino acid profile in dessert apple must and its effect on the synthesis of fusel alcohols and esters in cider were established by instrumental analysis. The amino acid profile was performed in nine apple musts. Two apple musts with high (>150 mg/L) and low (<75 mg/L) nitrogen content, and four enological yeast strains, were used in cider fermentation. The aspartic acid, asparagine and glutamic acid amino acids were the majority in all the apple juices, representing 57.10% to 81.95%. These three amino acids provided a high consumption (>90%) during fermentation in all the ciders. Principal component analysis (PCA) explained 81.42% of data variability and the separation of three groups for the analyzed samples was verified. The ciders manufactured with low nitrogen content showed sluggish fermentation and around 50% less content of volatile compounds (independent of the yeast strain used), which were mainly 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) and esters. However, in the presence of amino acids (asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine) there was a greater differentiation between the yeasts in the production of fusel alcohols and ethyl esters. High contents of these aminoacids in dessert apple musts are essential for the production of fusel alcohols and most of esters by aromatic yeasts during cider fermentation.

  7. Stuck at work? Quantitative proteomics of environmental wine yeast strains reveals the natural mechanism of overcoming stuck fermentation.

    PubMed

    Szopinska, Aleksandra; Christ, Eva; Planchon, Sebastien; König, Helmut; Evers, Daniele; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    During fermentation oenological yeast cells are subjected to a number of different stress conditions and must respond rapidly to the continuously changing environment of this harsh ecological niche. In this study we gained more insights into the cell adaptation mechanisms by linking proteome monitoring with knowledge on physiological behaviour of different strains during fermentation under model winemaking conditions. We used 2D-DIGE technology to monitor the proteome evolution of two newly discovered environmental yeast strains Saccharomyces bayanus and triple hybrid Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii × S. bayanus and compared them to data obtained for the commercially available S. cerevisiae strain. All strains examined showed (i) different fermentative behaviour, (ii) stress resistance as well as (iii) susceptibility to stuck fermentation which was reflected in significant differences in protein expression levels. During our research we identified differentially expressed proteins in 155 gel spots which correspond to 70 different protein functions. Differences of expression between strains were observed mainly among proteins involved in stress response, proteins degradation pathways, cell redox homeostasis and amino acids biosynthesis. Interestingly, the newly discovered triple hybrid S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii × S. bayanus strain which has the ability to naturally restart stuck fermentation showed a very strong induction of expression of two proteolytic enzymes: Pep4 and Prc1 that appear as numerous isoforms on the gel image and which may be the key to its unique properties. This study is an important step towards the better understanding of wine fermentations at a molecular level.

  8. Construction of a Genetically Modified Wine Yeast Strain Expressing the Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA Gene, Encoding an α-l-Rhamnosidase of Enological Interest

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, Paloma; Orejas, Margarita; Gil, José Vicente; de Graaff, Leo H.; Visser, Jaap; Ramón, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene encoding an α-l-rhamnosidase has been expressed in both laboratory and industrial wine yeast strains. Wines produced in microvinifications, conducted using a combination of the genetically modified industrial strain expressing rhaA and another strain expressing a β-glucosidase, show increased content mainly of the aromatic compound linalool. PMID:14660415

  9. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  10. Isolation of a high malic and low acetic acid-producing sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain screened from respiratory inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shingo; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant sake yeast strains by UV mutagenesis. Among the DNP-resistant mutants, we focused on strains exhibiting high malic acid and low acetic acid production. The improved organic acid composition is unlikely to be under the control of enzyme activities related to malic and acetic acid synthesis pathways. Instead, low mitochondrial activity was observed in DNP-resistant mutants, indicating that the excess pyruvic acid generated during glycolysis is not metabolized in the mitochondria but converted to malic acid in the cytosol. In addition, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the DNP-resistant strains was higher than that of the parental strain K901. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio together with the low mitochondrial activity alter the organic acid composition because malic acid synthesis requires NADH, while acetic acid uses NAD(+).

  11. Development of a phenotypic assay for characterisation of ethanologenic yeast strain sensitivity to inhibitors released from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Greetham, D; Wimalasena, T; Kerruish, D W M; Brindley, S; Ibbett, R N; Linforth, R L; Tucker, G; Phister, T G; Smart, K A

    2014-06-01

    Inhibitors released by the breakdown of plant cell walls prevent efficient conversion of sugar into ethanol. The aim of this study was to develop a fast and reliable inhibitor sensitivity assay for ethanologenic yeast strains. The assay comprised bespoke 96-well plates containing inhibitors in isolation or combination in a format that was compatible with the Phenotypic Microarray Omnilog reader (Biolog, hayward, CA, USA). A redox reporter within the assay permits analysis of inhibitor sensitivity in aerobic and/or anaerobic conditions. Results from the assay were verified using growth on spot plates and tolerance assays in which maintenance of viability was assessed. The assay allows for individual and synergistic effects of inhibitors to be determined. It was observed that the presence of both acetic and formic acid significantly inhibited the yeast strains assessed, although this impact could be partially mitigated by buffering to neutral pH. Scheffersomyces stipitis, Candida spp., and Pichia guilliermondii demonstrated increased sensitivity to short chain weak acids at concentrations typically present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. S. cerevisiae exhibited robustness to short chain weak acids at these concentrations. However, S. stipitis, Candida spp., and P. guilliermondii displayed increased tolerance to HMF when compared to that observed for S. cerevisiae. The results demonstrate that the phenotypic microarray assay developed in the current study is a valuable tool that can be used to identify yeast strains with desirable resistance to inhibitory compounds found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  12. A strategy to prevent the occurrence of Lactobacillus strains using lactate-tolerant yeast Candida glabrata in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Itsuki; Nakamura, Toshihide; Shima, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Contamination of Lactobacillus sp. in the fermentation broth of bioethanol production decreases ethanol production efficiency. Although the addition of lactate to the broth can effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sp., it also greatly reduces the fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this conflict, lactate-tolerant yeast strains were screened. Candida glabrata strain NFRI 3164 was found to exhibit both higher levels of lactate tolerance and fermentation ability. Co-cultivation of C. glabrata was performed with Lactobacillus brevis and Lb. fermentum, which were reported as major contaminating bacteria during bioethanol production, in culture medium containing 2% lactate. Under these culture conditions, the growth of Lactobacillus strains was greatly inhibited, but the ethanol production of C. glabrata was not significantly affected. Our data show the possibility of designing an effective fuel ethanol production process that eliminates contamination by Lactobacillus strains through the combined use of lactate addition and C. glabrata.

  13. Improvement of cellulose-degrading ability of a yeast strain displaying Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II by recombination of cellulose-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Ito, Junji; Fujita, Yasuya; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2004-01-01

    To improve the cellulolytic activity of a yeast strain displaying endoglucanase II (EGII) from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei QM9414, the genes encoding the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of EGII, cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) and cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) from T. reesei QM9414, were fused with the catalytic domain of EGII and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Display of each of the recombinant EGIIs was confirmed using immunofluorescence microscopy. In the case of EGII-displaying yeast strains in which the CBD of EGII was replaced with the CBD of CBHI or CBHII, the binding affinity to Avicel and hydrolytic activity toward phosphoric acid swollen Avicel were similar to that of a yeast strain displaying wild-type EGII. On the other hand, the three yeast strains displaying EGII with two or three tandemly aligned CBDs showed binding affinity and hydrolytic activity higher than that of the yeast strain displaying wild-type EGII. This result indicates that the hydrolytic activity of yeast strains displaying recombinant EGII increases with increased binding ability to cellulose.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel leaf-inhabiting osmo-, salt-, and alkali-tolerant Yarrowia lipolytica yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Zvyagilskaya, R; Andreishcheva, E; Soares, M I; Khozin, I; Berhe, A; Persson, B L

    2001-01-01

    Salt-excreting leaves of Atriplex halimus plants harvested in the central Negev Highlands of Israel were screened for yeasts inhabiting their surfaces. Several aerobic, moderately salt- and alkali-tolerant yeasts were isolated. One of the isolates (tentatively designated S-8) was identified as Yarrowia lipolytica (Wick.) van der Walt and Arx, on the basis of its morphological, biochemical/physiological characteristics, and of quantitative chemotaxonomic and molecular marker analyses. However, the strain is distinguished from the known members of the type Y. lipolytica strain by its pronounced osmo-, salt-, and pH tolerance. Cells displayed a unique capacity to grow over a wide pH range (from 3.5 to 11.5) with a pH optimum at 4.5 to 7.5. It is proposed that the S-8 strain be assigned to a single Y. lipolytica species as its anamorpha, or as a new variety, Y. lipolytica var. alkalitolerance. The ecophysiological properties and biotechnological potentials of the new strain are discussed.

  15. Integrated expression of the α-amylase, dextranase and glutathione gene in an industrial brewer's yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Jing; Wang, Zhao-Yue; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering is widely used to meliorate biological characteristics of industrial brewing yeast. But how to solve multiple problems at one time has become the bottle neck in the genetic modifications of industrial yeast strains. In a newly constructed strain TYRL21, dextranase gene was expressed in addition of α-amylase to make up α-amylase's shortcoming which can only hydrolyze α-1,4-glycosidic bond. Meanwhile, 18s rDNA repeated sequence was used as the homologous sequence for an effective and stable expression of LSD1 gene. As a result, TYRL21 consumed about twice much starch than the host strain. Moreover TYRL21 speeded up the fermentation which achieved the maximum cell number only within 3 days during EBC tube fermentation. Besides, flavor evaluation comparing TYRL21 and wild type brewing strain Y31 also confirmed TYRL21's better performances regarding its better saccharides utilization (83% less in residual saccharides), less off-flavor compounds (57% less in diacetyl, 39% less in acetaldehyde, 67% less in pentanedione), and improved stability index (increased by 49%) which correlated with sensory evaluation of final beer product.

  16. Selection of 80 newly isolated autochthonous yeast strains from the Tikveš region of Macedonia and their impact on the quality of red wines produced from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon grape varieties.

    PubMed

    Ilieva, Fidanka; Kostadinović Veličkovska, Sanja; Dimovska, Violeta; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Spasov, Hristo

    2017-02-01

    The main objectives of this study were to (i) isolate newly autochthonous yeast strains from the Tikveš region of Macedonia and (ii) test their impact on the quality of red wines from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon grape varieties. The newly isolated yeast strains were obtained by spontaneous fermentation of grape must from Vranec and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties collected from ten different micro-regions in Macedonia. The grapevines from both varieties grown in "Barovo" micro-region were the richest sources of yeast strains. In addition, the molecular identification and typing of strains were also carried out. The monomeric anthocyanins, polyphenolic content and other oenochemical characteristics of the wines were also compared with the wines from commercial yeast strain "SiHa". The Vranec wine from yeast strain F-8 and Cabernet Sauvignon wine from yeast strain F-20 had significantly (p<0.05) higher concentrations of monomeric anthocyanins and total phenolic compounds than other wines.

  17. Ethanol production by a new pentose-fermenting yeast strain, Scheffersomyces stipitis UFMG-IMH 43.2, isolated from the Brazilian forest.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriana D; Mussatto, Solange I; Cadete, Raquel M; Rosa, Carlos A; Silva, Silvio S

    2011-07-01

    The ability of a recently isolated Scheffersomyces stipitis strain (UFMG-IMH 43.2) to produce ethanol from xylose was evaluated. For the assays, a hemicellulosic hydrolysate produced by dilute acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was used as the fermentation medium. Initially, the necessity of adding nutrients (MgSO(4)·7H(2)O, yeast extract and/or urea) to this medium was verified, and the yeast extract supplementation favoured ethanol production by the yeast. Then, in a second stage, assays under different initial xylose and cell concentrations, supplemented or not with yeast extract, were performed. All these three variables showed significant (p < 0.05) influence on ethanol production. The best results (ethanol yield and productivity of 0.19 g/g and 0.13 g/l/h, respectively) were obtained using the hydrolysate containing an initial xylose concentration of 30 g/l, supplemented with 5.0 g/l yeast extract and inoculated with an initial cell concentration of 2.0 g/l. S. stipitis UFMG-IMH 43.2 was demonstrated to be a yeast strain with potential for use in xylose conversion to ethanol. The establishment of the best fermentation conditions was also proved to be of great importance to increasing the product formation by this yeast strain. These findings open up new perspectives for the establishment of a feasible technology for ethanol production from hemicellulosic hydrolysates.

  18. Next-generation sequencing analysis of lager brewing yeast strains reveals the evolutionary history of interspecies hybridization.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Miki; Kajitani, Rei; Ryusui, Rie; Morimoto, Hiroya; Kodama, Yukiko; Itoh, Takehiko

    2016-02-01

    The lager beer yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus is considered an allopolyploid hybrid species between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus. Many S. pastorianus strains have been isolated and classified into two groups according to geographical origin, but this classification remains controversial. Hybridization analyses and partial PCR-based sequence data have indicated a separate origin of these two groups, whereas a recent intertranslocation analysis suggested a single origin. To clarify the evolutionary history of this species, we analysed 10 S. pastorianus strains and the S. eubayanus type strain as a likely parent by Illumina next-generation sequencing. In addition to assembling the genomes of five of the strains, we obtained information on interchromosomal translocation, ploidy, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). Collectively, these results indicated that the two groups of strains share S. cerevisiae haploid chromosomes. We therefore conclude that both groups of S. pastorianus strains share at least one interspecific hybridization event and originated from a common parental species and that differences in ploidy and SNVs between the groups can be explained by chromosomal deletion or loss of heterozygosity.

  19. DNA typing methods for differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii strains and other yeasts related to surface ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K M; Møller, P L; Jespersen, L

    2001-09-19

    The discriminative power of ITS-PCR, ITS-PCR RFLP and mitochondrial (mt)-DNA RFLP were evaluated for differentiation of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. In total 60 isolates were included. Of these, 40 strains of the following species, Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii, D. hansenii var. fabryi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida zeylanoides, Kluyveromyces lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica, were obtained from culture collections and 20 isolates of D. hansenii representing six different phenotypes were collected from seven Danish producers of surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR was evaluated for differentiation at species level on the 40 strains obtained from culture collections. Ten strains of each variety of D. hansenii and five strains of each of the above mentioned species were analysed. For each of the investigated species, a specific ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region size was observed. Accordingly ITS-PCR was found valuable for differentiation at species level of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR RFLP was investigated for the purpose of strain typing of D. hansenii. Ten CBS strains of each variety of D. hansenii were analysed. Only one enzyme (TaqI) out of several investigated (BamHI, DpnI, Fnu4HI, HaeIII, HindIII, HpaII, NlaII, Sau3AI, TaqI) demonstrated genetic diversity within the strains. This enzyme divided the 20 strains in three groups. Sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region for the type strains of each variety of D. hansenii showed an identity of 99.84%, corresponding to a difference in one basepair. Based on these results, ITS-PCR RFLP was found ineffective for strain typing of D. hansenii. MtDNA RFLP using HaeIII and HpaII was evaluated for strain typing of D. hansenii on the 20 CBS strains of D. hansenii. The CBS strains were divided into 16 groups according to their restriction profiles, which proved the method useful for typing of D. hansenii at subspecies level. The 20 dairy isolates showed a lower genetic

  20. Production of a yeast artificial chromosome for stable expression of a synthetic xylose isomerase-xylulokinase polyprotein in a fuel ethanol yeast strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was engineered to contain a polyprotein gene construct expressing xylos...

  1. Co-fermentation of cellulose/xylan using engineered industrial yeast strain OC-2 displaying both β-glucosidase and β-xylosidase.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-09-01

    We constructed a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain OC2-AXYL2-ABGL2-Xyl2 by inserting two copies of the β-glucosidase (BGL) and β-xylosidase (XYL) genes, and a gene cassette for xylose assimilation in the genome of yeast strain OC-2HUT. Both BGL and XYL were expressed on the yeast cell surface with high enzyme activities. Using OC2-AXYL2-ABGL2-Xyl2, we performed ethanol fermentation from a mixture of powdered cellulose (KC-flock) and Birchwood xylan, with the additional supplementation of a 30-g/l Trichoderma reesei cellulase complex mixture. The ethanol yield (gram per gram of added cellulases) of the strain OC2-AXYL2-ABGL2-Xyl2 increased approximately 2.5-fold compared to that of strain OC2-Xyl2, which lacked β-glucosidase and β-xylosidase activities. Notably, the concentration of additional T. reesei cellulase was reduced from 30 to 24 g/l without affecting ethanol production. The BGL- and XYL-displaying industrial yeast of the strain OC2-AXYL2-ABGL2-Xyl2 represents a promising yeast for reducing cellulase consumption of ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic biomass by compensating for the inherent weak BGL and XYL activities of T. reesei cellulase complexes.

  2. Marine yeasts as biocontrol agents and producers of bio-products.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guanglei; Zhao, Shoufeng; Li, Jing; Peng, Ying

    2010-05-01

    As some species of marine yeasts can colonize intestine of marine animals, they can be used as probiotics. It has been reported that beta-glucans from marine yeast cells can be utilized as immuno-stimulants in marine animals. Some siderophores or killer toxins produced by marine yeasts have ability to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria or kill pathogenic yeasts in marine animals. The virulent factors from marine pathogens can be genetically displayed on marine yeast cells, and the yeast cells displaying the virulent factors can stimulate marine animals to produce specific antibody against the pathogens. Some marine yeast cells are rich in proteins and essential amino acids and can be used in nutrition for marine animals. The marine yeast cells rich in lipid can be used for biodiesel production. Recently, it has been reported that some strains of Yarrowia lipolytica isolated from marine environments can produce nanoparticles. Because many marine yeasts can remove organic pollutants and heavy metals, they can be applied to remediation of marine environments. It has been shown that the enzymes produced by some marine yeasts have many unique properties and many potential applications.

  3. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  4. Optimised quantification of the antiyeast activity of different barley malts towards a lager brewing yeast strain.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Sandra N E; Axcell, Barry C; Cantrell, Ian C; Rautenbach, Marina

    2008-10-01

    The brewing of beer involves two major biological systems, namely malted barley (malt) and yeast. Both malt and yeast show natural variation and assessing the impact of differing malts on yeast performance is important in the optimisation of the brewing process. Currently, the brewing industry uses well-established tests to assess malt quality, but these frequently fail to predict malt-associated problem fermentations, such as incomplete fermentations, premature yeast flocculation (PYF) and gushing of the final beer product. Antimicrobial compounds, and in particular antiyeast compounds in malt, may be one of the unknown and unmeasured malt factors leading to problem fermentations. In this study, the adaptation of antimicrobial assays for the determination of antiyeast activity in malt is described. Our adapted assay was able to detect differing antiyeast activities in nine malt samples. For this sample set, malts associated with PYF during fermentation and gushing activity in beer showed high antiyeast activity. Both PYF and gushing are malt quality issues associated with fungal infection of barley in the field which may result in elevated antimicrobial activity in the barley grain. Also, two more malts that passed the normal quality control tests were also observed to have high antiyeast activity and such malts must be considered as suspect. Based on our results, this assay is a useful measure of malt quality as it quantifies the antiyeast activity in malt which may adversely impact on brewery fermentation.

  5. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of autochthonous cider yeasts in a cellar from Asturias.

    PubMed

    Pando Bedriñana, R; Querol Simón, A; Suárez Valles, B

    2010-06-01

    This paper analyses yeast diversity and dynamics during the production of Asturian cider. Yeasts were isolated from apple juice and at different stages of fermentation in a cellar in Villaviciosa during two Asturian cider-apple harvests. The species identified by ITS-RFLP corresponded to Hanseniaspora valbyensis, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii, Candida parapsilosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus/Saccharomyces pastorianus/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii/Saccharomyces mikatae. The species C. parapsilosis is reported here for the first time in cider. The analysis of Saccharomyces mtDNA patterns showed great diversity, sequential substitution and the presence of a small number of yeast patterns (up to 8), present in both harvests. Killer (patterns nos. 22' and 47), sensitive (patterns nos. 12, 15, 33 and 61) and neutral phenotypes were found among the S. cerevisiae isolates. The detection of beta-glucosidase activity, with arbutin as the sole carbon source, allowed two S. cerevisiae strains (patterns nos. 3' and 19') to be differentiated by means of this enzymatic activity. Yeast strains producing the killer toxin or with beta-glucosidase activity are reported for the first time in autochthonous cider yeasts.

  6. Effect of yeast strain and some nutritional factors on tannin composition and potential astringency of model wines.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Aponte, Maria; Moio, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures, isolated from different sources, were tested for their ability to reduce tannins reactive towards salivary proteins, and potentially responsible for wine astringency. Strains were preliminary genetically characterized and evaluated for physiological features of technological interest. Laboratory-scale fermentations were performed in three synthetic media: CT) containing enological grape tannin; CTP) CT supplemented with organic nitrogen sources; CTPV) CTP supplemented with vitamins. Adsorption of total tannins, tannins reactive towards salivary proteins, yellow pigments, phenolics having antioxidant activity, and total phenols, characterizing the enological tannin, was determined by spectrophotometric methods after fermentation. The presence of vitamins and peptones in musts greatly influenced the adsorption of tannins reactive towards salivary proteins (4.24 g/L gallic acid equivalent), thus promoting the reduction of the potential astringency of model wines. With reference to the different phenolic classes, yeast strains showed different adsorption abilities. From a technological point of view, the yeast choice proved to be crucial in determining changes in gustative and mouthfeel profile of red wines and may assist winemakers to modulate colour and astringency of wine.

  7. Stress tolerance and growth physiology of yeast strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry.

    PubMed

    Della-Bianca, B E; Gombert, A K

    2013-12-01

    Improved biofuels production requires a better understanding of industrial microorganisms. Some wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from the fuel ethanol industry in Brazil, present exceptional fermentation performance, persistence and prevalence in the harsh industrial environment. Nevertheless, their physiology has not yet been systematically investigated. Here we present a first systematic evaluation of the widely used industrial strains PE-2, CAT-1, BG-1 and JP1, in terms of their tolerance towards process-related stressors. We also analyzed their growth physiology under heat stress. These strains were evaluated in parallel to laboratory and baker's strains. Whereas the industrial strains performed in general better than the laboratory strains under ethanol or acetic acid stresses and on industrial media, high sugar stress was tolerated equally by all strains. Heat and low pH stresses clearly distinguished fuel ethanol strains from the others, indicating that these conditions might be the ones that mostly exert selective pressure on cells in the industrial environment. During shake-flask cultivations using a synthetic medium at 37 °C, industrial strains presented higher ethanol yields on glucose than the laboratory strains, indicating that they could have been selected for this trait-a response to energy-demanding fermentation conditions. These results might be useful to guide future improvements of large-scale fuel ethanol production via engineering of stress tolerance traits in other strains, and eventually also for promoting the use of these fuel ethanol strains in different industrial bioprocesses.

  8. Characterization of Ccw7p cell wall proteins and the encoding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains: relevance for flor formation.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Mónika; Stuparevic, Igor; Mrsa, Vladimir; Maráz, Anna

    2008-11-01

    The specific flavour of Sherry-type wines requires aromatic compounds produced as by-products of the oxidative metabolism of yeasts that are able to form a biofilm (flor) at the wine surface. A similar yeast pellicle develops on the surface of 'Tokaji Szamorodni', one of the traditional Hungarian botrytized wines, during maturation. In this work, patterns of biotinylated cell wall proteins extracted from film-forming and nonfilm-forming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were compared. It was found that all the tested 23 film-forming 'Szamorodni' yeast strains had a decreased size of the Ccw7/Hsp150 protein, one of the members of the Pir-protein family. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that the strains were lacking three out of the 11 repeating sequences characteristic to this protein family. One of the film-forming strains contained CCW7 alleles of different length, which was generated by intragenic tandem duplication of a sequence containing two repetitive domains. Unlike the film-forming strains, 16 nonfilm-forming wine yeasts isolated from a different botrytized wine, 'Tokaji Aszu', showed pronounced polymorphism of the CCW7 locus. It is highly probable that the modified Ccw7 protein does not contribute to the increased hydrophobicity of film-forming strains but it may influence molecular reorganization of the cell wall during stress adaptation.

  9. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  10. Reconstruction of thermotolerant yeast by one-point mutation identified through whole-genome analyses of adaptively-evolved strains.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Miura, Natsuko; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-03-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a host strain in bioproduction, because of its rapid growth, ease of genetic manipulation, and high reducing capacity. However, the heat produced during the fermentation processes inhibits the biological activities and growth of the yeast cells. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 19 intermediate strains previously obtained during adaptation experiments under heat stress; 49 mutations were found in the adaptation steps. Phylogenetic tree revealed at least five events in which these strains had acquired mutations in the CDC25 gene. Reconstructed CDC25 point mutants based on a parental strain had acquired thermotolerance without any growth defects. These mutations led to the downregulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway, which controls a variety of processes such as cell-cycle progression and stress tolerance. The one-point mutations in CDC25 were involved in the global transcriptional regulation through the cAMP/PKA pathway. Additionally, the mutations enabled efficient ethanol fermentation at 39 °C, suggesting that the one-point mutations in CDC25 may contribute to bioproduction.

  11. Characterization of the peroxide sensitivity of COX-deficient yeast strains reveals unexpected relationships between COX assembly proteins.

    PubMed

    Veniamin, Simona; Sawatzky, Luanne G; Banting, Graham S; Glerum, D Moira

    2011-10-15

    A number of distinct cuproproteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane are required for the assembly of cytochrome oxidase (COX), thought to function in a "bucket brigade" fashion to provide copper to the Cu(A) and Cu(B) sites. In yeast, the loss of two these proteins, Sco1p and Cox11p, leads to respiratory deficiency and a specific inability to survive exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Using a quantitative assay, we have identified subtle differences in the peroxide-sensitive phenotypes between sco1 and cox11 mutant strains. Interestingly, the peroxide sensitivity of the sco1 null strain can be suppressed by overexpressing either SCO2 or COX11, although overexpression of neither SCO1 nor SCO2 can rescue the cox11 null strain. We also find that overexpression of either CTT1, encoding the cytosolic catalase T, or CTA1, encoding the mitochondrial matrix catalase, suppresses the peroxide sensitivity in both the sco1 and the cox11 null mutants. Direct measurement of peroxide metabolism shows that sco1 and cox11 null strains fail to degrade a significant amount of exogenously provided H(2)O(2). Taken together, our data demonstrate that although Cox11p and Sco1p play distinct roles in COX assembly, they seem to play overlapping or related roles in peroxide metabolism that require further investigation.

  12. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  13. Rapid and not culture-dependent assay based on multiplex PCR-SSR analysis for monitoring inoculated yeast strains in industrial wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Rodríguez, María Esther; Garrido, Carlos; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Wine industry needs a simple method for rapid diagnosis of the dominance of inoculated strains that could be performed routinely during the fermentation process. We present a suitable, high-throughput, and low-cost method to monitor rapidly the dominance of inoculated yeast strains in industrial fermentations of red and white wines using an activated carbon cleaning pretreatment, and a rapid DNA extraction method plus multiplex PCR-SSR analysis. We apply this technique directly to samples of fermenting wines without previously isolating yeast colonies. Results are obtained in a maximum time of 4.5 h.

  14. Development of new tolerant strains to hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic solvents by the yeast surface display methodology.

    PubMed

    Perpiñá, C; Vinaixa, J; Andreu, C; del Olmo, M

    2015-01-01

    Yeast surface display is a research methodology based on anchoring functional proteins and peptides onto the surface of the cells of this eukaryotic organism. Its development has resulted in the construction of a good number of new whole-cell biocatalysts with diverse applications in biotechnology, pharmacy, and medicine. In this work, we describe the design of new yeast strains in which several proteins and peptides have been introduced at the N-terminal position of protein agglutinin Aga2p. In all cases, proteins were correctly expressed and displayed on the cell surface according to the western blot, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analyses. The introduction of a glycosylable, Ser/Thr-rich protein (S1) resulted in improved resistance to ethanol, nonane, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) stress. The protein with a very high hydrophobic content (S2d) proved to confer tolerance to acetonitrile, ethanol, nonane, salt, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The introduction of five leucine residues at the N-terminal position of S1 and S2 resulted in similar or increased resistance to the above-mentioned stress conditions. The adverse effects described in a previous work, when these residues were introduced into the N-terminus of Aga2p, with no other protein acting as a spacer, were not observed. Indeed, these strains grew better in the presence of hydrophilic solvents such as acetonitrile and ethanol. The new strains reported in this work have biotechnological potentiality given their behavior under adverse conditions of interest for biocatalytic and industrial processes.

  15. Construction of an industrial brewing yeast strain to manufacture beer with low caloric content and improved flavor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Jing; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Liu, Xi-Feng; Guo, Xue-Na; He, Xiu-Ping; Wensel, Pierre Christian; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the problems of high caloric content, increased maturation time and off-flavors in commercial beer manufacture arising from residual sugar, diacetyl, and acetaldehyde levels were addressed. A recombinant industrial brewing yeast strain (TQ1) was generated from T1 [Lipomyces starkeyi dextranase gene (LSD1) introduced, alpha-acetohydroxyacid synthase gene (ILV2) disrupted] by introducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae glucoamylase (SGA1) and a strong promoter PGK1 while disrupting the genes coding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2). The highest glucoamylase activity for TQ1 was 93.26 U/ml compared with host strain T1 (12.36 U/ml) and wild-type industrial yeast strain YSF5 (10.39 U/ml), respectively. European Brewery Convention (EBC) tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broths of TQ1 with T1 and YSF5 showed that the real extract were reduced by 15.79% and 22.47%; the main residual maltotriose concentration were reduced by 13.75% and 18.82%; the caloric content were reduced by 27.18 and 35.39 calories per 12 oz. Due to the disruption of ADH2 gene in TQ1, the off-flavor acetaldehyde concentration in the fermentation broth were 9.43% and 13.28% respectively lower than that of T1 and YSF5. No heterologous DNA sequences or drug-resistance genes were introduced into TQ1. So, the gene manipulations in this work properly solved the addressed problems in commercial beer manufacture.

  16. Yeast strains with N-terminally truncated ribosomal protein S5: implications for the evolution, structure and function of the Rps5/Rps7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, Thomas; Bentley, Amber A; Beutler, William; Ghosh, Arnab; Galkin, Oleksandr; Komar, Anton A

    2010-03-01

    Ribosomal protein (rp)S5 belongs to the family of the highly conserved rp's that contains rpS7 from prokaryotes and rpS5 from eukaryotes. Alignment of rpS5/rpS7 from metazoans (Homo sapiens), fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) shows that the proteins contain a conserved central/C-terminal core region and possess variable N-terminal regions. Yeast rpS5 is 69 amino acids (aa) longer than the E. coli rpS7 protein; and human rpS5 is 48 aa longer than the rpS7, respectively. To investigate the function of the yeast rpS5 and in particular the role of its N-terminal region, we obtained and characterized yeast strains in which the wild-type yeast rpS5 was replaced by its truncated variants, lacking 13, 24, 30 and 46 N-terminal amino acids, respectively. All mutant yeast strains were viable and displayed only moderately reduced growth rates, with the exception of the strain lacking 46 N-terminal amino acids, which had a doubling time of about 3 h. Biochemical analysis of the mutant yeast strains suggests that the N-terminal part of the eukaryotic and, in particular, yeast rpS5 may impact the ability of 40S subunits to function properly in translation and affect the efficiency of initiation, specifically the recruitment of initiation factors eIF3 and eIF2.

  17. Biocontrol activity of four non- and low-fermenting yeast strains against Aspergillus carbonarius and their ability to remove ochratoxin A from grape juice.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Stefano; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Hammami, Walid; Razzu, Salvatorico; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2014-10-17

    Aspergillus spp. infection of grape may lead to ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination in processed beverages such as wine and grape juice. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the biocontrol potential of two non-fermenting (Cyberlindnera jadinii 273 and Candida friedrichii 778) and two low-fermenting (Candida intermedia 235 and Lachancea thermotolerans 751) yeast strains against the pathogenic fungus and OTA-producer Aspergillus carbonarius, and their ability to remove OTA from grape juice. Two strains, 235 and 751, showed a significant ability to inhibit A. carbonarius both on grape berries and in in vitro experiments. Neither their filtrate nor their autoclaved filtrate culture broth was able to prevent consistently pathogen growth. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by all four selected yeasts were likely able to consistently prevent pathogen sporulation in vitro. VOCs produced by the non-fermenting strain 778 also significantly reduced A. carbonarius vegetative growth. Three yeast strains (235, 751, and 778) efficiently adsorbed artificially spiked OTA from grape juice, while autoclaving treatment improved OTA adsorption capacity by all the four tested strains. Biological control of A. carbonarius and OTA-decontamination using yeast is proposed as an approach to meet the Islamic dietary laws concerning the absence of alcohol in halal beverages.

  18. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  19. Application of SNPs for assessing biodiversity and phylogeny among yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, G; Zenvirth, D; Sherman, A; Simchen, G; Lavi, U; Hillel, J

    2005-12-01

    We examined the efficacy of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the assessment of the phylogeny and biodiversity of Saccharomyces strains. Each of 32 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was genotyped at 30 SNP loci discovered by sequence alignment of the S. cerevisiae laboratory strain SK1 to the database sequence of strain S288c. In total, 10 SNPs were selected from each of the following three categories: promoter regions, nonsynonymous and synonymous sites (in open reading frames). The strains in this study included 11 haploid laboratory strains used for genetic studies and 21 diploids. Three non-cerevisiae species of Saccharomyces (sensu stricto) were used as an out-group. A Bayesian clustering-algorithm, Structure, effectively identified four different strain groups: laboratory, wine, other diploids and the non-cerevisiae species. Analysing haploid and diploid strains together caused problems for phylogeny reconstruction, but not for the clustering produced by Structure. The ascertainment bias introduced by the SNP discovery method caused difficulty in the phylogenetic analysis; alternative options are proposed. A smaller data set, comprising only the nine most polymorphic loci, was sufficient to obtain most features of the results.

  20. Response to acetaldehyde stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a strain-dependent regulation of several ALD genes and is mediated by the general stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; del Olmo Ml, Marcel lí

    2003-06-01

    One of the stress conditions that yeast may encounter is the presence of acetaldehyde. In a previous study we identified that, in response to this stress, several HSP genes are induced that are also involved in the response to other forms of stress. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) play an important role in yeast acetaldehyde metabolism (e.g. when cells are growing in ethanol). In this work we analyse the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes (ALD) and also the corresponding enzymatic activities under several growth conditions. We investigate three kinds of yeast strains: laboratory strains, strains involved in the alcoholic fermentation stage of wine production and flor yeasts (responsible for the biological ageing of sherry wines). The latter are very important to consider because they grow in media containing high ethanol concentrations, and produce important amounts of acetaldehyde. Under several growth conditions, further addition of acetaldehyde or ethanol in flor yeasts induced the expression of some ALD genes and led to an increase in ALDH activity. This result is consistent with their need to obtain energy from ethanol during biological ageing processes. Our data also suggest that post-transcriptional and/or post-translational mechanisms are involved in regulating the activity of these enzymes. Finally, analyses indicate that the Msn2/4p and Hsf1p transcription factors are necessary for HSP26, ALD2/3 and ALD4 gene expression under acetaldehyde stress, while PKA represses the expression of these genes.

  1. Inactive and mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams of different LET values in a red yeast strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jufang; Lu, Dong; Wu, Xin; Sun, Haining; Ma, Shuang; Li, Renmin; Li, Wenjian

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate biological action of microorganism exposed to charged particles during the long distance space exploration, induction of inactivation and mutation in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015 by carbon beams of different LET values (14.9-120.0 keV μm -1) was investigated. It was found that survival curves were exponential, and mutation curves were linear for all LET values. The dependence of inactivation cross section on LET approached saturation near 120.0 keV μm -1. The mutation cross section saturated when LET was higher than 58.2 keV μm -1. Meanwhile, the highest RBE i for inactivation located at 120.0 keV μm -1 and the highest RBE m for mutation was at 58.2 keV μm -1. The experiments imply that the most efficient mutagenic part of the depth dose profile of carbon ion is at the plateau region with intermediate LET value in which energy deposited is high enough to induce mutagenic lesions but too low to induce over kill effect in the yeast cells.

  2. Metabolite Profiling during Fermentation of Makgeolli by the Wild Yeast Strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Bai, Dong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage. The flavor of makgeolli is primarily determined by metabolic products such as free sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and aromatic compounds, which are produced during the fermentation of raw materials by molds and yeasts present in nuruk, a Korean fermentation starter. In this study, makgeolli was brewed using the wild yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5, and temporal changes in the metabolites during fermentation were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resultant data were analyzed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Various metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugar alcohols, small peptides, and nucleosides, were obviously altered by increasing the fermentation period. Changes in these metabolites allowed us to distinguish among makgeolli samples with different fermentation periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 days) on a PLS-DA score plot. In the makgeolli brewed in this study, the amounts of tyrosine (463.13 µg/mL) and leucine (362.77 µg/mL) were high. Therefore, our results indicate that monitoring the changes in metabolites during makgeolli fermentation might be important for brewing makgeolli with good nutritional quality. PMID:25606007

  3. Metabolite Profiling during Fermentation of Makgeolli by the Wild Yeast Strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Bai, Dong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage. The flavor of makgeolli is primarily determined by metabolic products such as free sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and aromatic compounds, which are produced during the fermentation of raw materials by molds and yeasts present in nuruk, a Korean fermentation starter. In this study, makgeolli was brewed using the wild yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5, and temporal changes in the metabolites during fermentation were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resultant data were analyzed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Various metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugar alcohols, small peptides, and nucleosides, were obviously altered by increasing the fermentation period. Changes in these metabolites allowed us to distinguish among makgeolli samples with different fermentation periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 days) on a PLS-DA score plot. In the makgeolli brewed in this study, the amounts of tyrosine (463.13 µg/mL) and leucine (362.77 µg/mL) were high. Therefore, our results indicate that monitoring the changes in metabolites during makgeolli fermentation might be important for brewing makgeolli with good nutritional quality.

  4. Characterization of very high gravity ethanol fermentation of corn mash. Effect of glucoamylase dosage, pre-saccharification and yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Devantier, Rasmus; Pedersen, Sven; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2005-09-01

    Ethanol was produced from very high gravity mashes of dry milled corn (35% w/w total dry matter) under simultaneous saccharification and fermentation conditions. The effects of glucoamylase dosage, pre-saccharification and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain on the growth characteristics such as the ethanol yield and volumetric and specific productivity were determined. It was shown that higher glucoamylase doses and/or pre-saccharification accelerated the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process and increased the final ethanol concentration from 106 to 126 g/kg although the maximal specific growth rate was decreased. Ethanol production was not only growth related, as more than half of the total saccharides were consumed and more than half of the ethanol was produced during the stationary phase. Furthermore, a high stress tolerance of the applied yeast strain was found to be crucial for the outcome of the fermentation process, both with regard to residual saccharides and final ethanol concentration. The increased formation of cell mass when a well-suited strain was applied increased the final ethanol concentration, since a more complete fermentation was achieved.

  5. A novel methodology independent of fermentation rate for assessment of the fructophilic character of wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Liccioli, T; Chambers, P J; Jiranek, V

    2011-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a fundamental role in fermenting grape juice to wine. During alcoholic fermentation its catabolic activity converts sugars (which in grape juice are a near equal ratio of glucose and fructose) and other grape compounds into ethanol, carbon dioxide and sensorily important metabolites. However, S. cerevisiae typically utilises glucose and fructose with different efficiency: glucose is preferred and is consumed at a higher rate than fructose. This results in an increasing difference between the concentrations of glucose and fructose during fermentation. In this study 20 commercially available strains were investigated to determine their relative abilities to utilise glucose and fructose. Parameters measured included fermentation duration and the kinetics of utilisation of fructose when supplied as sole carbon source or in an equimolar mix with glucose. The data were then analysed using mathematical calculations in an effort to identify fermentation attributes which were indicative of overall fructose utilisation and fermentation performance. Fermentation durations ranged from 74.6 to over 150 h, with clear differences in the degree to which glucose utilisation was preferential. Given this variability we sought to gain a more holistic indication of strain performance that was independent of fermentation rate and therefore utilized the area under the curve (AUC) of fermentation of individual or combined sugars. In this way it was possible to rank the 20 strains for their ability to consume fructose relative to glucose. Moreover, it was shown that fermentations performed in media containing fructose as sole carbon source did not predict the fructophilicity of strains in wine-like conditions (equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose). This work provides important information for programs which seek to generate strains that are faster or more reliable fermenters.

  6. Selection of aroma compounds for the differentiation of wines obtained by fermenting musts with starter cultures of commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Vararu, Florin; Moreno-García, Jaime; Zamfir, Cătălin-Ioan; Cotea, Valeriu V; Moreno, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Nine wines obtained by fermenting Aligoté musts with individual starter cultures of eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains and with the indigenous microbiota were compared in terms of their composition in minor volatile aroma compounds. An easy handle methodology Stir-Bar-Sorptive-Adsorption, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry based, permits the identification of 49 aroma compounds. The rearrangement of these aroma compounds in six chemical families permits the establishment of a finger printing for each wine. Eighteen aroma compounds that exhibit a high differentiation power (p⩽0.05) were selected for chemometric analysis. The Principal Component Analysis carried out with these aroma compounds reveal that the first two principal components explain 53.8% and 17.2% of the total variance, respectively, allowing the establishment of nine different groups, in accordance with the wine types obtained. These results reveal analytical differences among the wines that are not recognized by sensorial analysis.

  7. Characterization of technological features of dry yeast (strain I-7-43) preparation, product of electrofusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces diastaticus, in industrial application.

    PubMed

    Kotarska, Katarzyna; Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Czupryński, Bogusław

    2011-06-10

    The aim of the study was to verify the technological usability and stability of biotechnological features of active dry distillery yeast preparation (strain I-7-43 with amylolytic abilities) applied to full-scale production of agricultural distillery. Various reduced doses of glucoamylase preparation (San-Extra L) were used for starch saccharification, from 90% to 70% in relation to the full standard dose of preparation. The dry distillery yeast I-7-43 were assessed positively in respect to fermentation activity and yield of ethanol production. Application of the dry yeast I-7-43 preparation in distillery practice lowers the costs of spirit production by saving the glucoamylase preparation (up to 30%) used in the process of mash saccharification. Concentrations of the volatile fermentation by-products in raw spirits obtained from fermentations with application of I-7-43 strain were on the levels guaranteeing good organoleptic properties of distillates.

  8. Influence of the yeast strain on the changes of the amino acids, peptides and proteins during sparkling wine production by the traditional method.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, V; Polo, M C

    2002-12-01

    The influence of five yeast strains on the nitrogen fractions, amino acids, peptides and proteins, during 12 months of aging of sparkling wines produced by the traditional or Champenoise method, was studied. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques were used for analysis of the amino acid and peptide fractions. Proteins plus polypeptides were determined by the colorimetric Bradford method. Four main stages were detected in the aging of wines with yeast. In the first stage, a second fermentation took place; amino acids and proteins plus polypeptides diminished, and peptides were liberated. In the second stage, there was a release of amino acids and proteins, and peptides were degraded. In the third stage, the release of proteins and peptides predominated. In the fourth stage, the amino acid concentration diminished. The yeast strain used influenced the content of free amino acids and peptides and the aging time in all the nitrogen fractions.

  9. Genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and in silico analysis of methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris for strain improvement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. A number of studies have been reported for improving this expression system. However, its physiology and cellular metabolism still remained largely uncharacterized. Thus, it is highly desirable to establish a systems biotechnological framework, in which a comprehensive in silico model of P. pastoris can be employed together with high throughput experimental data analysis, for better understanding of the methylotrophic yeast's metabolism. Results A fully compartmentalized metabolic model of P. pastoris (iPP668), composed of 1,361 reactions and 1,177 metabolites, was reconstructed based on its genome annotation and biochemical information. The constraints-based flux analysis was then used to predict achievable growth rate which is consistent with the cellular phenotype of P. pastoris observed during chemostat experiments. Subsequent in silico analysis further explored the effect of various carbon sources on cell growth, revealing sorbitol as a promising candidate for culturing recombinant P. pastoris strains producing heterologous proteins. Interestingly, methanol consumption yields a high regeneration rate of reducing equivalents which is substantial for the synthesis of valuable pharmaceutical precursors. Hence, as a case study, we examined the applicability of P. pastoris system to whole-cell biotransformation and also identified relevant metabolic engineering targets that have been experimentally verified. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model characterizes the cellular physiology of P. pastoris, thus allowing us to gain valuable insights into the metabolism of methylotrophic yeast and devise possible strategies for strain improvement through in silico simulations. This computational approach, combined with synthetic biology techniques, potentially forms a basis for rational analysis and design of P. pastoris metabolic network to enhance humanized

  10. Suicide in serial killers.

    PubMed

    Lester, David; White, John

    2010-02-01

    In a sample of 248 killers of two victims in America from 1900 to 2005, obtained from an encyclopedia of serial killers by Newton (2006), those completing suicide did not differ in sex, race, or the motive for the killing from those who were arrested.

  11. Malolactic bioconversion using a Oenococcus oeni strain for cider production: effect of yeast extract supplementation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Mónica; García, Luis A; Díaz, Mario

    2003-12-01

    Yeast extract addition to reconstituted apple juice had a positive impact on the development of the malolactic starter culture used to ensure malolactic fermentation in cider, using active but non-proliferating cells. In this work, the reuse of fermentation lees from cider is proposed as an alternative to the use of commercial yeast extract products. Malolactic enzymatic assays, both in whole cells and cell-free extracts, were carried out to determine the best time to harvest cells for use as an inoculum in cider. Cells harvested at the late exponential phase, the physiological stage of growth corresponding to the maximum values of specific malolactic activity, achieved a good rate of malic acid degradation in controlled cider fermentation. Under the laboratory conditions used, malic acid degradation rates in the fermentation media turned out to be near 2.0 and 2.5 times lower, compared with the rates obtained in whole-cell enzymatic assays, as useful data applicable to industrial cider production.

  12. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  13. Regulatory concerns associated with use of value-added recombinant proteins and peptides screened in hgh-throughput for expression in fuel ethanol yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant proteins expressed in animals have been a public concern as a risk to the consumer since the animals are genetically modified to obtain desired improvements (GMO animals). Similarly, various commercially valuable proteins or peptides expressed in fuel ethanol yeast strains under develop...

  14. Comparison of the Sensititre YeastOne® dilution method with the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 microbroth dilution reference method for determining MIC of eight antifungal agents on 102 yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Bertout, S; Dunyach, C; Drakulovski, P; Reynes, J; Mallié, M

    2011-02-01

    The Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute ([CLSI] formerly NCCLS) reference broth microdilution testing method (protocol M27-A3) was compared with a commercially available methods (Sensititre YeastOne(®)) by testing two quality control strains and 102 isolates of Candida sp. and Cryptococcus sp. against fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, flucytosin, amphotericin B and caspofungin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) endpoints were determined after 24h of incubation for Sensititre YeastOne(®) and after 24 and 48 h for CLSI microdilution method. Essential agreements between methods vary from 70.6 to 92.2%. Categorical agreements vary from 94.1% for 5FC to 72.6% for AMB. Sensititre YeastOne(®) reading appears to be useful for avoiding very major errors and this confirms the interest of this method for evaluating new antifungals activity in vitro.

  15. Detection of azole susceptibility patterns in clinical yeast strains isolated from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Czaika, Viktor; Nenoff, Pietro; Glöckner, Andreas; Becker, Karsten; Fegeler, Wolfgang; Schmalreck, Arno F

    2014-10-01

    4,860 clinical yeast isolates (25 genera, 47 species) were tested in parallel to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole. After re-evaluation of all species according to their current valid taxonomic denominations, the range of the top four of the dermatology, gynaecology and paediatrics associated species from superficial infections was similar to those isolated from other wards with mainly systemic/invasive infections. Candida albicans (44.7%) was the most frequent pathogen followed by C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis. The MIC-assessment revealed for the ten-year test period an overall azole-susceptibility of about 75%, and ~80% for their associated ICUs. The overall susceptibility of the isolates from systemic and superficial infections to the four azoles was 79% and 80% respectively, and demonstrates a high in vitro activity. When two test periods (1998-2001 and 2002-2008) were compared by characteristic MIC values and multi-azole resistance, no significant increase could be detected in azole susceptibility/resistance over the two periods, respectively, over the total investigation period of ten years. This holds true when the characteristic MIC values were compared with those from different azole susceptibility studies from similar time periods and from different investigators around the world (1991 to 2010). With a new method, susceptibility pattern analysis for fungi, detailed information of multi-resistant microorganism populations could be obtained, and different characteristic resistance patterns in clinical yeast species detected. Although at a relatively low level, multi-resistance was seen in individual species populations demonstrating resistance to two (6.7%), three (4.4%), or all four (4%) azoles tested. A level of 4% and 2% fourfold parallel resistance was also determined in Candia spp. and non-Candida spp. derived of blood culture isolates.

  16. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; da Silva, Jessica Carolina Gomes; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2013-01-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Characterisation tests for invasiveness in Agar medium, killer activity, flocculation and fermentative capacity were performed on 22 strains (11 rough and 11 smooth colonies). The effects of acid treatment at different pH values on the growth of two strains (“52” - rough and “PE-02” - smooth) as well as batch fermentation tests with cell recycling and acid treatment of the cells were also evaluated. Invasiveness in YPD Agar medium occurred at low frequency; ten of eleven rough yeasts exhibited flocculation; none of the strains showed killer activity; and the rough strains presented lower and slower fermentative capacities compared to the smooth strains in a 48-h cycle in a batch system with sugar cane juice. The growth of the rough strain was severely affected by the acid treatment at pH values of 1.0 and 1.5; however, the growth of the smooth strain was not affected. The fermentative efficiency in mixed fermentation (smooth and rough strains in the same cell mass proportion) did not differ from the efficiency obtained with the smooth strain alone, most likely because the acid treatment was conducted at pH 1.5 in a batch cell-recycle test. A fermentative efficiency as low as 60% was observed with the rough colony alone. PMID:24688501

  17. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; da Silva, Jessica Carolina Gomes; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2013-12-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Characterisation tests for invasiveness in Agar medium, killer activity, flocculation and fermentative capacity were performed on 22 strains (11 rough and 11 smooth colonies). The effects of acid treatment at different pH values on the growth of two strains ("52"--rough and "PE-02"--smooth) as well as batch fermentation tests with cell recycling and acid treatment of the cells were also evaluated. Invasiveness in YPD Agar medium occurred at low frequency; ten of eleven rough yeasts exhibited flocculation; none of the strains showed killer activity; and the rough strains presented lower and slower fermentative capacities compared to the smooth strains in a 48-h cycle in a batch system with sugar cane juice. The growth of the rough strain was severely affected by the acid treatment at pH values of 1.0 and 1.5; however, the growth of the smooth strain was not affected. The fermentative efficiency in mixed fermentation (smooth and rough strains in the same cell mass proportion) did not differ from the efficiency obtained with the smooth strain alone, most likely because the acid treatment was conducted at pH 1.5 in a batch cell-recycle test. A fermentative efficiency as low as 60% was observed with the rough colony alone.

  18. Unexpected Genomic Variability in Clinical and Environmental Strains of the Pathogenic Yeast Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the most commonly reported invasive fungal infection worldwide. Although Candida albicans remains the main cause, the incidence of emerging Candida species, such as C. parapsilosis is increasing. It has been postulated that C. parapsilosis clinical isolates result from a recent global expansion of a virulent clone. However, the availability of a single genome for this species has so far prevented testing this hypothesis at genomic scales. We present here the sequence of three additional strains from clinical and environmental samples. Our analyses reveal unexpected patterns of genomic variation, shared among distant strains, that argue against the clonal expansion hypothesis. All strains carry independent expansions involving an arsenite transporter homolog, pointing to the existence of directional selection in the environment, and independent origins of the two clinical isolates. Furthermore, we report the first evidence for the existence of recombination in this species. Altogether, our results shed new light onto the dynamics of genome evolution in C. parapsilosis. PMID:24259314

  19. Effects of distillation system and yeast strain on the aroma profile of Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace spirits.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Garay, Y; Blanco, P; López-Vázquez, C; Rodríguez-Bencomo, J J; Pérez-Correa, J R; López, F; Orriols, I

    2014-10-29

    Orujo is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in Galicia (northwest Spain) from distillation of grape pomace, a byproduct of the winemaking industry. In this study, the effect of the distillation system (copper charentais alembic versus packed column) and the yeast strain (native yeast L1 versus commercial yeast L2) on the chemical and sensory characteristics of orujo obtained from Albariño (Vitis vinifera L.) grape pomace has been analyzed. Principal component analysis, with two components explaining 74% of the variance, is able to clearly differentiate the distillates according to distillation system and yeast strain. Principal component 1, mainly defined by C6-C12 esters, isoamyl octanoate, and methanol, differentiates L1 from L2 distillates. In turn, principal component 2, mainly defined by linear alcohols, linalool, and 1-hexenol, differentiates alembic from packed column distillates. In addition, an aroma descriptive test reveals that the distillate obtained with a packed column from a pomace fermented with L1 presented the highest positive general impression, which is associated with the highest fruity and smallest solvent aroma scores. Moreover, chemical analysis shows that use of a packed column increases average ethanol recovery by 12%, increases the concentration of C6-C12 esters by 25%, and reduces the concentration of higher alcohols by 21%. In turn, L2 yeast obtained lower scores in the alembic distillates aroma profile. In addition, with L1, 9% higher ethanol yields were achieved, and L2 distillates contained 34%-40% more methanol than L1 distillates.

  20. Microarray-based method for monitoring yeast overexpression strains reveals small-molecule targets in TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Rebecca A; Bhullar, Bhupinder S; Perlstein, Ethan O; Marsischky, Gerald; LaBaer, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2006-02-01

    Identification of the cellular targets of small-molecule hits in phenotypic screens is a central challenge in the development of small molecules as biological tools and potential therapeutics. To facilitate the process of small-molecule target identification, we developed a global, microarray-based method for monitoring the growth of pools of yeast strains, each overexpressing a different protein, in the presence of small molecules. Specifically, the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring approximately 3,900 different overexpression plasmids was monitored in the presence of rapamycin, which inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) proteins. TOR was successfully identified as a candidate rapamycin target, and many additional gene products were implicated in the TOR signaling pathway. We also characterized the mechanism of LY-83583, a small-molecule suppressor of rapamycin-induced growth inhibition. These data enabled functional links to be drawn between groups of genes implicated in the TOR pathway, identified several candidate targets for LY-83583, and suggested a role for mitochondrial respiration in mediating rapamycin sensitivity.

  1. Ethanol production from syngas by Clostridium strain P11 using corn steep liquor as a nutrient replacement to yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Maddipati, Prasanth; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Bellmer, Danielle D; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of replacing yeast extract (YE) by corn steep liquor (CSL), a low cost nutrient source, for syngas fermentation to produce ethanol using Clostridium strain P11 was investigated. About 32% more ethanol (1.7 g L(-1)) was produced with 20 g L(-1) CSL media in 250-mL bottle fermentations compared to media with 1 g L(-1) YE after 360 h. Maximum ethanol concentrations after 360 h of fermentation in a 7.5-L fermentor with 10 and 20 g L(-1) CSL media were 8.6 and 9.6 g L(-1), respectively, which represent 57% and 60% of the theoretical ethanol yields from CO. Only about 6.1 g L(-1) of ethanol was obtained in the medium with 1 g L(-1) YE after 360 h, which represents 53% of the theoretical ethanol yield from CO. The use of CSL also enhanced butanol production by sevenfold compared to YE in bottle fermentations. These results demonstrate that CSL can replace YE as the primary medium component and significantly enhance ethanol production by Clostridium strain P11.

  2. Recombinant industrial brewing yeast strains with ADH2 interruption using self-cloning GSH1+CUP1 cassette.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yue; Wang, Jin-Jing; Liu, Xi-Feng; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2009-06-01

    A self-cloning module for gene knock-out and knock-in in industrial brewing yeast strain was constructed that contains copper resistance and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene cassette, flanked by alcohol dehydrogenase II gene (ADH2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The module was used to obtain recombined strains RY1 and RY2 by targeting the ADH2 locus of host Y1. RY1 and RY2 were genetically stable. PCR and enzyme activity analysis of RY1 and RY2 cells showed that one copy of ADH2 was deleted by GSH1+CUP1 insertion, and an additional copy of wild type was still present. The fermentation ability of the recombinants was not changed after genetic modification, and a high level of glutathione (GSH) was secreted, resulting from GSH1 overexpression, which codes for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. A pilot-scale brewing test for RY1 and RY2 indicated that acetaldehyde content in fermenting liquor decreased by 21-22%, GSH content increased by 20-22% compared with the host, the antioxidizability of the recombinants was improved, and the sensorial evaluation was also better than that of the host. No heterologous DNA was harbored in the recombinants; therefore, they could be applied in the beer industry in terms of their biosafety.

  3. Gene expression analysis using strains constructed by NHEJ-mediated one-step promoter cloning in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ayako; Fujii, Hiroshi; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression analysis provides valuable information to evaluate cellular state. Unlike quantitative mRNA analysis techniques like reverse-transcription PCR and microarray, expression analysis using a reporter gene has not been commonly used for multiple-gene analysis, probably due to the difficulty in preparing multiple reporter-gene constructs. To circumvent this problem, we developed a novel one-step reporter-gene construction system mediated by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. As a selectable reporter gene, the ScURA3 selection marker was fused in frame with a red fluorescent gene yEmRFP (ScURA3:yEmRFP). The N-terminally truncated ScURA3:yEmRFP fragment was prepared by PCR. Promoter sequences were also prepared by PCR using primers containing the sequence of the deleted ScURA3 N-terminus to attach at their 3(') ends. The two DNA fragments were used for the transformation of a ura3(-) strain of K. marxianus, in which two DNA fragments are randomly joined and integrated into the chromosome through NHEJ. Only the correctly aligned fragments produced transformants on uracil-deficient medium and expressed red fluorescence under the control of the introduced promoters. A total of 36 gene promoters involved in glycolysis and other pathways were analyzed. Fluorescence measurements of these strains allowed real-time gene expression analysis in different culture conditions.

  4. Population structure and comparative genome hybridization of European flor yeast reveal a unique group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with few gene duplications in their genome.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation.

  5. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  6. Construction of a xylan-fermenting yeast strain through codisplay of xylanolytic enzymes on the surface of xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Satoshi; Fujita, Yasuya; Mizuike, Atsuko; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2004-09-01

    Hemicellulose is one of the major forms of biomass in lignocellulose, and its essential component is xylan. We used a cell surface engineering system based on alpha-agglutinin to construct a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain codisplaying two types of xylan-degrading enzymes, namely, xylanase II (XYNII) from Trichoderma reesei QM9414 and beta-xylosidase (XylA) from Aspergillus oryzae NiaD300, on the cell surface. In a high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, xylose was detected as the main product of the yeast strain codisplaying XYNII and XylA, while xylobiose and xylotriose were detected as the main products of a yeast strain displaying XYNII on the cell surface. These results indicate that xylan is sequentially hydrolyzed to xylose by the codisplayed XYNII and XylA. In a further step toward achieving the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of xylan, a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain was constructed by codisplaying XYNII and XylA and introducing genes for xylose utilization, namely, those encoding xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis and xylulokinase from S. cerevisiae. After 62 h of fermentation, 7.1 g of ethanol per liter was directly produced from birchwood xylan, and the yield in terms of grams of ethanol per gram of carbohydrate consumed was 0.30 g/g. These results demonstrate that the direct conversion of xylan to ethanol is accomplished by the xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain.

  7. Evaluation of the formation of volatiles and sensory characteristics of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.f.) fruit wines using different commercial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Cai; Niu, Yun Wei; Feng, Tao; Liu, Sheng Jiang; Cheng, He Xing; Xu, Na; Yu, Hai Yan; Xiao, Zuo Bing

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of five strains (IFFI 1346, IFFI 1363, CICC 31482, D254 and CGMCC2.346) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the aromatic profiles of fermented persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.f.) musts. A total of 50 and 60 compounds were identified in persimmon wine by stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. According to odour activity values (OAVs), 26 detected compounds showed an OAV above 1. Principal component analysis explained the distribution of these persimmon wines on the basis of volatile compounds with OAV>1. The volatile compounds with high OAV included ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, methyl decanoate, linalool and geraniol. Quantitative descriptive analysis was employed. The result showed that persimmon wines fermented with strains IFFI 1363 and D254 were strongly correlated with persimmon, aroma harmony, fruity, fusel and taste balanced, fullness, hedonic scale. Therefore, the two yeast strains could be used as starter culture for persimmon wine production.

  8. The new modern era of yeast genomics: community sequencing and the resulting annotation of multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains at the Saccharomyces Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Cherry, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first completed eukaryotic genome sequence was that of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the original model organism database. SGD remains the authoritative community resource for the S. cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation, and continues to provide comprehensive biological information correlated with S. cerevisiae genes and their products. A diverse set of yeast strains have been sequenced to explore commercial and laboratory applications, and a brief history of those strains is provided. The publication of these new genomes has motivated the creation of new tools, and SGD will annotate and provide comparative analyses of these sequences, correlating changes with variations in strain phenotypes and protein function. We are entering a new era at SGD, as we incorporate these new sequences and make them accessible to the scientific community, all in an effort to continue in our mission of educating researchers and facilitating discovery.

  9. Yeast ecology of vineyards within Marsala wine area (western Sicily) in two consecutive vintages and selection of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Luca; Sannino, Ciro; Francesca, Nicola; Guarcello, Rosa; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the yeast ecology associated with the spontaneous fermentation of Grillo cultivar grapes from 10 vineyards was analyzed from grape harvest till complete consumption of must sugars. The microbiological investigation started with the plate count onto two culture media to distinguish total yeasts (TY) and presumptive Saccharomyces (PS). Yeasts were randomly isolated and identified by a combined genotypic approach consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 5.8S rRNA gene and 26S rRNA and sequencing of D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene, which resulted in the recognition of 14 species belonging to 10 genera. The distribution of the yeasts within the vineyards showed some differences in species composition and concentration levels among 2008 and 2009 vintages. Due to the enological relevance, all Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates were differentiated applying two genotypic tools (interdelta analysis and microsatellite multiplex PCR of polymorphic microsatellite loci) that recognized 51 strains. Based on the low production of H(2)S, acetic acid and foam, ethanol resistance, growth in presence of high concentrations of potassium metabisulphite (KMBS) and CuSO(4) and at low temperatures, 14 strains were selected and used as starter to ferment grape must at 13 °C and 17 °C in presence of 100 mg/L of KMBS. Three strains (CS160, CS165 and CS182) showed optimal technological aptitudes.

  10. Fermentation of Apple Juice with a Selected Yeast Strain Isolated from the Fermented Foods of Himalayan Regions and Its Organoleptic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, S. S.; Keshani

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different fermented foods of Western Himalayas have been studied for strain level and functional diversity in our department. Among these 23 strains, 10 S. cerevisiae strains on the basis of variation in their brewing traits were selected to study their organoleptic effect at gene level by targeting ATF1 gene, which is responsible for ester synthesis during fermentation. Significant variation was observed in ATF1 gene sequences, suggesting differences in aroma and flavor of their brewing products. Apple is a predominant fruit in Himachal Pradesh and apple cider is one of the most popular drinks all around the world hence, it was chosen for sensory evaluation of six selected yeast strains. Organoleptic studies and sensory analysis suggested Sc21 and Sc01 as best indigenous strains for soft and hard cider, respectively, indicating their potential in enriching the local products with enhanced quality. PMID:27446050

  11. Modulation of Intestinal Inflammation by Yeasts and Cell Wall Extracts: Strain Dependence and Unexpected Anti-Inflammatory Role of Glucan Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Jawhara, Samir; Habib, Khalid; Maggiotto, François; Pignede, Georges; Vandekerckove, Pascal; Maes, Emmanuel; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Fontaine, Thierry; Guerardel, Yann; Poulain, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts and their glycan components can have a beneficial or adverse effect on intestinal inflammation. Previous research has shown that the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii (Sb) reduces intestinal inflammation and colonization by Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to identify dietary yeasts, which have comparable effects to the anti-C. albicans and anti-inflammatory properties of Sb and to assess the capabilities of yeast cell wall components to modulate intestinal inflammation. Mice received a single oral challenge of C. albicans and were then given 1.5% dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS) for 2 weeks followed by a 3-day restitution period. S. cerevisiae strains (Sb, Sc1 to Sc4), as well as mannoprotein (MP) and β-glucan crude fractions prepared from Sc2 and highly purified β-glucans prepared from C. albicans were used in this curative model, starting 3 days after C. albicans challenge. Mice were assessed for the clinical, histological and inflammatory responses related to DSS administration. Strain Sc1-1 gave the same level of protection against C. albicans as Sb when assessed by mortality, clinical scores, colonization levels, reduction of TNFα and increase in IL-10 transcription. When Sc1-1 was compared with the other S. cerevisiae strains, the preparation process had a strong influence on biological activity. Interestingly, some S. cerevisiae strains dramatically increased mortality and clinical scores. Strain Sc4 and MP fraction favoured C. albicans colonization and inflammation, whereas β-glucan fraction was protective against both. Surprisingly, purified β-glucans from C. albicans had the same protective effect. Thus, some yeasts appear to be strong modulators of intestinal inflammation. These effects are dependent on the strain, species, preparation process and cell wall fraction. It was striking that β-glucan fractions or pure β-glucans from C. albicans displayed the most potent anti-inflammatory effect in the DSS model. PMID

  12. Detection of weak estrogenic flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and a modified MCF7 cell proliferation assay.

    PubMed

    Breinholt, V; Larsen, J C

    1998-06-01

    A newly developed recombinant yeast strain, in which the human estrogen receptor has been stably integrated into the genome of the yeast, was used to gain information on the estrogenic activity of a large series of dietary flavonoids. Among 23 flavonoids investigated, 8 were found to markedly stimulate the transcriptional activity of the human estrogen receptor in the yeast assay increasing transcriptional activity 5-13-fold above background level, corresponding to EC50 values between 0.1 and 25 microM. Five compounds increased the transcriptional activity 2-5-fold over the control, with EC50 values ranging from 84 to 102 microM, whereas the remaining flavonoids were devoid of activity. The most potent flavonoid estrogens tested were naringenin, apigenin, kaempferol, phloretin, and the four isoflavonoids equol, genistein, daidzein, and biochanin A. With the exception of biochanin A, the main feature required to confer estrogenicity was the presence of a single hydroxyl group in the 4'-position of the B-ring of the flavan nucleus, corresponding to the 4-position on phloretin. The estrogenic potency of the flavonoids was found to be 4 000-4 000 000 times lower than that observed for 17beta-estradiol, when compared on the basis of EC50 values. The estrogenic activity of the dietary flavonoids was further investigated in estrogen-dependent human MCF7 breast cancer cells. In this system several of the flavonoids were likewise capable of mimicking natural estrogens and thereby induce cell proliferation. Similar structural requirements for estrogenic activity were found for the two assays. The present results provide evidence that several of the flavo-estrogens possess estrogenic properties comparable in activity to the well-established isoflavonoid estrogens. The use of Alamar Blue, a vital dye which is metabolically reduced by cellular enzymes to a fluorescent product, was found to greatly simplify the MCF7 cell-based estrogen screen, making this mammalian assay

  13. A non-Mendelian factor, [eta(+)], causes lethality of yeast omnipotent-suppressor strains.

    PubMed

    Liebman, S W; All-Robyn, J A

    1984-10-01

    Omnipotent suppressors cause translational ambiguity and have been associated with poor growth and inviability. We now report that a non-Mendelian element, [eta(+)], causes this inviability. In [eta(-)] strains the suppressors are not inviable. The [eta(+)] genetic element segregates to about 70% of the meiotic progeny, although almost all of the spores probably have the [eta(+)] phenotype for the first few divisions. Growth on 5 mM guanidine hydrochloride efficiently causes [eta(+)] strains to become [eta(-)]. The [eta(+)] factor has many similarities with the previously described [psi(+)] factor (Cox 1965, 1971). However, [eta(+)] and [psi(+)] differ in their patterns of inheritance, and by the fact that [psi(+)] affects ochre specific and not omnipotent suppressors, while the converse is true of [eta(+)].

  14. Secretion expression of SOD1 and its overlapping function with GSH in brewing yeast strain for better flavor and anti-aging ability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyue; Bai, Xuejing; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a significant antioxidant, but unlike glutathione (GSH), SOD cannot be secreted into beer by yeast cells during fermentation, this directly leads to the limited application of SOD in beer anti-aging. In this investigation, we constructed the SOD1 secretion cassette in which strong promoter PGK1p and the sequence of secreting signal factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both harbored to the upstream of coding sequence of SOD1 gene, as a result, the obtained strains carrying this cassette successfully realized the secretion of SOD1. In order to overcome the limitation of previous genetic modification on yeast strains, one new comprehensive strategy was adopted targeting the suitable homologous sites by gene deletion and SOD1 + GSH1 co-overexpression, and the new strain ST31 (Δadh2::SOD1 + Δilv2::GSH1) was constructed. The results of the pilot-scale fermentation showed that the diacetyl content of ST31 was lower by 42 % than that of the host, and the acetaldehyde content decreased by 29 %, the GSH content in the fermenting liquor of ST31 increased by 29 % compared with the host. Both SOD activity test and the positive and negative staining assay after native PAGE indicated that the secreted active SOD in the fermenting liquor of ST31 was mainly a dimer with the size of 32,500 Da. The anti-aging indexes such as the thiobarbituric acid and the resistance staling value further proved that the flavor stability of the beer brewed with strain ST31 was not only better than that of the original strain, but also better than that of the previous engineering strains. The multi-modification and comprehensive improvement of the beer yeast strain would greatly enhance beer quality than ever, and the self-cloning strain would be attractive to the public due to its bio-safety.

  15. Evaluation of the acetaldehyde production and degradation potential of 26 enological Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in a resting cell model system.

    PubMed

    Li, Erhu; de Orduña, Ramón Mira

    2011-09-01

    Acetaldehyde is relevant for wine aroma, wine color, and microbiological stability. Yeast are known to play a crucial role in production and utilization of acetaldehyde during fermentations but comparative quantitative data are scarce. This research evaluated the acetaldehyde metabolism of 26 yeast strains, including commercial Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces, in a reproducible resting cell model system. Acetaldehyde kinetics and peak values were highly genus, species, and strain dependent. Peak acetaldehyde values varied from 2.2 to 189.4 mg l(-1) and correlated well (r(2) = 0.92) with the acetaldehyde production yield coefficients that ranged from 0.4 to 42 mg acetaldehyde per g of glucose in absence of SO(2). S. pombe showed the highest acetaldehyde production yield coefficients and peak values. All other non-Saccharomyces species produced significantly less acetaldehyde than the S. cerevisiae strains and were less affected by SO(2) additions. All yeast strains could degrade acetaldehyde as sole substrate, but the acetaldehyde degradation rates did not correlate with acetaldehyde peak values or acetaldehyde production yield coefficients in incubations with glucose as sole substrate.

  16. Direct ethanol production from cassava pulp using a surface-engineered yeast strain co-displaying two amylases, two cellulases, and β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Murata, Yoshinori; Kosugi, Akihiko; Yamada, Ryosuke; Kondo, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Mori, Yutaka

    2011-04-01

    In order to develop a method for producing fuel ethanol from cassava pulp using cell surface engineering (arming) technology, an arming yeast co-displaying α-amylase (α-AM), glucoamylase, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrase, and β-glucosidase on the surface of the yeast cells was constructed. The novel yeast strain, possessing the activities of all enzymes, was able to produce ethanol directly from soluble starch, barley β-glucan, and acid-treated Avicel. Cassava is a major crop in Southeast Asia and used mainly for starch production. In the starch manufacturing process, large amounts of solid wastes, called cassava pulp, are produced. The major components of cassava pulp are starch (approximately 60%) and cellulose fiber (approximately 30%). We attempted simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation of cassava pulp with this arming yeast. During fermentation, ethanol concentration increased as the starch and cellulose fiber substrates contained in the cassava pulp decreased. The results clearly showed that the arming yeast was able to produce ethanol directly from cassava pulp without addition of any hydrolytic enzymes.

  17. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  18. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  19. The Violence of Collection: "Indian Killer"'s Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Janet

    2008-01-01

    At the close of Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer," in a final chapter titled "Creation Story," a killer carries a backpack containing, among other things, "dozens of owl feathers, a scrapbook, and two bloody scalps in a plastic bag." Readers schooled in the psychopathologies of real and fictional serial killers will be familiar with the detail:…

  20. Constitutive expression of the DUR1,2 gene in an industrial yeast strain to minimize ethyl carbamate production during Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianhui; Li, Xiaomin; Lu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Liang; Xie, Guangfa

    2016-01-01

    Urea and ethanol are the main precursors of ethyl carbamate (EC) in Chinese rice wine. During fermentation, urea is generated from arginine by arginase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and subsequently cleaved by urea amidolyase or directly transported out of the cell into the fermentation liquor, where it reacts with ethanol to form EC. To reduce the amount of EC in Chinese rice wine, we metabolically engineered two yeast strains, N85(DUR1,2) and N85(DUR1,2)-c, from the wild-type Chinese rice wine yeast strain N85. Both new strains were capable of constitutively expressing DUR1,2 (encodes urea amidolyase) and thus enhancing urea degradation. The use of N85(DUR1,2) and N85(DUR1,2)-c reduced the concentration of EC in Chinese rice wine fermented on a small-scale by 49.1% and 55.3%, respectively, relative to fermentation with the parental strain. All of the engineered strains showed good genetic stability and minimized the production of urea during fermentation, with no exogenous genes introduced during genetic manipulation, and were therefore suitable for commercialization to increase the safety of Chinese rice wine.

  1. Conversion of pentoses by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Claypool, T.A.; Maun, C.M.; Mccracken, L.D.; Tsao, G.T.; Ueng, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization and conversion of D-xylose, D-xyulose, L-arabinose, and xylitol by yeast strains have been investigated with the following results: 1) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylose and produce polyols, ethanol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products formed varies with the yeast strains used. The most commonly detected product is xylitol. 2) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylulose aerobically and fermentatively to produce ethanol, xylitol D-arabitol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products varies depending upon the yeast strains used. 3) Xylitol is a poor carbon and energy source for most yeasts tested. Some yeast strains produce small amounts of ethanol from xylitol. 4) Most yeast strains utilize L-arabinose, and L-arabitol is the common product. Small amounts of ethanol are also produced by some yeast strains. 5) Of the four substrates examined, D-xylulose was the preferred substrate, followed by D-xylose, L-arabinose, and xylitol. 6) Mutant yeast strains that exhibit different metabolic product patterns can be induced and isolated from Candida sp. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and other yeasts. These mutant strains can be used for ethanol production from D-xylose as well as for the study of metabolic regulation of pentose utilization in yeasts.

  2. Indistinguishable Landscapes of Meiotic DNA Breaks in rad50+ and rad50S Strains of Fission Yeast Revealed by a Novel rad50+ Recombination Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2008-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rec12 protein, the homolog of Spo11 in other organisms, initiates meiotic recombination by creating DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and becoming covalently linked to the DNA ends of the break. This protein–DNA linkage has previously been detected only in mutants such as rad50S in which break repair is impeded and DSBs accumulate. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DSB distribution in a rad50S mutant is markedly different from that in wild-type (RAD50) meiosis, and it was suggested that this might also be true for other organisms. Here, we show that we can detect Rec12-DNA linkages in Sc. pombe rad50+ cells, which are proficient for DSB repair. In contrast to the results from Sa. cerevisiae, genome-wide microarray analysis of Rec12-DNA reveals indistinguishable meiotic DSB distributions in rad50+ and rad50S strains of Sc. pombe. These results confirm our earlier findings describing the occurrence of widely spaced DSBs primarily in large intergenic regions of DNA and demonstrate the relevance and usefulness of fission yeast studies employing rad50S. We propose that the differential behavior of rad50S strains reflects a major difference in DSB regulation between the two species—specifically, the requirement for the Rad50-containing complex for DSB formation in budding yeast but not in fission yeast. Use of rad50S and related mutations may be a useful method for DSB analysis in other species. PMID:19023408

  3. Efficacy and putative mode of action of native and commercial antagonistic yeasts against postharvest pathogens of pear.

    PubMed

    Lutz, M Cecilia; Lopes, Christian A; Rodriguez, M Eugenia; Sosa, M Cristina; Sangorrín, Marcela P

    2013-06-17

    Putative mechanisms of action associated with the biocontrol capacity of four yeast strains (Cryptoccocus albidus NPCC 1248, Pichia membranifaciens NPCC 1250, Cryptoccocus victoriae NPCC 1263 and NPCC 1259) against Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were studied by means of in vitro and in situ assays. C. albidus(YP), a commercial yeast was also evaluated for comparative purposes. The yeast strains exhibited a variety of different mechanisms including: wound colonization, germination inhibition, biofilm formation, secretion of killer toxins, competition for nutrient and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes (protease, chitinase and glucanase). The relationship between strains (and their associated antagonist mechanisms) and in situ antagonist activity was also evaluated. Results indicate that mechanisms such as production of hydrolytic enzymes, the ability for colonization of wounds, production of killer toxin and inhibition of germination are the most important for biocontrol activity. Our study indicate that multiple modes of action may explain why P. membranifaciens NPCC 1250 and C. victoriae NPCC 1263 provided excellent control of postharvest pears disease.

  4. Yeast population dynamics in spontaneous fermentations: comparison between two different wine-producing areas over a period of three years.

    PubMed

    Torija, M J; Rozès, N; Poblet, M; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

    2001-09-01

    Yeast ecology, biogeography and biodiversity are important and interesting topics of research. The population dynamics of yeasts in several cellars of two Spanish wine-producing regions was analysed for three consecutive years (1996 to 1998). No yeast starter cultures had been used in these wineries which therefore provided an ideal winemaking environment to investigate the dynamics of grape-related indigenous yeast populations. Non-Saccharomyces yeast species were identified by RFLPs of their rDNA, while Saccharomyces species and strains were identified by RFLPs of their mtDNA. This study confirmed the findings of other reports that non-Saccharomyces species were limited to the early stages of fermentation whilst Saccharomyces dominated towards the end of the alcoholic fermentation. However, significant differences were found with previous studies, such as the survival of non-Saccharomyces species in stages with high alcohol content and a large variability of Saccharomyces strains (a total of 112, all of them identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with no clear predominance of any strain throughout all the fermentation, probably related to the absence of killer phenotype and lack of previous inoculation with commercial strains.

  5. Protein expression-yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline.

  6. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  7. Biology Myth-Killers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  8. Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This young adult author claims his most enjoyable task as a writer is "intellectual danger, getting into other people's trouble." He asks his readers not to trust him, and then, as evidence, tempts us with a look at a chapter from "Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer."

  9. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pan-genome reveals a pool of copy number variants distributed in diverse yeast strains from differing industrial environments

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Barbara; Richter, Chandra; Kvitek, Daniel J.; Pugh, Tom; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably one of the most well-studied organisms on earth, the genome-wide variation within this species—i.e., its “pan-genome”—has been less explored. We created a multispecies microarray platform containing probes covering the genomes of several Saccharomyces species: S. cerevisiae, including regions not found in the standard laboratory S288c strain, as well as the mitochondrial and 2-μm circle genomes–plus S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. kluyveri, and S. castellii. We performed array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) on 83 different S. cerevisiae strains collected across a wide range of habitats; of these, 69 were commercial wine strains, while the remaining 14 were from a diverse set of other industrial and natural environments. We observed interspecific hybridization events, introgression events, and pervasive copy number variation (CNV) in all but a few of the strains. These CNVs were distributed throughout the strains such that they did not produce any clear phylogeny, suggesting extensive mating in both industrial and wild strains. To validate our results and to determine whether apparently similar introgressions and CNVs were identical by descent or recurrent, we also performed whole-genome sequencing on nine of these strains. These data may help pinpoint genomic regions involved in adaptation to different industrial milieus, as well as shed light on the course of domestication of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22369888

  10. Crystalline xylitol production by a novel yeast, Pichia caribbica (HQ222812), and its application for quorum sensing inhibition in gram-negative marker strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Joshi-Navare, Kasturi; Prabhune, Asmita

    2013-03-01

    Xylitol, a sugar alcohol, is fast gaining ground over other artificial sugar substitutes owing to its advantageous properties. Xylitol is a safer alternative for diabetics because of insulin-independent metabolism. It has beneficial properties suitable to form an important part of odontological formulations. Conventional commercial production of xylitol involves harsh chemical method operating at high temperature and pressure. Thus, microbial production of xylitol is preferred over chemical method, and yeasts have been extensively exploited for this purpose. In the present manuscript, quantitative production of xylitol from D-xylose with the yield of 0.852 gm/gm and volumetric productivity of 1.83 gm/l/h in crystalline form, using novel yeast Pichia caribbica is reported. Also, a mild, safe procedure for product extraction is described. The ability of xylitol to act as a quorum sensing antagonist in gram-negative marker strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 has been demonstrated for the first time.

  11. Molecular dissection of Neurospora Spore killer meiotic drive elements.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Thomas M; Rehard, David G; Xiao, Hua; Shiu, Patrick K T

    2012-07-24

    Meiotic drive is a non-Mendelian inheritance phenomenon in which certain selfish genetic elements skew sexual transmission in their own favor. In some cases, progeny or gametes carrying a meiotic drive element can survive preferentially because it causes the death or malfunctioning of those that do not carry it. In Neurospora, meiotic drive can be observed in fungal spore killing. In a cross of Spore killer (Sk) × WT (Sk-sensitive), the ascospores containing the Spore killer allele survive, whereas the ones with the sensitive allele degenerate. Sk-2 and Sk-3 are the most studied meiotic drive elements in Neurospora, and they each theoretically contain two essential components: a killer element and a resistance gene. Here we report the identification and characterization of the Sk resistance gene, rsk (resistant to Spore killer). rsk seems to be a fungal-specific gene, and its deletion in a killer strain leads to self-killing. Sk-2, Sk-3, and naturally resistant isolates all use rsk for resistance. In each killer system, rsk sequences from an Sk strain and a resistant isolate are highly similar, suggesting that they share the same origin. Sk-2, Sk-3, and sensitive rsk alleles differ from each other by their unique indel patterns. Contrary to long-held belief, the killer targets not only late but also early ascospore development. The WT RSK protein is dispensable for ascospore production and is not a target of the spore-killing mechanism. Rather, a resistant version of RSK likely neutralizes the killer element and prevents it from interfering with ascospore development.

  12. Sequences at the 3' ends of yeast viral dsRNAs: proposed transcriptase and replicase initiation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, V E; Field, L; Cizdziel, P; Bruenn, J A

    1981-01-01

    ScV is a double-stranded RNA virus of yeast consisting of two separately encapsidated dsRNAs (L and M). ScV-1 and ScV-2 are two dsRNA viruses present in two different yeast killer strains, K1 and K2. Our 3' end sequence analysis shows that the two sets of viral dsRNAs from ScV-1 and ScV-2 are very similar. Consensus sequences for transcriptase and replicase initiation are proposed. A stem and loop structure with a 3' terminal AUGC sequence, like that of several plant virus plus strand RNAs, is present at the putative replicase initiation site of one of the yeast viral RNA plus strands. Images PMID:7029463

  13. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  14. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  15. The new modern era of yeast genomics: community sequencing and the resulting annotation of multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains at the Saccharomyces Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first completed eukaryotic genome sequence was that of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the original model organism database. SGD remains the authoritative community resource for the S. cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation, and continues to provide comprehensive biological information correlated with S. cerevisiae genes and their products. A diverse set of yeast strains have been sequenced to explore commercial and laboratory applications, and a brief history of those strains is provided. The publication of these new genomes has motivated the creation of new tools, and SGD will annotate and provide comparative analyses of these sequences, correlating changes with variations in strain phenotypes and protein function. We are entering a new era at SGD, as we incorporate these new sequences and make them accessible to the scientific community, all in an effort to continue in our mission of educating researchers and facilitating discovery. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23487186

  16. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    PubMed

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures.

  17. Extranuclear expression of the bacterial xylose isomerase (xylA) and the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (hasB) genes in yeast with Kluyveromyces lactis linear killer plasmids as vectors.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Gunge, N; Meinhardt, F

    1996-11-01

    On the basis of the linear killer plasmid pGKL1 from Kluyveromyces lactis, two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed. One of these, pRSC126, carried the xylA gene from Streptomyces rubiginosus encoding the xylose isomerase. The other linear hybrid molecule, pRSC128, carried the hasB gene of Streptococcus pyogenes encoding the UDP glucose dehydrogenase. Construction was performed in a way that the putative cytoplasmic promoter element of ORF5 of pGKL2 was fused to the coding region of the heterologous genes. After transformation, in vivo recombination led to the establishment of linear hybrid vectors. Though efficiency of expression was low when compared with bacterial systems, cytoplasmic expression of both genes was clearly demonstrated.

  18. Metabolomic by 1H NMR spectroscopy differentiates "Fiano di Avellino" white wines obtained with different yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Spaccini, Riccardo; Francesca, Nicola; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-11-13

    We employed (1)H NMR spectroscopy to examine the molecular profile of a white "Fiano di Avellino" wine obtained through fermentation by either a commercial or a selected autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast starter. The latter was isolated from the same grape variety used in the wine-making process in order to strengthen the relationship between wine molecular quality and its geographical origin. (1)H NMR spectra, where water and ethanol signals were suppressed by a presaturated T1-edited NMR pulse sequence, allowed for definition of the metabolic content of the two differently treated wines. Elaboration of NMR spectral data by multivariate statistical analyses showed that the two different yeasts led to significant diversity in the wine metabolomes. Our results indicate that metabolomics by (1)H NMR spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis enables wine differentiation as a function of yeast species and other wine-making factors, thereby contributing to objectively relate wine quality to the terroir.

  19. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  20. A Loss-of-Function Mutation in the PAS Kinase Rim15p Is Related to Defective Quiescence Entry and High Fermentation Rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sake Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G1 arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains. PMID:22447585

  1. Delaware's first serial killer.

    PubMed

    Inguito, G B; Sekula-Perlman, A; Lynch, M J; Callery, R T

    2000-11-01

    The violent murder of Shirley Ellis on November 29, 1987, marked the beginning of the strange and terrible tale of Steven Bryan Pennell's reign as the state of Delaware's first convicted serial killer. Three more bodies followed the first victim, and all had been brutally beaten and sadistically tortured. The body of a fifth woman has never been found. State and county police collaborated with the FBI to identify and hunt down their suspect, forming a task force of over 100 officers and spending about one million dollars. Through their knowledge and experience with other serial killers, the FBI was able to make an amazingly accurate psychological profile of Delaware's serial killer. After months of around-the-clock surveillance, Steven Pennell was arrested on November 29, 1988, one year to the day after the first victim was found. Pennell was found guilty in the deaths of the first two victims on November 29, 1989, and plead no contest to the murder of two others on October 30, 1991. Still maintaining his innocence, he asked for the death penalty so that he could spare his family further agony. Steven Pennell was executed by lethal injection on March 15, 1992.

  2. Breeding of flocculent industrial alcohol yeast strains by self-cloning of the flocculation gene FLO1 and repeated-batch fermentation by transformants.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Fujii, Keiko; Goto, Shingo; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Takagi, Yoshio; Saiki, Takashi; Takagi, Masamichi

    1998-10-01

    A nonflocculent industrial polyploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 396-9-6V, was converted to a flocculent one by introducing a functional FLO1 gene at the URA3 locus. The flocculent strain FSC27 obtained was a so-called self-cloned strain, having no bacterial DNA. FSC27 cells could be easily recovered for reuse from fermentation mash without any physical energy. The strain produced a concentration of alcohol as high as 396-9-6V, although the fermentation rate of FSC27 was slightly lower than that of 396-9-6V. When uracil was added to the medium or when URA3 was reintroduced into FSC27 (named FSCU-L18), the fermentation rate and the growth rate increased, and the ethanol concentration produced was higher than that produced by the parent strain. The stable flocculation and high ethanol productivity were observed by using FSCU-L18 during 10 cycles of repeated-batch fermentation test.

  3. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics.

  4. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %.

  5. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster.

  6. Suppressing the killer instinct.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kerry S

    2016-05-24

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells that have adopted activating and inhibitory signaling mechanisms enabling them to be tolerant of normal cells but to distinguish and eliminate tumor cells and virus-infected cells. In this issue of Science Signaling, Matalon et al show how inhibitory receptors disrupt NK cell activation by stimulating dephosphorylation of the adaptor protein LAT (linker of activated T cells) and phospholipase C-γ by the phosphatase SHP-1 [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1], as well as ubiquitylation of LAT by Cbl family E3 ubiquitin ligases.

  7. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  8. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Libo; Kanada, Masamitsu; Zhang, Jinyan; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli) expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli) were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540 − 580 nm). In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety. PMID:26213989

  9. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrea

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  10. Characterization of a surface membrane molecule expressed by natural killer cells in most inbred mouse strains: monoclonal antibody C9.1 identifies an allelic form of the 2B4 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K; Katoh, H; Muguruma, K; Koyama, K

    1999-01-01

    A newly generated monoclonal antibody (mAb C9.1) described in this study identifies a surface membrane molecule that is involved in the lytic programme of activated natural killer (NK) cells. This conclusion is based on the facts that, first, this antigen was expressed on the vast majority of surface immunoglobulin (sIg)− CD3− CD4− CD8− spleen lymphocytes, albeit it was also present on minor subsets of sIg+ B (≈7%) and CD3+ T (≈2%) lymphocytes; second, that all splenic NK activity was contained within the C9.1+ cell population, and was almost totally abolished by treatment of spleen cells with mAb C9.1 and complement; third, that mAb C9.1 was capable of increasing interleukin-2-cultured and in vivo polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-activated, NK cell-mediated, antibody-redirected lysis, but not freshly isolated NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, the strain distribution of the C9.1 antigen was shown to be antithetical to that of the 2B4 antigen already described as a molecule associated with major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted killing mediated by activated NK cells. The gene encoding C9.1 antigen was linked to the Akp1 isozyme locus on chromosome 1 close to the 2B4 gene. Although C9.1 and 2B4 were monomeric glycoproteins of 78 000 MW and 66 000 MW, respectively, removal of N-linked sugars from both antigens by endoglycosidase F yielded identical protein backbones of 38 000 MW. Thus, all of these results suggest that mAb C9.1 recognizes an allelic form of the 2B4 antigen. However, the detection of mAb C9.1-reactive antigen on a minor subset of B cells may suggest a possible reactivity of mAb C9.1 with some product of other members of the 2B4 family genes. PMID:10233732

  11. Application of a modified culture medium for the simultaneous counting of molds and yeasts and detection of aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Jaimez, J; Fente, C A; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A; Vázquez, B I

    2003-02-01

    Molds and yeasts from 91 samples of feed and raw materials used in feed formulation were enumerated on a new culture medium to which a beta cyclodextrin (beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) had been added. This medium was compared with other media normally used in laboratories for the routine analysis of fungi, such as Sabouraud agar, malt agar supplemented with 2% dextrose, and potato dextrose agar. When a t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) was applied, no statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the new culture medium and those obtained with the other media used to enumerate molds and yeasts were found. For the evaluation of contamination due to aflatoxin for all of the samples, Sabouraud agar and yeast extract agar, both supplemented with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin, and APA (aflatoxin-producing ability) medium were used. Aflatoxin was detected in 21% of the feed samples and in 23% of the raw-material samples analyzed, with maximal amounts of 2.8 and 6.0 microg of aflatoxin B1 per kg, respectively, being detected. In any case, the aflatoxin contents found exceeded the legally stipulated limits. The t test for paired data (0.05 significance level, 95% confidence interval) did not show statistically significant differences between the results obtained with the different culture media used for the detection of aflatoxins. The advantage of the new medium developed (Sabouraud agar with 0.3% beta-W7M 1.8-cyclodextrin) is that it allows simultaneous fungal enumeration and determination (under UV light) of the presence of aflatoxin-producing strains without prior isolation and culture procedures involving expensive and/or complex specific media and thus saves work, time, and money.

  12. Therapeutic activity of an anti-idiotypic antibody-derived killer peptide against influenza A virus experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Conti, Giorgio; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Nencioni, Lucia; Sgarbanti, Rossella; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Polonelli, Luciano

    2008-12-01

    The in vitro and in vivo activities of a killer decapeptide (KP) against influenza A virus is described, and the mechanisms of action are suggested. KP represents the functional internal image of a yeast killer toxin that proved to exert antimicrobial and anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activities. Treatment with KP demonstrated a significant inhibitory activity on the replication of two strains of influenza A virus in different cell lines, as evaluated by hemagglutination, hemadsorption, and plaque assays. The complete inhibition of virus particle production and a marked reduction of the synthesis of viral proteins (membrane protein and hemagglutinin, in particular) were observed at a KP concentration of 4 microg/ml. Moreover, KP administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 microg/mice once a day for 10 days to influenza A/NWS/33 (H1N1) virus-infected mice improved the survival of the animals by 40% and significantly decreased the viral titers in their lungs. Overall, KP appears to be the first anti-idiotypic antibody-derived peptide that displays inhibitory activity and that has a potential therapeutic effect against pathogenic microorganisms, HIV-1, and influenza A virus by different mechanisms of action.

  13. Conflicting results obtained by RAPD-PCR and large-subunit rDNA sequences in determining and comparing yeast strains isolated from flowers: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Michael; Fischer, Reinhard; Titze, Andreas

    2002-07-01

    Sixty-six yeast strains isolated from the nectar of various plant species in Central Europe were characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) and by sequencing of the variable D1/D2 domain of large-subunit (26S) rDNA. The usefulness of both methods for the determination and comparison of unknown ascomycetous and basidiomycetous yeast strains was compared and evaluated. The reproducibility of RAPD-PCR was shown to be low and the information obtained by this method was clearly not as precise as that obtained from sequence analysis. Numerous imponderables make RAPD-PCR analysis unreliable, at least as a means of identifying yeasts in ecological studies. The lack of standard protocols for RAPD-PCR analysis and the absence of a general database of banding patterns made it impossible to identify unknown yeast strains or to recognize new species. In contrast to RAPD-PCR, sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain was found to be a fast and reliable method for the rapid identification of yeast species and was also shown to be an invaluable tool for the discovery of new species.

  14. Biotechnological exploitation of Tetrapisispora phaffii killer toxin: heterologous production in Komagataella phaffii (Pichia pastoris).

    PubMed

    Chessa, Rossella; Landolfo, Sara; Ciani, Maurizio; Budroni, Marilena; Zara, Severino; Ustun, Murat; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2017-04-01

    The use of natural antimicrobials from plants, animals and microorganisms to inhibit the growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms is becoming more frequent. This parallels the increased consumer interest towards consumption of minimally processed food and 'greener' food and beverage additives. Among the natural antimicrobials of microbial origin, the killer toxin produced by the yeast Tetrapisispora phaffii, known as Kpkt, appears to be a promising natural antimicrobial agent. Kpkt is a glycoprotein with β-1,3-glucanase and killer activity, which induces ultrastructural modifications to the cell wall of yeast of the genera Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Zygosaccharomyces. Moreover, Kpkt maintains its killer activity in grape must for at least 14 days under winemaking conditions, thus suggesting its use against spoilage yeast in wine making and the sweet beverage industry. Here, the aim was to explore the possibility of high production of Kpkt for biotechnological exploitation. Molecular tools for heterologous production of Kpkt in Komagataella phaffii GS115 were developed, and two recombinant clones that produce up to 23 mg/L recombinant Kpkt (rKpkt) were obtained. Similar to native Kpkt, rKpkt has β-glucanase and killer activities. Moreover, it shows a wider spectrum of action with respect to native Kpkt. This includes effects on Dekkera bruxellensis, a spoilage yeast of interest not only in wine making, but also for the biofuel industry, thus widening the potential applications of this rKpkt.

  15. New applications of pHluorin--measuring intracellular pH of prototrophic yeasts and determining changes in the buffering capacity of strains with affected potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Maresová, Lydie; Hosková, Barbora; Urbánková, Eva; Chaloupka, Roman; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-06-01

    pHluorin is a pH-sensitive variant of green fluorescent protein for measuring intracellular pH (pH(in)) in living cells. We constructed a new pHluorin plasmid with the dominant selection marker KanMX. This plasmid allows pH measurements in cells without auxotrophic mutations and/or grown in chemically indefinite media. We observed differing values of pH(in) for three prototrophic wild-types. The new construct was also used to determine the pH(in) in strains differing in the activity of the plasma membrane Pma1 H(+)-ATPase and the influence of glucose on pH(in). We describe in detail pHluorin measurements performed in a microplate reader, which require much less hands-on time and much lower cell culture volumes compared to standard cuvettes measurements. We also utilized pHluorin in a new method of measuring the buffering capacity of yeast cell cytosol in vivo, shown to be ca. 52 mM/pH for wild-type yeast and moderately decreased in mutants with affected potassium transport.

  16. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations.

  17. Epitope-tagged yeast strains reveal promoter driven changes to 3'-end formation and convergent antisense-transcription from common 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Angavai; Beilharz, Traude H

    2016-01-08

    Epitope-tagging by homologous recombination is ubiquitously used to study gene expression, protein localization and function in yeast. This is generally thought to insulate the regulation of gene expression to that mediated by the promoter and coding regions because native 3' UTR are replaced. Here we show that the 3' UTRs, CYC1 and ADH1, contain cryptic promoters that generate abundant convergent antisense-transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover we show that aberrant, truncating 3' -end formation is often associated with regulated transcription in TAP-tagged strains. Importantly, the steady-state level of both 3' -truncated and antisense transcription products is locus dependent. Using TAP and GFP-tagged strains we show that the transcriptional state of the gene-of-interest induces changes to 3' -end formation by alternative polyadenylation and antisense transcription from a universal 3' UTR. This means that these 3' UTRs contains plastic features that can be molded to reflect the regulatory architecture of the locus rather than bringing their own regulatory paradigm to the gene-fusions as would be expected. Our work holds a cautionary note for studies utilizing tagged strains for quantitative biology, but also provides a new model for the study of promoter driven rewiring of 3' -end formation and regulatory non-coding transcription.

  18. Phytase-producing capacity of yeasts isolated from traditional African fermented food products and PHYPk gene expression of Pichia kudriavzevii strains.

    PubMed

    Greppi, Anna; Krych, Łukasz; Costantini, Antonella; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Arneborg, Nils; Cocolin, Luca; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-07-16

    Phytate is known as a strong chelate of minerals causing their reduced uptake by the human intestine. Ninety-three yeast isolates from traditional African fermented food products, belonging to nine species (Pichia kudriavzevii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Clavispora lusitaniae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Millerozyma farinosa, Candida glabrata, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii and Debaryomyces nepalensis) were screened for phytase production on solid and liquid media. 95% were able to grow in the presence of phytate as sole phosphate source, P. kudriavzevii being the best growing species. A phytase coding gene of P. kudriavzevii (PHYPk) was identified and its expression was studied during growth by RT-qPCR. The expression level of PHYPk was significantly higher in phytate-medium, compared to phosphate-medium. In phytate-medium expression was seen in the lag phase. Significant differences in gene expression were detected among the strains as well as between the media. A correlation was found between the PHYPk expression and phytase extracellular activity.

  19. Intraspecific diversity of Aureobasidium pullulans strains from different marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Zhiqiang; Chi, Zhenming; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Dechao

    2009-09-01

    Totally more than 500 yeast strains were isolated from seawater, sea sediments, mud of sea salterns, marine fish guts and marine algae. The results of routine and molecular biology identification methods show that nine strains among these marine yeasts belong to Aureobasidium pullulans, although the morphologies of their colonies are very different. The marine yeasts isolated from different marine environments indicate that A. pullulans is widely distributed in different environmental conditions. These Aureobasidium pullulans strains include A. pullulans 4#2, A. pullulans N13d, A. pullulans HN3-11, A. pullulans HN2-3, A. pullulans JHSc, A. pullulans HN4.7, A. pullulans HN5.3, A. pullulans HN6.2 and A. pullulans W13a. A. pullulans 4#2 could produce cellulase and single cell protein. A. pullulans N13d could produce protease, lipase, amylase and cellulase. Both A. pullulans HN3-11 and A. pullulans HN2-3 were able to produce protease, lipase and cellulase. A. pullulans JHSc could secrete cellulase and killer toxin. Both A. pullulans HN4.7 and A. pullulans HN5.3 could yield lipase and cellulase. A. pullulans W13a was able to secrete extracellular amylase and cellulase while A. pullulans HN4.7 and A. pullulans N13d could produce siderophores. This means that different A. pullulans strains from different marine environments have different physiological characteristics, which may be applied in many different biotechnological industries.

  20. Production of Formaldehyde by Detergent-Treated Cells of a Methanol Yeast, Candida boidinii S2 Mutant Strain AOU-1

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Tani, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of cells of a methanol yeast, Candida boidinii, with the cationic detergent cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride (Cation M2) improved the production of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde production was improved twofold with respect to the initial amount of formaldehyde and 1.61-fold with respect to the final amount of formaldehyde after a 12-h reaction under optimized detergent treatment conditions. The treatment caused formaldehyde and formate dehydrogenases to leak out of the cells more rapidly than catalase, but there was no leakage of alcohol oxidase. The improvement in formaldehyde production was considered to be due to the increased permeability of yeast cell membranes and to lower activities of formaldehyde and formate dehydrogenases in Cation M2-treated cells than in intact cells. Changes in the ultrastructure of the cells were observed upon Cation M2 treatment. Several developed peroxisomes were observed in intact cells. After Cation M2 treatment, the cells were obviously damaged, and several peroxisomes seemed to have fused with each other. Images PMID:16347563

  1. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  2. Immunobiology of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book combines research from many disciplines into a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volumes include: Volume I: Assays for NK Cell Cytotoxicity; Their Values and Pitfalls. Separation and Characterization of Phenotypically Distinct Subsets of NK Cells. Ultrastructure and Cytochemistry of the Human Large Granular Lymphocytes. Phylogeny and Ontogeny of NK Cells. Tissue and Organ distribution of NK Cells. Genetic Control of NK Cell Activity in Rodents. Phenotype, Functional Heterogeneity, and Lineage of Natural Killer Cells. Target Cell Structures, Recognition Sites, and the Mechanism of NK Cytotoxicity. Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors (NKCF) Role in Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity. Characteristics of Cultured NK Cells. Lectin-Dependent Killer Cells. MLC-Induced Cytotoxicity as a Model for the Development and Regulation of NK Cytotoxicity. LGL Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Man and Experimental Animals: The Characteristics of These Cells and Their Potential Experimental Uses. Index.

  3. Construction of amylolytic industrial brewing yeast strain with high glutathione content for manufacturing beer with improved anti-staling capability and flavor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinjing; Wang, Zhao-Yue; He, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2010-11-01

    Glutathione in beer works as the main antioxidant compounds which correlates with beer flavor stability. High residual sugars in beer contribute to major non-volatile components which correlate to high caloric content. In this work, Saccharomyces cerevisiae GSH1 gene encoding glutamylcysteine synthetase and Scharomycopsis fibuligera ALP1 gene encoding alpha-amylase were co-expressed in industrial brewing yeast strain Y31 targeting at alpha-acetolactate synthase (AHAS) gene (ILV2) and alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH2), and new recombinant strain TY3 was constructed. The glutathione content from the fermentation broth of TY3 increased to 43.83 mg/l compared to 33.34 mg/l from Y31. The recombinant strain showed high alpha-amylase activity and utilized more than 46% of starch after 5 days growing on starch as sole carbon source. European Brewery Convention tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broth of TY3 and Y31 showed that the flavor stability index increased to 1.3 fold and residual sugar concentration were reduced by 76.8%, respectively. Due to the interruption of ILV2 gene and ADH2 gene, the amounts of off-flavor compounds diacetyl and acetaldehyde were reduced by 56.93% and 31.25%, comparing with the amounts of these from Y31 fermentation broth. In addition, as no drug-resistance genes were introduced to new recombinant strain, consequently, it should be more suitable for use in beer industry because of its better flavor stability and other beneficial characteristics.

  4. Engineered killer mimotopes: new synthetic peptides for antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Salati, A; Arseni, S; Ravanetti, L; Frazzi, R; Polonelli, L

    2004-07-01

    This review deals with a novel approach to produce synthetic antibiotic peptides (killer mimotopes), similar to those described for the conversion of epitopes into peptide mimotopes, allowing their use as surrogate vaccines. Synthetic peptides pertaining to the complementary determining regions (CDRs) of a recombinant antiidiotypic antibody (PaKTscFv), which mimic the wide spectrum of microbicidal activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala (PaKT), have proven to act as structural or functional mimotopes of PaKT. This activity appeared to be mediated by interaction with specific cell wall killer toxin receptors (KTRs), mainly constituted by beta glucans. Killer mimotopes have shown in vitro an impressive microbicidal activity against Candida albicans. They were adopted as a model of PaKT- and PaKTscFv-susceptible microorganisms. Optimization through alanine scanning led to the generation of an engineered decapeptide (KP) of a CDR-L1 pertaining antibody fragment with an enhanced in vitro microbicidal activity. It had a potent therapeutic effect against experimental vaginal and systemic candidiasis in normal and immunodeficient mice caused by flucanozole susceptible and resistant yeast isolates. KP exerted a microbicidal activity in vitro against multidrug-resistant eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogenic microorganisms, which was neutralized by interaction with laminarin (beta 1,3-glucan). To our knowledge, KP represents the prototype of an engineered peptide fragment derived from a microbicidal recombinant antiidiotypic antibody. It is capable of exerting antimicrobial activity in vitro and a therapeutic effect in vivo presumably acting through interaction with the beta glucan KTR component in the cell walls of pathogenic microorganisms.

  5. The Ability of the Antagonist Yeast Pichia Guilliermondii Strain Z1 to Suppress Green Mould Infection in Citrus Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Hamadi, Younes; El Guilli, Mohammed; Jijakli, M. Haissam

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies it was shown that Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, isolated from healthy Moroccan citrus Valencia-Late oranges, was effective against Penicillium italicum. Here the effectiveness of strain Z1 was assessed against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould, under different temperature (5-25°C) and relative humidity (RH) (45-100%) regimes for its reliable and large-scale application in packinghouse. All main effects and interactions were significant (P<0.0001). In the pathogen control, the largest lesion diameter was at an RH range between 98 and 100%, regardless of the incubation temperature. The efficacy of strain Z1 was not dependent on the environment and reduced disease incidence by >80%. Its applications as a formulated product significantly reduced the incidence of infected fruit (55%) and the percentage of infected wounds (47%) compared to the only pathogen control treatment. However, disease control with formulated product was significantly less than that obtained with thiabendazole (30%) or strain Z1 culturable cells (35%). These results highlight that strain Z1 is an effective biological control agent for control of green mould under varying environmental conditions, and control may be optimized by combining its use with other environmentally-safe post-harvest treatments or improved formulation. PMID:27800373

  6. The Ability of the Antagonist Yeast Pichia Guilliermondii Strain Z1 to Suppress Green Mould Infection in Citrus Fruit.

    PubMed

    Lahlali, Rachid; Hamadi, Younes; El Guilli, Mohammed; Jijakli, M Haissam

    2014-12-09

    In previous studies it was shown that Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, isolated from healthy Moroccan citrus Valencia-Late oranges, was effective against Penicillium italicum. Here the effectiveness of strain Z1 was assessed against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould, under different temperature (5-25°C) and relative humidity (RH) (45-100%) regimes for its reliable and large-scale application in packinghouse. All main effects and interactions were significant (P<0.0001). In the pathogen control, the largest lesion diameter was at an RH range between 98 and 100%, regardless of the incubation temperature. The efficacy of strain Z1 was not dependent on the environment and reduced disease incidence by >80%. Its applications as a formulated product significantly reduced the incidence of infected fruit (55%) and the percentage of infected wounds (47%) compared to the only pathogen control treatment. However, disease control with formulated product was significantly less than that obtained with thiabendazole (30%) or strain Z1 culturable cells (35%). These results highlight that strain Z1 is an effective biological control agent for control of green mould under varying environmental conditions, and control may be optimized by combining its use with other environmentally-safe post-harvest treatments or improved formulation.

  7. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Roots of classical yeast genetics go back to the early work of Lindegreen in the 1930s, who studied thallism, sporulation and inheritance of wine yeast strains belonging to S. cerevisiae. Consequent mutation and hybridization of heterothallic S. cerevisae strains resulted in the discovery of life cycle and mating type system, as well as construction of the genetic map. Elaboration of induced mutation and controlled hybridization of yeast strains opened up new possibilities for the genetic analysis of technologically important properties and for the production of improved industrial strains, but a big drawback was the widely different genetic properties of laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Genetic analysis and mapping of industrial strains were generally hindered because of homothallism, poor sporulation and/or low spore viability of brewing and wine yeast strains [1, 2]. In spite of this, there are a few examples of the application of sexual hybridization in the study of genetic control of important technological properties, e.g. sugar utilization, flocculation and flavor production in brewing yeast strains [3] or in the improvement of ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains [4]. Rare mating and application of karyogamy deficient (kar-) mutants also proved useful in strain improvement [5]. Importance of yeasts in biotechnology is enormous. This includes food and beverage fermentation processes where a wide range of yeast species are playing role, but S. cerevisiae is undoubtedly the most important species among them. New biotechnology is aiming to improve these technologies, but besides this, a completely new area of yeast utilization has been emerged, especially in the pharmaceutical and medical areas. Without decreasing the importance of S. cerevisiae, numerous other yeast species, e.g. Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing potentialities in the modern

  8. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese.

  9. The radiation resistance and cobalt biosorption activity of yeast strains isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Chin; Chung, Hsiao-Ping; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Chang, Ching-Tu; Wang, Ya-Ting; Chou, Fong-In

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitous nature of microbes has made them the pioneers in radionuclides adsorption and transport. In this study, the radiation resistance and nuclide biosorption capacity of microbes isolated from the Lanyu low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) repository in Taiwan was assessed, the evaluation of the possibility of using the isolated strain as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution and the potential impact on radionuclides release. The microbial content of solidified waste and broken fragments of containers at the Lanyu LLRW repository reached 10(5) CFU/g. Two yeast strains, Candida guilliermondii (CT1) and Rhodotorula calyptogenae (RT1) were isolated. The radiation dose necessary to reduce the microbial count by one log cycle of CT1 and RT1 was 2.1 and 0.8 kGy, respectively. Both CT1 and RT1 can grow under a radiation field with dose rate of 6.8 Gy/h, about 100 times higher than that on the surface of the LLRW container in Lanyu repository. CT1 and RT1 had the maximum (60)Co biosorption efficiency of 99.7 ± 0.1% and 98.3 ± 0.2%, respectively in (60)Co aqueous solution (700 Bq/mL), and the (60)Co could stably retained for more than 30 days in CT 1. Nearly all of the Co was absorbed and reached equilibrium within 1 h by CT1 and RT1 in the 10 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Biosorption efficiency test showed almost all of the Co (II) was adsorbed by CT1 in 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution, the efficiency of biosorption by RT1 in 10 μg/g of Co (II) was lower. The maximum Co (II) sorption capacity of CT1 and RT1 was 5324.0 ± 349.0 μg/g (dry wt) and 3737.6 ± 86.5 μg/g (dry wt), respectively, in the 20 μg/g Co (II) aqueous solution. Experimental results show that microbial activity was high in the Lanyu LLRW repository in Taiwan. Two isolated yeast strains, CT1 and RT1 have high potential for use as biosorbents for (60)Co and Co (II) from contaminated aqueous solution, on the other hand, but may have the

  10. Evolutionary engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains with increased in vivo flux through the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cadière, Axelle; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Camarasa, Carole; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-05-01

    Amplification of the flux toward the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway might be of interest for various S. cerevisiae based industrial applications. We report an evolutionary engineering strategy based on a long-term batch culture on gluconate, a substrate that is poorly assimilated by S. cerevisiae cells and is metabolized by the PP pathway. After adaptation for various periods of time, we selected strains that had evolved a greater consumption capacity for gluconate. (13)C metabolic flux analysis on glucose revealed a redirection of carbon flux from glycolysis towards the PP pathway and a greater synthesis of lipids. The relative flux into the PP pathway was 17% for the evolved strain (ECA5) versus 11% for the parental strain (EC1118). During wine fermentation, the evolved strains displayed major metabolic changes, such as lower levels of acetate production, higher fermentation rates and enhanced production of aroma compounds. These represent a combination of novel traits, which are of great interest in the context of modern winemaking.

  11. Establishment of a yeast platform strain for production of p-coumaric acid through metabolic engineering of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Angelica; Kildegaard, Kanchana R; Li, Mingji; Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Aromatic amino acids are precursors of numerous plant secondary metabolites with diverse biological functions. Many of these secondary metabolites are already being used as active pharmaceutical or nutraceutical ingredients, and there are numerous exploratory studies of other compounds with promising applications. p-Coumaric acid is derived from aromatic amino acids and, besides being a valuable chemical building block, it serves as precursor for biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and some polyketides. Here we developed a p-coumaric acid-overproducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform strain. First, we reduced by-product formation by knocking out phenylpyruvate decarboxylase ARO10 and pyruvate decarboxylase PDC5. Second, different versions of feedback-resistant DAHP synthase and chorismate mutase were overexpressed. Finally, we identified shikimate kinase as another important flux-controlling step in the aromatic amino acid pathway by overexpressing enzymes from Escherichia coli, homologous to the pentafunctional enzyme Aro1p and to the bifunctional chorismate synthase-flavin reductase Aro2p. The highest titer of p-coumaric acid of 1.93 ± 0.26 g L(-1) was obtained, when overexpressing tyrosine ammonia-lyase TAL from Flavobacterium johnsoniaeu, DAHP synthase ARO4(K229L), chorismate mutase ARO7(G141S) and E. coli shikimate kinase II (aroL) in Δpdc5Δaro10 strain background. To our knowledge this is the highest reported titer of an aromatic compound produced by yeast. The developed S. cerevisiae strain represents an attractive platform host for production of p-coumaric-acid derived secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, polyphenols, and polyketides.

  12. [Selection and implantation of yeast strains of genus Saccharomyces at a winery regulated by Appellation Contrôlée "Chacolí de Vizcaya/Bizkaiko Txakolina"].

    PubMed

    Rementeria, Aitor; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Calvo, Ester; Amenabar, Ramón; Muguruza, José Ramón; Vivanco, Ana Belén; Garaizar, Javier; Sevilla, María Jesús

    2006-12-01

    The white wine Chacolía de Vizcaya/Bizkaiko Txakolina is characteristic from The Basque Country region and regulated under Appellation Contrôlée standards (BOPV 14/6/94). The objective of this study was the identification and selection of autochthonous yeast strains, to improve the conditions used to maintain the typical characteristics of this region wines. Yeasts identified as Saccharomyces bayanus isolated around these fields from 1996 to 1998, were subjected to a selective procedure based on enological characteristics and fermentative behaviour. Three of the selected strains were used to inoculate, at winery scale, two grape juice varieties accepted by the Appellation Contrôlée (Hondarrabi Zuri and Folle Blanche). The inoculated strains on the respective vinifications was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (REAmt) method with AluI enzyme, due to their specificity, short outcome, and technological simplicity compared with other molecular typing methods such as: chromosomal karyotyping analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism using the infrequently cutting enzyme SfiI (REA infrequent). This study demonstrated that strains with different phenotypic traits could show indistinguishable restriction patterns with REAmt, but could be discriminated using other typing methods such as RAPD-PCR, which although showing low reproducibility could be used as complementary to REAmt. Our results demonstrate that in spite of using autochthonous selected strains, the inoculation of musts with a particular strain do not guarantee its predominance and driving fermentation features. Of all yeast strains studied, strain no. 2 showed the best results in sensory testing and at the implantation process. Therefore, it could be used with commercial purposes for the production of Chacolí de Vizcaya/Bizkaiko Txakolina, especially when using musts from

  13. Biochemical characteristics of osmophilic yeasts isolated from pollens and honey.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Koo, M H; Oliveira, I M

    1996-11-01

    A total of 1752 strains of osmophilic yeasts were isolated from honey and pollens. Forty-three strains of osmophilic yeasts produced polyols, among which 6 strains produced erythritol in good yields. On the other hand, 52 osmophilic yeasts converted sucrose to fructooligosaccharides, among which 8 strains produced both extra and intracellular beta-fructofuranosidase, which converted sucrose to fructooligosaccharides. This investigation concluded that osmophilic yeasts converted sucrose not only to polyols, but also to fructooligosaccharides in good yields.

  14. Evaluation of estrogenic potential of flavonoids using a recombinant yeast strain and MCF7/BUS cell proliferation assay.

    PubMed

    Resende, Flávia A; de Oliveira, Ana Paula S; de Camargo, Mariana S; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana A

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, there is a search for compounds with estrogenic activity that can replace estrogen in hormone replacement therapy during menopause, without the undesirable effects of estrogen, such as the elevation of breast cancer occurrence. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to assess the estrogenic activity of flavonoids with different hydroxylation patterns: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone via two different in vitro assays, the recombinant yeast assay (RYA) and the MCF-7 proliferation assay (E-screen), since the most potent phytoestrogens are members of the flavonoid family. In these assays, kaempferol was the only compound that showed ERα-dependent transcriptional activation activity by RYA, showing 6.74±1.7 nM EEQ, besides acting as a full agonist for the stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells. The other compounds did not show detectable levels of interaction with ER under the conditions used in the RYA. However, in the E-screen assay, compounds such as galangin, luteolin and fisetin also stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells, acting as partial agonists. In the evaluation of antiestrogenicity, the compounds quercetin, chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone significantly inhibited the cell proliferation induced by 17-β-estradiol in the E-screen assay, indicating that these compounds may act as estrogen receptor antagonists. Overall, it became clear in the assay results that the estrogenic activity of flavonoids was affected by small structural differences such as the number of hydroxyl groups, especially those on the B ring of the flavonoid.

  15. Control of enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers by treatment with biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, derived from Pseudozyma spp. yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-02-01

    Cutinase-like esterase from the yeasts Pseudozyma antarctica (PaE) shows strong degradation activity in an agricultural biodegradable plastic (BP) model of mulch films composed of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA). P. antarctica is known to abundantly produce a glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL). Here, the effects of MEL on PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs were investigated. Based on PBSA dispersion solution, the degradation of PBSA particles by PaE was inhibited in the presence of MEL. MEL behavior on BP substrates was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a sensor chip coated with polymer films. The positive SPR signal shift indicated that MEL readily adsorbed and spread onto the surface of a BP film. The amount of BP degradation by PaE was monitored based on the negative SPR signal shift and was decreased 1.7-fold by MEL pretreatment. Furthermore, the shape of PBSA mulch films in PaE-containing solution was maintained with MEL pretreatment, whereas untreated films were almost completely degraded and dissolved. These results suggest that MEL covering the surface of BP film inhibits adsorption of PaE and PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs. We applied the above results to control the microbial degradation of BP mulch films. MEL pretreatment significantly inhibited BP mulch film degradation by both PaE solution and BP-degradable microorganism. Moreover, the degradation of these films was recovered after removal of the coated MEL by ethanol treatment. These results demonstrate that the biodegradation of BP films can be readily and reversibly controlled by a physical approach using MEL.

  16. Evaluation of Estrogenic Potential of Flavonoids Using a Recombinant Yeast Strain and MCF7/BUS Cell Proliferation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Flávia A.; de Oliveira, Ana Paula S.; de Camargo, Mariana S.; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana A.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, there is a search for compounds with estrogenic activity that can replace estrogen in hormone replacement therapy during menopause, without the undesirable effects of estrogen, such as the elevation of breast cancer occurrence. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to assess the estrogenic activity of flavonoids with different hydroxylation patterns: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone via two different in vitro assays, the recombinant yeast assay (RYA) and the MCF-7 proliferation assay (E-screen), since the most potent phytoestrogens are members of the flavonoid family. In these assays, kaempferol was the only compound that showed ERα-dependent transcriptional activation activity by RYA, showing 6.74±1.7 nM EEQ, besides acting as a full agonist for the stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells. The other compounds did not show detectable levels of interaction with ER under the conditions used in the RYA. However, in the E-screen assay, compounds such as galangin, luteolin and fisetin also stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells, acting as partial agonists. In the evaluation of antiestrogenicity, the compounds quercetin, chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone significantly inhibited the cell proliferation induced by 17-β-estradiol in the E-screen assay, indicating that these compounds may act as estrogen receptor antagonists. Overall, it became clear in the assay results that the estrogenic activity of flavonoids was affected by small structural differences such as the number of hydroxyl groups, especially those on the B ring of the flavonoid. PMID:24098354

  17. Modeling Natural Killer Cell Targeted Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Di Santo, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have extensively contributed to our understanding of human immunobiology and to uncover the underlying pathological mechanisms occurring in the development of diseases. However, mouse models do not reproduce the genetic and molecular complexity inherent in human disease conditions. Human immune system (HIS) mouse models that are susceptible to human pathogens and can recapitulate human hematopoiesis and tumor immunobiology provide one means to bridge the interspecies gap. Natural killer cells are the founding member of the innate lymphoid cell family. They exert a rapid and strong immune response against tumor and pathogen-infected cells. Their antitumor features have long been exploited for therapeutic purposes in the context of cancer. In this review, we detail the development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains and the models currently used in cancer research. We summarize the latest improvements in adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapies and the development of novel NK cell sources. Finally, we discuss the advantages of HIS mice to study the interactions between human NK cells and human cancers and to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Natural killer cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish

    2009-01-01

    A 42-year-old white woman, who was a general practitioner referral to the medical team, presented with a 3-day history of left upper quadrant pain; an urgent private ultrasound scan had showed splenomegaly. She was initially admitted with sepsis without an obvious cause but with a differential diagnosis of a haematological malignancy. Her admission blood tests showed a mildly reduced white cell count and low platelets. Her symptoms progressed and she developed right upper quadrant pain. Her blood counts deteriorated showing a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) picture and mildly deranged liver function tests. Blood films were non-diagnostic. A CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis showed splenomegaly and also hepatomegaly and ascites, not seen in her initial ultrasound scan. Multiple cultures of blood/urine/ascites and infective serology were unremarkable.She was transferred to a larger tertiary centre under the care of the surgeons with presumed abdominal sepsis and underwent an open laparotomy, which showed a big firm liver and spleen but no obvious cause for sepsis. The infectious disease team were unable to find a cause, and haematology became involved to investigate the possibility of a haematological malignancy. The patient underwent two bone marrow biopsies, a percutaneous liver biopsy and had flow cytometry of her ascitic fluid, which revealed the diagnosis of a natural killer cell leukaemia. After some slight improvement on steroids, the patient was given cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, rituximab (CHOP-R) chemotherapy. The patient had an initial response to chemotherapy, with reduction in ascitic volume and hepatosplenomegaly, and normalisation of her coagulation. This was accompanied by an overall improvement in her physical condition. She had a second cycle of CHOP-R, but unfortunately approximately 2 weeks after that, she deteriorated rapidly. She was too weak for salvage chemotherapy, so she was put on comfort care. She died

  19. Prevention of Yeast Spoilage in Feed and Food by the Yeast Mycocin HMK

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, K. F.; Shearman, C. A.; Payne, J.; MacKenzie, D.; Archer, D. B.; Merry, R. J.; Gasson, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Williopsis mrakii produces a mycocin or yeast killer toxin designated HMK; this toxin exhibits high thermal stability, high pH stability, and a broad spectrum of activity against other yeasts. We describe construction of a synthetic gene for mycocin HMK and heterologous expression of this toxin in Aspergillus niger. Mycocin HMK was fused to a glucoamylase protein carrier, which resulted in secretion of biologically active mycocin into the culture media. A partial purification protocol was developed, and a comparison with native W. mrakii mycocin showed that the heterologously expressed mycocin had similar physiological properties and an almost identical spectrum of biological activity against a number of yeasts isolated from silage and yoghurt. Two food and feed production systems prone to yeast spoilage were used as models to assess the ability of mycocin HMK to act as a biocontrol agent. The onset of aerobic spoilage in mature maize silage was delayed by application of A. niger mycocin HMK on opening because the toxin inhibited growth of the indigenous spoilage yeasts. This helped maintain both higher lactic acid levels and a lower pH. In yoghurt spiked with dairy spoilage yeasts, A. niger mycocin HMK was active at all of the storage temperatures tested at which yeast growth occurred, and there was no resurgence of resistant yeasts. The higher the yeast growth rate, the more effective the killing action of the mycocin. Thus, mycocin HMK has potential applications in controlling both silage spoilage and yoghurt spoilage caused by yeasts. PMID:10698773

  20. Antigenicity of cell wall mannans of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) strain cells cultured at high temperature in yeast extract-containing sabouraud liquid medium.

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Y; Goto, K; Nemoto, S; Akashi, M; Sugawara, C; Hanzawa, M; Kawamata, M; Takahata, T; Shibata, N; Kobayashi, H; Suzuki, S

    1996-01-01

    Cultivation of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) at high temperature (37 degrees C) for 48 h in yeast extract-containing Sabouraud liquid medium (YSLM) provided the following findings in comparison with the findings obtained after incubation at 27 degrees C. Growth of the blastoconidia of this strain was decreased, with a dry weight of 9%, and the cells were deficient in cytokinesis. The cells did not undergo agglutination with serum factor 5 from a commercially available serum factor kit (Candida Check). Mannan (B-37-M) obtained from the cells cultured at 37 degrees C had partially lost its reactivity against serum factor 4 and lost most of its reactivity against serum factor 5 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in contrast to that (B-27-M) at 27 degrees C. Both cells and mannan prepared by cultivation first at 37 degrees C and then at 27 degrees C entirely recovered their reactivities with serum factors 4 and 5. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis also revealed that B-37-M had lost a beta-1,2-linked mannopyranose unit and retained a phosphate group. Similar changes were observed in the three other serotype B strains used in the study. The beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides longer than mannotetraose were not included among the products released from B-37-M by mild acid treatment. The results of the inhibition ELISA with a series of beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides from biose to octaose (M2 to M8, respectively) showed that the reactivity against serum factor 4 was inhibited most strongly by the oligosaccharides M4 to M8 and that the reactivity against serum factor 5 was inhibited completely by relatively longer oligosaccharides, M5 to M8, indicating their participation as the antigenic factor 5 epitopes. PMID:8705679

  1. Combine Use of Selected Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Lachancea thermotolerans Yeast Strains as an Alternative to the Traditional Malolactic Fermentation in Red Wine Production.

    PubMed

    Benito, Ángel; Calderón, Fernando; Palomero, Felipe; Benito, Santiago

    2015-05-26

    Most red wines commercialized in the market use the malolactic fermentation process in order to ensure stability from a microbiological point of view. In this second fermentation, malic acid is converted into L-lactic acid under controlled setups. However this process is not free from possible collateral effects that on some occasions produce off-flavors, wine quality loss and human health problems. In warm viticulture regions such as the south of Spain, the risk of suffering a deviation during the malolactic fermentation process increases due to the high must pH. This contributes to produce wines with high volatile acidity and biogenic amine values. This manuscript develops a new red wine making methodology that consists of combining the use of two non-Saccharomyces yeast strains as an alternative to the traditional malolactic fermentation. In this method, malic acid is totally consumed by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, thus achieving the microbiological stabilization objective, while Lachancea thermotolerans produces lactic acid in order not to reduce and even increase the acidity of wines produced from low acidity musts. This technique reduces the risks inherent to the malolactic fermentation process when performed in warm regions.The result is more fruity wines that contain less acetic acid and biogenic amines than the traditional controls that have undergone the classical malolactic fermentation.

  2. Cell recycle batch fermentation of high-solid lignocellulose using a recombinant cellulase-displaying yeast strain for high yield ethanol production in consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Matano, Yuki; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a scheme of cell recycle batch fermentation (CRBF) of high-solid lignocellulosic materials. Two-phase separation consisting of rough removal of lignocellulosic residues by low-speed centrifugation and solid-liquid separation enabled effective collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with decreased lignin and ash. Five consecutive batch fermentation of 200 g/L rice straw hydrothermally pretreated led to an average ethanol titer of 34.5 g/L. Moreover, the display of cellulases on the recombinant yeast cell surface increased ethanol titer to 42.2 g/L. After, five-cycle fermentation, only 3.3 g/L sugar was retained in the fermentation medium, because cellulase displayed on the cell surface hydrolyzed cellulose that was not hydrolyzed by commercial cellulases or free secreted cellulases. Fermentation ability of the recombinant strain was successfully kept during a five-cycle repeated batch fermentation with 86.3% of theoretical yield based on starting biomass.

  3. Bioprotective Role of Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Muccilli, Serena; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts constitute a large group of microorganisms characterized by the ability to grow and survive in different and stressful conditions and then to colonize a wide range of environmental and human ecosystems. The competitive traits against other microorganisms have attracted increasing attention from scientists, who proposed their successful application as bioprotective agents in the agricultural, food and medical sectors. These antagonistic activities rely on the competition for nutrients, production and tolerance of high concentrations of ethanol, as well as the synthesis of a large class of antimicrobial compounds, known as killer toxins, which showed clearly a large spectrum of activity against food spoilage microorganisms, but also against plant, animal and human pathogens. This review describes the antimicrobial mechanisms involved in the antagonistic activity, their applications in the processed and unprocessed food sectors, as well as the future perspectives in the development of new bio-drugs, which may overcome the limitations connected to conventional antimicrobial and drug resistance. PMID:27682107

  4. Killer peptide: a novel paradigm of antimicrobial, antiviral and immunomodulatory auto-delivering drugs.

    PubMed

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Pertinhez, Thelma; Spisni, Alberto; Polonelli, Luciano

    2011-07-01

    The incidence of life-threatening viral and microbial infections has dramatically increased over recent decades. Despite significant developments in anti-infective chemotherapy, many issues have increasingly narrowed the therapeutic options, making it imperative to discover new effective molecules. Among them, small peptides are arousing great interest. This review will focus in particular on a killer peptide, engineered from an anti-idiotypic recombinant antibody that mimics the activity of a wide-spectrum antimicrobial yeast killer toxin targeting β-glucan cell-wall receptors. The in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial, antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of killer peptide and its ability to spontaneously and reversibly self-assemble and slowly release its active dimeric form over time will be discussed as a novel paradigm of targeted auto-delivering drugs.

  5. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  6. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  7. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  8. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  9. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  10. Purification of Candida guilliermondii and Pichia ohmeri killer toxin as an active agent against Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandre Rodrigo; Tachi, Masahico; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Nobrega, Gisele Maria Andrade; Hoffmann, Fernando Leite; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hirooka, Elisa Yoko

    2009-01-01

    An antifungal assay with cell-free culture supernatant of Pichia ohmeri 158 and Candida guilliermondii P3 was tested against Penicillium expansum strain #2 at 25 degrees C by measuring hyphal length and percentage conidia germination. C. guilliermondii was more effective against P. expansum conidia germination (58.15% inhibition), while P. ohmeri showed higher inhibition of mycelial growth (66.17%), indicating a probable mechanism associated with killer activity. This killer toxin (molecular mass <3 kDa) was partially purified by normal phase HPLC, using TSKgel Amide-80 analytical and preparative columns. Compared with crude extract, the killer toxin eluted from the post analytical column significantly inhibited P. expansum:% inhibition rose from 42.16 to 90.93% (C. guilliermondii) and 39.32 to 91.12% (P. ohmeri) (p < 0.05). The one-step purification process was adequate in isolating killer toxin from culture supernatant and also increased anti-Penicillium activity.

  11. Yeast β-1,6-glucan is a primary target for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Lukša, Juliana; Podoliankaitė, Monika; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Strazdaitė-Žielienė, Živilė; Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Servienė, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Certain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secrete different killer proteins of double-stranded-RNA origin. These proteins confer a growth advantage to their host by increasing its survival. K2 toxin affects the target cell by binding to the cell surface, disrupting the plasma membrane integrity, and inducing ion leakage. In this study, we determined that K2 toxin saturates the yeast cell surface receptors in 10 min. The apparent amount of K2 toxin, bound to a single cell of wild type yeast under saturating conditions, was estimated to be 435 to 460 molecules. It was found that an increased level of β-1,6-glucan directly correlates with the number of toxin molecules bound, thereby impacting the morphology and determining the fate of the yeast cell. We observed that the binding of K2 toxin to the yeast surface receptors proceeds in a similar manner as in case of the related K1 killer protein. It was demonstrated that the externally supplied pustulan, a poly-β-1,6-glucan, but not the glucans bearing other linkage types (such as laminarin, chitin, and pullulan) efficiently inhibits the K2 toxin killing activity. In addition, the analysis of toxin binding to the intact cells and spheroplasts confirmed that majority of K2 protein molecules attach to the β-1,6-glucan, rather than the plasma membrane-localized receptors. Taken together, our results reveal that β-1,6-glucan is a primary target of K2 toxin and is important for the execution of its killing property.

  12. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  13. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  14. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  15. Zygocin, a secreted antifungal toxin of the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, and its effect on sensitive fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Frank; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2003-03-01

    Zygocin, a protein toxin produced and secreted by a killer virus-infected strain of the osmotolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, kills a great variety of human and phytopathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. Toxicity of the viral toxin is envisaged in a two-step receptor-mediated process in which the toxin interacts with cell surface receptors at the level of the cell wall and the plasma membrane. Zygocin receptors were isolated and partially purified from the yeast cell wall mannoprotein fraction and could be successfully used as biospecific ligand for efficient one-step purification of the 10-kDa protein toxin by receptor-mediated affinity chromatography. Evidence is presented that zygocin-treated yeast cells are rapidly killed by the toxin, and intensive propidium iodide staining of zygocin-treated cells indicated that the toxin is affecting cytoplasmic membrane function, most probably by lethal ion channel formation. The presented findings suggest that zygocin has potential as a novel antimycotic in combating fungal infections.

  16. Growth requirements of san francisco sour dough yeasts and bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    Henry, N

    1976-03-01

    The growth requirements of several yeasts isolated from San Francisco sour dough mother sponges were compared with those of bakers' yeast. The sour dough yeasts studied were one strain of Saccharomyces uvarum, one strain of S. inusitatus, and four strains of S. exiguus. S. inusitatus was the only yeast found to have an amino acid requirement, namely, methionine. All of the yeasts had an absolute requirement for pantothenic acid and a partial requirement for biotin. Inositol was stimulatory to all except bakers' yeast. All strains of S. exiguus required niacin and thiamine. Interestingly, S. inusitatus, the only yeast that required methionine, also needed folic acid. For optimal growth of S. exiguus in a molasses medium, supplementation with thiamine was required.

  17. From Pichia anomala killer toxin through killer antibodies to killer peptides for a comprehensive anti-infective strategy.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    "Antibiobodies", antibodies (Abs) with antibiotic activity, internal image of a Pichia anomala killer toxin (PaKT) characterized by microbicidal activity against microorganisms expressing β-glucans cell-wall receptors (PaKTRs), were produced by idiotypic vaccination with a PaKT-neutralizing monoclonal Ab (PaKT-like Abs) or induced by a protein-conjugated β-glucan. Human natural PaKT-like Abs (PaKTAbs) were found in the vaginal fluid of women infected with KT-sensitive microorganisms. Monoclonal and recombinant PaKT-like Abs, and PaKTAbs proved to be protective against experimental candidiasis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis. A killer decapeptide (KP), synthesized from the sequence of a recombinant PaKT-like Ab or produced in transgenic plants, showed a microbicidal activity in vitro, neutralized by β-glucans, a therapeutic effect in vivo, against experimental mucosal and systemic mycoses, and a prophylactic role in planta, against phytopathogenic microorganisms, respectively. KP showed fungicidal properties against all the defective mutants of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae library, inclusive of strains recognized to be resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. KP inhibited in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo HIV-1 and Influenza A virus replication, owing to down-regulation of CCR5 co-receptors, physical block of the gp120-receptor interaction and reduction in the synthesis of glycoproteins, HA and M1 in particular. KP modulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC molecules on murine dendritic cells, improving their capacity to induce lymphocyte proliferation. KP, proven to be devoid of cytotoxicity on human cells, showed self-assembly-releasing hydrogel-like properties, catalyzed by β 1,3 glucan. PaKT's biotechnological derivatives may represent the prototypes of novel antifungal vaccines and anti-infective drugs characterized by different mechanisms of action.

  18. A Study of the Transmission and Structure of Double Stranded Rnas Associated with the Killer Phenomenon in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, T. Kevin; Tate, Ann; Fink, Gerald R.

    1976-01-01

    Killer strains contain two double stranded RNAs, L and M. The M dsRNA appears to be necessary for production of a toxin and for resistance to that toxin. Mutant strains have been found that are defective in their ability to kill and in their resistance to toxin. These sensitive, non-killer strains have altered dsRNA composition. One class has no M dsRNA. Another class of sensitive, non-killers called suppressives has no M dsRNA but instead has smaller dsRNAs called S. In diploids resulting from a cross of a wild-type killer by a suppressive the transmission of the M dsRNA is suppressed by the S dsRNA. When a suppressive is crossed by a strain with no M dsRNA, the diploids and all four meiotic spores have the S dsRNA characteristic of the parental suppressive strain. Suppressive strains do not suppress each other. Intercrosses between two different suppressives yields diploids with both parental S dsRNAs. These two S dsRNAs are transmitted to all 4 meiotic progeny. Another class of mutants has been found which is defective for one of the traits but retains the other. One type, temperature-sensitive killers, has a normal dsRNA composition but is unable to kill at 30°. The other type, immunity-minus, has a complex dsRNA pattern. The immunity-minus strain is extremely unstable during mitotic growth and segregates several different types of non-killers. Analysis of the dsRNAs from wild type and the mutants by electron microscopy shows that the L, M, and S dsRNAs are linear. All strains regardless of killer phenotype appear to have the same size L dsRNA. PMID:791748

  19. Biodiversity study of wine yeasts belonging to the "terroir" of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo "Colline Teramane" revealed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains exhibiting atypical and unique 5.8S-ITS restriction patterns.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    The Montepulciano d'Abruzzo "Colline Teramane" premium wine DOCG is produced in the Teramo province (Abruzzo, Italy). This region has a great tradition in winemaking and the wine is produced by a spontaneous fermentation so it could represent a reservoir of wine natural yeasts with important oenological features. The aim of this study was to characterize the yeast community of this wine grape growing region in order to create a Saccharomyces cerevisiae bank, providing data on oenological properties for potential industrial applications. A total of 430 yeasts were isolated at the end of spontaneous fermentation. PCR-RFLP was applied for the identification at the species level and underlined that 14 strains exhibited unusual and characteristic restriction patterns different from those typical of the species S. cerevisiae. This difference was due to the insertion of base C at a position 138 in the ITS1 region that determined an additional cleavage site for the enzyme HaeIII. This insertion could be associated to the fermentative performance and associated to the relationship existing between yeasts and a viticulture region or 'terroir'.

  20. OmZnT1 and OmFET, two metal transporters from the metal-tolerant strain Zn of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius, confer zinc tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Khouja, Hassine Radhouane; Abbà, Simona; Lacercat-Didier, Laurence; Daghino, Stefania; Doillon, Didier; Richaud, Pierre; Martino, Elena; Vallino, Marta; Perotto, Silvia; Chalot, Michel; Blaudez, Damien

    2013-03-01

    Two full-length cDNAs (OmZnT1 and OmFET) encoding membrane transporters were identified by yeast functional screening in the heavy metal tolerant ericoid mycorrhizal isolate Oidiodendron maius Zn. OmZnT1 belongs to the Zn-Type subfamily of the cation diffusion facilitators, whereas OmFET belongs to the family of iron permeases. Their properties were investigated in yeast by functional complementation of mutants affected in metal uptake and metal tolerance. Heterologous expression of OmZnT1 and OmFET in a Zn-sensitive yeast mutant restored the wild-type phenotype. Additionally, OmZnT1 expression also restored cobalt tolerance in a Co-sensitive mutant. A GFP fusion protein revealed that OmZnT1 was targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, a result consistent with a function for OmZnT1 in metal sequestration. Similarly to other iron permeases, OmFET-GFP was localized on the plasma membrane. OmFET restored the growth of uptake-defective strains for iron and zinc. Zinc-sensitive yeast mutants expressing OmFET specifically accumulated magnesium, as compared to cells transformed with the empty vector. We suggest that OmFET may counteract zinc toxicity by increasing entry of magnesium into the cell.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting from concentration of the solubles of mechanically ruptured cells of a selected strain of yeast,...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  6. The application of KillerRed for acute protein inactivation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy S.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Generating loss of protein function is a powerful investigatory tool particularly if carried out at a physiologically relevant timescale in a live-cell fluorescent imaging experiment. KillerRed mediated chromophore assisted light inactivation (CALI) uses genetic encoding for specificity and light for acute inactivation that can also be spatially restricted. This unit provides protocols for setting up and carrying out properly controlled KillerRed experiments during live-cell imaging of cultured cells. PMID:24984963

  7. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  8. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  9. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  10. [Additive effect of marihuana and retrovirus in the anergy of natural killer cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Specter, S; Horváth, A; Friedman, H

    1999-01-10

    Among the immunosuppressive effects of marijuana, impairment of natural killer cell activity is significant. HIV also inhibits these cells. Friend leukemia virus complex and its helper component Rowson-Parr virus induce early immunosuppression in mice resembling human AIDS, and late leukemia, providing a small animal AIDS model. Leukemia susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice were infected with these viruses. At different time points, their natural killer cells separated from spleens were treated with 0 to 10 micrograms/ml tetrahydrocannabinol, subsequently mixed with Yac-1 target cells for 4 and 18 h. The natural killer cell activity in both mouse strains infected by either virus complex or helper virus weakened on days 2 to 4 postinfection, normalized by day 8 and enhanced on days 11 to 14. Natural killer cell activity upon the effect of low concentration (1.0 to 2.5 micrograms/ml) of tetrahydrocannabinol slightly increased in BALB/c, was unaffected in C57BL/6, especially in 18 h assays. In the combined effects of marijuana and retrovirus, damages by marijuana dominated over those of retroviruses. Inhibition or reactive enhancement of natural killer cell activity on the effect of viruses are similar to those of infected but marijuana-free counterparts, but on the level of uninfected cells treated with marijuana. The effects of marijuana and retrovirus are additive resulting in anergy of natural killer cells.

  11. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  12. Candida orba sp. nov., a new cactus-specific yeast species from Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Starmer, W T; Phaff, H J; Ganter, P F; Lachance, M A

    2001-03-01

    A new species of yeast from decaying cladodes of Opuntia cactus, Candida orba, is described. This species is a member of a four-species clade of cactophilic yeasts. The new species has only been found in one region of Queensland, Australia, where it was presumably introduced during attempts to eradicate prickly pear cactus. DNA-DNA relatedness, phylogenetic analysis, physiological differences, killer-sensitivity profiles and mating reactions establish the distinctness of the taxon as a new species. C. orba is most closely related to Phaffomyces thermotolerans, a species found associated with columnar cacti in the North American Sonoran Desert. The type strain of C. orba, isolated from rotting cladodes of Opuntia stricta in the State of Queensland, Australia, is strain UCD-FST 84-833.1T (= CBS 8782T = NRRL Y-27336T = ATCC MYA-341). Only the h- mating type of the species has been recovered. The lack of the opposite mating type could be the result of a bottleneck during its introduction to Australia. The original geographic/host distribution of this species in the Americas is unknown.

  13. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells.

  14. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  15. Analysis of GzmbCre as a Model System for Gene Deletion in the Natural Killer Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiying; Evaristo, Cesar; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Kee, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of gene function in mature and activated natural killer cells has been hampered by the lack of model systems for Cre-mediated recombination in these cells. Here we have investigated the utility of GzmbCre for recombination of loxp sequences in these cells predicated on the observation that Gzmb mRNA is highly expressed in mature and activated natural killer cells. Using two different reporter strains we determined that gene function could be investigated in mature natural killer cells after GzmbCre mediated recombination in vitro in conditions that lead to natural killer cell activation such as in the cytokine combination of interleukin 2 and interleukin 12. We demonstrated the utility of this model by creating GzmbCre;Rosa26IKKbca mice in which Cre-mediated recombination resulted in expression of constitutively active IKKβ, which results in activation of the NFκB transcription factor. In vivo and in vitro activation of IKKβ in natural killer cells revealed that constitutive activation of this pathway leads to natural killer cell hyper-activation and altered morphology. As a caveat to the use of GzmbCre we found that this transgene can lead to recombination in all hematopoietic cells the extent of which varies with the particular loxp flanked allele under investigation. We conclude that GzmbCre can be used under some conditions to investigate gene function in mature and activated natural killer cells.

  16. Structural Basis for Phototoxicity of the Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Chudakov, Dmitri M.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Popov, Vladimir O.; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir

    2009-11-23

    KillerRed is the only known fluorescent protein that demonstrates notable phototoxicity, exceeding that of the other green and red fluorescent proteins by at least 1,000-fold. KillerRed could serve as an instrument to inactivate target proteins or to kill cell populations in photodynamic therapy. However, the nature of KillerRed phototoxicity has remained unclear, impeding the development of more phototoxic variants. Here we present the results of a high resolution crystallographic study of KillerRed in the active fluorescent and in the photobleached non-fluorescent states. A unique and striking feature of the structure is a water-filled channel reaching the chromophore area from the end cap of the {beta}-barrel that is probably one of the key structural features responsible for phototoxicity. A study of the structure-function relationship of KillerRed, supported by structure-based, site-directed mutagenesis, has also revealed the key residues most likely responsible for the phototoxic effect. In particular, Glu68 and Ser119, located adjacent to the chromophore, have been assigned as the primary trigger of the reaction chain.

  17. Comparative evaluation of 13 yeast species in the Yarrowia clade on lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate and genetic engineering of inhibitor tolerant strains for lipid and biofuel production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast that has garnered interest for commercial production of single cell oil and other fatty acid-derived chemicals because of its GRAS status and genetic tractability. Three recent peer-reviewed studies have highlighted the possibility of lipid production by th...

  18. Development of industrial yeast strain with improved acid- and thermo-tolerance through evolution under continuous fermentation conditions followed by haploidization and mating.

    PubMed

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Liu, Ze-Shen; Tang, Yue-Qin; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Continuous fermentation using the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strain WW was carried out under acidic or high-temperature conditions to achieve acid- or thermo-tolerant mutants. Mutants isolated at pH 2.5 and 41°C showed improved growth and fermentation ability under acidic and elevated temperature conditions. Haploid strains WW17A1 and WW17A4 obtained from the mutated diploid strain WW17A showed better growth and 4.5-6.5% higher ethanol yields at pH 2.7 than the original strains. Haploid strain WW12T4 obtained from mutated diploid strain WW12T showed 1.25-1.50 times and 2.8-4.7 times higher total cell number and cell viability, respectively, than the original strains at 42°C. Strain AT, which had significantly improved acid- and thermo-tolerance, was developed by mating strain WW17A1 with WW12T4. Batch fermentation at 41°C and pH 3.5 showed that the ethanol concentration and yield achieved during fermentation by strain AT were 55.4 g/L and 72.5%, respectively, which were 10 g/L and 13.4% higher than that of the original strain WW. The present study demonstrates that continuous cultivation followed by haploidization and mating is a powerful approach for enhancing the tolerance of industrial strains.

  19. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  20. Yeast communities in a natural tequila fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lachance, M A

    1995-08-01

    Fresh and cooked agave, Drosophila spp., processing equipment, agave molasses, agave extract, and fermenting must at a traditional tequila distillery (Herradura, Amatitan, Jalisco, México) were studied to gain insight on the origin of yeasts involved in a natural tequila fermentations. Five yeast communities were identified. (1) Fresh agave contained a diverse mycobiota dominated by Clavispora lusitaniae and an endemic species, Metschnikowia agaveae. (2) Drosophila spp. from around or inside the distillery yielded typical fruit yeasts, in particular Hanseniaspora spp., Pichia kluyveri, and Candida krusei. (3) Schizosaccharomyces pombe prevailed in molasses. (4) Cooked agave and extract had a considerable diversity of species, but included Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (5) Fermenting juice underwent a gradual reduction in yeast heterogeneity. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Hanseniaspora spp. progressively ceded the way to S. cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Candida milleri, and Brettanomyces spp. With the exception of Pichia membranaefaciens, which was shared by all communities, little overlap existed. That separation was even more manifest when species were divided into distinguishable biotypes based on morphology or physiology. It is concluded that crushing equipment and must holding tanks are the main source of significant inoculum for the fermentation process. Drosophila species appear to serve as internal vectors. Proximity to fruit trees probably contributes to maintaining a substantial Drosophila community, but the yeasts found in the distillery exhibit very little similarity to those found in adjacent vegetation. Interactions involving killer toxins had no apparent direct effects on the yeast community structure.

  1. Yeast succession in the Amazon fruit Parahancornia amapa as resource partitioning among Drosophila spp.

    PubMed Central

    Morais, P B; Martins, M B; Klaczko, L B; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Hagler, A N

    1995-01-01

    The succession of yeasts colonizing the fallen ripe amapa fruit, from Parahancornia amapa, was examined. The occupation of the substrate depended on both the competitive interactions of yeast species, such as the production of killer toxins, and the selective dispersion by the drosophilid guild of the amapa fruit. The yeast community associated with this Amazon fruit differed from those isolated from other fruits in the same forest. The physiological profile of these yeasts was mostly restricted to the assimilation of a few simple carbon sources, mainly L-sorbose, D-glycerol, DL-lactate, cellobiose, and salicin. Common fruit-associated yeasts of the genera Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora, Candida guilliermondii, and Candida krusei colonized fruits during the first three days after the fruit fell. These yeasts were dispersed and served as food for the invader Drosophila malerkotliana. The resident flies of the Drosophila willistoni group fed selectively on patches of yeasts colonizing fruits 3 to 10 days after the fruit fell. The killer toxin-producing yeasts Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri and Candida fructus were probably involved in the exclusion of some species during the intermediate stages of fruit deterioration. An increase in pH, inhibiting toxin activity and the depletion of simple sugars, may have promoted an increase in yeast diversity in the later stages of decomposition. The yeast succession provided a patchy environment for the drosophilids sharing this ephemeral substrate. PMID:8534092

  2. The direct effects of male killer infection on fitness of ladybird hosts (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Elnagdy, S; Majerus, M E N; Gardener, M; Lawson Handley, L-J

    2013-08-01

    Male killing bacteria are common in insects and are thought to persist in host populations primarily by indirect fitness benefits to infected females, whereas direct fitness effects are generally assumed to be neutral or deleterious. Here, we estimated the effect of male killer infection on direct fitness (number of eggs laid, as a measure of fecundity, together with survival) and other life-history traits (development time and body size) in seven ladybird host/male killer combinations. Effects of male killers on fecundity ranged, as expected, from costly to neutral; however, we found evidence of reduced development time and increased survival and body size in infected strains. Greater body size in Spiroplasma-infected Harmonia axyridis corresponded to greater ovariole number and therefore higher potential fecundity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of direct benefits of male killer infection after explicitly controlling for indirect fitness effects. Neutral or deleterious fitness effects of male killer infection should not therefore be automatically assumed.

  3. Evolutionary vignettes of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Beck, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of novel immune receptors has led to a recent renaissance of research into the innate immune system, following decades of intense research of the adaptive immune system. Of particular interest has been the discovery of the natural killer (NK) cell receptors which, depending on type, interact with classical or non-classical MHC class I antigens of the adaptive immune system, thus functioning at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review recent progress with respect to two such families of NK receptors, the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLRs), and attempt to trace their evolution across vertebrates.

  4. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  5. Identification of a mutation causing a defective spindle assembly checkpoint in high ethyl caproate-producing sake yeast strain K1801.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Ryo; Kume, Kazunori; Okada, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Eri; Tamura, Hiroyasu; Hasuda, Hirokazu; Inahashi, Masaaki; Okazaki, Naoto; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Mizunuma, Masaki; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Dai

    2016-08-01

    In high-quality sake brewing, the cerulenin-resistant sake yeast K1801 with high ethyl caproate-producing ability has been used widely; however, K1801 has a defective spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). To identify the mutation causing this defect, we first searched for sake yeasts with a SAC-defect like K1801 and found that K13 had such a defect. Then, we searched for a common SNP in only K1801 and K13 by examining 15 checkpoint-related genes in 23 sake yeasts, and found 1 mutation, R48P of Cdc55, the PP2A regulatory B subunit that is important for the SAC. Furthermore, we confirmed that the Cdc55-R48P mutation was responsible for the SAC-defect in K1801 by molecular genetic analyses. Morphological analysis indicated that this mutation caused a high cell morphological variation. But this mutation did not affect the excellent brewing properties of K1801. Thus, this mutation is a target for breeding of a new risk-free K1801 with normal checkpoint integrity.

  6. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here.

  7. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales. PMID:17148221

  8. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-12-22

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales.

  9. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  10. Nitric oxide signaling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As a cellular signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is widely conserved from microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and fungi, to higher eukaryotes including plants and mammals. NO is mainly produced by NO synthase (NOS) or nitrite reductase (NIR) activity. There are several NO detoxification systems, including NO dioxygenase (NOD) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). NO homeostasis based on the balance between NO synthesis and degradation is important for the regulation of its physiological functions because an excess level of NO causes nitrosative stress due to the high reactivity of NO and NO-derived compounds. In yeast, NO may be involved in stress responses, but NO and its signaling have been poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NOS orthologs in the genome. Even though the activities of NOS and NIR have been observed in yeast cells, the gene encoding NOS and the NO production mechanism catalyzed by NIR remain unclear. On the other hand, yeast cells employ NOD and GSNOR to maintain an intracellular redox balance following endogenous NO production, exogenous NO treatment, or environmental stresses. This article reviews NO metabolism (synthesis, degradation) and its regulation in yeast. The physiological roles of NO in yeast, including the oxidative stress response, are also discussed here. Such investigations into NO signaling are essential for understanding the NO-dependent genetic and physiological modulations. In addition to being responsible for the pathology and pharmacology of various degenerative diseases, NO signaling may be a potential target for the construction and engineering of industrial yeast strains.

  11. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  12. Biocontrol Potential of Metchnikowia pulcherrima Strains Against Blue Mold of Apple.

    PubMed

    Janisiewicz, W J; Tworkoski, T J; Kurtzman, C P

    2001-11-01

    ABSTRACT Eight strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima isolated over a 4-year period from an unmanaged orchard and selected for their biocontrol activity against blue mold (caused by Penicillium expansum) of apples were characterized phenotypically, genetically, and for their biocontrol potential against blue mold on apples. All strains grew well and only differed slightly in their growth in nutrient yeast dextrose broth medium at 1 degrees C after 216 h, but large differences occurred at 0 degrees C, with strain T5-A2 outgrowing other strains by more than 25% transmittance after 360 h. This strain was also one of the most resistant to diphenylamine (DPA), a postharvest antioxidant treatment. All strains required biotin for growth in minimum salt (MS) medium, although strain ST2-A10 grew slightly in MS medium containing riboflavin or folic acid, as did ST3-E1 in MS medium without vitamins. None of the strains produced killer toxins against an indicator strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of Biolog data from YT plates for all eight strains using the MLCLUST program resulted in separation of the strains into one major cluster containing four strains and four scattered strains from which strain ST1-D10 was the most distant from all other strains. This was particularly apparent in 3-D and principle component analysis. Genetic differentiation of the eight strains using maximum parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from domain D1/D2 of nuclear large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA resulted in detection of two clades. Strain ST1-D10 grouped with the type strain of M. pulcherrima but the remaining seven strains grouped separately, which might possibly represent a new species. All strains significantly reduced blue mold on mature Golden Delicious apples during 1 month of storage at 1 degrees C followed by 7 days at room temperature, but strains T5-A2 and T4-A2 were distinctly more effective under these conditions. Strain T5-A2 also was the most effective in tests on

  13. Expression, processing and secretion of a proteolytically-sensitive insect diuretic hormone by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the use of a yeast strain lacking genes encoding the Yap3 and Mkc7 endoproteases found in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Copley, K S; Alm, S M; Schooley, D A; Courchesne, W E

    1998-01-01

    A system is described for the heterologous expression of peptides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A synthetic gene encoding a precursor of the 41 amino acid Manduca sexta diuretic hormone (Mas-DH) was expressed at 0.8 mg/l purified peptide. A precursor of a mutant peptide of Mas-DH, Mas-DH[K22Q] was also expressed. The peptides were purified, then treated with peptidylglycine alpha-amidating enzyme to generate the alpha-amidated, mature, form of Mas-DH or Mas-DH[K22Q], which were biologically active. Successful expression of full-length Mas-DH+Gly depended upon the use of a protease-deficient yeast strain. In wild-type strains, Mas-DH+Gly was recovered only as proteolytic fragments, even in the presence of various protease inhibitors. Expression of Mas-DH+Gly in strains deficient in either the Mkc7 or the Yap3 protease reduced proteolysis, while no proteolysis of Mas-DH+Gly was detectable in a strain lacking both proteases. This protease-deficient strain may prove of general utility for expression of peptides. Analysis of recovered proteolytic fragments revealed a complex pattern of cleavage sites. Both the Yap3 and Mkc7 proteases preferred to cleave at a single Glu-Lys downward arrow-Glu-Arg site. Analysis of secondary cleavage sites showed that Yap3 preferred to cleave after either Lys or Arg and Mkc7 after Lys. This paper is the first report on the in vivo activity and specificity of Yap3 and Mkc7 expressed at physiological levels. PMID:9494104

  14. Oleaginous yeasts from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jiru, Tamene Milkessa; Abate, Dawit; Kiggundu, Nicholas; Pohl, Carolina; Groenewald, Marizeth

    2016-12-01

    Oleaginous microorganisms can produce high amounts of oil (>20 % of their biomass) under suitable cultivation conditions. In this research work 200 samples were collected from soil, plant surfaces (leaves, flowers and fruits), waste oils from traditional oil milling houses and dairy products (cheese, milk and yoghurt) in Ethiopia. Three hundred and forty yeast colonies were isolated from these samples. By applying Sudan III staining tests, 18 strains were selected as possible oleaginous yeasts. The 18 strains were identified and characterized for their lipid production as a feedstock for biodiesel production in the future. They were identified using morphological and physiological methods as well as sequencing the 3'end of the small-subunit rRNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS; ITS 1, ITS 2 and the intervening 5.8S rRNA gene), and the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. The 18 yeasts were identified as Cutaneotrichosporon curvatus (syn, Cryptococcus curvatus) (PY39), Rhodotorula kratochvilovae (syn, Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae) (SY89), Rhodotorula dairenensis (SY94) and Rhodotourula mucilaginosa (SY09, SY18, SY20, PY21, PY23, PY25, SY30, PY32, SY43, PY44, SY52, PY55, PY61, SY75 and PY86). Under nitrogen-limited cultivation conditions, R. mucilaginosa PY44 produced the highest biomass (15.10 ± 0.54 g/L), while R. mucilaginosa PY32 produced the lowest biomass (10.32 ± 0.18 g/L). The highest lipid yield of 6.87 ± 0.62 g/L and lipid content of 46.51 ± 0.70 % were attained by C. curvatus (syn, C. curvatus) PY39. On the other hand, R. mucilaginosa PY61 gave the lowest lipid yield (2.06 ± 0.52 g/L) and R. mucilaginosa SY52 gave the lowest lipid content of 16.99 ± 0.85 %. The results in this research work suggest that much more oleaginous yeasts can be isolated from Ethiopian environment. On the basis of their substantial lipid production abilities, the three oleaginous yeast strains PY39, SY89 and SY18 were selected and

  15. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given.

  16. Biodegradation of the endocrine disrupter 4-tert-octylphenol by the yeast strain Candida rugopelliculosa RRKY5 via phenolic ring hydroxylation and alkyl chain oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith Kumar; Huang, Shir-Ly; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kirschner, Roland

    2017-02-01

    4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutane)-phenol (4-tert-OP) is one of the most prevalent endocrine disrupting pollutants. Information about bioremediation of 4-tert-OP remains limited, and no study has been reported on the mechanism of 4-tert-OP degradation by yeasts. The yeast Candida rugopelliculosa RRKY5 was proved to be able to utilize 4-methylphenol, bisphenol A, 4-ethylphenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, 4-tert-OP, 4-tert-nonylphenol, isooctane, and phenol under aerobic conditions. The optimum conditions for 4-tert-OP degradation were 30°C, pH 5.0, and an initial 4-tert-OP concentration of 30mgL(-1); the maximum biodegradation rate constant was 0.107d(-1), equivalent to a minimum half-life of 9.6d. Scanning electron microscopy revealed formation of arthroconidia when cells were grown in the presence of 4-tert-OP, whereas the cells remained in the budding form without 4-tert-OP. Identification of the 4-tert-OP degradation metabolites using liquid chromatography-hybrid mass spectrometry revealed three different mechanisms via both branched alkyl side chain and aromatic ring cleavage pathways.

  17. Genetic diversity of the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, R; Klinner, U; Ritzerfeld, P; Zimmermann, M; Emeis, C C

    1992-12-01

    The electrophoretic karyotypes and some mtDNA restriction fragment patterns of 13 strains of Candida utilis and one strain of Hansenula jadinii were compared. PFGE separations revealed remarkable chromosome length polymorphisms between two groups of strains suggesting that perhaps they do not belong to the same species. However, all strains had the same or similar EcoRI, HindIII and BamHI mtDNA restriction patterns. The mtDNA genomes had an average size range of 55 kb. These results support the supposition that C. utilis is a yeast with a highly variable electrophoretic karyotype as already known for another imperfect yeast species, Candida albicans.

  18. Functional expression of chicken calmodulin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1989-01-31

    The coding region of a chicken calmodulin cDNA was fused to a galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter, and an expression system was constructed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of calmodulin was demonstrated by purifying the heterologously expressed protein and analyzing its biochemical properties. When the expression plasmid was introduced into a calmodulin gene (cmd1)-disrupted strain of yeast, the cells grew in galactose medium, showing that chicken calmodulin could complement the lesion of yeast calmodulin functionally. Repression of chicken calmodulin in the (cmd1)-disrupted strain caused cell cycle arrest with a G2/M nucleus, as observed previously with a conditional-lethal mutant of yeast calmodulin. These results suggest that the essential function of calmodulin for cell proliferation is conserved in cells ranging from yeast to vertebrate cells.

  19. Human natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of human natural killer (NK) cell development lags far behind that of human B- or T-cell development. Much of our recent knowledge of this incomplete picture comes from experimental animal models that have aided in identifying fundamental in vivo processes, including those controlling NK cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and the generation of a diverse NK cell repertoire. However, it has been difficult to fully understand the mechanistic details of NK cell development in humans, primarily because the in vivo cellular intermediates and microenvironments of this developmental pathway have remained elusive. Although there is general consensus that NK cell development occurs primarily within the bone marrow (BM), recent data implicate secondary lymphoid tissues as principal sites of NK cell development in humans. The strongest evidence stems from the observation that the newly described stages of human NK cell development are naturally and selectively enriched within lymph nodes and tonsils compared with blood and BM. In the current review, we provide an overview of these recent findings and discuss these in the context of existing tenets in the field of lymphocyte development.

  20. Selection of an autochthonous Saccharomyces strain starter for alcoholic fermentation of Sherry base wines.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Palero, María Jesús; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Codón, Antonio C; Benítez, Tahía; Valcárcel, Manuel J

    2013-06-01

    Several indigenous Saccharomyces strains from musts were isolated in the Jerez de la Frontera region, at the end of spontaneous fermentation, in order to select the most suitable autochthonous yeast starter, during the 2007 vintage. Five strains were chosen for their oenological abilities and fermentative kinetics to elaborate a Sherry base wine. The selected autochthonous strains were characterized by molecular methods: electrophoretic karyotype and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) and by physiological parameters: fermentative power, ethanol production, sugar consumption, acidity and volatile compound production, sensory quality, killer phenotype, desiccation, and sulphur dioxide tolerance. Laboratory- and pilot-scale fermentations were conducted with those autochthonous strains. One of them, named J4, was finally selected over all others for industrial fermentations. The J4 strain, which possesses exceptional fermentative properties and oenological qualities, prevails in industrial fermentations, and becomes the principal biological agent responsible for winemaking. Sherry base wine, industrially manufactured by means of the J4 strain, was analyzed, yielding, together with its sensory qualities, final average values of 0.9 g/l sugar content, 13.4 % (v/v) ethanol content and 0.26 g/l volatile acidity content; apart from a high acetaldehyde production, responsible for the distinctive aroma of "Fino". This base wine was selected for "Fino" Sherry elaboration and so it was fortified; it is at present being subjected to biological aging by the so-called "flor" yeasts. The "flor" velum formed so far is very high quality. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study covering from laboratory to industrial scale of characterization and selection of autochthonous starter intended for alcoholic fermentation in Sherry base wines. Since the 2010 vintage, the indigenous J4 strain is employed to industrially manufacture a

  1. Yeast and yeast-like diversity in the southernmost glacier of Europe (Calderone Glacier, Apennines, Italy).

    PubMed

    Branda, Eva; Turchetti, Benedetta; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Pecci, Massimo; Smiraglia, Claudio; Buzzini, Pietro

    2010-06-01

    The present study reports the characterization of psychrophilic yeast and yeast-like diversity in cold habitats (superficial and deep sediments, ice cores and meltwaters) of the Calderone Glacier (Italy), which is the southernmost glacier in Europe. After incubation at 4 and 20 degrees C, sediments contained about 10(2)-10(3) CFU of yeasts g(-1). The number of viable yeast cells in ice and meltwaters was several orders of magnitude lower. The concomitant presence of viable bacteria and filamentous fungi has also been observed. In all, 257 yeast strains were isolated and identified by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers (1 and 2) sequencing as belonging to 28 ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species of 11 genera (Candida, Cystofilobasidium, Cryptococcus, Dioszegia, Erythrobasidium, Guehomyces, Mastigobasidium, Mrakia, Mrakiella, Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces). Among them, the species Cryptococcus gastricus accounted for almost 40% of the total isolates. In addition, 12 strains were identified as belonging to the yeast-like species Aureobasidium pullulans and Exophiala dermatitidis, whereas 15 strains, presumably belonging to new species, yet to be described, were also isolated. Results herein reported indicate that the Calderone Glacier, although currently considered a vanishing ice body due to the ongoing global-warming phenomenon, still harbors viable psychrophilic yeast populations. Differences of yeast and yeast-like diversity between the glacier under study and other worldwide cold habitats are also discussed.

  2. Effect of supplementation of University of Wisconsin solution with glycoproteins from psychrophilic strains of yeast on hypothermic liver storage of rats.

    PubMed

    Tilser, I; Breierová, E; Tichý, M; Skalská, H; Ettlerová, E

    1996-06-01

    Extracellular yeast glycoproteins (YG) produced by Rhodosporidium toruloides have been shown to increase the survival rate of different yeast species after storage in liquid nitrogen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of YG on cold-stored rat livers. Water-soluble YG produced either by Phaffia rhodozyma (G3) or by Leucosporidium antarcticum (G4) were added to a modified University of Wisconsin solution (mUW) and used for cold storage (1 degree C) of isolated livers. The functional status of each liver was then assessed under conditions of 90-min normothermic reperfusion. The 46-h cold storage in mUW without G3 and G4 resulted in serious preservation-reperfusion injury of the liver. The addition of G3 to mUW for 46-h preservation of the liver resulted in significantly higher bile flow (4.32 +/- 0.35 vs 2.35 +/- 0.49 microliters/min/10 g at 75-90 min), higher portal blood flow (10.99 +/- 0.2 vs 4.78 +/- 1.07 ml/min/g at 90 min), lower liver weight after reperfusion (102.4 +/- 1.5 vs 116.7 +/- 6.6% of weight before preservation), and lower total tissue water after reperfusion (2.49 +/- 0.05 vs 2.92 +/- 0.13 g water/g dry weight). However, the activity of ALT, AST, and LDH in perfusate was not changed. The beneficial effect of G4 was less pronounced. The 24-h storage in mUW resulted in a significant increase of AST and LDH activity in perfusate; the addition of G3 to mUW for 24-h preservation did not affect these parameters. In conclusion, the addition of 0.05% G3 or G4 to mUW was only partially beneficial in improving rat liver preservation.

  3. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  4. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  5. Metallothionein function and genetic regulation in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, D.J.; Butt, T.R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Copper resistance in yeast is mediated by the CUP1 locus which codes for yeast metallothionein (MT). A genetic approach was taken to study yeast MT gene regulation and to test the function of MT in the detoxification of metal ions other than copper. A yeast strain was constructed (cup1/sup ..delta../) in which the MT structural and regulatory sequences were deleted. The deleted gene was then replaced with the following genetically modified forms of MT on high copy episomal plasmid (YE/sup p/ 13): 1) the intact yeast gene with normal structural and regulatory sequences; 2) a constitutively expressed yeast promoter (TDH) running the yeast MT structural gene. Metal resistance in the cup1/sup ..delta../ strain and the cup1/sup ..delta../ strain transformed with the MT plasmid constructions was compared on metal-supplemented agar plates. Both of the high copy MT plasmids conferred in excess of 500-fold greater copper resistance to the cup1/sup ..delta../ strain. Increased cadmium resistance was not observed in any of the strains that had MT under normal regulatory control. However, the strain with constitutively expressed MT was in excess of 1000-fold more resistant to cadmium. Neither of the MT constructions conferred resistance to Hg,Zn,Co,Ni,Ag,Au,Pt,La,U or Sn. MT gene induction measured by the analysis of MT mRNA on northern blots showed that the yeast MT promoter is not induced by Cd, Zn, Au, Hg, Ag, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, steroid hormones or heat shock.

  6. 75 FR 2853 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT76 False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team... (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of establishment of a False Killer Whale Take Reduction... Insular, and Palmyra Atoll stocks of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) in the Hawaii-based...

  7. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Simkin, M V; Roychowdhury, V P

    2014-08-21

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during 12 years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of "Devil's staircase" type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis.

  8. Pulmonary embolism: an unsuspected killer.

    PubMed

    Laack, Torrey A; Goyal, Deepi G

    2004-11-01

    The presentation of PE is often subtle and may mimic other diseases. Many pulmonary emboli invariably preclude diagnosis by their occult nature or by leading to rapid death from cardiopulmonary arrest. In patients who do manifest symptoms from PE, accurate diagnosis is essential. Often it is difficult to distinguish the vague symptoms of PE from other diagnoses, such as acute coronary syndrome, pneumonia, COPD, CHF,aortic dissection, myocarditis or pericarditis, pneumothorax, and musculo-skeletal or gastrointestinal causes. Regardless of the presentation, the most fundamental step in making the diagnosis of PE is first to consider it. Historical clues and risk factors should raise the clinician's suspicion.PE is an unsuspected killer with a nebulous presentation and high mortality. In all likelihood, PE will remain an elusive diagnosis despite advances in technology and a wealth of research. A high index of suspicion is required, but no amount of suspicion would eliminate all missed cases. Patients with significant underlying cardiopulmonary disease seem to be the most challenging. Patients with significant comorbidity have poor reserve and are likely to have poor outcomes, especially if the diagnosis is not made and anticoagulation is not initiated early. Controversy exists over the best diagnostic approach to PE. A battery of diagnostic studies is available, with few providing definitive answers. Studies such as CT may be helpful at some institutions but offer poor predictive value at others. Other diagnostic tests are not universally available. It is hoped that further research and improvements in current diagnostic modalities will clear some of the current confusion and controversy of this ubiquitous and deadly disease.

  9. Automatic identification of individual killer whales.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith C; Smaragdis, Paris; Nousek-McGregor, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Following the successful use of HMM and GMM models for classification of a set of 75 calls of northern resident killer whales into call types [Brown, J. C., and Smaragdis, P., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 221-224 (2009)], the use of these same methods has been explored for the identification of vocalizations from the same call type N2 of four individual killer whales. With an average of 20 vocalizations from each of the individuals the pairwise comparisons have an extremely high success rate of 80 to 100% and the identifications within the entire group yield around 78%.

  10. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) produce ultrasonic whistles.

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Vinding, Katja; Rasmussen, Marianne H; Swift, René J; Miller, Patrick J O

    2010-11-01

    This study reports that killer whales, the largest dolphin, produce whistles with the highest fundamental frequencies ever reported in a delphinid. Using wide-band acoustic sampling from both animal-attached (Dtag) and remotely deployed hydrophone arrays, ultrasonic whistles were detected in three Northeast Atlantic populations but not in two Northeast Pacific populations. These results are inconsistent with analyses suggesting a correlation of maximum frequency of whistles with body size in delphinids, indicate substantial intraspecific variation in whistle production in killer whales, and highlight the importance of appropriate acoustic sampling techniques when conducting comparative analyses of sound repertoires.

  11. Combining DNP NMR with segmental and specific labeling to study a yeast prion protein strain that is not parallel in-register.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Caporini, Marc A; Andreas, Loren B; Debelouchina, Galia T; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-04-04

    The yeast prion protein Sup35NM is a self-propagating amyloid. Despite intense study, there is no consensus on the organization of monomers within Sup35NM fibrils. Some studies point to a β-helical arrangement, whereas others suggest a parallel in-register organization. Intermolecular contacts are often determined by experiments that probe long-range heteronuclear contacts for fibrils templated from a 1:1 mixture of (13)C- and (15)N-labeled monomers. However, for Sup35NM, like many large proteins, chemical shift degeneracy limits the usefulness of this approach. Segmental and specific isotopic labeling reduce degeneracy, but experiments to measure long-range interactions are often too insensitive. To limit degeneracy and increase experimental sensitivity, we combined specific and segmental isotopic labeling schemes with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR. Using this combination, we examined an amyloid form of Sup35NM that does not have a parallel in-register structure. The combination of a small number of specific labels with DNP NMR enables determination of architectural information about polymeric protein systems.

  12. Novel brewing yeast hybrids: creation and application.

    PubMed

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The natural interspecies Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrid yeast is responsible for global lager beer production and is one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Its success in the lager brewing environment is due to a combination of traits not commonly found in pure yeast species, principally low-temperature tolerance, and maltotriose utilization. Parental transgression is typical of hybrid organisms and has been exploited previously for, e.g., the production of wine yeast with beneficial properties. The parental strain S. eubayanus has only been discovered recently and newly created lager yeast strains have not yet been applied industrially. A number of reports attest to the feasibility of this approach and artificially created hybrids are likely to have a significant impact on the future of lager brewing. De novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids outperform their parent strains in a number of respects, including, but not restricted to, fermentation rate, sugar utilization, stress tolerance, and aroma formation. Hybrid genome function and stability, as well as different techniques for generating hybrids and their relative merits are discussed. Hybridization not only offers the possibility of generating novel non-GM brewing yeast strains with unique properties, but is expected to aid in unraveling the complex evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast.

  13. Natural born killers?: the development of the sexually sadistic serial killer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Becker, J V

    1997-01-01

    Today's society seems enthralled with serial killers in the news and the media. Forensic psychiatrists often interview serial killers after they have been caught. There are retrospective studies and case reports of individuals who have committed sexually sadistic serial murders. However, there exists a dearth of case reports on adolescents who have expressed serious fantasies about becoming serial killer prior to actualizing their fantasy. This article presents nine clinical cases of 14- to 18-year-olds who have clinically significant fantasies of becoming a serial killer. Similarities exist in these adolescent cases when compared with retrospective studies and case reports of serial killers on the role of sexually sadistic fantasies and actual killings. Since it has been established that sexual paraphilias may develop at a young age, one can surmise that sadistic paraphilias may also develop in some adolescents. The question is posed, can we predict which of these adolescents may go on to actually become serial killers? This article focuses on how the sexually sadistic fantasy can eventually be acted out and possible motives for the act to be repeated multiple times. Finally, recommendations are made about assessing and treating a youngster who expresses violent sexually sadistic killing fantasies so that attempts can be made to interrupt the progression to actual killing.

  14. Solid-state fermentation: tool for bioremediation of adsorbed textile dyestuff on distillery industry waste-yeast biomass using isolated Bacillus cereus strain EBT1.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Avinash A; Kamatkar, Jeevan D; Khandare, Rahul V; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2013-02-01

    Bioremediation of textile dyestuffs under solid-state fermentation (SSF) using industrial wastes as substrate pose an economically feasible, promising, and eco-friendly alternative. The purpose of this study was to adsorb Red M5B dye, a sample of dyes mixture and a real textile effluent on distillery industry waste-yeast biomass (DIW-YB) and its further bioremediation using Bacillus cereus EBT1 under SSF. Textile dyestuffs were allowed to adsorb on DIW-YB. DIW-YB adsorbed dyestuffs were decolorized under SSF by using B. cereus. Enzyme analysis was carried out to ensure decolorization of Red M5B. Metabolites after dye degradation were analyzed using UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, HPLC, and GC-MS. DIW-YB showed adsorption of Red M5B, dyes mixture and a textile wastewater sample up to 87, 70, and 81 %, respectively. DIW-YB adsorbed Red M5B was decolorized up to 98 % by B. cereus in 36 h. Whereas B. cereus could effectively reduce American Dye Manufacture Institute value from DIW-YB adsorbed mixture of textile dyes and textile wastewater up to 70 and 100 %, respectively. Induction of extracellular enzymes such as laccase and azoreductase suggests their involvement in dye degradation. Repeated utilization of DIW-YB showed consistent adsorption and ADMI removal from textile wastewater up to seven cycles. HPLC and FTIR analysis confirms the biodegradation of Red M5B. GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of new metabolites. B. cereus has potential to bioremediate adsorbed textile dyestuffs on DIW-YB. B. cereus along with DIW-YB showed enhanced decolorization performance in tray bioreactor which suggests its potential for large-scale treatment procedures.

  15. Young Killers: The Challenge of Juvenile Homicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heide, Kathleen M.

    This book assembles and synthesizes some of the latest available information, research findings, and informed opinions regarding the parameters of homicide by youths and concerning the nature of young killers themselves. It provides a framework for understanding youths who kill, for moving forward with treatment, and for reducing violence in…

  16. The School: A Killer of Giftedness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Walt, J. L.

    Criticisms of the school as a killer of giftedness in children are cited. After defining giftedness and talent, the problem of educating the gifted child is raised, and opinions of "new left" educational theorists are presented. Accusations against the school, based on its failure to meet the individual needs and the mental or cognitive…

  17. Chasing Killer Statements From The Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Marianne

    1975-01-01

    This teacher discusses techniques she uses to rid the classroom of "killer statements", which are negative statements that express some kind of anger or distress and are unthinking outgrowths of the desire to get back at the world when feeling needy or deprived.

  18. Phenotypic modulation of porcine CD14+ monocytes, natural killer/natural killer T cells and CD8αβ+ T cell subsets by an antibody-derived killer peptide (KP).

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luca; Borghetti, Paolo; Ferrarini, Giulia; De Angelis, Elena; Canelli, Elena; Ogno, Giulia; Catella, Alessia; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Martelli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    An engineered killer peptide (KP) based on a recombinant anti-idiotypic antibody representing the functional image of a yeast killer toxin (KT) was demonstrated to mediate antimicrobial effects against fungi and viruses. KP binds to murine dendritic cells and macrophages and up-regulate co-receptor expression, thus sustaining CD4+ lymphocyte activation. No immunological data are available in domestic animals thus KP-induced immunomodulation was evaluated in porcine monocyte and lymphocyte subsets. PBMC from healthy adult pigs were stimulated with KP or a scramble peptide (SP), or kept unstimulated for 24, 48 and 72h, and subsequently analyzed by flow cytometry. In monocytes, KP induced a strong dose-dependent shift from a major fraction of CD172α+CD14+(low) cells to a predominant fraction of CD172α+CD14+(high) cells, known to sustain leukocyte activation/differentiation and inflammatory responses. The CD16+ cell percentages, specifically the CD3+CD16+ natural killer T (NKT) cell fraction and CD16 expression showed an intense and stable dose-dependent increase while the CD3-CD16+ NK cell fraction decreased. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased and CD8α and CD8β expression were up-regulated. CD8β+ cytotoxic T cells and CD16+ cells comparably increased. A marked stimulation of activated CD16+CD25+ and CD8β+CD25+ cells was observed at 24h. The increase of CD8α+ cells and CD8α expression were due to increased CD4+CD8α+ (memory T helper) cells, also showing a CD8α+(high) phenotype. Concomitantly, the CD4+CD8α- T helper lymphocyte fraction significantly decreased. Overall, KP induced a wide modulation of innate immune and T cells that can exert regulatory and cytotoxic functions, which are fundamental for an efficient Th1 response.

  19. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  20. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Casey, G P; Ingledew, W M

    1986-01-01

    It is now certain that the inherent ethanol tolerance of the Saccharomyces strain used is not the prime factor regulating the level of ethanol that can be produced in a high sugar brewing, wine, sake, or distillery fermentation. In fact, in terms of the maximum concentration that these yeasts can produce under batch (16 to 17% [v/v]) or fed-batch conditions, there is clearly no difference in ethanol tolerance. This is not to say, however, that under defined conditions there is no difference in ethanol tolerance among different Saccharomyces yeasts. This property, although a genetic determinant, is clearly influenced by many factors (carbohydrate level, wort nutrition, temperature, osmotic pressure/water activity, and substrate concentration), and each yeast strain reacts to each factor differently. This will indeed lead to differences in measured tolerance. Thus, it is extremely important that each of these be taken into consideration when determining "tolerance" for a particular set of fermentation conditions. The manner in which each alcohol-related industry has evolved is now known to have played a major role in determining traditional thinking on ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces yeasts. It is interesting to speculate on how different our thinking on ethanol tolerance would be today if sake fermentations had not evolved with successive mashing and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of rice carbohydrate, if distillers' worts were clarified prior to fermentation but brewers' wort were not, and if grape skins with their associated unsaturated lipids had not been an integral part of red wine musts. The time is now ripe for ethanol-related industries to take advantage of these findings to improve the economies of production. In the authors' opinion, breweries could produce higher alcohol beers if oxygenation (leading to unsaturated lipids) and "usable" nitrogen source levels were increased in high gravity worts. White wine fermentations could also, if

  1. Influence of pesticides on yeasts colonizing leaves.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nine different pesticides on the growth of yeasts isolated from the leaves of fruit and forest trees was investigated. Four insecticides (with the active ingredients: thiacloprid, deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (with the effective substances: bitertanol, kresoxim-methyl, mancozeb, trifloxystrobin, and cupric oxychloride) were tested. The concentrations of chemicals were those recommended by the manufacturers for the spraying of trees. The yeast strains isolated from the leaves of fruit trees were not sensitive to any of the insecticides. The majority of yeast strains isolated from the leaves of forest trees were either not sensitive or only to a small extent. While Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Pichia anomala were not affected by any insecticide, the strains of Cryptococcus laurentii and Rhodotorula glutinis showed the highest sensitivity. The effects of fungicides on the growth of isolated yeasts were more substantial. The fungicide Dithane DG (mancozeb) completely inhibited the growth of all yeasts. All strains isolated from fruit tree leaves were more resistant to the tested fungicides than those isolated from the leaves of forest trees. The most resistant strains from the leaves of fruit trees belonged to the species Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii, originating from the leaves of forest trees, showed the highest sensitivity to fungicides.

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in a thermotolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Arellano-Plaza, Melchor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    Stress tolerance is a key attribute that must be considered when using yeast cells for industrial applications. High temperature is one factor that can cause stress in yeast. High environmental temperature in particular may exert a natural selection pressure to evolve yeasts into thermotolerant strains. In the present study, three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MC4, and Kluyveromyces marxianus, OFF1 and SLP1) isolated from hot environments were exposed to increased temperatures and were then compared with a laboratory yeast strain. Their resistance to high temperature, oxidative stress, and antioxidant response were evaluated, along with the fatty acid composition of their cell membranes. The SLP1 strain showed a higher specific growth rate, biomass yield, and biomass volumetric productivity while also showing lower duplication time, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the SLP1 strain demonstrated more catalase activity after temperature was increased, and this strain also showed membranes enriched in saturated fatty acids. It is concluded that the SLP1 yeast strain is a thermotolerant yeast with less oxidative stress and a greater antioxidant response. Therefore, this strain could be used for fermentation at high temperatures.

  3. Yeasts associated with Sardinian ewe's dairy products.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, S; Fadda, M E; Deplano, M; Mulargia, A F; Palmas, F

    2001-09-19

    In the present work, the occurrence of yeasts in different types of typical Sardinian ewe's cheeses (32 samples of pecorino, 32 of caciotta, 40 of feta, 56 of ricotta) was determined. For the strains isolated the following properties were studied: proteolytic and lipolytic activities, the ability to grow at different temperatures, different concentrations of salt, and to assimilate and/or ferment compounds like lactate, citrate, lactose, glucose, galactose, lactic acid. Of 160 samples analysed, 76.2% yielded growth of yeasts. Yeast counts showed a certain variability among the samples. The highest levels were observed in caciotta and feta cheeses. A total of 281 strains belonging to 16 genera and 25 species were identified. In general, Debaryomyces hansenii was the dominant species, representing 28.8% of the total isolates. Other frequently appearing species were Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and K. marxianus. Other genera encountered were Pichia, Candida, Dekkera, Yarrowia and Rhodotorula. With regard to the biochemical and technological properties of the yeasts, only K. lactis, K. marxianus and Dek. anomala assimilated and fermented lactose, whereas the majority of the species assimilated lactic acid. The assimilation of citrate was a characteristic of D. hansenii, R. rubra and Y. lipolytica. On the whole, the yeasts were weakly proteolytic while lipolytic activity was present in several species. A high percentage of strains showed a certain tolerance to low temperatures while only some strains of D. hansenii and K. lactis were able to grow at a 10% NaCl concentration.

  4. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  5. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  6. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  7. Travel from a supercomputer to killer micros

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.E.

    1991-03-01

    I describe my effort to convert a Fortran application that runs on a parallel supercomputer (Cray Y/MP) to run on a set of BBN TC2000 killer micros. I used both shared memory parallel processing options available at MPCI for the BBN TC2000, the Parallel Fortran Preprocessor (PFP) and the Uniform System extended Fortran compiler (US). I describe how I used the BBN Xtra programming tools for analysis and debugging during this conversion process. My ultimate goal for this hands on experiment was to gain insight into the type of tools that might be helpful for porting existing programs from a supercomputer environment to a killer micro environment. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  9. Representation of the serial killer on the Italian Internet.

    PubMed

    Villano, P; Bastianoni, P; Melotti, G

    2001-10-01

    The representation of serial killers was examined from the analysis of 317 Web pages in the Italian language to study how the psychological profiles of serial killers are described on the Italian Internet. The correspondence analysis of the content of these Web pages shows that in Italy the serial killer is associated with words such as "monster" and "horror," which suggest and imply psychological perversion and aberrant acts. These traits are peculiar for the Italian scenario.

  10. Killer cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy; Urbanowicz, Richard A; Corne, Jonathan; Lamb, Jonathan R

    2008-04-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a treatable and preventable disease state, characterized by progressive airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. It is a current and growing cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with the WHO (World Health Organization) projecting that total deaths attributed to COPD will increase by more than 30% in the next 10 years. The pathological hallmarks of COPD are destruction of the lung parenchyma (pulmonary emphysema), inflammation of the central airways (chronic bronchitis) and inflammation of the peripheral airways (respiratory bronchiolitis). The destructive changes and tissue remodelling observed in COPD are a result of complex interactions between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The focus of the present review is directed towards the role of CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, NK (natural killer) cells and NKT cells (NK T-cells). These three classes of killer cell could all play an important part in the pathogenesis of COPD. The observed damage to the pulmonary tissue could be caused in three ways: (i) direct cytotoxic effect against the lung epithelium mediated by the activities of perforin and granzymes, (ii) FasL (Fas ligand)-induced apoptosis and/or (iii) cytokine and chemokine release. The present review considers the role of these killer cells in COPD.

  11. Is killer whale dialect evolution random?

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Burdin, Alexandr M; Hoyt, Erich

    2013-10-01

    The killer whale is among the few species in which cultural change accumulates over many generations, leading to cumulative cultural evolution. Killer whales have group-specific vocal repertoires which are thought to be learned rather than being genetically coded. It is supposed that divergence between vocal repertoires of sister groups increases gradually over time due to random learning mistakes and innovations. In this case, the similarity of calls across groups must be correlated with pod relatedness and, consequently, with each other. In this study we tested this prediction by comparing the patterns of call similarity between matrilines of resident killer whales from Eastern Kamchatka. We calculated the similarity of seven components from three call types across 14 matrilines. In contrast to the theoretical predictions, matrilines formed different clusters on the dendrograms made by different calls and even by different components of the same call. We suggest three possible explanations for this phenomenon. First, the lack of agreement between similarity patterns of different components may be the result of constraints in the call structure. Second, it is possible that call components change in time with different speed and/or in different directions. Third, horizontal cultural transmission of call features may occur between matrilines.

  12. Lysis of primary hepatic tumours by lymphokine activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, K H; Shu, S Y; Lee, C S; Chu, C T; Yang, C S; Chang, K J

    1987-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer cell is a newly described lytic system against a variety of solid tumours and is distinct in several respects from the classic cytolytic T cell and the natural killer systems. This study was conducted to evaluate the lytic activity of lymphokine activated killer cells against fresh autologous and allogeneic, as well as cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Lymphokine activated killer cell was generated by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with various concentrations of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2, Cetus, USA) for various periods of time. A four hour 51Cr release assay was used to measure cytotoxicity. The results show that fresh and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells were only slightly susceptible to natural killer cells. Normal hepatocytes were resistant to lymphokine activated killer-mediated lysis. Lymphokine activated killer cells could be generated from mononuclear cells of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and normal subjects with lytic activity against fresh autologous and allogeneic and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but lymphokine activated killer cells from the former was less efficient than that from the latter. It is concluded that the adoptive immunotherapy with combined rIL-2 and lymphokine activated killer may be worth trying in early cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:3030899

  13. A psychological profile of a serial killer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dogra, T D; Leenaars, Antoon A; Chadha, R K; Manju, Mehta; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Sood, Mamta; Lester, David; Raina, Anupuma; Behera, C

    2012-01-01

    Serial killers have always fascinated society. A serial killer is typically defined as a perpetrator who murders three or more people over a period of time. Most reported cases of serial killers come from the United States and Canada. In India, there are few reported cases. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first Indian case in the literature. The present case is of a 28-year-old man, Surinder Koli. The Department of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delphi handled the forensic study. We present a most unique psychological investigation into the mind of a serial killer.

  14. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  15. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air-liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed.

  16. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  17. Genetic constitution of industrial yeast.

    PubMed

    Benítez, T; Martínez, P; Codón, A C

    1996-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial yeast strains are highly heterogeneous. These industrial strains, including bakers', wine, brewing and distillers', have been compared with respect to their DNA content, number and size of chromosomes, homologies between their genes and those of laboratory strains, and restriction fragment lengths of their mitDNA. A high variability, and the presence of multigenic families, were observed in some industrial yeast groups. The occurrence or the lack of chromosomal polymorphism, as well as the presence of multiple copies of some genes, could be related to a selective process occurring under specific industrial conditions. This polymorphism is generated by reorganization events, that take place mainly during meiosis and are mediated by repetitive Y' and Ty elements. These elements give rise to ectopic and asymmetric recombination and to gene conversion. The polymorphism displayed by the mitDNA could also result from specific industrial conditions. However, in enological strains the selective process is masked by the mutagenic effect that ethanol exerts on this DNA.

  18. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  19. Developmentally programmed nuclear destruction during yeast gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Michael D; Cheung, Sally W T; Lee, Kwan Yin; Moffat, Jason; Meneghini, Marc D

    2012-07-17

    Autophagy controls cellular catabolism in diverse eukaryotes and modulates programmed cell death in plants and animals. While studies of the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided fundamental insights into the mechanisms of autophagy, the roles of cell death pathways in yeast are less well understood. Here, we describe widespread developmentally programmed nuclear destruction (PND) events that occur during yeast gametogenesis. PND is executed through apoptotic-like DNA fragmentation in coordination with an unusual form of autophagy that is most similar to mammalian lysosomal membrane permeabilization and mega-autophagy, a form of plant autophagic cell death. Undomesticated strains execute gametogenic PND broadly in maturing colonies to the apparent benefit of sibling cells, confirming its prominence during the yeast life cycle. Our results reveal that diverse cell-death-related processes converge during gametogenesis in a microbe distantly related to plants or animals, highlighting gametogenesis as a process during which programmed cell death mechanisms may have evolved.

  20. [Overexpression of FKS1 to improve yeast autolysis-stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-09-01

    With the development of high gravity brewing, yeast cells are exposed to multiple brewing-associated stresses, such as increased osmotic pressure, enhanced alcohol concentration and nutritional imbalance. These will speed up yeast autolysis, which seriously influence beer flavor and quality. To increase yeast anti-autolytic ability, FKS1 overexpression strain was constructed by 18S rDNA. The concentration of β-1,3-glucan of overexpression strain was 62% higher than that of wild type strain. Meantime, FKS1 overexpression strain increased anti-stress ability at 8% ethanol, 0.4 mol/L NaCl and starvation stress. Under simulated autolysis, FKS1 showed good anti-autolytic ability by slower autolysis. These results confirms the potential of FKS1 overexpression to tackle yeast autolysis in high-gravity brewing.

  1. Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for Rapid Identification of Yeasts and Yeast-Like Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Barbara; Adam, Thomas; Zill, Edith; Göbel, Ulf B.

    2000-01-01

    The new VITEK 2 system is a fully automated system dedicated to the identification and susceptibility testing of microorganisms. In conjunction with the VITEK ID-YST card the VITEK 2 system allows the identification of clinically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in 15 h due to a sensitive fluorescence-based technology. The ID-YST card consists of 47 biochemical reactions. The database comprises 51 taxa, including newly described species. In this study we evaluated the reliability of the VITEK ID-YST card for the identification of yeasts and yeast-like organisms encountered in a clinical microbiology laboratory. A total of 241 strains representing 21 species were studied. The strains were isolated from clinical samples within a period of 60 days prior to the identification. The tests were performed using 24-h to 55-h subcultures on Sabouraud-gentamicin-chloramphenicol agar. Each strain was tested in parallel using the ID 32C strip as a comparison method combined with microscopic morphology and an agglutination test for C. krusei. Overall, 222 strains (92.1%) were unequivocally identified including 11 isolates (4.6%) identified with low discrimination resolved by simple additional tests. Ten strains (4.1%) for which results were given with low discrimination could not be unequivocally identified with supplemental tests, 4 strains (1.7%) were misidentified and 5 strains (2.1%) could not be identified. In conclusion, we found that the VITEK 2 system is a rapid and accurate method for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms. PMID:10790099

  2. Effects of murine natural killer cells on Cryptococcus neoformans

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavi Nouri, N.

    1985-01-01

    Previous data generated by Murphy and McDaniel indicate that normal murine nylon wool nonadherent splenic cells, with the characteristics of natural killer (NK) cells, effectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like pathogen. Nylon wood nonadherent cells from spleens of 7-8 week old mice were further fractionated on discontinuous Percoll gradients. The enrichment of NK cells in Percoll fractions 1 and 2 was confirmed by morphological examination, immunofluorescent staining, and by assessing the cytolytic activity of each Percoll cell fraction against YAC-1 targets in the 4 h /sup 51/Cr release assay. Cells isolated from each Percoll fraction were tested for growth inhibitory activity against C neoformans, using an in vitro 18 h growth inhibition assay. The results showed that NK cell enrichment was concomitant with the enrichment of anti-cryptococcal activity the Percoll fractions 1 and 2. An immunolabeling method combined with scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the effector cells attached to C. neoformans were asialo GM/sub 1/ positive and, therefore, had NK cell characteristics. NK cells have Fc receptors on their surfaces , and are capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against IgG-coated target cells. The author examined the effects of the IgG fraction of rabbit anti-cryptococcal antibody on the NK cell-mediated growth inhibition of C. neoformans. The data indicated that the effector cells involved in antibody-dependent growth inhibition of cryptococci are either NK cells or copurify and coexist in the same population with NK cells.

  3. QTL mapping of sake brewing characteristics of yeast.

    PubMed

    Katou, Taku; Namise, Masahiro; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    A haploid sake yeast strain derived from the commercial diploid sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 showed better characteristics for sake brewing compared to the haploid laboratory yeast strain X2180-1B, including higher production of ethanol and aromatic components. A hybrid of these two strains showed intermediate characteristics in most cases. After sporulation of the hybrid strain, we obtained 100 haploid segregants of the hybrid. Small-scale sake brewing tests of these segregants showed a smooth continuous distribution of the sake brewing characteristics, suggesting that these traits are determined by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). To examine these sake brewing characteristics at the genomic level, we performed QTL analysis of sake brewing characteristics using 142 DNA markers that showed heterogeneity between the two parental strains. As a result, we identified 25 significant QTLs involved in the specification of sake brewing characteristics such as ethanol fermentation and the production of aromatic components.

  4. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  5. Yeast Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of yeast based sensors have been developed as analytical tools. Yeasts are known as facultative anaerobes. Facultative anaerobes can survive in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The yeast based sensor consisted of a DO electrode and an immobilized omnivorous yeast. In yeast based sensor development, many kinds of yeast have been employed by applying their characteristics to adapt to the analyte. For example, Trichosporon cutaneum was used to estimate organic pollution in industrial wastewater. Yeast based sensors are suitable for online control of biochemical processes and for environmental monitoring. In this review, principles and applications of yeast based sensors are summarized.

  6. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  7. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... OK? What's the best way to treat a yeast infection during pregnancy? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. You can safely treat a yeast infection during pregnancy with various over-the-counter ...

  8. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  9. [Treatment of drilling wastewater from oil field by using yeast].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanming; Yang, Min; Zheng, Shaokui; Zhou, Xiangyu; Shen, Zhemin

    2002-09-01

    Two strains of yeast, namely Wickerhamiella domercqii and Candida boidinii, were acquired through screening from soil samples contaminated by drilling wastewater. A TOC removal of 40.5% was acquired when the mixture of the two yeast strains was used for drilling wastewater treatment, a little higher than that with activated sludge acclimated with wastewater (35.2%). Some organic compounds in the fraction of molecular weight above 60,000 were found to be biodegradable.

  10. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J.; Interrante, Maria Filsinger; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. Here, we engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof-of-principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  11. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-04

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds.

  12. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production.

  13. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  14. Automated Yeast Transformation Protocol to Engineer S. cerevisiae Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production with Open Reading Frames that Express Proteins Binding to Xylose Isomerase Identified using Robotic Two-hybrid Screen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. Since S. cerevisiae naturally metabolizes xylulose, one approach involves introducing xylose isomerase (XI...

  15. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains.

  16. Photobleaching and phototoxicity of KillerRed in tumor spheroids induced by continuous wave and pulsed laser illumination.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Daria S; Shirmanova, Marina V; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Subochev, Pavel V; Turchin, Ilya V; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shakhov, Boris E; Kamensky, Vladislav A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate photobleaching of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed in tumor spheroids upon pulsed and continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation and to analyze the mechanisms of cancer cell death after the treatment. We observed the light-dose dependent mechanism of KillerRed photobleaching over a wide range of fluence rates. Loss of fluorescence was limited to 80% at light doses of 150 J/cm(2) and more. Based on the bleaching curves, six PDT regimes were applied for irradiation using CW and pulsed regimes at a power density of 160 mW/cm(2) and light doses of 140 J/cm(2) , 170 J/cm(2) and 200 J/cm(2). Irradiation of KillerRed-expressing spheroids in the pulsed mode (pulse duration 15 ns, pulse repetition rate 10 Hz) induced predominantly apoptotic cell death, while in the case of CW mode the cancer cells underwent necrosis. In general, these results improve our understanding of photobleaching mechanisms in GFP-like proteins and show the importance of appropriate selection of treatment mode for PDT with KillerRed. Representative fluorescence image of two KillerRed-expressing spheroids before and immediately after CW irradiation.

  17. Overwintering of Vineyard Yeasts: Survival of Interacting Yeast Communities in Grapes Mummified on Vines

    PubMed Central

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of grape must into wine involves the development and succession of yeast populations differing in species composition. The initial population is formed by vineyard strains which are washed into the must from the crushed grapes and then completed with yeasts coming from the cellar environment. As the origin and natural habitat of the vineyard yeasts are not fully understood, this study addresses the possibility, that grape yeasts can be preserved in berries left behind on vines at harvest until the spring of the next year. These berries become mummified during the winter on the vines. To investigate whether yeasts can survive in these overwintering grapes, mummified berries were collected in 16 localities in the Tokaj wine region (Hungary-Slovakia) in early March. The collected berries were rehydrated to recover viable yeasts by plating samples onto agar plates. For the detection of minority species which would not be detected by direct plating, an enrichment step repressing the propagation of alcohol-sensitive yeasts was also included in the process. The morphological, physiological, and molecular analysis identified 13 basidiomycetous and 23 ascomycetous species including fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance among the 3879 isolates. The presence of viable strains of these species demonstrates that the grapes mummified on the vine can serve as a safe reservoir of yeasts, and may contribute to the maintenance of grape-colonizing yeast populations in the vineyard over years, parallel with other vectors and habitats. All basidiomycetous species were known phylloplane yeasts. Three Hanseniaspora species and pigmented Metschnikowia strains were the most frequent ascomycetes. Other fermentative yeasts of wine-making relevance were detected only in the enrichment cultures. Saccharomyces (S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae, and S. uvarum) were recovered from 13% of the samples. No Candida zemplinina was found. The isolates with Aureobasidium morphology

  18. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  19. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    PubMed

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  20. Characterization of isolated yeast growth response to methionine analogs.

    PubMed

    Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Lingbeck, Jody M; Wilkinson, Heather H; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Crandall, Philip G; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Biswas, Debabrata; Ricke, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Methionine is one of the first limiting amino acids in poultry nutrition. The use of methionine-rich natural feed ingredients, such as soybean meal or rapeseed meal may lead to negative environmental consequences. Amino acid supplementation leads to reduced use of protein-rich ingredients. The objectives of this study were isolation of potentially high content methionine-containing yeasts, quantification of methionine content in yeasts and their respective growth response to methionine analogs. Minimal medium was used as the selection medium and the isolation medium of methionine-producing yeasts from yeast collection and environmental samples, respectively. Two yeasts previously collected along with six additional strains isolated from Caucasian kefir grains, air-trapped, cantaloupe, and three soil samples could grow on minimal medium. Only two of the newly isolated strains, K1 and C1, grew in minimal medium supplied with either methionine analogs ethionine or norleucine at 0.5% (w/v). Based on large subunit rRNA sequences, these isolated strains were identified as Pichia udriavzevii/Issatchenkia orientalis. P. kudriavzevii/I. orentalis is a generally recognized as a safe organism. In addition, methionine produced by K1 and C1 yeast hydrolysate yielded 1.3 ± 0.01 and 1.1 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) dry cell. Yeast strain K1 may be suitable as a potential source of methionine for dietary supplements in organic poultry feed but may require growth conditions to further increase their methionine content.

  1. Physiological characteristics of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala J121.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Elisabeth; Druvefors, Ulrika; Boysen, Marianne E; Lingsten, Karl-Johan; Schnürer, Johan

    2002-08-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala J121 prevents mold spoilage and enhances preservation of moist grain in malfunctioning storage systems. Development of P. anomala J121 as a biocontrol agent requires in-depth knowledge about its physiology. P. anomala J121 grew under strictly anaerobic conditions, at temperatures between 3 degrees C and 37 degrees C, at pH values between 2.0 and 12.4, and at a water activity of 0.92 (NaCl) and 0.85 (glycerol). It could assimilate a wide range of C- and N-sources and produce killer toxin. A selective medium containing starch, nitrate, acetic acid, and chloramphenicol was developed for P. anomala. P. anomala was equally sensitive as Candida albicans to common antifungal compounds. Growth ability at a range of environmental conditions contributes to the competitive ability of the biocontrol yeast P. anomala J121.

  2. Transgenic wine yeast technology comes of age: is it time for transgenic wine?

    PubMed

    Cebollero, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Tabera, Laura; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2007-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main yeast responsible for alcoholic fermentation of grape juice during wine making. This makes wine strains of this species perfect targets for the improvement of wine technology and quality. Progress in winemaking has been achieved through the use of selected yeast strains, as well as genetic improvement of wine yeast strains through the sexual and pararexual cycles, random mutagenesis and genetic engineering. Development of genetically engineered wine yeasts, their potential application, and factors affecting their commercial viability will be discussed in this review.

  3. Engineering of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain with multiple chromosome-integrated genes of human alpha-fetoprotein and its high-yield secretory production, purification, structural and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Dudich, Elena; Dudich, Igor; Semenkova, Lidia; Benevolensky, Sergey; Morozkina, Elena; Marchenko, Aleksey; Zatcepin, Sergey; Dudich, Dmitry; Soboleva, Galina; Khromikh, Luidmila; Roslovtceva, Olga; Tatulov, Eduard

    2012-07-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a biological drug candidate of high medicinal potential in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, cancer, and regenerative medicine. Large-scale production of recombinant human alpha-fetoprotein (rhAFP) is desirable for structural and functional studies and applied research. In this study we cloned and expressed in the secreted form wild-type glycosylated human rhAFP and non-glycosylated mutant rhAFP(0) (N233S) in the yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae with multiple chromosome-integrated synthetic human AFP genes. RhAFP and rhAFP(0) were successfully produced and purified from the culture liquids active naturally folded proteins. Elimination of the glycosylation by mutation reduced rhAFP(0) secretion about threefold as compared to the wild-type protein showing critical role of the N-linked glycan for heterologous protein folding and secretion. Structural similarity of rhAFP and rhAFP(0) with natural embryonic eAFP was confirmed by circular dichroism technique. Functional tests demonstrated similar type of tumor suppressive and immunosuppressive activity for both recombinant species rhAFP and rhAFP(0) as compared to natural eAFP. It was documented that both types of biological activities attributed to rhAFP and rhAFP(0) are due to the fast induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Despite the fact that rhAFP and rhAFP(0) demonstrated slightly less effective tumor suppressive activity as compared to eAFP but rhAFP(0) had produced statistically notable increase in its ability to induce inhibition of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation as compared to the glycosylated rhAFP and eAFP. We conclude that N-linked glycosylation of rhAFP is required for efficient folding and secretion. However the presence of N-linked sugar moiety was shown to be unimportant for tumor suppressive activity but was critically important for its immunoregulative activity which demonstrates that different molecular mechanisms are involved

  4. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeasts from wastewater in the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Maryam; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Phenol and phenolic compounds are environmental pollutants present in industrial wastewaters such as coal tar, oil refineries and petrochemical plants. Phenol removal from industrial effluents is extremely important for the protection of environment. Usually, phenol degradation is carried out by physicochemical methods that are costly and produce hazardous metabolites. Recently, phenol biodegradation has been considered. Yeasts are the most important phenol biodegraders. In this study, the phenol-degrading yeast from environmental samples (soil and wastewater) was isolated from the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman. Then total heterotrophic yeasts were counted. The soil samples had higher rates of yeast degrader, in comparison to wastewater samples. After three passages, four yeasts (K1, K2, K7 and K11) that had the highest growth rate were selected for further study. Also, these yeasts were able to remove phenol measured by Gibbs reagent. The effect of four different concentrations of phenol (50, 125, 200 and 275) mg L−1 was measured and three degradation patterns in these yeasts were observed. The hydrophobicity and emulsification activity were measured in all eleven yeasts. Finally, strong yeasts in phenol degrading yeasts were identified by molecular method using amplification of 18S rRNA gene region. The sequencing results showed that these isolated yeasts belonged to Candida tropicalis strain K1, Pichia guilliermondii strain K2, Meyerozyma guilliermondii strain K7 and C. tropicalis strain K11. PMID:26887222

  5. Comparative study on the identification of food-borne yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Török, T; King, A D

    1991-01-01

    Morphologically distinct yeast colonies from partially and fully processed fruits and vegetables were isolated over a 3-year period. Identification of 239 strains was achieved by using standard methods, commercial identification kits (API 20C and API YEAST-IDENT), and a simplified system for food-borne yeasts. The identified strains of fruit origin represented 36 species belonging to 19 genera. Among strains of vegetable origin, 34 species representing 17 genera were identified. The simplified identification system and the conventional method provided the same results in 80% of the cases. The commercial identification kits were easy to use but were not appropriate for food-borne yeast species. Computer-assisted identification was helpful. PMID:2059042

  6. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-08

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP.

  7. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-07-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells.

  8. Genome Sequence of the Native Apiculate Wine Yeast Hanseniaspora vineae T02/19AF

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, Facundo M.; Berná, Luisa; Greif, Gonzalo; Camesasca, Laura; Salzman, Valentina; Medina, Karina; Robello, Carlos; Gaggero, Carina; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of novel yeast strains for winemaking improves quality and provides variety including subtle characteristic differences in fine wines. Here we report the first genome of a yeast strain native to Uruguay, Hanseniaspora vineae T02/19AF, which has been shown to positively contribute to aroma and wine quality. PMID:24874663

  9. Biochemical characterization and growth patterns of new yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Djegui, Kadjogbé Y; Gachomo, Emma W; Hounhouigan, Djidjoho J; Kayodé, Adéchola P P; Kotchoni, Simeon O

    2014-08-01

    African sorghum opaque beers play a vital role in the diet of millions of consumers. In the current study we investigated the growth profiles of yeast strains isolated from kpete-kpete, a traditional starter used to produce tchoukoutou, an opaque sorghum beer in Benin. 10 yeast strains were isolated from sorghum beer starters and cultivated under both liquid and solid media for phenotypic growth characterization. All yeast isolates were able to grow both on solid and liquid media. Based on their growth profiles, the isolates were clustered into three groups: (i) the aggressive growth pattern (30%), (ii) the moderate growth pattern (50%), and (iii) the slow growth pattern (20%). Based on gene expression pattern, absorbance (A(600 nm)) and diameter of growth in both liquid and solid media respectively, yeast strains YK34, YK15 and YK48 were clustered in the first group, and referred to as the most aggressive growth strains, followed by group 2 (YK24, YK5, YK12, YK20, YK2) and group 3 (YK37, YK41). This growth pattern was confirmed by Invertase gene expression profiling of the yeasts showing group 1 with high level of Invertase gene expression followed by group 2 and group 3 respectively. Our results suggest that YK34, YK15 and YK48 and YK2 yeast strains constitute the best candidates in fermentation of sorghum beer production based on growth rate and assimilation of carbon and nitrogen sources.

  10. Yeasts colonizing the leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sláviková, Elena; Vadkertiová, Renata; Vránová, Dana

    2007-08-01

    The yeasts were isolated from the leaf surfaces of ten species of trees. The study site was a forest park (Zelezná Studnicka) of the Small Carpathians mountain range. One hundred and thirty seven yeast strains belonging to 13 genera were isolated from 320 samples of leaves and needles. Seventeen yeast species were isolated, but only seven occurred regularly: Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus laurentii, Pichia anomala, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomyces sp., Lachancea thermotolerans, and Rhodotorula glutinis. The remaining species were isolated from the leaves and needles of three or less tree species. A. pullulans, Cr. laurentii, and P. anomala were the most frequently found species and they occurred on leaves and needles of all ten tree species. Saccharomyces sp. occurred in leaf samples collected from eight kinds of trees. M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans were found in samples collected from six species of trees. Both these species occurred almost always on the leaves of deciduous trees. Rh. glutinis was the most frequently isolated carotenoids producing species. We have found out that the ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species were present in the leaf samples in approximately equal frequency, contrary to the soil samples taken from this forest park, where the ascomycetous species were found rarely.

  11. Yeast metallothionein function in metal ion detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ecker, D J; Butt, T R; Sternberg, E J; Neeper, M P; Debouck, C; Gorman, J A; Crooke, S T

    1986-12-25

    A genetic approach was taken to test the function of yeast metallothionein in metal ion detoxification. A yeast strain was constructed in which the metallothionein locus was deleted (cup1 delta). The cup1 delta strain was complemented with normal or mutant metallothionein genes under normal or constitutive regulatory control on high copy episomal plasmids. Metal resistance of the cup1 delta strain with and without the metallothionein-expressing vectors was analyzed. The normally regulated metallothionein gene conferred resistance only to copper (1000-fold); constitutively expressed metallothionein conferred resistance to both copper (500-fold) and cadmium (1000-fold), but not to mercury, zinc, silver, cobalt, nickel, gold, platinum, lanthanum, uranium, or tin. Two mutant versions of the metallothionein gene were constructed and tested for their ability to confer metal resistance in the cup1 delta background. The first had a deletion of a highly conserved amino acid sequence (Lys-Lys-Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser). The second was a hybrid gene consisting of the sequences coding for the first 20 amino acids of the yeast protein fused to the monkey metallothionein gene. Expression of these genes under the CUP1 promoter provided significant protection from copper, but none of the other metals tested. These results demonstrate that there is significant flexibility in the structural requirements for metallothionein to function in copper detoxification and that yeast metallothionein is also capable of detoxifying cadmium under conditions of constitutive expression.

  12. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  13. Significance of yeasts in the fermentation of maize for ogi production.

    PubMed

    Omemu, A M; Oyewole, O B; Bankole, M O

    2007-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida krusei, C. tropicalis, Geotrichum candidum, G. fermentans and Rhodotorula graminis were isolated during the fermentation of maize for ogi production. All the isolates except Geotrichum fermentans and Rhodotorula graminis were able to degrade phytate. All the yeasts strains exhibited lipase and esterase activities. Only S. cerevisiae (2.60%) and C. krusei (7.41%) exhibited amylase activities. Candida sp. produced wider zone of inhibition than the other yeasts strains tested during lipase activity while S. cerevisiae strains produced significantly wider zone of clearing as compared to the other yeasts for esterase activities. The study of inter-relationships between Lactobacillus plantarum and yeasts (C. krusei and S. cerevisiae) showed that the growth of the yeast strains were enhanced during fermentation by the presence of the lactic acid bacteria, but the growth of the L. plantarum strain was significantly enhanced especially by the C. krusei.

  14. Natural killer T cell based Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Sun, Wenji; East, James E.; Li, Junxin; Webb, Tonya J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play an important immunoregulatory role and are thought to bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses. Following activation through cognate interactions with lipid antigen presented in the context of CD1d molecules, NKT cells rapidly produce a plethora of cytokines and can also mediate cytotoxicity. Due to their potent effector functions, extensive research has been performed to increase our understanding on how to effectively modulate these cells. In fact, NKT cell agonists have been used as vaccine adjuvants to enhance antigen specific T and B cell responses to infections and malignancy. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in NKT cell-based vaccination strategies. Given the role that NKT cells play in autoimmune disease, infectious diseases, cancer, transplant immunology and dermatology, it is important to understand how to effectively guide their effector functions in order to develop novel immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:24089657

  15. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  16. Natural killer cells in inflammatory heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, SuFey; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Despite of a multitude of excellent studies, the regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiac disease is greatly underappreciated. Clinical abnormalities in the numbers and functions of NK cells are observed in myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) as well as in cardiac transplant rejection [1-6]. Because treatment of these disorders remains largely symptomatic in nature, patients have little options for targeted therapies [7,8]. However, blockade of NK cells and their receptors can protect against inflammation and damage in animal models of cardiac injury and inflammation. In these models, NK cells suppress the maturation and trafficking of inflammatory cells, alter the local cytokine and chemokine environments, and induce apoptosis in nearby resident and hematopoietic cells [1,9,10]. This review will dissect each protective mechanism employed by NK cells and explore how their properties might be exploited for their therapeutic potential.

  17. Natural killer cells: In health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arundhati; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute our bodies' frontline defense system, guarding against tumors and launching attacks against infections. The activities of NK cells are regulated by the interaction of various receptors expressed on their surfaces with cell surface ligands. While the role of NK cells in controlling tumor activity is relatively clear, the fact that they are also linked to various other disease conditions is now being highlighted. Here, we present an overview of the role of NK cells during normal body state as well as under diseased state. We discuss the possible utilization of these powerful cells as immunotherapeutic agents in combating diseases such as asthma, autoimmune diseases, and HIV-AIDS. This review also outlines current challenges in NK cell therapy.

  18. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure.

  19. Killer whales are capable of vocal learning

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Andrew D; Griffin, Rachael M; Howitt, David; Larsson, Lisa; Miller, Patrick J.O; Rus Hoelzel, A

    2006-01-01

    The production learning of vocalizations by manipulation of the sound production organs to alter the physical structure of sound has been demonstrated in only a few mammals. In this natural experiment, we document the vocal behaviour of two juvenile killer whales, Orcinus orca, separated from their natal pods, which are the only cases of dispersal seen during the three decades of observation of their populations. We find mimicry of California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) barks, demonstrating the vocal production learning ability for one of the calves. We also find differences in call usage (compared to the natal pod) that may reflect the absence of a repertoire model from tutors or some unknown effect related to isolation or context. PMID:17148275

  20. Technological properties of bakers' yeasts in durum wheat semolina dough.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Virgilio; Longo, Chiara; Damigella, Arcangelo; Raspagliesi, Domenico; Spina, Alfio; Palumbo, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Properties of 13 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from different sources (traditional sourdoughs, industrial baking yeasts etc.) were studied in dough produced with durum wheat (Sicilian semolina, variety Mongibello). Durum wheat semolina and durum wheat flour are products prepared from grain of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) by grinding or milling processes in which the bran and germ are essentially removed and the remainder is comminuted to a suitable degree of fineness. Acidification and leavening properties of the dough were evaluated. Strains isolated from traditional sourdoughs (DSM PST18864, DSM PST18865 and DSM PST18866) showed higher leavening power, valuable after the first and second hours of fermentation, than commercial baking yeasts. In particular the strain DSM PST 18865 has also been successfully tested in bakery companies for the improvement of production processes. Baking and staling tests were carried out on five yeast strains to evaluate their fermentation ability directly and their resistance to the staling process. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) was used to investigate genetic variations in the yeast strains. This study showed an appreciable biodiversity in the microbial populations of both wild and commercial yeast strains.

  1. The role of natural killer cells in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Wilensky, Asaf; Chaushu, Stella; Shapira, Lior

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of humans. The microbial etiology of the disease is well documented, as is the major role of the host response in disease pathogenesis. As natural killer cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity against bacteria and viruses, they can be expected to act as major players in the development of the disease. Through direct interaction with periodontal pathogens, natural killer cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that subsequently may lead to tissue destruction. Indeed, using a murine periodontitis model, such mechanisms have been shown to be involved in bacterial-induced alveolar bone loss. In the present review we document the available literature and evidence base regarding the origin, biology and characteristics of natural killer cells, and their interactions with periodontal pathogens. The potential role of natural killer cells in periodontal pathogenesis and the mechanisms involved are discussed.

  2. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides.

  3. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  4. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation.

  5. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S.