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Sample records for killing vectors energy

  1. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  2. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  3. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  4. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  5. Comments on conformal Killing vector fields and quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Ottewill, A.C.; Siklos, S.T.C.

    1982-10-15

    We give a comprehensive analysis of those vacuums for flat and conformally flat space-times which can be defined by timelike, hypersurface-orthogonal, conformal Killing vector fields. We obtain formulas for the difference in stress-energy density between any two such states and display the correspondence with the renormalized stress tensors. A brief discussion is given of the relevance of these results to quantum-mechanical measurements made by noninertial observers moving through flat space.

  6. Approximate Killing vectors on S{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Gregory B.; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2007-08-15

    We present a new method for computing the best approximation to a Killing vector on closed 2-surfaces that are topologically S{sup 2}. When solutions of Killing's equation do not exist, this method is shown to yield results superior to those produced by existing methods. In addition, this method appears to provide a new tool for studying the horizon geometry of distorted black holes.

  7. On the Lie subalgebra of Killing-Milne and Killing-Cartan vector fields in Newtonian spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The Galilean (and more generally Milne) invariance of Newtonian theory allows for Killing vector fields of a general kind, whereby the Lie derivative of a field is not required to vanish but only to be cancellable by some infinitesimal Galilean (respectively Milne) gauge transformation. In this paper, it is shown that both the Killing-Milne vector fields, which preserve the background Newtonian spacetime structure and the Killing-Cartan vector fields, which in addition preserve the gravitational field, form a Lie subalgebra.

  8. Binary black hole spacetimes with a helical Killing vector

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Christian

    2004-12-15

    Binary black hole spacetimes with a helical Killing vector, which are discussed as an approximation for the early stage of a binary system, are studied in a projection formalism. In this setting the four-dimensional Einstein equations are equivalent to a three-dimensional gravitational theory with a SL(2,R)/SO(1,1) sigma model as the material source. The sigma model is determined by a complex Ernst equation. 2+1 decompositions of the three-metric are used to establish the field equations on the orbit space of the Killing vector. The two Killing horizons of spherical topology which characterize the black holes, the cylinder of light where the Killing vector changes from timelike to spacelike, and infinity are singular points of the equations. The horizon and the light cylinder are shown to be regular singularities, i.e., the metric functions can be expanded in a formal power series in the vicinity. The behavior of the metric at spatial infinity is studied in terms of formal series solutions to the linearized Einstein equations. It is shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the strong sense to have a smooth null infinity under the assumption that the metric tends asymptotically to the Minkowski metric. In this case the metric functions have an oscillatory behavior in the radial coordinate in a nonaxisymmetric setting, the asymptotic multipoles are not defined. The asymptotic behavior of the Weyl tensor near infinity shows that there is no smooth null infinity.

  9. Wormholes admitting conformal Killing vectors and supported by generalized Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, Peter K. F.

    2015-08-01

    When Morris and Thorne first proposed that traversable wormholes may be actual physical objects, they concentrated on the geometry by specifying the shape and redshift functions. This mathematical approach necessarily raises questions regarding the determination of the required stress-energy tensor. This paper discusses a natural way to obtain a complete wormhole solution by assuming that the wormhole (1) is supported by generalized Chaplygin gas and (2) admits conformal Killing vectors.

  10. Bioengineered viral vectors for targeting and killing prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-xin; Jia, William; Rennie, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Enabling the transduction of therapeutic gene expression exclusively in diseased sites is the key to developing more effective treatments for advanced prostate cancer using viral-based therapy. While prostate cancers that express high levels of HER-2 are resistant to the killing effects of trastuzumab, they can be targeted for selective gene expression and destruction by lentiviruses with envelope proteins engineered to bind to this therapeutic antibody. More importantly, after intravenous injection, this trastuzumab-bound lentivirus is able to target castration-resistant prostate tumor xenografts, albeit with low efficiency. This proof of principle opens up multiple possibilities for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer using a viral-based therapy. However, to be safe and more effective, the viral vectors must target prostate cancer cells more selectively and efficiently. A higher degree of specificity and efficiency of cancer cell targeting can be achieved by engineering viral vectors to bind to a specific cell surface marker and by controlling the expression of the therapeutic payload at transcriptional level, with a tissue-specific promoter, and at the translational level, with a regulatory sequences inserted into either the 5'UTR or 3'UTR regions of the therapeutic gene(s). The latter would be designed to ensure that translation of this mRNA occurs exclusively in malignant cells. Furthermore, in order to obtain a potent anti-tumor effect, viral vectors would be engineered to express pro-apoptotic genes, intra-cellar antibodies/nucleotide aptamers to block critical proteins, or siRNAs to knockdown essential cellular mRNAs. Alternatively, controlled expression of an essential viral gene would restore replication competence to the virus and enable selective oncolysis of tumor cells. Successful delivery of such bioengineered viruses may provide a more effective way to treat advanced prostate cancer.

  11. Timelike Killing vectors and ergo surfaces in non-asymptotically flat spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelavas, N.

    2005-02-01

    Ergo surfaces are investigated in spacetimes with a cosmological constant. We find the existence of multiple timelike Killing vectors, each corresponding to a distinct ergo surface, with no one being preferred. Using a kinematic invariant, which provides a measure of hypersurface orthogonality, we explore its potential role in selecting a preferred timelike Killing vector and consequently a unique ergo surface.

  12. Interior solutions of fluid sphere in f(R,T) gravity admitting conformal killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Sardar, I. H.; Rahaman, F.; Abbas, G.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the interior solutions of fluid Sphere in f(R,T) gravity admitting conformal killing vectors, where R is Ricci scalar and T is trace of energy momentum tensor. The solutions corresponding to isotropic and anisotropic configurations have been investigated explicitly. Further, the anisotropic case has been dealt by the utilization of linear equation of state. The results for both cases have been interpreted graphically. The equation of state parameter, integration constants and other parameters of the theory have been chosen to find the central density equal to standard value of central density of the compact objects. The energy conditions as well as stability of the solutions have been investigated in the background of f(R,T) gravity.

  13. Einstein Finsler metrics and killing vector fields on Riemannian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, XinYue; Shen, ZhongMin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use a Killing form on a Riemannian manifold to construct a class of Finsler metrics. We find equations that characterize Einstein metrics among this class. In particular, we construct a family of Einstein metrics on $S^3$ with ${\\rm Ric} = 2 F^2$, ${\\rm Ric}=0$ and ${\\rm Ric}=- 2 F^2$, respectively. This family of metrics provide an important class of Finsler metrics in dimension three, whose Ricci curvature is a constant, but the flag curvature is not.

  14. Killing vector fields in three dimensions: a method to solve massive gravity field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürses, Metin

    2010-10-01

    Killing vector fields in three dimensions play an important role in the construction of the related spacetime geometry. In this work we show that when a three-dimensional geometry admits a Killing vector field then the Ricci tensor of the geometry is determined in terms of the Killing vector field and its scalars. In this way we can generate all products and covariant derivatives at any order of the Ricci tensor. Using this property we give ways to solve the field equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG) introduced recently. In particular when the scalars of the Killing vector field (timelike, spacelike and null cases) are constants then all three-dimensional symmetric tensors of the geometry, the Ricci and Einstein tensors, their covariant derivatives at all orders, and their products of all orders are completely determined by the Killing vector field and the metric. Hence, the corresponding three-dimensional metrics are strong candidates for solving all higher derivative gravitational field equations in three dimensions.

  15. Teleparallel conformal Killing vector fields of LRS Bianchi type V spacetimes in teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Suhail; Hussain, Tahir; Khan, Gulzar Ali

    The aim of this paper is to explore teleparallel conformal Killing vector fields (CKVFs) of locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type V spacetimes in the context of teleparallel gravity and compare the obtained results with those of general relativity (GR). The general solution of teleparallel conformal Killing's equations is found in terms of some unknown functions of t and x, along with a set of integrability conditions. The integrability conditions are solved in some particular cases to get the final form of teleparallel CKVFs. It is observed that the LRS Bianchi type V spacetimes admit proper teleparallel CKVF in only one case, while in remaining cases the teleparallel CKVFs reduce to teleparallel Killing vector fields (KVFs). Moreover, it is shown that the LRS Bianchi type V spacetimes do not admit any proper teleparallel homothetic vector field (HVF).

  16. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  17. Symmetries and conservation laws of space-times admitting two commuting killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Balraj

    In this dissertation, we determined all first-order generalized symmetries of the vacuum Einstein equations for spacetimes admitting two commuting Killing vector fields. The field equations for the two Killing vector models, referred to as the reduced Einstein equations, were first derived using a projection formalism first developed by Geroch. In the derivation of the reduced Einstein equations, we assumed the two-dimensional distribution orthogonal to the vector spaces spanned by the Killing vector fields admits integral submanifolds. Prior to embarking on the symmetry analysis, the reduced Einstein equations were expressed in harmonic-null coordinates. A brief survey of the theory of symmetry groups of differential equations, variational symmetries, and local conservation laws preceded the generalized symmetry analysis of the reduced Einstein equation. These concepts were motivated and presented through their application to a variety of physical systems drawn from classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, classical electromagnetism, and general relativity. We obtained partial results from a preliminary analysis of kth-order generalized symmetries (for k ≥ 1) of the reduced Einstein equations. This was followed by the determination of all first-order generalized symmetries admitted by the reduced Einstein equations. We showed that all first-order generalized symmetries of the reduced Einstein equations are, in fact, prolonged point symmetries. Since the reduced Einstein equations admit a Lagrangian formulation, the variational symmetries and local conservation laws associated with the first-order symmetries were also determined and discussed.

  18. Gauge theories on A(dS) space and Killing vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2008-03-15

    We provide a general technique for collectively analysing a manifestly covariant formulation of non-abelian gauge theories on both anti-de Sitter as well as de Sitter spaces. This is done by stereographically projecting the corresponding theories, defined on a flat Minkowski space, onto the surface of the A(dS) hyperboloid. The gauge and matter fields in the two descriptions are mapped by conformal Killing vectors and conformal Killing spinors, respectively. A bilinear map connecting the spinors with the vector is established. Different forms of gauge fixing conditions and their equivalence are discussed. The U(1) axial anomaly as well as the non-abelian covariant and consistent chiral anomalies on A(dS) space are obtained. Electric-magnetic duality is demonstrated. The zero curvature limit is shown to yield consistent findings.

  19. Killing of cancer cells through the use of eukaryotic expression vectors harbouring genes encoding nucleases and ribonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2015-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy vectors are promising tools for killing cancer cells with the purpose of eradicating malignant tumours entirely. Different delivery methods of vectors into the cancer cells, including both non-viral and viral, as well as promoters for the targeted expression of genes encoding anticancer proteins were developed for effective and selective killing of cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Many vectors have been created to kill cancer cells, and some vectors suppress malignant tumours with high efficiency. This review is focused on vectors bearing genes for nucleases such as deoxyribonucleases (caspase-activated DNase, deoxyribonuclease I-like 3, endonuclease G) and ribonucleases (human polynucleotide phosphorylase, ribonuclease L, α-sarcin, barnase), as well as vectors harbouring gene encoding ribonuclease inhibitor. The data concerning the functionality and the efficacy of such vectors are presented.

  20. Proper conformal Killing vectors in static plane symmetric space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Khan, S.; Bokhari, A. H.; Khan, G. A.

    2017-04-01

    Conformal Killing vectors (CKVs) in static plane symmetric space-times were recently studied by Saifullah and Yazdan, who concluded by remarking that static plane symmetric space-times do not admit any proper CKV except in the case where these space-times are conformally flat. We present some non-conformally flat static plane symmetric space-time metrics admitting proper CKVs. For these space-times, we also investigate a special type of CKVs, known as inheriting CKVs.

  1. Eukaryotic expression vectors containing genes encoding plant proteins for killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2013-12-01

    Gene therapy has attracted attention for its potential to specifically and efficiently target cancer cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. At present, it offers a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. Numerous vectors have been engineered for the sole purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Many plant proteins have anticancer properties; consequently, genes encoding some of these proteins are being used to design constructs for the inhibition of multiplying cancer cells. Data addressing the function of vectors harbouring genes specifically encoding ricin, saporin, lunasin, linamarase, and tomato thymidine kinase 1 under the control of different promoters are summarised here. Constructs employing genes to encode cytotoxic proteins as well as constructs employing genes of enzymes that convert a nontoxic prodrug into a toxic drug are considered here. Generation of eukaryotic expression vectors containing genes encoding plant proteins for killing of cancer cells may permit the broadening of cancer gene therapy strategy, particularly because of the specific mode of action of anticancer plant proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New conserved currents for vacuum space-times in dimension four with a Killing vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Lobo, Alfonso García-Parrado

    2016-10-01

    A new family of conserved currents for vacuum space-times with a Killing vector is presented. The currents are constructed from the superenergy tensor of the Mars-Simon tensor and using the positivity properties of the former we find that the conserved charges associated to the currents have natural positivity properties in certain cases. Given the role played by the Mars-Simon tensor in local and semi-local characterisations of the Kerr solution, the currents presented in this work are useful to construct non-negative scalar quantities characterising Kerr initial data (known in the literature as non-Kerrness) which in addition are conserved charges.

  3. Kaluza-Klein consistency, Killing vectors and Kähler spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoxha, P.; Martinez-Acosta, R. R.; Pope, C. N.

    2000-10-01

    We make a detailed investigation of all spaces Qn1...nNq1...qN of the form of U(1) bundles over arbitrary products ∏iCPni of complex projective spaces, with arbitrary winding numbers qi over each factor in the base. Special cases, including Q1111 (sometimes known as T11), Q111111 and Q2132, are relevant for compactifications of type IIB and D = 11 supergravity. Remarkable `conspiracies' allow consistent Kaluza-Klein S5, S4 and S7 sphere reductions of these theories that retain all the Yang-Mills fields of the isometry group in a massless truncation. We prove that such conspiracies do not occur for the reductions on the Qn1...nNq1...qN spaces, and that it is inconsistent to make a massless truncation in which the non-Abelian SU(ni + 1) factors in their isometry groups are retained. In the course of proving this we derive many properties of the spaces Qn1...nNq1...qN of more general utility. In particular, we show that they always admit Einstein metrics, and that the spaces where qi = (ni + 1)/l all admit two Killing spinors. We also obtain an iterative construction for real metrics on CPn, and construct the Killing vectors on Qn1...nNq1...qN in terms of scalar eigenfunctions on CPni. We derive bounds that allow us to prove that certain Killing-vector identities on spheres, necessary for consistent Kaluza-Klein reductions, are never satisfied on Qn1...nNq1...qN.

  4. All ASD complex and real 4-dimensional Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudecki, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Anti-self-dual (ASD) 4-dimensional complex Einstein spaces with nonzero cosmological constant Λ equipped with a nonnull Killing vector are considered. It is shown that any conformally nonflat metric of such spaces can be always brought to a special form and the Einstein field equations can be reduced to the Boyer-Finley-Plebański equation (Toda field equation). Some alternative forms of the metric are discussed. All possible real slices (neutral, Euclidean and Lorentzian) of ASD complex Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector are found.

  5. Change in Hamiltonian general relativity from the lack of a time-like Killing vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, J. Brian

    2014-08-01

    In General Relativity in Hamiltonian form, change has seemed to be missing, defined only asymptotically, or otherwise obscured at best, because the Hamiltonian is a sum of first-class constraints and a boundary term and thus supposedly generates gauge transformations. Attention to the gauge generator G of Rosenfeld, Anderson, Bergmann, Castellani et al., a specially tuned sum of first-class constraints, facilitates seeing that a solitary first-class constraint in fact generates not a gauge transformation, but a bad physical change in electromagnetism (changing the electric field) or General Relativity. The change spoils the Lagrangian constraints, Gauss's law or the Gauss-Codazzi relations describing embedding of space into space-time, in terms of the physically relevant velocities rather than auxiliary canonical momenta. While Maudlin and Healey have defended change in GR much as G. E. Moore resisted skepticism, there remains a need to exhibit the technical flaws in the no-change argument. Insistence on Hamiltonian-Lagrangian equivalence, a theme emphasized by Mukunda, Castellani, Sugano, Pons, Salisbury, Shepley and Sundermeyer among others, holds the key. Taking objective change to be ineliminable time dependence, one recalls that there is change in vacuum GR just in case there is no time-like vector field ξα satisfying Killing's equation £ξgμν = 0, because then there exists no coordinate system such that everything is independent of time. Throwing away the spatial dependence of GR for convenience, one finds explicitly that the time evolution from Hamilton's equations is real change just when there is no time-like Killing vector. The inclusion of a massive scalar field is simple. No obstruction is expected in including spatial dependence and coupling more general matter fields. Hence change is real and local even in the Hamiltonian formalism. The considerations here resolve the Earman-Maudlin standoff over change in Hamiltonian General Relativity: the

  6. PSMA-homing dsRNA chimeric protein vector kills prostate cancer cells and activates anti-tumor bystander responses

    PubMed Central

    Langut, Yael; Edinger, Nufar; Flashner-Abramson, Efrat; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lebendiker, Mario; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Klein, Shoshana; Levitzki, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic androgen-resistant prostate cancer remains a challenge. We describe a protein vector that selectively delivers synthetic dsRNA, polyinosinic/polycytidylic acid (polyIC), to prostate tumors by targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is overexpressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. The chimeric protein is built from the double stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain of PKR tethered to a single chain anti-PSMA antibody. When complexed with polyIC, the chimera demonstrates selective and efficient killing of prostate cancer cells. The treatment causes the targeted cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and to secrete toxic cytokines. In a bystander effect, these cytokines kill neighboring cancer cells that do not necessarily overexpress PSMA, and activate immune cells that enhance the killing effect. The strong effects of the targeted polyIC are demonstrated on both 2D cell cultures and 3D tumor spheroids. PMID:28445962

  7. A rotating hairy AdS3 black hole with the metric having only one Killing vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Norihiro; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Maeda, Kengo

    2015-08-01

    We perturbatively construct a three-dimensional rotating AdS black hole with a real scalar hair. We choose the mass of a scalar field slightly above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound and impose a general boundary condition for the bulk scalar field at AdS infinity. We first show that rotating BTZ black holes are unstable against scalar field perturbations under our more general boundary condition. Next we construct a rotating hairy black hole perturbatively with respect to a small amplitude ɛ of the scalar field, up to O( ɛ 4). Our hairy black hole is stationary and exhibits no dissipation, but the lumps of the non-linearly perturbed geometry break axial symmetry, thus providing the first example of a rotating black hole whose metric admits only one Killing vector field. Furthermore, we numerically show that the entropy of our hairy black hole is larger than that of the BTZ black hole with the same energy and the angular momentum. We briefly discuss if our rotating hairy black hole in lumpy geometry could be the endpoint of the instability.

  8. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  9. On the integrability of Einstein-Maxwell-(A)dS gravity in the presence of Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietmar; Nozawa, Masato; Rabbiosi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    We study symmetry and integrability properties of four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a nonvanishing cosmological constant in the presence of Killing vectors. First of all, we consider stationary spacetimes, which lead, after a timelike Kaluza-Klein reduction followed by a dualization of the two vector fields, to a three-dimensional nonlinear sigma model coupled to gravity, whose target space is a noncompact version of {{C}}{{{P}}}2 with an {{SU}}(2,1) isometry group. It is shown that the potential for the scalars that arises from the cosmological constant in four dimensions breaks three of the eight {{SU}}(2,1) symmetries, corresponding to the generalized Ehlers and the two Harrison transformations. This leaves a semidirect product of a one-dimensional Heisenberg group and a translation group {{{R}}}2 as residual symmetry. We show that, under the additional assumptions that the three-dimensional manifold is conformal to a product space {{R}}× {{Σ }} and all fields depend only on the coordinate along {{R}}, the equations of motion are integrable. This generalizes the results of Leigh et al in arXiv:1403.6511 to the case where electromagnetic fields are also present. In the second part of the paper we consider the purely gravitational spacetime admitting a second Killing vector that commutes with the timelike one. We write down the resulting two-dimensional action and discuss its symmetries. If the fields depend only on one of the two coordinates, the equations of motion are again integrable, and the solution turns out to be one constructed by Krasiński many years ago.

  10. How to "Kill a Watt" and Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massiha, G. H.; Houston, Shelton; Rawat, Kuldeep S.

    2011-01-01

    Many technology students--and especially those interested in environmental and energy issues--can benefit from learning about power ratings and the energy usage of electrical systems like the electrical equipment and appliances found in most homes. Students enrolled in electronics and construction technology courses learn to determine the power…

  11. How to "Kill a Watt" and Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massiha, G. H.; Houston, Shelton; Rawat, Kuldeep S.

    2011-01-01

    Many technology students--and especially those interested in environmental and energy issues--can benefit from learning about power ratings and the energy usage of electrical systems like the electrical equipment and appliances found in most homes. Students enrolled in electronics and construction technology courses learn to determine the power…

  12. A vector supersymmetry killing IR divergences in non-commutative gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D. N.

    2008-02-01

    This is a report on the joint work with François Gieres, Stefan Hohenegger, Olivier Piguet and Manfred Schweda. We consider a non-commutative U(1) gauge theory with an extension which was originally proposed by A. A. Slavnov [3, 4] in order to get rid of UV/IR mixing problems. Here we show, that the improved IR behaviour of this model is mainly due to the appearence of a linear vector supersymmetry.

  13. Fascioliasis Control: In Vivo and In Vitro Phytotherapy of Vector Snail to Kill Fasciola Larva

    PubMed Central

    Sunita, Kumari; Singh, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    Snail is one of the important components of an aquatic ecosystem, it acts as intermediate host of Fasciola species. Control of snail population below a certain threshold level is one of the important methods in the campaign to reduce the incidence of fascioliasis. Life cycle of the parasite can be interrupted by killing the snail or Fasciola larva redia and cercaria in the snail body. In vivo and in vitro toxicity of the plant products and their active component such as citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin, and allicin against larva of Fasciola in infected snail Lymnaea acuminata were tested. Mortality of larvae were observed at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 8 h, of treatment. In in vivo treatment, azadirachtin caused highest mortality in redia and cercaria larva (8 h, LC50 0.11, and 0.05 mg/L) whereas in in vitro condition allicin was highly toxic against redia and cercaria (8 h, LC50 0.01, and 0.009 mg/L). Toxicity of citral was lowest against redia and cercaria larva. PMID:22132306

  14. CR structures and twisting vacuum spacetimes with two Killing vectors and cosmological constant: type II and more special

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Finley, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Based on the CR formalism of algebraically special spacetimes by Hill, Lewandowski and Nurowski, we derive a nonlinear system of two real ODEs, of which the general solution determines a twisting type II (or more special) vacuum spacetime with two Killing vectors (commuting or not) and at most seven real parameters in addition to the cosmological constant Λ. To demonstrate a broad range of interesting spacetimes that these ODEs can capture, special solutions of various Petrov types are presented and described as they appear in this approach. They include Kerr-NUT, Kerr and Debney/Demiański’s type II, Lun’s types II and III (subclasses of Held-Robinson), MacCallum and Siklos’ type III (Λ < 0) and the type N solutions (Λ ≠ 0) we found in an earlier paper, along with a new class of type II solutions as a nontrivial limit of Kerr and Debney’s type II solutions. Also, we discuss a situation in which the two ODEs can be reduced to one. However, constructing the general solution still remains an open problem.

  15. Comparison of antibody response to a non-adjuvanted, live canarypox-vectored recombinant rabies vaccine and a killed, adjuvanted rabies vaccine in Eld's deer (Rucervus eldi thamin).

    PubMed

    Marrow, Judilee C; Padilla, Luis R; Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Bush, Mitch; Murray, Suzan

    2014-06-01

    Captive Eld's deer (Rucervus eldi thamin) were evaluated for the presence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies using a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition after vaccination with either a live canarypox-vectored recombinant rabies vaccine or a killed monovalent rabies vaccine. Twelve deer were vaccinated with 1.0 ml of killed, adjuvanted, monovalent rabies vaccine at 5-33 mo of age then annually thereafter, and 14 deer were vaccinated with 1.0 ml nonadjuvanted, live canarypox-vectored rabies vaccine at 3-15 mo of age then annually thereafter. Banked serum was available or collected prospectively from deer at 6 mo and 1 yr after initial vaccination, then collected annually. Rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies considered adequate (>0.5 IU/ml) were present in 20/34 samples vaccinated with canarypox-vectored rabies vaccine and in 12/14 samples vaccinated with killed adjuvanted rabies vaccine. Poor seroconversion was noted in deer less than 6 mo of age vaccinated with the canarypox-vectored rabies vaccine.

  16. Effective cancer cell killing by hydrophobic nanovoid-enhanced cavitation under safe low-energy ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-03-01

    β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD)-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids were prepared and used for effective cancer cell killing in synergistic combination with low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm(-2) , 1 MHz). The water-dispersible nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids can be taken up by cancer cells and subsequently evoke a remarkable cavitation effect under irradiation with mild low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm(-2) , 1 MHz). A significant cancer cell killing effect was observed in cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft tumor model treated with the nanoagents together with the low-energy ultrasound, showing a distinct dependence on the concentration of nanoagents and ultrasound intensity. By contrast, an antitumor effect was not observed when either low-energy ultrasound or nanoagents were applied alone. These findings are significant as the technique promises a safe, low-cost, and effective treatment for cancer therapy.

  17. Geographic origins and population genetics of bats killed at wind-energy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pylant, Cortney L; Nelson, David M; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gates, J Edward; Keller, Stephen R

    2016-07-01

    An unanticipated impact of wind-energy development has been large-scale mortality of insectivorous bats. In eastern North America, where mortality rates are among the highest in the world, the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) and the eastern red bat (L. borealis) comprise the majority of turbine-associated bat mortality. Both species are migratory tree bats with widespread distributions; however, little is known regarding the geographic origins of bats killed at wind-energy facilities or the diversity and population structure of affected species. We addressed these unknowns by measuring stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δ(2) H) and conducting population genetic analyses of bats killed at wind-energy facilities in the central Appalachian Mountains (USA) to determine the summering origins, effective size, structure, and temporal stability of populations. Our results indicate that ~1% of hoary bat mortalities and ~57% of red bat mortalities derive from non-local sources, with no relationship between the proportion of non-local bats and sex, location of mortality, or month of mortality. Additionally, our data indicate that hoary bats in our sample consist of an unstructured population with a small effective size (Ne ) and either a stable or declining history. Red bats also showed no evidence of population genetic structure, but in contrast to hoary bats, the diversity contained in our red bat samples is consistent with a much larger Ne that reflects a demographic expansion after a bottleneck. These results suggest that the impacts of mortality associated with intensive wind-energy development may affect bat species dissimilarly, with red bats potentially better able to absorb sustained mortality than hoary bats because of their larger Ne . Our results provide important baseline data and also illustrate the utility of stable isotopes and population genetics for monitoring bat populations affected by wind-energy development.

  18. A Plant Bacterial Pathogen Manipulates Its Insect Vector's Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj; Ebert, Timothy A; Rogers, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    Insect-transmitted plant-pathogenic bacteria may alter their vectors' fitness, survival, behavior, and metabolism. Because these pathogens interact with their vectors on the cellular and organismal levels, potential changes at the biochemical level might occur. "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. The genome of CLas revealed the presence of an ATP translocase that mediates the uptake of ATP and other nucleotides from medium to achieve its biological processes, such as growth and multiplication. Here, we showed that the levels of ATP and many other nucleotides were significantly higher in CLas-infected than healthy psyllids. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation for ATP synthase subunits, while ATPase enzyme activity showed a decrease in ATPase activity. These results indicated that CLas stimulated Diaphorina citri to produce more ATP and many other energetic nucleotides, while it may inhibit their consumption by the insect. As a result of ATP accumulation, the adenylated energy charge (AEC) increased and the AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP ratios decreased in CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. Survival analysis confirmed a shorter life span for CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. In addition, electropenetrography showed a significant reduction in total nonprobing time, salivation time, and time from the last E2 (phloem ingestion) to the end of recording, indicating that CLas-infected psyllids were at a higher hunger level and they tended to forage more often. This increased feeding activity reflects the CLas-induced energetic stress. In conclusion, CLas alters the energy metabolism of its psyllid vector, D. citri, in order to secure its need for energetic nucleotides.IMPORTANCE Insect transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria involves propagation and circulation of the bacteria within their vectors. The transmission process is complex and requires specific interactions at the molecular and biochemical

  19. A Plant Bacterial Pathogen Manipulates Its Insect Vector's Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hijaz, Faraj; Ebert, Timothy A.; Rogers, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insect-transmitted plant-pathogenic bacteria may alter their vectors' fitness, survival, behavior, and metabolism. Because these pathogens interact with their vectors on the cellular and organismal levels, potential changes at the biochemical level might occur. “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. The genome of CLas revealed the presence of an ATP translocase that mediates the uptake of ATP and other nucleotides from medium to achieve its biological processes, such as growth and multiplication. Here, we showed that the levels of ATP and many other nucleotides were significantly higher in CLas-infected than healthy psyllids. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation for ATP synthase subunits, while ATPase enzyme activity showed a decrease in ATPase activity. These results indicated that CLas stimulated Diaphorina citri to produce more ATP and many other energetic nucleotides, while it may inhibit their consumption by the insect. As a result of ATP accumulation, the adenylated energy charge (AEC) increased and the AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP ratios decreased in CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. Survival analysis confirmed a shorter life span for CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. In addition, electropenetrography showed a significant reduction in total nonprobing time, salivation time, and time from the last E2 (phloem ingestion) to the end of recording, indicating that CLas-infected psyllids were at a higher hunger level and they tended to forage more often. This increased feeding activity reflects the CLas-induced energetic stress. In conclusion, CLas alters the energy metabolism of its psyllid vector, D. citri, in order to secure its need for energetic nucleotides. IMPORTANCE Insect transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria involves propagation and circulation of the bacteria within their vectors. The transmission process is complex and requires specific interactions at the molecular

  20. Progress in directed energy control of vectors for microbes and other cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Vivekananda, Jeeva; Sloan, Mark A.; Stribling, Lucille J. V.

    2004-07-01

    Biosynthetic semiconductor, diazoluminomelanin (DALM), is a polymer of tyrosine, luminol, and nitrite. DALM has a very large cross section of absorption for light from ultraviolet to radio frequencies. This polymer can be made efficiently in a genetically engineered E.coli, JM109/pIC2ORNR1.1 (ATCC# 69905). We have been pursuing ways to couple electromagnetic radiation to vectors using this polymer. DNA capture elements (DCEs; formerly aptamers) have made this possible. We incorporated DCEs into the plasmid of this E. coli to direct binding to whatever microbe or cell desired and to produce DALM attached to the plasmid DNA. Using two other vectors pSV2neoNR101 or pSV2neoNR8005 (ATCC # 69617 and 69618, respectively), both propagated in the E. coli host HB101, we have also inserted genes necessary for DALM production into animal and human cell lines (mouse monocytic leukemia: ATCC # CRL- 11771, -11772, -1173, mouse mammary adenocarcinoma: ATCC# CRL-12184, -12185; and human carcinoma of the cervix: ATCC # CRL-12510). The DCE/DALM vectors can be used to tag target cells, detectable by broad-spectrum light absorbance, luminescence, or fluorescence. DCE/DALM can further be activated with light, microwave energy, or by oxidative chemistry to kill the targeted microbes or other cells.

  1. Description of dark energy and dark matter by vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    A simple Lagrangian (with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term) turned out an adequate tool for oscopic description of dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Space-like and time-like massive vector fields describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like field is attractive. It is responsible for the observed plateau in galaxy rotation curves. The time-like massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four-parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the Universe. In particular, the singular "big bang" turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with accelerated expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions (in the absence of vector fields). The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows analyzing the main properties of the dark sector analytically, avoiding unnecessary model assumptions.

  2. Killing tensors on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    We show that Killing tensors on conformally flat n-dimensional tori whose conformal factor only depends on one variable, are polynomials in the metric and in the Killing vector fields. In other words, every first integral of the geodesic flow polynomial in the momenta on the sphere bundle of such a torus is linear in the momenta.

  3. Defect energy of infinite-component vector spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Lee, L W; Young, A P

    2005-09-01

    We compute numerically the zero-temperature defect energy DeltaE of the vector spin glass in the limit of an infinite number of spin components m , for a range of dimensions 2< or d < or =5 . Fitting to DeltaE approximately L(theta) , where L is the system size, we obtain: theta similar to-1.54 (d=2) , theta similar to-1.04 (d=3) , theta similar to -0.67 (d=4) , and theta similar to -0.37 (d=5) . These results show that the lower critical dimension dl (the dimension where theta changes sign) is significantly higher for m=infinity than for finite m (where 2< dl <3 ).

  4. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  5. A comment on "bats killed in large numbers at United States wind energy facilities"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Dalthorp, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Widespread reports of bat fatalities caused by wind turbines have raised concerns about the impacts of wind power development. Reliable estimates of the total number killed and the potential effects on populations are needed, but it is crucial that they be based on sound data. In a recent BioScience article, Hayes (2013) estimated that over 600,000 bats were killed at wind turbines in the United States in 2012. The scientific errors in the analysis are numerous, with the two most serious being that the included sites constituted a convenience sample, not a representative sample, and that the individual site estimates are derived from such different methodologies that they are inherently not comparable. This estimate is almost certainly inaccurate, but whether the actual number is much smaller, much larger, or about the same is uncertain. An accurate estimate of total bat fatality is not currently possible, given the shortcomings of the available data.

  6. Neutralinos in vector boson fusion at high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Lin, Tongyan; Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-06-01

    Discovering dark matter at high-energy colliders continues to be a compelling and well-motivated possibility. Weakly interacting massive particles are a particularly interesting class in which the dark matter particles interact with the standard model weak gauge bosons. Neutralinos are a prototypical example that arise in supersymmetric models. In the limit where all other superpartners are decoupled, it is known that for relic density motivated masses, the rates for neutralinos are too small to be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but that they may be large enough to observe at 100 TeV. In this work we perform a careful study in the vector boson fusion channel for pure winos and pure Higgsinos. We find that given a systematic uncertainty of 1% (5%), with 3000 fb-1 , the LHC is sensitive to winos of 240 GeV (125 GeV) and Higgsinos of 125 GeV (55 GeV). A future 100 TeV collider would be sensitive to winos of 1.1 TeV (750 GeV) and Higgsinos of 530 GeV (180 GeV) with a 1% (5%) uncertainty, also with 3000 fb-1 .

  7. The Cry4B toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis kills Permethrin-resistant Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of malaria.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Griko, Natalya B; Bulla, Lee A

    2013-04-01

    Resurgence of malaria has been attributed, in part, to the development of resistance by Anopheles gambiae, a principal vector of the disease, to various insecticidal compounds such as Permethrin. Permethrin, a neurotoxicant, is widely used to impregnate mosquito nets. An alternative strategy to control mosquitoes is the use of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) because there is no observable resistance in the field to the bacterium. Bti kills mosquitoes by targeting cadherin molecules residing in the midgut epithelium of larvae of the insect. Cry proteins (Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry10A and Cry11A) produced by the bacterium during the sporulation phase of its life cycle bind to the cadherin molecules, which serve as receptors for the proteins. These Cry proteins have variable specificity to a variety of mosquitoes, including Culex and Aedes as well as Anopheles. Importantly, selective mosquitocidal action is occasioned by binding of the respective Cry toxins to cadherins distinctive to individual mosquito species. Differential fractionation of the four Cry proteins from a novel Bti isolate (M1) and cloning and expression of their genes in Escherichia coli revealed that Cry4B is the only Cry protein that exerts insecticidal action against An. gambiae. Indeed, it does so against a Permethrin-resistant strain of the mosquito. The other three Cry proteins are ineffective. Multiple sequence alignments of the four Cry proteins revealed a divergent sequence motif in the Cry4B toxin, which most likely determines binding of the toxin to its cognate receptor, BT-R3, in An. gambiae and to its specific toxicity. A model showing Cry4B toxin binding to BT-R3 is presented.

  8. Killing and preserving nematodes in soil samples with chemicals and microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Barker, K R; Gooding, G V; Elder, A S; Eplee, R E

    1972-04-01

    Three basic procedures for treating nematode-bearing soil samples for international shipment or from areas under quarantine were tested for their killing effect and recovery of nematodes by sugar flotation for diagnostic and advisory purposes. These were: fumigation with methyl bromide followed by storage at -15 C; microwave treatment (2450 MHz, 630 w, 2-5 min) followed by addition of FAA + picric acid or 5% Formalin; and adding chemical preservatives (FAA + picric acid, 5% Formalin, NAN, and 2-phenoxyethanol) directly to the soil. Larvae of Heterodera glycines in eggs within cysts were stimulated to hatch by 2-rain exposure to microwaves, and an exposure of 5 rain was required to kill them. Soil type and moisture significantly affected microwave effectiveness. Direct saturation of soil samples with preservative chemical solutions (FAA + picric acid or 5% Formalin) was most effective, and often increased the number of nematodes recovered. The high concentration (2%) of NaN a required for soil sterilization is too hazardous for routine work. NaN, therefore, is not recommended for this purpose.

  9. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious."…

  10. Duel between an ASAT with multiple-kill vehicles and a space-based weapons platform with kinetic-energy weapons. Final report, Oct 84-Dec 85

    SciTech Connect

    Cutchis, P.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model is described for a duel between a ground-based anti-satellite (ASAT) and a spaced-based weapons platform defending itself with kinetic energy weapons. The ASAT carries 1-6 kill vehicles and the space platform may first attack the ASAT booster with 1-3 defense missiles. If the ASAT kill vehicles collectively survive the boost phase, they are each subject to a post-boost phase attack consisting of 1-3 defense missiles. A formula for the probability of killing the space platform with a single ASAT launch is derived as a function of the vehicle reliabilities, target detection probabilities, kill probabilities, and number of participating vehicles. Formulas are also given for kill probabilities if the space platform defends itself with a high-energy laser or with both high-energy laser and defense missiles. Illustrative examples are calculated for the case in which the space platform is defended by defense missiles only. It is assumed that all offense and defense reliabilities, detection probabilities, and kill probabilities are equal to 0.90. A sensitivity analysis illustrates the effect of a variation in any one of the assumed parameters on the probability of killing the space platform when all other parameters are held equal to 0.90. It is shown that the survivability of the space platform is crucially dependent on a capability to destroy the ASAT booster before it can deploy its miniature kill vehicles. Improvement in parameter values above the 0.9 level, if shared equally by both the ASAT offense and space platform defense, will favor the platform defense.

  11. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  12. Mammalian cell killing by ultrasoft X rays and high-energy radiation: an extension of the MK model.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Roland B

    2006-08-01

    An alternate formulation of the microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is presented that applies to irradiation of mammalian cells with ultrasoft X rays as well as high-energy radiations of variable linear energy transfer (LET). Survival and DNA double-strand break measurements for V79 cells from the literature are examined to illustrate application of the model. It is demonstrated that the linear component of the linear-quadratic survival relationship (alpha) is enhanced because repairable potentially lethal lesions formed from a single ultrasoft X-ray energy deposition event, when closer on average than for a single high-energy radiation event, are more likely to combine to form a lethal lesion. The quadratic component (beta) of the linear-quadratic survival relationship is increased because the potentially lethal lesions formed by ultrasoft X rays are created with greater efficiency than those of high-energy radiation. In addition, potentially lethal lesions from very low-energy carbon K-shell X rays may be enriched in structural forms that favor combination to form lethal lesions instead of repair. These features account for the increased effectiveness of killing of V79 cells by ultrasoft X rays compared to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The importance of pairwise combination of potentially lethal lesions to form exchange chromosome aberrations that become lethal lesions is discussed. The extended MK model explains and reconciles differences between the MK model and the theory of dual radiation action on the one hand, and on the other, the view that variation in the RBE with radiation quality is explained by differences in energy deposition in nanometer- rather than micrometer-size volumes.

  13. Targeted Killings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    American territory in history. Two aircraft torpedoed into the Twin Towers in New York City at speeds of over 490mph killing 2,595 people . Shortly...bomb exploded in the World Trade Center in New York City, killing a half-dozen people and wounding over a thousand. Over the next three years Al...executed his most incredible attack killing close to 3,000 people . President Bush announced to the world that, “U.S. troops will hunt down terrorists and

  14. Lie algebra of conformal Killing-Yano forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-06-01

    We provide a generalization of the Lie algebra of conformal Killing vector fields to conformal Killing-Yano forms. A new Lie bracket for conformal Killing-Yano forms that corresponds to slightly modified Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of differential forms is proposed. We show that conformal Killing-Yano forms satisfy a graded Lie algebra in constant curvature manifolds. It is also proven that normal conformal Killing-Yano forms in Einstein manifolds also satisfy a graded Lie algebra. The constructed graded Lie algebras reduce to the graded Lie algebra of Killing-Yano forms and the Lie algebras of conformal Killing and Killing vector fields in special cases.

  15. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  16. Guided energy-minimizing model for segmentation of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binias, Bartosz

    2016-06-01

    Active contours or snakes, are a group of image segmentation methods based on the idea of energy-minimizng curves. In this paper classical snake model with added Balloon Force is modified, granting it the capability of performing object segmentation task on data with unlimited number of channels. Thanks to introduction of novel component, named the Guiding Energy, into the classical active contour energy functional, the method is now capable of focusing on the objects which posses a specified features provided to the model.

  17. Noether versus Killing symmetry of conformally flat Friedmann metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Kara, A. H.

    2007-12-01

    In a recent study Noether symmetries of some static spacetime metrics in comparison with Killing vectors of corresponding spacetimes were studied. It was shown that Noether symmetries provide additional conservation laws that are not given by Killing vectors. In an attempt to understand how Noether symmetries compare with conformal Killing vectors, we find the Noether symmetries of the flat Friedmann cosmological model. We show that the conformally transformed flat Friedman model admits additional conservation laws not given by the Killing or conformal Killing vectors. Inter alia, these additional conserved quantities provide a mechanism to twice reduce the geodesic equations via the associated Noether symmetries.

  18. Heavier ions with a different linear energy transfer spectrum kill more cells due to similar interference with the Ku-dependent DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-01

    Ionizing radiation kills cells mainly due to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). High-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation induces more cell death and generates a higher relative biological effect (RBE) than low-LET ionizing radiation (such as X or γ ray). Although it is known that interference with the Ku-dependent nonhomologous ending-joining (NHEJ) pathway appears to be the major cause of iron-ion- and carbon-ion-induced cell death, it remains unclear whether other ions with a similar or different LET and higher RBE in terms of cell killing are controlled in the same way. In this study, we compared the clonogenic survival frequency of Ku80+/+ (NHEJ-proficient) and Ku80-/- (NHEJ-deficient) cells after exposure to iron (175 keV/μm), silicon (75 keV/μm), oxygen (25 keV/μm) and X ray (low-LET). The results showed that Ku80-/- cells had the same RBE value of 1 for cell killing for all types of ionizing radiation, whereas Ku80+/+ cells had different RBE values for cell killing that depended on the specific type of ionizing radiation. The results indicate that the Ku-dependent NHEJ is the major repair pathway that heavier ions interfere with, resulting in higher RBE for cell killing. These results provide useful information for followup studies that will focus on improving high-LET protection or heavier ion radiotherapy in the near future.

  19. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  20. Using a new odour-baited device to explore options for luring and killing outdoor-biting malaria vectors: a report on design and field evaluation of the Mosquito Landing Box.

    PubMed

    Matowo, Nancy S; Moore, Jason; Mapua, Salum; Madumla, Edith P; Moshi, Irene R; Kaindoa, Emanuel W; Mwangungulu, Stephen P; Kavishe, Deogratius R; Sumaye, Robert D; Lwetoijera, Dickson W; Okumu, Fredros O

    2013-05-04

    Mosquitoes that bite people outdoors can sustain malaria transmission even where effective indoor interventions such as bednets or indoor residual spraying are already widely used. Outdoor tools may therefore complement current indoor measures and improve control. We developed and evaluated a prototype mosquito control device, the 'Mosquito Landing Box' (MLB), which is baited with human odours and treated with mosquitocidal agents. The findings are used to explore technical options and challenges relevant to luring and killing outdoor-biting malaria vectors in endemic settings. Field experiments were conducted in Tanzania to assess if wild host-seeking mosquitoes 1) visited the MLBs, 2) stayed long or left shortly after arrival at the device, 3) visited the devices at times when humans were also outdoors, and 4) could be killed by contaminants applied on the devices. Odours suctioned from volunteer-occupied tents were also evaluated as a potential low-cost bait, by comparing baited and unbaited MLBs. There were significantly more Anopheles arabiensis, An. funestus, Culex and Mansonia mosquitoes visiting baited MLB than unbaited controls (P≤0.028). Increasing sampling frequency from every 120 min to 60 and 30 min led to an increase in vector catches of up to 3.6 fold (P≤0.002), indicating that many mosquitoes visited the device but left shortly afterwards. Outdoor host-seeking activity of malaria vectors peaked between 7:30 and 10:30 pm, and between 4:30 and 6:00 am, matching durations when locals were also outdoors. Maximum mortality of mosquitoes visiting MLBs sprayed or painted with formulations of candidate mosquitocidal agent (pirimiphos-methyl) was 51%. Odours from volunteer occupied tents attracted significantly more mosquitoes to MLBs than controls (P<0.001). While odour-baited devices such as the MLBs clearly have potential against outdoor-biting mosquitoes in communities where LLINs are used, candidate contaminants must be those that are effective at

  1. Using a new odour-baited device to explore options for luring and killing outdoor-biting malaria vectors: a report on design and field evaluation of the Mosquito Landing Box

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes that bite people outdoors can sustain malaria transmission even where effective indoor interventions such as bednets or indoor residual spraying are already widely used. Outdoor tools may therefore complement current indoor measures and improve control. We developed and evaluated a prototype mosquito control device, the ‘Mosquito Landing Box’ (MLB), which is baited with human odours and treated with mosquitocidal agents. The findings are used to explore technical options and challenges relevant to luring and killing outdoor-biting malaria vectors in endemic settings. Methods Field experiments were conducted in Tanzania to assess if wild host-seeking mosquitoes 1) visited the MLBs, 2) stayed long or left shortly after arrival at the device, 3) visited the devices at times when humans were also outdoors, and 4) could be killed by contaminants applied on the devices. Odours suctioned from volunteer-occupied tents were also evaluated as a potential low-cost bait, by comparing baited and unbaited MLBs. Results There were significantly more Anopheles arabiensis, An. funestus, Culex and Mansonia mosquitoes visiting baited MLB than unbaited controls (P≤0.028). Increasing sampling frequency from every 120 min to 60 and 30 min led to an increase in vector catches of up to 3.6 fold (P≤0.002), indicating that many mosquitoes visited the device but left shortly afterwards. Outdoor host-seeking activity of malaria vectors peaked between 7:30 and 10:30pm, and between 4:30 and 6:00am, matching durations when locals were also outdoors. Maximum mortality of mosquitoes visiting MLBs sprayed or painted with formulations of candidate mosquitocidal agent (pirimiphos-methyl) was 51%. Odours from volunteer occupied tents attracted significantly more mosquitoes to MLBs than controls (P<0.001). Conclusion While odour-baited devices such as the MLBs clearly have potential against outdoor-biting mosquitoes in communities where LLINs are used, candidate

  2. Killing fetuses and killing newborns.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2013-05-01

    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot be harmed and because there are morally relevant differences between fetuses and newborns.

  3. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  4. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  5. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  6. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  7. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  8. On pseudosupersymmetric oscillators and reality of relativistic energies for vector mesons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckers, Jules; Debergh, Nathalie

    1995-01-01

    Specific oscillators - hereafter called pseudosupersymmetric oscillators - appear as interesting nonrelativistic concepts in connection with the study of relativistic vector mesons interacting with an external constant magnetic field when the real character of the energy eigenvalues is required as expected. A new pseudosupersymmetric quantum mechanics can then be developed and the corresponding pseudosupersymmetries can be pointed out.

  9. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  10. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  11. Can the Abraham Light Momentum and Energy in a Medium Constitute a Lorentz Four-Vector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbiao

    2013-08-01

    By analyzing the Einstein-box thought experiment with the principle of relativity, it is shown that Abraham's light momentum and energy in a medium cannot constitute a Lorentz four-vector, and they consequentially break global momentum and energy conservation laws. In contrast, Minkowski's momentum and energy always constitute a Lorentz four-vector no matter whether in a medium or in vacuum, and the Minkowski's momentum is the unique correct light momentum. A momentum-associated photon mass in a medium is exposed, which explains why only the Abraham's momentum is derived in the traditional "center-of-mass-energy" approach. The EM boundary-condition matching approach, combined with Einstein light-quantum hypothesis, is proposed to analyze this thought experiment, and it is found for the first time that only from Maxwell equations without resort to the relativity, the correctness of light momentum definitions cannot be identified. Optical pulling effect is studied as well.

  12. A novel single tetracycline-regulative adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax gene expression and cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Zhang, Lidong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Tongyu; Yin, Min; Xu, Kai; Ji, Lin; Roth, Jack A; Fang, Bingliang

    2002-07-18

    Using a binary adenoviral system, we recently showed that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter induces tumor-specific Bax gene expression. However, the strong cytotoxicity of Bax and other pro-apoptotic genes to packaging 293 cells has so far hindered construction of the desired single adenoviral vectors expressing toxic genes. We report here the construction of a single bicistronic adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax expression. The vector (Ad/gBax) utilizes the Tet-Off system and expresses a GFP/Bax fusion protein for easy detection. The hTERT promoter drives the expression of tTA, a transactivator capable of binding to TRE (tetracycline-responsive element) in the absence of tetracycline, which in turn induces expression of the GFP-Bax gene. The addition of tetracycline in 293 cells blocks the binding of tTA to TRE and substantially inhibits GFP-Bax expression and toxicity, thus allowing the packaging and production of Ad/gBax. Our data show that Ad/gBax could drive the high expression of GFP-Bax in tumor cells but not in normal cells and mouse tissues. Furthermore, the expression of GFP-Bax fusion protein elicited tumor-specific apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo at a level comparable to that induced by the binary system. Thus, Ad/gBax may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on the adaptive neuro-controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Karandeev, D.

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing evolution of the power system towards a Smart Grid implies an important role of intelligent technologies, but poses strict requirements on their control schemes to preserve stability and controllability. This paper presents the adaptive neuro-controller for the vector control of induction motor within Smart Gird. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on adaptive neuro-controller are verified by simulation results at different operating conditions over a wide speed range of induction motor.

  14. Vector dark energy models with quadratic terms in the Maxwell tensor derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghani, Zahra; Harko, Tiberiu; Sepangi, Hamid Reza; Shahidi, Shahab

    2017-03-01

    We consider a vector-tensor gravitational model with terms quadratic in the Maxwell tensor derivatives, called the Bopp-Podolsky term. The gravitational field equations of the model and the equations describing the evolution of the vector field are obtained and their Newtonian limit is investigated. The cosmological implications of a Bopp-Podolsky type dark energy term are investigated for a Bianchi type I homogeneous and anisotropic geometry for two models, corresponding to the absence and presence of the self-interacting potential of the field, respectively. The time evolutions of the Hubble function, of the matter energy density, of the shear scalar, of the mean anisotropy parameter, and of the deceleration parameter, respectively, as well as the field potentials are obtained for both cases by numerically integrating the cosmological evolution equations. In the presence of the vector type dark energy with quadratic terms in the Maxwell tensor derivatives, depending on the numerical values of the model parameters, the Bianchi type I Universe experiences a complex dynamical evolution, with the dust Universes ending in an isotropic phase. The presence of the self-interacting potential of the vector field significantly shortens the time interval necessary for the full isotropization of the Universe.

  15. Geotemporal vectors of coastal geomorphological change interacting with National Park Service management policy at Great Kills Park, Gateway National Recreation Area, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psuty, Norbert P.; Schmelz, William J.; Spahn, Andrea; Greenberg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The trend and episodes of erosion at Great Kills Park, part of the National Park Service, are products of the origin of the park's location and the impact of a negative sediment budget. Management response to the impacts of erosion is somewhat limited by National Park Service philosophy, but some options remain because the negative sediment budget is a product of barriers to sediment transport updrift of the Park. The erosional situation is exacerbated by an exposure of an antecedent backmarsh feature within the Park that is affecting the inshore pattern of incident waves. Recent monitoring data indicate planform conformity to an updrift log-spiral erosional bluff that extends downdrift to a site with beach and dune features. Despite a general net negative sediment budget in the profile, the dune feature is increasing in volume as it shifts inland, fitting models of foredune development. Seasonal monitoring of the topography records that storms cause a stepwise inland displacement of an updrift portion of the Park and a more linear displacement in the downdrift portion. Among the options consistent with management policy responding to the negative sediment budget issue is an opportunity to work within the scale of the small sediment transport cell and backpass sediment toward the updrift margin of the cell.

  16. High-energy feedback microwave thermotherapy and intraprostatic injections of mepivacaine and adrenaline: an evaluation of calculated cell kill accuracy and responder rate.

    PubMed

    Stenmark, Fredrik; Brudin, Lars; Stranne, Johan; Peeker, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cell kill accuracy and responder rate when using injections of intraprostatic mepivacaine and adrenaline (MA) before high-energy microwave thermotherapy (HE-TUMT). This retrospective evaluation encompassed 283 treatments in men with lower urinary tract symptoms or urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. They were treated consecutively during 2003-2008 using HE-TUMT with a feedback technique. Immediately before treatment, MA was administered into the prostate via a Schelin Catheter®. Clinical outcome was evaluated 3 months after treatment using a validated symptom score, transrectal ultrasound, peak urinary flow and postvoid residual. Systematic underestimation of the resulting coagulation necrosis was a consistent finding when using MA, a calculated cell kill of 21% yielding a volume reduction of 26% for prostate volumes less than 100 ml and 31% for prostate volumes greater than or equal to 100 ml. Mean prostate volume was 74 ml and mean treatment time was 13 min. Less than 1% of the patients needed analgesics or sedatives on demand. Analysis of the data showed an estimated clinical responder rate of approximately 87%. The resulting prostate volume reduction corresponds to the earlier empirically recommended 30% cell kill for CoreTherm® without MA. The treatment concept combining CoreTherm with intraprostatic injections of MA corresponds to the clinical outcome of thermotherapy without MA, with the benefits of reduced pain, shortened treatment time and decreased energy consumption.

  17. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  18. Mode specificity and product energy disposal in unimolecular reactions: insights from the sudden vector projection model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2014-04-03

    A simple model is proposed to predict mode specificity and product energy disposal in unimolecular dissociation reactions. This so-called Sudden Vector Projection (SVP) model quantifies the coupling of a reactant or product mode with the reaction coordinate at the transition state by projecting the corresponding normal mode vector onto the imaginary frequency mode at the saddle point. Due to the sudden assumption, SVP predictions for mode specificity are expected to be valid only when the reactant molecule has weak intermodal coupling. On the other hand, the sudden limit is generally satisfied for its predictions of product energy disposal in unimolecular reactions with a tight barrier. The SVP model is applied to several prototypical systems and the agreement with available experimental and theoretical results is satisfactory.

  19. Exploring energy loss by vector flow mapping in children with ventricular septal defect: Pathophysiologic significance.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takashi; Itatani, Keiichi; Takanashi, Manabu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Ando, Hisashi; Kimura, Sumito; Oka, Norihiko; Miyaji, Kagami; Ishii, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    Vector flow mapping is a novel echocardiographic flow visualization method, and it has enabled us to quantitatively evaluate the energy loss in the left ventricle (intraventricular energy loss). Although intraventricular energy loss is assumed to be a part of left ventricular workload itself, it is unclear what this parameter actually represents. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the characteristics of intraventricular energy loss. We enrolled 26 consecutive children with ventricular septal defect (VSD). On echocardiography vector flow mapping, intraventricular energy loss was measured in the apical 3-chamber view. We measured peak energy loss and averaged energy loss in the diastolic and systolic phases, and subsequently compared these parameters with catheterization parameters and serum brain natrium peptide (BNP) level. Diastolic, peak, and systolic energy loss were strongly and positively correlated with right ventricular systolic pressure (r=0.76, 0.68, and 0.56, p<0.0001, = 0.0001, and 0.0029, respectively) and right ventricular end diastolic pressure (r=0.55, 0.49, and 0.49, p=0.0038, 0.0120, and 0.0111, respectively). In addition, diastolic, peak, and systolic energy loss were significantly correlated with BNP (r=0.75, 0.69 and 0.49, p<0.0001, < 0.0001, and=0.0116, respectively). In children with VSD, elevated right ventricular pressure is one of the factors that increase energy loss in the left ventricle. The results of the present study encourage further studies in other study populations to elucidate the characteristics of intraventricular energy loss for its possible clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Performance and optimization of support vector machines in high-energy physics classification problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, M. Ö.; Krücker, D.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we promote the use of Support Vector Machines (SVM) as a machine learning tool for searches in high-energy physics. As an example for a new-physics search we discuss the popular case of Supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider. We demonstrate that the SVM is a valuable tool and show that an automated discovery-significance based optimization of the SVM hyper-parameters is a highly efficient way to prepare an SVM for such applications.

  1. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  2. Distinct roles of Ape1 protein, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, in high or low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A; Yu, David S; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-31

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Timelike Killing spinors in seven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2004-12-15

    We employ the G-structure formalism to study supersymmetric solutions of minimal and SU(2) gauged supergravities in seven dimensions admitting Killing spinors with an associated timelike Killing vector. The most general such Killing spinor defines a SU(3) structure. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a timelike Killing spinor on the bosonic fields of the theories, and find that such configurations generically preserve one out of 16 supersymmetries. Using our general supersymmetric ansatz we obtain numerous new solutions, including squashed or deformed anti-de Sitter solutions of the gauged theory, and a large class of Goedel-like solutions with closed timelike curves.

  4. Machine Learning Prediction of the Energy Gap of Graphene Nanoflakes Using Topological Autocorrelation Vectors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Abreu, Jose I; Shi, Hongqing; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-11-14

    The possibility of band gap engineering in graphene opens countless new opportunities for application in nanoelectronics. In this work, the energy gaps of 622 computationally optimized graphene nanoflakes were mapped to topological autocorrelation vectors using machine learning techniques. Machine learning modeling revealed that the most relevant correlations appear at topological distances in the range of 1 to 42 with prediction accuracy higher than 80%. The data-driven model can statistically discriminate between graphene nanoflakes with different energy gaps on the basis of their molecular topology.

  5. Fuzzy Integration of Support Vector Regression Models for Anticipatory Control of Complex Energy Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Agarwal, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory control systems are a class of systems whose decisions are based on predictions for the future state of the system under monitoring. Anticipation denotes intelligence and is an inherent property of humans that make decisions by projecting in future. Likewise, artificially intelligent systems equipped with predictive functions may be utilized for anticipating future states of complex systems, and therefore facilitate automated control decisions. Anticipatory control of complex energy systems is paramount to their normal and safe operation. In this paper a new intelligent methodology integrating fuzzy inference with support vector regression is introduced. Our proposed methodology implements an anticipatorymore » system aiming at controlling energy systems in a robust way. Initially a set of support vector regressors is adopted for making predictions over critical system parameters. Furthermore, the predicted values are fed into a two stage fuzzy inference system that makes decisions regarding the state of the energy system. The inference system integrates the individual predictions into a single one at its first stage, and outputs a decision together with a certainty factor computed at its second stage. The certainty factor is an index of the significance of the decision. The proposed anticipatory control system is tested on a real world set of data obtained from a complex energy system, describing the degradation of a turbine. Results exhibit the robustness of the proposed system in controlling complex energy systems.« less

  6. Fuzzy Integration of Support Vector Regression Models for Anticipatory Control of Complex Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Agarwal, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory control systems are a class of systems whose decisions are based on predictions for the future state of the system under monitoring. Anticipation denotes intelligence and is an inherent property of humans that make decisions by projecting in future. Likewise, artificially intelligent systems equipped with predictive functions may be utilized for anticipating future states of complex systems, and therefore facilitate automated control decisions. Anticipatory control of complex energy systems is paramount to their normal and safe operation. In this paper a new intelligent methodology integrating fuzzy inference with support vector regression is introduced. Our proposed methodology implements an anticipatory system aiming at controlling energy systems in a robust way. Initially a set of support vector regressors is adopted for making predictions over critical system parameters. Furthermore, the predicted values are fed into a two stage fuzzy inference system that makes decisions regarding the state of the energy system. The inference system integrates the individual predictions into a single one at its first stage, and outputs a decision together with a certainty factor computed at its second stage. The certainty factor is an index of the significance of the decision. The proposed anticipatory control system is tested on a real world set of data obtained from a complex energy system, describing the degradation of a turbine. Results exhibit the robustness of the proposed system in controlling complex energy systems.

  7. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  8. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  9. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  10. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  11. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  12. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  13. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  14. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  15. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  16. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  17. Using Support Vector Machine to Forecast Energy Usage of a Manhattan Skyscraper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R.; Boulanger, A.; Anderson, R.; Wu, L.

    2011-12-01

    As our society gains a better understanding of how humans have negatively impacted the environment, research related to reducing carbon emissions and overall energy consumption has become increasingly important. One of the simplest ways to reduce energy usage is by making current buildings less wasteful. By improving energy efficiency, this method of lowering our carbon footprint is particularly worthwhile because it actually reduces energy costs of operating the building, unlike many environmental initiatives that require large monetary investments. In order to improve the efficiency of the heating and air conditioning (HVAC) system of a Manhattan skyscraper, 345 Park Avenue, a predictive computer model was designed to forecast the amount of energy the building will consume. This model uses support vector machine (SVM), a method that builds a regression based purely on historical data of the building, requiring no knowledge of its size, heating and cooling methods, or any other physical properties. This pure dependence on historical data makes the model very easily applicable to different types of buildings with few model adjustments. The SVM model was built to predict a week of future energy usage based on past energy, temperature, and dew point temperature data. The predictive model closely approximated the actual values of energy usage for the spring and less closely for the winter. The prediction may be improved with additional historical data to help the model account for seasonal variability. This model is useful for creating a close approximation of future energy usage and predicting ways to diminish waste.

  18. A model for soft high-energy scattering: Tensor pomeron and vector odderon

    SciTech Connect

    Ewerz, Carlo; Maniatis, Markos

    2014-03-15

    A model for soft high-energy scattering is developed. The model is formulated in terms of effective propagators and vertices for the exchange objects: the pomeron, the odderon, and the reggeons. The vertices are required to respect standard rules of QFT. The propagators are constructed taking into account the crossing properties of amplitudes in QFT and the power-law ansätze from the Regge model. We propose to describe the pomeron as an effective spin 2 exchange. This tensor pomeron gives, at high energies, the same results for the pp and pp{sup -bar} elastic amplitudes as the standard Donnachie–Landshoff pomeron. But with our tensor pomeron it is much more natural to write down effective vertices of all kinds which respect the rules of QFT. This is particularly clear for the coupling of the pomeron to particles carrying spin, for instance vector mesons. We describe the odderon as an effective vector exchange. We emphasise that with a tensor pomeron and a vector odderon the corresponding charge-conjugation relations are automatically fulfilled. We compare the model to some experimental data, in particular to data for the total cross sections, in order to determine the model parameters. The model should provide a starting point for a general framework for describing soft high-energy reactions. It should give to experimentalists an easily manageable tool for calculating amplitudes for such reactions and for obtaining predictions which can be compared in detail with data. -- Highlights: •A general model for soft high-energy hadron scattering is developed. •The pomeron is described as effective tensor exchange. •Explicit expressions for effective reggeon–particle vertices are given. •Reggeon–particle and particle–particle vertices are related. •All vertices respect the standard C parity and crossing rules of QFT.

  19. Killing Sections and Sigma Models with Lie Algebroid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Andrew James

    2016-08-01

    We define and examine the notion of a Killing section of a Riemannian Lie algebroid as a natural generalisation of a Killing vector field. We show that the various expression for a vector field to be Killing naturally generalise to the setting of Lie algebroids. As an application we examine the internal symmetries of a class of sigma models for which the target space is a Riemannian Lie algebroid. Critical points of these sigma models are interpreted as generalised harmonic maps.

  20. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-15

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density p{sub a} of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5p{sub a}, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -16} dyn cm{sup -2}.

  2. Scalar and vector self-energies of heavy baryons in nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2017-04-01

    The in-medium sum rules are employed to calculate the shifts in the mass and residue as well as the scalar and vector self-energies of the heavy ΛQ ,ΣQ and ΞQ baryons, with Q being b or c quark. The maximum shift in mass due to nuclear matter belongs to the Σc baryon and it is found to be ΔmΣc = - 936 MeV. In the case of residue, it is obtained that the residue of Σb baryon is maximally affected by the nuclear medium with the shift ΔλΣb = - 0.014 GeV3. The scalar and vector self-energies are found to be ΣΛbS = 653 MeV, ΣΣbS = - 614 MeV, ΣΞbS = - 17 MeV, ΣΛcS = 272 MeV, ΣΣcS = - 936 MeV, ΣΞcS = - 5 MeV and ΣΛbν = 436 ± 148 MeV, ΣΣbν = 382 ± 129 MeV, ΣΞbν = 15 ± 5 MeV, ΣΛcν = 151 ± 45 MeV, ΣΣcν = 486 ± 144 MeV and ΣΞcν = 1.391 ± 0.529 MeV.

  3. Energy-momentum tensor renormalization for vector fields in Robertson-Walker backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, L.P.; Cossarini, A.E. )

    1990-05-15

    In this paper we generalize the Stueckelberg formalism of flat spacetime to describe vector fields propagating in a Robertson-Walker spatially flat background. In the zero-mass limit of the regularized energy-momentum tensor we recover the usual vacuum-polarization terms of the massless Maxwell theory. Further on we investigate particle creation and the renormalizability of the energy-momentum tensor expectation value in the vacuum state which minimizes the metric Hamiltonian. In the massive case we found that the last one corresponds to that obtained through the Higgs mechanism and that it is not renormalizable in general. In the massless case we found that both quantities are finite and are in agreement with those in the literature obtained by different regularization methods, the resulting vacuum being the standard conformal one.

  4. Triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting wind energy and as self-powered wind vector sensor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhu, Guang; Zhang, Hulin; Chen, Jun; Zhong, Xiandai; Lin, Zong-Hong; Su, Yuanjie; Bai, Peng; Wen, Xiaonan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-10-22

    We report a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that plays dual roles as a sustainable power source by harvesting wind energy and as a self-powered wind vector sensor system for wind speed and direction detection. By utilizing the wind-induced resonance vibration of a fluorinated ethylene-propylene film between two aluminum foils, the integrated TENGs with dimensions of 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 22 cm deliver an output voltage up to 100 V, an output current of 1.6 μA, and a corresponding output power of 0.16 mW under an external load of 100 MΩ, which can be used to directly light up tens of commercial light-emitting diodes. Furthermore, a self-powered wind vector sensor system has been developed based on the rationally designed TENGs, which is capable of detecting the wind direction and speed with a sensitivity of 0.09 μA/(m/s). This work greatly expands the applicability of TENGs as power sources for self-sustained electronics and also self-powered sensor systems for ambient wind detection.

  5. Towards photo-rechargeable textiles integrating power conversion and energy storage functions: can we kill two birds with one stone?

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Sun, Baoquan

    2013-03-01

    Wearable power supplies: Photo-rechargeable devices integrating power conversion and energy storage functions are useful for supplying power to portable electronics. A recent report introduces a facile method to fabricate flexible dual-functional devices on a single metal wire which paves the way for wearable fabric power supplies.

  6. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  7. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  8. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  9. Killing symmetry on the Finsler manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuka, Takayoshi; Yahagi, Ryoko; Ishida, Muneyuki

    2017-05-01

    Symmetry and conservation law are discussed on the Finsler manifold M. We adopt the point Finsler approach, where we consider the geometry on a point manifold M not on TM. Generalized vector fields are defined on oriented curves on M, and Finsler non-linear connections are considered on M, not on the tangent space TM. Killing vector fields K are defined as generalized vector fields as {{L}K}F=\\text{d}B , and the Killing symmetry is also reformulated simply as S{{K}\\flat}=0 by using the Killing 1-form {{K}\\flat} and the spray operator S defined by using the non-linear connection. {{K}\\flat} is related to the generalization of Killing tensors on the Finsler manifold, and our ansatz of {{K}\\flat} and S{{K}\\flat}=0 give an analytical method of finding higher derivative conserved quantities, which may be called hidden conserved quantities. We show two examples: the Carter constant on Kerr spacetime and the Runge-Lentz vectors in Newtonian gravity.

  10. An Energy Scaled and Expanded Vector-Based Forwarding Scheme for Industrial Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks with Sink Mobility.

    PubMed

    Wadud, Zahid; Hussain, Sajjad; Javaid, Nadeem; Bouk, Safdar Hussain; Alrajeh, Nabil; Alabed, Mohamad Souheil; Guizani, Nadra

    2017-09-30

    Industrial Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (IUASNs) come with intrinsic challenges like long propagation delay, small bandwidth, large energy consumption, three-dimensional deployment, and high deployment and battery replacement cost. Any routing strategy proposed for IUASN must take into account these constraints. The vector based forwarding schemes in literature forward data packets to sink using holding time and location information of the sender, forwarder, and sink nodes. Holding time suppresses data broadcasts; however, it fails to keep energy and delay fairness in the network. To achieve this, we propose an Energy Scaled and Expanded Vector-Based Forwarding (ESEVBF) scheme. ESEVBF uses the residual energy of the node to scale and vector pipeline distance ratio to expand the holding time. Resulting scaled and expanded holding time of all forwarding nodes has a significant difference to avoid multiple forwarding, which reduces energy consumption and energy balancing in the network. If a node has a minimum holding time among its neighbors, it shrinks the holding time and quickly forwards the data packets upstream. The performance of ESEVBF is analyzed through in network scenario with and without node mobility to ensure its effectiveness. Simulation results show that ESEVBF has low energy consumption, reduces forwarded data copies, and less end-to-end delay.

  11. Lipophilic triphenylphosphonium derivatives enhance radiation-induced cell killing via inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Sakai, Yuri; Bo, Tomoki; Nagane, Masaki; Nishimura, Eri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Inanami, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    It has recently been reported that radiation enhances mitochondrial energy metabolism in various tumor cell lines. To examine how this radiation-induced alteration in mitochondrial function influences tumor cell viability, various lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) cation derivatives and related compounds such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-oxy-piperidin (Tempol) with TPP(+) (named "Mito-") were designed to inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol (M10T) and its derivatives, Mito-(CH2)5-Tempol (M5T), Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol-Methyl (M10T-Me), Mito-C10H21 (M10), and C10H21-Tempol (10T), were prepared. In HeLa human cervical adenocarcinoma cells and A549 human lung carcinoma cells, the fractional uptake of the compound into mitochondria was highest among the TTP(+) analogs conjugated with Tempol (M10T, M5T, and 10T). M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 exhibited strong cytotoxicity and enhanced X-irradiation-induced reproductive cell death, while 10T and M5T did not. Furthermore, M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 decreased basal mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP. M10T treatment inhibited X-ray-induced increases in ATP production. These results indicate that the TPP cation and a long hydrocarbon linker are essential for radiosensitization of tumor cells. The reduction in intracellular ATP by lipophilic TPP(+) is partly responsible for the observed radiosensitization.

  12. N-body simulations with a cosmic vector for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Jiménez, Jose Beltrán.; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of a series of cosmological N-body simulations of a vector dark energy (VDE) model, performed using a suitably modified version of the publicly available GADGET-2 code. The set-ups of our simulations were calibrated pursuing a twofold aim: (1) to analyse the large-scale distribution of massive objects and (2) to determine the properties of halo structure in this different framework. We observe that structure formation is enhanced in VDE, since the mass function at high redshift is boosted up to a factor of 10 with respect to Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), possibly alleviating tensions with the observations of massive clusters at high redshifts and early reionization epoch. Significant differences can also be found for the value of the growth factor, which in VDE shows a completely different behaviour, and in the distribution of voids, which in this cosmology are on average smaller and less abundant. We further studied the structure of dark matter haloes more massive than 5 × 1013 h-1 M⊙, finding that no substantial difference emerges when comparing spin parameter, shape, triaxiality and profiles of structures evolved under different cosmological pictures. Nevertheless, minor differences can be found in the concentration-mass relation and the two-point correlation function, both showing different amplitudes and steeper slopes. Using an additional series of simulations of a ΛCDM scenario with the same ? and σ8 used in the VDE cosmology, we have been able to establish whether the modifications induced in the new cosmological picture were due to the particular nature of the dynamical dark energy or a straightforward consequence of the cosmological parameters. On large scales, the dynamical effects of the cosmic vector field can be seen in the peculiar evolution of the cluster number density function with redshift, in the shape of the mass function, in the distribution of voids and on the characteristic form of the growth index γ(z). On

  13. Null conformal Killing-Yano tensors and Birkhoff theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, Joan Josep; Sáez, Juan Antonio

    2016-04-01

    We study the space-times admitting a null conformal Killing-Yano tensor whose divergence defines a Killing vector. We analyze the similarities and differences with the recently studied non null case (Ferrando and Sáez in Gen Relativ Gravit 47:1911, 2015). The results by Barnes concerning the Birkhoff theorem for the case of null orbits are analyzed and generalized.

  14. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine...

  15. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine...

  16. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine...

  17. Automatic construction of statistical shape models using deformable simplex meshes with vector field convolution energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinke; Shi, Changfa

    2017-04-24

    In the active shape model framework, principal component analysis (PCA) based statistical shape models (SSMs) are widely employed to incorporate high-level a priori shape knowledge of the structure to be segmented to achieve robustness. A crucial component of building SSMs is to establish shape correspondence between all training shapes, which is a very challenging task, especially in three dimensions. We propose a novel mesh-to-volume registration based shape correspondence establishment method to improve the accuracy and reduce the computational cost. Specifically, we present a greedy algorithm based deformable simplex mesh that uses vector field convolution as the external energy. Furthermore, we develop an automatic shape initialization method by using a Gaussian mixture model based registration algorithm, to derive an initial shape that has high overlap with the object of interest, such that the deformable models can then evolve more locally. We apply the proposed deformable surface model to the application of femur statistical shape model construction to illustrate its accuracy and efficiency. Extensive experiments on ten femur CT scans show that the quality of the constructed femur shape models via the proposed method is much better than that of the classical spherical harmonics (SPHARM) method. Moreover, the proposed method achieves much higher computational efficiency than the SPHARM method. The experimental results suggest that our method can be employed for effective statistical shape model construction.

  18. Characterization of left ventricle energy loss in healthy adults using vector flow mapping: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Chao; Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Weihua; Ta, Shengjun; Zhao, Dan; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Liwen

    2017-05-01

    Energy loss (EL) is a new quantitative hemodynamic index based on vector flow mapping (VFM). This study aimed to characterize EL of the left ventricle (LV) in healthy adults. Fifty-one healthy adults were enrolled in this study. EL of LV was analyzed frame by frame using color Doppler images of a standard apical three-chamber dynamic view on an offline VFM workstation. The average EL of systole and diastole was calculated, and the results were averaged over three cardiac cycles. The average EL for systole and diastole was 11.07±5.82J/m/s and 11.58±5.54 J/m/s, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the aortic velocity time integral (AOVTI), A-wave peak velocity, and isovolumetric contraction time (IVCT) were independently associated with the average systolic EL. E-wave peak velocity, height, and IVCT were independently associated with the average diastolic EL. For females, the average systolic and diastolic EL was 12.66±7.06J/m/s and 13.90±5.37J/m/s, respectively. For males, the systolic and diastolic EL was 9.29±3.33J/m/s and 8.97±4.55J/m/s, respectively. Energy loss in LV changes regularly during the cardiac cycle. The average systolic EL has a high positive correlation with AOVTI, whereas the average diastolic EL has with E-wave peak velocity. Women have higher average EL than men in both systole and diastole. By recognizing the EL characterization of healthy adults, the variation in EL may reflect cardiac dysfunction. These were preliminary results, and thus, the clinical implications of EL warrant further investigation. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Assessment of Left Ventricular Dissipative Energy Loss by Vector Flow Mapping in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yue; Liu, Yanting; Wu, Ting; Song, Huizi; Chen, Zhongxiu; Zhu, Wei; Cai, Yuyan; Zhang, Wen; Bai, Wenjuan; Tang, Hong; Rao, Li

    2016-05-01

    Dissipative energy loss derived from vector flow mapping represents the viscous dissipation of turbulent blood flow. We aimed to determine the left ventricular (LV) energy loss in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients with ESRD and a preserved LV ejection fraction, who consisted of a group receiving peritoneal dialysis, a group receiving hemodialysis, and a group receiving preparation for dialysis initiation, were examined by echocardiography; a group of healthy control participants were examined as well. Vector flow mapping analysis was then performed from the apical 4-chamber view to calculate the energy loss during diastole and systole in the left ventricle. Conventional transthoracic echocardiography and LV energy loss calculations were successfully performed in 63 cases and 50 controls. The patients with ESRD had significantly higher diastolic energy loss [median (interquartile range), 71.73 (46.08-106.75) versus 23.32 (17.17-29.26) mW/m; P < .001] and higher systolic energy loss [25.28 (19.03-33.93) versus 12.52 (9.35-16.47) mW/m; P < .001]. A significant difference in diastolic energy loss between the peritoneal dialysis and preparation groups was found [54.92 (39.28-89.94) versus 84.82 (62.58-171.4) mW/m; P = .04]. In patients with ESRD, the log-transformed diastolic energy loss had a significant association with the peak early diastolic transmitral flow velocity (P = .011), peak early diastolic transmitral flow velocity-to-peak early diastolic mitral annular flow velocity ratio (P = .001), LV mass index (P = .017), and heart rate (P = .003). Impaired blood flow efficiency was detected in patients with ESRD by using dissipative energy loss derived from vector flow mapping. The energy loss value could be a novel parameter for evaluating the ventricular workload of uremic hearts in terms of fluid mechanics. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Hidden symmetries and Lie algebra structures from geometric and supergravity Killing spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açık, Özgür; Ertem, Ümit

    2016-08-01

    We consider geometric and supergravity Killing spinors and the spinor bilinears constructed out of them. The spinor bilinears of geometric Killing spinors correspond to the antisymmetric generalizations of Killing vector fields which are called Killing-Yano forms. They constitute a Lie superalgebra structure in constant curvature spacetimes. We show that the Dirac currents of geometric Killing spinors satisfy a Lie algebra structure up to a condition on 2-form spinor bilinears. We propose that the spinor bilinears of supergravity Killing spinors give way to different generalizations of Killing vector fields to higher degree forms. It is also shown that those supergravity Killing forms constitute a Lie algebra structure in six- and ten-dimensional cases. For five- and eleven-dimensional cases, the Lie algebra structure depends on an extra condition on supergravity Killing forms.

  1. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  2. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  3. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  4. Killing spinors as a characterisation of rotating black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael J.; Valiente Kroon, Juan A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the implications of the existence of Killing spinors in a spacetime. In particular, we show that in vacuum and electrovacuum a Killing spinor, along with some assumptions on the associated Killing vector in an asymptotic region, guarantees that the spacetime is locally isometric to the Kerr or Kerr-Newman solutions. We show that the characterisation of these spacetimes in terms of Killing spinors is an alternative expression of characterisation results of Mars (Kerr) and Wong (Kerr-Newman) involving restrictions on the Weyl curvature and matter content.

  5. Killing-Yano tensors of order n - 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The properties of a Killing-Yano tensor of order n-1 in an n-dimensional manifold are investigated. The integrability conditions are worked out and all metrics admitting a Killing-Yano tensor of order n-1 are found. A connection between such tensors and a generalization of the concept of angular momentum is pointed out. A theorem on how to generate closed conformal Killing vectors using the symmetries of a manifold is proved and used to find all Killing-Yano tensors of order n-1 of a maximally symmetric space.

  6. ASTROPHYSICS AND COSMOLOGY RELATED TO PARTICLES AND NUCLEI: Plasma neutrino energy loss due to the axial-vector current at the late stages of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Jing

    2009-10-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory, the plasma neutrino energy loss rates of vector and axial-vector contributions are studied. A ratable factor of the rates from the axial-vector current relative to those of the total neutrino energy loss rates is accurately calculated. The results show that the ratable factor will reach a maximum of 0.95 or even more at relatively higher temperature and lower density (such as ρ/μe < 107 g/cm3). Thus the rates of the axial-vector contribution cannot be neglected. On the other hand, the rates of the axial-vector contribution are on the order of ~0.01% of the total vector contribution, which is in good agreement with Itoh's at relatively high density (such as ρ/μe < 107 g/cm3) and a temperature of T <= 1011 K.

  7. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  8. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species.

  9. Report Bee Kills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA uses incident report data to help inform our pesticide regulatory decisions. Information from these reports helps us identify patterns of bee kills associated with the use of specific pesticides or active ingredients. Here's how to report incidents.

  10. An accurate density functional theory calculation for electronic excitation energies: the least-squares support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Sun, Shi-Ling; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hui; Li, Hong-Zhi; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-05-14

    Support vector machines (SVMs), as a novel type of learning machine, has been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce least-squares (LS) SVMs to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation with LS-SVM correction approach has been applied to evaluate the electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules. The newly introduced LS-SVM approach reduces the root-mean-square deviation of the calculated electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules from 0.32 to 0.11 eV for the B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculation. Thus, the LS-SVM correction on top of B3LYP/6-31G(d) is a better method to correct electronic excitation energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results which are impossible to obtain experimentally.

  11. The vector potential and stored energy of thin cosine (n{theta}) helical wiggler magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Expressions for pure multipole field components that are present in helical devices have been derived from a current distribution on the surface of an infinitely thin cylinder of radius R. The strength of such magnetic fields varies purely as a Fourier sinusoidal series of the longitudinal coordinate Z in proportion to cos(n{theta}- {omega}{sub m}z), where {omega}{sub m} = (2m-1){pi}/L, L denotes the half-period and m = 1, 2, 3 etc. As an alternative to describing such field components as given by the negative gradient of a scalar potential function (Appendix A), one of course can derive these same fields as the curle of a vector potential function {rvec A}--specifically one for which {nabla} {times} {nabla} {times} {rvec A} = 0 and {nabla}{center_dot}{rvec A} = 0. It is noted that we seek a divergence-free vector that exhibits continuity in any of its components across the interface r = R, a feature that is free of possible concern when applying Stokes` theorem in connection with this form of vector potential. Alternative simpler forms of vector potential, that individually are divergence-free in their respective regions (r < R and r > R), do not exhibit full continuity on r = R and whose curl evaluations provide in these respective regions the correct components of magnetic field are not considered here. Such alternative forms must differ merely by the gradient of scalar functions that with the divergence-free property are required to be ``harmonic`` ({nabla}{sup 2}{Psi} = 0).

  12. Objective research of auscultation signals in Traditional Chinese Medicine based on wavelet packet energy and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianjun; Shen, Xiaojing; Wang, Yiqin; Li, Fufeng; Xia, Chunming; Guo, Rui; Chen, Chunfeng; Shen, Qingwei

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at utilising Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm to make objective analysis and quantitative research for the auscultation in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnosis. First, Wavelet Packet Decomposition (WPD) at level 6 was employed to split more elaborate frequency bands of the auscultation signals. Then statistic analysis was made based on the extracted Wavelet Packet Energy (WPE) features from WPD coefficients. Furthermore, the pattern recognition was used to distinguish mixed subjects' statistical feature values of sample groups through SVM. Finally, the experimental results showed that the classification accuracies were at a high level.

  13. Input vector optimization of feed-forward neural networks for fitting ab initio potential-energy databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malshe, M.; Raff, L. M.; Hagan, M.; Bukkapatnam, S.; Komanduri, R.

    2010-05-01

    The variation in the fitting accuracy of neural networks (NNs) when used to fit databases comprising potential energies obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations is investigated as a function of the number and nature of the elements employed in the input vector to the NN. Ab initio databases for H2O2, HONO, Si5, and H2CCHBr were employed in the investigations. These systems were chosen so as to include four-, five-, and six-body systems containing first, second, third, and fourth row elements with a wide variety of chemical bonding and whose conformations cover a wide range of structures that occur under high-energy machining conditions and in chemical reactions involving cis-trans isomerizations, six different types of two-center bond ruptures, and two different three-center dissociation reactions. The ab initio databases for these systems were obtained using density functional theory/B3LYP, MP2, and MP4 methods with extended basis sets. A total of 31 input vectors were investigated. In each case, the elements of the input vector were chosen from interatomic distances, inverse powers of the interatomic distance, three-body angles, and dihedral angles. Both redundant and nonredundant input vectors were investigated. The results show that among all the input vectors investigated, the set employed in the Z-matrix specification of the molecular configurations in the electronic structure calculations gave the lowest NN fitting accuracy for both Si5 and vinyl bromide. The underlying reason for this result appears to be the discontinuity present in the dihedral angle for planar geometries. The use of trigometric functions of the angles as input elements produced significantly improved fitting accuracy as this choice eliminates the discontinuity. The most accurate fitting was obtained when the elements of the input vector were taken to have the form Rij-n, where the Rij are the interatomic distances. When the Levenberg-Marquardt procedure was modified

  14. Input vector optimization of feed-forward neural networks for fitting ab initio potential-energy databases.

    PubMed

    Malshe, M; Raff, L M; Hagan, M; Bukkapatnam, S; Komanduri, R

    2010-05-28

    The variation in the fitting accuracy of neural networks (NNs) when used to fit databases comprising potential energies obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations is investigated as a function of the number and nature of the elements employed in the input vector to the NN. Ab initio databases for H(2)O(2), HONO, Si(5), and H(2)C[Double Bond]CHBr were employed in the investigations. These systems were chosen so as to include four-, five-, and six-body systems containing first, second, third, and fourth row elements with a wide variety of chemical bonding and whose conformations cover a wide range of structures that occur under high-energy machining conditions and in chemical reactions involving cis-trans isomerizations, six different types of two-center bond ruptures, and two different three-center dissociation reactions. The ab initio databases for these systems were obtained using density functional theory/B3LYP, MP2, and MP4 methods with extended basis sets. A total of 31 input vectors were investigated. In each case, the elements of the input vector were chosen from interatomic distances, inverse powers of the interatomic distance, three-body angles, and dihedral angles. Both redundant and nonredundant input vectors were investigated. The results show that among all the input vectors investigated, the set employed in the Z-matrix specification of the molecular configurations in the electronic structure calculations gave the lowest NN fitting accuracy for both Si(5) and vinyl bromide. The underlying reason for this result appears to be the discontinuity present in the dihedral angle for planar geometries. The use of trigometric functions of the angles as input elements produced significantly improved fitting accuracy as this choice eliminates the discontinuity. The most accurate fitting was obtained when the elements of the input vector were taken to have the form R(ij) (-n), where the R(ij) are the interatomic distances. When the Levenberg

  15. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  16. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  17. Older women and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Canetto, S S; Hollenshead, J D

    Mercy killing is usually defined as intentional killing, often by family members or friends, with the stated intent to end perceived suffering. International evidence suggests that mercy killing typically involves an older man killing his ailing wife. In this study, we examined U.S. cases of mercy killing recorded by The Hemlock Society for the period 1960-1993. We found that the typical case involved an older woman being killed by a man, often her husband, with her poor health as the justification for the killing. A firearm was often used in these incidents. These patterns of mercy killing are consistent with patterns of homicide-suicide among older adults. Future research should seek to understand why women are typically the targets, and men the agents of mercy killing.

  18. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  19. Application of Artificial Neural Network and Support Vector Machines in Predicting Metabolizable Energy in Compound Feeds for Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In the nutrition literature, there are several reports on the use of artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) approaches for predicting feed composition and nutritive value, while the use of support vector machines (SVM) method as a new alternative approach to MLR and ANN models is still not fully investigated. The MLR, ANN, and SVM models were developed to predict metabolizable energy (ME) content of compound feeds for pigs based on the German energy evaluation system from analyzed contents of crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), crude fiber (CF), and starch. A total of 290 datasets from standardized digestibility studies with compound feeds was provided from several institutions and published papers, and ME was calculated thereon. Accuracy and precision of developed models were evaluated, given their produced prediction values. The results revealed that the developed ANN [R(2) = 0.95; root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.19 MJ/kg of dry matter] and SVM (R(2) = 0.95; RMSE = 0.21 MJ/kg of dry matter) models produced better prediction values in estimating ME in compound feed than those produced by conventional MLR (R(2) = 0.89; RMSE = 0.27 MJ/kg of dry matter). The developed ANN and SVM models produced better prediction values in estimating ME in compound feed than those produced by conventional MLR; however, there were not obvious differences between performance of ANN and SVM models. Thus, SVM model may also be considered as a promising tool for modeling the relationship between chemical composition and ME of compound feeds for pigs. To provide the readers and nutritionist with the easy and rapid tool, an Excel(®) calculator, namely, SVM_ME_pig, was created to predict the metabolizable energy values in compound feeds for pigs using developed support vector machine model.

  20. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Holten, J.-W. van; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2014-12-15

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

  1. Abnormal early diastolic intraventricular flow 'kinetic energy index' assessed by vector flow mapping in patients with elevated filling pressure.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Yoshie; Ishizu, Tomoko; Atsumi, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kawamura, Ryo; Seo, Yoshihiro; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2013-03-01

    Recently developed vector flow mapping (VFM) enables evaluation of local flow dynamics without angle dependency. This study used VFM to evaluate quantitatively the index of intraventricular haemodynamic kinetic energy in patients with left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and to compare those with normal subjects. We studied 25 patients with estimated high left atrial (LA) pressure (pseudonormal: PN group) and 36 normal subjects (control group). Left ventricle was divided into basal, mid, and apical segments. Intraventricular haemodynamic energy was evaluated in the dimension of speed, and it was defined as the kinetic energy index. We calculated this index and created time-energy index curves. The time interval from electrocardiogram (ECG) R wave to peak index was measured, and time differences of the peak index between basal and other segments were defined as ΔT-mid and ΔT-apex. In both groups, early diastolic peak kinetic energy index in mid and apical segments was significantly lower than that in the basal segment. Time to peak index did not differ in apex, mid, and basal segments in the control group but was significantly longer in the apex than that in the basal segment in the PN group. ΔT-mid and ΔT-apex were significantly larger in the PN group than the control group. Multiple regression analysis showed sphericity index, E/E' to be significant independent variables determining ΔT apex. Retarded apical kinetic energy fluid dynamics were detected using VFM and were closely associated with LV spherical remodelling in patients with high LA pressure.

  2. Vector meson backgrounds at high-energy e anti e machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1982-08-01

    This note presents cross sections for e anti e ..-->.. W/sup -/W/sup +/, ZZ, Z..gamma.. at high energies. The first of these is available in the LEP reports and elsewhere, but the remaining two seem to be unavailable. These cross-sections represent a background to potentially interesting physics on mass scales of order 1 TeV. They are large due to t channel lepton exchange diagrams.

  3. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  4. Vector-boson-tagged jet production in heavy ion collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan; Xing, Hongxi

    2017-07-01

    Vector-boson-tagged jet production in collisions of heavy nuclei opens new opportunities to study parton shower formation and propagation in strongly interacting matter. It has been argued to provide a golden channel that can constrain the energy loss of jets in the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion reactions. We present theoretical results for isolated-photon-tagged and Z0-boson-tagged jet production in Pb + Pb collisions with √{sN N}=5.02 TeV at the LHC. Specifically, we evaluate the transverse momentum imbalance xJV distribution and nuclear modification factor IAA of tagged jets and compare our theoretical calculations to recent experimental measurements by ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Our analysis, which includes both collisional and radiative energy losses, sheds light on their relative importance versus the strength of jet-medium interactions and helps quantify the amount of out-of-cone radiation of predominantly prompt quark-initiated jets.

  5. Medicalized killing in Auschwitz.

    PubMed

    Lifton, R J

    1982-11-01

    Since late 1977 I have been conducting a psychological study of medical behavior in Auschwitz, and of Nazi doctors in general. I have been especially interested in the relationship of doctors, SS doctors in particular, to the killing process--in the transformation from healer to killer. I am concerned with the importance of the medicalized pattern for the overall Nazi project of mass murder and have therefore tried to examine the interaction of biomedical ideology, political ideology, and individual behavior. Finally, the work raises questions of more general significance: for doctors and medicine elsewhere; for scientists, other professionals, and institutions of all kinds; for approaches to "triage" and control over life and death; and for our understanding of human nature and human values. After describing how I did the study, I will discuss what I call the Nazi "biomedical vision" and its relationship to the killing of mental patients as well as to Auschwitz. Next I will suggest features of the Auschwitz atmosphere, particularly in regard to the psychological factors, or mechanisms, that enabled the Nazi doctors to do what they did. Finally, I will turn very briefly to the more general problems raised by the study.

  6. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine...

  7. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207 Encephalomyelitis...

  8. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207 Encephalomyelitis...

  9. 9 CFR 113.207 - Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Western, and Venezuelan, Killed Virus. 113.207 Section 113.207 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.207 Encephalomyelitis...

  10. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.202 Section 113.202 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine...

  11. Acoustic energy density distribution and sound intensity vector field inside coupled spaces.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the modal expansion method supported by a computer implementation has been used to predict steady-state distributions of the potential and kinetic energy densities, and the active and reactive sound intensities inside two coupled enclosures. The numerical study was dedicated to low-frequency room responses. Calculation results have shown that the distribution of energetic quantities in coupled spaces is strongly influenced by the modal localization. Appropriate descriptors of the localization effect were introduced to identify localized modes. As was evidenced by numerical data, the characteristic objects in the active intensity field are vortices positioned irregularly inside the room. It was found that vortex centers lie exactly on the lines corresponding to zeros of the eigenfunction for a dominant mode. Finally, an impact of the wall impedance on the quantitative relationship between the active and reactive intensities was analyzed and it was concluded that for very small sound damping the behavior of the sound intensity inside the room space is essentially only oscillatory.

  12. How to kill creativity.

    PubMed

    Amabile, T M

    1998-01-01

    In today's knowledge economy, creativity is more important than ever. But many companies unwittingly employ managerial practices that kill it. How? By crushing their employees' intrinsic motivation--the strong internal desire to do something based on interests and passions. Managers don't kill creativity on purpose. Yet in the pursuit of productivity, efficiency, and control--all worthy business imperatives--they undermine creativity. It doesn't have to be that way, says Teresa Amabile. Business imperatives can comfortably coexist with creativity. But managers will have to change their thinking first. Specifically, managers will need to understand that creativity has three parts: expertise, the ability to think flexibly and imaginatively, and motivation. Managers can influence the first two, but doing so is costly and slow. It would be far more effective to increase employees' intrinsic motivation. To that end, managers have five levers to pull: the amount of challenge they give employees, the degree of freedom they grant around process, the way they design work groups, the level of encouragement they give, and the nature of organizational support. Take challenge as an example. Intrinsic motivation is high when employees feel challenged but not overwhelmed by their work. The task for managers, therefore, becomes matching people to the right assignments. Consider also freedom. Intrinsic motivation--and thus creativity--soars when managers let people decide how to achieve goals, not what goals to achieve. Managers can make a difference when it comes to employee creativity. The result can be truly innovative companies in which creativity doesn't just survive but actually thrives.

  13. Kill operation requires thorough analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-15

    Full control of a blowout well requires a properly designed post-capping kill operation because failures in regaining well control usually occur during the kill operation, not during capping. Capping (the installation of pressure control or diverter equipment on the wellhead) is generally very reliable in gaining control of a blowout well. The following techniques are some of the viable means of killing blowout wells once the capping assemblies are in place: direct shut in of the flow; bullheading; momentum kill; volumetric control for migration of fluids or lubrication after migration ceases; and dynamic kills (friction-based dynamic kills or mass flow rate kills) The objective of most post-capping operations is to stop the flow and put the well under hydrostatic control. The means of killing a blowout once capping assemblies are in place should be chosen with care to avoid problems such as cratering, equipment failure, and underground blowouts. The particular circumstances and well integrity will dictate which kill method will be the most viable. Each of these five methods are explained.

  14. Does smoking really kill anybody?

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1995-12-01

    Statements that so many people are killed by smoking use the term "kill" in a very unusual manner which is easily misunderstood by people not expert in epidemiology. In addition, the usual calculations leave out of account the fact that smoking interacts synergistically with other risk factors, so that it is a combination of risk factors rather than any specific one that is likely to have a causal influence on mortality. Strictly speaking it is quite inappropriate to state that smoking kills anybody, if we use the term "kill" in a meaningful fashion.

  15. Computationally efficient approach for the minimization of volume constrained vector-valued Ginzburg-Landau energy functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Rouhollah

    2015-08-01

    The minimization of volume constrained vector-valued Ginzburg-Landau energy functional is considered in the present study. It has many applications in computational science and engineering, like the conservative phase separation in multiphase systems (such as the spinodal decomposition), phase coarsening in multiphase systems, color image segmentation and optimal space partitioning. A computationally efficient algorithm is presented to solve the space discretized form of the original optimization problem. The algorithm is based on the constrained nonmonotone L2 gradient flow of Ginzburg-Landau functional followed by a regularization step, which is resulted from the Tikhonov regularization term added to the objective functional, that lifts the solution from the L2 function space into H1 space. The regularization step not only improves the convergence rate of the presented algorithm, but also increases its stability bound. The step-size selection based on the Barzilai-Borwein approach is adapted to improve the convergence rate of the introduced algorithm. The success and performance of the presented approach is demonstrated throughout several numerical experiments. To make it possible to reproduce the results presented in this work, the MATLAB implementation of the presented algorithm is provided as the supplementary material.

  16. Rotating Killing horizons in generic F( R) gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2016-10-01

    We discuss various properties of rotating Killing horizons in generic F( R) theories of gravity in dimension four for spacetimes endowed with two commuting Killing vector fields. Assuming there is no curvature singularity anywhere on or outside the horizon, we construct a suitable (3+1)-foliation. We show that similar to Einstein's gravity, we must have T_{ab}k^ak^b=0 on the Killing horizon, where k^a is a null geodesic tangent to the horizon. For axisymmetric spacetimes, the effective gravitational coupling ˜ F'^{-1}(R) should usually depend upon the polar coordinate and hence need not necessarily be a constant on the Killing horizon. We prove that the surface gravity of such a Killing horizon must be a constant, irrespective of whether F'(R) is a constant there or not. We next apply these results to investigate some further basic features. In particular, we show that any hairy solution for the real massive vector field in such theories is clearly ruled out, as long as the potential of the scalar field generated in the corresponding Einstein's frame is a positive definite quantity.

  17. Measurements of wind vectors, eddy momentum transports, and energy conversions in Jupiter's atmosphere from Voyager 1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, R. F.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Hunt, G. E.; Muller, J.-P.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager 1 narrow-angle images were used to obtain displacements of features down to 100 to 200 km in size over intervals of 10 hours. A global map of velocity vectors and longitudinally averaged zonal wind vectors as functions of the latitude, is presented and discussed

  18. Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields and energy flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields in stationary spacetime. > Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the electomagnetic field tensor. > Energy-momentum in terms of eigenvectors and Killing vector. > Explicit form of reference frame with vanishing Poynting vector. > Application of formalism to Bessel beams. - Abstract: The algebraic structures of a general electromagnetic field and its energy-momentum tensor in a stationary space-time are analyzed. The explicit form of the reference frame in which the energy of the field appears at rest is obtained in terms of the eigenvectors of the electromagnetic tensor and the existing Killing vector. The case of a stationary electromagnetic field is also studied and a comparison is made with the standard short-wave approximation. The results can be applied to the general case of a structured light beams, in flat or curved spaces. Bessel beams are worked out as example.

  19. Mass killings and detection of impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Digby J.

    1988-01-01

    Highly energetic bolide impacts occur and their flux is known. For larger bodies the energy release is greater than for any other short-term global phenomenon. Such impacts produce or release a large variety of shock induced changes including major atmospheric, sedimentologic, seismic and volcanic events. These events must necessarily leave a variety of records in the stratigraphic column, including mass killings resulting in major changes in population density and reduction or extinction of many taxonomic groups, followed by characteristic patterns of faunal and flora replacement. Of these effects, mass killings, marked by large-scale loss of biomass, are the most easily detected evidence in the field but must be manifest on a near-global scale. Such mass killings that appear to be approximately synchronous and involve disappearance of biomass at a bedding plane in many sedimentologically independent sections globally suggest a common cause and probable synchroneity. Mass killings identify an horizon which may be examined for evidence of cause. Geochemical markers may be ephemeral and absence may not be significant. There appears to be no reason why ongoing phenomena such as climate and sea-level changes are primary causes of anomolous episodic events.

  20. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  1. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  2. First integrals of motion in a gauge covariant framework, Killing-Maxwell system and quantum anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinescu, M.

    2012-10-15

    Hidden symmetries in a covariant Hamiltonian framework are investigated. The special role of the Stackel-Killing and Killing-Yano tensors is pointed out. The covariant phase-space is extended to include external gauge fields and scalar potentials. We investigate the possibility for a higher-order symmetry to survive when the electromagnetic interactions are taken into account. Aconcrete realization of this possibility is given by the Killing-Maxwell system. The classical conserved quantities do not generally transfer to the quantized systems producing quantum gravitational anomalies. As a rule the conformal extension of the Killing vectors and tensors does not produce symmetry operators for the Klein-Gordon operator.

  3. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  4. Symmetries of second-order PDEs and conformal Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamparlis, Michael; Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2015-06-01

    We study the Lie point symmetries of a general class of partial differential equations (PDE) of second order. An equation from this class naturally defines a second-order symmetric tensor (metric). In the case the PDE is linear on the first derivatives we show that the Lie point symmetries are given by the conformal algebra of the metric modulo a constraint involving the linear part of the PDE. Important elements in this class are the Klein-Gordon equation and the Laplace equation. We apply the general results and determine the Lie point symmetries of these equations in various general classes of Riemannian spaces. Finally we study the type II hidden symmetries of the wave equation in a Riemannian space with a Lorenzian metric.

  5. The Calabi complex and Killing sheaf cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2017-03-01

    It has recently been noticed that the degeneracies of the Poisson bracket of linearized gravity on constant curvature Lorentzian manifold can be described in terms of the cohomologies of a certain complex of differential operators. This complex was first introduced by Calabi and its cohomology is known to be isomorphic to that of the (locally constant) sheaf of Killing vectors. We review the structure of the Calabi complex in a novel way, with explicit calculations based on representation theory of GL(n) , and also some tools for studying its cohomology in terms of locally constant sheaves. We also conjecture how these tools would adapt to linearized gravity on other backgrounds and to other gauge theories. The presentation includes explicit formulas for the differential operators in the Calabi complex, arguments for its local exactness, discussion of generalized Poincaré duality, methods of computing the cohomology of locally constant sheaves, and example calculations of Killing sheaf cohomologies of some black hole and cosmological Lorentzian manifolds.

  6. Energy conservation for dynamical black holes.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sean A

    2004-12-17

    An energy conservation law is described, expressing the increase in mass-energy of a general black hole in terms of the energy densities of the infalling matter and gravitational radiation. This first law of black-hole dynamics describes how a black hole grows and is regular in the limit where it ceases to grow. An effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor is obtained, providing measures of both ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation on and near a black hole. Corresponding energy-tensor forms of the first law involve a preferred time vector which plays the role of a stationary Killing vector. Identifying an energy flux, vanishing if and only if the horizon is null, allows a division into energy supply and work terms. The energy supply can be expressed in terms of area increase and a newly defined surface gravity, yielding a Gibbs-like equation.

  7. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Husak, D N

    1979-01-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  8. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible.

  9. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Selective killing of nonreplicating mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-03-13

    Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease.

  11. Rapid detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi in mosquito vectors (Diptera: Culicidae) using a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer multiplex PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2009-01-01

    We developed a single-step real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) merged with melting curve analysis for the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi DNA in blood-fed mosquitoes. Real-time FRET multiplex PCR is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid of amplicons generated from two families of repeated DNA elements: the 188 bp SspI repeated sequence, specific to W. bancrofti, and the 153-bp HhaI repeated sequence, specific to the genus Brugia and two pairs of specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Both W. bancrofti and B. malayi can be differentially detected in infected vectors by this process through their different fluorescence channel and melting temperatures. The assay could distinguish both human filarial DNAs in infected vectors from the DNAs of Dirofilaria immitis- and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human red blood cells and noninfected mosquitoes and human leukocytes. The technique showed 100% sensitivity and specificity and offers a rapid and reliable procedure for differentially identifying lymphatic filariasis. The introduced real-time FRET multiplex PCR can reduce labor time and reagent costs and is not prone to carry over contamination. The test can be used to screen mosquito vectors in endemic areas and therefore should be a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of infection rate of the mosquito populations and for xenomonitoring in the community after eradication programs such as the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis.

  12. Single vector boson production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2005-01-01

    The cross sections for single vector boson production in the Weν and Zee channels are measured from the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP for centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209  GeV. These data correspond to a total integratedluminosity of 683 pb-1. Single-W production is studied in both hadronic and leptonic decay channels. Hadronic and dimuon decays are used for single-Z production. The measured cross sections agree with the Standard Model predictions.

  13. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1) The...

  14. Poynting-vector filter

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R [Tracy, CA

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  15. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  16. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  17. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  18. Secondary Kill Effect of Deltamethrin on Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    MALONEY, KATHLEEN M.; ANCCA-JUAREZ, JENNY; SALAZAR, RENZO; BORRINI-MAYORI, KATTY; PAMO-TITO, DANITZA; KEATING, JOSEPH A.; LEVY, MICHAEL Z.

    2012-01-01

    Control of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, relies on the application of pyrethroid insecticides, especially deltamethrin. We performed laboratory studies to determine whether a T. infestans nymph that comes into contact with a deltamethrin-treated surface horizontally transfers the insecticide to subsequent triatomines. We found that a triatomine that walks on a deltamethrin-treated surface for a short period of time has the ability to transport the insecticide in concentrations sufficient to kill other triatomines with which it comes into contact. The effect was limited to high-density environments, and mortality as a result of secondary exposure was greater among second-instar nymphs compared with fifth-instar nymphs. Our results suggest that deltamethrin could be killing triatomines through both direct and indirect contact, although it remains unclear whether the phenomenon occurs in natural conditions. PMID:21845956

  19. Women who kill their mates.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Dominique; Gagné, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Spousal homicide perpetrators are much more likely to be men than women. Accordingly, little research has focused on delineating characteristics of women who have committed spousal homicide. A retrospective clinical review of coroners' files containing all cases of spousal homicide occurring in Quebec over a 20-year period was carried out. A total of 276 spousal homicides occurred between 1991 and 2010, with 42 homicides by female spouses and 234 homicides by male spouses. Differences between homicides committed by female offenders and male offenders are discussed, and findings on spousal homicide committed by women are compared with those of previous studies. Findings regarding offenses perpetrated by females in the context of mental illness, domestic violence, and homicide-suicide are explored. The finding that only 28% of the female offenders in the Quebec sample had previously been subjected to violence by their victim is in contrast to the popular belief and reports that indicate that most female-perpetrated spousal homicide occurs in self-defense or in reaction to long-term abuse. In fact, women rarely gave a warning before killing their mates. Most did not suffer from a mental illness, although one-fifth were acutely intoxicated at the time of the killing. In the vast majority of cases of women who killed their mates, there were very few indicators that might have signaled the risk and helped predict the violent lethal behavior. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  1. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  2. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  3. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  4. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  5. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  6. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  7. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  8. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  9. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  10. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  11. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  12. Dissipative energy loss within the left ventricle detected by vector flow mapping in children: Normal values and effects of age and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taiyu; Itatani, Keiichi; Inuzuka, Ryo; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Shindo, Takahiro; Hirata, Yoichiro; Miyaji, Kagami

    2015-11-01

    Vector flow mapping (VFM) is a novel echocardiographic technology which enables visualization of the intraventricular flow velocity vector. Dissipative energy loss (EL) derived from the velocity vector field of intraventricular blood flow is considered to reflect the efficiency of blood flow, and could be an indicator of left ventricular function. We aimed to determine the reference values of the EL derived from VFM within the left ventricle. VFM analysis was performed using echocardiography in 64 healthy children. The velocity vector fields of the intra-left ventricular blood flow were obtained from the apical 5-chamber view, and the EL values during systole and diastole were calculated. The measurements were averaged over three cardiac cycles, and indexed to body surface area (BSA). The mean subject age was 6.8±4.3 years. The mean EL was 4.10±2.35mW/m/m(2) BSA during systole and 16.24±11.63mW/m/m(2) BSA during diastole. On multivariate analysis, age and heart rate (HR) were independent predictors of systolic EL, whereas age, HR, and E wave peak velocity were independent predictors of diastolic EL. The regression equations used to predict the BSA-indexed systolic and diastolic EL were as follows: log10 (systolic EL)=-0.0332-0.00213×age (months)+0.00789×HR (beats/min) (adjusted R(2), 0.833; p<0.0001); and log10 (diastolic EL)=0.277-0.00346×age (months)+0.00570×HR (beats/min)+0.00564×E wave peak velocity (cm/s) (adjusted R(2), 0.867; p<0.0001). The systolic and diastolic EL were positively correlated with HR and negatively correlated with age. Moreover, the diastolic EL was positively correlated with the E wave peak velocity. The present study provides reference values for the systolic and diastolic EL that can be used in future studies examining patients with heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. TDA and RPA pseudoscalar and vector solutions for the low energy regime of a motivated QCD Hamiltonian.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yépez-Martínez, T.; Amor Quiroz, D. A.; Hess, P. O.; Civitarese, O.

    2017-07-01

    We present the low energy meson spectrum of a Coulomb gauge QCD motivated Hamiltonian for light and strange quarks. We have used the harmonic oscillator as a trial basis and performed a pre-diagonalization of the kinetic energy term in order to get an effective basis where quark and anti-quark degrees of freedom are defined. For the relevant interactions between quarks and anti-quarks, we have implemented a confining interaction between color sources, in order to account in an effective way for the gluonic degrees of freedom. The low energy meson spectrum is obtained from the implementation of the TDA and RPA many-body-methods. The physical states have been described as TDA and RPA collective states with a relatively good agreement. Particularly, the particle-hole correlations of the RPA ground state improve the RPA pion-like state (159.7 MeV) close to its physical value while the TDA one remains at a higher energy (269.2 MeV).

  14. Killing(-Yano) tensors in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    We construct the Killing(-Yano) tensors for a large class of charged black holes in higher dimensions and study general properties of such tensors, in particular, their behavior under string dualities. Killing(-Yano) tensors encode the symmetries beyond isometries, which lead to insights into dynamics of particles and fields on a given geometry by providing a set of conserved quantities. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the Killing tensor, we provide a prescription for constructing several conserved quantities starting from a single object, and we demonstrate that Killing tensors in higher dimensions are always associated with ellipsoidal coordinates. We also determine the transformations of the Killing(-Yano) tensors under string dualities, and find the unique modification of the Killing-Yano equation consistent with these symmetries. These results are used to construct the explicit form of the Killing(-Yano) tensors for the Myers-Perry black hole in arbitrary number of dimensions and for its charged version.

  15. Harmonic vector fields on pseudo-Riemannian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friswell, R. M.; Wood, C. M.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of harmonic vector fields on Riemannian manifolds is generalised to pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. The congruence structure of conformal gradient fields on pseudo-Riemannian hyperquadrics and Killing fields on pseudo-Riemannian quadrics is elucidated, and harmonic vector fields of these two types are classified up to congruence. A para-Kähler twisted anti-isometry is used to correlate harmonic vector fields on the quadrics of neutral signature.

  16. f(R)-gravity from Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2016-04-01

    We consider f(R)-gravity in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with zero spatial curvature. We apply the Killing tensors of the minisuperspace in order to specify the functional form of f(R) and for the field equations to be invariant under Lie-Bäcklund transformations, which are linear in momentum (contact symmetries). Consequently, the field equations to admit quadratic conservation laws given by Noether’s theorem. We find three new integrable f(R)-models, for which, with the application of the conservation laws, we reduce the field equations to a system of two first-order ordinary differential equations. For each model we study the evolution of the cosmological fluid. We find that for each integrable model the cosmological fluid has an equation of state parameter, in which there is linear behavior in terms of the scale factor which describes the Chevallier, Polarski and Linder parametric dark energy model.

  17. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.215 Section 113.215 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD...

  18. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.215 Section 113.215 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD...

  19. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.215 Section 113.215 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD...

  20. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  1. Letting die and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Narbekovas, Andrius; Meilius, Kazimieras

    2003-01-01

    We are all called to make moral decisions, not only about preserving life and health, but also about accepting our death and dying. There are situations, when it is morally right, and indeed obligatory, to allow a dying person to die in peace and dignity. But there is a world of difference between allowing a peaceful death, and deliberately setting out to bring death of the person either by acts of commission (s.c. 'active euthanasia'), or by acts of omission (s.c. 'passive euthanasia'). The word "killing" seems proper for euthanasia, because "to kill" does mean " to intentionally cause the death of someone." It can be morally acceptable to withhold or withdraw a treatment precisely because it is reasonably judged as inefficacious (futile), or excessively burdensome for the patient. One's reason for withholding such treatment must not be a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the patient's life, but a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the treatment, which is futile or burdensome.

  2. Euthanasia: killing as due care?

    PubMed

    Oduncu, Fuat S

    2003-01-01

    On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will be exempted from criminal liability provided they satisfy the so-called 'due care criteria'. However, in medical history euthanasia has never been part of the medical duty of care. Instead, the goals of medicine have always been the relief of pain and suffering. The current article provides insights into the Dutch, Belgian and Oregon euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide practices and reflects upon some central medical and legal documents on the regulation of euthanasia and the provision of palliative care. Modern palliative care includes both the delivery of competent palliative skills and a virtuous attitude of compassionate caring about the terminally ill patient as an autonomous person. Here, the author rejects killing as due care and proposes a novel concept of 'RAHME' (Aramaic: compassion, love, mercy), which calls for a holistically oriented concept where physicians act as companions to the terminally ill and dying patients.

  3. Vector carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.

    1995-03-22

    Previous papers have described a general method for visualizing vector fields that involves drawing many small ``glyphs`` to represent the field. This paper shows how to improve the speed of the algorithm by utilizing hardware support for line drawing and extends the technique from regular to unstructured grids. The new approach can be used to visualize vector fields at arbitrary surfaces within regular and unstructured grids. Applications of the algorithm include interactive visualization of transient electromagnetic fields and visualization of velocity fields in fluid flow problems.

  4. Universal properties from a local geometric structure of a Killing horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-ichirou

    2007-06-01

    We consider universal properties that arise from a local geometric structure of a Killing horizon, and analyse whether such universal properties give rise to degeneracy of classical configurations. We first introduce a non-perturbative definition of such a local geometric structure, which we call an asymptotic Killing horizon. It is then shown that infinitely many asymptotic Killing horizons reside on a common null hypersurface, once there exists one asymptotic Killing horizon, which is thus considered as degeneracy. In order to see how this degeneracy is physically meaningful, we analyse also the acceleration of the orbits of the vector that generates an asymptotic Killing horizon. It is shown that there exists the diff(S1) or diff(R1) sub-algebra on an asymptotic Killing horizon universally, which is picked out naturally, based on the behaviour of the acceleration. We argue that the discrepancy between string theory and the Euclidean approach in the entropy of an extreme black hole may be resolved, if the microscopic states responsible for black hole thermodynamics are connected with asymptotic Killing horizons.

  5. Ricci collineation vectors in fluid space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Tsamparlis, M. ); Mason, D.P. )

    1990-07-01

    The properties of fluid space-times that admit a Ricci collineation vector (RCV) parallel to the fluid unit four-velocity vector {ital u}{sup {ital a}} are briefly reviewed. These properties are expressed in terms of the kinematic quantities of the timelike congruence generated by {ital u}{sup {ital a}}. The cubic equation derived by Oliver and Davis (Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare {bold 30}, 339 (1979)) for the equation of state {ital p}={ital p}({mu}) of a perfect fluid space-time that admits an RCV, which does not degenerate to a Killing vector, is solved for physically realistic fluids. Necessary and sufficient conditions for a fluid space-time to admit a spacelike RCV parallel to a unit vector {ital n}{sup {ital a}} orthogonal to {ital u}{sup {ital a}} are derived in terms of the expansion, shear, and rotation of the spacelike congruence generated by {ital n}{sup {ital a}}. Perfect fluid space-times are studied in detail and analogues of the results for timelike RCVs parallel to {ital u}{sup {ital a}} are obtained. Properties of imperfect fluid space-times for which the energy flux vector {ital q}{sup {ital a}} vanishes and {ital n}{sup {ital a}} is a spacelike eigenvector of the anisotropic stress tensor {pi}{sub {ital ab}} are derived. Fluid space-times with anisotropic pressure are discussed as a special case of imperfect fluid space-times for which {ital n}{sup {ital a}} is an eigenvector of {pi}{sub {ital ab}}.

  6. Multiplexed tracking of protease activity using a single color of quantum dot vector and a time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer relay.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Malanoski, Anthony P; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Hildebrandt, Niko; Medintz, Igor L

    2012-11-20

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive probes for optical sensing and imaging due to their unique photophysical attributes and nanoscale size. In particular, the development of assays and biosensors based on QDs and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) continues to be a prominent focus of research. Here, we demonstrate the application of QDs as simultaneous donors and acceptors in a time-gated FRET relay for the multiplexed detection of protease activity. In contrast to the current state-of-the-art, which uses multiple colors of QDs, multiplexing was achieved using only a single color of QD. The other constituents of the FRET relay, a luminescent terbium complex and fluorescent dye, were assembled to QDs via peptides that were selected as substrates for the model proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin. Loss of prompt FRET between the QD and dye signaled the activity of chymotrypsin; loss of time-gated FRET between the terbium and QD signaled the activity of trypsin. We applied the FRET relay in a series of quantitative, real-time kinetic assays of increasing biochemical complexity, including multiplexed sensing, measuring inhibition in a multiplexed format, and tracking the proteolytic activation of an inactive pro-protease to its active form in a coupled, multienzyme system. These capabilities were derived from a ratiometric analysis of the two FRET pathways in the relay and permitted extraction of initial reaction rates, enzyme specificity constants, and apparent inhibition constants. This work adds to the growing body of research on multifunctional nanoparticles and introduces multiplexed sensing as a novel capability for a single nanoparticle vector. Furthermore, the ability to track both enzymes within a coupled biological system using one vector represents a significant advancement for nanoparticle-based biosensing. Prospective applications in biochemical research, applied diagnostics, and drug discovery are discussed.

  7. Conformal vectors and stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjonjo, A. M.; Maharaj, S. D.; Moopanar, S.

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between conformal symmetries and relativistic spheres in astrophysics is studied. We use the nonvanishing components of the Weyl tensor to classify the conformal symmetries in static spherical spacetimes. It is possible to find an explicit connection between the two gravitational potentials for both conformally flat and nonconformally flat cases. We show that the conformal Killing vector admits time dependence in terms of quadratic, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. The Einstein and Einstein-Maxwell field equations can be written in terms of a single potential, any choice of which leads to an exact solution. Previous results of conformally invariant static spheres are contained in our treatment.

  8. Blocking transmission of vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Schorderet-Weber, Sandra; Noack, Sandra; Selzer, Paul M; Kaminsky, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Vector-borne diseases are responsible for significant health problems in humans, as well as in companion and farm animals. Killing the vectors with ectoparasitic drugs before they have the opportunity to pass on their pathogens could be the ideal way to prevent vector borne diseases. Blocking of transmission might work when transmission is delayed during blood meal, as often happens in ticks. The recently described systemic isoxazolines have been shown to successfully prevent disease transmission under conditions of delayed pathogen transfer. However, if the pathogen is transmitted immediately at bite as it is the case with most insects, blocking transmission becomes only possible if ectoparasiticides prevent the vector from landing on or, at least, from biting the host. Chemical entities exhibiting repellent activity in addition to fast killing, like pyrethroids, could prevent pathogen transmission even in cases of immediate transfer. Successful blocking depends on effective action in the context of the extremely diverse life-cycles of vectors and vector-borne pathogens of medical and veterinary importance which are summarized in this review. This complexity leads to important parameters to consider for ectoparasiticide research and when considering the ideal drug profile for preventing disease transmission.

  9. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  10. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  11. Thrust-vectored differential turns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Cliff, E. M.; Lefton, L.

    1980-01-01

    Barrier surface construction in the joint space of the differential turning game for thrust-vectored vs. conventional aircraft is discussed. Differential-turn studies are based on modifications of existing computer programs including an energy-turn program, and one which generates hodograph data. Optimal turning flight in energy approximation is discussed for the conventional aircraft configurations. It is concluded that any advantages realized from thrust-vectoring are minor, unless hover is possible, where advantages would be major at low energies, and affect tactics at high energies as well.

  12. Serum factors responsible for killing of Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Reed, W. P.; Albright, Elizabeth L.

    1974-01-01

    Eight strains of Shigella were tested for susceptibility to killing by seven normal human sera. Although there was a wide range of susceptibility between strains of bacteria, there was surprisingly little difference in the killing activity of individual sera and no relationship between antibody titres and killing capacity. Bacteriolysis required small amounts of antibody, but as little as 0.02 mg of a 19S fraction from normal serum restored full killing capacity to 1 ml of antibody depleted serum. Neither 11S IgA nor Cohn fraction II restored the bacteriolytic ability. Both the early reacting complement sequence and the alternate C3 activating pathway appeared to participate in killing as indicated by the roles of C2 and C3PA. Killing occurred, but with reduced efficiency, when either of the two substances was missing. However, serum lacking both C2 and C3PA could no longer kill Shigella. Killing also required the presence of C3, and presumably some of the later components of complement are subsequently involved. PMID:4846468

  13. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  14. Puzzling cases about killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Favor, C D

    1996-01-01

    Discussions of euthanasia often appeal to the distinction between killing people and letting them die. Favor asks whether this distinction is morally important--in particular, whether killing is worse than merely letting someone die, even when the motivations and consequences are the same. She explores our moral intuitions via a discussion of various subtly different hypothetical examples.

  15. Killing and letting die: a defensible distinction.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, W

    1996-04-01

    The distinction between killing and letting die is investigated and clarified. It is then argued that in most cases, though not in all, it is worse to kill than to let die. In euthanasia the significance of the distinction is diminished, but still important.

  16. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  17. Killing, letting die, and simple conflicts.

    PubMed

    Malm, H M

    1989-01-01

    Proponents of the moral equivalence of killing and letting die argue that in cases of simple conflict, where one agent must either perform a positive act and kill one person, or not perform that act and allow another person to die, the agent's alternatives are clearly morally equivalent. Malm rejects this view in a three part essay. He argues that in cases of simple conflict, the acts of killing and letting die are morally different, and that killing is not in itself worse than letting die. Malm considers and rejects the suggestion that the agent should decide randomly between the two alternatives. He concludes that while simple conflict cases require us to recognize a morally significant difference between killing and letting die, they do not require us to recognize a morally significant difference between acting and refraining.

  18. Antibacterial surface design - Contact kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Liu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Designing antibacterial surfaces has become extremely important to minimize Healthcare Associated Infections which are a major cause of mortality worldwide. A previous biocide-releasing approach is based on leaching of encapsulated biocides such as silver and triclosan which exerts negative impacts on the environment and potentially contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. This drawback of leachable compounds led to the shift of interest towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach: contact-killing surfaces. Biocides that can be bound onto surfaces to give the substrates contact-active antibacterial activity include quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), quaternary phosphoniums (QPs), carbon nanotubes, antibacterial peptides, and N-chloramines. Among the above, QACs and N-chloramines are the most researched contact-active biocides. We review the engineering of contact-active surfaces using QACs or N-chloramines, the modes of actions as well as the test methods. The charge-density threshold of cationic surfaces for desired antibacterial efficacy and attempts to combine various biocides for the generation of new contact-active surfaces are discussed in detail. Surface positive charge density is identified as a key parameter to define antibacterial efficacy. We expect that this research field will continue to attract more research interest in view of the potential impact of self-disinfective surfaces on healthcare-associated infections, food safety and corrosion/fouling resistance required on industrial surfaces such as oil pipes and ship hulls.

  19. Choke and kill control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, R.E.

    1988-08-02

    A control system is described for a choke and kill safety valve for use in a well conduit, in which the valve indicates a housing having a bore therethrough, a sleeve telescopically movable in the housing about the bore, a valve closure member positioned in the housing and connected to the sleeve and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube longitudinally movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means between the sleeve and the flow tube for biasing the flow tube in a direction for causing the valve closure member to move the closed position, releasable latch means between the sleeve and the flow tube initially holding the flow tube in position holding the valve closure member in the open position, a biased piston and cylinder assembly initially engaging the releasable latch and holding the latch engaged, the assembly being exposed on one side to pressure in the housing, and the housing and the sleeve including openings which when aligned by movement of the sleeve by well pressure allows fluid to be inserted into the bore from the outside of the housing.

  20. The Plasmodium bottleneck: malaria parasite losses in the mosquito vector

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Nearly one million people are killed every year by the malaria parasite Plasmodium. Although the disease-causing forms of the parasite exist only in the human blood, mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the obligate vector for transmission. Here, we review the parasite life cycle in the vector and highlight the human and mosquito contributions that limit malaria parasite development in the mosquito host. We address parasite killing in its mosquito host and bottlenecks in parasite numbers that might guide intervention strategies to prevent transmission. PMID:25185005

  1. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  2. Vector fields in multidimensional cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    2011-09-01

    Vector fields in the expanding Universe are considered within the multidimensional theory of general relativity. Vector fields in general relativity form a three-parametric variety. Our consideration includes the fields with a nonzero covariant divergence. Depending on the relations between the particular parameters and the symmetry of a problem, the vector fields can be longitudinal and/or transverse, ultrarelativistic (i.e. massless) or nonrelativistic (massive), and so on. The longitudinal and transverse vector fields are considered separately in detail in the background of the de Sitter cosmological metric. In most cases the field equations reduce to Bessel equations, and their temporal evolution is analyzed analytically. The energy-momentum tensor of the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector fields enters the Einstein equations as an additive to the cosmological constant. In this case the de Sitter metric is the exact solution of the Einstein equations. Hence, the most simple zero-mass longitudinal vector field pretends to be an adequate tool for macroscopic description of dark energy as a source of the expansion of the Universe at a constant rate. The zero-mass vector field does not vanish in the process of expansion. On the contrary, massive fields vanish with time. Though their amplitude is falling down, the massive fields make the expansion accelerated.

  3. On Potential Vorticity Flux Vectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Peter R.; Schmidli, Jürg; Schär, Christoph

    2003-12-01

    Dynamical, rather than kinematical, considerations indicate that a generalized potential vorticity in terms of the gradient of an arbitrary scalar function requires that the potential vorticity flux vector contain a contribution due to gravity and the pressure gradient force. It is shown that such a potential vorticity flux vector has a simpler definition in terms of the gradient of the kinetic energy rather than that of a Bernoulli function. This result is valid for multicomponent fluids. Flux vectors for a salty ocean and a moist atmosphere with hydrometeors are presented.

  4. Tri-Axial Dynamic Acceleration as a Proxy for Animal Energy Expenditure; Should We Be Summing Values or Calculating the Vector?

    PubMed Central

    Qasem, Lama; Cardew, Antonia; Wilson, Alexis; Griffiths, Iwan; Halsey, Lewis G.; Shepard, Emily L. C.; Gleiss, Adrian C.; Wilson, Rory

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic body acceleration (DBA) has been used as a proxy for energy expenditure in logger-equipped animals, with researchers summing the acceleration (overall dynamic body acceleration - ODBA) from the three orthogonal axes of devices. The vector of the dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA) may be a better proxy so this study compared ODBA and VeDBA as proxies for rate of oxygen consumption using humans and 6 other species. Twenty-one humans on a treadmill ran at different speeds while equipped with two loggers, one in a straight orientation and the other skewed, while rate of oxygen consumption () was recorded. Similar data were obtained from animals but using only one (straight) logger. In humans, both ODBA and VeDBA were good proxies for with all r2 values exceeding 0.88, although ODBA accounted for slightly but significantly more of the variation in than did VeDBA (P<0.03). There were no significant differences between ODBA and VeDBA in terms of the change in estimated by the acceleration data in a simulated situation of the logger being mounted straight but then becoming skewed (P = 0.744). In the animal study, ODBA and VeDBA were again good proxies for with all r2 values exceeding 0.70 although, again, ODBA accounted for slightly, but significantly, more of the variation in than did VeDBA (P<0.03). The simultaneous contraction of muscles, inserted variously for limb stability, may produce muscle oxygen use that at least partially equates with summing components to derive DBA. Thus, a vectorial summation to derive DBA cannot be assumed to be the more ‘correct’ calculation. However, although within the limitations of our simple study, ODBA appears a marginally better proxy for . In the unusual situation where researchers are unable to guarantee at least reasonably consistent device orientation, they should use VeDBA as a proxy for . PMID:22363576

  5. Energy loss in the left ventricle obtained by vector flow mapping as a new quantitative measure of severity of aortic regurgitation: a combined experimental and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Stugaard, Marie; Koriyama, Hikaru; Katsuki, Keiko; Masuda, Kasumi; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Takeda, Yasuharu; Sakata, Yasushi; Itatani, Keiichi; Nakatani, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    In aortic regurgitation (AR), energy loss (EL) produced by inefficient turbulent flow may be a burden to the heart predicting decompensation. We attempted to quantify EL in AR induced in an acute dog model and in patients with chronic AR using novel echocardiographic method vector flow mapping (VFM). In 11 anaesthetized open-chest dogs, AR was induced by distorting the aortic valve with a pigtail catheter, in totally 20 cases. Regurgitant fraction was determined using pulsed Doppler echocardiography, <30% considered mild to moderate (Group 1, n = 11) and ≥30% moderate to severe (Group 2, n = 9). The clinical study consisted of 22 patients with various degrees of AR; 11 mild to moderate (Group 1) and 11 moderate to severe (Group 2), and compared with 12 normals. VFM is based on continuity equation applied to colour Doppler and speckle tracking velocities, acquired from apical long-axis image. EL was calculated frame by frame, averaged from three beats. In the dog study, diastolic EL increased significantly with severity of AR (baseline vs. Group 1 vs. Group 2: 3.8 ± 1.6 vs. 13.0 ± 5.0 vs. 22.4 ± 14.0 [J/(m s)], ANOVA P = 0.0001). Similar to dogs, diastolic EL also increased in humans by the severity of AR (control vs. Group 1 vs. Group 2: 2.8 ± 1.5 vs. 14.3 ± 11.5 vs. 18.6 ± 2.3 [J/(m s)], ANOVA P = 0.001). VFM provides a promising method to quantify diastolic EL in AR. Diastolic EL increases in AR proportional to its severity. EL may be useful to determine the severity of disease from the aspect of cardiac load. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  7. Acts and omissions, killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1986-01-11

    Gillon asks what, if any, moral importance resides in the distinction between killing and letting die in the context of medical care. He considers and rejects the acts and omissions doctrine, which claims that actions (killing) resulting in some undesirable end are in general morally worse than failures to act (allowing to die) that have the same result. He also refutes the argument that the moral distinction between killing and letting die is one of harming versus benefitting, and that a physician has a responsibility not to harm (kill) a patient but no duty to help (keep alive). Gillon concludes by discussing the moral claims upon which the Roman Catholic rejection of the acts and omissions doctrine is based, which are the subjects of his next British Medical Journal article on medical ethics.

  8. Is killing no worse than letting die?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, W

    1995-01-01

    Those who wish to refute the view that it is worse to kill than to let die sometimes produce examples of cases in which an agent lets someone die but would be generally agreed to be no less reprehensible than if he had killed. It is argued that the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine.

  9. Killing and letting die: hidden value assumptions.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G

    1983-01-01

    In this paper I argue for several related theses: first, that the distinction between killing and letting die, as it is drawn by ordinary persons in ordinary contexts, is more complex than is generally understood; second, that the key feature of this complexity lies in the presence of a hidden normative component in what appears to be a straightforwardly descriptive distinction; and, third, that this complexity renders the killing/letting die distinction an inadequate and hazardous guide for moral reasoning.

  10. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  11. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  12. On the killing of mycobacteria by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jordao, Luisa; Bleck, Christopher K E; Mayorga, Luis; Griffiths, Gareth; Anes, Elsa

    2008-02-01

    Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria are internalized into macrophage phagosomes. Whereas the non-pathogenic types are invariably killed by all macrophages, the pathogens generally survive and grow. Here, we addressed the survival, production of nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and intracellular trafficking of the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen-like, BCG and the pathogenic M. bovis in different mouse, human and bovine macrophages. The bacteriocidal effects of RNI were restricted for all bacterial species to the early stages of infection. EM analysis showed clearly that all the mycobacteria remained within phagosomes even at late times of infection. The fraction of BCG and M. bovis found in mature phagolysosomes rarely exceeded 10% of total, irrespective of whether bacteria were growing, latent or being killed, with little correlation between the extent of phagosome maturation and the degree of killing. Theoretical modelling of our data identified two different potential sets of explanations that are consistent with our results. The model we favour is one in which a small but significant fraction of BCG is killed in an early phagosome, then maturation of a small fraction of phagosomes with both live and killed bacteria, followed by extremely rapid killing and digestion of the bacteria in phago-lysosomes.

  13. Topically Applied AaeIAP1 Double-Stranded RNA Kills Female Adults of Aedes aegypti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT , RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Topically Applied AaeIAP1 Double-Stranded RNA Kills Female Adults of Aedes aegypti JULIA W...Armed Forces Pest Management Board. References Cited Aitken, T. H., W. G. Downs, and R. E. Shope. 1977. Aedes aegypti strain Þtness for yellow fever...virus transmission. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 26: 985Ð989. Ambrosini, G., C. Adida , and D. C. Altieri. 1997. A novel anti-apoptosis gene, survivin

  14. Optimal choices of reference for a quasilocal energy: Spherically symmetric spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming-Fan; Chen, Chiang-Mei; Liu, Jian-Liang; Nester, James M.

    2011-10-15

    For a given timelike displacement vector, the covariant Hamiltonian quasilocal energy expression requires a proper choice of reference spacetime. We propose a program for determining the reference by embedding a neighborhood of the two-sphere boundary in the dynamic spacetime into a Minkowski reference, so that the two-sphere is embedded isometrically, and then extremizing the energy to determine the embedding variables. Applying this idea to Schwarzschild spacetime, we found that for each given future timelike displacement vector our program gives a unique energy value. The static observer measures the maximal energy. Applied to the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetime, we find that the maximum energy value is non-negative; the associated displacement vector is the unit dual mean curvature vector; and the expansion of the two-sphere boundary matches that of its reference image. For these spherically symmetric cases the reference determined by our program is equivalent to isometrically matching the geometry at the two-sphere boundary and taking the displacement vector to be orthogonal to the spacelike constant coordinate time hypersurface, like the timelike Killing vector of the Minkowski reference.

  15. Vectors, viscin, and Viscaceae: mistletoes as parasites, mutualists, and resources.

    Treesearch

    Juliann E. Aukema

    2003-01-01

    Mistletoes are aerial, hemiparasitic plants found on trees throughout the world. They have unique ecological arrangements with the host plants they parasitize and the birds that disperse their seeds. Similar in many respects to vector-borne macroparasites, mistletoes are often detrimental to their hosts, and can even kill them. Coevolution has led to resistance...

  16. Oral, Slow-Release Ivermectin: Biting Back at Malaria Vectors.

    PubMed

    Chaccour, Carlos J; Rabinovich, N Regina

    2017-03-01

    Bellinger and colleagues offer an elegant twist for a promising new tool against malaria. This formulation is designed to release ivermectin, a mosquito-killing drug for 10 days after a single oral dose. This could reduce the vector population and serve as a complementary tool for malaria elimination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integration of long-term fish kill data with ambient water quality monitoring data and application to water quality management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trim, Alan H.; Marcus, James M.

    1990-05-01

    Almost half (354) of all fish kills (805) in South Carolina, USA, between 1978 and 1988 occurred in the coastal zone. These kills were analyzed for causative, spatial, and temporal associations as a distinct data set and as one integrated with ambient water quality monitoring data. Estuarine kills as a result of natural causes accounted for 42.8% followed by man-induced (35.1%) and undetermined causes (22.1%). Although general pesticide usage was responsible for 53.9% of man-induced kills, weed control activities around resorts and municipal areas accounted for slightly more kills (20.9%) than did agricultural (19.8%) or vector control (13.2%) uses. A dramatic decline in agricultural-related kills has been observed since 1986 as the integrated pest management approach was adopted by many farmers. When taken with the few kills (12.0%) resulting from wastewaters, this suggests that these two land-use activities have been successfully managed via existing programs (IPM and NPDES, respectively) to minimize their contributions to estuarine fish kills. Ambient trend monitoring data demonstrated no coastal-wide dispersion of pesticide pollution. These data confirmed the nature of fish kills to be site-specific, near-field events most closely associated with the contiguous land-use practices and intensities. Typically, fish kill data are considered as event-specific data limited to the bounds of that event only. Our analysis has shown, however, that a long-term data set, when integrated with ambient water quality data, can assist in regulatory and resource management decisions for both short- and long-term planning and protection applications.

  18. Tri-axial dynamic acceleration as a proxy for animal energy expenditure; should we be summing values or calculating the vector?

    PubMed

    Qasem, Lama; Cardew, Antonia; Wilson, Alexis; Griffiths, Iwan; Halsey, Lewis G; Shepard, Emily L C; Gleiss, Adrian C; Wilson, Rory

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic body acceleration (DBA) has been used as a proxy for energy expenditure in logger-equipped animals, with researchers summing the acceleration (overall dynamic body acceleration--ODBA) from the three orthogonal axes of devices. The vector of the dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA) may be a better proxy so this study compared ODBA and VeDBA as proxies for rate of oxygen consumption using humans and 6 other species. Twenty-one humans on a treadmill ran at different speeds while equipped with two loggers, one in a straight orientation and the other skewed, while rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) was recorded. Similar data were obtained from animals but using only one (straight) logger. In humans, both ODBA and VeDBA were good proxies for VO2 with all r(2) values exceeding 0.88, although ODBA accounted for slightly but significantly more of the variation in VO2 than did VeDBA (P<0.03). There were no significant differences between ODBA and VeDBA in terms of the change in VO2 estimated by the acceleration data in a simulated situation of the logger being mounted straight but then becoming skewed (P = 0.744). In the animal study, ODBA and VeDBA were again good proxies for VO2 with all r(2) values exceeding 0.70 although, again, ODBA accounted for slightly, but significantly, more of the variation in VO2 than did VeDBA (P<0.03). The simultaneous contraction of muscles, inserted variously for limb stability, may produce muscle oxygen use that at least partially equates with summing components to derive DBA. Thus, a vectorial summation to derive DBA cannot be assumed to be the more 'correct' calculation. However, although within the limitations of our simple study, ODBA appears a marginally better proxy for VO2. In the unusual situation where researchers are unable to guarantee at least reasonably consistent device orientation, they should use VeDBA as a proxy for VO2.

  19. Dissipative energy loss within the left ventricle detected by vector flow mapping in diabetic patients with controlled and uncontrolled blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Mei; Bai, Wen-Juan; Liu, Yan-Ting; Tang, Hong; Rao, Li

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is related to increased risks of cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction, diabetic cardiomyopathy and secondary hypertension. Dissipative energy loss (EL) derived from vector flow mapping (VFM) is thought to reflect the efficiency of blood flow and has been deemed to be an index for the evaluation of left ventricular function. Our study aimed to investigate the value of dissipative EL in diabetic patients with controlled and uncontrolled blood glucose by VFM. Eighty-eight patients with DM and 58 age-matched healthy controls were recruited. All of the patients received echocardiography examinations. VFM analyses were executed to calculate the EL values according to the apical four-chamber examinations from the left ventricle (LV) view. Our results showed that diastolic EL was compromised in the controlled-blood glucose (59.19 mV/m vs. 32.68 mV/m, p = 0.039) patients and was more dramatically increased in the uncontrolled blood glucose group (88.84 mV/m vs. 32.68 mV/m, p < 0.001) compared with the healthy controls. The impairment of systolic EL was observed only in the uncontrolled blood glucose patients (39.65 mV/m vs. 20.29 mV/m, p < 0.001) and not in the controlled blood glucose patients (29.25 mV/m vs. 20.29 mV/m, p = 0.072). Multivariate backward stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that the HbA1c level was independently related to the diastolic EL (β = 0.233, p = 0.026) and systolic EL (β = 0.237, p = 0.023). VFM is feasible and reproducible for assessing LV dissipative EL in DM patients with normal LVEF values in whom diastolic EL may be a more vulnerable indicator of early LV cardiac dysfunction in patients with DM. However, LV systolic EL may be a sensitive indicator of preclinical LV dysfunction for patients with DM with uncontrolled blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled blood glucose, which is independently correlated with subclinical LV dysfunction, may lead to increases

  20. Female serial killing: review and case report.

    PubMed

    Frei, Andreas; Völlm, Birgit; Graf, Marc; Dittmann, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Single homicide committed by women is rare. Serial killing is very infrequent, and the perpetrators are usually white, intelligent males with sadistic tendencies. Serial killing by women has, however, also been described. To conduct a review of published literature on female serial killers and consider its usefulness in assessing a presenting case. A literature review was conducted, after searching EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. The presenting clinical case is described in detail in the context of the literature findings. Results The literature search revealed few relevant publications. Attempts to categorize the phenomenon of female serial killing according to patterns of and motives for the homicides have been made by some authors. The most common motive identified was material gain or similar extrinsic gratification while the 'hedonistic' sadistic or sexual serial killer seems to be extremely rare in women. There is no consistent theory of serial killing by women, but psychopathic personality traits and abusive childhood experiences have consistently been observed. The authors' case did not fit the description of a 'typical' female serial killer. In such unusual circumstances as serial killing by a woman, detailed individual case formulation is required to make sense of the psychopathology in each case. Publication of cases in scientific journals should be encouraged to advance our understanding of this phenomenon. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Kill fluid for oil field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes a process employing a kill fluid to substantially reduce the volumetric flow of formation fluid into a wellbore penetrating a formation containing the formation fluid below an earthen surface. It comprises: admixing components of a continuous flowing gel at the surface comprising of water-soluble carboxylate-containing polymer, a complex capable of crosslinking the polymer and formed of at least one electropositive chromium III species and at least one electronegative carboxylatespecies, and an aqueous solvent for the polymer and the complex; crosslinking the polymer and the complex to form the gel, wherein the kill fluid comprises the gel; placing a volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore sufficient to create a hydrostatic head which exerts a kill fluid pressure against the formation fluid substantially equal to or greater than the formation fluid pressure and thereby substantially reduces the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore; performing an oil field operation after placing the volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore; and removing the gel from the wellbore to substantially restore the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore.

  2. Sindbis viral vectors target hematopoietic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Suzme, R; Tseng, J-C; Levin, B; Ibrahim, S; Meruelo, D; Pellicer, A

    2012-11-01

    Sindbis viral vectors target and inhibit the growth of various solid tumors in mouse models. However, their efficacy against blood cancer has not been well established. Here, we show that Sindbis vectors infect and efficiently trigger apoptosis in mouse BW5147 malignant hematopoietic T-cells, but only at low levels in human lymphoma and leukemia cells (Jurkat, Karpas, CEM, DHL and JB). The Mr 37/67 kD laminin receptor (LAMR) has been suggested to be the receptor for Sindbis virus. However, JB cells, which are infected by Sindbis at low efficiency, express high levels of LAMR, revealing that additional factors are involved in Sindbis tropism. To test the infectivity and therapeutic efficacy of Sindbis vectors against malignant hematopoietic cells in vivo, we injected BW5147 cells intraperitoneally into (C3HXAKR) F1 hybrid mice. We found that Sindbis vectors targeted the tumors and significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We also tested the Sindbis vectors in a transgenic CD4-Rgr model, which spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas. However, infectivity in this model was less efficient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sindbis vectors have the potential to target and kill hematopoietic malignancies in mice, but further research is needed to evaluate the mechanism underlining the susceptibility of human lymphoid malignancies to Sindbis therapy.

  3. 'Total disability' and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Omelianchuk, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin G Miller recently argued that the wrongness of killing is best explained by the harm that comes to the victim, and that 'total disability' best explains the nature of this harm. Hence, killing patients who are already totally disabled is not wrong. I maintain that their notion of total disability is ambiguous and that they beg the question with respect to whether there are abilities left over that remain relevant for the goods of personhood and human worth. If these goods remain, then something more is lost in death than in 'total disability,' and their explanation of what makes killing wrong comes up short. But if total disability is equivalent with death, then their argument is an interesting one.

  4. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  5. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  6. Cytotoxic Killing and Immune Evasion by Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J. T.; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-07-01

    The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is a complex one, with pathogens constantly developing new ways of evading destruction by the immune system. The immune system's task is made even harder when the pathogen in question is an intra-cellular one (such as a virus or certain bacteria) and it is necessary to kill the infected host cell in order to eliminate the pathogen. This causes damage to the host, and such killing therefore needs to be carefully controlled, particularly in tissues with poor regenerative potential, or those involved in the immune response itself. Host cells therefore possess repair mechanisms which can counteract killing by immune cells. These in turn can be subverted by pathogens which up-regulate the resistance of infected cells to killing. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that this repair process plays an important role in determining the efficacy of evasion and escape from immune control. We model a situation where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells kill pathogen-infected and tumour cells by directed secretion of preformed granules containing perforin and granzymes. Resistance to such killing can be conferred by the expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). These are utilized by several virally infected and tumour cells, as well as playing a role in the protection of host bystander, immune and immuneprivileged cells. We build a simple stochastic model of cytotoxic killing, where serpins can neutralize granzymes stoichiometrically by forming an irreversible complex, and the survival of the cell is determined by the balance between serpin depletion and replenishment, which in its simplest form is equivalent to the well known shot noise process. We use existing analytical results for this process, and additional simulations to analyse the effects of repair on cytotoxic killing. We then extend the model to the case of a replicating target cell population, which gives a branching process

  7. Ambiguities in 'killing' and 'letting die'.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G M

    1983-05-01

    In a recent article Carla Kary (1980) attempts to show that there can be a significant moral difference between instances of killing and letting die. I shall maintain in Section I that Kary's argument is somewhat weakened by her failure to note an important ambiguity in the notion of killing a person. I shall also argue in Section II that a similar ambiguity affects the notion of letting someone die, and that failure to note this latter ambiguity also weakens the position developed by Robert Coburn (1980) with regard to defective newborns.

  8. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  9. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  10. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  11. Accessing transverse nucleon and gluon distributions in heavy nuclei using coherent vector meson photoproduction at high energies in ion ultraperipheral collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.; Zhalov, M.

    2017-02-01

    By using the theoretical approaches that describe well the available data on t -integrated coherent photoproduction of light and heavy vector mesons in Pb-Pb ultraperipheral collisions (UPCs) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Run 1, we calculate the momentum transfer distributions for this process for ρ and J /ψ vector mesons in the kinematics of Run 2 at the LHC. We demonstrate that nuclear shadowing not only suppresses the absolute value of the cross sections but also shifts the momentum transfer distributions toward smaller values of the momentum transfer |t | . This result can be interpreted as a broadening in the impact parameter space of the effective nucleon density in nuclei by 14% in the case of ρ and the nuclear gluon distribution by 5%-11% in the case of J /ψ .

  12. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  13. School Shootings; Standards Kill Students and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angert, Betsy L.

    2008-01-01

    School shootings have been in the news of late. People ponder what occurs in classrooms today. Why would a young person wish to take a life? Within educational institutions, the killings are a concern. In our dire attempt to teach the children and ensure student success, it seems many of our offspring are lost. Some students feel separate from…

  14. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  15. Nonlinear symmetries on spaces admitting Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinescu, Mihai

    2010-04-01

    Nonlinear symmetries corresponding to Killing tensors are investigated. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard supersymmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated with a Killing-Yano tensor. In the case of the nonlinear symmetries the dynamical algebras of the Dirac-type operators is more involved and could be organized as infinite dimensional algebras or superalgebras. The general results are applied to some concrete spaces involved in theories of modern physics. As a first example it is considered the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space and its generalizations introduced by Iwai and Katayama. One presents the infinite dimensional superalgebra of Dirac type operators on Taub-NUT space that could be seen as a graded loop superalgebra of the Kac-Moody type. The axial anomaly, interpreted as the index of the Dirac operator, is computed for the generalized Taub-NUT metrics. Finally the existence of the conformal Killing-Yano tensors is investigated for some spaces with mixed Sasakian structures.

  16. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  17. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  18. The evolution of reduced microbial killing.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; Valliere, Michael; Riley, Margaret A

    2009-10-20

    Bacteria engage in a never-ending arms race in which they compete for limited resources and niche space. The outcome of this intense interaction is the evolution of a powerful arsenal of biological weapons. Perhaps the most studied of these are colicins, plasmid-based toxins produced by and active against Escherichia coli. The present study was designed to explore the molecular responses of a colicin-producing strain during serial transfer evolution. What evolutionary changes occur when colicins are produced with no target present? Can killing ability be maintained in the absence of a target? To address these, and other, questions, colicinogenic strains and a noncolicinogenic ancestor were evolved for 253 generations. Samples were taken throughout the experiment and tested for killing ability. By the 38th transfer, a decreased killing ability and an increase in fitness were observed in the colicin-producing strains. Surprisingly, DNA sequence determination of the colicin plasmids revealed no changes in plasmid sequences. However, a set of chromosomally encoded loci experienced changes in gene expression that were positively associated with the reduction in killing. The most significant expression changes were observed in DNA repair genes (which were downregulated in the evolved strains), Mg ion uptake genes (which were upregulated), and late prophage genes (which were upregulated). These results indicate a fine-tuned response to the evolutionary pressures of colicin production, with far more genes involved than had been anticipated.

  19. Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Susan Arpajian

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

  20. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  1. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kath

    1993-06-24

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  2. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  3. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings.

    PubMed

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings.

  4. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Methods Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. Conclusions We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings. PMID:26135941

  5. Bovine polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Aydintug, M K; Widders, P R; Leid, R W

    1993-07-01

    The role of bovine antibody and complement in bovine neutrophil-mediated killing of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. No neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity was detected when Hanks' balanced salt solution, a widely utilized and weakly buffered medium, was used. This lack of neutrophil activity was evident even in the presence of specific bovine antibody and bovine complement. Moreover, the pH of the weakly buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was observed to fall from pH 7.0 to 5.8 in 4 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of T. foetus. The pH of 5.8 inhibited the bactericidal activity of bovine neutrophils for Staphylococcus epidermidis by 53.2% and may have contributed to the lack of neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity in the weakly buffered salt solution. However, T. foetus was susceptible to bovine neutrophil-mediated destruction when a HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was used (21.8% killing by neutrophils alone). Neither specific bovine immune serum nor purified immune bovine immunoglobulin G2 alone enhanced bovine neutrophil-mediated killing. When complement-sensitized trichomonads were incubated with bovine neutrophils, killing of T. foetus was observed, a result which represented the additive effects of each treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) killing of trichomonads was observed when antibody- and complement-opsonized trichomonads were exposed to bovine neutrophils (> 70% parasite destruction), an effect which reflected the additive nature of each treatment.

  6. Inactivated- or killed-virus HIV/AIDS vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Haynes W

    2005-06-01

    Inactivated or "killed" virus (KV) is a "classical" approach that has produced safe and effective human and veterinary vaccines but has received relatively little attention in the effort to develop an HIV/AIDS vaccine. Initially, KV and rgp120 subunit vaccines were the two most obvious approaches but, unfortunately, rgp120 has not been efficacious and the KV approach has been limited by a variety of scientific, technical, and sociological factors. For example, when responses to cellular antigens, present on SIV grown in human cells, proved to be largely responsible for efficacy, the KV approach was widely discounted. Similarly, when lab-adapted HIV-1 appeared to lose envelope glycoprotein during preparation (not the case for primary isolates), this was viewed as a fundamental barrier to the KV concept. Also, a preference for "safer", genetically-engineered vaccines, and emphasis on cellular immunity, have left KV low on the priority list for funding agencies and investigators. The recent suggestion that "native" trimeric gp120 displays conserved conformational neutralization epitopes, along with the failure of rgp120, and difficulties in raising strong cellular responses with DNA or vectored vaccines, has restored some interest in the KV concept. In the past 15 years, several groups have initiated pre-clinical development of KV candidates for SIV or HIV and promising, albeit limited, information has been produced. In this chapter we discuss the rationale (including pros and cons) for producing and testing killed-HIV vaccines, the prospects for success, the nature and scope of research needed to test the KV concept, what has been learned to date, and what remains undone.

  7. Symplectic and Killing symmetries of AdS3 gravity: holographic vs boundary gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, G.; Mao, P.; Seraj, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The set of solutions to the AdS3 Einstein gravity with Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions is known to be a family of metrics labeled by two arbitrary periodic functions, respectively left and right-moving. It turns out that there exists an appropriate presymplectic form which vanishes on-shell. This promotes this set of metrics to a phase space in which the Brown-Henneaux asymptotic symmetries become symplectic symmetries in the bulk of spacetime. Moreover, any element in the phase space admits two global Killing vectors. We show that the conserved charges associated with these Killing vectors commute with the Virasoro symplectic symmetry algebra, extending the Virasoro symmetry algebra with two U(1) generators. We discuss that any element in the phase space falls into the coadjoint orbits of the Virasoro algebras and that each orbit is labeled by the U(1) Killing charges. Upon setting the right-moving function to zero and restricting the choice of orbits, one can take a near-horizon decoupling limit which preserves a chiral half of the symplectic symmetries. Here we show two distinct but equivalent ways in which the chiral Virasoro symplectic symmetries in the near-horizon geometry can be obtained as a limit of the bulk symplectic symmetries.

  8. Affine conformal vectors in space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Tupper, B. O. J.

    1992-05-01

    All space-times admitting a proper affine conformal vector (ACV) are found. By using a theorem of Hall and da Costa, it is shown that such space-times either (i) admit a covariantly constant vector (timelike, spacelike, or null) and the ACV is the sum of a proper affine vector and a conformal Killing vector or (ii) the space-time is 2+2 decomposable, in which case it is shown that no ACV can exist (unless the space-time decomposes further). Furthermore, it is proved that all space-times admitting an ACV and a null covariantly constant vector (which are necessarily generalized pp-wave space-times) must have Ricci tensor of Segré type {2,(1,1)}. It follows that, among space-times admitting proper ACV, the Einstein static universe is the only perfect fluid space-time, there are no non-null Einstein-Maxwell space-times, and only the pp-wave space-times are representative of null Einstein-Maxwell solutions. Otherwise, the space-times can represent anisotropic fluids and viscous heat-conducting fluids, but only with restricted equations of state in each case.

  9. 75 FR 30299 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... closures to facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from July 5... regulations to facilitate scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance. Under this temporary deviation the...

  10. Light axial vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  11. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  12. Deprivations, futures and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Marquis, D

    2001-12-01

    In my essay, Why abortion is immoral, I criticised discussions of the morality of abortion in which the crucial issue is whether fetuses are human beings or whether fetuses are persons. Both argument strategies are inadequate because they rely on indefensible assumptions. Why should being a human being or being a person make a moral difference? I argued that the correct account of the morality of abortion should be based upon a defensible account of why killing children and adults is wrong. I claimed that what makes killing us wrong is that our premature deaths deprive us of our futures of value, that is, the goods of life we would have experienced had we survived. This account of the wrongness of killing explains why killing is one of the worst of crimes and how killing greatly harms the victim. It coheres with the attitudes of those with cancer or HIV facing premature death. It explains why we believe it is wrong to kill infants (as personhood theories do not). It does not entail that it wrongs a human being to end her life if she is in persistent vegetative state or if her future must consist only of unbearable physical suffering and she wants to die (as sanctity of human life theories do not). This account of the wrongness of killing implies (with some defensible additional assumptions) that abortion is immoral because we were fetuses once and we know those fetuses had futures of value. Mark Brown claims that this potential future of value account is unsound because it implies that we have welfare rights to what we need to stay alive that most people would reject. I argue that Brown is incorrect in two ways: a welfare right to what we need to stay alive is not directly implied by my account and, in addition, most of us do believe that dependent human beings have substantial welfare rights to what they need to stay alive. Brown argues that depriving us of a future of value of which we have mental representations both is a better explanation of the wrongness of

  13. Parricide: Children Who Kill Their Parents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    adolescents who kill their parents. The research centers on who is the offender, why he or she has used parricide as a solution to an unresolvable problem...parricide. Conclusions Reached Based on the results of the literature review three conclusions were reached. First, adolescents who commit parricide have been...at the hands of their abuser. Secondly, the treatment of these adolescents by the criminal justice system varies greatly depending on the willingness

  14. 11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD SPLITTERS' PLATFORMS - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  15. GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  16. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  17. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood. PMID:11353851

  18. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J C; Liao, C J; Lewis, K; Klibanov, A M

    2001-05-22

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 +/- 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 +/- 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  19. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-05-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  20. Killing, letting die, and withdrawing aid.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of this article is to contribute to the identification of the empirical criteria governing the use of the concepts of killing and letting die. I will not attempt a comprehensive analysis of the concepts but will limit the inquiry to certain problematic cases -- namely, cases involving the removal or withdrawal of life-supporting aid or protection. The analysis of these cases will, however, shed light on the criteria for distinguishing killing and letting die in other cases as well. My overall aims in the article are partly constructive and partly skeptical. I hope to advance our understanding of the nature of the distinction between killing and letting die. This, I believe, will enable us to defend the moral relevance of the distinction against certain objections -- in particular, objections that claim that the distinction fails to coincide with commonsense moral intuitions. Yet I will suggest that, as we get clearer about the nature of the distinction and the sources of its intuitive appeal, it may seem that the intuitions it supports are not so well grounded as one could wish.

  1. Killing spinors, twistor - spinors and Hijazi inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichnerowicz, Andre

    Let (W, g) be a spin manifold of dimension n. In terms of the Dirac operator P of (W, g), we introduce on the spinor fields a conformally covariant first-order operator D that is strictly connected with the twistor-spinors. We show that the operator (Δ - ρ) (ρ = (n/4(n - 1))R) is positive. For a compact spin manifold of dimension n ⩾ 3, the existences of harmonic spinors and twistor-spinors ≠ O are mutually exclusive, except for the parallel spinors. By means of a universal formula, we show that the Hijazi inequality [8] holds for every spinor field such that (Pψ, Pψ) = λ 2(ψ, ψ) (λ = const). In the limiting case, the manifold admits a Killing spinor which can be evaluated in terms of ψ. Using the Yamabe-Schoen theorem [15], we prove that, if the space K of the twistor-spinors of (W, g) is not reduced to zero, there is a conformal change of the metric g giving a manifold with Killing spinors ≠ 0. Interpretation of dim K in terms of these spaces of Killing spinors. If the compact spin manifold (W, g) of dimension n ⩾ 3 is not conformally isometric with the sphere, every twistor-spinor is without zero on W.

  2. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  3. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  4. Controlled cell killing by a recombinant nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Parks, Griffith D; Young, Virginia A; Koumenis, Constantinos; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Layer, Jennifer L; Cooke, Kelly M

    2002-02-01

    In most tissue culture cell lines tested, infection with the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) results in very little cell death. To determine if SV5 could be used as a vector for controlled killing of tumor cells, a recombinant SV5 (rSV5-TK) was constructed to encode the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene. MDBK cells infected with rSV5-TK showed a time-dependent loss of viability when infected cells were cultured in the presence of the prodrug acyclovir (ACV) or ganciclovir (GCV) while no significant toxicity was observed in the absence of prodrug. Cells infected with a control rSV5 expressing GFP and cultured with prodrug showed only a slight reduction in growth rate and little cell death. Time-lapse video microscopy of rSV5-TK-infected MDBK cells that were cultured in the presence of ACV showed an accumulation of cells with morphological effects characteristic of apoptotic cell death. An MDBK cell line persistently infected with rSV5-TK retained long-term expression of TK and sensitivity to prodrug-mediated cell killing that were comparable to those found in an acute infection. Titration experiments showed that the rSV5-TK plus GCV combination resulted in cell death for all mouse and human cell lines tested, although the kinetics and efficiency of cell death varied between cell types. Our results demonstrating controlled cell killing by a recombinant paramyxovirus support the use of negative-strand RNA viruses as therapeutic vectors for targeted killing of cancer cells.

  5. Induced melanin reduces mutations and cell killing in mouse melanoma.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Hill, H Z

    1997-03-01

    When melanin absorbs light energy, it can produce potentially damaging active oxygen species. There is little doubt that constitutive pigment in dark-skinned individuals is photoprotective against skin cancer, but induced pigment-as in tanning-may not be. The first step in cancer induction is mutation in DNA. The most suitable systems for evaluating the role of melanin are those in which pigment can be varied and mutations can be measured. Several cell lines from Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma can be induced to form large quantities of melanin pigment after treatment with a number of different agents enabling comparison of mutant yields in the same cells differing principally in pigment concentration. In these studies, melanin was induced with synthetic alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and with isobutyl methyl xanthine in the cell line S91/mel. The former inducer produced about 50% more pigment than the latter. Survival and mutation induction at the Na+/K(+)-ATPase locus were studied using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), a standard mutagen and five UV lamps emitting near monochromatic and polychromatic UV light in the three wave-length ranges of UV. There was greater protection against killing and mutation induction in the more heavily pigmented cells after exposure to EMS and after irradiation with monochromatic UVC and UVB. There was significant protection against killing by polychromatic UVB + UVA (FS20), but the small degree of protection against mutation was not significant. No significant change in killing and mutation using the same protocol was seen in S91/amel, a related cell line that does not respond to these inducers. No mutants were produced by either monochromatic or polychromatic UVA at doses that killed 50% of the cells. Our results show that induced pigment-shown earlier to be eumelanin (K. A. Cieszka et al., Exp. Dermatol. 4, 192-198, 1995)-is photo- and chemoprotective, but it is less effective in protection against mutagenesis by polychromatic

  6. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  7. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Newcastle Disease Vaccine... Newcastle disease virus supplied by or approved by Veterinary Services and the vaccinates observed each...

  8. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  9. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  10. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  11. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  12. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jacqueline T; Mengersen, Kerrie; Abram, Nicola K; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wells, Jessie A; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI) and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI). These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  13. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  14. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  16. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  17. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  18. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  19. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Diana L.; Collins, Casey P.; Hocum, Jonah D.; Leap, David J.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34+ cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  20. Restart 68000 vector remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, J.

    1984-05-03

    The circuit described allows power-on-reset (POR) vector fetch from ROM for a 68000 microprocessor. It offers programmability of exception vectors, including the restart vector. This method eliminates the need for high-resolution, address-decoder peripheral circuitry.

  1. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  2. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  3. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

  4. Meteorological Forcing of the Kills in New York / New Jersey Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, K. L.; Chant, R. J.; Bruno, M. S.; Glenn, S.

    2002-12-01

    flow structure. The resulting sub-tidal residual circulation velocities are significantly weaker than the tidal velocities; however, it was found that during westerly wind events exceeding 30 knots, set-down in the Newark Bay complex was on the order of 0.5 m and sub-tidal currents, usually much weaker than tidal flows, were as strong as the usual tidal flows. Flows in the Arthur Kill and in Perth Amboy were 60 cm/s and 12 cm/s to the south, respectively. Flows through the Kill Van Kull were to the west at between 5 and 20 cm/s. Similarly, it was found that during easterly wind events, exceeding 20 knots, set-up occurred across the region, and vertically uniform flows at Perth Amboy were to the north at 18 cm/s and to the east at 13 cm/s through the Kill Van Kull. Sea Surface Slope: We also examined the relationship between wind vectors and the sea surface slope. Wind data from the Newark Airport station from several months were binned into 30-degree bands and cross-correlated with the sea-surface slope along Newark Bay, the Kill Van Kull and the Arthur Kill. Results from six time-series in 2000 and 2001 show that winds blowing from the west are well-correlated with the sea surface slope along the Arthur Kill (r = 0.62 - 0.86 at 0 lags). Wind blowing from the south-west were less correlated with sea surface slope along the Kill Van Kull, and correlation coefficients ranged from 0.46 - 0.66 at 0.5 lags (0.5 days).

  5. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  6. The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Purnima; Leggatt, Graham; Matthaei, Klaus I; Frazer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) have been reported to show a range of motility patterns from rapid long-range tracking to complete arrest, but how and whether these kinematics affect their ability to kill target cells is not known. Many in vitro killing assays utilize cell lines and tumour-derived cells as targets, which may be of limited relevance to the kinetics of CTL-mediated killing of somatic cells. Here, live-cell microscopy is used to examine the interactions of CTL and primary murine skin cells presenting antigens. We developed a qualitative and quantitative killing assay using extended-duration fluorescence time-lapse microscopy coupled with large-volume objective software-based data analysis to obtain population data of cell-to-cell interactions, motility and apoptosis. In vivo and ex vivo activated antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes were added to primary keratinocyte targets in culture with fluorometric detection of caspase-3 activation in targets as an objective determinant of apoptosis. We found that activated CTL achieved contact-dependent apoptosis of non-tumour targets after a period of prolonged attachment - on average 21 hours - which was determined by target cell type, amount of antigen, and activation status of CTL. Activation of CTL even without engagement of the T cell receptor was sufficient to mobilise cells significantly above baseline, while the addition of cognate antigen further enhanced their motility. Highly activated CTL showed markedly increased vector displacement, and velocity, and lead to increased antigen-specific target cell death. These data show that the inherent kinematics of CTL correlate directly with their ability to kill non-tumour cells presenting cognate antigen.

  7. Killing symmetries and Smarr formula for black holes in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan; Modak, Sujoy Kumar; Samanta, Saurav

    2010-12-15

    We calculate the effective Komar conserved quantities for the N+1 dimensional charged Myers-Perry spacetime. At the event horizon we derive a new identity K{sub {chi}}{sup {mu}=}2ST where the left hand side is the Komar conserved quantity corresponding to the null Killing vector {chi}{sup {mu}} while in the right hand side S, T are the black hole entropy and Hawking temperature. From this identity we also derive the generalized Smarr formula connecting the macroscopic parameters M, J, Q of the black hole with its surface gravity and horizon area. The consistency of this new formula is established by an independent algebraic approach.

  8. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  9. LET and ion-species dependence for cell killing and mutation induction in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Suzuki, Masao; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2003-10-01

    We have been studying LET and ion species dependence of RBE values in cell killing and mutation induction. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with heavy-ion beams such as carbon (290 Mev/u and 135 Mev/u), neon (230 Mev/u and 400 Mev/u), silicon (490 Mev/u) and iron (500 Mev/u) ion beams, generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Cell killing effect was detected as reproductive cell death using a colony formation assay. Mutation induction in hprt locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine resistant colonies. The RBE-LET curves of cell killing and mutation induction were different each ion beam. So, we plotted RBE for cell killing and mutation induction as function of Z*2/beta2 instead of LET. RBE-Z*2/beta2 curves of cell killing indicated that the discrepancy of RBE-LET curves was reconciled each ion species. But RBE-Z*2/beta2 curves of mutation induction didn't corresponded between carbon- and silicon-ion beams. These results suggested that different biological endpoints may be suitable for different physical parameter, which represent the track structure of energy deposition of ion beams.

  10. Dynamic kill: controlling wild wells a new way

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, E.M.; Soeiinah, E.

    1981-10-01

    Dynamic kill describes a technique for terminating a blowout utilizing flowing frictional pressure to supplement the hydrostatic pressure of the kill fluid being injected through the relief well and up the blowing well. Therefore, a lighter kill fluid such as water can be implemented. The objective is to allow a blowout to be killed without breaking down the formation so the maximum amount of fluid can be circulated through the relief well by not losing fluid to a fractured formation. This allows optimum control during the kill operation and stable communication between the two wells. By allowing more fluid to be applied to the kill through one relief well, dynamic kill also increases the probability that one relief well will be sufficient. When the well is dynamically dead, the initial kill fluid, which will usually be too light to hold the well dead in a static condition, is replaced with a heavier kill mud. In fact, three weights of mud may be required to allow control during the transition from low density initial dynamic kill mud to heavy final kill mud. 5 refs.

  11. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  12. Sensitisation of Candida albicans to killing by low-power laser light.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Mia, N

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether Candida albicans, and other Candida spp. responsible for HIV-associated candidosis, could be sensitised to killing by low-power laser light. Suspensions of C. albicans were treated with a number of potential photosensitisers, exposed to laser light from a Helium/Neon (HeNe) or Gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAs) laser for 120 s and survivors enumerated. Toluidine blue O (TBO), thionin and crystal violet were able to sensitise the yeast to killing by light from the HeNe laser (energy dose = 876 mJ at a density of 66.36 J/cm2), the kills achieved being 6.8 x 10(6) cfu/ml, 3.1 x 10(6) cfu/ml and 1.3 x 10(6) cfu/ml respectively. TBO was also able to sensitise several other Candida spp. to killing by HeNe laser light. Dihaematoporphyrin ester was not an effective photosensitiser under the conditions employed. Methylene blue, but not aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine, was able to sensitise C. albicans to killing by light from the GaAs laser (energy dose 1.32 J at a density of 2.04 J/cm2). The viability of the yeast was not affected by exposure to laser light in the absence of the photosensitisers. As killing of dye-sensitised C. albicans, and other Candida spp., could be achieved by exposure to low-power laser light for short periods of time, this approach merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic modality for HIV-associated candidosis.

  13. Triops (Entomostraca) eggs killed only by boiling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D B

    1968-07-19

    Temporary rainpools near Khartoum, Sudan, are inhabited by the notostracan crustacean Triops which completes its life cycle within 4 weeks. The annual rains fall in late summer, and throughout the winter and early summer the eggs of Triops remain in the dried mud or dust where they may be exposed to temperatures up to 80 degrees C. Laboratory experiments show that they can withstand temperatures up to within 1 degrees C of boiling, but are killed in partial vacuum by 70 degrees C, at atmospheric pressure by 100 degrees C, or under pressure by 105 degrees C. Exposure to high temperature seems to be necessary to break the egg diapause.

  14. The killing efficiency of soft iron shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, R.; Longcore, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    A cooperative research effort between the ammunition industry and the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is aimed at finding a suitable non-toxic substitute for lead shot. A contract study by an independent research organization evaluated ways of coating or detoxifying lead shot or replacing it with another metal. As a result of that study, the only promising candidate is soft iron. Previous tests of hard iron shot had suggested that its killing effectiveness was poor at longer ranges due to the lower density. In addition, its hardness caused excessive damage to shotgun barrels. A unique, automated shooting facility was constructed at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to test the killing effectiveness of soft iron shot under controlled conditions. Tethered game-farm mallards were transported across a shooting point in a manner simulating free flight. A microswitch triggered a mounted shotgun so that each shot was 'perfect.' A soft iron shot, in Number 4 size, was produced by the ammunition industry and loaded in 12-gauge shells to give optimum ballistic performance. Commercial loads of lead shot in both Number 4 and Number 6 size were used for comparison. A total of 2,010 ducks were shot at ranges of 30 to 65 yards and at broadside and head-on angles in a statistically designed procedure. The following data were recorded for each duck: time until death, broken wing or leg bones, and number of embedded shot. Those ducks not killed outright were held for 10 days. From these data, ducks were categorized as 'probably bagged,' 'probably lost cripples,' or survivors. The test revealed that the killing effectiveness of this soft iron shot was superior to its anticipated performance and close to that obtained with commercial lead loads containing an equal number of pellets. Bagging a duck, in terms of rapid death or broken wing, was primarily dependent on the probability of a shot striking that vital area, and therefore a function of range. There was no indication

  15. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  16. Micro-sociology of mass rampage killings.

    PubMed

    Collins, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Spectacular but very rare violent events such as mass killings by habitual non-criminals cannot be explained by factors which are very widespread, such as possession of firearms, being a victim of bullying, an introvert, or a career failure. A stronger clue is clandestine preparation of attack by one or two individuals, against randomly chosen representatives of a hated collective identity. Mass killers develop a deep back-stage, obsessed with planning their attack, overcoming social inferiority and isolation by an emotion of clandestine excitement.

  17. Curved manifolds with conserved Runge-Lenz vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ngome, J.-P.

    2009-12-15

    van Holten's algorithm is used to construct Runge-Lenz-type conserved quantities, induced by Killing tensors, on curved manifolds. For the generalized Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino metric, the most general external potential such that the combined system admits a conserved Runge-Lenz-type vector is found. In the multicenter case, the subclass of two-center metric exhibits a conserved Runge-Lenz-type scalar.

  18. Is drought helping or killing dengue? Investigation of spatiotemporal relationship between dengue fever and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2015-04-01

    Dengue Fever is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted between human and mosquitos in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Previous studies have found significant relationship between the epidemic of dengue cases and climate variables, especially temperature and precipitation. Besides, the natural phenomena (e.g., drought) are considered that significantly drop the number of dengue cases by killing vector's breeding environment. However, in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, there are evidences that the temporal pattern of dengue is correlated to drought events. Kaohsiung City experienced two main dengue outbreaks in 2002 and 2014 that both years were confirmed with serious drought. Especially in 2014, Kaohsiung City was suffered from extremely dengue outbreak in 2014 that reported the highest number of dengue cases in the history. This study constructs the spatiotemporal model of dengue incidences and index of drought events (Standardized Precipitation Index, SPI) based on the distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM). Other meteorological measures are also included in the analysis.

  19. Vector analyses of linearly and circularly polarized Bessel beams using Hertz vector potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanxun; Dou, Wenbin; Meng, Hongfu

    2014-04-07

    Using the transverse Hertz vector potentials, vector analyses of linearly and circularly polarized Bessel beams of arbitrary orders are presented in this paper. Expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of vector Bessel beams in free space that are rigorous solutions to the vector Helmholtz equation are derived. Their respective time averaged energy density and Poynting vector are also obtained, in order to exhibit their non-diffracting properties. Polarization patterns and magnitude profiles with different parameters are displayed. Particular emphasis is placed on the cases where the ratio of wave number over its transverse component k/kt approximately equals to one and largely exceeds it, which corresponding to the nonparaxial and paraxial condition, respectively. These results allow us to recognize that the vector Bessel beams exhibit new and important features, compared with the scalar fields.

  20. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Haiti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    The elderly and children are most susceptible to infection. VECTOR TRANSMISSION: Primary Vectors: Culex nigripalpus , Aedes taeniorhynchus VECTOR...BIONOMICS: Culex nigripalpus breeds in a broad variety of aquatic habitats including lakes, temporary pools, epiphytic plants, brackish water, and...disease. VECTOR TRANSMISSION: Primary Vectors: Culex quinquefasciatus and Cx. nigripalpus ; both species are primary vectors in the U.S., and both

  1. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  2. Optimization and synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Isaria fumosorosea against human vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Banu, A Najitha; Balasubramanian, C

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of silver generated larvicide with the help of entomopathogenic fungi, Isaria fumosorosea (Ifr) against major vector mosquitoes Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. The Ifr-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were characterized structurally and functionally using UV-visible spectrophotometer followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The optimum pH (alkaline), temperature (30 °C) and agitation (150 rpm) for AgNP synthesis and its stability were confirmed through colour change. Ae. aegypti larvae (I-IV instars) were found highly susceptible to synthesized AgNPs than the larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, the mortality rate was indirectly proportional to the larval instar and the concentration. The lethal concentration that kills 50% of the exposed larvae (LC50) and lethal concentration that kills 90% of the exposed larvae (LC90) values of the tested concentration are 0.240, 0 0.075.337, 0.430, 0.652 and 1.219, 2.210, 2.453, 2.916; 0.065, 0.075, 0.098, 0.137 and 0.558, 0.709, 0.949, 1.278 ppm with respect to 0.03 to 1.00 ppm of Ifr-AgNPs against first, second, third and fourth instars of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively. This is the first report for synthesis of AgNPs using Ifr against human vector mosquitoes. Hence, Ifr-AgNPs would be significantly used as a potent mosquito larvicide.

  3. Kill: boosting HIV-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Lydie

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that purging the latent HIV reservoir in virally suppressed individuals will require both the induction of viral replication from its latent state and the elimination of these reactivated HIV-infected cells ('Shock and Kill' strategy). Boosting potent HIV-specific CD8 T cells is a promising way to achieve an HIV cure. Recent studies provided the rationale for developing immune interventions to increase the numbers, function and location of HIV-specific CD8 T cells to purge HIV reservoirs. Multiple approaches are being evaluated including very early suppression of HIV replication in acute infection, adoptive cell transfer, therapeutic vaccination or use of immunomodulatory molecules. New assays to measure the killing and antiviral function of induced HIV-specific CD8 T cells have been developed to assess the efficacy of these new approaches. The strategies combining HIV reactivation and immunobased therapies to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells can be tested in in-vivo and in-silico models to accelerate the design of new clinical trials. New immunobased strategies are explored to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells able to purge the HIV-infected cells with the ultimate goal of achieving spontaneous control of viral replication without antiretroviral treatment.

  4. 75 FR 62469 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from October 26, 2010... scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance previously authorized for two six-week closures from July 5...

  5. Molecular neurosurgery: vectors and vector delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    White, Edward

    2012-12-01

    Molecular neurosurgery involves the use of vector-mediated gene therapy and gene knockdown to manipulate in vivo gene expression for the treatment of neurological diseases. These techniques have the potential to revolutionise the practice of neurosurgery. However, significant challenges remain to be overcome before these techniques enter routine clinical practice. These challenges have been the subject of intensive research in recent years and include the development of strategies to facilitate effective vector delivery to the brain and the development of both viral and non-viral vectors that are capable of efficient cell transduction without excessive toxicity. This review provides an update on the practice of molecular neurosurgery with particular focus on the practical neurosurgical aspects of vector delivery to the brain. In addition, an introduction to the key vectors employed in clinical trials and a brief overview of previous gene therapy clinical trials is provided. Finally, key areas for future research aimed at increasing the likelihood of the successful translation of gene therapy into clinical trials are highlighted.

  6. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Gable, Thomas D.; Windels, Steve K.; Bruggink, John G.; Homkes, Austin T.

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers. PMID:27992441

  7. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Gable, Thomas D; Windels, Steve K; Bruggink, John G; Homkes, Austin T

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers.

  8. Constraining vectors and axial-vectors in walking technicolor by a holographic principle

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-09-01

    We use a holographic principle to study the low-energy spectrum of walking technicolor models. In particular, we predict the masses of the axial-vectors as well as the decay constants of vectors and axial-vectors as functions of the mass of the techni-{rho}. Given that there are very few nonperturbative techniques to study strongly coupled theories, using holography might provide us with insight into how to constrain the parameters of the low-energy effective action of walking technicolor models. We also compare our results with findings from other setups.

  9. 76 FR 36910 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC. v. New York Independent...

  10. 76 FR 34692 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC; v. New York Independent...

  11. Pathogenic Rickettsia Species Acquire Vitronectin from Human Serum to Promote Resistance to Complement-mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Sean P.; Patterson, Jennifer L.; Nava, Samantha; Martinez, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria of the genus Rickettsia are transmitted from arthropod vectors and primarily infect cells of the mammalian endothelial system. Throughout this infectious cycle, the bacteria are exposed to the deleterious effects of serum complement. Using Rickettsia conorii, the etiologic agent of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF), as a model rickettsial species, we have previously demonstrated that this class of pathogen interacts with human factor H to mediate partial survival in human serum. Herein, we demonstrate that R. conorii also interacts with the terminal complement complex inhibitor vitronectin (Vn). We further demonstrate that an evolutionarily conserved rickettsial antigen, Adr1/RC1281, interacts with human vitronectin and is sufficient to mediate resistance to serum killing when expressed at the outer-membrane of serum sensitive E. coli. Adr1 is an integral outer-membrane protein whose structure is predicted to contain eight membrane-embedded β-strands and four “loop” regions that are exposed to extracellular milieu. Site-directed mutagenesis of Adr1 revealed that at least two predicted “loop” regions are required to mediate resistance to complement-mediated killing and vitronectin acquisition. These results demonstrate that rickettsial species have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade complement deposition and that evasion of killing in serum is an evolutionarily conserved virulence attribute for this genus of obligate intracellular pathogens. PMID:24286496

  12. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-Rays at the Phosphorus K-Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10 photons/sec/mm . The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  13. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-rays at the Phosphorus K-edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10(exp 18) photons/sec/sq mm. The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140 eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  14. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-Rays at the Phosphorus K-Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10 photons/sec/mm . The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  15. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-rays at the Phosphorus K-edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10(exp 18) photons/sec/sq mm. The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140 eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  16. Heterosigma bloom and associated fish kill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Postel, J.R.; Taub, F.B.

    1997-01-01

    A bloom of the harmful marine phytoplankton, Heterosigma carterae occurred in upper Case Inlet, south Puget Sound, Washington in late September, 1994, correlating with the presence of at least 35 dead salmon. This marks the first time that this alga has been closely correlated with a wild fish kill; in the past it was thought to be associated with kills of penned fish at fish farms only. We were informed of the presence of a possible harmful algal bloom and dead salinois Ilear the town of Allyn on 27 September and a team was formed to investigate. We arrived at the Allyn waterfront at 17:30 hours the same day. Prior to our arrival, state agency personnel walked approximatcly two miles of shoreline from the powerlines north of the dock, to the mouth of Sherwood Creek and conducted the only official count of dead fish present along the shore consisting of 12 coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), 11 chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), 12 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), one flat fish, and one sculpin on the morning of 9/27. Since previous harmful blooms of Heterosigma have resultedin the majority of net penreared salmon sinking to the bottom of pens, and only approximately two miles of shoreline were sampled, it is suspected that many more exposed fish may have succumbed than were counted. Witnesses who explored the east side of the bay reported seeing many dead salmon there as well, but no counts were made. State agency personnel who observed the fish kill reported seeing “dying fish coming to the beach, gulping at the surface, trying to get out of the water” Scavengers were seen consuming the salmon carcasses; these included two harbor seals, a house cat, and Hymenopteran insects. None suffered any noticeable acute ill effects. Although precise cause of death has not been ascertained, visual inspection of the reproductive organs from a deceased male chum salmon found on the shore at Allyn confirmed that the fish was not yet reproductively mature and

  17. Locally connected neural network with improved feature vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Tyson (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pattern recognizer which uses neuromorphs with a fixed amount of energy that is distributed among the elements. The distribution of the energy is used to form a histogram which is used as a feature vector.

  18. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Using Chemoattractants to Lure Bacteria to Contact-Killing Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishabh; Faith, Nancy G; Milkowski, Andrew; Nelson, Kevin; Busche, David; Lynn, David M; Czuprynski, Charles J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-05-04

    Antimicrobial surfaces with covalently attached biocidal functionalities only kill microbes that come into direct contact with the surfaces (contact-killing surfaces). Herein, the activity of contact-killing surfaces is shown to be enhanced by using gradients in the concentration of soluble chemoattractants (CAs) to attract bacteria to the surfaces. Two natural and nonbiocidal CAs (aspartate and glucose) were used to attract bacteria to model surfaces decorated with quaternary ammonium groups (known to kill bacteria that come into contact with them). These results demonstrate the killing of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, two common pathogens, at levels 10- to 20-times greater than that of the native surfaces alone. This approach is general and provides new strategies for the design of active or dynamic contact-killing surfaces with enhanced antimicrobial activities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Killing of an encapsulated strain of Escherichia coli by human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P W; Kroll, H P

    1983-01-01

    Changes in cell viability and in factors affecting metabolic integrity were examined after exposure of Escherichia coli LP1092 to human serum. Antibody-dependent classical pathway activity accounted for the rapid killing of strain LP1092 by complement. Removal of serum lysozyme by bentonite absorption or by neutralization with anti-human lysozyme immunoglobulin G resulted in a reduction in the rate of killing; optimal activity could be restored by the addition of physiological amounts of egg-white lysozyme. The pattern of 86Rb+ and alkaline phosphatase release obtained after serum treatment did not support the view that complement simultaneously disrupts cytoplasmic and outer membrane integrity. Macromolecular synthesis was affected late in the reaction sequence; complete inhibition of precursor incorporation into RNA, DNA, and protein occurred only after almost total loss of bacterial colony-forming ability. Addition of chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, to the bactericidal system resulted in a marked reduction in the rate of serum killing. Killing was completely inhibited by an inhibitor (KCN) and an uncoupler (2,4-dinitrophenol) of oxidative phosphorylation. Exposure of LP1092 cells to serum was followed by a rapid and large increase in intracellular ATP levels; ATP synthesis did not occur when bacteria were exposed to dialyzed serum, which killed LP1092 cells at a much reduced rate. Addition of glucose or serum ultrafiltrate to dialyzed serum restored optimal bactericidal activity. We suggest that optimal killing of gram-negative bacteria is an energy-dependent process requiring an input of bacterially generated ATP. PMID:6185430

  1. Killing, letting die and moral perception.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant

    1994-10-01

    There are a number of arguments that purport to show, in general terms, that there is no difference between killing and letting die. These are used to justify active euthanasia on the basis of the reasons given for allowing patients to die. I argue that the general and abstract arguments fail to take account of the complex and particular situations which are found in the care of those with terminal illness. When in such situations, there are perceptions and intuitions available that do not easily find propositional form but lead most of those whose practice is in the care of the dying to resist active euthanasia. I make a plea for their intuitions to be heeded above the sterile voice of abstract premises and arguments by examining the completeness of the outline form of the pro-euthanasia argument. In doing so, I make use of Nussbaum's discussion of moral perception and general claims to be found in the literature of moral particularism.

  2. Advanced gel propulsion controls for kill vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, W. K.; Olson, A.; Finato, S.

    1993-06-01

    A gel propulsion control concept for tactical applications is reviewed, and the status of the individual component technologies currently under development at the Aerojet Propulsion Division is discussed. It is concluded that a gel propellant Divert and Attitude Control Subsystem (DACS) provides a safe, insensitive munitions compliant alternative to current liquid Theater Missile Defense (TMD) DACS approaches. The gel kill vehicle (KV) control system packages a total impulse typical of a tactical weapon interceptor for the ground- or sea-based TMD systems. High density packaging makes it possible to increase firepower and to eliminate long-term high pressure gas storage associated with bipropellant systems. The integrated control subsystem technologies encompass solid propellant gas generators, insulated composite overwrapped propellant tanks, lightweight endoatmospheric thrusters, and insensitive munition gel propellants, which meet the requirements of a deployable, operationally safe KV.

  3. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells.

  4. Cholate-dependent killing of Giardia lamblia by human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Gillin, F D; Reiner, D S; Gault, M J

    1985-01-01

    We showed previously that nonimmune human milk (NHM) kills Giardia lamblia trophozoites in vitro and presented evidence that killing requires the bile salt-stimulated lipase of milk. Since this enzyme is activated by bile salts, killing should be dependent on the presence of bile salts. We now show that killing by fresh NHM or NHM stored at -70 degrees C is totally dependent on sodium cholate (a bile salt). With less than 0.4 mM cholate, no parasites were killed, whereas with 1 mM cholate, greater than 99.7% were killed by 5% NHM in 30 min. Moreover, killing activity was completely heat labile. The G. lamblia-killing activity of human milk was greatly altered by storage at -10 or -20 degrees C. In less than 23 days, the 50% lethal dose decreased, cholate dependence was lost, and killing activity became heat stable. In contrast, the activity of milk stored at -70 degrees C remained unchanged. Milk lipase activity, like killing activity, became cholate independent during storage at -10 or -20 degrees C. On the basis of these results, we hypothesize that killing of G. lamblia by fresh NHM or NHM stored at -70 degrees C depends on bile salt-stimulated lipase, which must be activated by bile salts. In contrast, NHM stored at -20 degrees C accumulated free fatty acids which kill G. lamblia. In support of this thesis, milk stored at -10 degrees C had a concentration of 18.7 mM free fatty acids compared with only 1.1 mM in an identical sample stored at -70 degrees C. PMID:3972442

  5. Roles of antibodies and complement in phagocytic killing of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Arduino, R C; Murray, B E; Rakita, R M

    1994-01-01

    The contributions of complement and antibodies to polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-mediated killing of enterococci were investigated with pooled normal human serum (PNHS) or immune human sera (IHS) from patients with serious enterococcal infections. Each IHS containing antienterococcal antibodies demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting (immunoblotting) was examined with the enterococcus strain isolated from the same patient. PNHS promoted PMN-mediated killing of enterococci similar to that for IHS. PMN-mediated killing was consistently abrogated after preopsonization with heat-inactivated PNHS, but some heat-inactivated IHS supported neutrophil bactericidal activity. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by chelation of either PNHS or IHS with Mg-EGTA [Mg-ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] did not alter PMN-mediated killing, suggesting that activation of the alternative pathway of complement is sufficient to promote killing of enterococci by PMNs. PMN-mediated killing assays were also performed with normal rabbit serum and immune rabbit serum against enterococci. Preopsonization with heat-inactivated immune rabbit serum resulted in PMN-mediated killing of enterococci, which was ablated after adsorption of the serum with the same isolate used for immunization. The influence of different phenotypic enterococcal traits on neutrophil-mediated killing was also investigated. Similar kinetics of killing were observed for derivatives of Enterococcus faecalis strains regardless of resistance to antimicrobial agents or production of beta-lactamase, hemolysin, gelatinase, or surface proteins involved in the aggregative response to pheromones. In summary, PMN-mediated killing of enterococci appears to depend primarily on complement activation by either the classical or the alternative pathway. Human antienterococcal antibodies generated during infection variably promoted neutrophil bactericidal

  6. Transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seoung Dal

    2015-04-01

    On a closed, connected Riemannian manifold with a Kähler foliation of codimension q = 2 m, any transverse Killing r(≥ 2) -form is parallel (Jung and Jung, 2012). In this paper, we study transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations. In fact, if the foliation is minimal, then for any transverse conformal Killing r-form ϕ(2 ≤ r ≤ q - 2), Jϕ is parallel. Here J is defined in Section 4.

  7. Picloram herbicide for killing chaparral species...a preliminary rating

    Treesearch

    Lisle R. Green; Joe R. Goodin; Theordore R. Plumb

    1966-01-01

    Picloram, in spray and pellet forms, was tested for its ability to kill chaparral species at several sites in southern California, in 1963. This herbicide proved to be as effective as brushkiller (2.4-D and 2,4, 5-T) or slightly more so. Both herbicides kilIed chamise readily at low rates, but failed to kill scrub oak. Kill of other species varied between these two...

  8. Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    1977-01-01

    Schools must teach pupils about the wide nature of our energy dilemma and prepare them for a future in which not only will conservation of energy be essential, but also the conservation and preservation of our total natural resources. (JD)

  9. Advancements in dynamic kill calculations for blowout wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouba, G.E. . Production Fluids Div.); MacDougall, G.R. ); Schumacher, B.W. . Information Technology Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses the development, interpretation, and use of dynamic kill equations. To this end, three simple calculation techniques are developed for determining the minimum dynamic kill rate. Two techniques contain only single-phase calculations and are independent of reservoir inflow performance. Despite these limitations, these two methods are useful for bracketing the minimum flow rates necessary to kill a blowing well. For the third technique, a simplified mechanistic multiphase-flow model is used to determine a most-probable minimum kill rate.

  10. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  11. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect.

    PubMed

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-23

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  12. Vector correlations study of the reaction N(2D)+H2(X1Σg+)→NH(a1Δ)+H(2S) with different collision energies and reagent vibration excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Yong-Jia; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Zhao, Mei-Yu; Ding, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vector correlations of the reaction are studied based on a recent DMBE-SEC PES for the first excited state of NH2 [J. Phys. Chem. A 114 9644 (2010)] by using a quasi-classical trajectory method. The effects of collision energy and the reagent initial vibrational excitation on cross section and product polarization are investigated for v = 0-5 and j = 0 states in a wide collision energy range (10-50 kcal/mol). The integral cross section could be increased by H2 vibration excitation remarkably based on the DMBE-SEC PES. The different phenomena of differential cross sections with different collision energies and reagent vibration excitations are explained. Particularly, the NH molecules are scattered mainly in the backward hemisphere at low vibration quantum number and evolve from backward to forward direction with increasing vibration quantum number, which could be explained by the fact that the vibrational excitation enlarges the H-H distance in the entrance channel, thus enhancing the probability of collision between N atom and H atom. A further study on product polarization demonstrates that the collision energy and vibrational excitation of the reagent remarkably influence the distributions of P(θr), P(ϕr), and P(θr, ϕr). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474141 and 11404080), the Special Fund Based Research New Technology of Methanol conversion and Coal Instead of Oil, the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550158) , the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry of China (Grant No. 2014-1685), and the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant Nos. LJQ2015040 and LJQ2014001).

  13. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery.

  14. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  15. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  16. Exclusive heavy vector meson photoproduction in hadronic collisions at the LHC: Predictions of the color glass condensate model for Run 2 energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Moreira, B. D.; Navarra, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we update the predictions for exclusive J /Ψ , Ψ (2 S ), and ϒ photoproduction in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Run 2 LHC energies obtained with the color dipole formalism and considering the impact-parameter color glass condensate model (bCGC) for the forward dipole-target scattering amplitude. The impact of the charm mass on the predictions is investigated, and a comparison with the LHCb data on rapidity distributions and photon-hadron cross sections is presented. Our results demonstrate that the current data can be quite well described by the bCGC model, which takes into account nonlinear effects in the QCD dynamics and reproduces the very precise HERA data, without introducing any additional effect or free parameter.

  17. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  18. Killing a Peacock: A Case Study of the Targeted Killing of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    operation to kill Yamamoto. Lastly, analysis of the end, the aftermath of mission, will give insight into its effectiveness. Examining the immediate...section carries the greatest significance for current and future operations of this nature. Analysis of the circumstances surrounding the decision...on his dash. Mitscher had come through. Likewise, the other pilots strapped in their aircraft as the mechanics buttoned up the last of the open

  19. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: rapid killing accompanying phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    The kinetics of bactericidal activity of activated macrophages can be precisely described by a mathematical model in which phagocytosis, killing, digestion, and release of degraded bacterial material are considered to occur continuously. To gain a better understanding of these events, I have determined the period of time between first contact of bacteria with macrophages and the onset of killing. Activated rat peritoneal macrophages were incubated for various times up to 15 min with Listeria monocytogenes previously labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine and the unassociated bacteria removed by two centrifugations through a density interface. Both cell-associated radioactivity and cell-associated viable bacteria, determined as colony forming units after sonication of the cell pellet, increased with time of incubation. However, the specific viability of these bacteria, expressed as the ratio of number of viable bacteria per unit radioactivity declined with time, as an approximate inverse exponential, after a lag period of 2.9 +/- 0.8 min. Evidence is given that other possible causes for this decline in specific viability, other than death of the bacteria, such as preferential ingestion of dead Listeria, clumping of bacteria, variations in autolytic activity, or release of Listericidins are unlikely. I conclude therefore that activated macrophages kill Listeria approximately 3 min after the cell and the bacterium first make contact.

  20. Image compression with embedded wavelet coding via vector quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavounidis, Ioannis; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1995-09-01

    In this research, we improve Shapiro's EZW algorithm by performing the vector quantization (VQ) of the wavelet transform coefficients. The proposed VQ scheme uses different vector dimensions for different wavelet subbands and also different codebook sizes so that more bits are assigned to those subbands that have more energy. Another feature is that the vector codebooks used are tree-structured to maintain the embedding property. Finally, the energy of these vectors is used as a prediction parameter between different scales to improve the performance. We investigate the performance of the proposed method together with the 7 - 9 tap bi-orthogonal wavelet basis, and look into ways to incorporate loseless compression techniques.

  1. Etiology, background, worldwide situation and control of Citrus Tristeza virus and its vectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is readily graft-transmissible and, in nature, is spread by aphid vectors in a semi-persistent manner. CTV-decline has killed >85 million citrus trees grown on sour orange rootstock worldwide. Citrus in these areas must be grown on CTV-tolerant or resistant rootstocks. ...

  2. EGFR-targeted magnetic nanoparticle heaters kill cancer cells without a perceptible temperature rise.

    PubMed

    Creixell, Mar; Bohórquez, Ana C; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2011-09-27

    It is currently believed that magnetic nanoparticle heaters (MNHs) can kill cancer cells only when the temperature is raised above 43 °C due to energy dissipation in an alternating magnetic field. On the other hand, simple heat conduction arguments indicate that in small tumors or single cells the relative rates of energy dissipation and heat conduction result in a negligible temperature rise, thus limiting the potential of MNHs in treating small tumors and metastatic cancer. Here we demonstrate that internalized MNHs conjugated to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) do result in a significant (up to 99.9%) reduction in cell viability and clonogenic survival in a thermal heat dose dependent manner, without the need for a perceptible temperature rise. The effect appears to be cell type specific and indicates that magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions previously considered as not possible.

  3. Plasma Motions and Turbulent Magnetic Diffusivity of Active Region AR 12158 Using a Minimum Energy Functional and Non-Force-Free Reconstructions of Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Benoit; Vincent, Alain

    2017-01-01

    We present a generalization of the resistive minimum-energy fit (MEF-R: Tremblay and Vincent, Solar Phys. 290, 437, 2015) for non-force-free (NFF) magnetic fields. In MEF-R, an extremum principle is used to infer two-dimensional maps of plasma motions [boldsymbol{v}(x,y)] and magnetic eddy diffusivity [η _{eddy}(x,y)] at the photosphere. These reconstructions could be used as boundary conditions in data-driven simulations or in data assimilation. The algorithm is validated using the analytical model of a resistive expanding spheromak by Rakowski, Laming, and Lyutikov ( Astrophys. J. 730, 30, 2011). We study the flaring Active Region AR 12158 using a series of magnetograms and Dopplergrams provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The results are discussed for a non-force-free magnetic-field reconstruction [boldsymbol{B}_{NFF}] (Hu and Dasgupta in Solar Phys. 247, 87, 2008). We found that the vertical plasma velocities [vz(x,y)] inferred using MEF-R are very similar to the observed Doppler velocities [vr(x,y)]. Finally, we study the potential spatial correlation between microturbulent velocities and significant values of η_{eddy}(x,y).

  4. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  5. A Flexible Turbulent Vector Field Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, A.; Davis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Analysis and generation of turbulent vector fields is a necessity in many areas, such as Atmospheric Science. A candidate model of vector field must be flexible enough to tune some features, such as the spacial distribution of vortices, sinks and sources, according to physical measures. To achieve that goal, we propose a model that depends upon a given matricial function called "topolet" and a law of random vectors family. This model has a hierarchical structure. Its spinal column is a tree: the encoding tree of the domain where the vector field lives. The sets of vortices, sinks and sources are driven by some Bernouilli subtrees, directly giving their fractal dimension. At each node of the tree is attached a rate of energy loose giving the spectral slope. All those quantities are independantly identifiable on the base of mathematical proofs. A primitive version of this model have been proposed for generating clouds.

  6. Baculovirus Transfer Vectors.

    PubMed

    Possee, Robert D; King, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    The production of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector normally involves mixing infectious virus DNA with a plasmid-based transfer vector and then co-transfecting insect cells to initiate virus infection. The aim of this chapter is to provide an update on the range of baculovirus transfer vectors currently available. Some of the original transfer vectors developed are now difficult to obtain but generally have been replaced by superior reagents. We focus on those that are available commercially and should be easy to locate. These vectors permit the insertion of single or multiple genes for expression, or the production of proteins with specific peptide tags that aid subsequent protein purification. Others have signal peptide coding regions permitting protein secretion or plasma membrane localization. A table listing the transfer vectors also includes information on the parental virus that should be used with each one. Methods are described for the direct insertion of a recombinant gene into the virus genome without the requirement for a transfer vector. The information provided should enable new users of the system to choose those reagents most suitable for their purposes.

  7. Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...procurement or storage of standard, common use fuels. NATURAL GAS Natural gas, abundant globally and domestically, offers energy versatility among

  8. Autonomous parvovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ian H; Terrell, Kristina L; Maxwell, Françoise

    2002-10-01

    Parvoviruses are small, icosahedral viruses (approximately 25 nm) containing a single-strand DNA genome (approximately 5 kb) with hairpin termini. Autonomous parvoviruses (APVs) are found in many species; they do not require a helper virus for replication but they do require proliferating cells (S-phase functions) and, in some cases, tissue-specific factors. APVs can protect animals from spontaneous or experimental tumors, leading to consideration of these viruses, and vectors derived from them, as anticancer agents. Vector development has focused on three rodent APVs that can infect human cells, namely, LuIII, MVM, and H1. LuIII-based vectors with complete replacement of the viral coding sequences can direct transient or persistent expression of transgenes in cell culture. MVM-based and H1-based vectors with substitution of transgenes for the viral capsid sequences retain viral nonstructural (NS) coding sequences and express the NS1 protein. The latter serves to amplify the vector genome in target cells, potentially contributing to antitumor activity. APV vectors have packaging capacity for foreign DNA of approximately 4.8 kb, a limit that probably cannot be exceeded by more than a few percent. LuIII vectors can be pseudotyped with capsid proteins from related APVs, a promising strategy for controlling tissue tropism and circumventing immune responses to repeated administration. Initial success has been achieved in targeting such a pseudotyped vector by genetic modification of the capsid. Subject to advances in production and purification methods, APV vectors have potential as gene transfer agents for experimental and therapeutic use, particularly for cancer therapy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  9. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green...

  10. 9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF BEEF KILLING FLOOR; LOOKING SOUTHEAST; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF BEEF KILLING FLOOR; LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PLATFORMS IN FOREGROUND WERE USED BY SPLITTERS, TRIMMERS AND GOVERNMENT INSPECTORS; SKINNING TABLE RAN ALONG THE WINDOWS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  11. Killing of bacteria during solar eclipse and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S K; Chatterjee, S N

    1983-01-01

    Enhanced killing of bacteria was obtained by radiation reaching the earth during total solar eclipse (February 16, 1980) than during the corresponding time of a normal day (February 26, 1980). The killing was not due to the formation of sunlight induced photoproducts of tryptophan. The damage to the bacteria exposed to sunlight could be repaired by photoreactivation.

  12. Control of Influenza and Poliomyelitis with Killed Virus Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Jonas; Salk, Darrell

    1977-01-01

    Discusses control of poliomyelitis and influenza by live and killed virus vaccines. Considered are the etiological agents, pathogenic mechanisms and epidemiology of each disease. Reviews recent scientific studies of the diseases. Recommends use of killed virus vaccines in controlling both diseases. (CS)

  13. Control of Influenza and Poliomyelitis with Killed Virus Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Jonas; Salk, Darrell

    1977-01-01

    Discusses control of poliomyelitis and influenza by live and killed virus vaccines. Considered are the etiological agents, pathogenic mechanisms and epidemiology of each disease. Reviews recent scientific studies of the diseases. Recommends use of killed virus vaccines in controlling both diseases. (CS)

  14. Pseudomonas piscicida kills vibrios by two distinct mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudoalteromonas piscicida is a naturally-occurring marine bacterium which kills competing bacteria, including vibrios. In studies by Richards et al. (AEM00175-17), three strains of P. piscicida were isolated and characterized. Strains secreted proteolytic enzymes which likely killed competing or...

  15. Male Brown-headed Cowbird Attacks and Kills a Nestling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Igl, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    I observed a male Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) attack and kill a nestling of an unidentified passerine in a grassland field in Day County, South Dakota, in June 2000. The killing or removal of nestlings by female cowbirds has been reported by others, but this behavior has not been documented previously in male cowbirds.

  16. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set...

  18. 7. LOOKING WEST TOWARD SHEEP KILL AREA ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LOOKING WEST TOWARD SHEEP KILL AREA ON SOUTH END OF BUILDING 149; INCLINED CONVEYOR AT LEFT CENTER CARRIED TROLLEYS TO THE AUTOMATIC WASHER/OILER ON THE GALLERY LEVEL - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  19. PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Celecoxib Killing in Multiple Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    BOOTH, LAURENCE; ROBERTS, JANE L.; CRUICKSHANKS, NICHOLA; TAVALLAI, SEYEDMEHRAD; WEBB, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, PETER; CONLEY, ADAM; BINION, BRITTANY; YOUNG, HAROLD F.; POKLEPOVIC, ANDREW; SPIEGEL, SARAH; DENT, PAUL

    2015-01-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  20. The Seal Killing Controversy: What Are the Facts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffer, Victor B.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the seal controversy using the harp and Alaska fur seals to illustrate the two distinct issues, i.e., conservation (the effect of killing upon the animal population); and two, morality (the effect of killing upon the human spirit). Factual information combines with personal philosophy. (LK)

  1. Killing Unwanted West Indies Mahogany Trees by Peeling and Frilling

    Treesearch

    R. W. Nobles; C. B. Briscoe

    1966-01-01

    Peeling and frilling each killed approximately 70 percent of treated West Indies mahogany, but peeling killed a higher percentage of trees between 18 and 33 centimeters (7 and 13 inches) than did frilling. Essentially all mortality occurred within the first 15 months following treatment.

  2. The Seal Killing Controversy: What Are the Facts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffer, Victor B.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the seal controversy using the harp and Alaska fur seals to illustrate the two distinct issues, i.e., conservation (the effect of killing upon the animal population); and two, morality (the effect of killing upon the human spirit). Factual information combines with personal philosophy. (LK)

  3. Killing of bacteria by copper surfaces involves dissolved copper.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K; Solioz, Marc

    2010-06-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

  4. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.201 Section 113.201 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has...

  5. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or tissues obtained from mink that...

  6. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  7. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  8. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or tissues obtained from mink that...

  9. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  10. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  11. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.212 Section 113.212 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only...

  12. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  13. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  14. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or tissues obtained from mink that...

  15. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). 113.214 Section 113.214 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, recommended for use in dogs, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only...

  16. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.212 Section 113.212 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only...

  17. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  18. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  19. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or tissues obtained from mink that...

  20. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  1. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  2. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  3. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.201 Section 113.201 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has...

  4. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  5. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  6. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). 113.214 Section 113.214 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, recommended for use in dogs, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only...

  7. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.204 Section 113.204 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or tissues obtained from mink that...

  8. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  9. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  10. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  11. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  12. Second powerful bounce at Utah mine kills three rescuers trying to reach six trapped miners

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-15

    The article reports on rescue operations at Crandall Canyon Mine in Energy Country, Utah, where coal miners were trapped on 6 August by a large cave-in. The miners, who were carrying out retreat mining, were believed to be 1,500 ft deep and 4 miles from the portal. Rescue efforts involved drilling several boreholes and injecting compressed air into the mine. A significant bounce occurred on 17 August killing three rescue workers. 1 photo.

  13. Inhibiting Mitophagy as a Novel Mechanism to Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mitophagy, the mitochondrial-specific form of autophagy, to kill prostate cancer cells. Cancer cells become increasingly dependent on mitophagy as an energy...cancer cells. Key mediators of the mitophagic process, specifically Parkin, dynamin-related protein-1 ( Drp1 ), fission-1 (Fis1), and cyclophilin-D (CypD...and especially Drp1 maybe of therapeutic benefit as they were found to induce mitochondrial dysfunction and/or ROS production along with a

  14. Inhibiting Mitophagy as a Novel Mechanism to Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    mitochondrial-specific form of autophagy, to kill prostate cancer cells. Cancer cells become increasingly dependent on mitophagy as an energy source...cells. Key mediators of the mitophagic process, specifically Parkin, dynamin- related protein-1 ( Drp1 ), fission-1 (Fis1), and cyclophilin-D (CypD...and PC3 cells to the necrotic effects of doxorubicin. Finally, we found that Drp1 knockdown was sufficient to impair mitochondrial function, induce ROS

  15. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  16. Killing (absorption) versus survival in random motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    We address diffusion processes in a bounded domain, while focusing on somewhat unexplored affinities between the presence of absorbing and/or inaccessible boundaries. For the Brownian motion (Lévy-stable cases are briefly mentioned) model-independent features are established of the dynamical law that underlies the short-time behavior of these random paths, whose overall lifetime is predefined to be long. As a by-product, the limiting regime of a permanent trapping in a domain is obtained. We demonstrate that the adopted conditioning method, involving the so-called Bernstein transition function, works properly also in an unbounded domain, for stochastic processes with killing (Feynman-Kac kernels play the role of transition densities), provided the spectrum of the related semigroup operator is discrete. The method is shown to be useful in the case, when the spectrum of the generator goes down to zero and no isolated minimal (ground state) eigenvalue is in existence, like in the problem of the long-term survival on a half-line with a sink at origin.

  17. The Cell Killing Mechanisms of Hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amanpreet; Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a well-established inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase that has a long history of scientific interest and clinical use for the treatment of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. It is currently the staple drug for the management of sickle cell anemia and chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Due to its reversible inhibitory effect on DNA replication in various organisms, hydroxyurea is also commonly used in laboratories for cell cycle synchronization or generating replication stress. However, incubation with high concentrations or prolonged treatment with low doses of hydroxyurea can result in cell death and the DNA damage generated at arrested replication forks is generally believed to be the direct cause. Recent studies in multiple model organisms have shown that oxidative stress and several other mechanisms may contribute to the majority of the cytotoxic effect of hydroxyurea. This review aims to summarize the progress in our understanding of the cell-killing mechanisms of hydroxyurea, which may provide new insights towards the improvement of chemotherapies that employ this agent. PMID:27869662

  18. Clomipramine kills Trypanosoma brucei by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    de Silva Rodrigues, Jean Henrique; Stein, Jasmin; Strauss, Mariana; Rivarola, Héctor Walter; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Duszenko, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Drug repositioning, i.e. use of existing medicals to treat a different illness, is especially rewarding for neglected tropical diseases (NTD), since in this field the pharmaceutical industry is rather reluctant to spend vast investments for drug development. NTDs afflict primarily poor populations in under-developed countries, which minimizes financial profit. Here we investigated the trypanocidal effect of clomipramine, a commercial antipsychotic drug, on Trypanosoma brucei. The data showed that this drug killed the parasite with an IC50 of about 5μM. Analysis of the involved cell death mechanism revealed furthermore an initial autophagic stress response and finally the induction of apoptosis. The latter was substantiated by a set of respective markers such as phosphatidylserine exposition, DNA degradation, loss of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic morphological changes. Clomipramine was described as a trypanothione inhibitor, but as judged from our results it also showed DNA binding capacities and induced substantial morphological changes. We thus consider it likely that the drug induces a multifold adverse interaction with the parasite's physiology and induces stress in a way that trypanosomes cannot cope with.

  19. On pseudo-Riemannian manifolds with many Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseevsky, D. V.; Cortes, V.

    2009-02-02

    Let M be a pseudo-Riemannian spin manifold of dimension n and signature s and denote by N the rank of the real spinor bundle. We prove that M is locally homogeneous if it admits more than (3/4)N independent Killing spinors with the same Killing number, unless n {identical_to} 1(mod 4) and s {identical_to} 3(mod 4). We also prove that M is locally homogeneous if it admits k{sub +} independent Killing spinors with Killing number {lambda} and k{sub -} independent Killing spinors with Killing number -{lambda} such that k{sub +}+k{sub -}>(3/2)N, unless n {identical_to} s {identical_to} 3(mod 4). Similarly, a pseudo-Riemannian manifold with more than (3/4)N independent conformal Killing spinors is conformally locally homogeneous. For (positive or negative) definite metrics, the bounds (3/4)N and (3/2)N in the above results can be relaxed to (1/2)N and N, respectively. Furthermore, we prove that a pseudo-Riemannnian spin manifold with more than (3/4)N parallel spinors is flat and that (1/4)N parallel spinors suffice if the metric is definite. Similarly, a Riemannnian spin manifold with more than (3/8)N Killing spinors with the Killing number {lambda}(set-membership sign)R has constant curvature 4{lambda}{sup 2}. For Lorentzian or negative definite metrics the same is true with the bound (1/2)N. Finally, we give a classification of (not necessarily complete) Riemannian manifolds admitting Killing spinors, which provides an inductive construction of such manifolds.

  20. [Time point and methods for emergency killing in cattle].

    PubMed

    Khol, J L; Schafbauer, T; Wittek, T

    2016-01-01

    Emergency killing is defined as the killing of injured or ill animals to avoid excessive pain or harm. Decision-making for emergency killing or a prolonged therapy can be difficult and has to be based on the case history and results of the clinical examination contributing to the prognosis, particularly in downer cows. Evaluation of enzyme activities and total bilirubin can be used as additional factors pointing to a guarded prognosis; however, none of these parameters provides a clear cut-off value indicating a poor prognosis and mandatory emergency killing. Euthanasia by intravenous drug application is seen as the least stressful method of killing and should therefore always be the first method of choice for emergency killing in cattle. Drugs containing pentobarbital as well as a combination of three different drugs (T61-Injektionslösung, MSD Animal Health) are available for euthanasia in cattle. All drugs must be administered by a veterinarian. Before application of pentobarbital, an animal should be deeply sedated. The administration of T61 requires anaesthesia of the animal and it is not licensed for use in pregnant animals. Alternative methods for emeragency killing, including captive bolt stunning and the use of firearms, although not regularly performed by veterinarians, should be assessed concerning their correct application and performance. When captive bolt stunning or emergency killing using firearms is performed, the correct position of the device is crucial as well as a quick exsanguination or the application of a pithing rod for the actual killing of the animal after captive bolt stunning. In addition to medical considerations, economic and personal factors contribute to the decision about emergency killing in cattle. Therefore, veterinarians should aim to evaluate each case thoroughly based on personal knowledge and experience, case history, clinical findings and laboratory parameters to avoid prolonged suffering of the animal.

  1. The Vector Decomposition Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Maki; Mitsunari, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Toru

    This paper introduces a new computational problem on a two-dimensional vector space, called the vector decomposition problem (VDP), which is mainly defined for designing cryptosystems using pairings on elliptic curves. We first show a relation between the VDP and the computational Diffie-Hellman problem (CDH). Specifically, we present a sufficient condition for the VDP on a two-dimensional vector space to be at least as hard as the CDH on a one-dimensional subspace. We also present a sufficient condition for the VDP with a fixed basis to have a trapdoor. We then give an example of vector spaces which satisfy both sufficient conditions and on which the CDH is assumed to be hard in previous work. In this sense, the intractability of the VDP is a reasonable assumption as that of the CDH.

  2. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  3. Vector inflation and vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.M. )

    1991-09-15

    A vector field {ital A}{sub {mu}} is coupled to the Einstein equations with a linearly perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, constructed to generate first-order vector perturbations. A working classical chaotic vector inflation is demonstrated and then quantum fluctuations of the field are used to constrain the cosmological perturbations. In particular, the vector momentum flux {ital T}{sub 0{ital i}} is tracked to the epoch where radiation-dominated matter exists. Matching conditions using observational constraints of the cosmic microwave background radiation give rise to a peculiar cosmological velocity of the order of 10{sup {minus}100}{ital c}. Amplification of this number, e.g., by breaking the conformal invariance of the field, could be used to generate cosmic magnetic fields using a dynamo mechanism.

  4. Managing Threat, Cost, and Incentive to Kill: The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Intervention in Mass Killings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathman, Jacob D.; Wood, Reed M.

    2011-01-01

    How do third-party interventions affect the severity of mass killings? The authors theorize that episodes of mass killing are the consequence of two factors: (1) the threat perceptions of the perpetrators and (2) the cost of implementing genocidal policies relative to other alternatives. To reduce genocidal hostilities, interveners must address…

  5. Managing Threat, Cost, and Incentive to Kill: The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Intervention in Mass Killings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathman, Jacob D.; Wood, Reed M.

    2011-01-01

    How do third-party interventions affect the severity of mass killings? The authors theorize that episodes of mass killing are the consequence of two factors: (1) the threat perceptions of the perpetrators and (2) the cost of implementing genocidal policies relative to other alternatives. To reduce genocidal hostilities, interveners must address…

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Rudolf, Fabian

    2017-01-10

    Yeast shuttle vectors are indispensable tools in yeast research. They enable cloning of defined DNA sequences in Escherichia coli and their direct transfer into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. There are three types of commonly used yeast shuttle vectors: centromeric plasmids, episomal plasmids and integrating plasmids. In this review, we discuss the different plasmid systems and their characteristic features. We focus on their segregational stability and copy number and indicate how to modify these properties. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  8. Psychological traits underlying different killing methods among Malaysian male murderers.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, Mohammad Rahim; Shariff, Nadiah Syariani; Nurfarliza, Siti; Othman, Azizah; Ismail, Khaidzir H; Mat Saat, Geshina Ayu

    2014-04-01

    Murder is the most notorious crime that violates religious, social and cultural norms. Examining the types and number of different killing methods that used are pivotal in a murder case. However, the psychological traits underlying specific and multiple killing methods are still understudied. The present study attempts to fill this gap in knowledge by identifying the underlying psychological traits of different killing methods among Malaysian murderers. The study adapted an observational cross-sectional methodology using a guided self-administered questionnaire for data collection. The sampling frame consisted of 71 Malaysian male murderers from 11 Malaysian prisons who were selected using purposive sampling method. The participants were also asked to provide the types and number of different killing methods used to kill their respective victims. An independent sample t-test was performed to establish the mean score difference of psychological traits between the murderers who used single and multiple types of killing methods. Kruskal-Wallis tests were carried out to ascertain the psychological trait differences between specific types of killing methods. The results suggest that specific psychological traits underlie the type and number of different killing methods used during murder. The majority (88.7%) of murderers used a single method of killing. Multiple methods of killing was evident in 'premeditated' murder compared to 'passion' murder, and revenge was a common motive. Examples of multiple methods are combinations of stabbing and strangulation or slashing and physical force. An exception was premeditated murder committed with shooting, when it was usually a single method, attributed to the high lethality of firearms. Shooting was also notable when the motive was financial gain or related to drug dealing. Murderers who used multiple killing methods were more aggressive and sadistic than those who used a single killing method. Those who used multiple methods or

  9. A parallel vectorized implementation of triple excitations in CCSD(T) - Application to the binding energies of the AlH3, AlH2F, AlHF2 and AlF3 dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.; Komornicki, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    An efficient method for various noniterative estimates of connected triple excitations in coupled-cluster theory is outlined and related to a similar expression occurring in Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. The method is highly vectorized and capable of utilizing multiple processors on a shared-memory machine, leading to computational rates in excess of one billion floating-point operations per second on four processors of a CRAY Y-MP. Using the new procedure, the binding energies of the D(2h) diborane-type dimers of AlH3, AlH2F, AlHF2, and AlF3 have been determined to be 32, 40, 20, and 47 kcal/mol, respectively. For Al2F6, the correlation procedure includes 232 molecular orbitals and over 1.5 x 10 to the 6th single and double coupled-cluster amplitudes, effectively accounting for over 2 x 10 to the 9th connected triple excitations.

  10. Heat-killed Lactobacillus spp. cells enhance survivals of Caenorhabditis elegans against Salmonella and Yersinia infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choe, J; Kim, J; Oh, S; Park, S; Kim, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the effect of feeding heat-killed Lactobacillus cells on the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes after Salmonella Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica infection. The feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum 133 (LP133) and Lactobacillus fermentum 21 (LP21) cells to nematodes was shown to significantly increase the survival rate as well as stimulate the expression of pmk-1 gene that key factor for C. elegans immunity upon infection compared with control nematodes that were only fed Escherichia coli OP50 (OP50) cells. These results suggest that heat-killed LP133 and LF21 cells exert preventive or protective effects against the Gram-negative bacteria Salm. Typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the LF21-mediated and LP133-mediated protection against bacterial infection in nematodes, transcriptional profiling was performed for each experimental group. These experiments showed that genes related to energy generation and ageing, regulators of insulin/IGF-1-like signalling, DAF genes, oxidation and reduction processes, the defence response and/or the innate immune response, and neurological processes were upregulated in nematodes that had been fed heat-killed Lactobacillus cells compared with nematodes that had been fed E. coli cells. In this study, the feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus bacteria to Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes was shown to decrease infection by Gram-negative bacteria and increase the host lifespan. C. elegans has a small, well-organized genome and is an excellent in vivo model organism; thus, these results will potentially shed light on important Lactobacillus-host interactions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Eukaryotic expression vectors bearing genes encoding cytotoxic proteins for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2012-09-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. A primary goal of all cancer therapies is to selectively target and kill tumour cells. Such therapies are administered via different approaches, including both viral and non-viral delivery; however, both methods have advantages and disadvantages. Transcriptional targeting enables genes encoding toxic proteins to be expressed directly in cancer cells. Numerous vectors have been created with the purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Data concerning the function of vectors bearing genes that encode cytotoxic proteins under the control of different promoters, including tissue/tumour specific and constitutive promoters, is summarised here. This review focuses on vectors that bear genes encoding diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, caspases, gef, streptolysin, and melittin. Data describing the efficacy of such vectors have been summarised. Notably, there are vectors that killed cancer cell lines originating from the same type of cancer with differential efficiency. Thus, there is differential inhibition of cancer cell growth dependent on the cell line. In this review, the constructs employing genes whose expression induces cell death and the efficiency with which they suppress cancer cell growth will be summarised.

  12. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  13. Did Vertigo Kill America's Forgotten Astronaut?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg A.; Merlin, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    On November 15, 1967, U.S. Air Force test pilot Major Michael J. Adams was killed while flying the X-15 rocket-propelled research vehicle in a parabolic spaceflight profile. This flight was part of a joint effort with NASA. An electrical short in one of the experiments aboard the vehicle caused electrical transients, resulting in excessive workload by the pilot. At altitude Major Adams inappropriately initiated a flat spin that led to a series of unusual aircraft attitudes upon atmospheric re-entry, ultimately causing structural failure of the airframe. Major Adams was known to experience vertigo (i.e. spatial disorientation) while flying the X-15, but all X-15 pilots most likely experienced vertigo (i.e. somatogravic, or "Pitch-Up", illusion) as a normal physiologic response to the accelerative forces involved. Major Adams probably experienced vertigo to a greater degree than did others, since prior aeromedical testing for astronaut selection at Brooks AFB revealed that he had an unusually high degree of labyrinthine sensitivity. Subsequent analysis reveals that after engine burnout, and through the zenith of the flight profile, he likely experienced the oculoagravic ("Elevator") illusion. Nonetheless, painstaking investigation after the mishap revealed that spatial disorientation (Type II, Recognized) was NOT the cause, but rather, a contributing factor. The cause was in fact the misinterpretation of a dual-use flight instrument (i.e. Loss of Mode Awareness), resulting in confusion between yaw and roll indications, with subsequent flight control input that was inappropriate. Because of the altitude achieved on this flight, Major Adams was awarded Astronaut wings posthumously. Understanding the potential for spatial disorientation, particularly the oculoagravic illusion, associated with parabolic spaceflight profiles, and understanding the importance of maintaining mode awareness in the context of automated cockpit design, are two lessons that have direct

  14. Can Nanomedicines Kill Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Most tumors are heterogeneous and many cancers contain small population of highly tumorigenic and intrinsically drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Like normal stem cell, CSCs have ability to self-renew and differentiate to other tumor cell types. They are believed to be a source for drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. CSCs often overexpress drug efflux transporters, spend most of their time in non-dividing G0 cell cycle state, and therefore, can escape the conventional chemotherapies. Thus, targeting CSCs is essential for developing novel therapies to prevent cancer relapse and emerging of drug resistance. Nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (nanomedicines) have been used to achieve longer circulation times, better stability and bioavailability over current therapeutics. Recently, some groups have successfully applied nanomedicines to target CSCs to eliminate the tumor and prevent its recurrence. These approaches include 1) delivery of therapeutic agents (small molecules, siRNA, antibodies) that affect embryonic signaling pathways implicated in self-renewal and differentiation in CSCs, 2) inhibiting drug efflux transporters in an attempt to sensitize CSCs to therapy, 3) targeting metabolism in CSCs through nanoformulated chemicals and field-responsive magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, and 4) disruption of multiple pathways in drug resistant cells using combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with amphiphilic Pluronic block copolymers. Despite clear progress of these studies the challenges of targeting CSCs by nanomedicines still exist and leave plenty of room for improvement and development. This review summarizes biological processes that are related to CSCs, overviews the current state of anti-CSCs therapies, and discusses state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed to kill CSCs. PMID:24120657

  15. Kill a brand, keep a customer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nirmalya

    2003-12-01

    Most brands don't make much money. Year after year, businesses generate 80% to 90% of their profits from less than 20% of their brands. Yet most companies tend to ignore loss-making brands, unaware of the hidden costs they incur. That's because executives believe it's easy to erase a brand; they have only to stop investing in it, they assume, and it will die a natural death. But they're wrong. When companies drop brands clumsily, they antagonize loyal customers: Research shows that seven times out of eight, when firms merge two brands, the market share of the new brand never reaches the combined share of the two original ones. It doesn't have to be that way. Smart companies use a four-step process to kill brands methodically. First, CEOs make the case for rationalization by getting groups of senior executives to conduct joint audits of the brand portfolio. These audits make the need to prune brands apparent throughout the organization. In the next stage, executives need to decide how many brands will be retained, which they do either by setting broad parameters that all brands must meet or by identifying the brands they need in order to cater to all the customer segments in their markets. Third, executives must dispose of the brands they've decided to drop, deciding in each case whether it is appropriate to merge, sell, milk, or just eliminate the brand outright. Finally, it's critical that executives invest the resources they've freed to grow the brands they've retained. Done right, dropping brands will result in a company poised for new growth from the source where it's likely to be found--its profitable brands.

  16. Macrophage elastase kills bacteria within murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Houghton, A McGarry; Hartzell, William O; Robbins, Clinton S; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-07-30

    Macrophages are aptly positioned to function as the primary line of defence against invading pathogens in many organs, including the lung and peritoneum. Their ability to phagocytose and clear microorganisms has been well documented. Macrophages possess several substances with which they can kill bacteria, including reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and antimicrobial proteins. We proposed that macrophage-derived proteinases may contribute to the antimicrobial properties of macrophages. Macrophage elastase (also known as matrix metalloproteinase 12 or MMP12) is an enzyme predominantly expressed in mature tissue macrophages and is implicated in several disease processes, including emphysema. Physiological functions for MMP12 have not been described. Here we show that Mmp12(-/-) mice exhibit impaired bacterial clearance and increased mortality when challenged with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria at macrophage-rich portals of entry, such as the peritoneum and lung. Intracellular stores of MMP12 are mobilized to macrophage phagolysosomes after the ingestion of bacterial pathogens. Once inside phagolysosomes, MMP12 adheres to bacterial cell walls where it disrupts cellular membranes resulting in bacterial death. The antimicrobial properties of MMP12 do not reside within its catalytic domain, but rather within the carboxy-terminal domain. This domain contains a unique four amino acid sequence on an exposed beta loop of the protein that is required for the observed antimicrobial activity. The present study represents, to our knowledge, the first report of direct antimicrobial activity by a matrix metallopeptidase, and describes a new antimicrobial peptide that is sequentially and structurally unique in nature.

  17. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  18. Copper Reduction and Contact Killing of Bacteria by Iron Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Salima; Kumar, Ranjeet; Solioz, Marc

    2015-09-01

    The well-established killing of bacteria by copper surfaces, also called contact killing, is currently believed to be a combined effect of bacterial contact with the copper surface and the dissolution of copper, resulting in lethal bacterial damage. Iron can similarly be released in ionic form from iron surfaces and would thus be expected to also exhibit contact killing, although essentially no contact killing is observed by iron surfaces. However, we show here that the exposure of bacteria to iron surfaces in the presence of copper ions results in efficient contact killing. The process involves reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+) by iron; Cu(+) has been shown to be considerably more toxic to cells than Cu(2+). The specific Cu(+) chelator, bicinchoninic acid, suppresses contact killing by chelating the Cu(+) ions. These findings underline the importance of Cu(+) ions in the contact killing process and infer that iron-based alloys containing copper could provide novel antimicrobial materials. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Kill-painting of hypoxic tumours in charged particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Krämer, Michael; Maier, Andreas; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Friedrich, Thomas; Scifoni, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumours often present regions with severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia), which are resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Increased radiosensitivity as a function of the oxygen concentration is well described for X-rays. It has also been demonstrated that radioresistance in anoxia is reduced using high-LET radiation rather than conventional X-rays. However, the dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) on radiation quality in the regions of intermediate oxygen concentrations, those normally found in tumours, had never been measured and biophysical models were based on extrapolations. Here we present a complete survival dataset of mammalian cells exposed to different ions in oxygen concentration ranging from normoxia (21%) to anoxia (0%). The data were used to generate a model of the dependence of the OER on oxygen concentration and particle energy. The model was implemented in the ion beam treatment planning system to prescribe uniform cell killing across volumes with heterogeneous radiosensitivity. The adaptive treatment plans have been validated in two different accelerator facilities, using a biological phantom where cells can be irradiated simultaneously at three different oxygen concentrations. We thus realized a hypoxia-adapted treatment plan, which will be used for painting by voxel of hypoxic tumours visualized by functional imaging. PMID:26596243

  20. Tanshinone IIA enhances bystander cell killing of cancer cells expressing Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase in nuclei and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyang; Zhao, Lei; Dong, Xiaoshen; He, Anning; Zheng, Caiwei; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna; Zheng, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Heterologous expression of the Drosophila melanogaster multi-substrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to several cytotoxic nucleoside analogs. Thus, it may be used as a suicide gene in combined gene/chemotherapy treatment of cancer. To further characterize this potential suicide gene, we constructed two retroviral vectors that enabled the expression of Dm-dNK in cancer cells. One vector harbored the wild‑type enzyme that localized to the nucleus. The other vector harbored a mitochondrial localized mutant enzyme that was constructed by deleting the nuclear localization signal and fusing it to a mitochondrial import signal of cytochrome c oxidase. A thymidine kinase-deficient osteosarcoma cell line was transduced with the recombinant viruses. The sensitivity and bystander cell killing in the presence of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)‑2'‑deoxyuridine and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylthymine were investigated. Tanshinone IIA is a constituent of Danshen; a traditional Chinese medicine used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study also looked at the influence of Tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that sensitivity of the osteosarcoma cell line to the nucleoside analogs and the efficiency of bystander cell killing were independent of the subcellular localization of Dm-dNK. The enhanced effect of tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect was related to the increased expression of Cx43 and Cx26.

  1. AP-1/Fos-TGase2 Axis Mediates Wounding-induced Plasmodium falciparum Killing in Anopheles gambiae*

    PubMed Central

    Nsango, Sandrine E.; Pompon, Julien; Xie, Ting; Rademacher, Annika; Fraiture, Malou; Thoma, Martine; Awono-Ambene, Parfait H.; Moyou, Roger S.; Morlais, Isabelle; Levashina, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    Anopheline mosquitoes are the only vectors of human malaria worldwide. It is now widely accepted that mosquito immune responses play a crucial role in restricting Plasmodium development within the vector; therefore, further dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes should inform new vector control strategies urgently needed to roll back the disease. Here, using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, bioinformatics, and functional gene analysis, we identify a new axis of mosquito resistance to monoclonal Plasmodium falciparum infections that includes the AP-1 transcription factor Fos and the transglutaminase 2 (TGase2), a cross-linking enzyme with known roles in wound responses. We demonstrate that Fos regulates induction of TGase2 expression after wounding but does not affect expression of the components of the well characterized complement-like system. Silencing of Fos or of TGase2 aborts the wounding-induced mosquito killing of P. falciparum. These results reveal multiple signaling pathways that are required for efficient Plasmodium killing in Anopheles gambiae. PMID:23592781

  2. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.; Sidell N.; Hagiwara, S.

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K/sup +/) current in NK cells. The K/sup +/ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd/sup 2 +/. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd/sup 2 +/, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K/sup +/ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K/sup +/ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process.

  3. Multipole vector solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2006-05-15

    We show that multipole solitons can be made stable via vectorial coupling in bulk nonlocal nonlinear media. Such vector solitons are composed of mutually incoherent nodeless and multipole components jointly inducing a nonlinear refractive index profile. We found that stabilization of the otherwise highly unstable multipoles occurs below certain maximum energy flow. Such a threshold is determined by the nonlocality degree.

  4. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  5. Role of Peroxide in Phagocytic Killing of Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Jane; Bernheimer, Harriet P.

    1974-01-01

    Two mutants of a pneumococcus type I with diminished peroxide production were selected from a population of nitrosoguanidine-treated cells. White cells of normal patients killed the mutant pneumococci as well as the otherwise isogenic wild-type strain. In patients studied with chronic granulomatous disease, however, the peroxide-poor strain was killed far less well than the wild type. These studies indicate that the removal of a peroxide-generating system in the phagocytic vacuole specifically brings forth the killing defect in chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:4148725

  6. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  7. Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle Quality Assurance and Reliability Assessment - Part A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-08

    No. DODIG-2014-111 S E P T E M B E R 8 , 2 0 1 4 Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle Quality Assurance and Reliability Assessment – Part A Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle Quality Assurance and Reliability...Department of Defense F r a u d , W a s t e & A b u s e DODIG-2014-111 (Project No. D2013-DT0TAD-0005.000) │ i Results in Brief Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle

  8. 76 FR 36914 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC, v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc. Notice of Revised Comment Dates On June 3...

  9. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  10. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaty, B J; Bishop, D H

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of bunyaviruses have been applied to understanding bunyavirus-vector interactions. Such approaches have revealed which virus gene and gene products are important in establishing infections in vectors and in transmission of viruses. However, much more information is required to understand the molecular mechanisms of persistent infections of vectors which are lifelong but apparently exert no untoward effect. In fact, it seems remarkable that LAC viral antigen can be detected in almost every cell in an ovarian follicle, yet no untoward effect on fecundity and no teratology is seen. Similarly the lifelong infection of the vector would seem to provide ample opportunity for bunyavirus evolution by genetic drift and, under the appropriate circumstances, by segment reassortment. The potential for bunyavirus evolution by segment reassortment in vectors certainly exists. For example the Group C viruses in a small forest in Brazil seem to constitute a gene pool, with the 6 viruses related alternately by HI/NT and CF reactions, which assay respectively M RNA and S RNA gene products (Casals and Whitman, 1960; Shope and Causey, 1962). Direct evidence for naturally occurring reassortant bunyaviruses has also been obtained. Oligonucleotide fingerprint analyses of field isolates of LAC virus and members of the Patois serogroup of bunyaviruses have demonstrated that reassortment does occur in nature (El Said et al., 1979; Klimas et al., 1981; Ushijima et al., 1981). Determination of the genotypic frequencies of viruses selected by the biological interactions of viruses and vectors after dual infection and segment reassortment is an important issue. Should a virus result that efficiently interacts with alternate vector species, the virus could be expressed in different circumstances with serious epidemiologic consequences. Dual infection of vectors with different viruses is not unlikely, because many bunyaviruses are sympatric in

  11. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  12. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  13. Energy extraction from Kerr black holes by rigidly rotating strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Igata, Takahisa; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we show that a rigidly rotating string can extract the rotational energy from a rotating black hole. We consider Nambu-Goto strings stationary with respect to a corotating Killing vector with an uniform angular velocity ω in the Kerr spacetime. We show that a necessary condition of the energy-extraction process is that an effective horizon on the string world sheet, which corresponds to the inner light surface, is inside the ergosphere of the Kerr black hole and the angular velocity ω is less than that of the black hole Ωh . Furthermore, we discuss global configurations of such strings in both of a slow-rotation limit and the extremal Kerr case.

  14. Scalable motion vector coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  15. Babesial Vector Tick Defensin against Babesia sp. Parasites▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Naotoshi; Battsetseg, Badgar; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Xuan, Xuenan; Oliver, James H.; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of host innate immunity, a well-conserved, evolutionarily ancient defensive mechanism. Infectious disease-bearing vector ticks are thought to possess specific defense molecules against the transmitted pathogens that have been acquired during their evolution. We found in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis a novel parasiticidal peptide named longicin that may have evolved from a common ancestral peptide resembling spider and scorpion toxins. H. longicornis is the primary vector for Babesia sp. parasites in Japan. Longicin also displayed bactericidal and fungicidal properties that resemble those of defensin homologues from invertebrates and vertebrates. Longicin showed a remarkable ability to inhibit the proliferation of merozoites, an erythrocyte blood stage of equine Babesia equi, by killing the parasites. Longicin was localized at the surface of the Babesia sp. parasites, as demonstrated by confocal microscopic analysis. In an in vivo experiment, longicin induced significant reduction of parasitemia in animals infected with the zoonotic and murine B. microti. Moreover, RNA interference data demonstrated that endogenous longicin is able to directly kill the canine B. gibsoni, thus indicating that it may play a role in regulating the vectorial capacity in the vector tick H. longicornis. Theoretically, longicin may serve as a model for the development of chemotherapeutic compounds against tick-borne disease organisms. PMID:17485458

  16. Babesial vector tick defensin against Babesia sp. parasites.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naotoshi; Battsetseg, Badgar; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Xuan, Xuenan; Oliver, James H; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2007-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of host innate immunity, a well-conserved, evolutionarily ancient defensive mechanism. Infectious disease-bearing vector ticks are thought to possess specific defense molecules against the transmitted pathogens that have been acquired during their evolution. We found in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis a novel parasiticidal peptide named longicin that may have evolved from a common ancestral peptide resembling spider and scorpion toxins. H. longicornis is the primary vector for Babesia sp. parasites in Japan. Longicin also displayed bactericidal and fungicidal properties that resemble those of defensin homologues from invertebrates and vertebrates. Longicin showed a remarkable ability to inhibit the proliferation of merozoites, an erythrocyte blood stage of equine Babesia equi, by killing the parasites. Longicin was localized at the surface of the Babesia sp. parasites, as demonstrated by confocal microscopic analysis. In an in vivo experiment, longicin induced significant reduction of parasitemia in animals infected with the zoonotic and murine B. microti. Moreover, RNA interference data demonstrated that endogenous longicin is able to directly kill the canine B. gibsoni, thus indicating that it may play a role in regulating the vectorial capacity in the vector tick H. longicornis. Theoretically, longicin may serve as a model for the development of chemotherapeutic compounds against tick-borne disease organisms.

  17. The Chlorella killed by pulsed electrical discharge in liquid with two different reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Y.; Sun, B.; Yan, Z. Y.; Zhu, X. M.; Liu, H.; Song, Y. J.; Sato, M.

    2013-03-01

    The application of pulsed high-voltage discharge in liquid has attracted wide attention as an effective water treatment. In this paper, two different liquid high-voltage discharge systems were constructed with plate-hole-plate and needle-plate electrode structures, and the inactivation behaviors of Chlorella were studied in the two reactors. The results show that the killing rates of algae in both reactors all increased significantly with increasing discharge voltage and the killing rates were intensely related to discharge power, instantaneous power and single pulse input energy. Furthermore, the inactivation effect in needle-plate reactor was superior to that in plate-hole-plate reactor under the same experimental conditions.

  18. Kinetic Modeling for the Dissolution of MgO Lining Refractory in Al-Killed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fuxiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhang, Ying; Ren, Ying

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model for the dissolution of the magnesia refractory in Al-killed steels was developed to predict the change of chemical compositions in the molten steel. Coupled reaction model and empirical equations were employed to calculate reactions between the refractory and the molten steel. The calculated result showed good agreement with the experimental value from the literature. The relationship between the mass transfer coefficient and the stirring energy dissipation in the molten steel was obtained as k = ( {5.6 - 4.7 × e^{-96.6\\dot{ɛ } ) × 10^{ - 4} m/s. The formation of spinels is dependent on the chemical composition of the molten steel. The MgO refractory may react with Al and O in the liquid steel. Meanwhile, the decomposing of the MgO refractory also plays an important role in the dissolution of the magnesia refractory in Al-killed steels.

  19. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  20. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  1. Combining Synthetic Human Odours and Low-Cost Electrocuting Grids to Attract and Kill Outdoor-Biting Mosquitoes: Field and Semi-Field Evaluation of an Improved Mosquito Landing Box

    PubMed Central

    Matowo, Nancy S.; Koekemoer, Lizette L.; Moore, Sarah J.; Mmbando, Arnold S.; Mapua, Salum A.; Coetzee, Maureen; Okumu, Fredros O.

    2016-01-01

    Background On-going malaria transmission is increasingly mediated by outdoor-biting vectors, especially where indoor insecticidal interventions such as long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) are widespread. Often, the vectors are also physiologically resistant to insecticides, presenting major obstacles for elimination. We tested a combination of electrocuting grids with synthetic odours as an alternative killing mechanism against outdoor-biting mosquitoes. Methods An odour-baited device, the Mosquito Landing Box (MLB), was improved by fitting it with low-cost electrocuting grids to instantly kill mosquitoes attracted to the odour lure, and automated photo switch to activate attractant-dispensing and mosquito-killing systems between dusk and dawn. MLBs fitted with one, two or three electrocuting grids were compared outdoors in a malaria endemic village in Tanzania, where vectors had lost susceptibility to pyrethroids. MLBs with three grids were also tested in a large semi-field cage (9.6×9.6×4.5m), to assess effects on biting-densities of laboratory-reared Anopheles arabiensis on volunteers sitting near MLBs. Results Significantly more mosquitoes were killed when MLBs had two or three grids, than one grid in wet and dry seasons (P<0.05). The MLBs were highly efficient against Mansonia species and malaria vector, An. arabiensis. Of all mosquitoes, 99% were non-blood fed, suggesting host-seeking status. In the semi-field, the MLBs reduced mean number of malaria mosquitoes attempting to bite humans fourfold. Conclusion The improved odour-baited MLBs effectively kill outdoor-biting malaria vector mosquitoes that are behaviourally and physiologically resistant to insecticidal interventions e.g. LLINs. The MLBs reduce human-biting vector densities even when used close to humans, and are insecticide-free, hence potentially antiresistance. The devices could either be used as surveillance tools or complementary mosquito control interventions to accelerate malaria

  2. Combining Synthetic Human Odours and Low-Cost Electrocuting Grids to Attract and Kill Outdoor-Biting Mosquitoes: Field and Semi-Field Evaluation of an Improved Mosquito Landing Box.

    PubMed

    Matowo, Nancy S; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Moore, Sarah J; Mmbando, Arnold S; Mapua, Salum A; Coetzee, Maureen; Okumu, Fredros O

    2016-01-01

    On-going malaria transmission is increasingly mediated by outdoor-biting vectors, especially where indoor insecticidal interventions such as long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) are widespread. Often, the vectors are also physiologically resistant to insecticides, presenting major obstacles for elimination. We tested a combination of electrocuting grids with synthetic odours as an alternative killing mechanism against outdoor-biting mosquitoes. An odour-baited device, the Mosquito Landing Box (MLB), was improved by fitting it with low-cost electrocuting grids to instantly kill mosquitoes attracted to the odour lure, and automated photo switch to activate attractant-dispensing and mosquito-killing systems between dusk and dawn. MLBs fitted with one, two or three electrocuting grids were compared outdoors in a malaria endemic village in Tanzania, where vectors had lost susceptibility to pyrethroids. MLBs with three grids were also tested in a large semi-field cage (9.6 × 9.6 × 4.5m), to assess effects on biting-densities of laboratory-reared Anopheles arabiensis on volunteers sitting near MLBs. Significantly more mosquitoes were killed when MLBs had two or three grids, than one grid in wet and dry seasons (P<0.05). The MLBs were highly efficient against Mansonia species and malaria vector, An. arabiensis. Of all mosquitoes, 99% were non-blood fed, suggesting host-seeking status. In the semi-field, the MLBs reduced mean number of malaria mosquitoes attempting to bite humans fourfold. The improved odour-baited MLBs effectively kill outdoor-biting malaria vector mosquitoes that are behaviourally and physiologically resistant to insecticidal interventions e.g. LLINs. The MLBs reduce human-biting vector densities even when used close to humans, and are insecticide-free, hence potentially antiresistance. The devices could either be used as surveillance tools or complementary mosquito control interventions to accelerate malaria elimination where outdoor

  3. Charge properties and bacterial contact-killing of hyperbranched polyurea-polyethyleneimine coatings with various degrees of alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, Steven; van der Mei, Henny C.; Loontjens, Ton J. A.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of immobilized-quaternary-ammonium-ions (QUAT) uniquely kill adhering bacteria upon contact. QUAT-coatings require a minimal cationic-charge surface density for effective contact-killing of adhering bacteria of around 1014 cm-2. Quaternization of nitrogen is generally achieved through alkylation. Here, we investigate the contribution of additional alkylation with methyl-iodide to the cationic-charge density of hexyl-bromide alkylated, hyperbranched polyurea-polyethyleneimine coatings measuring charge density with fluorescein staining. X-ray-photoelectron-spectroscopy was used to determine the at.% alkylated-nitrogen. Also streaming potentials, water contact-angles and bacterial contact-killing were measured. Cationic-charge density increased with methyl-iodide alkylation times up to 18 h, accompanied by an increase in the at.% alkylated-nitrogen. Zeta-potentials became more negative upon alkylation as a result of shielding of cationiccharges by hydrophobic alkyl-chains. Contact-killing of Gram-positive Staphylococci only occurred when the cationic-charge density exceeded 1016 cm-2 and was carried by alkylated-nitrogen (electron-binding energy 401.3 eV). Gram-negative Escherichia coli was not killed upon contact with the coatings. There with this study reveals that cationic-charge density is neither appropriate nor sufficient to determine the ability of QUAT-coatings to kill adhering bacteria. Alternatively, the at.% of alkylated-nitrogen at 401.3 eV is proposed, as it reflects both cationic-charge and its carrier. The at.% N401.3 eV should be above 0.45 at.% for Gram-positive bacterial contact-killing.

  4. Hidden symmetries and killing tensors on curved spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ianus, S.; Visinescu, M.; Vilcu, G. E.

    2010-11-15

    Higher-order symmetries corresponding to Killing tensors are investigated. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and nonstandard supersymmetries is pointed out. In the Dirac theory on curved spaces, Killing-Yano tensors generate Dirac-type operators involved in interesting algebraic structures as dynamical algebras or even infinite dimensional algebras or superalgebras. The general results are applied to space-times which appear in modern studies. One presents the infinite dimensional superalgebra of Dirac type operators on the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space that can be seen as a twisted loop algebra. The existence of the conformal Killing-Yano tensors is investigated for some spaces with mixed 3-Sasakian structures.

  5. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-01-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

  6. PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE KILLS FISH BY MICROPREDATION NOT ECOTOXIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Massive fish kills in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries involving several million Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus,have been attributed to dinoflagellates of the toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC). Potent ichthyotoxins secreted during Pfiesteria blooms are thought to be responsible fo...

  7. PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE KILLS FISH BY MICROPREDATION NOT ECOTOXIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Massive fish kills in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries involving several million Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus,have been attributed to dinoflagellates of the toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC). Potent ichthyotoxins secreted during Pfiesteria blooms are thought to be responsible fo...

  8. US EPA, Pesticide Product Label, MOLE-NOTS KILLS MOLES ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2011-04-14

    ... ' . I' \\ ~,I' !/~'k .' j /' ,I, ~~:, 11), Kills Moles & Gophers - -- -. J. ... r . • :: I \\ .• ~_. P G r""' l- i • ... • r I , -' .. j . , , . ' I , , "'. Is Mole ~ .s. (iuptle r

  9. Erythrocyte and leukocyte: two partners in bacteria killing.

    PubMed

    Minasyan, Hayk A

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes can't perform phagocytosis in blood stream. Blood velocity prevents phagocytosis because there is no time for leukocyte to recognize and catch bacteria. Bloodstream clearance from pathogens is performed by erythrocytes. During motion in bloodstream erythrocytes become charged by triboelectric effect. This charge attracts bacteria and fixes them on the surface of erythrocyte, then bacteria are engulfed and killed by hemoglobin oxygen. In bloodstream, leukocyte thin-wrinkled elastic membrane can't be charged by triboelectric effect and so leukocyte can't catch bacteria by means of electrostatic attraction force. Leukocytes engulf and kill bacteria out of blood circulatory system: in tissues, lymph nodes, slow velocity lymph, etc. Erythrocyte and leukocyte are bactericidal partners: the first kills bacteria in bloodstream, the second kills them locally, out of blood circulation.

  10. 'Superbug' Resistant to All Antibiotics Killed Nevada Woman

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163038.html 'Superbug' Resistant to All Antibiotics Killed Nevada Woman She died after possibly ... in September from a "superbug" infection that resisted all antibiotics, according to a report released Friday. The ...

  11. Superoxide dismutase protects Escherichia coli against killing by human serum.

    PubMed

    McManus, D C; Josephy, P D

    1995-02-20

    To assess the role of superoxide dismutase in protecting Escherichia coli from killing by human serum and neutrophils, we constructed isogenic, smooth-lipopolysaccharide K-12 strains, either sod wild-type, delta sodA, or delta sodA delta sodB. The delta sodA delta sodB strain was killed by serum much more readily than either the wild-type or delta sodA strain. After allowing for this serum sensitivity difference, the delta sodA delta sodB strain also showed increased susceptibility to phagocytic killing by human neutrophils. These results indicate that superoxide dismutase protects E. coli from killing by serum (complement system) and by human neutrophils, possibly by a role in maintaining bacterial membrane structure.

  12. Killing superalgebra deformations of ten-dimensional supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Vercnocke, Bert

    2007-12-01

    We explore Lie superalgebra deformations of the Killing superalgebras of some ten-dimensional supergravity backgrounds. We prove the rigidity of the Poincaré superalgebras in types I, IIA and IIB, as well as of the Killing superalgebra of the Freund Rubin vacuum of type IIB supergravity. We also prove rigidity of the Killing superalgebras of the NS5-, D0-, D3-, D4- and D5-branes, whereas we exhibit the possible deformations of the D1-, D2-, D6- and D7-brane Killing superalgebras, as well as of that of the type II fundamental string solutions. We relate the superalgebra deformations of the D2- and D6-branes to those of the (delocalized) M2-brane and the Kaluza Klein monopole, respectively. The good behaviour under Kaluza Klein reduction suggests that the deformed superalgebras ought to have a geometric interpretation.

  13. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-06-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered.

  14. Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162649.html Mouthwash Helps Kill Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat: Study Listerine's maker has ... A commercial brand of mouthwash can help control gonorrhea bacteria in the mouth, and daily use may ...

  15. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    PubMed Central

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-01-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism. PMID:25906433

  16. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  17. Comparison of methods to evaluate bacterial contact-killing materials.

    PubMed

    van de Lagemaat, Marieke; Grotenhuis, Arjen; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Roest, Steven; Loontjens, Ton J A; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2017-09-01

    Cationic surfaces with alkylated quaternary-ammonium groups kill adhering bacteria upon contact by membrane disruption and are considered increasingly promising as a non-antibiotic based way to eradicate bacteria adhering to surfaces. However, reliable in vitro evaluation methods for bacterial contact-killing surfaces do not yet exist. More importantly, results of different evaluation methods are often conflicting. Therefore, we compared five methods to evaluate contact-killing surfaces. To this end, we have copolymerized quaternary-ammonium groups into diurethane dimethacrylate/glycerol dimethacrylate (UDMA/GDMA) and determined contact-killing efficacies against five different Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Spray-coating bacteria from an aerosol onto contact-killing surfaces followed by air-drying as well as ASTM E2149-13a (American Society for Testing and Materials) were found unsuitable, while the Petrifilm® system and JIS Z 2801 (Japanese Industrial Standards) were found to be excellent methods to evaluate bacterial contact-killing surfaces. It is recommended however, that these methods be used in combination with a zone of inhibition on agar assay to exclude that leakage of antimicrobials from the material interferes with the contact-killing ability of the surface. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces of biomaterials implants can be life-threatening. Antimicrobials to treat biomaterial-associated infections often fail due to the bacterial biofilm-mode-of-growth or are ineffective due to antibiotic-resistance of causative organisms. Positively-charged, quaternized surfaces can kill bacteria upon contact and are promising as a non-antibiotic-based treatment of biomaterial-associated infections. Reliable methods to determine efficacies of contact-killing surfaces are lacking, however. Here, we show that three out of five methods compared, including an established ASTM, are unsuitable. Methods found suitable should be used in combination with a zone

  18. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  19. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  20. Vector models and generalized SYK models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng

    2017-05-01

    We consider the relation between SYK-like models and vector models by studying a toy model where a tensor field is coupled with a vector field. By integrating out the tensor field, the toy model reduces to the Gross-Neveu model in 1 dimension. On the other hand, a certain perturbation can be turned on and the toy model flows to an SYK-like model at low energy. A chaotic-nonchaotic phase transition occurs as the sign of the perturbation is altered. We further study similar models that possess chaos and enhanced reparameterization symmetries.

  1. Vector models and generalized SYK models

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Cheng

    2017-05-23

    Here, we consider the relation between SYK-like models and vector models by studying a toy model where a tensor field is coupled with a vector field. By integrating out the tensor field, the toy model reduces to the Gross-Neveu model in 1 dimension. On the other hand, a certain perturbation can be turned on and the toy model flows to an SYK-like model at low energy. Furthermore, a chaotic-nonchaotic phase transition occurs as the sign of the perturbation is altered. We further study similar models that possess chaos and enhanced reparameterization symmetries.

  2. Potency of killed plague vaccines prepared from avirulent Yersinia pestis*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James E.; Altieri, Patricia L.; Berman, Sanford; Lowenthal, Joseph P.; Cavanaugh, Dan C.

    1980-01-01

    Killed plague vaccines prepared from avirulent strains A1122 and EV76S of Yersinia pestis were more effective in mouse potency tests than samples of Plague Vaccine, USP, prepared from killed Y. pestis of the virulent strain 195/P. Manufacture of vaccine from avirulent Y. pestis would obviate requirements for the large containment facilities that are currently needed for producing Plague Vaccine, USP. PMID:6975184

  3. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG KILLING ROOM ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF HOG KILLING ROOM ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING NORTHWEST; A PORTION OF THE SCALDING TANK IS VISIBLE AT EXTREME RIGHT, CENTER; CONCRETE PYLONS AT LOWER RIGHT SUPPORTED BY SCRAPING MACHINE; FINAL SCRAPING WAS DONE BY WORKERS STANDING ON ELEVATED PLATFORMS AT LEFT; BATHTUB-SHAPED CART NEAR CENTER OF PHOTO WAS USED TO TRANSPORT OFFAL TO RENDERING AREAS - Rath Packing Company, Hog Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  4. Killing tensors in stationary and axially symmetric space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the existence of Killing tensors for certain (physically motivated) stationary and axially symmetric vacuum space-times. We show nonexistence of a nontrivial Killing tensor for a Tomimatsu-Sato metric (up to valence 7), for a C-metric (up to valence 9) and for a Zipoy-Voorhees metric (up to valence 11). The results are obtained by mathematically completely rigorous, nontrivial computer algebra computations with a huge number of equations involved in the problem.

  5. Moral dilemma: to kill or allow to die?

    PubMed

    Cole, J J

    1989-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that while allowing a person to die with care can be morally justified in particular cases, the option of mercy killing can never be morally defended. There is a significant moral difference between these two concepts. Furthermore, the wedge argument, the medical fallibility argument, and the medical care and trust argument provide cogent and convincing reasons for maintaining a legal distinction between mercy killing and letting a person die.

  6. Yersinia pestis kills Caenorhabditis elegans by a biofilm-independent process that involves novel virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Styer, Katie L; Hopkins, Gregory W; Bartra, Sara Schesser; Plano, Gregory V; Frothingham, Richard; Aballay, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    It is known that Yersinia pestis kills Caenorhabditis elegans by a biofilm-dependent mechanism that is similar to the mechanism used by the pathogen to block food intake in the flea vector. Using Y. pestis KIM5, which lacks the genes that are required for biofilm formation, we show that Y. pestis can kill C. elegans by a biofilm-independent mechanism that correlates with the accumulation of the pathogen in the intestine. We used this novel Y. pestis–C. elegans pathogenesis system to show that previously known and unknown virulence-related genes are required for full virulence in C. elegans. Six Y. pestis mutants with insertions in genes that are not related to virulence before were isolated using C. elegans. One of the six mutants carried an insertion in a novel virulence gene and showed significantly reduced virulence in a mouse model of Y. pestis pathogenesis. Our results indicate that the Y. pestis–C. elegans pathogenesis system that is described here can be used to identify and study previously uncharacterized Y. pestis gene products required for virulence in mammalian systems. PMID:16170309

  7. Molecular detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in road-killed wild animals.

    PubMed

    Richini-Pereira, Virgínia Bodelão; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Griese, Juliana; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Macoris, Severino Assis Graça; da Silva, Reinaldo José; Barrozo, Lígia; Tavares, Patrícia Morais e Silva; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2008-02-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infections have been little studied in wild and/or domestic animals, which may represent an important indicator of the presence of the pathogen in nature. Road-killed wild animals have been used for surveillance of vectors of zoonotic pathogens and may offer new opportunities for eco-epidemiological studies of paracoccidiodomycosis (PCM). The presence of P. brasiliensis infection was evaluated by Nested-PCR in tissue samples collected from 19 road-killed animals; 3 Cavia aperea (guinea pig), 5 Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating-fox), 1 Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), 1 Dasypus septemcinctus (seven-banded armadillo), 2 Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossum), 1 Eira barbara (tayra), 2 Gallictis vittata (grison), 2 Procyon cancrivorus (raccoon) and 2 Sphiggurus spinosus (porcupine). Specific P. brasiliensis amplicons were detected in (a) several organs of the two armadillos and one guinea pig, (b) the lung and liver of the porcupine, and (c) the lungs of raccoons and grisons. P. brasiliensis infection in wild animals from endemic areas might be more common than initially postulated. Molecular techniques can be used for detecting new hosts and mapping 'hot spot' areas of PCM.

  8. Spacetime characterizations of Λ-vacuum metrics with a null Killing 2-form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Marc; Senovilla, José M. M.

    2016-10-01

    An exhaustive list of four-dimensional Λ-vacuum spacetimes admitting a Killing vector ξ whose self-dual Killing two-form {{ F }}μ ν is null is obtained assuming that the self-dual Weyl tensor is proportional to the tensor product of {{ F }}μ ν by itself. Our analysis complements previous results (Mars 1999 Class Quantum Grav. 16 2507-23 Mars and Senovilla 2015 Ann. H. Poincaré 16 1509-50) concerning the case with non-null {{ F }}μ ν . We analyze both cases with Λ vanishing or not. In the latter case we prove that {{Λ }}\\lt 0 must hold necessarily, and we find a characterization of the Einstein spacetimes conformal to pp-waves. In the former case we obtain spacetime characterizations of vacuum plane waves and of the stationary vacuum Brinkmann spacetimes. At the light of the full set of results, old and new, we reformulate the case with non-null {{ F }}μ ν and {{Λ }}=0. We finally present a table collecting the results for both null, and non-null, {{ F }}μ ν .

  9. Vector meson electroproduction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Juan; Cai, Xian-Hao; Zhou, Li-Juan

    2012-08-01

    Based on the generalized QCD vector meson dominance model, we study the electroproduction of a vector meson off a proton in the QCD inspired eikonalized model. Numerical calculations for the total cross section σtot and differential cross section dσ/dt are performed for ρ, ω and varphi meson electroproduction in this paper. Since gluons interact among themselves (self-interaction), two gluons can form a glueball with quantum numbers IG, JPC = 0+,2++, decay width Γt ≈ 100 MeV, and mass of mG = 2.23 GeV. The three gluons can form a three-gluon colorless bound state with charge conjugation quantum number C = -1, called the Odderon. The mediators of interactions between projectiles (the quark and antiquark pair fluctuated from the virtual photon) and the proton target (a three-quark system) are the tensor glueball and the Odderon. Our calculated results in the tensor glueball and Odderon exchange model fit to the existing data successfully, which evidently shows that our present QCD mechanism is a good description of meson electroproduction off a proton. It should be emphasized that our mechanism is different from the theoretical framework of Block et al. We also believe that the present study and its success are important for the investigation of other vector meson electro- and photoproduction at high energies, as well as for searching for new particles such as tensor glueballs and Odderons, which have been predicted by QCD and the color glass condensate model (CGC). Therefore, in return, it can test the validity of QCD and the CGC model.

  10. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:3013778

  11. Role of nitric oxide and superoxide in Giardia lamblia killing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P D; Assreuy, J

    1997-01-01

    Giardia lamblia trophozoites were incubated for 2 h with activated murine macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) donors or a superoxide anion generator (20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase plus 1 mM xanthine). Activated macrophages were cytotoxic to Giardia trophozoites (approximately 60% dead trophozoites). The effect was inhibited (> 90%) by an NO synthase inhibitor (200 microM) and unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD, 300 U/ml). Giardia trophozoites were killed by the NO donors, S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in a dose-dependent manner (LD50 300 and 50 microM, respectively). A dual NO-superoxide anion donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), did not have a killing effect in concentrations up to 1 mM. However, when SOD (300 U/ml) was added simultaneously with SIN-1 to Giardia, a significant trophozoite-killing effect was observed (approximately 35% dead trophozoites at 1 mM). The mixtures of SNAP or SNP with superoxide anion, which yields peroxynitrite, abolished the trophozoite killing induced by NO donors. Authentic peroxynitrite only killed trophozoites at very high concentrations (3 mM). These results indicate that NO accounts for Giardia trophozoites killing and this effect is not mediated by peroxynitrite.

  12. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  13. Vectors Point Toward Pisa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    The author shows that the set of all sequences in which each term is the sum of the two previous terms forms a vector space of dimension two. He uses this result to obtain the formula for the Fibonacci sequence and applies the same technique to other linear recursive relations. (MM)

  14. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  15. The vector reflector.

    PubMed

    Citrin, D S

    2012-06-15

    A linearly polarized Bessel beam, whose spatial frequencies correspond to the Brewster angle, impinging at normal incidence on a higher refractive-index interface is shown to lead to a reflected field that can be used to produce an azimuthally polarized optical vector beam.

  16. LTR-vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Woude, G.F.; McClements, W.L.; Oskarsson, M.K.; Blair, D.G.

    1981-07-01

    The patent application describes the production of vectors composed of portions of retrovirus, particularly of Moloney sarcoma virus DNA including the 'LTR' sequence which can activate genes and additional viral sequences which can 'rescue' these genes into a replicating virus particle.

  17. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  18. Designing plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy vectors are commonly based on recombinant bacterial plasmids or their derivatives. The plasmids are propagated in bacteria, so, in addition to their therapeutic cargo, they necessarily contain a bacterial replication origin and a selection marker, usually a gene conferring antibiotic resistance. Structural and maintenance plasmid stability in bacteria is required for the plasmid DNA production and can be achieved by carefully choosing a combination of the therapeutic DNA sequences, replication origin, selection marker, and bacterial strain. The use of appropriate promoters, other regulatory elements, and mammalian maintenance devices ensures that the therapeutic gene or genes are adequately expressed in target human cells. Optimal immune response to the plasmid vectors can be modulated via inclusion or exclusion of DNA sequences containing immunostimulatory CpG sequence motifs. DNA fragments facilitating construction of plasmid vectors should also be considered for inclusion in the design of plasmid vectors. Techniques relying on site-specific or homologous recombination are preferred for construction of large plasmids (>15 kb), while digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes with subsequent ligation of the resulting DNA fragments continues to be the mainstream approach for generation of small- and medium-size plasmids. Rapid selection of a desired recombinant plasmid against a background of other plasmids continues to be a challenge. In this chapter, the emphasis is placed on efficient and flexible versions of DNA cloning protocols using selection of recombinant plasmids by restriction endonucleases directly in the ligation mixture.

  19. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  20. What is a vector?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anthony James; Morgan, Eric René; Booth, Mark; Norman, Rachel; Perkins, Sarah Elizabeth; Hauffe, Heidi Christine; Mideo, Nicole; Antonovics, Janis; McCallum, Hamish; Fenton, Andy

    2017-05-05

    Many important and rapidly emerging pathogens of humans, livestock and wildlife are 'vector-borne'. However, the term 'vector' has been applied to diverse agents in a broad range of epidemiological systems. In this perspective, we briefly review some common definitions, identify the strengths and weaknesses of each and consider the functional differences between vectors and other hosts from a range of ecological, evolutionary and public health perspectives. We then consider how the use of designations can afford insights into our understanding of epidemiological and evolutionary processes that are not otherwise apparent. We conclude that from a medical and veterinary perspective, a combination of the 'haematophagous arthropod' and 'mobility' definitions is most useful because it offers important insights into contact structure and control and emphasizes the opportunities for pathogen shifts among taxonomically similar species with similar feeding modes and internal environments. From a population dynamics and evolutionary perspective, we suggest that a combination of the 'micropredator' and 'sequential' definition is most appropriate because it captures the key aspects of transmission biology and fitness consequences for the pathogen and vector itself. However, we explicitly recognize that the value of a definition always depends on the research question under study.This article is part of the themed issue 'Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission'. © 2017 The Authors.