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  1. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia Overview Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells. The term "chronic" in chronic myelogenous leukemia indicates that this cancer ...

  2. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  5. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mielógena crónica About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  6. Overcoming resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia is an issue that has developed in parallel to the availability of rationally designed small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors to treat the disease. A significant fraction of patients with clinical resistance are recognized to harbor point mutations/substitutions in the Abl kinase domain, which limit or preclude drug binding and activity. Recent data suggest that compound mutations may develop as well. Proper identification of clinical resistance and prudent screening for all causes of resistance, ranging from adherence to therapy to Abl kinase mutations, is crucial to success with kinase inhibitor therapy. There is currently an array of Abl kinase inhibitors with unique toxicity and activity profiles available, allowing for individualizing therapy beginning with initial choice at diagnosis and as well informed choice of subsequent therapy in the face of toxicity or resistance, with or without Abl kinase domain mutations. Recent studies continue to highlight the merits of increasingly aggressive initial therapy to subvert resistance and importance of early response to identify need for change in therapy. Proper knowledge and navigation amongst novel therapy options and consideration of drug toxicities, individual patient characteristics, disease response, and vigilance for development of resistance are necessary elements of optimized care for the patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  7. Mechanisms of Disease Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard L. Defoe Brian J. Druker, M.D. CONTRACTING...Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0606 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Richard L. Defoe, Brian J...resistant cells to imatinib or alternative Bcr-Abl kinase inhibitors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Chronic Myeloid Leukemia , Disease Persistence, Resistance 16

  8. Management of chronic myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Amit; Rolen, Katrina; Shah, Binay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to improvement in survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. Many young CML patients encounter pregnancy during their lifetime. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors inhibit several proteins that are known to have important functions in gonadal development, implantation and fetal development, thus increasing the risk of embryo toxicities. Studies have shown imatinib to be embryotoxic in animals with varying effects in fertility. Since pregnancy is rare in CML, there are no randomized controlled trials to address the optimal management of this condition. However, there are several case reports and case series on CML in pregnancy. At the present time, there is no consensus on how to manage different pregnancy situations in CML. In this article, we review current literature on CML in pregnancy, discuss the effects of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors on fertility and pregnancy and suggest an evidence-based treatment of CML in pregnancy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amsberg, Gunhild Keller-von; Schafhausen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA) trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events.

  12. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Amsberg, Gunhild Keller-von; Schafhausen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA) trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events. PMID:23674887

  13. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Mechanisms of Graft-vs.-Leukemia against a Novel Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0311 TITLE: Mechanisms of Graft-vs.- Leukemia ...against a Novel Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Warren D. Shlomchik, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanisms of Graft-vs.- Leukemia against a Novel Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17

  15. Allogeneic marrow transplantation for children with juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J E; Buckner, C D; Thomas, E D; Fleischer, R; Sullivan, K M; Appelbaum, F A; Storb, R

    1988-04-01

    Fourteen children between the ages of 2 and 5 years with juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia were given cyclophosphamide, total-body irradiation, and marrow transplants. Unmodified marrow was given to six patients who received marrow from HLA-identical siblings and eight patients who received marrow from family members HLA identical for one haplotype but mismatched for one to three loci on the nonshared haplotype. Five patients died of transplant-related complications, and three relapsed at 48, 81, and 1,670 days posttransplant and died of leukemia. Six patients survive in continuous remission from 0.5 to 11.5 years posttransplant.

  16. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  17. Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0798 TITLE: Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Christa Muller-Sieburg, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center San Diego, Ca 92121-1131 REPORT DATE: September 2005 TYPE OF REPORT...2005 4, TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81

  18. Bosutinib: a review of preclinical studies in chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Boschelli, Frank; Arndt, Kim; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally active Src and Abl kinase inhibitor presently in Phase III trials for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), and in Phase II trials for treatment of breast cancer. Bosutinib is a potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic agent in CML cells and inhibits Bcr-Abl mediated signalling at nanomolar concentrations. Short-term administration of bosutinib causes regression of K562 and KU812 CML tumour xenografts. BaF3 murine myeloid cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl are sensitive to bosutinib treatment, as are BaF3 cells expressing many imatinib-resistant forms of Bcr-Abl. Recent studies indicate that bosutinib is active against a broader spectrum of kinases than originally believed. These additional inhibitory activities have interesting possibilities for further clinical development. This review will focus on preclinical studies supporting the clinical development of bosutinib for treatment of CML, with a discussion on the broader potential of this agent in other oncology indications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jennifer L; Whittington, Julia K; Wilmes, Christine M; Messick, Joanne B

    2009-03-01

    A free-ranging adult female great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was presented to the Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois after being observed with anorexia and decreased activity. A severe leukocytosis (212 400 cells/microl), primarily comprised of mature heterophils, was found at presentation. Results of various diagnostic tests including radiographs, Chlamydophila serologic testing, measurement of Aspergillus antibody and antigen titers, plasma protein electrophoresis, fecal culture and acid-fast staining, coelioscopy, endoscopy, tracheoscopy, exploratory coelomotomy, nuclear scintigraphy, tissue cultures, bone marrow biopsy, and histopathology revealed no underlying cause for the persistent leukocytosis. No response to treatment with antibiotics or antifungal agents was observed, although a transient, significant decrease in the leukocyte count (6200 cells/microl) was observed after treatment with fenbendazole. A presumptive diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia was made based on 3 factors: disease duration of greater than 3 months, a lack of identifiable foci of inflammation, and a lack of response to conventional therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed based on postmortem examination and testing 177 days after initial presentation.

  20. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia- Initiating Cells Require Polycomb Group Protein EZH2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huafeng; Peng, Cong; Huang, Jialiang; Li, Bin E; Kim, Woojin; Smith, Elenoe C; Fujiwara, Yuko; Qi, Jun; Cheloni, Giulia; Das, Partha P; Nguyen, Minh; Li, Shaoguang; Bradner, James E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have revolutionized chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) management. Disease eradication, however, is hampered by innate resistance of leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) to TKI-induced killing, which also provides the basis for subsequent emergence of TKI-resistant mutants. We report that EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), is overexpressed in CML LICs and required for colony formation and survival and cell-cycle progression of CML cell lines. A critical role for EZH2 is supported by genetic studies in a mouse CML model. Inactivation of Ezh2 in conventional conditional mice and through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing prevents initiation and maintenance of disease and survival of LICs, irrespective of BCR-ABL1 mutational status, and extends survival. Expression of the EZH2 homolog EZH1 is reduced in EZH2-deficient CML LICs, creating a scenario resembling complete loss of PRC2. EZH2 dependence of CML LICs raises prospects for improved therapy of TKI-resistant CML and/or eradication of disease by addition of EZH2 inhibitors.

  2. Cytomegalovirus sinusitis in a child with chronic myelogenous leukemia following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Ahmad; Sahni, Kiren; Hanna, Christian; Suryadevara, Manika; Goyal, Parul; Cherrick, Irene

    2011-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common opportunistic pathogen. CMV sinusitis has been described in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, but not in other immune compromising conditions. In this report, we describe CMV sinusitis in a child with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) following bone marrow transplantation.

  3. A BCR-ABL Kinase Activity-Independent Signaling Pathway in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    myeloproliferative disease in mice receiving P210 bcr/abl-transduced bone marrow. Blood. 1998;92:3780-3792. 17. Zhang X, Ren R. Bcr-Abl efficiently induces a... myeloproliferative disease and production of excess interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in mice: a novel model for chronic...Xu L, et al. Efficient and rapid induction of a chronic myelogenous leukemia-like myeloproliferative disease in mice receiving P210 bcr/abl-transduced

  4. Effects of Inactivating Ras-Converting Enzyme or Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferases in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Enzyme or Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferase in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ruibao Ren...Methyltransferase in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0238 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...commonly activated in human cancers , are critical mediators of BCR-ABL in leukemogenesis. Ras-converting enzyme (Rce1) and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl

  5. Evaluation of the G-quadruplex Binding Drug Telomestatin as an Inhibitor of c-myb in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Drug Telomestatin as an Inhibitor of c- myb in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Scot W. Ebbinghaus, M.D...c-myb in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0233 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Scot...CML in vivo? We hypothesize that the anti- leukemia activity of telomestatin in CML is in part due to inhibition of MYB expression by the binding of

  6. beta-Glucuronidase is an optimal normalization control gene for molecular monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Won; Chen, Qiaofang; Knowles, Daniel M; Cesarman, Ethel; Wang, Y Lynn

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative monitoring of breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson kinase (ABL) transcripts has become indispensable in the clinical care of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because quantity and quality of RNA in clinical samples are highly variable, a suitable internal normalization control is required for accurate BCR-ABL quantification. However, few studies have examined suitability of the control genes using criteria relevant to residual disease testing. In this study, we evaluated a number of control genes with the application of several novel criteria, including control gene performance on serial patient sample testing and in a residual disease model. We also examined expression of the control genes in BCR-ABL-positive K562 cells in response to Gleevec treatment. We found that beta-glucuronidase is the best control gene among those studied. Importantly, ABL, a widely used control gene, generates misleading BCR-ABL changes that potentially affect the clinical management of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

  7. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia with persistent neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Seki, Takahiro; Nakahara, Yoshitaka; Tomita, Akitada; Takahashi, Masashi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed in a 7-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat. Leukocytosis (74,900/µl)--mature neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia--was observed. Bone marrow aspiration revealed hypercellularity with proliferation of cells of myeloid lineage. An underlying condition leading to leukocytosis was not identified. The severe leukocytosis did not respond to antibiotic therapy. Based on these findings, chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed. Because of the absence of clinical signs, the cat was monitored without treatment until 7 months after diagnosis, when it developed pruritic skin lesions. Pruritus was controlled with oral prednisolone. Forty-two months after diagnosis, the cat developed nasal lymphoma, which was treated with radiation therapy, resulting in complete remission. The cat was still in good physical condition 63 months after diagnosis, despite the persistence of marked neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia.

  8. Response of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients to COAP-splenectomy. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Hester, J P; Waddell, C C; Coltman, C A; Morrison, F S; Stephens, R L; Balcerzak, S P; Baker, L H; Chen, T T

    1984-11-01

    Eighty-seven patients from 18 institutions with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia were registered on a Southwest Oncology Group protocol for multiagent induction and single-agent maintenance chemotherapy, with randomization to an immunotherapy arm. Elective surgical splenectomy was performed for 42 patients at the completion of 3 months of induction therapy. Final analysis of the study revealed statistically significant survival advantages were correlated with age, splenectomy, the absence of hepatic leukemic infiltrate at the time of splenectomy, and race.

  9. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  10. [beta-thalassemia minor diagnosed in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia during hydroxyurea therapy].

    PubMed

    Chiba, K; Kurosawa, M; Kondo, T; Suzuki, S; Musashi, M; Asaka, M; Imamura, M; Hattori, Y; Oba, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of leukocytosis and microcytic anemia with hypochromia, target cells, and increased levels of hemoglobin A2 and hemoglobin F. The results of a gene analysis yielded a diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia and beta-thalassemia minor. A gradual increase in hemoglobin was observed during hydroxyurea therapy, which was performed over a 12-week period. This increment appeared to be due to suppressed production of myeloid cells. It was been reported that hydroxyurea increases total hemoglobin due to increased hemoglobin F synthesis in patients with beta-thalassemia. However, hydroxyurea had no clear influence on hemoglobin concentration in this case.

  11. Heralding Extramedullary Blast Crisis: Horner's Syndrome with Brachial Plexopathy in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sajish; Patil, Sadanand I

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) blast crisis is an ominous clinical event that is challenging to treat. This can develop at extramedullary sites rarely and is defined as the infiltration of blasts outside the bone marrow irrespective of proliferation of blasts within the bone marrow. We aim to report an unusual clinical presentation characterized by Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral arm weakness, and cervical lymphadenopathy as the first signs of extramedullary blast crisis in a CML patient. To the best of our knowledge, the extramedullary locations involving the brachial plexus along with cervicothoracic paraspinal chloroma have not been previously reported in the literature.

  12. Bcr-Abl and inhibition of apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Luna, J L

    2000-10-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells are highly resistant to apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. The observation that production of Bcr-Abl is the initiating event in CML has focussed attention on the survival signals triggered by this oncogene. A number of signal transducers and transcription factors have been associated with the antiapoptotic phenotype of CML cells, some of which lead to the expression and/or activation of members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis modulators, such as Bcl-xL and Bad. In this article, recent advances in understanding the antiapoptotic pathways triggered by Bcr-Abl in CML cells, are discussed.

  13. [Sudden deafness as the initial manifestation of chronic myelogenous leukemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yandi; An, Lifeng; Jin, Guanghua

    2015-05-01

    To study the pathogenesis of hearing loss in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). To report one case with CML whose first sign was sudden unilateral hearing loss. Sudden hearing loss in CML was presented with dramatic high white blood cell count in peripheral blood. Some cases of sudden hearing loss in CML may be improved or even cured by leukapheresis and intrathecal chemotherapy. The proposed pathogenesis for deafness in leukemia is due to hyperleukocytosis, hyperviscosity syndrome, leukemic infiltration and the inner ear hemorrhage. In treatment, clinicians should quickly reduce the number of white blood cells to lighten the tumor burden. Intrathecal injection of MTX and plasmapheresis is commonly used.

  14. Blastoid mantle cell lymphoma occurring in a patient in complete remission of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garzia, M; Sora, F; Teofili, L; Di Mario, A; Voso, M T; Rumi, C; La Rocca, L M; Sica, S; Zini, G

    2007-01-01

    The development of a de novo lymphoma in patients affected by chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a rare event. The introduction of new molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), allows a correct differential diagnosis between lymphoid blastic crisis and a blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), which shows an aggressive behavior and some molecular characteristics detectable by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry. We report a case of a blastoid variant of MCL that developed in a patient with CML who achieved complete cytogenetic and molecular response to imatinib mesylate treatment.

  15. Heralding Extramedullary Blast Crisis: Horner's Syndrome with Brachial Plexopathy in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sadanand I.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) blast crisis is an ominous clinical event that is challenging to treat. This can develop at extramedullary sites rarely and is defined as the infiltration of blasts outside the bone marrow irrespective of proliferation of blasts within the bone marrow. We aim to report an unusual clinical presentation characterized by Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral arm weakness, and cervical lymphadenopathy as the first signs of extramedullary blast crisis in a CML patient. To the best of our knowledge, the extramedullary locations involving the brachial plexus along with cervicothoracic paraspinal chloroma have not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:28096817

  16. Structural Biology Contributions to the Discovery of Drugs to Treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    This case study illustrates how the determination of multiple co-crystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery efforts leading to the design of nilotinib, a newly approved therapy for imatinib-intolerant and - resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from the BCR-Abl onco-protein, which possesses a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although many chronic-phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent, durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail, or lose their response to therapy, often due to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 60 such point mutations have been detected in imatinib-resistant patients. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small molecule Abl inhibitors, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis for resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way this information is used to support drug discovery.

  17. Structural biology contributions to the discovery of drugs to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W. Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    A case study showing how the determination of multiple cocrystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery, resulting in a compound effective in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) results from the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, which has a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although most chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail to respond or lose their response to therapy owing to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 40 such point mutations have been observed in imatinib-resistant patients. The crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small-molecule Abl inhibitors were determined, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis of resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way that this information is used to support drug discovery.

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Emole, Josephine; Talabi, Taiwo; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. PMID:27013862

  20. [Undifferentiated blastic cell crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic tumor in the skin].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Kiyosaki, M; Amaya, H; Nakamaki, T; Hino, K; Tomoyasu, S

    2000-04-01

    A 54-year-old female, who had been treated for 4 years in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was admitted for management of a CML blastic crisis. Blast cells showed strong positive expression of CD7 and HLA-DR, and weakly expressed CD2, CD5 and CD10, as well. The cells were peroxidase negative in peripheral blood and bone marrow. An undifferentiated blastic crisis was diagnosed and she was treated with Interferon-alpha and VP(vincristine 2 mg/week; prednisolone 30 mg/day). A 5-7 mm in diameter tumor in the skin of the anterior right chest appeared one week after VP therapy. The tumor consisted of blasts which were CD13, CD33 and peroxidase positive, unlike the peripheral undifferentiated blasts. This is a rare case of mixed blast crisis with an increase in undifferentiated blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and myeloblastic tumor formation in the skin.

  1. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Erythroid differentiation in K562 chronic myelogenous cells induced by crambescidin 800, a pentacyclic guanidine alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Shunji; Kong, Dexin; Matsui, Kouhei; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation induction of K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells by crambescidin 800, a pentacyclic guanidine alkaloid isolated from a marine sponge, was examined. Crambescidin 800 increased hemoglobin production in K562 cells at concentrations of 0.15-1 microM and arrested the cell cycle of K562 cells at the S-phase. The expression of p21 was detected after 24-h treatment with crambescidin 800, and an increase of the expression was observed after 48-h treatment, but there was no remarkable change in the expression level of p27. This evidence indicates that crambescidin 800 induced the differentiation of K562 cells into erythroblasts accompanied by cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Furthermore, crambescidin 800 induced a morphological change with neurite outgrowth in Neuro 2A cells at a 0.03-0.1 microM concentration.

  3. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse Presenting With Central Nervous System Blast Crisis and Bilateral Optic Nerve Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Abdel Fattah, Maaly; Al Nounou, Randa M; Chebbo, Wahiba; Dogar, Mohammed Asif

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral, simultaneous optic nerve sheath infiltration as a manifestation of leukemia relapse is very rare. A 45-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia was successfully treated to cytogenetic bone marrow remission 1 year previously and maintained on imatinib. She developed total bilateral blindness with marked, bilateral optic disc edema and evidence of bilateral optic nerve infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology confirmed central nervous system (CNS) blast crisis. She recovered visual acuity of 20/20 in the right eye, and 20/25 in the left eye with salvage systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Our report underscores the importance of timely and aggressive intervention of blast crisis of the CNS and the need for CNS penetrating induction and maintenance therapy.

  4. Candida albicans epididymo-orchitis and fungemia in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Mark; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Qureshi, Salman

    1996-01-01

    The fourth reported case of candidal epididymo-orchitis in the literature and the first reported case successfully cured with only low dose amphotericin B is described. A 75-year-old male with chronic myelogenous leukemia presented with acute testicular and epididymal swelling and pain. Subsequent investigations suggested the diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis due to Candida albicans. This was successfully treated with intravenous amphotericin B (total dose of 500 mg). Based on the three previous case reports and the current case several characteristic features that increased the suspicion of this entity were identified. These features include an immunocompromised state, candiduria, specific epididymal ultrasonographic appearance, as well as typical clinical features of epididymo-orchitis. PMID:22514460

  5. Familial Mediterranean fever gene as a possible modifier of Sweet syndrome with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Takashi; Yamashita, Kouhei; Ohno, Tatsuharu; Izumi, Taisuke; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Sasada, Masataka; Uchiyama, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Sweet syndrome is a multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized by acute fever, as well as painful erythematous plaques infiltrated with mature neutrophils in the absence of vasculitis. The pathogenesis of the disease has not yet been clarified, although several proinflammatory cytokines have been reported to be involved in the disease process. We describe here a patient clinically diagnosed with Sweet syndrome with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The mutational analysis of the patient revealed a compound heterozygous E148Q/R202Q mutation in exon 2 of MEFV gene, which is a causative gene for familial Mediterranean fever. This is the first report to describe MEFV gene mutations in Sweet syndrome. Our results suggest that Sweet syndrome may be mediated though similar inflammatory mechanisms to those of familial Mediterranean fever. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Acute kidney injury presenting a feature of leukemic infiltration during therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Yukio; Sato, Waichi; Masuda, Tomohiro; Hamada, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Miho; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Ozaki, Takenori; Ito, Isao; Mizuno, Masashi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease that originates in abnormal pluripotent bone marrow stem cells and it is consistently associated with the Philadelphia chromosome and/or BCR/ ABL fusion gene. Renal infiltration of leukemic cells is relatively rare in CML and is associated with renal impairment. We describe a patient who developed acute renal failure by tubulointerstitial nephropathy during treatment with imatinib mesylate for CML. The acute kidney injury was subsequently found to be due to direct leukemic infiltration. Treatment with hydroxycarbamide and prednisolone resulted in stabilization of the renal function for approximately 4 months. Leukemic infiltration into the kidney should always be considered when a patient with CML presents with renal impairment, regardless of the clinical stage, as the renal failure often responds well to chemotherapy.

  7. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: a multivariate analysis of the associations of patient characteristics and therapy with survival.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, H M; Smith, T L; McCredie, K B; Keating, M J; Walters, R S; Talpaz, M; Hester, J P; Bligham, G; Gehan, E; Freireich, E J

    1985-12-01

    The prognostic importance of patient pretreatment clinical and laboratory features was investigated in a group of 303 patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive benign-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Intensive chemotherapy was given to 97 patients, and 78 underwent an early elective splenectomy. The overall median survival time, dated from hospital admission, was 39 months. Patient characteristics associated with shortened survival were age 60 years or older, black race, the presence of hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, symptoms, weight loss, and poor performance status. Adverse blood and bone marrow parameters were anemia, thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia, a high proportion of peripheral blasts plus promyelocytes or of basophils, a high proportion of marrow blasts or basophils, decreased marrow megakaryocytes, and cytogenetic abnormalities in addition to the Philadelphia chromosome. Several of these factors were interrelated. A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the combination blood basophilia, race, additional cytogenetic abnormalities, age and marrow basophilia had the strongest predictive relationship to survival time. This resulted in a model segregating patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, with median survivals of 53, 39, and 25 months, respectively. Another model was derived that did not include the marrow features and identified splenomegaly and platelet counts as adding to the prognosis prediction by blood basophilia, race, and age. Evaluation of the effect of therapy, after adjusting for differences in prognostic characteristics, showed that intensive chemotherapy was associated with survival prolongation among patients at intermediate and high risk of death. We conclude that a combination of pretreatment factors identifies different risk subcategories in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and is helpful in assessing overall prognosis and treatment effect.

  8. Bosutinib: a review of its use in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; McCormack, Paul L; Plosker, Greg L

    2014-02-01

    Bosutinib (Bosulif®) is an orally administered small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of BCR-ABL and SRC family kinases. It is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy (imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib) [USA] or for a small subpopulation of these patients for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options (EU). In a multinational pivotal trial (n = 547), bosutinib treatment resulted in a major cytogenetic response (MCyR) at 24 weeks in one-third of all treated patients with imatinib-resistant chronic-phase CML who had no previous exposure to any TKIs other than imatinib (primary endpoint), with similar results observed in chronic-phase CML patients who were intolerant of imatinib and naïve to all other TKIs. MCyRs were also seen in more than one-quarter of evaluable patients with chronic-phase CML previously treated with multiple TKIs. Most of the patients with chronic-phase CML achieved a complete hematologic response with bosutinib and some patients with advanced phases of CML achieved an overall hematologic response. Responses were seen irrespective of the type of BCR-ABL mutation at baseline, except T315I. Bosutinib had a manageable tolerability profile in the pivotal trial, with ≤21 % of patients with chronic-phase CML discontinuing the treatment because of adverse events. Diarrhea was the most common adverse event but was generally manageable, with only few patients discontinuing the treatment because of diarrhea. Therefore, bosutinib is a useful TKI option for patients with Ph+ CML in second-line or greater settings.

  9. Presence of Additional Cytogenetic Abnormality of t(1;15) at Diagnosis of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia-Chronic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ji, Misuk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hyeong Nyeon; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo-Min; Kim, Sung-Yong; Han, Sung-Hee

    2016-05-01

    At diagnosis, fewer than 10% of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients have additional cytogenetic abnormalities (ACAs), which are frequently found in transformation to blast crisis. We report a case of CML-chronic phase (CML-CP) that showed t(1;15) at diagnosis. A 64-year-old man presented with sustained leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. His bone marrow (BM) was hypercellular with 2.5% blasts and BCR-ABL1 rearrangement. The karyotype in the BM was 46,XY,t(1;15)(q32;p13),t(9;22)(q34;q11.2)[20], while the karyotype in the peripheral blood was 46,XY[20]. This is the first report on the presence of t(1;15) at diagnosis of CML-CP, and its clinical significance remains unclear.

  10. Omacetaxine: a protein translation inhibitor for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is driven by the Bcr-Abl fusion protein which is a result of a (9;22) chromosomal translocation. Imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors, TKIs) have revolutionized how CML is treated. While the majority of patients respond to these kinase inhibitors, a subset become resistant to these therapeutics. Synribo (omacetaxine mepesuccinate) was recently FDA approved for Philadelphia-positive CML either in chronic or accelerated phase whose disease failed two prior TKIs. With omacetaxine 1.25 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 days during induction and for 7 days during maintenance, a major cytogenetic response occurred in 20% of patients in chronic phase and major hematologic response in 27% of patients in accelerated phase. Laboratory investigations unraveled the mechanism of action and effectiveness of this agent. Bcr-Abl protein is intrinsically programmed to turn over with a short half-life which makes it susceptible to protein translation inhibitors. Omacetaxine (homoharringtonine) inhibits total protein biosynthesis by binding to A-site cleft of ribosomes. As a corollary to this action, there is a diminution of short-lived proteins such as Bcr-Abl followed by cell death. Approval of this first-in-class protein translation inhibitor opens up new avenues for its use in other diseases as well as mechanism-based combinations. PMID:24501394

  11. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. [Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps.

  13. Armillaridin induces autophagy-associated cell death in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Han; Huang, Huey-Lan; Huang, Wei-Pang; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-10-01

    Armillaridin (AM) is an aromatic ester compound isolated from Armillaria mellea. Treatment with AM markedly reduced the viability of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562, chronic erythroleukemia HEL 92.1.7, and acute monoblastic leukemia U937 cells, but not normal human monocytes, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of K562 cells with AM caused changes characteristic of autophagy. Only a small amount of AM-treated K562 cells exhibited apoptosis. By contrast, AM treatment resulted in extensive apoptotic features in U937 and HEL 92.1.7 cells without evident autophagy. The autophagy of K562 cells induced by AM involved autophagic flux, including autophagosome induction, the processing of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and downregulation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3). By bcr-abl knockdown, the growth inhibition of K562 cells caused by AM was partially blocked, suggesting that AM-induced cell death might be a bcr-abl-dependent mode of autophagy-associated cell death. In conclusion, AM is capable of inhibiting growth and inducing autophagy-associated cell death in K562 cells, but not in normal monocytes. It may have potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent against leukemia.

  14. Chronic myelogenous leukemia accompanied by megaloblastic anemia showing atypical clinical features.

    PubMed

    Koiso, Hiromi; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Shimano, Shun-ichi; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2011-11-01

    Leukocytosis, splenomegaly, and an increased vitamin B(12) level are characteristic findings of chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, we report a patient with CML-CP accompanied by megaloblastic anemia. A 61-year-old man consulted our hospital because of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On physical examination, there were no remarkable findings; there was no hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory findings were: hemoglobin 6.0 g/dl; MCV 113.6 fl; platelet count 100×10(9)/l; white cell count 8.66×10(9)/l; and LDH 1,236 IU/l. Peripheral blood smear demonstrated hypersegmented neutrophils and megalocytes with emergence of myeloblasts, giant metamyelocytes, and nucleated red cells. Vitamin B(12) and folic acid levels were low. Bone marrow examination showed megaloblastic change in the erythroblasts and myeloid hyperplasia. Following vitamin B(12) and folic acid administration, anemia and thrombocytopenia rapidly improved; thereafter, marked leukocytosis became evident. Based on the presence of t(9;22)(q34;q11) on cytogenetic study and a positive result for Major bcr/abl fusion gene, a diagnosis of CML-CP was established. This case illustrates that ineffective erythropoiesis results in anemia and thrombocytopenia in CML with vitamin B12 and/or folic acid deficiency.

  15. Clinical roundtable monograph: Emerging treatment options for TKI-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Jorge; Radich, Jerald; Mauro, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit signaling of the constitutive BCR-ABL protein revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). These agents have dramatically changed the treatment landscape for CML, shifting the use of allogeneic stem cell transplantation to selected patients in the salvage setting. Four BCR-ABL TKIs are now commercially available for the treatment of CML: the first-generation TKI imatinib, and the second-generation TKIs dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib. Continuous treatment with these agents induces durable responses in a high proportion of patients with chronic-phase CML. Research is focused on identifying which patients can discontinue therapy without a recurrence of disease. For the group of patients with resistance to TKIs, multiple alternative therapies are being evaluated. The third-generation TKI ponatinib is a BCR-ABL inhibitor that has demonstrated significant activity, including in patients with the TKI resistance mutation T315I. The homoharringtonine derivative omacetaxine mepesuccinate, which inhibits protein synthesis, has also demonstrated clinical activity in CML, including in patients with TKI resistance due to T315I and in patients who have TKI resistance despite no evidence of ABL mutations. It is essential that clinicians implement these new agents with care and change therapies only when appropriate in order to preserve as many options as possible for future use if needed.

  16. Effect of interferon-alpha on chromosome abnormalities in treated chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideo; Tanaka, Kimio; Oguma, Nobuo; Ito, Kinro; Ito, Takuo; Kyo, Taiichi; Dohy, Hiroo; Kimura, Akiro

    2004-09-01

    To investigate the relationship of chromosomal aberrations at blastic crisis (BC) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), with previous therapies and with atomic bomb (AB) exposure, we studied 114 CML patients who developed BC, including 23 AB survivors in Hiroshima. In total, only 45.6% showed major-route abnormalities, which figure was far lower than those previously reported, implying possibility of geographical difference. Occurrence of major-route abnormality was not associated with either duration of chronic phase or survival time after BC. Patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) showed lower frequency of major-route abnormalities and lower number of abnormal chromosomes than did patients treated with busulfan (Bu). The frequency of trisomy 8 was lower and monosomy 7 was higher in IFNalpha-treated than in Bu-treated patients. The frequency of unusual abnormalities at BC in IFNalpha-treated patients was indistinguishable from those in Bu-treated patients and, notably, a more common (40%) feature in IFNalpha-treated patients was no change in the cytogenetic picture. Thus, we conclude that IFNalpha action on chromosome aberration is basically quite neutral and that IFNalpha does not induce any specific aberrations, including unusual ones at BC, with an exception of deletion of chromosome 7. Atomic bomb exposure status did not make any difference in secondary abnormalities at BC.

  17. Bosutinib: a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Lindsay; Hughes, Thomas E; Walsh-Chocolaad, Tracey L

    2013-12-01

    To review clinical trials and main characteristics of bosutinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Pertinent data were identified through a search of PubMed (January 1990-April 2013) using the primary search terms SKI-606, bosutinib, and CML. Additionally, preliminary reports published in abstract form by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and American Society of Hematology (January 1990-April 2013) were screened for inclusion. Clinical Phase 1, 2, and 3 studies reported in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of bosutinib in patients with CML were reviewed. Bosutinib is a TKI of the breakpoint cluster region/Abelson murine leukemia (BCR-ABL) gene approved by the Food and Drug Administration on September 4, 2012, for second-line treatment of chronic phase, accelerated phase, and blast phase CML. In the second-line setting, bosutinib is effective in some patients with CML resistant or intolerant to imatinib, dasatinib, and/or nilotinib, but it is not effective in patients whose disease expresses the T315I point mutation in BCR-ABL. Bosutinib also has been compared with imatinib, the standard first-line treatment, in 502 patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase CML in a Phase 3 trial. Complete cytogenetic response at 12 months, the primary efficacy end point, is similar between bosutinib and imatinib (p = 0.601); therefore, bosutinib is not indicated in the first-line setting. Common adverse events associated with bosutinib include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events reported in at least 5% of bosutinib-treated patients include elevated serum lipase and liver aminotransferases, anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and diarrhea. Currently available clinical trials suggest that bosutinib is generally a safe and effective treatment option for patients with CML who have failed first-line TKIs and who do not express the T315I mutation; however, tolerability

  18. It’s About Time: Lessons For Solid Tumors From Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Jason R.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-01-01

    The use of imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) transformed the disease, rapidly changing the median survival from 4 years to at least 20 years. In this review, we outline the causes of this revolution, including the identification of a critical driving molecular aberration--BCR-ABL--and the development of a potent and specific inhibitor--imatinib. Equally important was the timing of the targeted therapy, specifically its administration to patients with newly diagnosed disease. In solid tumors, targeted therapies are often both developed and used in metastatic malignancies after conventional approaches have failed. We postulate that this strategy is similar to using imatinib in blast crisis CML, where response rates are <15%, all patients relapse, and median survival remains only about one year. We hypothesize that the imatinib-led revolution in CML, including the critically important factor of timing, may be applicable to other cancers as well. Therefore, it will be important to utilize promising targeted therapies in the earliest phases of biomarker-defined solid tumors, prior to metastatic progression, to determine if outcomes can be significantly improved, and hence establish if the success of imatinib in CML is an anomaly or a paradigm. PMID:23204432

  19. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  20. Chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia: new bone marrow transplantation options.

    PubMed

    Viele, C S

    1996-04-01

    To describe new bone marrow transplantation (BMT) options for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), as well as their applications and prognoses, and to describe the role of the oncology nurse in caring for the BMT recipient and options for future nursing research. Published articles, book chapters, and personal experience. Various pretransplant agents and methods are under investigation to improve the outcome and reduce the costs of allogeneic and autologous BMT and peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplants. Preliminary results of current studies indicate that autologous BMTs and PBPC transplants have merit as a treatment option in patients with AML and require further research. For patients with APL, BMT usually is reserved for those who fail to achieve or relapse after achieving remission with chemotherapy. Preliminary data show that patients with CML and APL who receive a PBPC transplant engraft more rapidly with decreased morbidity and mortality. BMT options for patients with CML and APL continue to evolve as advances in pretransplant methods and symptom management become capable of improving the outcome, decreasing costs, and shifting patient care to the outpatient and homecare settings. Understanding the marrow transplant options available to patients with CML and APL is essential for nurses. They must stay informed about ongoing improvements in pretransplant processes and symptom-management procedures that reduce BMT morbidity and mortality. Inpatient and outpatient nurses need to collaborate and participate in nursing research to find better ways of providing the best care possible for patients.

  1. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  2. Clinical roundtable monograph: Unmet needs in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias J; Bixby, Dale; Akard, Luke P

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are diagnosed each year in the United States. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved survival time for many CML patients. Current first-line treatment options include imatinib and the second-generation agents nilotinib and dasatinib. Second- and third-line agents include nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and the new agent ponatinib. Despite the effectiveness of TKIs, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to these agents. A number of mutations of the BCR-ABL gene have been identified and are associated with TKI resistance. Patients may benefit from switching to a second-line TKI, undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or receiving newly emerging agents. Although early response is associated with improved patient outcome, clinicians lack tests that can determine which patients will benefit from which therapies. To ensure adequate response, patients should be monitored by both polymerase chain reaction and cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow. This roundtable monograph reviews key unmet needs in patients with CML related to disease management and treatment options.

  3. High imatinib dose overcomes insufficient response associated with ABCG2 haplotype in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Delord, Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Sigaux, François; Guilhot, Joëlle; Preudhomme, Claude; Guilhot, François; Loiseau, Pascale; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Geromin, Daniela; Génin, Emmanuelle; Calvo, Fabien; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) typically use a candidate gene approach. In an alternative strategy, we analyzed the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug transporter genes on the molecular response to imatinib, using a DNA chip containing 857 SNPs covering 94 drug transporter genes. Two cohorts of CML patients treated with imatinib were evaluated: an exploratory cohort including 105 patients treated at 400 mg/d and a validation cohort including patients sampled from the 400 mg/d and 600 mg/d arms of the prospective SPIRIT trial (n=239). Twelve SNPs discriminating patients according to cumulative incidence of major molecular response (CI-MMR) were identified within the exploratory cohort. Three of them, all located within the ABCG2 gene, were validated in patients included in the 400 mg/d arm of the SPIRIT trial. We identified an ABCG2 haplotype (define as G-G, rs12505410 and rs2725252) as associated with significantly higher CI-MMR in patients treated at 400 mg/d. Interestingly, we found that patients carrying this ABCG2 “favorable” haplotype in the 400 mg arm reached similar CI-MMR rates that patients randomized in the imatinib 600 mg/d arm. Our results suggest that response to imatinib may be influenced by constitutive haplotypes in drug transporter genes. Lower response rates associated with “non-favorable” ABCG2 haplotypes may be overcome by increasing the imatinib daily dose up to 600 mg/d. PMID:24123600

  4. Comparison of different antisense oligonucleotides against the BCR/ABL junction in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaebisch, A; Seay, U; Wicker, S; Weber, C; Lohmeyer, J; Ortigao, J; Pralle, H

    1996-05-01

    The activity of the BCR/ABL hybrid gene is associated with a growth advantage of the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) stem cell. Suppression of BCR/ABL hybrid gene expression can be a valuable tool for leukemic cell purging. Antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) have the capacity to specifically downregulate gene expression. Data reported on the effect they have on BCR/ABL hybrid gene expression are controversial. We present data illustrating that prolongation of ODN half-life by means of chemical or sequence modification has only limited specific growth suppressive effect on BCR/ABL-positive clonogenic cells in vitro. Compared to unmodified phosphodiester ODNs (PO-ODNs) spanning the BCR/ABL junctions, modified ODNs with either a 3'-GC-clamp (GC-ODNs) or ODNs with one 3'-inverted nucleotide (3'-3' ODNs) to prevent 3'-exonuclease degradation, showed significantly prolonged extra- and intracellular half lives and different subcellular distributions in CML cell lines. In clonogenic assays from patients with CML, the modified ODNs were to some extent able to reduce colonies expressing BCR/ABL (GC-ODNs >3'-3'-ODNs >PO-ODNs). This difference did not become significant statistically. We demonstrate a substantially diminished hybridization efficacy of the modified antisense ODNs used, which may serve as a possible explanation for the failure to augment the leukemic cell purging efficacy.

  5. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL–expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL–expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  6. Molecular monitoring of the treatment of patients with BCR/ABL (+) chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; López-Martínez, B; Ramírez-Cabrera, J M; Reyes-Núñez, V; Rodríguez-Cedeño, H M; Garcés-Eisele, J

    2001-01-01

    The molecular follow-up of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has been described as useful in other countries, but there are not data reported in Mexico. All patients studied at Laboratories Clínicos de Puebla/Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla in which the BCR-ABL hybrid gene was identified by means of polymerase chain reaction were analyzed. In 22 individuals the molecular marker of the disease was studied at diagnosis and in different instances afterwards; these patients were treated with chemotherapy, interferon, autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Only the six patients that were allografted from HLA-identical siblings cleared the molecular marker of the disease; the rest of them did not achieve molecular remissions. The median survival (SV) of the whole group has not been reached, whereas the 53-month SV is 68%. One of the allografted patients died as a result of complications of graft versus-host disease. We have found useful the molecular monitoring of the treatment of patients with CML. Using this approach, we found that molecular remissions can be accomplished only with allografting; however, other therapeutic approaches may also result in long-lasting hematologic remissions.

  7. Inhibition of Polysome Assembly Enhances Imatinib Activity against Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Overcomes Imatinib Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Fu, Wuxia; Prabhu, Sharmila; Moore, James C.; Ko, Je; Kim, Jung Woo; Druker, Brian J.; Trapp, Valerie; Fruehauf, John; Gram, Hermann; Fan, Hung Y.; Ong, S. Tiong

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulated mRNA translation is implicated in the pathogenesis of many human cancers including chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Because our prior work has specifically implicated translation initiation in CML, we tested compounds that could modulate translation initiation and polysomal mRNA assembly. Here, we evaluated the activity of one such compound, CGP57380, against CML cells and explored its mechanisms of action. First, using polysomal mRNA profiles, we found that imatinib and CGP57380 could independently, and cooperatively, impair polysomal mRNA loading. Imatinib and CGP57380 also synergistically inhibited the growth of Ba/F3-Bcr-Abl and K562 cells via impaired cell cycle entry and increased apoptosis. Mechanistically, CGP57380 inhibited efficient polysomal assembly via two processes. First, it enhanced imatinib-mediated inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F induction, and second, it independently impaired phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 on the preinitiation complex. We also identified multiple substrates of the mTOR, Rsk, and Mnk kinases as targets of CGP57380. Finally, we found a novel negative-feedback loop to the mitogen-activated protein kinase/Mnk pathway that is triggered by CGP57380 and demonstrated that an interruption of the loop further increased the activity of the combination against imatinib-sensitive and -resistant CML cells. Together, this work supports the inhibition of translation initiation as a therapeutic strategy for treating cancers fueled by dysregulated translation. PMID:18694961

  8. [Economic burden for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia--healthcare economics and medical governance of cancer].

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuko; Kami, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Due to the recent economic downturn, the economic burden of cancer patients has been further worsened. Specifically for chronic myelogenous leukemia patients, their annual income has decreased by 1, 500, 000 yen from 2000 to 2008, while the cost of their medications has increased from 1,000,000 yen to 1,200,000 yen due the advent of the new drug, Glivec, which was approved in 2001. The scores for psychological burden have increased 30% over the past 8 years before Glivec became available. The economic crisis among cancer patients is a consequence of structural problems with many anticancer drugs and cancer treatment. Especially, problems involving the cost of medical care and the system of drug pricing should be resolved by thorough discussion not only with cancer patients but also with the entire population. Discussion on the medical expense burden for CML patients has flourished through patients' spontaneous activities and information disclosure to a wider population through the internet. This methodology will be significant in establishing medical governance in cancer treatment in Japan.

  9. A clinical observation of Chinese chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chen; Meng, Li; Li, Chunrui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Hongxiang; Li, Weiming; Wang, Jue; Cheng, Fanjun; Guo, Anyuan; Liu, Songya; Jin, Caibao; Zhu, Xiaojian; You, Yong; Zou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be safely discontinued is a key focus of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) at present. We report a clinical observation of TKIs cessation in Chinese CML patients and a probable connection between CML leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and relapse. In all, 22 of 1057 patients consented to participate in this observation. The average time of complete molecular response was 12.73 months after TKI withdrawal. LSCs could be flow cytometrically detected in most of the patients. However, the number of LSCs did not differ between the relapsers and non-relapsers. We evaluated the leukemogenetic ability of the LSCs by transplanting bone marrow into irradiated NOD/SCID mice. The results indicated that part of the bone marrow from the relapsers lead to leukemogensis in the mice. Besides, we found that LSCs-derived microvesicles might serve as a novel factor for the stratification of undetectable minimal residual disease and an early warning sign of relapse. In summary, post-TKI cessation relapse seems to show none association with the number of LSCs. A mouse xenograft model would provide a novel and useful method of analyzing LSCs function and predicting relapse. Microvesicles may provide important information about optimal molecular monitoring schedules in TKI discontinuation strategies. PMID:27533462

  10. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Liu, Yan; Xi, Ronggang; Zou, Wei; Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiran; Liu, Zhongyang; Qu, Chao; Xu, Baoli; Wang, Xiaobo

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11)-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during realgar NP treatment, a Cav-1 overexpression cell model was established by using transient transfection. The results indicated that Cav-1 overexpression inhibited K562 cell proliferation, promoted endogenic autophagy, and increased the sensitivity of K562 cells to realgar NPs. Therefore, the results demonstrated that realgar NPs degraded Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, while the underlying mechanism might be related to apoptosis and autophagy, and Cav-1 might be considered as a

  13. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia exosomes modulate bone marrow microenvironment through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Chiara; Saieva, Laura; Raimondo, Stefania; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Recent evidence indicates that altered crosstalk between CML and mesenchymal stromal cells may affect leukaemia survival; moreover, vesicles released by both tumour and non-tumour cells into the microenvironment provide a suitable niche for cancer cell growth and survival. We previously demonstrated that leukaemic and stromal cells establish an exosome-mediated bidirectional crosstalk leading to the production of IL8 in stromal cells, thus sustaining the survival of CML cells. Human cell lines used are LAMA84 (CML cells), HS5 (stromal cells) and bone marrow primary stromal cells; gene expression and protein analysis were performed by real-time PCR and Western blot. IL8 and MMP9 secretions were evaluated by ELISA. Exosomes were isolated from CML cells and blood samples of CML patients. Here, we show that LAMA84 and CML patients' exosomes contain amphiregulin (AREG), thus activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in stromal cells. EGFR signalling increases the expression of SNAIL and its targets, MMP9 and IL8. We also demonstrated that pre-treatment of HS5 with LAMA84 exosomes increases the expression of annexin A2 that promotes the adhesion of leukaemic cells to the stromal monolayer, finally supporting the growth and invasiveness of leukaemic cells. Leukaemic and stromal cells establish a bidirectional crosstalk: exosomes promote proliferation and survival of leukaemic cells, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing IL8 secretion from stromal cells. We propose that this mechanism is activated by a ligand-receptor interaction between AREG, found in CML exosomes, and EGFR in bone marrow stromal cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto; González, Juan R.; Sigaux, François; Villoutreix, Bruno O.; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Guilhot, Joëlle; Preudhomme, Claude; Guilhot, François; Poyet, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about inherited factors associated with the risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We used a dedicated DNA chip containing 16 561 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 1 916 candidate genes to analyze 437 CML patients and 1 144 healthy control individuals. Single SNP association analysis identified 139 SNPs that passed multiple comparisons (1% false discovery rate). The HDAC9, AVEN, SEMA3C, IKBKB, GSTA3, RIPK1 and FGF2 genes were each represented by three SNPs, the PSM family by four SNPs and the SLC15A1 gene by six. Haplotype analysis showed that certain combinations of rare alleles of these genes increased the risk of developing CML by more than two or three-fold. A classification tree model identified five SNPs belonging to the genes PSMB10, TNFRSF10D, PSMB2, PPARD and CYP26B1, which were associated with CML predisposition. A CML-risk-allele score was created using these five SNPs. This score was accurate for discriminating CML status (AUC: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.58–0.64). Interestingly, the score was associated with age at diagnosis and the average number of risk alleles was significantly higher in younger patients. The risk-allele score showed the same distribution in the general population (HapMap CEU samples) as in our control individuals and was associated with differential gene expression patterns of two genes (VAPA and TDRKH). In conclusion, we describe haplotypes and a genetic score that are significantly associated with a predisposition to develop CML. The SNPs identified will also serve to drive fundamental research on the putative role of these genes in CML development. PMID:26474455

  15. An optimal dynamic inversion-based neuro-adaptive approach for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Radhakant; Kothari, Mangal

    2007-09-01

    Combining the advanced techniques of optimal dynamic inversion and model-following neuro-adaptive control design, an innovative technique is presented to design an automatic drug administration strategy for effective treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). A recently developed nonlinear mathematical model for cell dynamics is used to design the controller (medication dosage). First, a nominal controller is designed based on the principle of optimal dynamic inversion. This controller can treat the nominal model patients (patients who can be described by the mathematical model used here with the nominal parameter values) effectively. However, since the system parameters for a realistic model patient can be different from that of the nominal model patients, simulation studies for such patients indicate that the nominal controller is either inefficient or, worse, ineffective; i.e. the trajectory of the number of cancer cells either shows non-satisfactory transient behavior or it grows in an unstable manner. Hence, to make the drug dosage history more realistic and patient-specific, a model-following neuro-adaptive controller is augmented to the nominal controller. In this adaptive approach, a neural network trained online facilitates a new adaptive controller. The training process of the neural network is based on Lyapunov stability theory, which guarantees both stability of the cancer cell dynamics as well as boundedness of the network weights. From simulation studies, this adaptive control design approach is found to be very effective to treat the CML disease for realistic patients. Sufficient generality is retained in the mathematical developments so that the technique can be applied to other similar nonlinear control design problems as well.

  16. Clonal evolution in Ph{prime}-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Gebre, W.; Kalavar, M. |

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) usually transforms into accelerated and/or blastic phases (ABP) in 2 to 6 years, and patients with CML often succumb to the disease with cytogenetic evolvement. This 43-year-old man was know for his CML for the last 6 years. He experienced clinical deterioration with massive splenomegaly and granulocytic sarcoma in the enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The white blood cell count was 132.2 x 10{sup 9}/L with 14% basophils and less than 5% myeloblasts in the blood and the marrow. The peripheral blood disclosed 46,XY,t(9;22)(q34;q11)[9]/48,XY,+8,t(9;22)(q34;q11),+22q{sup -}[11]. He was treated accordingly and succumbed to the disease 6 months later. In CML, the Ph{prime}-positive finding is present in about 95% of the patients. The remaining Ph{prime}-negative ones are either bcr-positive or bcr-negative. This group may comprise heterogenous myeloid disorders and shows more often RAS gene mutations than {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} CML. The common chromosomal abnormalities seen in ABP are an additional Ph{prime} chromosome, trisomy 8, isochrosome 17 and trisomy 19. Some 15-35% of patients in ABP show only Ph{prime} without additional mutation. Although overall survival is grim, patients with CML in ABP with additional chromosomal changes, regardless of the blastic natures, fare worse than those without. The presence of clonal evolution at the onset of ABP denotes clinical and hematologic deterioration and adversely effects patient`s survival.

  17. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Indirubin derivatives induce apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells involving inhibition of Stat5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Scuto, Anna; Yang, Fan; Chen, Wenyong; Park, Sungman; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Konig, Heiko; Bhatia, Ravi; Cheng, Xinlai; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Jove, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Indirubin is the major active anti-tumor component of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). While previous studies indicate that indirubin is a promising therapeutic agent for CML, the molecular mechanism of action of indirubin is not fully understood. We report here that indirubin derivatives (IRDs) potently inhibit Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (Stat5) protein in CML cells. Compound E804, which is the most potent in this series of IRDs, blocked Stat5 signaling in human K562 CML cells, imatinib-resistant human KCL-22 CML cells expressing the T315I mutant Bcr-Abl (KCL-22M), and CD34-positive primary CML cells from patients. Autophosphorylation of Src family kinases (SFKs) was strongly inhibited in K562 and KCL-22M cells at 5 μM E804, and in primary CML cells at 10 μM E804, although higher concentrations partially inhibited autophosphorylation of Bcr-Abl. Previous studies indicate that SFKs cooperate with Bcr-Abl to activate downstream Stat5 signaling. Activation of Stat5 was strongly blocked by E804 in CML cells. E804 down-regulated expression of Stat5 target proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1, associated with induction of apoptosis. In sum, our findings identify IRDs as potent inhibitors of the SFK/Stat5 signaling pathway downstream of Bcr-Abl, leading to apoptosis of K562, KCL-22M and primary CML cells. IRDs represent a promising structural class for development of new therapeutics for wild type or T315I mutant Bcr-Abl-positive CML patients.

  19. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) inhibits Stat5 signaling associated with apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Williams, Ann; Vultur, Adina; List, Alan; Bhalla, Kapil; Smith, David; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a novel, oral, potent, multi-targeted kinase inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and Src family kinases (SFK) and is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Preclinical data indicate that dasatinib is 325-fold more potent than imatinib against cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl, and that dasatinib is active against 18 of 19 Bcr-Abl mutations known to cause imatinib resistance. Phase I clinical data show that dasatinib is well tolerated and highly effective for the treatment of imatinib-resistant/imatinib-intolerant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the molecular mechanism of action of dasatinib is not fully understood. In this study, we confirm that dasatinib inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of SFKs, including Src, Hck, and Lyn, in K562 human CML cells. Significantly, downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) signaling is also blocked by dasatinib as shown by decreases in levels of phosphorylated Stat5 and Stat5 DNA-binding activities. In addition, dasatinib down-regulates expression of Stat5 target genes, including Bcl-x, Mcl-1, and cyclin D1. Consistent with these results, blockade of Stat5 signaling by dasatinib is accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Surprisingly, Stat5 DNA-binding activities are enhanced with increasing cell density, which is associated with resistance to apoptosis by dasatinib. Our findings indicate that inhibition of Stat5 signaling downstream of Bcr-Abl/SFKs contributes to the action of dasatinib, and, conversely, that increasing cell density up-regulates Stat5 activation and confers resistance to dasatinib. Moreover, the level of phosphorylated Stat5 in CML cells represents a mechanistically relevant biomarker for monitoring inhibition of Bcr-Abl signaling by dasatinib in CML patients using convenient immunocytochemical assays.

  20. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dan; Liu, Yan; Xi, Ronggang; Zou, Wei; Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiran; Liu, Zhongyang; Qu, Chao; Xu, Baoli; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11)-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during realgar NP treatment, a Cav-1 overexpression cell model was established by using transient transfection. The results indicated that Cav-1 overexpression inhibited K562 cell proliferation, promoted endogenic autophagy, and increased the sensitivity of K562 cells to realgar NPs. Therefore, the results demonstrated that realgar NPs degraded Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, while the underlying mechanism might be related to apoptosis and autophagy, and Cav-1 might be considered as a

  1. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  3. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. DNA methyltransferase 1 mediated aberrant methylation and silencing of SHP-1 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Liu, Xuedong; Guo, Xiufeng; Liu, Xiao; Luo, Jianmin

    2017-07-01

    Extensive studies on SHP-1 protein and SHP-1 mRNA revealed that the diminishment or abolishment of the expression of SHP-1 in leukemias/lymphomas was due to aberrant promoter methylation. Thus far, the mechanism of epigenetic silencing of the SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase gene that occurs in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells remains poorly understood. The expressions of the target molecules were determined by quantitative real time PCR and western blot, respectively. Bisulfite sequencing PCR was used to detect methylation status of DNA CpG. The lentiviral vectors were applied to modify gene expression. In the present study, we found that the promoter 2 of SHP-1 gene is located between positions from -577bp to +300bp, and 22 CpG sites contained in positions -353bp∼+182bp are aberrantly methylated in K562 cells. In vitro, we demonstrated that DNMT1 silencing induced demethylation of the 22 CpG sites located in the SHP-1 promoter and re-expression of SHP-1 gene in K562 cells. Moreover, we proved that the expression levels of DNMT1 and SHP-1 mRNA and protein were negatively correlated in K562 cells and BM aspirates mononuclear cells from CML patients. Collectively, these results indicate that DNMT1 mediates aberrant methylation and silencing of SHP-1 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, and provide a novel therapeutic target for CML. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia receiving imatinib in Japan: a retrospective survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The financial burden of medical expenses has been increasing for cancer patients. We investigated the relationship between household income and financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) who have been treated with imatinib. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 1200 patients between May and August 2009. We retrospectively surveyed their household incomes, out-of-pocket medical expenses, final co-payments after refunds, and the perceived financial burden of their medical expenses in 2000, 2005 and 2008. Results A total of 577 patients completed the questionnaire. Their median age was 61 years (range, 15–94). A financial burden was felt by 41.2 % (28 of 68) of the patients treated with imatinib in 2000, 70.8 % (201 of 284) in 2005, and 75.8 % (400 of 528) in 2008. Overall, 182 patients (31.7 %) considered its discontinuation because of the financial burden and 15 (2.6 %) temporarily stopped their imatinib prescription. In 2000, 2005 and 2008, the patients’ median annual household incomes were 49,615 US Dollars (USD), 38,510 USD and 36,731 USD, respectively, with an average currency exchange rate of 104 Yen/USD in 2008. Their median annual out-of-pocket expenses were 11,548, 12,067 and 11,538 USD and their median final annual co-payments were 4,375, 4,327 and 3,558 USD, respectively. Older patients (OR = 0.96, 95 % CI: 0.95–0.98, p ≪ 0.0001 for 1-year increments), and patients with higher household incomes (OR = 0.92, 95 % CI: 0.85–0.99, p = 0.03 for 10,000 USD-increments) were less likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conversely, patients with higher annual final co-payments (OR = 2.21, 95 % CI: 1.28–4.28, p = 0.004 for 10,000 USD-increments) were more likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conclusions The proportion of CML patients who sensed a financial burden increased between 2000 and 2008. During this period

  6. Impact of oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Masha Sh; Cheung, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Studies have identified non-adherence as one of the major contributing factors to treatment failure in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients receiving imatinib. Published literature has demonstrated a unique role of oncology pharmacists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, in contributing to overall positive outcomes for patients. To evaluate the impact of an oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program on oral medication adherence in CML patients versus usual care. Electronic refill history and medical records of patients diagnosed with CML treated with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) managed by oncology pharmacists during a 6-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. Imatinib adherence rate, as the primary endpoint, was compared with the rate for those in the usual care group within the same organization. The secondary endpoints were descriptive to characterize pharmacist interventions for all TKIs. A total of 56 patients including 45 who were treated with imatinib, were evaluated. The group managed by oncology pharmacists resulted in a higher percentage of imatinib adherence rate compared to usual care (88.6% vs 65.8%, p = 0.0046). A total of 3432 pharmacist encounters were reviewed, and 567 interventions of six categories including side effect monitoring/management (n = 95; 16.8%); drug interaction detection (n = 109; 19.2%); TKI dose adjustment (n = 82; 14.5%); laboratory monitoring (n = 200; 35.3%); non-CML related drug choice (n = 74; 13.1%); and copay assistance (n = 7; 1.2%), were documented. This resulted in a mean of 10.1 interventions per patient. Our oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program significantly improved TKI adherence rates in CML patients. We attribute the success of our program to consistent follow-up by utilizing routine phone, and secure email follow-ups, that allowed our oncology pharmacists to build a close and trustworthy relationship with patients and

  7. Duplication of small segments within the major breakpoint cluster region in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Litz, C E; McClure, J S; Copenhaver, C M; Brunning, R D

    1993-03-15

    The t(9;22) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) may be reciprocal or, in a minority of cases, may result in an extensive deletion of a portion of the major breakpoint cluster region (M-bcr) of the BCR. This report provides evidence of the duplication of small segments within the M-bcr in a small group of patients with CML. Southern blots of Bgl II and Bgl II/BamHI double-digested DNA from the blood or bone marrow of 46 patients with CML were probed with a 5' 1.4-kb Taq I/HindIII M-bcr probe and a 3' 2-kb HindIII/BamHI M-bcr probe. In three patients, rearrangements were noted with both probes in Bgl II-digested DNA, but were not present in Bgl II/BamHI-digested DNA with either probe. Southern analysis of DNA samples double-digested with Bgl II and BspHI from two of these three cases showed no rearrangements with either probe; the M-bcr BspHI site is located 26 bp 3' of the BamHI site in the second intron of the M-bcr. The presence of a rearranged M-bcr with both probes in Bgl II-digested DNA and the lack of rearrangement in Bgl II/BamHI and Bgl II/BspHI double-digested DNA suggest the presence of M-bcr BamHI and BspHI sites on both 9q+ chromosome (9q+) and the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). This implies a duplication of at least the 26-bp M-bcr BamHI/BspHI fragment in these two samples. Sequence data from one of these two cases confirmed the M-bcr breakpoints to be staggered; the Ph M-bcr breakpoint occurred 258 bp downstream from the 9q+ M-bcr breakpoint. It is concluded that a duplication of small segments within the M-bcr occurs in a small group of patients with CML, which may lead to pseudogermline patterns on Southern blot. Such a duplication may provide insight into the mechanism of some chromosomal translocations in neoplasia.

  8. Has the time for first-line treatment with second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia already come? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Ronit; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Vidal, Liat; Leader, Avi; Ram, Ron; Shacham-Abulafia, Adi; Paul, Mical; Ben-Bassat, Isaac; Shpilberg, Ofer; Raanani, Pia

    2013-01-01

    Second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors have recently been introduced as first-line treatment for chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2(nd) generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors versus imatinib as first-line treatment for these patients. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing 2(nd) generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors to imatinib as first-line treatment in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Outcomes assessed were: complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response at 12, 18 and 24 months, all-cause mortality and progression to accelerated phase/blastic crisis at 12, 18 and 24 months, and chronic myelogenous leukemia related mortality and toxicity at last follow up. Relative risks were estimated and pooled using a fixed effect model. Our search yielded four trials including 2,120 patients. At 12 months, treatment with 2(nd) generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors significantly improved both complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response (relative risk 1.16, 95% CI: 1.09-1.23, and 1.68, 95% CI: 1.48-1.91, respectively). While major molecular response was improved at all time points, complete cytogenetic response improved at 18 months but not at 24 months. Importantly, rate of progression to accelerated phase/blastic crisis was significantly lower with the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors throughout all time points. Second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors improved chronic myelogenous leukemia related mortality without a statistically significant difference in all-cause mortality at 12, 18 and 24 months. We conclude that 2(nd) generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors can be added safely to the first-line treatment armamentarium of chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Although an advantage is suggested by surrogate parameters, longer follow up is necessary to see if this translates into superior

  9. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    reported data and different outcome definitions, we could not perform a meta - analysis and thus, a final judgment about the influence of corticosteroids...myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disease (MPD) characterized by the expression of the p210-BCR/ABL fusion gene [1]. This gene...components downstream of BCR/ABL. During the first year of this award, we reported our progress on the analysis of the role of Rac GTPases in

  10. Dipeptide species regulate p38MAPK-Smad3 signalling to maintain chronic myelogenous leukaemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Naka, Kazuhito; Jomen, Yoshie; Ishihara, Kaori; Kim, Junil; Ishimoto, Takahiro; Bae, Eun-Jin; Mohney, Robert P; Stirdivant, Steven M; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yukio; Ooshima, Akira; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-08-20

    Understanding the specific survival of the rare chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) stem cell population could provide a target for therapeutics aimed at eradicating these cells. However, little is known about how survival signalling is regulated in CML stem cells. In this study, we survey global metabolic differences between murine normal haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and CML stem cells using metabolomics techniques. Strikingly, we show that CML stem cells accumulate significantly higher levels of certain dipeptide species than normal HSCs. Once internalized, these dipeptide species activate amino-acid signalling via a pathway involving p38MAPK and the stemness transcription factor Smad3, which promotes CML stem cell maintenance. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of dipeptide uptake inhibits CML stem cell activity in vivo. Our results demonstrate that dipeptide species support CML stem cell maintenance by activating p38MAPK-Smad3 signalling in vivo, and thus point towards a potential therapeutic target for CML treatment.

  11. [The quality practice of molecular-genetic testing in the era of molecular target therapy in chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Hayato; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Masukawa, Atsuko; Asai, Satomi

    2012-10-01

    The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as molecular target therapy has resulted in a marked change in the laboratory process for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia. This includes defining the molecular typing of BCR-ABL1 to establish the diagnosis, a quantitative and/or high quality assay for minimal residual disease to evaluate the molecular response, and mutation analysis and chromosomal examination to assess its resistance to inhibitors. These processes should be used where appropriate for each patient. In the ongoing development and clinical use of novel agents for treatment of the leukemia, the quality assurance of each process of molecular-genetic testing, such as specimen handling, measurement, and reporting, has become increasingly important in the quality care of patients.

  12. Dipeptide species regulate p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling to maintain chronic myelogenous leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Kazuhito; Jomen, Yoshie; Ishihara, Kaori; Kim, Junil; Ishimoto, Takahiro; Bae, Eun-Jin; Mohney, Robert P.; Stirdivant, Steven M.; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yukio; Ooshima, Akira; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the specific survival of the rare chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) stem cell population could provide a target for therapeutics aimed at eradicating these cells. However, little is known about how survival signalling is regulated in CML stem cells. In this study, we survey global metabolic differences between murine normal haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and CML stem cells using metabolomics techniques. Strikingly, we show that CML stem cells accumulate significantly higher levels of certain dipeptide species than normal HSCs. Once internalized, these dipeptide species activate amino-acid signalling via a pathway involving p38MAPK and the stemness transcription factor Smad3, which promotes CML stem cell maintenance. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of dipeptide uptake inhibits CML stem cell activity in vivo. Our results demonstrate that dipeptide species support CML stem cell maintenance by activating p38MAPK–Smad3 signalling in vivo, and thus point towards a potential therapeutic target for CML treatment. PMID:26289811

  13. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-05

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  14. Constitutively activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase primes platelets from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia for thrombopoietin-induced aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Tanaka, T; Ohnishi, H; Kitanaka, A; Okutani, Y; Taminato, T; Ishida, T; Kamano, H

    2004-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the aggregation of platelets from 40 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including 17 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP), 10 with polycythemia vera, 10 with essential thrombocythemia, and three with myelofibrosis. TPO by itself dose-dependently induced the aggregation of platelets from patients with CML-CP but not from those with other MPDs or with CML-CP in cytogenetical complete remission. The expression of CD63 in CML-CP platelets was induced by TPO treatment. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was constitutively activated in CML-CP platelets. Pretreatment with PI3-kinase inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) dose-dependently inhibited TPO-induced aggregation of CML-CP platelets. The Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate and the Jak inhibitor AG490 suppressed TPO-induced aggregation of CML-CP platelets. Pretreatment with imatinib mesylate, but not with AG490, inhibited the activity of PI3-kinase in CML-CP platelets. In addition, tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak2 was undetected in CML-CP platelets before TPO treatment. These findings indicate that the constitutive activation of PI3-kinase primes CML-CP platelets for the aggregation induced by TPO, and that Bcr-Abl, but not Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, are involved in the constitutive activation of PI3-kinase in CML-CP platelets.

  15. Targeted agents for chronic myelogenous leukemia: will that be the end of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for that disease?

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Lai, Yongrong; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Li, Qiaochuan; Ma, Jie; Luo, Jun; Liu, Rongrong; Shi, Lingling; Zhou, Jicheng; Peng, Zhigang; Yang, Jie; Deng, Donghong; Zhou, Yizhen

    2010-06-01

    Although the drug imatinib has been accepted as the treatment of choice for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) throughout the Western world, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) continues to remain a widely practiced first-line treatment in countries with limited health care budgets. The rationale is not scientific, but largely economically based. We analyzed a cohort of 46 CML patients who participated in a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis clinical trial and underwent related HLA-matched allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. The median time of follow-up in surviving patients was 43 months (range: 4-89 months). Risk stratification of the population was done by European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) criteria. The estimated probabilities of overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) at 3 years in low EBMT risk score (0-2) patients were both 91%, respectively. We conclude that in countries with restricted access to imatinib, allo-SCT should be considered early on as front-line therapy. Continued research support for bone marrow transplantation will be needed to make a global impact on this disease. Copyright 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS) assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively). Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. PMID:22913434

  17. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    PubMed

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  19. Activation of a novel Bcr/Abl destruction pathway by WP1130 induces apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A; Talpaz, Moshe; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Kong, Ling Yuan; Wang, Shimei; Estrov, Zeev; Priebe, Waldemar; Wu, Ji; Donato, Nicholas J

    2007-04-15

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is effective therapy against Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia, but resistance develops in all phases of the disease. Bcr/Abl point mutations and other alterations reduce the kinase inhibitory activity of imatinib mesylate; thus, agents that target Bcr/Abl through unique mechanisms may be needed. Here we describe the activity of WP1130, a small molecule that specifically and rapidly down-regulates both wild-type and mutant Bcr/Abl protein without affecting bcr/abl gene expression in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Loss of Bcr/Abl protein correlated with the onset of apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of Bcr/Abl substrates. WP1130 did not affect Hsp90/Hsp70 ratios within the cells and did not require the participation of the proteasomal pathway for loss of Bcr/Abl protein. WP1130 was more effective in reducing leukemic versus normal hematopoietic colony formation and strongly inhibited colony formation of cells derived from patients with T315I mutant Bcr/Abl-expressing CML in blast crisis. WP1130 suppressed the growth of K562 heterotransplanted tumors as well as both wild-type Bcr/Abl and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl-expressing BaF/3 cells transplanted into nude mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that WP1130 reduces wild-type and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl protein levels in CML cells through a unique mechanism and may be useful in treating CML.

  20. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  1. Del(15q) is a recurrent “minor route” cytogenetic abnormality in the clonal evolution of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, C. Cameron; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Apostolidou, Effrosyni; Cortes, Jorge E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Lu, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Del(15q) is known to occur in acute leukemias, but has been described rarely in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We describe five cases of CML associated with del(15q). There were four men and one woman. Bone marrow aspirate smears demonstrated increased blasts in all cases at the time of del(15q) detection, showing accelerated phase in two and myeloid blast phase in three. Conventional cytogenetic analysis showed t(9;22) and del(15q), as well as other inconsistent clonal abnormalities. All patients received imatinib mesylate, four received additional chemotherapy, and two underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). For the three patients who did not receive ASCT, one died, one was in persistent blast phase, and one was in clinical remission with molecular evidence of residual disease, 16, 6, and 34 months after identification of del(15q), respectively. For the two patients who underwent ASCT, one died and one was in clinical remission with molecular evidence of disease, 15 and 64 months after identification of del(15q), respectively. Our findings indicate that del(15q) is a recurrent cytogenetic abnormality that may be seen either at initial presentation of advanced disease or emerge during disease progression. Del(15q) appears to be associated with a poor prognosis in CML. PMID:19480932

  2. Effects of imatinib mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in Korean patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Tan, Eugene Y; Jin, Yu; Park, Sahee; Hayes, Michael; Demirhan, Eren; Schran, Horst; Wang, Yanfeng

    2011-01-01

    AIMS The major objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of imatinib on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). METHODS Patients (n= 12) received a single oral dose of acetaminophen 1000 mg on day 1 (control). On days 2–8, imatinib 400 mg was administered daily. On day 8 (treatment), another 1000 mg dose of paracetamol was administered 1 h after the morning dose of imatinib 400 mg. Blood and urine samples were collected for bioanalytical analyses. RESULTS The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) for paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate under control conditions was similar to that after treatment with imatinib; the 90% confidence interval of the log AUC ratio was within 0.8 to 1.25. Urinary excretion of paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate was also unaffected by imatinib. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and imatinib in Korean patients with CML were similar to previous pharmacokinetic results in white patients with CML. Co-administration of a single dose of paracetamol and multiple doses of imatinib was well tolerated and safety profiles were similar to those of either drug alone. CONCLUSIONS The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and its major metabolites in the presence of imatinib were similar to those of the control conditions and the combination was well tolerated. These findings suggest that imatinib can be safely administered with paracetamol without dose adjustment of either drug. PMID:21219400

  3. Upregulating miR-146a by physcion reverses multidrug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; He, Juan; Yang, Yiling; Guo, Qulian; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of miR-146a in the drug resistance of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (K562/ADM) and to investigate the reversal effect of physcion, a natural compound, on the multidrug-resistance in CML. Our results showed that miR-146a was significantly downregulated in drug-resistant K562 cells and the overexpression of miR-146a in K562/ADM cells could restore the sensitivity to adriamycin (ADM). In addition, our results showed that the downregulation of miR-146a was associated with increase in CXCR4 expression, which was a direct target of miR-146a. Moreover, our findings also provided experimental evidence that physcion could enhance the anti-proliferative effect of ADM in K562/ADM cells by upregulating miR-146a. In conclusion, this present study showed that miR-146a conferred ADM resistance in CML cells and physcion could improve the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells by enhancing apoptosis via upregulating miR-146a. PMID:27904770

  4. Upregulating miR-146a by physcion reverses multidrug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; He, Juan; Yang, Yiling; Guo, Qulian; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of miR-146a in the drug resistance of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (K562/ADM) and to investigate the reversal effect of physcion, a natural compound, on the multidrug-resistance in CML. Our results showed that miR-146a was significantly downregulated in drug-resistant K562 cells and the overexpression of miR-146a in K562/ADM cells could restore the sensitivity to adriamycin (ADM). In addition, our results showed that the downregulation of miR-146a was associated with increase in CXCR4 expression, which was a direct target of miR-146a. Moreover, our findings also provided experimental evidence that physcion could enhance the anti-proliferative effect of ADM in K562/ADM cells by upregulating miR-146a. In conclusion, this present study showed that miR-146a conferred ADM resistance in CML cells and physcion could improve the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells by enhancing apoptosis via upregulating miR-146a.

  5. C(5) modified uracil derivatives showing antiproliferative and erythroid differentiation inducing activities on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breveglieri, Giulia; Accetta, Alessandro; Corradini, Roberto; Manicardi, Alex; Borgatti, Monica; Canella, Alessandro; Multineddu, Chiara; Marchelli, Rosangela; Gambari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The K562 cell line has been proposed as a useful experimental system to identify anti-tumor compounds acting by inducing terminal erythroid differentiation. K562 cells exhibit a low proportion of hemoglobin-synthesizing cells under standard cell growth conditions, but are able to undergo terminal erythroid differentiation when treated with a variety of anti-tumor compounds. In this paper we report a screening study on a set of different modified C(5) uracil derivatives for the evaluation of their antiproliferative effect in connection with erythroid differentiation pathways, and for defining a new class of drug candidates for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Activity of the derivatives tested can be classified in two effect: an antiproliferative effect linked to a high level of erythroid differentiation activity and an antiproliferative effect without activation of gamma globin genes The highest antiproliferative effect and erythroid induction was shown by compound 9, a thymine derivative bearing a n-octyl chain on nitrogen N(1), whereas thymine did not show any effect, suggesting the importance of the linear alkyl chain in position N(1). To our knowledge this compound should be considered among the most efficient inducers of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. This work is the starting point for the quest of more effective and specific drugs for the induction of terminal erythroid differentiation, for leading new insights in the treatment of neoplastic diseases with molecules acting by inducing differentiation rather than by simply exerting cytotoxic effects. PMID:21958870

  6. Implication of the Autologous Immune System in BCR-ABL Transcript Variations in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; El Cheikh, Raouf; Bernard, Samuel; Ruby, Jérémy; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML); however, most patients are not cured. Deeper mechanistic understanding may improve TKI combination therapies to better control the residual leukemic cell population. In analyzing our patients' data, we found that many patients who otherwise responded well to imatinib therapy still showed variations in their BCR-ABL transcripts. To investigate this phenomenon, we applied a mathematical model that integrates CML and an autologous immune response to the patients' data. We define an immune window or a range of leukemic loads for which the autologous immune system induces an improved response. Our modeling results suggest that, at diagnosis, a patient's leukemic load is able to partially or fully suppress the autologous immune response developed in a majority of patients, toward the CML clone(s). Imatinib therapy drives the leukemic population into the "immune window," allowing the patient's autologous immune cells to expand and eventually mount an efficient recognition of the residual leukemic burden. This response drives the leukemic load below this immune window, allowing the leukemic population to partially recover until another weaker immune response is initiated. Thus, the autologous immune response may explain the oscillations in BCR-ABL transcripts regularly observed in patients on imatinib.

  7. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  8. SAHA and S116836, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor, synergistically induce apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Qiangui; Cui, Lijing; Li, Juan; Du, Xin; Zou, Waiyi; Ding, Ke; Pan, Jingxuan

    2014-01-01

    Limited treatment options are available for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients who develop imatinib mesylate (IM) resistance. Here we proposed a novel combination regimen, a co-administration of S116836, a novel small molecule multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that was synthesized by rational design, and histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to overcome IM resistance in CML. S116836 at low concentrations used in the present study mildly downregulates auto-tyrosine phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl. SAHA, an FDA-approved HDACi drug, at 1 μM has modest anti-tumor activity in treating CML. However, we found a synergistic interaction between SAHA and S116836 in Bcr-Abl-positive CML cells that were sensitive or resistant to IM. Exposure of KBM5 and KBM5-T315I cells to minimal or non-toxic concentrations of SAHA and S116836 synergistically reduced cell viability and induced cell death. Co-treatment with SAHA and S116838 repressed the expressions of anti-apoptosis proteins, such as Mcl-1 and XIAP, but promoted Bim expression and mitochondrial damage. Of importance, treatment with both drugs significantly reduced cell viability of primary human CML cells, as compared with either agent alone. Taken together, our findings suggest that SAHA exerts synergistically with S116836 at a non-toxic concentration to promote apoptosis in the CML, including those resistant to imatinib or dasatinib. PMID:24759597

  9. Effects of imatinib mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in Korean patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Tan, Eugene Y; Jin, Yu; Park, Sahee; Hayes, Michael; Demirhan, Eren; Schran, Horst; Wang, Yanfeng

    2011-02-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of imatinib on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). Patients (n = 12) received a single oral dose of acetaminophen 1000 mg on day 1 (control). On days 2-8, imatinib 400 mg was administered daily. On day 8 (treatment), another 1000 mg dose of paracetamol was administered 1 h after the morning dose of imatinib 400 mg. Blood and urine samples were collected for bioanalytical analyses. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate under control conditions was similar to that after treatment with imatinib; the 90% confidence interval of the log AUC ratio was within 0.8 to 1.25. Urinary excretion of paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate was also unaffected by imatinib. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and imatinib in Korean patients with CML were similar to previous pharmacokinetic results in white patients with CML. Co-administration of a single dose of paracetamol and multiple doses of imatinib was well tolerated and safety profiles were similar to those of either drug alone. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and its major metabolites in the presence of imatinib were similar to those of the control conditions and the combination was well tolerated. These findings suggest that imatinib can be safely administered with paracetamol without dose adjustment of either drug. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  11. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in plasma/serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Narita, Miwako; Saito, Anri; Kojima, Aya; Iwabuchi, Minami; Satoh, Naoya; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Yamahira, Akie; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule) was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  12. Effect of CD38 on the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    YALÇINTEPE, LEMAN; HALIS, EMRE; ULKU, SIBEL

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Alterations in the intracellular concentration and homeostasis of calcium (Ca2+) may contribute to the development of drug resistance. To investigate the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia, the present study rendered human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells resistant to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin by progressively adapting the sensitive parental K562 cells to doxorubicin. The resulting cells were termed K562/DOX. Subsequently, the expression of two multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), was analyzed in K562/DOX cells. In addition to P-gp and MRP1, these cells also expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)38 and its active enzyme adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyl cyclase. The present study also demonstrated that K562/DOX cells responded to cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that CD38 may participate in the development of drug resistance to doxorubicin in K562 cells. PMID:26998164

  13. CM363, a novel naphthoquinone derivative which acts as multikinase modulator and overcomes imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; McNaughton-Smith, Grant; Jiménez-Alonso, Sandra; Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Montero, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Raquel; León, Javier; Rodríguez-González, Germán; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Pandiella, Atanasio; Díaz-Chico, Bonifacio Nicolás; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Human Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) is a hematological stem cell disorder which is associated with activation of Bcr-Abl-Stat5 oncogenic pathway. Direct Bcr-Abl inhibitors are initially successful for the treatment of CML but over time many patients develop drug resistance. In the present study, the effects of CM363, a novel naphthoquinone (NPQ) derivative, were evaluated on human CML-derived K562 cells. CM363 revealed an effective cell growth inhibition (IC50 = 0.7 ± 0.5 μM) by inducing cancer cells to undergo cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. CM363 caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases. This cell cycle arrest was associated with increased levels of cyclin E, pChk1 and pChk2 whereas CM363 downregulated cyclin B, cyclin D3, p27, pRB, Wee1, and BUBR1. CM363 increased the double-strand DNA break marker γH2AX. CM363 caused a time-dependent increase of annexin V-positive cells, DNA fragmentation and increased number of apoptotic nuclei. CM363 triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as reflected by a release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and induction of the cleavage of caspase-3 and -9, and PARP. CM363 showed multikinase modulatory effects through an early increased JNK phosphorylation followed by inhibition of pY-Bcrl-Abl and pY-Stat5. CM363 worked synergistically with imatinib to inhibit cell viability and maintained its activity in imatinib-resistant cells. Finally, CM363 (10 mg/Kg) suppressed the growth of K562 xenograft tumors in athymic mice. In summary, CM363 is a novel multikinase modulator that offers advantages to circumvent imanitib resistance and might be therapeutically effective in Bcrl-Abl-Stat5 related malignancies. PMID:27557509

  14. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in Plasma/Serum of Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Miwako; Saito, Anri; Kojima, Aya; Iwabuchi, Minami; Satoh, Naoya; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Yamahira, Akie; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule) was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure. PMID:23155364

  15. CM363, a novel naphthoquinone derivative which acts as multikinase modulator and overcomes imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Martín-Rodríguez, Patricia; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; McNaughton-Smith, Grant; Jiménez-Alonso, Sandra; Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Montero, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Raquel; León, Javier; Rodríguez-González, Germán; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Pandiella, Atanasio; Díaz-Chico, Bonifacio Nicolás; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2017-05-02

    Human Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) is a hematological stem cell disorder which is associated with activation of Bcr-Abl-Stat5 oncogenic pathway. Direct Bcr-Abl inhibitors are initially successful for the treatment of CML but over time many patients develop drug resistance. In the present study, the effects of CM363, a novel naphthoquinone (NPQ) derivative, were evaluated on human CML-derived K562 cells. CM363 revealed an effective cell growth inhibition (IC50 = 0.7 ± 0.5 μM) by inducing cancer cells to undergo cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. CM363 caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases. This cell cycle arrest was associated with increased levels of cyclin E, pChk1 and pChk2 whereas CM363 downregulated cyclin B, cyclin D3, p27, pRB, Wee1, and BUBR1. CM363 increased the double-strand DNA break marker γH2AX. CM363 caused a time-dependent increase of annexin V-positive cells, DNA fragmentation and increased number of apoptotic nuclei. CM363 triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as reflected by a release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and induction of the cleavage of caspase-3 and -9, and PARP. CM363 showed multikinase modulatory effects through an early increased JNK phosphorylation followed by inhibition of pY-Bcrl-Abl and pY-Stat5. CM363 worked synergistically with imatinib to inhibit cell viability and maintained its activity in imatinib-resistant cells. Finally, CM363 (10 mg/Kg) suppressed the growth of K562 xenograft tumors in athymic mice. In summary, CM363 is a novel multikinase modulator that offers advantages to circumvent imanitib resistance and might be therapeutically effective in Bcrl-Abl-Stat5 related malignancies.

  16. Why do chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells survive allogeneic stem cell transplantation or imatinib: does it really matter?

    PubMed

    Goldman, John; Gordon, Myrtle

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can 'cure' chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), although occasional patients relapse more than 10 years after the transplant procedure. Such cures presumably result from the combined effects of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) of the conditioning regimen and the graft-vs.-leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by donor-derived T lymphocytes. The advent of imatinib has revolutionized the management of patients with CML, but much evidence suggests that it does not eradicate all LSCs, which theoretically remain a potential source of relapse to chronic phase or advanced phase disease. Moreover, sub-clones of Philadelphia-positive cells bearing mutations that code for amino-acid substitutions in the Bcr-Abl kinase domain can be identified in patients receiving treatment with imatinib and are associated with varying degrees of resistance to this agent. In the present review, we postulate that LSCs, similar to their normal counterparts, may alternate between cycling and quiescent modes. In the cycling mode, they may express Bcr-Abl protein and be susceptible to the acquisition of additional mutations, whereas, in the quiescent mode, they may express little or no Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, cannot acquire additional mutations and are unaffected by imatinib. Thus, a patient who starts treatment early in the natural history of CML, and who responds to imatinib clinically, may not have had the opportunity to acquire additional mutations in LSCs. In this case, the persistence long-term of quiescent 'non-mutated' LSCs despite imatinib treatment might be consistent with freedom from relapse to chronic or advanced phase disease, provided that they remain vulnerable to imatinib when they are recruited into cycle. Conversely, when imatinib resistant Philadelphia-positive sub-clones predominate, this is likely to be due to the recruitment to hematopoiesis of quiescent stem cells that had been in cycle before administration of imatinib and

  17. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Kendra; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1) tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1) inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia.

  18. A BCR-ABL Kinase Activity-Independent Signaling Pathway in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    leukemia (CML), but does not cure mice with BCR-ABL-induced acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), similar to CML lymphoid blast crisis. The inability... leukemia or Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia who develop imatinib (STI571) resistance. Blood. 2002;99:3472-3475. 9. von Bubnoff N, Schneller F...the blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome. N Engl J Med. 2001;344:1038-1042. 11

  19. Bosutinib : a review of preclinical and clinical studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Francesca; Piazza, Rocco; Vagge, Elisabetta; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disease. It is characterized by a Bcr-Abl (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus) tyrosine kinase fusion protein produced from the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML. In recent years, many other TKIs have been approved for the treatment of patients with CML. For this reason, the choice of the best strategy treatment has become increasingly complex. Bosutinib , a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, has shown potent activity against CML and it has been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of chronic, accelerated or blast-phase Ph+ CML. This review was conducted to describe the preclinical and clinical activity of bosutinib and the safety and tolerability of the drug in the treatment of CML. Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in July 2013 and relevant conference proceedings. Imatinib continues to represent the treatment of choice for CML. However, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to imatinib or to other second-generation TKIs. Bosutinib shows a good therapeutic activity with a benign safety profile, no cardiovascular toxicity, and offers an important therapeutic addition to the armamentarium that physicians can use against resistant CML.

  20. Renal malakolpkia followed by chronic myelogenous leukaemia: treatment challenges case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Al Salman, Jameela Mohammed; Husain, Aysha

    2013-01-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology and usually affects patients with underlying immunosuppression. This disorder usually involves the genitourinary tract but has been reported in a wide array of anatomical sites. We are presenting, what is to our knowledge, the first case in the literature in which a patient was diagnosed with malakoplakia and after his successful management; he was diagnosed with chronic meylomoncytic leukaemia. All cases of malakoplakia reported in the literature were either preceded or accompanied by an immunosuppressive state. PMID:23349170

  1. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia initially presenting with multiple subcutaneous tumors due to extramedullary hematopoiesis].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Shuhei; Doki, Noriko; Kaito, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Harada, Kaito; Hino, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Keita; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Yosioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Senoo, Yasushi; Watakabe, Kyoko; Hagino, Takeshi; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted with right upper-extremity pain and multiple subcutaneous masses. Bone marrow aspirate showed hypercellular marrow with increased myeloid components at all stages of maturation. Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed 100% Philadelphia chromosome positivity along with BCR/ABL gene rearrangement, as demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A diagnosis of chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was therefore made. Biopsy of one of the subcutaneous masses showed proliferation of granulocytes in various stages of differentiation. There were also erythroid cells and megakaryocytes, without p53 and CD34-positive blasts. These results suggested that the subcutaneous masses had developed from extramedullary hematopoiesis, not blastomas. The patient was administered dasatinib (DA) 140 mg, combined with radiation therapy for pain and peripheral neuropathy from the right axial extramedullary tumor. The patient showed complete hematological remission and the subcutaneous masses had disappeared 1 month after starting administration of DA. Because the patient did not achieve a cytogenetic response, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib was administered. She will undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the near future. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML is uncommon. Our case emphasizes the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML.

  2. Aurora kinase inhibitors: which role in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to imatinib?

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Soverini, Simona; Cilloni, Daniela; Baccarani, Michele

    2009-01-01

    At present, there are no compounds in clinical development in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that have been documented to harbor significant activity against the imatinib-resistant T315I mutation. Recent reports on the pre-clinical activity of some emerging tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as ON012380, VX-680 and PHA-739358 promise possible clinical efficacy against this specific Bcr-Abl mutant form. Here, we focus on the role of aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680 and PHA-739358 in blocking the leukemogenic pathways driven by wild-type and T315I-Bcr-Abl in CML or Ph+ ALL by reviewing recent research evidence. We also discuss the possibility of employing aurora kinase inhibitors as a promising new therapeutic approach in the treatment of CML and Ph+ ALL patients resistant to first and second generation TK inhibitors.

  3. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia: monitoring and predictors of a favorable response to treatment with imatinib].

    PubMed

    Mela Osorio, María J; Giere, Isabel A; Fernández, Isolda; Pavlovsky, Miguel A; Intile, Dante; Pavlovsky, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    The expected five-year survival of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is over 90%. Little data is available regarding the results in the Argentinian population. This information might be of interest as generic imatinib is now available in the region. The aim of this study is to provide information on monitoring and the long-term treatment with imatinib outside of a controlled clinical trial, as well as to analyze the predictive effect of early responses to achieve molecular remission 4.0 (RM 4.0) and the detection of variables that may condition treatment failure. We included 106 patients, who received imatinib 400 mg daily as first-line inhibitor for a median of 8.9 years (IQR 5.8-11.7) between June 2000 and December, 2015. Overall survival was 93%. At latest follow-up 74% of patients continues on initial imatinib. The achievement of response at targeted milestones (6, 12 months) was associated with increased failure-free survival: 87% vs. 56%, p = 0.007; 90% vs. 69% p = 0.01 and was independently associated to RM 4.0: OR 5.6 (95% CI: 1.6-19.0); OR 5.3 (95% CI: 1.4-21.0) p = 0.006. After long-term follow-up, imatinib provided high-rates of response and survival. The prognostic value of response at targeted milestones was confirmed. This study reinforces the importance of molecular monitoring under IS standardization at known timepoints and this must continue to be a target in Argentina.

  4. Gadd45a deficiency accelerates BCR-ABL driven chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Sha, Xiaojin; Magimaidas, Andrew; Maifrede, Silvia; Skorski, Tomasz; Bhatia, Ravi; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2017-01-10

    The Gadd45a stress sensor gene is a member in the Gadd45 family of genes that includes Gadd45b & Gadd45g. To investigate the effect of GADD45A in the development of CML, syngeneic wild type lethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with either wild type or Gadd45a null myeloid progenitors transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the 210-kD BCR-ABL fusion oncoprotein. Loss of Gadd45a was observed to accelerate BCR-ABL driven CML resulting in the development of a more aggressive disease, a significantly shortened median mice survival time, and increased BCR-ABL expressing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (GFP+Lin- cKit+Sca+). GADD45A deficient progenitors expressing BCR-ABL exhibited increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis relative to WT counterparts, which was associated with enhanced PI3K-AKT-mTOR-4E-BP1 signaling, upregulation of p30C/EBPα expression, and hyper-activation of p38 and Stat5. Furthermore, Gadd45a expression in samples obtained from CML patients was upregulated in more indolent chronic phase CML samples and down regulated in aggressive accelerated phase CML and blast crisis CML. These results provide novel evidence that Gadd45a functions as a suppressor of BCR/ABL driven leukemia and may provide a unique prognostic marker of CML progression.

  5. Paediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukaemia (JCML) detected by cytogenetic and FISH techniques.

    PubMed

    Acar, H; Caliskan, U; Cora, T

    1999-12-01

    This report presents two rare cases, one of paediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and the other juvenile chronic myeloid leukaemia (jCML). In the first case, there were clinical and biological features of MDS-refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB). The bone marrow (BM) karyotype demonstrated a monosomy 7 which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, FISH analysis showed that an alpha-satellite DNA sequence had been transferred from chromosomes 13/21 to one homologue of chromosomes 22. The BCR-ABL rearrangement was negative. In the second case, at diagnosis, the karyotype was 46,XX. FISH analysis with the simultaneous and individual application of abl and bcr probes for chromosome 9 and 22, respectively, revealed the presence of the BCR-ABL rearrangement in addition to an extra ABL sequence locating chromosome 20. A clone that was BCR-ABL gene rearrangement negative but with an extra ABL DNA sequence on chromsome 20, and another clone that was BCR-ABL gene rearrangement negative were detected by DC-FISH and uni-colour (UC-) FISH analysis. No monosomy 7 was detected by conventional cytogenetic or FISH analyses.

  6. Bypass mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibition in chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Marfe, Gabriella; Di Stefano, Carla

    2014-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a disease induced by the BCR-ABL oncogene. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were introduced in the late 1990s and have revolutionized the management of CML. The majority of such patients can now expect to live a normal life providing they continue to comply with TKI treatment. However, in a significant proportion of cases, TKI resistance develops over time, requiring a change of therapy. Over the past few years, multiple molecular mechanisms of resistance have been identified and some common themes have emerged. One is the development of resistance mutations in the drug target that prevent the drug from effectively inhibiting the respective TK domain. The second is activation of alternative molecules that maintain the signalling of key downstream pathways despite sustained inhibition of the original drug target. In this mini-review, we summarize the concepts underlying resistance, the specific examples known to date and the challenges of applying this knowledge to develop improved therapeutic strategies to prevent or overcome resistance.

  7. Predictors of Neuropsychological Change in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Chang, Grace; Jones, Jennifer A.; Antin, Joseph R.; Orav, E. John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the course of neuropsychological functioning in patients with chronic myelogeous leukemia (n = 91) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 15) who underwent standard treatment for their disease or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months post-treatment. At baseline, 23% of the participants (n = 75) in the longitudinal sample had Z-scores on at least one of the neuropsychological tests that were <1.4. Participants in the study showed improvement over baseline at the 12 and 18 months assessments. The average Z-scores for the six cognitive domains in the longitudinal data set over the course of the study ranged from −0.89 to 0.59. Significant predictors of change in neuropsychological test scores included age, with older participants showing less improvement over time. Other predictors included baseline cognitive domains (language, memory, and attention), previous cocaine use, disease status, intelligence quotient, and quality of life measures. Findings support previous studies in patients with hematological malignancies who showed cognitive impairments at baseline prior to HSCT. However, there was little evidence for further cognitive decline over the course of 18 months. PMID:23391504

  8. Ganglioside GM3 is required for caffeic acid phenethyl ester-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Chung, Tae-Wook; Song, Kwon-Ho; Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ha, Ki-Tae; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2014-08-01

    The human chronic myelogenous cell line K562 has been used extensively as a model for the study of leukemia differentiation. We show here that treatment of K562 cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) induced a majority of cells to differentiate towards the megakaryocytic lineage. Microscopy analysis showed that K562 cells treated with CAPE exhibited characteristic features of physiological megakaryocytic differentiation, including the presence of vacuoles and demarcation membranes. Differentiation of K562 cells treated with CAPE was also accompanied by a net increase in megakaryocytic markers. The transcriptional activity of lactosylceramide α-2,3-sialyltransferase (GM3 synthase) and synthesis of ganglioside GM3 were increased by CAPE treatment. The promoter analysis of GM3 synthase demonstrated that CAPE induced the expression of GM3 synthase mRNA via activation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), transcription factor in nucleus. Interestingly, the inhibition of ganglioside GM3 synthesis by D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propranol (D-PDMP) and GM3 synthase-siRNA blocked the CAPE-induced expression of the megakaryocytic markers and differentiation of K562 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CAPE induces ganglioside GM3-mediated megakaryocytic differentiation of human chronic myelogenous cells.

  9. Juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia: report of the Italian Registry. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Aricò, M; Bossi, G; Schirò, R; Galimberti, M; Longoni, D; Macchia, P; Miniero, R; Natale, D; Pession, A; Pillon, M

    1993-01-01

    Since juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia (JCML) represents no more than 2% of leukemia in children, clinical and investigative experience of this disorder has been limited. In order to evaluate the diagnostic criteria currently applied, to provide centralized facilities for blood culture and to collect data on treatment, and to propose a uniform treatment protocol in our country, a National Registry for JCML was recently established in the "Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica" (AIEOP). Out of the 24 cases reported from 9/35 centres, 22 were considered sufficiently documented and were enrolled in the Registry. Clonogenic assay on marrow and peripheral blood cells was performed in all available cases. Common features were non-specific clinical (fever, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, lymphadenomegaly) and hematologic alterations (anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis usually < 50 x 10(9)/l, monocytosis, circulating immature granulocytes, increased HbF, normal karyotype). In 11 out of 11 cases, in vitro blood cultures showed the spontaneous growth of CFU-C in the absence of any exogenous source of colony-stimulating activity. Twelve of the 22 patients (55%) are alive (probability of survival 47.7%); most patients were treated according to an acute myeloid leukemia-directed schedule; 5/7 children treated with interferon were alive with disease after a median time of 29 months from diagnosis (range 8-95 months); 4/5 children who underwent bone marrow transplantation were alive in complete remission 10, 24, 42 and 118 months, after the diagnosis. Age < 1 year at presentation was the most significant prognostic factor in terms of probability of survival (80% vs 28%; p = 0.0024). JCML must be considered in young children for whom acute leukemia has been suspected but ruled out; in vitro cultures should be considered mandatory to confirm the diagnosis. Age less than one year at the presentation was associated with prolonged survival. Only bone marrow

  10. Economic benefits of adequate molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Annie; Chen, Lei; Dea, Katherine; Wu, Eric Q; Goldberg, Stuart L

    2014-02-01

    Molecular monitoring of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been associated with improved clinical outcomes during tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy (TKI), yet recent studies have demonstrated its use is far below published guidelines. This study sought to determine frequencies of molecular monitoring and its impact on resource utilization and medical costs. A retrospective US claims administrative database (IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims and Truven Health Analytics MarketScan databases, 11/2007-06/2012) was used to analyze the economic impact of qPCR testing in CML patients on first-line TKIs during the initial 12-months of treatment. One thousand two hundred and five adult CML patients met the sample selection criteria. Among these, 41.0% had no qPCR tests, 31.9% had 1-2 tests, and 27.1% had 3-4 tests; 88.9% were initiated on imatinib; 47.7% were female. Patients in the 3-4 tests cohort incurred 44% (p < 0.001) fewer in-patient (IP) admissions than patients in the 0-tests cohort. Adjusted all-cause IP cost was $5663 (p = 0.005) lower for the 3-4 tests cohort than the 0-tests cohort. Adjusted progression-related IP cost was $4132 (p = 0.013) lower for the 3-4 tests cohort than the 0-tests cohort. Adjusted medical service cost was $5997 (p = 0.049) lower for the 3-4 tests cohort than the 0-tests cohort. Claims databases did not include information on the primary cause of hospitalizations. Among CML patients in two large claims databases, nearly three-quarters did not receive adequate molecular monitoring per published guidelines. Those who were more frequently monitored incurred lower medical service costs, with the majority of the difference in costs being related to disease progression. These findings underscore the clinical and economic values of molecular monitoring in CML.

  11. Population-based Testing and Treatment Characteristics for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Styles, Timothy; Wu, Manxia; Wilson, Reda; Babcock, Frances; Butterworth, David; West, Dee W.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction National and International Hematology/Oncology Practice Guidelines recommend testing for the BCR-ABL mutation for definitive diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to allow for appropriate treatment with a Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI). The purpose of our study was to describe population-based testing and treatment practice characteristics for patients diagnosed with CML. Methods We analyzed cases of CML using 2011 data from 10 state registries which are part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Program of Cancer Registries. We describe completeness of testing for the BCR-ABL gene and availability of outpatient treatment with TKIs and associated characteristics. Results A total of 685 cases of CML were identified; 55% (374) had a documented BCR-ABL gene test with 96% (360) of these being positive for the BCR-ABL gene and the remaining 4% (14) either testing negative or had a missing result. Registries were able to identify the use of TKIs in 54% (369) of patients, though only 43% (296) had a corresponding BCR-ABL gene test documented. One state registry reported a significantly lower percentage of patients being tested for the BCR-ABL gene (25%) and receiving TKI treatment (21%). Limiting analysis to CML case reports from the remaining nine CER registries, 78% (305) patients had a documented BCR-ABL gene test and 79% (308) had documented treatment with a TKI. Receipt of testing or treatment for these nine states did not vary by sex, race, ethnicity, census tract poverty level, census tract urbanization, or insurance status; BCR-ABL testing varied by state of residence and BCR-ABL testing and TKI therapy occurred less often with increasing age (OR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.95–0.99; OR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96–0.99 respectively). Conclusions Collection of detailed CML data vary significantly by states. A majority of the case patients had appropriate testing for the BCR-ABL gene and treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  12. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Overcoming psychosocial and developmental barriers to blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in an adolescent/young adult (AYA) transgender patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khazal, Sajad; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kapoor, Neena; Mahadeo, Kris M

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents/young adults (AYAs) afflicted with cancer face unique barriers to potentially standard curative therapies, such as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). Transgender AYAs face additional barriers and there is a dearth of published literature regarding their oncology-related experience. We present the case of an AYA male-to-female (MTF) transgender patient on cross-sex hormone therapy, with a history of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) and significant psychosocial barriers, which initially served as a barrier to BMT at two different centers; we modified our standard consent and education process and was able to successfully proceed with BMT and subsequently cure her CML. Despite unique challenges, AYA and transgender patients with significant psychosocial barriers may achieve successful outcomes with BMT. Research is needed regarding guidelines for cross-sex hormone therapy administration for patients undergoing BMT and other issues, which may be unique to the transgender experience.

  16. Can clues to the molecular defects in chronic myelogenous leukemia come from genetic studies on the Abelson tyrosine kinase in fruit flies?

    PubMed

    Comer, A R; Liebl, E C; Hoffmann, F M

    1995-06-01

    Translocations affecting the structure of the c-abl proto-oncogene are involved in the development or progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Leukemic cells from patients with CML show alterations in adhesive properties that may play a part in the pathology of these diseases. Mutations in the Drosophila Abl homolog are lethal and indicate that Abl may mediate processes involving differential cell adhesion. These observations suggest that Abl may regulate similar adhesive processes in human beings and Drosophila. Genetic analysis of Abl function in Drosophila has identified novel proteins that function in Abl-related processes. Analysis of the functions of these new molecules may provide insight into mechanisms by which oncogenic abl proteins participate in the etiology of CML and ALL.

  17. Successful autografting in chronic myelogenous leukaemia using Philadelphia negative blood progenitor cells mobilized with rHuG-CSF alone in a patient responding to alpha-interferon.

    PubMed

    Carreras, E; Sierra, J; Rovira, M; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Martinez, C; Nomdedeu, B; Cervantes, F; Marín, P; Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1997-02-01

    Several non-randomized studies suggest a possible survival advantage for chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) patients treated with an autologous stem-cell transplantation. Due to the possible contribution of residual leukaemic cells present in the inoculum in post-transplant relapse, several methods are being evaluated to eliminate neoplastic cells or to select 'normal' (Ph1 negative) progenitor cells for autografting. Recently, several studies have shown that Ph1 negative blood progenitor cells can be mobilized by rHuG-CSF alone in patients who have a cytogenetic response to alpha-interferon (IFN). We describe the first case, as far as we are aware, of a CML patient responding to IFN autografted by using blood progenitor cells collected by rHuG-CSF alone.

  18. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  19. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Blastic Phase; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase of Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Disease

  20. CBL, CBLB, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH1/2 mutations and additional chromosomal aberrations constitute molecular events in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Hideki; Jankowska, Anna M.; McDevitt, Michael A.; O'Keefe, Christine; Dujardin, Simon; Cazzolli, Heather; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Prince, Courtney; Nicoll, John; Siddaiah, Harish; Shaik, Mohammed; Szpurka, Hadrian; Hsi, Eric; Advani, Anjali; Paquette, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) to accelerated (AP) and blast phase (BP) is because of secondary molecular events, as well as additional cytogenetic abnormalities. On the basis of the detection of JAK2, CBL, CBLB, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH1/2 mutations in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, we hypothesized that they may also contribute to progression in CML. We screened these genes for mutations in 54 cases with CML (14 with chronic phase, 14 with AP, 20 with myeloid, and 6 with nonmyeloid BP). We identified 1 CBLB and 2 TET2 mutations in AP, and 1 CBL, 1 CBLB, 4 TET2, 2 ASXL1, and 2 IDH family mutations in myeloid BP. However, none of these mutations were found in chronic phase. No cases with JAK2V617F mutations were found. In 2 cases, TET2 mutations were found concomitant with CBLB mutations. By single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, uniparental disomy on chromosome 5q, 8q, 11p, and 17p was found in AP and BP but not involving 4q24 (TET2) or 11q23 (CBL). Microdeletions on chromosomes 17q11.2 and 21q22.12 involved tumor associated genes NF1 and RUNX1, respectively. Our results indicate that CBL family, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH family mutations and additional cryptic karyotypic abnormalities can occur in advanced phase CML. PMID:21346257

  1. Chronic myelogenous leukemia stem and progenitor cells demonstrate chromosomal instability related to repeated breakage-fusion-bridge cycles mediated by increased nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sujata; Stark, Jeremy M; Sun, Can-Lan; Modi, Hardik; Chen, WenYong; O'Connor, Timothy R; Forman, Stephen J; Bhatia, Smita; Bhatia, Ravi

    2012-06-28

    Chromosomal aberrations are an important consequence of genotoxic exposure and contribute to pathogenesis and progression of several malignancies. We investigated the susceptibility to chromosomal aberrations in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) progenitors after exposure to ionizing radiation. In normal progenitors, ionizing radiation induced both stable and unstable chromosomal lesions, but only stable aberrations persisted after multiple divisions. In contrast, radiation of chronic phase CML progenitors resulted in enhanced generation of unstable lesions that persisted after multiple divisions. CML progenitors demonstrated active cell cycle checkpoints and increased nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, suggesting that persistence of unstable aberrations was the result of continued generation of these lesions. CML progenitors demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to repeated cycles of chromosome damage, repair, and damage through a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism. Perpetuation of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles in CML progenitors was mediated by classic nonhomologous end joining repair. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of chromosomal instability in leukemia progenitors because of continued generation of unstable chromosomal lesions through repeated cycles of breakage and repair of such lesions.

  2. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Long, Mark D; van den Berg, Patrick R; Russell, James L; Singh, Prashant K; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-09-03

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib.

  4. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-09-15

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study.

  5. Molecular and functional analysis of the stem cell compartment of chronic myelogenous leukemia reveals the presence of a CD34- cell population with intrinsic resistance to imatinib.

    PubMed

    Lemoli, Roberto M; Salvestrini, Valentina; Bianchi, Elisa; Bertolini, Francesco; Fogli, Miriam; Amabile, Marilina; Tafuri, Agostino; Salati, Simona; Zini, Roberta; Testoni, Nicoletta; Rabascio, Cristina; Rossi, Lara; Martin-Padura, Ines; Castagnetti, Fausto; Marighetti, Paola; Martinelli, Giovanni; Baccarani, Michele; Ferrari, Sergio; Manfredini, Rossella

    2009-12-10

    We show the molecular and functional characterization of a novel population of lineage-negative CD34-negative (Lin(-)CD34(-)) hematopoietic stem cells from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients at diagnosis. Molecular karyotyping and quantitative analysis of BCR-ABL transcript demonstrated that approximately one-third of CD34(-) cells are leukemic. CML Lin(-)CD34(-) cells showed kinetic quiescence and limited clonogenic capacity. However, stroma-dependent cultures induced CD34 expression on some cells and cell cycling, and increased clonogenic activity and expression of BCR-ABL transcript. Lin(-)CD34(-) cells showed hematopoietic cell engraftment rate in 2 immunodeficient mouse strains similar to Lin-CD34(+) cells, whereas endothelial cell engraftment was significantly higher. Gene expression profiling revealed the down-regulation of cell-cycle arrest genes and genes involved in antigen presentation and processing, while the expression of genes related to tumor progression, such as angiogenic factors, was strongly up-regulated compared with normal counterparts. Phenotypic analysis confirmed the significant down-regulation of HLA class I and II molecules in CML Lin(-)CD34(-) cells. Imatinib mesylate did not reduce fusion transcript levels, BCR-ABL kinase activity, and clonogenic efficiency of CML Lin(-)CD34(-) cells in vitro. Moreover, leukemic CD34(-) cells survived exposure to BCR-ABL inhibitors in vivo. Thus, we identified a novel CD34(-) leukemic stem cell subset in CML with peculiar molecular and functional characteristics.

  6. Safranal, a Crocus sativus L constituent suppresses the growth of K-562 cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In silico and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Papadopoulos, Theophanis; Sahpazidou, Despina; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Crocin, a main constituent of Crocus sativus L (saffron), has been found to inhibit the growth of K-562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells expressing Bcr-Abl protein tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the ability of the bioactive saffron's constituents, crocin (CRC) and safranal (SFR), to inhibit the Bcr-Abl protein activity employing an in silico approach, as well as the in vitro effect of these compounds on K-562 growth and gene expression of Bcr-Abl. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that mostly SFR can be attached to Bcr-Abl protein, positioned inside the protein's binding cavity at the same place with the drug used in the treatment of CML, imatinib mesylate (IM). The predicted polar interactions and hydrophobic contacts constructing a hydrophobic cavity inside the active site, explain the observed inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that SFR and CRC mediate cytotoxic response to K562 cells. In vitro studies on the expression of Bcr-Abl gene revealed that SFR and in a lesser degree IM inhibited the expression of the gene, while in contrast CRC induced an increase. The ultimate goal was to evaluate the existence of a potential antitumor activity of saffron's constituents SFR and CRC.

  7. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; van den Berg, Patrick R.; Russell, James L.; Singh, Prashant K.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J.

    2015-01-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:26117541

  8. High-performance Liquid Chromatographic Ultraviolet Detection of Nilotinib in Human Plasma from Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, and Comparison with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Ryosuke; Satho, Yuhki; Itoh, Hiroki

    2016-11-01

    A method for determining nilotinib concentration in human plasma is proposed using high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection. Nilotinib and the internal standard dasatinib were separated using a mobile phase of 0.5% Na2 PO4 H2 O (pH 2.5)-acetonitrile-methanol (55:25:20, v/v/v) on a Capcell Pak C18 MG II column (250 × 4.6 mm) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, and ultraviolet measurement at 250 nm. The calibration curve exhibited linearity over the nilotinib concentration range of 50-2,500 ng/ml at 250 nm, with relative standard deviations (n = 5) of 7.1%, 2.5%, and 2.9% for 250, 1,500, and 2,500 ng/ml, respectively. The detection limit for nilotinib was 5 ng/ml due to three blank determinations (ρ = 3). This method was successfully applied to assaying nilotinib in human plasma samples from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. In addition, we compared the results with those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) at BML, Inc. (a commercial laboratory). A strong correlation was observed between the nilotinib concentrations measured by our high-performance liquid chromatographic method and those obtained by LC/MS-MS (r(2) = 0.988, P < 0.01). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The value of open access and a patient centric approach to oral oncolytic utilization in the treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: A U.S. perspective.

    PubMed

    Das, Lopamudra; Gitlin, Matthew; Siegartel, Lisa R; Makenbaeva, Dinara

    2017-04-01

    Since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has resulted in significant improvement in patient survival but at a higher pharmaceutical cost to payers. The recent introduction of generic imatinib presents an opportunity to lower pharmacy costs within a population that is growing due to improved survival. Recent literature has focused on the likely benefits to payers of step therapy through generic imatinib. Areas covered: This review provides a perspective that is broader than the evaluation of financial savings or narrowly defined health economic metrics by incorporating factors such as CML patient heterogeneity, including varying levels of disease progression risk, comorbidities and genetic mutation status, differences in TKI product profiles, clinical guideline recommendations, and the importance of individualized patient care. A focused literature review evaluating the real-world impact of utilization management programs is presented. Expert commentary: The findings indicate that payers can achieve substantial savings without the need to implement utilization management policies. Compromises in the ability to provide individualized patient care and unwanted economic consequences resulting from increased costs of disease progression, adverse events, and lack of response to treatment due to utilization management are summarized.

  10. Bosutinib in the treatment of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ann Q; Wilson, Nicole M; Gleason, Shannon L; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2014-02-01

    Bosutinib is an orally bioavailable SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against all phases of resistant chronic myeloid leukemia that do not express the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. Bosutinib has a unique toxicity profile that is manageable. This paper provides an overview of bosutinib, covering pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties, results of treatment in newly diagnosed and previously treated chronic myeloid leukemia patients, as well as common side effects.

  11. H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells induced by imatinib.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaqiong; Xiong, Min; Duan, Lianning; Liu, Ze; Niu, Tianhui; Luo, Yuan; Wu, Xinpin; Xu, Chengshan; Lu, Chengrong

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that histone H2AX plays a critical role in regulation of tumor cell apoptosis and acts as a novel human tumor suppressor protein. However, the action of H2AX in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells is unknown. The detailed mechanism and epigenetic regulation by H2AX remain elusive in cancer cells. Here, we report that H2AX was involved in apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of H2AX increased apoptotic sensitivity of CML cells (K562) induced by imatinib. However, overexpression of Ser139-mutated H2AX (blocking phosphorylation) decreased sensitivity of K562 cells to apoptosis. Similarly, knockdown of H2AX made K562 cells resistant to apoptotic induction. These results revealed that the function of H2AX involved in apoptosis is strictly related to its phosphorylation (Ser139). Our data further indicated that imatinib may stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family member p38, and H2AX phosphorylation followed a similar time course, suggesting a parallel response. H2AX phosphorylation can be blocked by p38 siRNA or its inhibitor. These data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation was regulated by p38 MAPK pathway in K562 cells. However, the p38 MAPK downstream, mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase-1 and -2, which phosphorylated histone H3, were not required for H2AX phosphorylation during apoptosis. Finally, we provided epigenetic evidence that H2AX phosphorylation regulated apoptosis-related gene Bim expression. Blocking of H2AX phosphorylation inhibited Bim gene expression. Taken together, these data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in CML cells induced by imatinib.

  12. Increase of T and B cells and altered BACH2 expression patterns in bone marrow trephines of imatinib-treated patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Von Laffert, Maximilian; Hänel, Mathias; Dietel, Manfred; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of imatinib on T and B cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is not well understood. An upregulation of the transcription factor Broad-complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-Brac and Cap‘n’collar 1 bZip transcription factor 2 (BACH2), which is involved in the development and differentiation of B cells, was demonstrated in a CML cell line treated with imatinib. The present study retrospectively analysed the expression and distribution of cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD20 and BACH2 (per 1,000 cells), as well as the co-expression of CD20 and BACH2, using immunohistochemistry in serial bone marrow trephines obtained from 14 CML patients treated with imatinib in comparison to 17 patients with newly diagnosed CML and 6 control trephines. Bone marrow trephines of CML patients in remission under imatinib therapy exhibited significantly higher numbers of CD3 and CD20 infiltrates (partly ordered in aggregates) compared with patients with newly diagnosed CML and control individuals. Similarly, nuclear expression of BACH2 in granulopoietic cells was increased in CML patients treated with imatinib, which may represent the histological correlate of the positive treatment effect. Furthermore, since BACH2 is involved in B cell development, its altered expression patterns by imatinib may be one explanation for high B cell numbers, as revealed by CD20/BACH2 (nuclear)-positive cells. As the present data are preliminary, future prospective studies are required to assess the prognostic and predictive role of BACH2 in patients with CML under targeted therapy. PMID:27698808

  13. A 41-kilodalton protein is a potential substrate for the p210bcr-abl protein-tyrosine kinase in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Freed, E; Hunter, T

    1992-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by a translocation involving the c-abl protein-tyrosine kinase gene. A chimeric mRNA is formed containing sequences from a chromosome 22 gene (bcr) at its 5' end and all but the variable exon 1 of c-abl sequence. The product of this mRNA, p210bcr-abl, has constitutively high protein-tyrosine kinase activity. We examined K562 cells and other lines established from CML patients for the presence of phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr)-containing proteins which might be p210bcr-abl substrates. Two-dimensional gel separation of 32P-labeled proteins followed by phosphoamino acid analysis of 25 phosphoproteins, which comprised the major alkali-stable phosphoproteins, indicated that three related proteins of 41 kDa are the most prominent P-Tyr-containing proteins detected by this method. The 41-kDa phosphoproteins are found in two other CML lines that we examined but not in lines of similar lineage isolated from patients with distinct leukemic disease. A protein that comigrates with the major form of pp41 (pp41A) and contains P-Tyr is also found in murine fibroblasts and B-lymphoid cells transformed by Abelson murine leukemia virus, which encodes the v-abl protein, and in platelet-derived growth factor-treated fibroblasts, in which it has been described previously. We analyzed three pairs of Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-cell lines from individual CML patients and found that only the lines in which active p210bcr-abl was present contained detectable pp41. We also performed immunoblotting with anti-P-Tyr antibodies on the same CML cell lines and detected at least four other putative substrates of p210bcr-abl, which were undetected with use of the two-dimensional gel technique. Images PMID:1545812

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Simvastatin in combination with bergamottin potentiates TNF-induced apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB signalling pathway in human chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Moo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong Hyun; Yang, Woong Mo; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Seok-Geun; Um, Jae-Young; Shim, Bum Sang; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2016-10-01

    Context Simvastatin (SV) and bergamottin (BGM) are known to exhibit diverse anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Objective Very little is known about the potential efficacy of combination of these two agents to potentiate TNF-induced apoptosis in human chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). Materials and methods In the present study, we investigated whether SV combined with BGM mediates its effect through suppression of NF-κB-signalling pathway. Results We found that the combination treatment enhanced cytotoxicity and potentiated the apoptosis induced by TNF as indicated by intracellular esterase activity, Annexin V staining and caspase activation. This effect of co-treatment correlated with down-regulation of various gene products that mediate cell proliferation (cyclin D1), cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Survivin), invasion (MMP-9) and angiogenesis (VEGF); all known to be regulated by NF-κB. SV combined with BGM also produced TNF-induced cell-cycle arrest in S-phase and this arrest correlated with a concomitant increase in the levels of cyclin-dependent inhibitor p21 and p27. The combination therapy inhibited TNF-induced NF-κB activation, IκBα degradation and p65 translocation to the nucleus as compared with the treatment with individual agents alone. Besides, SV combined with BGM did not significantly potentiate apoptotic effect induced by TNF in p65(-)(/)(-) cells, as compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Discussion and conclusion Our results provide novel insight into the role of SV and BGM in potentially preventing and treating cancer through modulation of NF-κB signalling pathway and its regulated gene products.

  16. Prevalence of Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog-breakpoint cluster region fusions and correlation with peripheral blood parameters in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Ali Asghar; Shahsavar, Farhad; Gorji, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Kolsoum; Nazarabad, Vahideh Heydari; Bahmani, Banafsheh

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a chronic malignancy of myeloid linage associated with a significant increase in granulocytes in bone marrow and peripheral blood. CML diagnosis is based on detection of Philadelphia chromosome and “Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog” (ABL)-“breakpoint cluster region protein” fusions (ABL-BCR fusions). Aims: In this study, patients with CML morphology were studied according to ABL-BCR fusions and the relationship between the fusions and peripheral blood cell changes was examined. Materials and Methods: All patients suspected to chronic myeloproliferative disorders in Lorestan Province visiting subspecialist hematology clinics who were confirmed by oncologist were studied over a period of 5 years. After completing basic data questionnaire, blood samples were obtained with informed consent from the patients. Blood cell count and morphology were investigated and RNA was extracted from blood samples. cDNA was synthesized from RNA and ABL-BCR fusions including b3a2 and b2a2 (protein 210 kd or p210), e1a2 (protein 190 kdor p190), and e19a2 (protein 230 kdor p230) were studied by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) fusions was also studied. The prevalence of mutations and their correlation with the blood parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Of 58 patients positive for ABL-BCR fusion, 18 (30.5%) had b2a2 fusion, 37 (62.71%) had b3a2 fusion and three (3.08%) had e1a2 fusion. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) was not observed. There was no significant correlation between ABL-BCR fusions and white blood cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobin concentration. Conclusions: The ABL-BCR fusions in Lorestan Province were similar to other studies in Iran, and b3a2 fusion had the highest prevalence in the studied patients studied. PMID:27857896

  17. [Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)--VP(M) regimen starting during its chronic phase, and the second nation-wide survey on the long-term survivors of CML in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, K; Nakada, H

    1989-08-01

    Eighty-three patients in the chronic phase of Ph1-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) have been treated with busulfan or other alkylating agents in a conventional way hitherto acknowledged. During its chronic phase, 31 cases of these 83 had received an additional intermittent therapy every 4 to 6 months, consisting of vincristine 2 mg or vindesine 3 mg per week, prednisolone 20 to 30 mg per day, and partly 6-mercaptopurine 50 to 100 mg, combined with allopurinol 200 to 300 mg per day for 2 to 3 weeks. The 50% survival of these patients using the Kaplan-Meier's method was 73, 7 months and 5-year survival was 70.2%, while those of the remaining patients were 41.2 months and 13.4%, respectively. The second nation-wide survey of long-term survivors of CML in Japan was attempted. CML totalling 195 surviving over 7 years from the initial diagnosis and 113 of CML surviving over one year from the blastic crisis had been collected by the end of March 1988. The longest survivors of the former group was for 21.3 years, while the latter 4.6 years. In addition, recent increase of the annual incidence of the above both groups was clarified. These results strongly support the progress of chemotherapy of CML in recent years.

  18. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB) transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I) and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5) or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I) CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for further drug development to

  19. Dendritic cells generated from blood precursors of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients carry the Philadelphia translocation and can induce a CML-specific primary cytotoxic T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Eibl, B; Ebner, S; Duba, C; Böck, G; Romani, N; Erdel, M; Gächter, A; Niederwieser, D; Schuler, G

    1997-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells specialized in the initiation of primary immune responses. We were interested to know whether mature DC can be grown in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and whether they carry the Philadelphia (Ph) translocation. Using a method recently described, DC were generated from PBMC precursors of 12 patients with CML using GM-CSF, IL-4, and monocyte-conditioned medium. DC exhibited the typical morphology with thin cytoplasmatic processes and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD86, and CD83 typical for mature DC. After sorting with the monoclonal antibody CD83, a cell population of more than 95% CD83 positive cells was obtained. The presence of the Ph translocation was analyzed in these cells, in PBMC, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T blasts from the same patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In contrast to all other cells analyzed, the vast majority of DC (95.9 +/- 0.7%) displayed the Ph translocation, irrespective of disease stage or therapy. PBMC were predominantly positive for the Ph chromosome (67.6 +/- 7.3%), whereas only 11.4 +/- 1% of the B cells and 4.4 +/- 1.1% of the PHA blasts carried the Ph translocation. Using such leukemic DC as antigen-presenting cells, a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro was obtained, as shown by the specific recognition of Ph chromosome positive cells. We conclude that DC can be generated from blood progenitors of CML patients in vitro and exhibit, to a large extent, the Ph translocation. Such DC, which in a preliminary experiment have been able to induce a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro, might be ideal candidates for adoptive immunotherapy either by direct transfer of DC for in vivo generation of a T-cell response or by in vitro generation of CML-specific cytotoxic autologous or HLA

  20. Clinical Safety and Efficacy of Nilotinib or Dasatinib in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Pre-existing Liver and/or Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Koji; Lahoti, Amit; Jabbour, Elias; Jain, Preetesh; Pierce, Sherry; Borthakur, Gautam; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND The safety and efficacy of frontline nilotinib and dasatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-CP) patients with pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction are unknown. PATIENTS and METHODS We analyzed adverse event rates, response rates, and survival rates of 215 CML-CP patients with or without renal and/or liver dysfunction who were treated with front-line nilotinib (108 patients) or dasatinib (107 patients). RESULTS Overall median follow-up was 49 months. At baseline, 6 (6%) dasatinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction and 13 (12%) had mild liver dysfunction. Eight (7%) nilotinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction, 1 (1%) had moderate renal dysfunction, and 9 (8%) mild liver dysfunction. There were no significant differences in the rates of complete cytogenetic response, major molecular response, or MR4.5 between organ function cohorts. Dasatinib- or nilotinib- treated patients with baseline renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of transient reversible acute kidney injury (p=0.011; p<0.001), and nilotinib-treated patients with renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of bleeding (p<0.001). CONCLUSION CML-CP patients with mild to moderate renal or liver dysfunction can be safely treated with frontline dasatinib or nilotinib and can achieve response rates similar to those of CML-CP patients with normal organ function. PMID:26796981

  1. Activated ClpP kills persisters and eradicates a chronic biofilm infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian P.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Fleck, Laura E.; LaFleur, Michael D.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Coleman, K.; Leonard, Steve N.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lewis, Kim

    2013-11-21

    The current antibiotic crisis stems from two distinct phenomena-drug resistance, and drug tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as drug efflux or modification prevent antibiotics from binding to their targets 1, allowing pathogens to grow. Antibiotic tolerance is the property of persister cells, phenotypic variants of regular bacteria 2. Antibiotics kill by corrupting targets, but these are inactive in dormant persisters, leading to tolerance. Persisters were first identified by Joseph Bigger in 1944, when he discovered a surviving sub-population of Staphylococcus following treatment with penicillin3. Persisters are largely responsible for recalcitrance of chronic diseases such as tuberculosis, and various infections associated with biofilms - endocarditis, osteomyelitis, infections of catheters and indwelling devices, and deep-seated infections of soft tissues 4. There are a number of redundant pathways involved in persister formation5,6 precluding development of drugs inhibiting their formation. The acyldepsipeptide antibiotic (ADEP 4) has been shown to activate the ClpP protease resulting in death of growing cells 7. Here we show that ADEP4 activated ClpP becomes a fairly non-specific protease and kills persister cells by degradation of over 400 intracellular targets. clpP mutants are resistant to ADEP4 7, but we find that they display increased susceptibility to killing by a range of conventional antibiotics. Combining ADEP4 with rifampicin leads to eradication of persisters, stationary and biofilm populations of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a deep-seated murine infection. Target corruption/activation provides an approach to killing persisters and eradicating chronic infections.

  2. Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giralt, S; Kantarjian, H; Talpaz, M

    1995-08-01

    Allogeneic BMT and IFN-A-based therapy have undoubtedly changed the natural history of CML. Despite these advances, many patients still die from their disease. Most patients do not qualify for an allogeneic BMT either because of age or lack of an appropriate donor, and only a fraction of patients achieve a complete cytogenetic remission with IFN-A-based therapy. The timing of BMT and treatment sequences of IFN-A and BMT have been discussed. Prior treatment with IFN-A does not seem to affect transplant outcome; however, delaying transplantation has been reported to impact adversely on transplant results. Until controlled trials are performed, the issue of optimal timing of allogeneic BMT will remain controversial. The use of alternative donors may extend the option of allogeneic BMT to younger patients; however, for older patients this therapeutic modality still has an unacceptably high incidence of morbidity and mortality with current BMT regimens and other alternative treatments are needed. Investigational strategies searching for ways of improving the proportion of patients achieving complete cytogenetic remissions with IFN-A therapy need to be actively explored. These include new agents (eg, HHT) or new modalities such as intensive chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation with in vitro purging. Investigators in the field must decide whether to continue randomized trials of IFN-A versus conventional chemotherapy, or to explore strategies that may enhance the effect of IFN-A-based therapy. Only when the durable cytogenetic response rates with IFN-A combinations increase to 40% or 50% will it be of value to proceed to phase III trials. Further understanding in the basic biology of CML and the effect of IFN-A in this disease will also provide clues to improving therapy with the goal of obtaining long-term disease control and cures in the majority of patients with the least burden of therapy.

  3. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  4. Lack of clinical exacerbations in adults with chronic asthma after immunization with killed influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Stenius-Aarniala, B; Huttunen, J K; Pyhälä, R; Haahtela, T; Jokela, P; Jukkara, A; Karakorpi, T; Kataja, M; Kava, T; Kuusisto, P

    1986-06-01

    The effects of immunization with killed influenza virus vaccine were assessed by comparison with placebo in a double-blind study of 318 adult patients with chronic asthma. The patients were randomly allocated to active vaccine and placebo. No difference was observed in peak expiratory flow rate or in clinical symptoms of bronchial obstruction between the groups receiving active vaccine and placebo during the first week after immunization. The data were analyzed separately for age, sex, duration of the disease, hypersensitivity to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), atopic status, patients with a history of attacks of asthma induced by viral infections, patients with a diurnal variation of baseline peak expiratory flow of 20 percent or more, and patients receiving continuous oral steroid medication, but none of these factors seemed to predict any short-term adverse effects of vaccination. Follow-up for eight months after the vaccination revealed no differences in asthmatic symptoms between the patients treated with active vaccine and those receiving placebo. The antiviral antibody response to vaccination was normal. The possible protection provided by the vaccination against exacerbation of asthma induced by influenza could not be evaluated, since the influenza epidemic expected during the season failed to occur in Finland. It is concluded that immunization with killed influenza vaccine is safe and is not associated with any significant side effects in adult patients with chronic asthma.

  5. Relapse after non-T-cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia: early transplantation, use of an unrelated donor, and chronic graft-versus-host disease are protective.

    PubMed

    Enright, H; Davies, S M; DeFor, T; Shu, X; Weisdorf, D; Miller, W; Ramsay, N K; Arthur, D; Verfaillie, C; Miller, J; Kersey, J; McGlave, P

    1996-07-15

    We analyzed the incidence of posttransplant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) relapse in 283 consecutive related-donor (n = 177) and unrelated-donor (n = 106) allogeneic transplant recipients. Twenty-two of 165 related-donor recipients with stable or advanced disease at the time of transplant had hematologic relapse of CML following transplant (5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of relapse, 20%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 30%). One of 12 patients transplanted in second stable phase following blast crisis also relapsed. Fifteen related-donor transplant recipients relapsed within 5 years of transplant; however, seven relapsed between 5 and 9 years after transplant. Factors independently associated with an increased risk of posttransplant relapse for related-donor recipients included prolonged interval between diagnosis and transplant (relative risk, [RR], 3.81; P = .009) and bone marrow basophilia (RR, 5.62; P = .01). Related-donor recipients with posttransplant chronic graft-versus-host disease (CGVHD) had a decreased risk of relapse (RR, 0.24; P = .005). Only two of 106 unrelated-donor transplant recipients relapsed following transplant (5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of relapse, 3%; 95% CI, 0% to 7%). When both related- and unrelated-donor recipients were considered, the use of an unrelated donor was independently associated with a decreased risk of relapse (RR, 0.24; P = .07). Twelve of 16 relapsing patients who received further therapy (nine of 13 who underwent second transplant and three of three who received donor leukocyte infusions) remain alive. This analysis shows that relapse, sometimes occurring long after transplant, is an important adverse outcome in allogeneic transplantation for CML. Early transplant, posttransplant CGVHD, and use of an unrelated donor are associated with a reduced incidence of relapse, perhaps due to allogeneic disparities enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

  6. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industries. Part XXX: Causal relationship between chronic myelogenous leukemia and benzene-containing solvents.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2006-09-01

    Benzene and benzene-containing products and solvents have long been associated with bone marrow toxicity. Both animal studies and human epidemiological studies have shown statistically significant increases of leukemia and other lymphohematopoietic cancers in workers exposed to benzene. The most common leukemia that has been associated with benzene exposure, also called benzene poisoning, is acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). A review of the epidemiological literature on workers exposed to benzene or benzene-containing solvents and products shows, without question, that this exposure is significantly related to other types of leukemia and lymphoma. In this article, we review the literature on the relationship between benzene exposure and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and find that benzene and benzene-containing products are significantly related to morbidity and mortality from CML.

  7. Results of therapy with interferon alpha and cyclic combination chemotherapy in patients with philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in early chronic phase.

    PubMed

    Giles, F J; Kantarjian, H; O'Brien, S; Rios, M B; Cortes, J; Beran, M; Koller, C; Keating, M; Talpaz, M

    2001-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of cyclic combination therapy offered to patients with Ph-positive CML having a sub-optimal response to IFN-alpha. Patients in early chronic phase CML were treated with IFN-alpha at 5MU/m(2) daily. Patients who did not achieve cytogenetic response after 6 months of IFN-alpha therapy, or Ph-suppression to less than 35% Ph-positive cells (partial cytogenetic response) after 12 months of therapy were offered cyclic intensive chemotherapy every 6 months, with IFN-alpha maintenance between cycles. The initial 3 cycles included daunorubicin, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) and prednisone (DOAP). Later cycles were given with cyclophosphamide replacing daunorubicin (COAP). Of 74 patients treated, 61 (82%) achieved complete hematologic response (CHR): 51 (69%) had a cytogenetic response, which was major (Ph < 35%) in 31 (42%), and complete in 23 (31%). Fifty-five patients (74%) achieved CHR by 6 months of therapy, 38 (69%; 51% of total) with a cytogenetic response - 13 (24%) had a major cytogenetic response. Seventeen patients received at least 1 course of DOAP therapy. Median survival of the overall cohort of patients was 120 months. With a median follow-up of 145 months (103+ to 155+ months), 40 patients (54%) have died. The median duration of cytogenetic response was 35 months (range 3 to 149+ months) and the estimated 10-year cytogenetic response rate was 37%. A durable complete cytogenetic response was observed in 16 patients (20%) with a median duration of 139+ months (range 12+ to 149+ months), 11 of them (15%) are now off IFN-alpha therapy for a median of 57+ months (range 12+ to 128+ months). The projected 10-year survival was 50% for the study group versus 35% for 208 patients who received other IFN-alpha based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (p<.01). In conclusion, the addition of intensive chemotherapy may improve survival in patients with CML who have not obtained an

  8. The European medicines agency review of bosutinib for the treatment of adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Hanaizi, Zahra; Unkrig, Christoph; Enzmann, Harald; Camarero, Jorge; Sancho-Lopez, Arantxa; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    On March 27, 2013, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union was issued for bosutinib (Bosulif) for the treatment of adult patients with chronic-phase, accelerated-phase, and blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph⁺) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) previously treated with one tyrosine kinase inhibitor or more and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Bosutinib is a kinase inhibitor that targets the BCR-ABL kinase. The recommended dose is 500 mg of bosutinib once daily. The main evidence of efficacy for bosutinib was based on a CML subgroup analysis of study 3160A4-200, a phase I/II study of bosutinib in Ph⁺ leukemia in imatinib-resistant or intolerant CML. The subgroup was defined based on the presence of a BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation that would be expected to confer resistance to dasatinib (F317, E255) or nilotinib (E255, Y253, F359) and expected to have sensitivity to bosutinib or based on the presence of medical conditions or prior toxicities that may predispose the patient to unacceptable risk in the setting of nilotinib or dasatinib therapy. A conditional marketing authorization was granted because of the limited evidence of efficacy and safety currently supporting this last-line indication.

  9. The European Medicines Agency Review of Bosutinib for the Treatment of Adult Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Unkrig, Christoph; Enzmann, Harald; Camarero, Jorge; Sancho-Lopez, Arantxa; Salmonson, Tomas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Laane, Edward; Pignatti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 2013, a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union was issued for bosutinib (Bosulif) for the treatment of adult patients with chronic-phase, accelerated-phase, and blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) previously treated with one tyrosine kinase inhibitor or more and for whom imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are not considered appropriate treatment options. Bosutinib is a kinase inhibitor that targets the BCR-ABL kinase. The recommended dose is 500 mg of bosutinib once daily. The main evidence of efficacy for bosutinib was based on a CML subgroup analysis of study 3160A4-200, a phase I/II study of bosutinib in Ph+ leukemia in imatinib-resistant or intolerant CML. The subgroup was defined based on the presence of a BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation that would be expected to confer resistance to dasatinib (F317, E255) or nilotinib (E255, Y253, F359) and expected to have sensitivity to bosutinib or based on the presence of medical conditions or prior toxicities that may predispose the patient to unacceptable risk in the setting of nilotinib or dasatinib therapy. A conditional marketing authorization was granted because of the limited evidence of efficacy and safety currently supporting this last-line indication. PMID:24668331

  10. Complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response as surrogate outcomes for overall survival in first-line treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia: a case study for technology appraisal on the basis of surrogate outcomes evidence.

    PubMed

    Oriana, Ciani; Martin, Hoyle; Toby, Pavey; Chris, Cooper; Ruth, Garside; Claudius, Rudin; Rod, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence assessed dasatinib, nilotinib, and standard-dose imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Licensing of these alternative treatments was based on randomized controlled trials assessing complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and major molecular response (MMR) at 12 months as primary end points. We use this case study to illustrate the validation of CCyR and MMR as surrogate outcomes for overall survival in CML and how this evidence was used to inform National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's recommendation on the public funding of these first-line treatments for CML. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify the association between CCyR and MMR at 12 months and overall survival in patients with chronic phase CML. We estimated life expectancy by extrapolating long-term survival from the weighted overall survival stratified according to the achievement of CCyR and MMR. Five studies provided data on the observational association between CCyR or MMR and overall survival. Based on the pooled association between CCyR and MMR and overall survival, our modeling showed comparable predicted mean duration of survival (21-23 years) following first-line treatment with imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib. This case study illustrates the consideration of surrogate outcome evidence in health technology assessment. Although it is often recommended that the acceptance of surrogate outcomes be based on randomized controlled trial data demonstrating an association between the treatment effect on both the surrogate outcome and the final outcome, this case study shows that policymakers may be willing to accept a lower level of evidence (i.e., observational association). Copyright © 2013, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Rapid improvement of disseminated intravascular coagulation by donor leukocyte infusions in a patient with promyelocytic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation from an HLA 2-antigen-mismatched mother.

    PubMed

    Matsue, Kosei; Yamada, Konagi; Takeuchi, Masami; Tabayashi, Takayuki

    2003-05-01

    Donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) is recognized as effective therapy for relapse after stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, the clinical efficacy of DLI in the advanced phase of CML or other types of leukemia has not been clearly defined because of its varying degree of success. We describe a 22-year-old male patient with promyelocytic crisis of CML who had a relapse after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, under reduced-intensity conditioning, from his HLA 2-antigen-mismatched mother. Complete hematologic remission was obtained after transplantation. However, a relapse that occurred on day 66 posttransplantion was characterized by an increase in number of leukemic promyelocytes with simultaneous exacerbation of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The patient received DLI containing 1 x 10(7)/kg CD3+ cells on day 73. Because rapid improvement of DIC paralleled the decrease in leukemic cells and because it was observed soon after DLI and before the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we hypothesized that leukemia-specific cells other than natural killer cells or cytotoxic T-cells unrelated to GVHD played a role in the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed in our patient. In addition, this may be the first report of effective correction of DIC by DLI after stem cell transplantation.

  12. SKI-606, a 4-anilino-3-quinolinecarbonitrile dual inhibitor of Src and Abl kinases, is a potent antiproliferative agent against chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in culture and causes regression of K562 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Golas, Jennifer M; Arndt, Kim; Etienne, Carlo; Lucas, Judy; Nardin, Danielle; Gibbons, James; Frost, Philip; Ye, Fei; Boschelli, Diane H; Boschelli, Frank

    2003-01-15

    Constitutive tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl promotes proliferation and survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Inhibition of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase activity or signaling proteins activated by Bcr-Abl in CML cells blocks proliferation and causes apoptotic cell death. The selective Abl kinase inhibitor, STI-571 (marketed as Gleevec), is toxic to CML cells in culture, causes regression of CML tumors in nude mice, and is currently used to treat CML patients. Here we describe a p.o. active, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor with potent antiproliferative activity against CML cells in culture. This 4-anilino-3-quinolinecarbonitrile (SKI-606) ablates tyrosine phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl in CML cells and of v-Abl expressed in fibroblasts. SKI-606 inhibits phosphorylation of cellular proteins, including STAT5, at concentrations that inhibit proliferation in CML cells. Phosphorylation of the autoactivation site of the Src family kinases Lyn and/or Hck is also reduced by treatment with SKI-606. Once daily oral administration of this compound at 100 mg/kg for 5 days causes complete regression of large K562 xenografts in nude mice.

  13. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  14. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of HIG, a novel human cell line carrying t(1;3)(p36.3;q25.3) established from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriko; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Tohru; Hangaishi, Akira; Wang, Lili; Qiao, Ying; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kogi, Mieko; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving 1p36, 3q21, and/or 3q26 have been reported in a subset of myeloid neoplasms having characteristic dysmegakaryopoiesis, and the overexpression of EVI1 on 3q26 or of MEL1 on 1p36 has been implicated in their pathogenesis. We describe molecular cytogenetic analyses of a novel human cell line, HIG, established from a unique case in which a novel translocation t(1;3)(p36;q26) appeared as the sole additional chromosomal abnormality at the time of blastic transformation of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient displayed clinical features resembling those of the 3q21q26 syndrome. The HIG cell line retained der(1)t(1;3)(p36;q26) but lost t(9;22)(q34;q11). To identify the relevant gene that would be deregulated by this translocation, we molecularly cloned the translocation's breakpoints. They were distant from the breakpoint cluster regions of the 3q21q26 syndrome or t(1;3)(p36;q21), and neither the EVI1 nor the MEL1 transcript was detected in the HIG cell line. None of the genes located within 150 kilobase pairs of the breakpoints were aberrantly expressed, suggesting that in this case other gene(s) more distant from the breakpoints are deregulated by possible remote effects. Further analyses of the deregulated genes in the HIG cell line should provide important insight into the mechanisms involved in these types of leukemias.

  15. From the field: Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Boyd, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Surveillance programs for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids often use a standard of being able to detect 1% prevalence when determining minimum sample sizes. However, 1% prevalence may represent >10,000 infected animals in a population of 1 million, and most wildlife managers would prefer to detect the presence of CWD when far fewer infected animals exist. We wanted to detect the presence of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Pennsylvania when the disease was present in only 1 of 21 wildlife management units (WMUs) statewide. We used computer simulation to estimate the probability of detecting CWD based on a sampling design to detect the presence of CWD at 0.1% and 1.0% prevalence (23-76 and 225-762 infected deer, respectively) using tissue samples collected from hunter-killed deer. The probability of detection at 0.1% prevalence was <30% with sample sizes of ???6,000 deer, and the probability of detection at 1.0% prevalence was 46-72% with statewide sample sizes of 2,000-6,000 deer. We believe that testing of hunter-killed deer is an essential part of any surveillance program for CWD, but our results demonstrated the importance of a multifaceted surveillance approach for CWD detection rather than sole reliance on testing hunter-killed deer.

  16. Minimal residual disease after bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia and implications for graft-versus-leukemia effect: a review of recent results.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, K; Barrett, A J; Kodera, Y; Saito, H

    1994-08-01

    Cure of leukemia by allogeneic BMT is achieved by the combined effect of the myeloablative preparative regimen and an allo-immune response of donor cells to residual leukemia termed the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. In the first year following BMT for CML, PCR used to detect the leukemia-specific BCR/ABL message frequently reveals subclinical levels of persisting leukemia. In a meta-analysis of reports on qualitative PCR findings after BMT for CML in 12 recently published series, we found that for unmanipulated BMT in chronic phase, PCR detection was not associated with a higher relapse risk and that most patients became PCR negative within 2 years post-BMT. In contrast, PCR detection of BCR/ABL transcripts was a more reliable predictor in recipients of T cell-depleted BMT and in those transplanted in accelerated or blastic phase of their disease. For accurate prediction of relapse, serial quantitative PCR is necessary. It could also be used to monitor efficacy of experimental treatments of relapse with interferon or donor lymphocyte transfusions. Furthermore, studies of the association of GVHD with PCR detection of BCR/ABL message may shed light on the relationship of GVL with minimal residual disease in CML.

  17. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis confers adriamycin resistance to human chronic myelogenous leukemia and oroxylin A improves the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Miao, Hanchi; Li, Wei; Yao, Jing; Sun, Yang; Li, Zhiyu; Zhao, Li; Guo, Qinglong

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the reversal effect of oroxylin A, a naturally bioactive monoflavonoid separated and purified from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, in human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that CXCL12 could enhance the resistance of K562 cells to adriamycin (ADM) by increasing the expression of CXCR4, up-regulating the downstream PI3K/Akt pathway, and promoting translocation of NF-κB dimers into nucleus and subsequently decreasing the expression of apoptosis-related proteins in K562 cells. And we found that ADM resistance was partially reversed by CXCR4 siRNA transfection. Moreover, the sensitivity enhancement of oroxylin A was demonstrated by decreasing the expression of CXCR4 at both protein and mRNA levels, via PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway and triggering the apoptosis pathway in vitro. In addition, the in vivo study showed that oroxylin A increased apoptosis of leukemic cells with low systemic toxicity, and the mechanism was the same as in vitro study. In conclusion, all these results showed that oroxylin A improved the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells by increasing apoptosis in leukemic cells and decreasing the expression of CXCR4 and PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway, and probably served as a most promising agent for CML treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Wogonoside induces growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest via promoting the expression and binding activity of GATA-1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hui, Hui; Xu, Jingyan; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2016-06-01

    GATA-1, a zinc finger transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a key role in the progression of leukemia. In this study, we investigate the effects of wogonoside, a naturally bioactive flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, on cell growth and cell cycle in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, and uncover its underlying mechanisms. The experimental design comprised CML cell lines K562, imatinib-resistant K562 (K562r) cells, and primary CML cells, treated in vitro or in vivo, respectively, with wogonoside; growth and cell cycle were then evaluated. We found that wogonoside could induce growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in both normal and K562r cells. Wogonoside promotes the expression of GATA-1 and facilitates the binding to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and p21 promoter, thus inhibiting MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including CDK2, CDK4, cyclin A, and cyclin D1, and increasing p21 expression. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that administration of wogonoside decreased CML cells and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice with CML cell xenografts. In conclusion, these results clearly revealed the inhibitory effect of wogonoside on the growth in CML cells and suggested that wogonoside may act as a promising drug for the treatment of imatinib-resistant CML.

  19. Timosaponin A-III reverses multi-drug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells via downregulation of MDR1 and MRP1 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-05-01

    One of the major causes of failure in chemotherapy for patients with human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is often associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family. Timosaponin A-III (TAIII), a saponin isolated from the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides, has previously demonstrated the ability to suppress certain human tumor processes and the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Nevertheless, the ability of TAIII to reverse MDR has not yet been explored. In this study, the adriamycin (ADM) resistance reversal effect of TAIII in human CML K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that TAIII had a reversal effect on the drug resistance of K562/ADM cells. Flow cytometry assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of ADM after cells were pretreated with TAIII, and the changes in the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) dye in K562/ADM cells were determined to be similar to the changes of intracellular accumulation of ADM. After pretreatment of cells with TAIII, the decreasing expression of P-gp and MRP1 mRNA was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blotting showed TAIII inhibiting P-gp and MRP1 expression depended on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the activity of p-Akt. Moreover, wortmannin an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Besides, the combined treatment with TAIII did not have an affect on wortmannin downregulation of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TAIII induced MDR reversal through inhibition of P-gp and MRP1 expression and function with regained adriamycin sensitivity which might mainly correlate to the regulation of PI3K

  20. Comparison of Cell-Labeling Methods with 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM for Cell Tracking Using Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Expressing HSV1-tk and Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Jun; Son, Jin-Ju; Chun, Kwon-Soo; Song, In-Ho; Park, Yong-Serk; Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Joo-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cell-tracking methods with molecular-imaging modality can monitor the biodistribution of cells. In this study, the direct-labeling method with 64Cu-pyruvaldehyde-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-PTSM), indirect cell-labeling methods with herpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-mediated 124I-2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU) were comparatively investigated in vitro and in vivo for tracking of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. K562-TL was established by retroviral transduction of the HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase gene in the K562 cell. K562-TL cells were labeled with 64Cu-PTSM or 124I-FIAU. Cell labeling efficiency, viability, and radiolabels retention were compared in vitro. The biodistribution of radiolabeled K562-TL cells with each radiolabel and small-animal positron emission tomography imaging were performed. Additionally, in vivo and ex vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and tissue reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis were used for confirming those results. K562-TL cells were efficiently labeled with both radiolabels. The radiolabel retention (%) of 124I-FIAU (95.2%±1.1%) was fourfold higher than 64Cu-PTSM (23.6%±0.7%) at 24 hours postlabeling. Viability of radiolabeled cells was statistically nonsignificant between 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM. The radioactivity of each radiolabeled cells was predominantly accumulated in the lungs and liver at 2 hours. Both the radioactivity of 64Cu-PTSM- and 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was highly accumulated in the liver at 24 hours. However, the radioactivity of 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was markedly decreased from the body at 24 hours. The K562-TL cells were dominantly localized in the lungs and liver, which also verified by BLI and RT-PCR analysis at 2 and 24 hours postinjection. The 64Cu-PTSM-labeled cell-tracking method is more efficient than 124I-FIAU-labeled cell tracking, because of markedly decrease of radioactivity and

  1. Effects of imatinib (Glivec) on the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol, a CYP2D6 substrate, in Chinese patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhou, Li; Dutreix, Catherine; Leroy, Elisabeth; Yin, Qi; Sethuraman, Venkat; Riviere, Gilles-Jacques; Yin, Ophelia Q P; Schran, Horst; Shen, Zhi-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To investigate the effect of imatinib on the pharmacokinetics of a CYP2D6 substrate, metoprolol, in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The pharmacokinetics of imatinib were also studied in these patients. METHODS Patients (n = 20) received a single oral dose of metoprolol 100 mg on day 1 after an overnight fast. On days 2–10, imatinib 400 mg was administered twice daily. On day 8, another 100 mg dose of metoprolol was administered 1 h after the morning dose of imatinib 400 mg. Blood samples for metoprolol and α-hydroxymetoprolol measurement were taken on study days 1 and 8, and on day 8 for imatinib. RESULTS Of the 20 patients enrolled, six patients (30%) were CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizers (IMs), 13 (65%) extensive metabolizers (EMs), and the CYP2D6 status in one patient was unknown. In the presence of 400 mg twice daily imatinib, the mean metoprolol AUC was increased by 17% in IMs (from 1190 to 1390 ng ml−1 h), and 24% in EMs (from 660 to 818 ng ml−1 h). Patients classified as CYP2D6 IMs had an approximately 1.8-fold higher plasma metoprolol exposure than those classified as EMs. The oral clearance of imatinib was 11.0 ± 2.0 l h−1 and 11.8 ± 4.1 l h−1 for CYP2D6 IMs and EMs, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Co-administration of a high dose of imatinib resulted in a small or moderate increase in metoprolol plasma exposure in all patients regardless of CYP2D6 status. The clearance of imatinib showed no difference between CYP2D6 IMs and EMs. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, exhibits a competitive inhibition on the CYP450 2D6 isozyme with a Ki value of 7.5 μm. However, the clinical significance of the inhibition and its relevance to 2D6 polymorphisms have not been evaluated. The pharmacokinetics of imatinib have been well studied in Caucasians, but not in a Chinese population. Metoprolol, a CYP2D6 substrate, has different clearances among patients with different CYP2D6 genotypes. It is often

  2. A derivative of epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis via SHP-1-mediated suppression of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Yun, Miyong; Choo, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Myoung-Seok; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Eun-Ok; Kato, Nobuo; Kim, Bonglee; Srivastava, Sanjay K; Kaihatsu, Kunihiro; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component of green tea known to have chemo-preventative effects on several cancers. However, EGCG has limited clinical application, which necessitates the development of a more effective EGCG prodrug as an anticancer agent. Experimental Approach Derivatives of EGCG were evaluated for their stability and anti-tumour activity in human chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) K562 and KBM5 cells. Key Results EGCG-mono-palmitate (EGCG-MP) showed most prolonged stability compared with other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP exerted greater cytotoxicity and apoptosis in K562 and KBM5 cells than the other EGCG derivatives. EGCG-MP induced Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) leading decreased oncogenic protein BCR-ABL and STAT3 phosphorylation in CML cells, compared with treatment with EGCG. Furthermore, EGCG-MP reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and survival genes in K562 cells, compared with EGCG. Conversely, depletion of SHP-1 or application of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate blocked the ability of EGCG-MP to suppress phosphorylation of BCR-ABL and STAT3, and the expression of survival genes downstream of STAT3. In addition, EGCG-MP treatment more effectively suppressed tumour growth in BALB/c athymic nude mice compared with untreated controls or EGCG treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased caspase 3 and SHP-1 activity and decreased phosphorylation of BCR-ABL in the EGCG-MP-treated group relative to that in the EGCG-treated group. Conclusions and Implications EGCG-MP induced SHP-1-mediated inhibition of BCR-ABL and STAT3 signalling in vitro and in vivo more effectively than EGCG. This derivative may be a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CML treatment. PMID:25825203

  3. With no interaction, knockdown of Apollon and MDR1 reverse the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Li, You-Jie

    2017-05-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment method for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and has achieved marked results. However, the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR) has seriously affected the quality of life and survival rate of patients. The overexpression of the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent binding cassette (ABC) transporters are the two main causes of MDR. Apollon and MDR1 are the most important and representative members, respectively, among the IAPs and ABC transporters. In the present study, we investigated the role of Apollon and MDR1 in chemotherapy resistance and their mechanism of interaction. We respectively knocked down the expression of Apollon and MDR1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in adriamycin (ADM) resistant human CML K562 cells and examined the drug sensitivity, the consequences with regard to ADM accumulation and the alterations in the expression of Apollon and MDR1. The expression levels of Apollon and MDR1 mRNA were higher in the K562/ADM cells compared with the parental K562 cells as determined by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The plasmids of Apollon and MDR1 shRNA were respectively stably transfected into K562/ADM cells using Lipofectamine 2000. The transfection efficiency was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay revealed that Apollon or MDR1 knockdown significantly increased the chemosensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADM. Flow cytometric assay revealed that K562/ADM/shMDR1 cells exhibited a significantly increased intracellular accumulation of ADM, and that changes were not found in the K562/ADM/shApollon cells. Compared with the parental K562/ADM cells, a significantly decreased expression of Apollon mRNA and protein was determined in the K562/ADM/shApollon cells without affecting the expression of MDR1 as determined by RT-PCR and western blotting. Likewise, the expression levels of MDR1 m

  4. Toward an HIV Cure Based on Targeted Killing of Infected Cells: Different Approaches Against Acute Versus Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Barna; Berger, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Current regimens of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) offer effective control of HIV infection, with maintenance of immune health and near-normal life expectancy. What will it take to progress beyond the status quo, whereby infectious virus can be eradicated (a “sterilizing cure”) or fully controlled without the need for ongoing cART (a “functional cure”)? Recent findings Based on therapeutic advances in the cancer field, we propose that targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill HIV-infected cells represents a logical complement to cART for achieving an HIV cure. This concept is based on the fact that cART effectively blocks replication of the virus, but does not eliminate cells that are already infected; targeted cytotoxic therapy would contribute precisely this missing component. We suggest that different modalities are suited for curing primary acute versus established chronic infection. For acute infection, relatively short-acting potent agents such as recombinant immunotoxins might prove sufficient for HIV eradication whereas for chronic infection, a long-lasting (lifelong?) modality is required to maintain full virus control, as might be achieved with genetically modified autologous T cells. Summary We present perspectives for complementing cART with targeted cytotoxic therapy whereby HIV infection is either eradicated or fully controlled, thereby eliminating the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25710815

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood and bone marrow so there is less room for healthy white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. When this happens, infection, ... the blood and bone marrow , there is less room for healthy white blood cells , red blood cells , and platelets . This may result in ...

  6. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone marrow, doctors can tell whether the Philadelphia chromosome is present. They also can tell how many cancer cells are in the blood at any given time. Tissue typing or HLA (human leukocyte antigen) typing. If a child needs a ...

  7. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  8. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  9. Chronic Iron Overload Results in Impaired Bacterial Killing of THP-1 Derived Macrophage through the Inhibition of Lysosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Jun-Kai; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ho, Li-Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for living organisms and the disturbance of iron homeostasis is associated with altered immune function. Additionally, bacterial infections can cause major complications in instances of chronic iron overload, such as patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Monocytes and macrophages play important roles in maintaining systemic iron homoeostasis and in defense against invading pathogens. However, the effect of iron overload on the function of monocytes and macrophages is unclear. We elucidated the effects of chronic iron overload on human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and THP-1 derived macrophages (TDM) by continuously exposing them to high levels of iron (100 μM) to create I-THP-1 and I-TDM, respectively. Our results show that iron overload did not affect morphology or granularity of I-THP-1, but increased the granularity of I-TDM. Bactericidal assays for non-pathogenic E. coli DH5α, JM109 and pathogenic P. aeruginosa all revealed decreased efficiency with increasing iron concentration in I-TDM. The impaired P. aeruginosa killing ability of human primary monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) was also found when cells are cultured in iron contained medium. Further studies on the bactericidal activity of I-TDM revealed lysosomal dysfunction associated with the inhibition of lysosomal acidification resulting in increasing lysosomal pH, the impairment of post-translational processing of cathepsins (especially cathepsin D), and decreased autophagic flux. These findings may explain the impaired innate immunity of thalassemic patients with chronic iron overload, suggesting the manipulation of lysosomal function as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27244448

  10. Immunotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Powles, R. L.; Crowther, D.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; McElwain, T. J.; Russell, J.; Lister, T. A.; Whitehouse, J. M. A.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Pike, M.; Alexander, P.; Fairley, G. Hamilton

    1973-01-01

    One hundred and seven untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were admitted to St Bartholomew's Hospital between 10 October 1970 and 31 January 1973. Before receiving drugs to induce remission they were allocated alternatively into 2 groups to decide their remission treatment—a group to receive chemotherapy alone and a group to receive the same chemotherapy with immunotherapy. The patients were then given induction chemotherapy and 45 of them attained complete remission. All patients in remission then received chemotherapy consisting of 5 days treatment every 28 days. Patients receiving immunotherapy were also given multiple weekly intradermal injections of irradiated stored AML cells and Glaxo B.C.G. using a Heaf gun. There were 19 patients in the group which received only chemotherapy during remission; 7 of these patients remain alive (median survival after attaining remission 303 days) and only 5 are still in their first remission (median remission length 188 days). Twenty-three patients were allocated to receive immunotherapy during remission in addition to chemotherapy and 16 remain alive (median 545 days) and 8 are in their first remission (median 312 days). The difference in survival of the two groups is significant with a P value of 0·003. PMID:4271320

  11. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.

  12. Activated Allogeneic NK Cells Preferentially Kill Poor Prognosis B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Gómez, Natalia; Muntasell, Aura; Cisneros, Elisa; Moraru, Manuela; Azaceta, Gemma; Anel, Alberto; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Villalba, Martin; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; García Marco, José A.; Pardo, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild-type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA-mismatched Natural killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here, we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell-activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs) and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV) are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells, and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments. PMID:27833611

  13. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-08

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  14. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious."…

  15. Targeted Killings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    American territory in history. Two aircraft torpedoed into the Twin Towers in New York City at speeds of over 490mph killing 2,595 people . Shortly...bomb exploded in the World Trade Center in New York City, killing a half-dozen people and wounding over a thousand. Over the next three years Al...executed his most incredible attack killing close to 3,000 people . President Bush announced to the world that, “U.S. troops will hunt down terrorists and

  16. Low risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and relapse associated with T cell-depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission: results of the blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network protocol 0303.

    PubMed

    Devine, Steven M; Carter, Shelly; Soiffer, Robert J; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Stein, Anthony; Lazarus, Hillard M; Linker, Charles; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Alyea, Edwin P; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2011-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is most effectively prevented by ex vivo T cell depletion (TCD) of the allograft, but its role in the treatment of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) remains unclear. We performed a phase 2 single-arm multicenter study to evaluate the role of TCD in AML patients in CR1 or CR2 up to age 65 years. The primary objective was to achieve a disease-free survival (DFS) rate of >75% at 6 months posttransplantation. A total of 44 patients with AML in CR1 (n = 37) or CR2 (n = 7) with a median age of 48.5 years (range, 21-59 years) received myeloablative chemotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (1375 cGy) followed by immunomagnetically selected CD34-enriched, T cell‒depleted allografts from HLA-identical siblings. No pharmacologic GVHD prophylaxis was given. All patients engrafted. The incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV was 22.7%, and the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was 6.8% at 24 months. The relapse rate for patients in CR1 was 17.4% at 36 months. With a median follow-up of 34 months, DFS for all patients was 82% at 6 months, and DFS for patients in CR1 was 72.8% at 12 months and 58% at 36 months. HCT after myeloablative chemoradiotherapy can be performed in a multicenter setting using a uniform method of TCD, resulting in a low risk of extensive chronic GVHD and relapse for patients with AML in CR1.

  17. Studies on the surface antigenicity and susceptibility to antibody-dependent killing of developing schistosomula using sera from chronically infected mice and mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Bickle, Q.D.; Ford, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Changes in the surface antigenicity and susceptibility to in vitro killing during development of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were studied using serum from chronically infected mice (CIS) and from mice vaccinated with highly irradiated (20 krad) cercariae (VS). Binding of these sera was quantitated by counting the number of P388D/sub 1/ cells (a transformed, macrophage-like cell of mouse origin, bearing Fc receptors for IgG) binding to the parasite surface. Compared with schistosomula derived in vitro by mechanical transformation (MS), schistosomula recovered 3 hr after skin penetration in vitro (SS) showed a significant loss in surface binding of CIS. Schistosomula recovered 3 hr after skin penetration in vivo (SRS) showed even less binding, and this trend continued such that parasites recovered from the lungs 5 days after infection (LS) showed only minimal binding, and 10-day-old worms from the portal system showed no significant binding. In contrast, VS, which bound significantly less well to MS than CIS, showed enhanced binding to SS, and in the face of their declining antigenicity with respect to CIS, 3- to 24-hr SRS maintained this raised level of antigenicity. Although there appeared to be a decline in binding of VS thereafter, LS remained antigenic, still binding as many cells as MS did despite the fact that they also expressed host antigens detected usng antisera raised against mouse RBC. In spite of this persistence of VS binding up to the lung stage, resistance to eosinophil-mediated killing in vitro had developed by 48 hr post-infection, and LS were totally resistant to both eosinophil- and C-mediated killing.

  18. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  19. Killing fetuses and killing newborns.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2013-05-01

    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot be harmed and because there are morally relevant differences between fetuses and newborns.

  20. Use of an Sm-p80-based therapeutic vaccine to kill established adult schistosome parasites in chronically infected baboons.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Torben, Workineh; Alam, Mayeen U; Le, Loc; Damian, Raymond T; Wolf, Roman F; White, Gary L; Carey, David W; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-06-15

    No vaccines are available for human use for any parasitic infections, including the helminthic disease schistosomiasis. Sm-p80, the large subunit of Schistosoma mansoni calpain, is a leading antigen candidate for a schistosomiasis vaccine. Prophylactic and antifecundity efficacies of Sm-p80 have been tested using a variety of vaccine approaches in both rodent and nonhuman primate models. However, the therapeutic efficacy of a Sm-p80-based vaccine had not been determined. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Sm-p80 by using 2 different strategies and 3 Sm-p80-based vaccine formulations in baboons. Vaccine formulations were able to decrease established adult worms by 10%-36%, reduce retention of eggs in tissues by 10%-57%, and decrease egg excretion in feces by 13%-33%, compared with control formulations. Marked differences were observed in B and T cell immune correlates between vaccinated and control animals. This is the first report of killing of established adult schistosome worms by a vaccine. In addition to distinct prophylactic efficacy of Sm-p80, this study adds to the evidence that Sm-p80 is a potentially important antigen with both substantial prophylactic and therapeutic efficacies. These data reinforce that Sm-p80 should be moved forward along the path toward human clinical trials.

  1. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Management of Adult Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, D.; Powles, R. L.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; Gauci, C. L.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Malpas, J. S.; Fairley, G. Hamilton; Scott, Ronald Bodley

    1973-01-01

    Consecutive adult patients admitted to St. Bartholomew's Hospital with acute myelogenous leukaemia have been treated with a remission induction drug schedule consisting of daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside. Intermittent five-day courses were used in 72 patients, and a complete remission was obtained in 39 patients (54%). An alternative drug schedule in 22 patients resulted in fewer remissions but this may have been due to age differences in the two groups. Age and initial platelet count were found to be important factors in determining the success of remission induction therapy; the older patients and those with low platelet counts responded less well. A series of 23 patients who achieved remissions was divided into two groups; one received intermittent combination chemotherapy as the only form of maintenance, and the other was given weekly immunotherapy in addition to the chemotherapy. The immunotherapy consisted of irradiated allogeneic leukaemic cells and B.C.G. Eight of the 10 patients on chemotherapy alone have already relapsed compared with five out of 13 patients in the immunotherapy group. It is hoped that these promising initial results with this form of maintenance will be confirmed as more patients enter the maintenance trials. PMID:4513355

  3. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein

    PubMed Central

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Ågerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph+) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34+ cells and also in cord blood CD34+ cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph−) and leukemic (Ph+) cells within the CML CD34+CD38− cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34+CD38−IL1RAP+ cells were Ph+, whereas CML CD34+CD38−IL1RAP− cells were almost exclusively Ph−. By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph+ and Ph− candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34+CD38− cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph+ from Ph− candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML. PMID:20805474

  4. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Agerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph(-)) and leukemic (Ph(+)) cells within the CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(+) cells were Ph(+), whereas CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(-) cells were almost exclusively Ph(-). By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph(+) and Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph(+) from Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML.

  5. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia and glycogen storage disease 1b.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Maury; Burzynski, Jeffrey; Yhap, Margaret; Fraser, Robert B; Cummings, Brian; Ste-Marie, Micheline

    2002-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease 1b (GSD 1b) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and the intracellular accumulation of glycogen. The disease presents with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, as well as neutropenia causing increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections. We present a case of a young woman with GSD 1b who developed acute myelogenous leukemia while on long-term granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy. The presence of two rare diseases in a single patient raises suspicion that GSD 1b and acute myelogenous leukemia are linked. Surveillance for acute myelogenous leukemia should become part of the long-term follow-up for GSD 1b.

  7. Two mechanisms for platelet-mediated killing of tumour cells: one cyclo-oxygenase dependent and the other nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, M; Sagawa, T; Tominaga, A; Kodama, T; Hitsumoto, Y

    1996-01-01

    We have tried to identify the cytotoxic effectors in platelet-mediated tumour cell killing, using two tumour cell lines K562 (a chronic myelogenic leukaemic cell line) and LU99A (a lung cancer cell line), which are both sensitive to platelet cytotoxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and indomethacin, effectively inhibited the platelet-mediated killing of K562 cells, but not that of LU99A cells. In contrast, inhibitors of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway. NG-nitro-1-arginine (L-NA), haemoglobin and methylene blue, reduced the cytotoxic activity of platelets against LU99A, but not against K562. Synthetic analogues of platelet cyclo-oxygenase products thromboxane A2/ prostaglandin H2(TXA2/PGH2) exerted cytotoxicity against K562 cells but not against LU99A cells. Electron microscopic study showed that TXA2/PGH2 analogues induced bleb formation and disruption of the plasma membrane of K562 cells. K562 cells enhanced the production of TXA2 by platelets, as inferred from the accumulation of thromboxane B2 (TXB2), a spontaneous hydrolysis product of TXA2. LU99A cells had no such effects. These results indicate that platelets kill these two tumour cell lines through different mechanisms. In K562, the cyclooxygenase products TXA2/PGH2 possibly play a significant role but in LU99A the NO pathway seems to be involved. Images Figure 5 PMID:8911154

  8. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: extending the prospects for cure.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C; Wakoff, A; Porter, D L

    1998-06-15

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular defects underlying this leukemia have led to novel therapeutic approaches that have not only altered the natural history of the disease but also apparently effected cures in some patients. The next step may be to offer the possibility of a cure to all patients. Allogeneic bone marrow and T cell transplantation shows promise in this regard.

  9. Mechanisms of Disease Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    neoplasms . Am J Clin Pathol. 2002;118:560-566. Annual Report – CM050037 Brian J. Druker, MD Page 13 of 39 19. Florian S, Sonneck K, Hauswirth AW, et al...Murine JAK2V617F-Positive Myeloproliferative Disease. Cancer Res 66:11156-11165. 204. Annual Report – CM050037 Brian J. Druker, MD Page 33 of 39...Characterization of murine JAK2V617F-positive myeloproliferative disease. Cancer Res. 66(23):11156-65 2006. Annual Report – CM050037 Brian J. Druker, MD Page 39 of 39

  10. Pathogenic Mechanism of Malignant Progression in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    EcoV -R ecotropic retrovirus. To enable ecotropic infection of human cells, we introduced a receptor for ecotropic retrovirus ( EcoV -R) into MO7e cells 20...An expression cassette of EcoV -R was cloned into an amphotropic retrovirus vector bearing a puromycin-resistance gene pCX4/ EcoV -R IRES (Figure 1...The expressions of both EcoV -R and Puromycinr are driven from a single promoter in the 5’ LTR. An internal ribosome entry sites (IRES)21’ 22 is

  11. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of quinolone nucleosides against the human myelogenous leukemia k-562 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Lena; Engels, Joachim W; Gambari, Roberto; Saab, Antoine M

    2013-10-01

    A set of 6-substituted quinolone nucleosides linked to aniline or phenol via N or O heteroatom-bridges presenting new compounds were synthesized by palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig cross-coupling reactions. 6-Bromoquinolone nucleoside precursors, being protected by either benzoyl or TBDMS protecting groups on the ribose moiety, were subjected to different Buchwald-Hartwig conditions as the key step. Defined deprotection steps led, in good yields, to the final target compounds that carry, in position 3, either ester, acid, or amide functions. Thus, a series of novel quinolone nucleoside derivatives was obtained via a convergent synthesis route. Biological tests in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells exerted an efficient antiproliferative activity for two of them without induction of differentiation. These novel nucleosides deserve further experiments to determine their antiproliferative effects on other CML cell lines. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. [Subacute myelogenous leukemia with Phildelphia chromosome].

    PubMed

    Brière, J; Castro-Malaspina, H; Tanzer, J; Bernard, J

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-five cases of a special pattern of chronic myeloid leukemia characterized, at the first evaluation, by excessive amount of blasts in blood or bone marrow (myeloblasts greater than or equal to 20%), Ph1 chromosome, and short evolution (median survival = 14,5 months) are reported. Age, spleen volume, white blood cell count are in keeping with those found in usual chronic myeloid leukemia (C.M.L.). However, clinical course is more severe with fever, bone pains, and anemia. Myelogibrosis, high circulating basophil polymorphonuclear count, platelet and megacaryocyte abnormalities (in morphology and number) are frequently associated with blastic excess. Subacute myeloid leukemia Ph1 positive (L.M.S. Ph1+) is proposed as an appellation for these cases in order to distinguish them from chronic myelocytic leukemia (C.M.L.) and other subacute myelogytic leukemias. The association of Ph1 chromosome excess of blasts and bone marrow fibrosis distinguishes L.M.S. Ph+ from: 1 degree C.M.L. with myelogibrosis; 2 degrees unusual cases of Ph1 positive myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (M.M.M.); 3 degrees h1 positive acute leukemia. Forms of L.M.S. Ph+ with heavy blastic involvement are probably transitional cases with Ph1 acute myeloblastic leukemia. Prognosis is poorer than in C.M.L. but better than in acute blastic crisis occurring after chronic phase, which can be very similar to L.M.S. Ph1+, when seen for the first time.

  14. MLN4924 induces Noxa upregulation in acute myelogenous leukemia and synergizes with Bcl-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Knorr, K L B; Schneider, P A; Meng, X W; Dai, H; Smith, B D; Hess, A D; Karp, J E; Kaufmann, S H

    2015-12-01

    MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an inhibitor of the Nedd8 activating enzyme (NAE), has exhibited promising clinical activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Here we demonstrate that MLN4924 induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and clinical samples via a mechanism distinct from those observed in other malignancies. Inactivation of E3 cullin ring ligases (CRLs) through NAE inhibition causes accumulation of the CRL substrate c-Myc, which transactivates the PMAIP1 gene encoding Noxa, leading to increased Noxa protein, Bax and Bak activation, and subsequent apoptotic changes. Importantly, c-Myc knockdown diminishes Noxa induction; and Noxa siRNA diminishes MLN4924-induced killing. Because Noxa also neutralizes Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 paralog often upregulated in resistant AML, further experiments have examined the effect of combining MLN4924 with BH3 mimetics that target other anti-apoptotic proteins. In combination with ABT-199 or ABT-263 (navitoclax), MLN4924 exerts a synergistic cytotoxic effect. Collectively, these results provide new insight into MLN4924-induced engagement of the apoptotic machinery that could help guide further exploration of MLN4924 for AML.

  15. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  16. The Family Physician's Role in Managing Chronic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a brief update on the clinical approach to chronic myelogenous leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, based on advances in pathbiology and the effect of new concepts on treatment policies. These disorders were selected because family physicians take most responsibility for the day-to-day management of these most common forms of chronic leukemias. PMID:21253119

  17. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  18. A Ferritin Mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Highly Susceptible to Killing by Antibiotics and Is Unable To Establish a Chronic Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ruchi

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential, elusive, and potentially toxic nutrient for most pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Due to the poor solubility of ferric iron under aerobic conditions, free iron is not found in the host. M. tuberculosis requires specialized iron acquisition systems to replicate and cause disease. It also depends on a strict control of iron metabolism and intracellular iron levels to prevent iron-mediated toxicity. Under conditions of iron sufficiency, M. tuberculosis represses iron acquisition and induces iron storage, suggesting an important role for iron storage proteins in iron homeostasis. M. tuberculosis synthesizes two iron storage proteins, a ferritin (BfrB) and a bacterioferritin (BfrA). The individual contributions of these proteins to the adaptive response of M. tuberculosis to changes in iron availability are not clear. By generating individual knockout strains of bfrA and bfrB, the contribution of each one of these proteins to the maintenance of iron homeostasis was determined. The effect of altered iron homeostasis, resulting from impaired iron storage, on the resistance of M. tuberculosis to in vitro and in vivo stresses was examined. The results show that ferritin is required to maintain iron homeostasis, whereas bacterioferritin seems to be dispensable for this function. M. tuberculosis lacking ferritin suffers from iron-mediated toxicity, is unable to persist in mice, and, most importantly, is highly susceptible to killing by antibiotics, showing that endogenous oxidative stress can enhance the antibiotic killing of this important pathogen. These results are relevant for the design of new therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. PMID:22802345

  19. Killing two birds with one stone: screening for chronic hepatitis C at the time of colonoscopy in the baby boomer cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Dawn M; Harrison, Stephen A

    2013-06-01

    Colonoscopy is a well-accepted colon cancer screening modality that is recommended by the United States Multi-Society Task Force on all individuals greater than 50 years of age. Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a common cause of chronic liver disease with notably increased rates of infection in individuals born between 1945 and 1965. The Centers for Disease Control recently recommended all individuals of this "Baby Boomer" cohort undergo one time screening for CHC. As gastroenterologists interface with these patients for screening colonoscopy, this represents a unique opportunity to complete this screening and identify CHC patients at risk for advanced liver disease.

  20. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  1. Killing tensors on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    We show that Killing tensors on conformally flat n-dimensional tori whose conformal factor only depends on one variable, are polynomials in the metric and in the Killing vector fields. In other words, every first integral of the geodesic flow polynomial in the momenta on the sphere bundle of such a torus is linear in the momenta.

  2. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  3. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  4. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  5. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species.

  6. Report Bee Kills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA uses incident report data to help inform our pesticide regulatory decisions. Information from these reports helps us identify patterns of bee kills associated with the use of specific pesticides or active ingredients. Here's how to report incidents.

  7. Generation of non-MHC restricted killing in cultures stimulated with B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients: phenotypic characterization of the precursor and effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matera, L; Foa, R; Malavasi, F; Bellone, G; Funaro, A; Veglia, F; Santoli, D

    1988-01-01

    Freshly isolated B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients (B-CLL) have been previously shown to induce a strong proliferative response and high levels of NK-like activity in lymphocytes from healthy donors. The present paper deals with the origin, mitotic state, target spectrum and cell surface phenotype of the NK-like effectors generated after stimulation with B-CLL. Experiments using large granular lymphocytes (LGL) and T cells as responders demonstrated that most of the precursors of the newly generated NK-like effectors express the CD3 antigen. The induction of NK-like activity paralleled cell activation, as judged by blast transformation, thymidine uptake and appearance of cell surface activation markers. The newly generated NK-like effectors displayed a T cell phenotype and a broader target repertoire than native NK cells. PMID:3261664

  8. Role of Peroxide in Phagocytic Killing of Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Jane; Bernheimer, Harriet P.

    1974-01-01

    Two mutants of a pneumococcus type I with diminished peroxide production were selected from a population of nitrosoguanidine-treated cells. White cells of normal patients killed the mutant pneumococci as well as the otherwise isogenic wild-type strain. In patients studied with chronic granulomatous disease, however, the peroxide-poor strain was killed far less well than the wild type. These studies indicate that the removal of a peroxide-generating system in the phagocytic vacuole specifically brings forth the killing defect in chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:4148725

  9. Azithromycin Blocks Quorum Sensing and Alginate Polymer Formation and Increases the Sensitivity to Serum and Stationary-Growth-Phase Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Attenuates Chronic P. aeruginosa Lung Infection in Cftr−/− Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Lee, Baoleri; Hentzer, Morten; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Song, Zhijun; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of O-acetylated alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are tolerance to both antibiotic treatments and effects on the innate and the adaptive defense mechanisms. In clinical trials, azithromycin (AZM) has been shown to improve the lung function of CF patients. The present study was conducted in accordance with previous in vitro studies suggesting that the effect of AZM may be the inhibition of alginate production, blockage of quorum sensing (QS), and increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and the complement system. Moreover, we show that AZM may affect the polymerization of P. aeruginosa alginate by the incomplete precipitation of polymerized alginate and high levels of readily dialyzable uronic acids. In addition, we find that mucoid bacteria in the stationary growth phase became sensitive to AZM, whereas cells in the exponential phase did not. Interestingly, AZM-treated P. aeruginosa lasI mutants appeared to be particularly resistant to serum, whereas bacteria with a functional QS system did not. We show in a CF mouse model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection that AZM treatment results in the suppression of QS-regulated virulence factors, significantly improves the clearance of P. aeruginosa alginate biofilms, and reduces the severity of the lung pathology compared to that in control mice. We conclude that AZM attenuates the virulence of P. aeruginosa, impairs its ability to form fully polymerized alginate biofilms, and increases its sensitivity to complement and stationary-phase killing, which may explain the clinical efficacy of AZM. PMID:17620382

  10. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  11. Wogonin reversed resistant human myelogenous leukemia cells via inhibiting Nrf2 signaling by Stat3/NF-κB inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Lin; Liu, Yicheng; Huang, Shaoliang; Lu, Lu; Kong, Lingyi; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Zhao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) activation has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in enhancing cell survival and resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. Wogonin had strong reversal potency via reduction of Nrf2 mRNA in Adriamycin (ADR)-induced resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/A02, but the mechanism of reduction of Nrf2 mRNA was still unclear. In this study, we aimed to delineate the mechanism by which Wogonin suppressed transcription of Nrf2 in resistant CML cells and further evaluate the reversal effects of Wogonin on the established animal models. Data indicated that Wogonin suppressed transcription of Nrf2 by NF-κB inactivation. Wogonin inhibited the binding of p65 to Nrf2 by suppression of the κB-binding activity. Further research revealed the κB2 site was responsible for the decreased Nrf2 by Wogonin in resistant K562 cells. Furthermore, reduction of pY705-Stat3 was involved in inhibition of the binding of p65 to Nrf2 by Wogonin. In vivo, Wogonin potentiated the inhibitory effect of ADR on leukemia development by suppressing pY705-Stat3 and Nrf2 signaling. In summary, these results demonstrated Wogonin could combat chemoresistance effectively through inhibiting Nrf2 via Stat3/NF-κB signaling, and supported that Wogonin can be developed into an efficient natural sensitizer for resistant human myelogenous leukemia. PMID:28150717

  12. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  13. New approaches to transplantation in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative therapeutic option for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). This is due to the combined effect of chemo/radiation therapy and the immunologic graft-versus-leukemia effect. The field of HSCT has benefited from advances in a variety of "fronts," including our increasing ability to break the human leukocyte antigen barrier, which has led to greater access to transplantation. Furthermore, progress in the biologic, genetic, and pharmacologic arenas is creating a scenario where traditional borders between transplant and non-transplant therapies are less clear. This overlap is exemplified by new approaches to pharmacologic maintenance of remission strategies after HSCT. In addition, cellular adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to exploit narrowly targeted anti-tumor effects within or outside the allogeneic HSCT "frame," holding the promise of avoiding off target side effects, such as graft-versus-host disease. Here we discuss these and other lines of active investigation designed to improve outcomes of HSCT for AML. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  14. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  15. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  16. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  17. Older women and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Canetto, S S; Hollenshead, J D

    Mercy killing is usually defined as intentional killing, often by family members or friends, with the stated intent to end perceived suffering. International evidence suggests that mercy killing typically involves an older man killing his ailing wife. In this study, we examined U.S. cases of mercy killing recorded by The Hemlock Society for the period 1960-1993. We found that the typical case involved an older woman being killed by a man, often her husband, with her poor health as the justification for the killing. A firearm was often used in these incidents. These patterns of mercy killing are consistent with patterns of homicide-suicide among older adults. Future research should seek to understand why women are typically the targets, and men the agents of mercy killing.

  18. IRF8 Regulates Acid Ceramidase Expression to Mediate Apoptosis and Suppresses Myelogeneous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaolin; Yang, Dafeng; Zimmerman, Mary; Liu, Feiyan; Yang, Jine; Kannan, Swati; Burchert, Andreas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Ozato, Keiko; Bhalla, Kapil; Liu, Kebin

    2011-01-01

    IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a key transcription factor for myeloid cell differentiation and its expression is frequently lost in hematopoietic cells of human myeloid leukemia patients. IRF8-deficient mice exhibit uncontrolled clonal expansion of undifferentiated myeloid cells that can progress to a fatal blast crisis, thereby resembling human chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). Therefore, IRF8 is a myeloid leukemia suppressor. While the understanding of IRF8 function in CML has recently improved, the molecular mechanisms underlying IRF8 function in CML is still largely unknown. In this study, we identified acid ceramidase (A-CDase) as a general transcription target of IRF8. We demonstrated that IRF8 expression is regulated by IRF8 promoter DNA methylation in myeloid leukemia cells. Restoration of IRF8 expression repressed A-CDase expression, resulting in C16 ceramide accumulation and increased sensitivity of CML cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. In myeloid cells derived from IRF8-deficient mice, A-CDase protein level was dramatically increased. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IRF8 directly bind to the A-CDase promoter. At the functional level, inhibition of A-CDase activity, silencing A-CDase expression or application of exogenous C16 ceramide sensitized CML cells to FasL-induced apoptosis, whereas, overexpression of A-CDase decreased CML cells sensitivity to FasL-induced apoptosis. Consequently, restoration of IRF8 expression suppressed CML development in vivo at least partially through a Fas-dependent mechanism. In summary, our findings determine the mechanism of IRF8 downregulation in CML cells and they determine a primary pathway of resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis and disease progression. PMID:21487040

  19. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34+ cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34+CD38− subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34+ cells but not those from normal CD34+ cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide–down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML. PMID:23513221

  20. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-04-02

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34(+) cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34(+)CD38(-) subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34(+) cells but not those from normal CD34(+) cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide-down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML.

  1. Detection of minimal residual disease in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Raanani, P; Ben-Bassat, I

    2004-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is considered to be in complete remission when fewer than 5% of the cells in bone marrow are blasts. Nevertheless, approximately two thirds of patients relapse due to persisting leukemic blasts. The persistence of these cells, below the threshold of morphological detection, is termed minimal residual disease (MRD) and various methods are used for its detection. These methods include classical cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR and multiparametric flow cytometry. Currently, less than half of the AML patients have a specific marker detectable by RT-PCR techniques. The major specific molecular markers are involvement of the MLL gene with up to 50 different partners and partial tandem duplications, the core binding factor leukemias with AML1/ETO and CBFbeta/MYH11 rearrangements, PML/RARalpha in acute promyelocytic leukemia, internal tandem duplications and mutations of FLT3 and some other rare translocations. In addition, several other genes show abnormal expression levels in AML, including the Wilms tumor gene, the PRAME gene and Ig/TCR rearrangements. Most of these genetic abnormalities can be detected by qualitative but more importantly by quantitative RT-PCR. The kinetics of disappearance of molecular markers in AML differs between the various types of leukemias, although at least a 2 log reduction of transcript after induction chemotherapy is necessary for long-term remission in all types. Conversely, the change of PCR from negativity to positivity is highly predictive of relapse. Whereas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiparametric flow cytometry is an established method for MRD detection, this is less so in AML. The reason is the absence of well-characterized leukemia-specific antigens and the existence of phenotypic changes at relapse. On the other hand, this method is convenient due to its simplicity and universal applicability. In conclusion, several methods can be used

  2. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  3. Medicalized killing in Auschwitz.

    PubMed

    Lifton, R J

    1982-11-01

    Since late 1977 I have been conducting a psychological study of medical behavior in Auschwitz, and of Nazi doctors in general. I have been especially interested in the relationship of doctors, SS doctors in particular, to the killing process--in the transformation from healer to killer. I am concerned with the importance of the medicalized pattern for the overall Nazi project of mass murder and have therefore tried to examine the interaction of biomedical ideology, political ideology, and individual behavior. Finally, the work raises questions of more general significance: for doctors and medicine elsewhere; for scientists, other professionals, and institutions of all kinds; for approaches to "triage" and control over life and death; and for our understanding of human nature and human values. After describing how I did the study, I will discuss what I call the Nazi "biomedical vision" and its relationship to the killing of mental patients as well as to Auschwitz. Next I will suggest features of the Auschwitz atmosphere, particularly in regard to the psychological factors, or mechanisms, that enabled the Nazi doctors to do what they did. Finally, I will turn very briefly to the more general problems raised by the study.

  4. How to kill creativity.

    PubMed

    Amabile, T M

    1998-01-01

    In today's knowledge economy, creativity is more important than ever. But many companies unwittingly employ managerial practices that kill it. How? By crushing their employees' intrinsic motivation--the strong internal desire to do something based on interests and passions. Managers don't kill creativity on purpose. Yet in the pursuit of productivity, efficiency, and control--all worthy business imperatives--they undermine creativity. It doesn't have to be that way, says Teresa Amabile. Business imperatives can comfortably coexist with creativity. But managers will have to change their thinking first. Specifically, managers will need to understand that creativity has three parts: expertise, the ability to think flexibly and imaginatively, and motivation. Managers can influence the first two, but doing so is costly and slow. It would be far more effective to increase employees' intrinsic motivation. To that end, managers have five levers to pull: the amount of challenge they give employees, the degree of freedom they grant around process, the way they design work groups, the level of encouragement they give, and the nature of organizational support. Take challenge as an example. Intrinsic motivation is high when employees feel challenged but not overwhelmed by their work. The task for managers, therefore, becomes matching people to the right assignments. Consider also freedom. Intrinsic motivation--and thus creativity--soars when managers let people decide how to achieve goals, not what goals to achieve. Managers can make a difference when it comes to employee creativity. The result can be truly innovative companies in which creativity doesn't just survive but actually thrives.

  5. Kill operation requires thorough analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-15

    Full control of a blowout well requires a properly designed post-capping kill operation because failures in regaining well control usually occur during the kill operation, not during capping. Capping (the installation of pressure control or diverter equipment on the wellhead) is generally very reliable in gaining control of a blowout well. The following techniques are some of the viable means of killing blowout wells once the capping assemblies are in place: direct shut in of the flow; bullheading; momentum kill; volumetric control for migration of fluids or lubrication after migration ceases; and dynamic kills (friction-based dynamic kills or mass flow rate kills) The objective of most post-capping operations is to stop the flow and put the well under hydrostatic control. The means of killing a blowout once capping assemblies are in place should be chosen with care to avoid problems such as cratering, equipment failure, and underground blowouts. The particular circumstances and well integrity will dictate which kill method will be the most viable. Each of these five methods are explained.

  6. Does smoking really kill anybody?

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1995-12-01

    Statements that so many people are killed by smoking use the term "kill" in a very unusual manner which is easily misunderstood by people not expert in epidemiology. In addition, the usual calculations leave out of account the fact that smoking interacts synergistically with other risk factors, so that it is a combination of risk factors rather than any specific one that is likely to have a causal influence on mortality. Strictly speaking it is quite inappropriate to state that smoking kills anybody, if we use the term "kill" in a meaningful fashion.

  7. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  8. Protein IsG15 Modification in the Development and the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    of cancers , especially chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although a recently developed new drug - imatinib mesylate (ST1571) has shown tremendous...sensitive and -resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Cancer Res. 52:1087-1090. 21. Lozzio, C. B. and B. B. Lozzio. 1975. Human chronic...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0269 TITLE: Protein IsGl5 Modification in the Development and the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia PRINCIPAL

  9. Autocrine stimulation of interleukin 1 beta in acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A significant increase in CD25 antigen-positive cells by IL-1 was observed in cells of a patient with M7 acute myelogenous leukemia. Basal proliferation and expression of CD25 antigen by the M7 leukemic cells were inhibited by addition of anti-IL-1 beta antibody in a dose- dependent manner, but not by rabbit anti-IL-1 alpha antibody. Culture supernatants of these leukemic cells contained IL-1 activity, which was specifically inhibited by addition of anti-IL-1 beta antibody, and Northern blot analysis detected intracellular IL-1 beta mRNA. These results indicated that autocrine secretion of IL-1 beta was involved in proliferation of some myelogenous leukemic cells. PMID:3316474

  10. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  11. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  12. Reactivation of chronic Chagas' disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and successful pre-emptive therapy with benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Altclas, J; Sinagra, A; Jaimovich, G; Salgueira, C; Luna, C; Requejo, A; Milovic, V; De Rissio, A; Feldman, L; Riarte, A

    1999-06-01

    This report shows the early detection of reactivation of chronic Chagas' disease (CCd) in a 27-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Pre-emptive therapy with benznidazole during a period of 7 weeks led to a rapid recovery of the patient, who remains free of parasitemia 2 years after the bone marrow transplantation.

  13. Mucormycosis resulting in gastric perforation in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyo Young; Kang, Won Kyung; Park, Chong Won; Choi, Yeong Jin; Rha, Sung Eun; Park, Cho Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection that may develop in immunocompromised patients with conditions such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia, lymphoma, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or after transplantation with immunosupperessive therapy. We report a case of gastric perforation caused by a mucormycosis infection in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The patient was treated successfully with gastrectomy and the aggressive use of intravenous amphotericin B. He is still alive 1 year after his operation.

  14. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  15. Myelogenous leukemia in adult inbred MHC-defined miniature swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Cho, Patricia S; Teague, Alexander G S; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S; Hanekamp, John S; Moran, Shannon G; Wikiel, Krzysztof J; Ferguson, Kelly K; Lo, Diana P; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V; Spitzer, Thomas R; McMorrow, Isabel M; Sachs, David H; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A

    2010-06-15

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk of acute myelogenous leukaemia and myelodysplasia following cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F E

    1996-03-01

    Now that a substantial group of cancer patients has such a favourable prognosis, it has become increasingly important to evaluate the long-term complications of treatment. Of all late effects of treatment, secondary leukaemia is one of the most serious. Increased risk of AML has been observed both after RT and after CT; however, several types of CT have much stronger leukaemogenic properties than RT. Limited field radiation in the therapeutic dose range is associated with very little or no increased risk of leukaemia, which has been attributed to cell killing at the higher radiation doses. With respect to CT, two different syndromes of treatment-related AML have been recognized. Risk of alkylating agent-related AML is highest in the 5-10 year follow-up period and seems to decrease afterwards. This type of leukaemia is often preceded by MDS, and is characterized by deletions of chromosomes 5 and 7. Leukaemias related to treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitors are characterized by a short induction period, presentation as myelomonocytic or monocytic leukaemia (rather than MDS) and balanced chromosomal translocations involving bands 11q23 and 21q22. This review addresses the risk of secondary AML and MDS following treatment of HD, NHL, testicular cancer, ovarian cancer, breast cancer and paediatric malignancies. In patients with HD, the risk of AML is higher with an increasing number of mechlorethamine-procarbazine-containing cycles, a greater number of CT episodes, and after splenectomy. The majority of data shows that RT does not add to the leukaemia risk from CT, but this issue is still surrounded by some controversy. ABV(D)-treated patients have a very low risk of AML. Generally, patients with NHL, testicular cancer and breast cancer experience much lower risk of AML than patients with HD. NHL and breast cancer treatment regimens with cumulative cyclophosphamide doses of 20 g or less do not confer an appreciable increase of AML. Recently, strongly increased

  17. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are a type of biologic therapy. ... of chemotherapy followed by an infusion of natural killer cells . A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy and ...

  18. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    specific GEFs TrioN or Tiam1 in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, NSC23766 did not interfere with the binding or activation of Cdc42 or RhoA by...formation, but did not affect endogenous Cdc42 or RhoA activity. NSC23766 reduced growth stimulated by the Rac-GEFs Trio or Tiam1 , but not proliferation... Tiam1 or Ras-induced cell trans- formation and was shown to attenuate solid tumor cell line transformation and invasion. When human prostate cancer PC

  19. Human AQP5 Plays a Role in the Progression of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Young Kwang; Kang, Sung Koo; Kim, Myoung Sook; Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Chang, Steven; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Inho; Keam, Bhumsuk; Rhee, Jiyoung; Koo, Nam Hee; Park, Gyeongsin; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Se-Eun; Kweon, Il-Young; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) have previously been associated with increased expression in solid tumors. However, its expression in hematologic malignancies including CML has not been described yet. Here, we report the expression of AQP5 in CML cells by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. While normal bone marrow biopsy samples (n = 5) showed no expression of AQP5, 32% of CML patient samples (n = 41) demonstrated AQP5 expression. In addition, AQP5 expression level increased with the emergence of imatinib mesylate resistance in paired samples (p = 0.047). We have found that the overexpression of AQP5 in K562 cells resulted in increased cell proliferation. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting AQP5 reduced the cell proliferation rate in both K562 and LAMA84 CML cells. Moreover, by immunoblotting and flow cytometry, we show that phosphorylation of BCR-ABL1 is increased in AQP5-overexpressing CML cells and decreased in AQP5 siRNA-treated CML cells. Interestingly, caspase9 activity increased in AQP5 siRNA-treated cells. Finally, FISH showed no evidence of AQP5 gene amplification in CML from bone marrow. In summary, we report for the first time that AQP5 is overexpressed in CML cells and plays a role in promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. Furthermore, our findings may provide the basis for a novel CML therapy targeting AQP5. PMID:18612408

  20. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients Aged ≥70 Years.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Karamjeet S; Brunstein, Claudio; DeFor, Todd; Bejanyan, Nelli; Arora, Mukta; Warlick, Erica; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ustun, Celalettin

    2016-02-01

    The maximum age of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) has been moving up over time. However, the availability of a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor may limit access of this patient population to alloHCT. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) after reduced-intensity conditioning regimens in patients aged ≥70 years with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) between 2010 and 2014. During this period 70 patients with AML/MDS were referred to our center for alloHCT consideration. Twenty-two patients (33%) received alloHCT: 10 UCBT, 9 HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation, 2 haploidentical alloHCT, and 1 unrelated donor alloHCT. In UCBT, cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality and relapse were 20% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day +100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years was 10%. Seven patients had viral reactivation/infections. Rates of overall survival and disease-free survival were 60% and 50% at 2 years, respectively. Moreover, these outcomes seemed to be similar to that of patients aged 60 to 69 years receiving UCBT (n = 60) and patients aged ≥70 years receiving HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 9). These results suggest that UCBT is feasible in selected AML/MDS patients aged ≥70 years. In fact, UCBT shortens the required time for an unrelated donor search and thus increases the chance of proceeding with alloHCT, which might contribute to higher rates of alloHCT in the referral group. Outcomes of UCBT are promising; however, larger studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  3. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Husak, D N

    1979-01-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  4. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible.

  5. Giardiasis in a patient undergoing chemotherapy for retinoblastoma and acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Sakaki-Nakatsubo, Hisano; Taneichi, Hiromichi; Nomura, Keiko; Miyawaki, Toshio; Tokoro, Masaharu; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2013-08-01

    Giardiasis is a common cause of diarrhea in undeveloped countries, but is very rare in developed countries. A patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and retinoblastoma presented with a high fever and severe watery diarrhea during induction chemotherapy. On microscopy, cysts were seen in her stool, suggesting Giardia intestinalis, which was confirmed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). G. intestinalis was also detected in the patient's asymptomatic parents, who may have transmitted it to the patient. Giardiasis should be tested for in patients with severe and persistent diarrhea during chemotherapy, when other etiologies have been excluded. PCR used to amplify the DNA of G. intestinalis is rapid and sensitive.

  6. Fatal Breakthrough Mucormycosis in an Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patient while on Posaconazole Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Seon; Bae, Myoung Nam; Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kwan Yong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole is a new oral triazole with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Posaconazole has also shown a significant advantage of preventing invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole or itraconazole in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Indeed, posaconazole has been commonly used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing remission induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We experienced a case of fatal mucormycosis despite posaconazole prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal breakthrough mucormycosis in a patient receiving posaconazole prophylaxis during remission induction chemotherapy in Korea. This case demonstrated that breakthrough fungal infection can occurs in patients receiving posaconazole prophylaxis because of its limited activity against some mucorales.

  7. Pulmonary Complications of Azanucleoside Therapy in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Manuel; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Mims, Martha; Rahman, Effie; Rivero, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Our primary aim was to identify potential risk factors and clinical outcome of azanucleoside induced pulmonary complications in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We present an 89-year-old female with MDS derived AML who developed fatigability, hypoxemia, and bilateral lung infiltrates indicating interstitial lung disease after 11 cycles of azanucleoside. In addition, we describe a cohort of six MDS patients with fever, cough, dyspnea, and pulmonary infiltrates at early time point during azanucleoside treatment. Early and late onset of pulmonary manifestations suggest different pathogenic mechanisms. Brief azanucleoside discontinuation and steroids led to rapid improvement in symptoms. PMID:26798526

  8. Vancomycin-resistant Aureobacterium species cellulitis and bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Arnold, K E; Sweat, H; Winton, E F; Funke, G

    1996-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with acute myelogenous leukemia and concomitant porphyria cutanea tarda was admitted to the hospital for consolidation chemotherapy of his leukemia. During his hospitalization, he developed cellulitis of the left hand and persistent bacteremia with a yellow-pigmented, nonfermenting coryneform bacterium that was identified as Aureobacterium sp. The portal of entry for the Aureobacterium infection was probably through the skin lesions due to porphyria cutanea tarda. The infection developed while the patient was receiving vancomycin prophylaxis, and the vancomycin MIC for the isolate was 32 micrograms/ml. PMID:8818896

  9. Selective killing of nonreplicating mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-03-13

    Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease.

  10. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  11. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells.

  12. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1) The...

  13. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  14. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  15. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  16. Gentle Massage Improves Disease- and Treatment-Related Symptoms in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ann Gill; Snyder, Audrey E; Anderson, Joel G; Brown, Cynthia J; Densmore, John J; Bourguignon, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cancer treatment is reported to be stressful, and patients diagnosed with hematologic cancers often exhibit higher levels of anxiety and emotional distress than individuals with other malignancies. Management of these symptoms in patients with hematologic cancer presents significant challenges, as many of them are in and out of the hospital while undergoing high dose chemotherapy. Oncology patients use complementary modalities such as therapeutic massage in an attempt to alleviate disease and treatment-related symptoms, including anxiety and emotional distress. In the current study, the feasibility of a novel massage intervention delivered over the continuum of care, as well as assessment of the immediate and cumulative effects of massage, was examined in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Methods A mixed-methods, unmasked, prospective, randomized study was conducted with two groups: a usual care alone control group and a massage therapy intervention plus usual care group. Results Significant improvements in levels of stress and health-related quality of life were observed in the massage therapy group versus the usual care alone group, after adjusting for anxiety level, including both immediate and cumulative effects of massage. Conclusions While the findings of the current study regarding acceptability, feasibility, and potential efficacy of therapeutic massage as a complementary health-enhancing intervention in patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia are very promising, the relatively small size of the study sample limits generalizability. PMID:25530922

  17. Recommendations of the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laneuville, P.; Barnett, M.J.; Bélanger, R.; Couban, S.; Forrest, D.L.; Roy, D.C.; Lipton, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (cml) is a disease characterized by the expression of Bcr/Abl, an oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, and by evolution over time from a relatively benign chronic phase to a rapidly fatal cml blast crisis. Until recently, the standard of care included potentially curative therapy with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, available only to a minority (about 10%) of patients, or medical therapy with interferon-α with or without cytarabine, which helped to prolong the chronic phase of the disease in a minority of patients. The availability of imatinib mesylate, a selective inhibitor of Bcr/Abl approved by Health Canada in 2001, has profoundly altered the clinical and laboratory management of cml. This change in practice has been reviewed by the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and has resulted in a new set of recommendations for the optimal care of cml patients. PMID:22792021

  18. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  19. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  20. Women who kill their mates.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Dominique; Gagné, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Spousal homicide perpetrators are much more likely to be men than women. Accordingly, little research has focused on delineating characteristics of women who have committed spousal homicide. A retrospective clinical review of coroners' files containing all cases of spousal homicide occurring in Quebec over a 20-year period was carried out. A total of 276 spousal homicides occurred between 1991 and 2010, with 42 homicides by female spouses and 234 homicides by male spouses. Differences between homicides committed by female offenders and male offenders are discussed, and findings on spousal homicide committed by women are compared with those of previous studies. Findings regarding offenses perpetrated by females in the context of mental illness, domestic violence, and homicide-suicide are explored. The finding that only 28% of the female offenders in the Quebec sample had previously been subjected to violence by their victim is in contrast to the popular belief and reports that indicate that most female-perpetrated spousal homicide occurs in self-defense or in reaction to long-term abuse. In fact, women rarely gave a warning before killing their mates. Most did not suffer from a mental illness, although one-fifth were acutely intoxicated at the time of the killing. In the vast majority of cases of women who killed their mates, there were very few indicators that might have signaled the risk and helped predict the violent lethal behavior. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Why myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may kill you: disorders in the inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways may explain cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank Nm

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that disorders in inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways and a lowered antioxidant status are important pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Important precipitating and perpetuating factors for ME/CFS are (amongst others) bacterial and viral infections; bacterial translocation due to an increased gut permeability; and psychological stress. Recently, Jason et al (2006) reported that the mean age of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome dying from heart failure, i.e. 58.7 years, is significantly lower than the age of those dying from heart failure in the general US population, i.e. 83.1 years. These findings implicate that ME/CFS is a risk factor to cardio-vascular disorder. This review demonstrates that disorders in various IO&NS pathways provide explanations for the earlier mortality due to cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS. These pathways are: a) chronic low grade inflammation with extended production of nuclear factor kappa B and COX-2 and increased levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha; b) increased O&NS with increased peroxide levels, and phospholipid oxidation including oxidative damage to phosphatidylinositol; c) decreased levels of specific antioxidants, i.e. coenzyme Q10, zinc and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate; d) bacterial translocation as a result of leaky gut; e) decreased omega-3 polyunsatutared fatty acids (PUFAs), and increased omega-6 PUFA and saturated fatty acid levels; and f) the presence of viral and bacterial infections and psychological stressors. The mechanisms whereby each of these factors may contribute towards cardio-vascular disorder in ME/CFS are discussed. ME/CFS is a multisystemic metabolic-inflammatory disorder. The aberrations in IO&NS pathways may increase the risk for cardiovascular disorders.

  2. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  3. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  4. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  5. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  6. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  7. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  8. Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) inactivates C/EBPalpha and causes acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; He, Yiping; Wouters, Bas J.; Shestova, Olga; Xu, Lanwei; Sai, Hong; Rodriguez, Carlos G.; Maillard, Ivan; Tobias, John W.; Valk, Peter; Carroll, Martin; Aster, Jon C.; Delwel, Ruud; Pear, Warren S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) was identified as a down-regulated transcript in leukemic cells undergoing growth arrest. To investigate the effects of Trib2 in hematopoietic progenitors, mice were reconstituted with hematopoietic stem cells retrovirally expressing Trib2. Trib2-transduced bone marrow cells exhibited a growth advantage ex vivo and readily established factor-dependent cell lines. In vivo, Trib2-reconstituted mice uniformly developed fatal transplantable acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In mechanistic studies, we found that Trib2 associated with and inhibited C/EBPα. Furthermore, Trib2 expression was elevated in a subset of human AML patient samples. Together, our data identify Trib2 as an oncogene that induces AML through a mechanism involving inactivation of C/EBPα. PMID:17097562

  9. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E; Klepin, Heidi D

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥ 4 versus ≤ 1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18-84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15-3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML.

  10. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15–3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML. PMID:25127690

  11. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  12. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  13. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  14. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  15. Killing(-Yano) tensors in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    We construct the Killing(-Yano) tensors for a large class of charged black holes in higher dimensions and study general properties of such tensors, in particular, their behavior under string dualities. Killing(-Yano) tensors encode the symmetries beyond isometries, which lead to insights into dynamics of particles and fields on a given geometry by providing a set of conserved quantities. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the Killing tensor, we provide a prescription for constructing several conserved quantities starting from a single object, and we demonstrate that Killing tensors in higher dimensions are always associated with ellipsoidal coordinates. We also determine the transformations of the Killing(-Yano) tensors under string dualities, and find the unique modification of the Killing-Yano equation consistent with these symmetries. These results are used to construct the explicit form of the Killing(-Yano) tensors for the Myers-Perry black hole in arbitrary number of dimensions and for its charged version.

  16. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Kłak, Marlena; Bubak, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Żaczek, Maciej; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Górski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired). Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients' peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients' phagocytes' ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy. PMID:26783541

  17. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  18. Letting die and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Narbekovas, Andrius; Meilius, Kazimieras

    2003-01-01

    We are all called to make moral decisions, not only about preserving life and health, but also about accepting our death and dying. There are situations, when it is morally right, and indeed obligatory, to allow a dying person to die in peace and dignity. But there is a world of difference between allowing a peaceful death, and deliberately setting out to bring death of the person either by acts of commission (s.c. 'active euthanasia'), or by acts of omission (s.c. 'passive euthanasia'). The word "killing" seems proper for euthanasia, because "to kill" does mean " to intentionally cause the death of someone." It can be morally acceptable to withhold or withdraw a treatment precisely because it is reasonably judged as inefficacious (futile), or excessively burdensome for the patient. One's reason for withholding such treatment must not be a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the patient's life, but a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the treatment, which is futile or burdensome.

  19. Euthanasia: killing as due care?

    PubMed

    Oduncu, Fuat S

    2003-01-01

    On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will be exempted from criminal liability provided they satisfy the so-called 'due care criteria'. However, in medical history euthanasia has never been part of the medical duty of care. Instead, the goals of medicine have always been the relief of pain and suffering. The current article provides insights into the Dutch, Belgian and Oregon euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide practices and reflects upon some central medical and legal documents on the regulation of euthanasia and the provision of palliative care. Modern palliative care includes both the delivery of competent palliative skills and a virtuous attitude of compassionate caring about the terminally ill patient as an autonomous person. Here, the author rejects killing as due care and proposes a novel concept of 'RAHME' (Aramaic: compassion, love, mercy), which calls for a holistically oriented concept where physicians act as companions to the terminally ill and dying patients.

  20. Identification of ins(8;21) with AML1/ETO fusion in acute myelogenous leukemia M2 by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Mateo, M S; Martínez, P; Contra, T; Benítez, J

    2002-02-01

    A high percentage of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) of the M2 subtype show a rearrangement between the AML1 and ETO genes. The detection of the AML1/ETO fusion has clinical relevance because patients with this subtype have a good prognosis. We present the results of conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia French-American-British M2 classification, who had a complex karyotype involving chromosomes 8 and 21. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the AML1/ETO probe demonstrated a recombination of both genes on an add(8) chromosome. The use of other FISH probes (CEP8, c-myc and TEL21) and spectral karyotyping indicated that AML1/ETO fusion occurred as a consequence of a previously undescribed ins(8;21)(q22;q22.1q22.3).

  1. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  2. The Cell Killing Mechanisms of Hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amanpreet; Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a well-established inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase that has a long history of scientific interest and clinical use for the treatment of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. It is currently the staple drug for the management of sickle cell anemia and chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Due to its reversible inhibitory effect on DNA replication in various organisms, hydroxyurea is also commonly used in laboratories for cell cycle synchronization or generating replication stress. However, incubation with high concentrations or prolonged treatment with low doses of hydroxyurea can result in cell death and the DNA damage generated at arrested replication forks is generally believed to be the direct cause. Recent studies in multiple model organisms have shown that oxidative stress and several other mechanisms may contribute to the majority of the cytotoxic effect of hydroxyurea. This review aims to summarize the progress in our understanding of the cell-killing mechanisms of hydroxyurea, which may provide new insights towards the improvement of chemotherapies that employ this agent. PMID:27869662

  3. Familial occurrence of chronic neutrophilic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Yasukawa, M; Hara, M; Nawa, Y; Kimura, Y; Narumi, H; Fujita, S

    1999-05-01

    A father and son who both developed chronic neutrophilic leukaemia (CNL) are reported. The father, aged 63, had been exposed to radioactive fallout after the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima; he presented with hepatosplenomegaly and neutrophilic leucocytosis, and died of intracerebral haemorrhage 1 month after diagnosis. 4 years later his son, then aged 44, presented with neutrophilic leucocytosis. Leukaemic transformation to acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML-M1) occurred, and he died of refractory leukaemia 4 months after the diagnosis of CNL. This is the first report of this rare disease occurring in family members; genetic effect due to radioactive poisoning was suspected in the development of CNL in these two cases.

  4. Timelike Killing spinors in seven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2004-12-15

    We employ the G-structure formalism to study supersymmetric solutions of minimal and SU(2) gauged supergravities in seven dimensions admitting Killing spinors with an associated timelike Killing vector. The most general such Killing spinor defines a SU(3) structure. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a timelike Killing spinor on the bosonic fields of the theories, and find that such configurations generically preserve one out of 16 supersymmetries. Using our general supersymmetric ansatz we obtain numerous new solutions, including squashed or deformed anti-de Sitter solutions of the gauged theory, and a large class of Goedel-like solutions with closed timelike curves.

  5. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  6. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  7. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Ryan, Terence E; Neufer, P Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N; Davis, Traci S; MacDougall, Matthew R; Fox, Todd E; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F; Barth, Brian M; Deering, Tye G; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the "Warburg effect" represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia1

    PubMed Central

    Morad, Samy A. F.; Ryan, Terence E.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Davis, Traci S.; MacDougall, Matthew R.; Fox, Todd E.; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F.; Barth, Brian M.; Deering, Tye G.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the “Warburg effect” represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. PMID:27140664

  9. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; P<0.01). On the other hand, inhibition of Leo1 reverses PRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  10. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  11. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy.

  12. Regulatory T cells in acute myelogenous leukemia: is it time for immunomodulation?

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Celalettin; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Munn, David H.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The microenviroment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune effector cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as a contributor factor and may be recruited and exploited by leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. Studies have shown that the frequencies of marrow and blood Tregs are greater in patients with AML than in control patients. Although increased Tregs have been associated with a decreased risk of GVHD after allogeneic HCT and hence may impede the graft-versus-tumor effect, recent findings indicate that that this may not be the case. Because there is a need to improve outcomes of standard treatment (chemotherapy with or without allogeneic HCT) in AML, targeting Tregs present an outstanding opportunity in AML because discoveries may apply throughout its treatment. Here, we review data on the roles of Tregs in mediating immune system-AML interactions. We focused on in vitro, animal, and observational human studies of Tregs in AML biology, development, prognosis, and therapy in different settings (eg, vaccination and HCT). Manipulation of Tregs or other types of immunomodulation may become a part of AML treatment in the future. PMID:21881045

  13. Induction of differentiation of myelogenous leukemia cells by humulone, a bitter in the hop.

    PubMed

    Honma, Y; Tobe, H; Makishima, M; Yokoyama, A; Okabe-Kado, J

    1998-07-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. VD3 mobilizes calcium stores from bone by inducing the dissolution of bone mineral and matrix. We have recently found that humulone, a bitter in the hop extract for beer brewing, effectively inhibits bone resorption. In this study we examined the effect of humulone on the differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cells. Humulone alone inhibited the growth of monoblastic leukemia U937 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Humulone effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing action of VD3. Other myelomonocytic leukemia cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by humulone. Since humulone is a less-toxic inhibitor of bone resorption, the combination of humulone and VD3 may be useful in differentiation therapy of myelomonocytic leukemia.

  14. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  15. Investigational BET bromodomain protein inhibitors in early stage clinical trials for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Gardin, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies driven by genetic mutations and deregulated epigenetic control. Relapse/refractory disease remains frequent in younger patients and even more so in older patients, including treatment with epigenetic drugs in this age group, mainly with hypomethylating agents. New treatment strategies are urgently needed. The recent discovery that epigenetic readers of the bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) protein family, are crucial for AML maintenance by transcription of oncogenic c-MYC lead to rapid development of BET inhibitors entering clinical trials. Areas covered: We provide a critical overview using main sources for the use of BET inhibitors in AML treatment. Limits of this treatment approach including resistance mechanisms and future directions including development of new generation BET inhibitors and combination strategies with other drugs are detailed. Expert opinion: BET inhibitors were expected to overcome limits of conventional treatment in patients as impressive in vitro data emerged recently in well-characterized AML subsets, including those associated with poor risk characteristics in the clinic. Nevertheless single activity of BET inhibitors appears to be modest and resistance mechanisms were already identified. BET inhibitors with alternative mechanisms of action and/or combination strategies with epigenetic drugs should be tested.

  16. Antineoplastic effects and mechanisms of micheliolide in acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-er; Song, He-nan; Yang, Ming; Liu, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Zi-xiang; Li, Ying-hui; Gao, Ying-dai

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) greatly contribute to the initiation, relapse, and multidrug resistance of leukemia. Current therapies targeting the cell cycle and rapidly growing leukemic cells, including conventional chemotherapy, have little effect due to the self-renewal and differentiated malignant cells replenishment ability of LSCs despite their scarce supply in the bone marrow. Micheliolide (MCL) is a natural guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone (GSL) which was discovered in michelia compressa and michelia champaca plants, and has been shown to exert selective cytotoxic effects on CD34+CD38− LSCs. In this study, we demonstrate that DMAMCL significantly prolongs the lifespan of a mouse model of human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Mechanistic investigations further revealed that MCL exerted its cytotoxic effects via inhibition of NF-κB expression and activity, and by generating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying MCL-induced cytotoxicity of LSCs, and support further preclinical investigations of MCL-related therapies for the treatment of AML. PMID:27542251

  17. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  18. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  19. What do mathematical models tell us about killing rates during HIV-1 infection?

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few decades the extent to which cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication has been studied extensively, yet their role and mode of action remain controversial. In some studies, CTLs were found to kill a large fraction of the productively infected cells relative to the viral cytopathicity, whereas in others CTLs were suggested to kill only a small fraction of infected cells. In this review, we compile published estimates of CTL-mediated death rates, and examine whether these studies permit determining the rate at which CTLs kill HIV-1 infected cells. We highlight potential misinterpretations of the CTL-killing rates from the escape rates of mutants, and from perturbations of the steady state viral load during chronic infection. Our major conclusion is that CTL-mediated killing rates remain unknown. But contrary to current consensus, we argue that killing rates higher than one per day are perfectly consistent with the experimental data, which would imply that the majority of the productively infected cells could still die from CTL-mediated killing rather than from viral cytopathicity.

  20. Serum factors responsible for killing of Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Reed, W. P.; Albright, Elizabeth L.

    1974-01-01

    Eight strains of Shigella were tested for susceptibility to killing by seven normal human sera. Although there was a wide range of susceptibility between strains of bacteria, there was surprisingly little difference in the killing activity of individual sera and no relationship between antibody titres and killing capacity. Bacteriolysis required small amounts of antibody, but as little as 0.02 mg of a 19S fraction from normal serum restored full killing capacity to 1 ml of antibody depleted serum. Neither 11S IgA nor Cohn fraction II restored the bacteriolytic ability. Both the early reacting complement sequence and the alternate C3 activating pathway appeared to participate in killing as indicated by the roles of C2 and C3PA. Killing occurred, but with reduced efficiency, when either of the two substances was missing. However, serum lacking both C2 and C3PA could no longer kill Shigella. Killing also required the presence of C3, and presumably some of the later components of complement are subsequently involved. PMID:4846468

  1. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  2. Puzzling cases about killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Favor, C D

    1996-01-01

    Discussions of euthanasia often appeal to the distinction between killing people and letting them die. Favor asks whether this distinction is morally important--in particular, whether killing is worse than merely letting someone die, even when the motivations and consequences are the same. She explores our moral intuitions via a discussion of various subtly different hypothetical examples.

  3. Killing and letting die: a defensible distinction.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, W

    1996-04-01

    The distinction between killing and letting die is investigated and clarified. It is then argued that in most cases, though not in all, it is worse to kill than to let die. In euthanasia the significance of the distinction is diminished, but still important.

  4. A Subpopulation of the K562 Cells Are Killed by Curcumin Treatment after G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Castillo, Macario; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Aleman-Lazarini, Leticia; Meraz-Rios, Marco Antonio; Orozco, Lorena; Cedillo-Barron, Leticia; Cordova, Emilio J.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is extensively investigated as a good chemo-preventive agent in the development of many cancers and particularly in leukemia, including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and it has been proposed as an adjuvant for leukemia therapies. Human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562), were treated with 20 μM of curcumin, and we found that a subpopulation of these cells were arrested and accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Characterization of this cell subpopulation showed that the arrested cells presented nuclear morphology changes resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, collapse of the mitotic spindle and abnormal chromosome segregation. Then, these cells died in an apoptosis dependent manner and showed diminution in the protein levels of BCL-2 and XIAP. Moreover, our results shown that a transient activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) occurred early in these cells, but decreased after 6 h of the treatment, explaining in part the diminution of the anti-apoptotic proteins. Additionally, P73 was translocated to the cell nuclei, because the expression of the C/EBPα, a cognate repressor of the P73 gene, was decreased, suggesting that apoptosis is trigger by elevation of P73 protein levels acting in concert with the diminution of the two anti-apoptotic molecules. In summary, curcumin treatment might produce a P73-dependent apoptotic cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562), which was triggered by mitotic catastrophe, due to sustained BAX and survivin expression and impairment of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and XIAP. PMID:27832139

  5. A Subpopulation of the K562 Cells Are Killed by Curcumin Treatment after G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Castillo, Macario; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Aleman-Lazarini, Leticia; Meraz-Rios, Marco Antonio; Orozco, Lorena; Cedillo-Barron, Leticia; Cordova, Emilio J; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is extensively investigated as a good chemo-preventive agent in the development of many cancers and particularly in leukemia, including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and it has been proposed as an adjuvant for leukemia therapies. Human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562), were treated with 20 μM of curcumin, and we found that a subpopulation of these cells were arrested and accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Characterization of this cell subpopulation showed that the arrested cells presented nuclear morphology changes resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, collapse of the mitotic spindle and abnormal chromosome segregation. Then, these cells died in an apoptosis dependent manner and showed diminution in the protein levels of BCL-2 and XIAP. Moreover, our results shown that a transient activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) occurred early in these cells, but decreased after 6 h of the treatment, explaining in part the diminution of the anti-apoptotic proteins. Additionally, P73 was translocated to the cell nuclei, because the expression of the C/EBPα, a cognate repressor of the P73 gene, was decreased, suggesting that apoptosis is trigger by elevation of P73 protein levels acting in concert with the diminution of the two anti-apoptotic molecules. In summary, curcumin treatment might produce a P73-dependent apoptotic cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562), which was triggered by mitotic catastrophe, due to sustained BAX and survivin expression and impairment of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and XIAP.

  6. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  7. Killing, letting die, and simple conflicts.

    PubMed

    Malm, H M

    1989-01-01

    Proponents of the moral equivalence of killing and letting die argue that in cases of simple conflict, where one agent must either perform a positive act and kill one person, or not perform that act and allow another person to die, the agent's alternatives are clearly morally equivalent. Malm rejects this view in a three part essay. He argues that in cases of simple conflict, the acts of killing and letting die are morally different, and that killing is not in itself worse than letting die. Malm considers and rejects the suggestion that the agent should decide randomly between the two alternatives. He concludes that while simple conflict cases require us to recognize a morally significant difference between killing and letting die, they do not require us to recognize a morally significant difference between acting and refraining.

  8. Antibacterial surface design - Contact kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Liu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Designing antibacterial surfaces has become extremely important to minimize Healthcare Associated Infections which are a major cause of mortality worldwide. A previous biocide-releasing approach is based on leaching of encapsulated biocides such as silver and triclosan which exerts negative impacts on the environment and potentially contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. This drawback of leachable compounds led to the shift of interest towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach: contact-killing surfaces. Biocides that can be bound onto surfaces to give the substrates contact-active antibacterial activity include quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), quaternary phosphoniums (QPs), carbon nanotubes, antibacterial peptides, and N-chloramines. Among the above, QACs and N-chloramines are the most researched contact-active biocides. We review the engineering of contact-active surfaces using QACs or N-chloramines, the modes of actions as well as the test methods. The charge-density threshold of cationic surfaces for desired antibacterial efficacy and attempts to combine various biocides for the generation of new contact-active surfaces are discussed in detail. Surface positive charge density is identified as a key parameter to define antibacterial efficacy. We expect that this research field will continue to attract more research interest in view of the potential impact of self-disinfective surfaces on healthcare-associated infections, food safety and corrosion/fouling resistance required on industrial surfaces such as oil pipes and ship hulls.

  9. Choke and kill control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, R.E.

    1988-08-02

    A control system is described for a choke and kill safety valve for use in a well conduit, in which the valve indicates a housing having a bore therethrough, a sleeve telescopically movable in the housing about the bore, a valve closure member positioned in the housing and connected to the sleeve and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube longitudinally movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means between the sleeve and the flow tube for biasing the flow tube in a direction for causing the valve closure member to move the closed position, releasable latch means between the sleeve and the flow tube initially holding the flow tube in position holding the valve closure member in the open position, a biased piston and cylinder assembly initially engaging the releasable latch and holding the latch engaged, the assembly being exposed on one side to pressure in the housing, and the housing and the sleeve including openings which when aligned by movement of the sleeve by well pressure allows fluid to be inserted into the bore from the outside of the housing.

  10. [The karyotype of bone marrow cells in the preleukemic phase of chronic myelocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bondare, D; Barawika, I; Kolodjasnaja, I

    1978-01-01

    The caryotype of bone-marrow cells of 19 patients affected with leukocytosis of obscure origin was examined by means of G-staining. A chronic myelogenous leukaemia in its preleukaemic stage was diagnosed in 11 patients by identifying Ph'-chromosomes in all metaphases observed and a lowered acid leukocyte phosphatase. Besides Ph'-chromosomes an aneuploida (47 chromosomes with trisomia 8) was observed in one patient. The diagnostic and prognostic significance of this pathological caryotype is discussed.

  11. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  12. Chronic granulomatous disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Bigley, R

    1985-09-01

    The ability of phagocytes to kill certain bacteria is impaired in chronic granulomatous disease. This results in frequent infection in the childhood period and frequent death in the early teens. Survival beyond this period is rare and often occurs in patients who have a mild variant of the disease. Reported herein is the obstetric course of a patient with chronic granulomatous disease.

  13. SYNERGISTIC PROAPOPTOTIC ACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT TRAIL PLUS THE AKT INHIBITOR PERIFOSINE IN ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Tabellini, Giovanna; Ricci, Francesca; Papa, Veronica; Bortul, Roberta; Chiarini, Francesca; Evangelisti, Camilla; Martinelli, Giovanni; Bontadini, Andrea; Cocco, Lucio; McCubrey, James A.; Martelli, Alberto M.

    2008-01-01

    To potentiate the response of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells to TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) cytotoxicity, we have examined the efficacy of a combination with perifosine, a novel phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling inhibitor. The rationale for using such a combination is that perifosine was recently described to increase TRAIL-R2 receptor expression and decrease the cellular FLICE-Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP) in human lung cancer cell lines. Perifosine and TRAIL both induced cell death by apoptosis in the THP-1 AML cell line, which is characterized by constitutive PI3K/Akt activation, but lacks functional p53. Perifosine, at concentrations below IC50, dephosphorylated Akt and increased TRAIL-R2 levels, as demonstrated by western blot, RT-PCR, and flow cytometric analysis. Perifosine also decreased the long isoform of cFLIP (cFLIP-L) and the X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) expression. Perifosine and TRAIL synergized to activate caspase-8 and induce apoptosis, which was blocked by a caspase- 8 selective inhibitor. Upregulation of TRAIL-R2 expression was dependent on a protein kinase Cα/c-Jun-NH2-kinase 2/c-Jun signaling pathway activated by perifosine through reactive oxygen species production. Perifosine synergized with TRAIL also in primary AML cells displaying constitutive activation of the Akt pathway, by inducing apoptosis, Akt dephosphorylation, TRAIL-R2 upregulation, cFLIP-L and XIAP downregulation, and c-Jun phosphorylation. The combined treatment negatively affected the clonogenic activity of CD34+ cells from AML patients. In contrast, CD34+ cells from healthy donors were resistant to perifosine and TRAIL treatment. Our findings suggest that the combination perifosine and TRAIL might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:19010914

  14. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of topotecan in combination with thymoquinone on acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khalife, Rana; El-Hayek, Stephany; Stephany, El-Hayek; Tarras, Omayr; Hodroj, Mohammad Hassan; Rizk, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Topotecan has shown promising antineoplastic activity in solid tumors and acute leukemia. Because of the primary dose-limiting toxicity of topotecan, it is necessary to identify other agents that can work synergistically with topotecan, potentially increasing its efficacy while limiting its toxicity. Many studies showed synergism in combination of topotecan with gemcitabine and bortezomib. Other studies report the increase in growth inhibition of gemcitabine or oxaliplatin when cells were preexposed to naturally occurring drugs such as thymoquinone. The aim of this project was to study the mode of action of topotecan along with thymoquinone, on survival and apoptosis pathways in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines, and to investigate the potential synergistic effect of thymoquinone on topotecan. U937 cells were incubated with different topotecan and thymoquinone concentrations for 24 and 48 hours, separately and in combination. Cell proliferation was determined using WST-1 (Roche) reagent. The effect of the compounds on protein expression of Bax, Bcl2, p53, caspase-9, -8, and -3 was determined using Western blot analysis. Cell cycle analysis was performed in addition to annexin/propidium iodide staining. Thymoquinone and topotecan exhibited antiproliferative effects on U937 cells when applied separately. In combination, the reduction in proliferation was extremely significant with a major increase in the expression levels of Bax/Bcl2, p53, and caspase-3 and -9. Preexposure with thymoquinone resulted in an increase in cell growth inhibition compared with topotecan treatment. Thymoquinone, when combined with topotecan in noncytotoxic doses, produced synergistic antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in AML cells. Preexposure to thymoquinone seems to be more effective than simultaneous application with topotecan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elevated calpain activity in acute myelogenous leukemia correlates with decreased calpastatin expression

    PubMed Central

    Niapour, M; Farr, C; Minden, M; Berger, S A

    2012-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular cysteine proteases that have crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Elevated calpain activity has been associated with many pathological states. Calpain inhibition can be protective or lethal depending on the context. Previous work has shown that c-myc transformation regulates calpain activity by suppressing calpastatin, the endogenous negative regulator of calpain. Here, we have investigated calpain activity in primary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blast cells. Calpain activity was heterogeneous and greatly elevated over a wide range in AML blast cells, with no correlation to FAB classification. Activity was particularly elevated in the CD34+CD38− enriched fraction compared with the CD34+CD38+ fraction. Treatment of the cells with the specific calpain inhibitor, PD150606, induced significant apoptosis in AML blast cells but not in normal equivalent cells. Sensitivity to calpain inhibition correlated with calpain activity and preferentially targeted CD34+CD38− cells. There was no correlation between calpain activity and p-ERK levels, suggesting the ras pathway may not be a major contributor to calpain activity in AML. A significant negative correlation existed between calpain activity and calpastatin, suggesting calpastatin is the major regulator of activity in these cells. Analysis of previously published microarray data from a variety of AML patients demonstrated a significant negative correlation between calpastatin and c-myc expression. Patients who achieved a complete remission had significantly lower calpain activity than those who had no response to treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate elevated calpain activity in AML, anti-leukemic activity of calpain inhibition and prognostic potential of calpain activity measurement. PMID:22829235

  16. Evolution of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cell properties after treatment and progression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tzu-Chieh; LaMere, Mark; Stevens, Brett M.; Ashton, John M.; Myers, Jason R.; O’Dwyer, Kristen M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Mendler, Jason H.; Guzman, Monica; Morrissette, Jennifer D.; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir; Jordan, Craig T.

    2016-01-01

    Most cancers evolve over time as patients initially responsive to therapy acquire resistance to the same drugs at relapse. Cancer stem cells have been postulated to represent a therapy-refractory reservoir for relapse, but formal proof of this model is lacking. We prospectively characterized leukemia stem cell populations (LSCs) from a well-defined cohort of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at diagnosis and relapse to assess the effect of the disease course on these critical populations. Leukemic samples were collected from patients with newly diagnosed AML before therapy and after relapse, and LSC frequency was assessed by limiting dilution analyses. LSC populations were identified using fluorescent-labeled cell sorting and transplantation into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/interleukin 2 receptor γ chain null mice. The surface antigen expression profiles of pretherapy and postrelapse LSCs were determined for published LSC markers. We demonstrate a 9- to 90-fold increase in LSC frequency between diagnosis and relapse. LSC activity at relapse was identified in populations of leukemic blasts that did not demonstrate this activity before treatment and relapse. In addition, we describe genetic instability and exceptional phenotypic changes that accompany the evolution of these new LSC populations. This study is the first to characterize the evolution of LSCs in vivo after chemotherapy, identifying a dramatic change in the physiology of primitive AML cells when the disease progresses. Taken together, these findings provide a new frame of reference by which to evaluate candidate AML therapies in which both disease control and the induction of more advanced forms of disease should be considered. PMID:27421961

  17. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  18. The medical and surgical management of typhlitis in children with acute nonlymphocytic (myelogenous) leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shamberger, R C; Weinstein, H J; Delorey, M J; Levey, R H

    1986-02-01

    The treatment of acute leukemia in childhood has been increasingly successful. Infectious complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality among these patients receiving aggressive chemotherapy. In particular, neutropenic enterocolitis or typhlitis has had a reported mortality of 50% to 100%. The authors reviewed a series of 77 previously untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukemia begun on treatment from March 1976 to June 1984 to better define the characteristics of typhlitis and its optimum management. Twenty-five patients had episodes of typhlitis, characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and tenderness, occurring during periods of neutropenia. Ten of these patients had watery diarrhea as a major additional symptom, and nine patients had a significant episode of gastrointestinal bleeding. In seven instances, blood culture results were positive, all for intestinal flora. The episodes of typhlitis occurred most frequently during the induction therapy (19 patients). Five patients experienced typhlitis during maintenance therapy, and one patient had acute appendicitis. Two patients had typhlitis during their reinduction therapy, and of note, one had had abdominal symptoms during her initial induction. All patients were treated initially with broad-spectrum antibiotics and bowel rest. Four criteria have been used for surgical intervention: (1) persistent gastrointestinal bleeding after resolution of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and correction of clotting abnormalities; (2) evidence of free intraperitoneal perforation; (3) clinical deterioration requiring support with vasopressors, or large volumes of fluid, suggesting uncontrolled sepsis; and (4) development of symptoms of an intra-abdominal process, in the absence of neutropenia, which would normally require surgery. Using these criteria, five patients required surgical intervention for typhlitis or its sequelae and one for acute appendicitis. There was one perioperative death resulting from

  19. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  20. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  1. Conditioning with targeted busulfan for autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in an XYY male.

    PubMed

    Sada, Eriko; Henzan, Hideho; Ohtani, Ryoko; Takase, Ken; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Fukuda, Takahiro; Nagafuji, Koji; Yamauchi, Keita; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Inaba, Shoichi; Harada, Mine

    2005-01-01

    We report herein a 19-year-old Japanese male with XYY syndrome who developed acute myelogenous leukemia. During three courses of cytotoxic chemotherapy, he suffered repeated hepatic and renal insufficiencies, possibly related to latent dysfunction from the XYY syndrome. The patient was treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor combined with etoposide, cytarabine, and busulfan (the latter adjusted to a targeting dose) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. He had no severe regimen-related toxicities and is now free of leukemia.

  2. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  3. Acts and omissions, killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1986-01-11

    Gillon asks what, if any, moral importance resides in the distinction between killing and letting die in the context of medical care. He considers and rejects the acts and omissions doctrine, which claims that actions (killing) resulting in some undesirable end are in general morally worse than failures to act (allowing to die) that have the same result. He also refutes the argument that the moral distinction between killing and letting die is one of harming versus benefitting, and that a physician has a responsibility not to harm (kill) a patient but no duty to help (keep alive). Gillon concludes by discussing the moral claims upon which the Roman Catholic rejection of the acts and omissions doctrine is based, which are the subjects of his next British Medical Journal article on medical ethics.

  4. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  5. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  6. Is killing no worse than letting die?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, W

    1995-01-01

    Those who wish to refute the view that it is worse to kill than to let die sometimes produce examples of cases in which an agent lets someone die but would be generally agreed to be no less reprehensible than if he had killed. It is argued that the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine.

  7. Killing and letting die: hidden value assumptions.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G

    1983-01-01

    In this paper I argue for several related theses: first, that the distinction between killing and letting die, as it is drawn by ordinary persons in ordinary contexts, is more complex than is generally understood; second, that the key feature of this complexity lies in the presence of a hidden normative component in what appears to be a straightforwardly descriptive distinction; and, third, that this complexity renders the killing/letting die distinction an inadequate and hazardous guide for moral reasoning.

  8. Lie algebra of conformal Killing-Yano forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-06-01

    We provide a generalization of the Lie algebra of conformal Killing vector fields to conformal Killing-Yano forms. A new Lie bracket for conformal Killing-Yano forms that corresponds to slightly modified Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of differential forms is proposed. We show that conformal Killing-Yano forms satisfy a graded Lie algebra in constant curvature manifolds. It is also proven that normal conformal Killing-Yano forms in Einstein manifolds also satisfy a graded Lie algebra. The constructed graded Lie algebras reduce to the graded Lie algebra of Killing-Yano forms and the Lie algebras of conformal Killing and Killing vector fields in special cases.

  9. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  10. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  11. On the killing of mycobacteria by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jordao, Luisa; Bleck, Christopher K E; Mayorga, Luis; Griffiths, Gareth; Anes, Elsa

    2008-02-01

    Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria are internalized into macrophage phagosomes. Whereas the non-pathogenic types are invariably killed by all macrophages, the pathogens generally survive and grow. Here, we addressed the survival, production of nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and intracellular trafficking of the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen-like, BCG and the pathogenic M. bovis in different mouse, human and bovine macrophages. The bacteriocidal effects of RNI were restricted for all bacterial species to the early stages of infection. EM analysis showed clearly that all the mycobacteria remained within phagosomes even at late times of infection. The fraction of BCG and M. bovis found in mature phagolysosomes rarely exceeded 10% of total, irrespective of whether bacteria were growing, latent or being killed, with little correlation between the extent of phagosome maturation and the degree of killing. Theoretical modelling of our data identified two different potential sets of explanations that are consistent with our results. The model we favour is one in which a small but significant fraction of BCG is killed in an early phagosome, then maturation of a small fraction of phagosomes with both live and killed bacteria, followed by extremely rapid killing and digestion of the bacteria in phago-lysosomes.

  12. An unusual translocation t(5;21) (q13;q22) in a case of acute myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bellam, S.P.; da Costa, M.; Gogineni, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a disease often characterized by consistant chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells. When specific abnormalities are detected, a specific disease classification can be established. Often, however, disease presentation is confusing and aberrations are unusual. We report a case presenting with anemia and leukocytosis. Cytological markers were mixed lymphoid/myeloid; however, the majority of markers supported a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis with Q and G banding revealed an unusual t(5;21) translocation. Whole chromosome five-specific (Cambio, England) and whole chromosome 21-specific (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD) painting probes confirmed the involvement of each chromosome and established the breakpoints at band 5q13 and band 21q22. It is very rare for chromosome 5 to be in translocation with chromosome 21 and this appears to be the first time it has been reported with these two breakpoints. Although the translocation is unique, the breakpoints are common in AML: The 5q13 is associated with multiple classifications and the 21q22 is the same breakpoint in the t(8;21), the hallmark of the M2 classification. Thus, molecular cytogenetic techniques were able to support a diagnosis of AML.

  13. Chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  14. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  15. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Selective bowel decontamination for the prevention of infection in acute myelogenous leukemia: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Gun; Choi, Su Mi; Choi, Jung Hyun; Yoo, Jin Hong; Park, Yoon Hee; Kim, Yoo Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang Ki; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Shin, Wan Shik; Kim, Chun Choo

    2002-03-01

    Infection is still a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients receiving chemotherapy. Recently the main cause of infection has changed from gram-negative to gram-positive bacteria and the resistance to antibiotics has increased. This study aimed to access the effectiveness of antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) with orally absorbable antibiotics. Ninety-five AML patients receiving chemotherapy at Catholic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Center from March 1999 to July 1999 were randomly divided into the AP group (250 mg ciprofloxacin twice a day, 150 mg roxithromycin twice a day, 50 mg fluconazole once a day) and the control group for a prospective analysis. The incidence of fever was 82.6% in the AP group and 91.6% in the control group (p = 0.15). Though classification and sites of infections showed no difference between the two groups, the catheter associated infection occurred more frequently in the AP group in significance. The time interval between initiation of chemotherapy and onset of fever, white blood cell (WBC) count at the onset of fever, duration of leukopenia (WBC < 1,000/mm3), duration of systemic antibiotic therapy, mortality due to infection and hospitalization period from the data starting chemotherapy showed no differences between the two groups. Infections due to gram negative bacteria decreased to 33.3% in the AP group (vs. 92% in the control group), but infections due to gram positive bacteria increased to 66.7% (vs. 8% in the control group). Gram negative bacteria showed 100% resistance to ciprofloxacin in the AP group and gram-positive bacteria showed 90-100% resistance to erythromycin, regardless of the presence of AP. The AP could not reduce the occurrence of infection or infection associated death in AML patients receiving chemotherapy. On considering increased gram-positive infection and resistance to fluoroquinolone and macrolide, routine prescription of AP should be reconsidered. Further

  17. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  18. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Evaluation of the G-quadruplex Binding Drug Telomestatin as an Inhibitor of c-myb in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    growth of these CML xenografts. To determine the in vivo mechanism of action of telomestatin, tumors will be harvested and analyzed by standard...cells and undetectable levels in differentiated cells (4). c-Myb is overexpressed in many leukemias and some solid tumors , and plays a critical role in...essential for the ME1a1-mediated expression of the c-myc gene during neuroectodermal differentiation of P19 cells. Oncogene, 15, 1123-1131. 39

  20. Curcumin modulates chronic myelogenous leukemia exosomes composition and affects angiogenic phenotype via exosomal miR-21

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Simona; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Pucci, Marzia; Saieva, Laura; De Caro, Viviana; Cardinale, Valeria Giunta; Giallombardo, Marco; Vicario, Emanuela; Rolfo, Christian; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor derived exosomes are vesicles which contain proteins and microRNAs that mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in angiogenesis and tumor progression. Curcumin derived from the plant Curcuma longa, shows anticancer effects. Exosomes released by CML cells treated with Curcumin contain a high amount of miR-21 that is shuttled into the endothelial cells in a biologically active form. The treatment of HUVECs with CML Curcu-exosomes reduced RhoB expression and negatively modulated endothelial cells motility. We showed that the addition of CML control exosomes to HUVECs caused an increase in IL8 and VCAM1 levels, but Curcu-exosomes reversed these effects thus attenuating their angiogenic properties. This antiangiogenic effect was confirmed with in vitro and in vivo vascular network formation assays. SWATH analysis of the proteomic profile of Curcu-exosomes revealed that Curcumin treatment deeply changes their molecular properties, in particular, Curcumin induces a release of exosomes depleted in pro-angiogenic proteins and enriched in proteins endowed with anti-angiogenic activity. Among the proteins differential expressed we focused on MARCKS, since it was the most modulated protein and a target of miR-21. Taken together our data indicated that also Curcumin attenuates the exosome's ability to promote the angiogenic phenotype and to modulate the endothelial barrier organization. PMID:27050372

  1. Female serial killing: review and case report.

    PubMed

    Frei, Andreas; Völlm, Birgit; Graf, Marc; Dittmann, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Single homicide committed by women is rare. Serial killing is very infrequent, and the perpetrators are usually white, intelligent males with sadistic tendencies. Serial killing by women has, however, also been described. To conduct a review of published literature on female serial killers and consider its usefulness in assessing a presenting case. A literature review was conducted, after searching EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. The presenting clinical case is described in detail in the context of the literature findings. Results The literature search revealed few relevant publications. Attempts to categorize the phenomenon of female serial killing according to patterns of and motives for the homicides have been made by some authors. The most common motive identified was material gain or similar extrinsic gratification while the 'hedonistic' sadistic or sexual serial killer seems to be extremely rare in women. There is no consistent theory of serial killing by women, but psychopathic personality traits and abusive childhood experiences have consistently been observed. The authors' case did not fit the description of a 'typical' female serial killer. In such unusual circumstances as serial killing by a woman, detailed individual case formulation is required to make sense of the psychopathology in each case. Publication of cases in scientific journals should be encouraged to advance our understanding of this phenomenon. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Kill fluid for oil field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes a process employing a kill fluid to substantially reduce the volumetric flow of formation fluid into a wellbore penetrating a formation containing the formation fluid below an earthen surface. It comprises: admixing components of a continuous flowing gel at the surface comprising of water-soluble carboxylate-containing polymer, a complex capable of crosslinking the polymer and formed of at least one electropositive chromium III species and at least one electronegative carboxylatespecies, and an aqueous solvent for the polymer and the complex; crosslinking the polymer and the complex to form the gel, wherein the kill fluid comprises the gel; placing a volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore sufficient to create a hydrostatic head which exerts a kill fluid pressure against the formation fluid substantially equal to or greater than the formation fluid pressure and thereby substantially reduces the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore; performing an oil field operation after placing the volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore; and removing the gel from the wellbore to substantially restore the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore.

  3. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  4. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  5. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  6. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  7. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  8. 'Total disability' and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Omelianchuk, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin G Miller recently argued that the wrongness of killing is best explained by the harm that comes to the victim, and that 'total disability' best explains the nature of this harm. Hence, killing patients who are already totally disabled is not wrong. I maintain that their notion of total disability is ambiguous and that they beg the question with respect to whether there are abilities left over that remain relevant for the goods of personhood and human worth. If these goods remain, then something more is lost in death than in 'total disability,' and their explanation of what makes killing wrong comes up short. But if total disability is equivalent with death, then their argument is an interesting one.

  9. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  10. Summary of the published Indian data on chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Manish K.; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (LML) was recognized as a distinct entity in the mid-1800s. Since Nowell and Hunagerford initiated their research on CML in1960 our understanding in CML has been increasing. Imatinib became the preferred treatment from 2000 onwards as a result of its unprecedented success. The lack of structured Indian data on CML led to the formation of a CML data cansortuim which invited CML data albiet retro spartive form around the country including major cancer service providers both government and private. We provide a summary of published Indian data on CML here. PMID:27606306

  11. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  12. Cytotoxic Killing and Immune Evasion by Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J. T.; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-07-01

    The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is a complex one, with pathogens constantly developing new ways of evading destruction by the immune system. The immune system's task is made even harder when the pathogen in question is an intra-cellular one (such as a virus or certain bacteria) and it is necessary to kill the infected host cell in order to eliminate the pathogen. This causes damage to the host, and such killing therefore needs to be carefully controlled, particularly in tissues with poor regenerative potential, or those involved in the immune response itself. Host cells therefore possess repair mechanisms which can counteract killing by immune cells. These in turn can be subverted by pathogens which up-regulate the resistance of infected cells to killing. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that this repair process plays an important role in determining the efficacy of evasion and escape from immune control. We model a situation where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells kill pathogen-infected and tumour cells by directed secretion of preformed granules containing perforin and granzymes. Resistance to such killing can be conferred by the expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). These are utilized by several virally infected and tumour cells, as well as playing a role in the protection of host bystander, immune and immuneprivileged cells. We build a simple stochastic model of cytotoxic killing, where serpins can neutralize granzymes stoichiometrically by forming an irreversible complex, and the survival of the cell is determined by the balance between serpin depletion and replenishment, which in its simplest form is equivalent to the well known shot noise process. We use existing analytical results for this process, and additional simulations to analyse the effects of repair on cytotoxic killing. We then extend the model to the case of a replicating target cell population, which gives a branching process

  13. Ambiguities in 'killing' and 'letting die'.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G M

    1983-05-01

    In a recent article Carla Kary (1980) attempts to show that there can be a significant moral difference between instances of killing and letting die. I shall maintain in Section I that Kary's argument is somewhat weakened by her failure to note an important ambiguity in the notion of killing a person. I shall also argue in Section II that a similar ambiguity affects the notion of letting someone die, and that failure to note this latter ambiguity also weakens the position developed by Robert Coburn (1980) with regard to defective newborns.

  14. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  15. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  16. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    PubMed

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  17. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-01-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  18. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body's immune system. The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the genes controlling cell survival and

  19. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body’s immune system. Methods and Findings The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the

  20. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  1. Mass killings and detection of impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Digby J.

    1988-01-01

    Highly energetic bolide impacts occur and their flux is known. For larger bodies the energy release is greater than for any other short-term global phenomenon. Such impacts produce or release a large variety of shock induced changes including major atmospheric, sedimentologic, seismic and volcanic events. These events must necessarily leave a variety of records in the stratigraphic column, including mass killings resulting in major changes in population density and reduction or extinction of many taxonomic groups, followed by characteristic patterns of faunal and flora replacement. Of these effects, mass killings, marked by large-scale loss of biomass, are the most easily detected evidence in the field but must be manifest on a near-global scale. Such mass killings that appear to be approximately synchronous and involve disappearance of biomass at a bedding plane in many sedimentologically independent sections globally suggest a common cause and probable synchroneity. Mass killings identify an horizon which may be examined for evidence of cause. Geochemical markers may be ephemeral and absence may not be significant. There appears to be no reason why ongoing phenomena such as climate and sea-level changes are primary causes of anomolous episodic events.

  2. School Shootings; Standards Kill Students and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angert, Betsy L.

    2008-01-01

    School shootings have been in the news of late. People ponder what occurs in classrooms today. Why would a young person wish to take a life? Within educational institutions, the killings are a concern. In our dire attempt to teach the children and ensure student success, it seems many of our offspring are lost. Some students feel separate from…

  3. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  4. Nonlinear symmetries on spaces admitting Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinescu, Mihai

    2010-04-01

    Nonlinear symmetries corresponding to Killing tensors are investigated. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard supersymmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated with a Killing-Yano tensor. In the case of the nonlinear symmetries the dynamical algebras of the Dirac-type operators is more involved and could be organized as infinite dimensional algebras or superalgebras. The general results are applied to some concrete spaces involved in theories of modern physics. As a first example it is considered the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space and its generalizations introduced by Iwai and Katayama. One presents the infinite dimensional superalgebra of Dirac type operators on Taub-NUT space that could be seen as a graded loop superalgebra of the Kac-Moody type. The axial anomaly, interpreted as the index of the Dirac operator, is computed for the generalized Taub-NUT metrics. Finally the existence of the conformal Killing-Yano tensors is investigated for some spaces with mixed Sasakian structures.

  5. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  6. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  7. The evolution of reduced microbial killing.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; Valliere, Michael; Riley, Margaret A

    2009-10-20

    Bacteria engage in a never-ending arms race in which they compete for limited resources and niche space. The outcome of this intense interaction is the evolution of a powerful arsenal of biological weapons. Perhaps the most studied of these are colicins, plasmid-based toxins produced by and active against Escherichia coli. The present study was designed to explore the molecular responses of a colicin-producing strain during serial transfer evolution. What evolutionary changes occur when colicins are produced with no target present? Can killing ability be maintained in the absence of a target? To address these, and other, questions, colicinogenic strains and a noncolicinogenic ancestor were evolved for 253 generations. Samples were taken throughout the experiment and tested for killing ability. By the 38th transfer, a decreased killing ability and an increase in fitness were observed in the colicin-producing strains. Surprisingly, DNA sequence determination of the colicin plasmids revealed no changes in plasmid sequences. However, a set of chromosomally encoded loci experienced changes in gene expression that were positively associated with the reduction in killing. The most significant expression changes were observed in DNA repair genes (which were downregulated in the evolved strains), Mg ion uptake genes (which were upregulated), and late prophage genes (which were upregulated). These results indicate a fine-tuned response to the evolutionary pressures of colicin production, with far more genes involved than had been anticipated.

  8. Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Susan Arpajian

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

  9. Killing symmetry on the Finsler manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuka, Takayoshi; Yahagi, Ryoko; Ishida, Muneyuki

    2017-05-01

    Symmetry and conservation law are discussed on the Finsler manifold M. We adopt the point Finsler approach, where we consider the geometry on a point manifold M not on TM. Generalized vector fields are defined on oriented curves on M, and Finsler non-linear connections are considered on M, not on the tangent space TM. Killing vector fields K are defined as generalized vector fields as {{L}K}F=\\text{d}B , and the Killing symmetry is also reformulated simply as S{{K}\\flat}=0 by using the Killing 1-form {{K}\\flat} and the spray operator S defined by using the non-linear connection. {{K}\\flat} is related to the generalization of Killing tensors on the Finsler manifold, and our ansatz of {{K}\\flat} and S{{K}\\flat}=0 give an analytical method of finding higher derivative conserved quantities, which may be called hidden conserved quantities. We show two examples: the Carter constant on Kerr spacetime and the Runge-Lentz vectors in Newtonian gravity.

  10. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  11. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kath

    1993-06-24

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  12. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  13. [Induction and maintenance treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in adults by sequential use of combination chemotherapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fülle, H H

    1977-04-15

    The therapeutic regimens for acute myelogenous leukemia in 2 different periods of time will be described with comparison of their results. A. 28 adults were treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine only. Thereby, 28% complete and 16% partial remissions were achieved. The mean duration of the complete remissions was 23 weeks. The mean survival time of the patients with complete remission amounted to 53 weeks B. 46% complete and 12% partial remissions were obtained in 37 patients treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine doubling the dosage of the above mentioned regimen followed by 3 cycles of TRAP (and COAP). Using a maintenance therapy with modified TRAP, COAP, and POMP cycles the complete remissions lasted 47 weeks at an average. The mean survival time of patients with complete remission was 87 weeks after start of treatment.

  14. HOXB4 knockdown reverses multidrug resistance of human myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP expression via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Chen, Jie-Ru; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plays a pivotal role in human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) chemotherapy failure. MDR is mainly associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade is involved in the MDR phenotype and is correlated with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) expression in many human malignancies. Homeobox (HOX) B4, a member of the HOX gene family, has been reported to be correlated with occurrence, development, poor prognosis and drug resistance of human leukemia. In the present study, HOXB4 expression was analyzed in K562 cell line and its MDR subline K562/ADM. Compared with K562 cells, drug-resistant K562/ADM cells demonstrated evidently higher HOXB4 expression. In addition, we firstly investigated the reversal effect of HOXB4 deletion on K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism. The Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry assays showed that knockdown of HOXB4 enhanced chemosensitivity and decreased drug efflux in K562/ADM cells. Moreover, HOXB4 knockout led to downregulation of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP expression and PI3K/Akt signaling activity, suggesting that repression of HOXB4 might be a key point to reverse MDR of K562/ADM cells.

  15. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings.

    PubMed

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings.

  16. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Methods Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. Conclusions We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings. PMID:26135941

  17. Bovine polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Aydintug, M K; Widders, P R; Leid, R W

    1993-07-01

    The role of bovine antibody and complement in bovine neutrophil-mediated killing of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. No neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity was detected when Hanks' balanced salt solution, a widely utilized and weakly buffered medium, was used. This lack of neutrophil activity was evident even in the presence of specific bovine antibody and bovine complement. Moreover, the pH of the weakly buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was observed to fall from pH 7.0 to 5.8 in 4 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of T. foetus. The pH of 5.8 inhibited the bactericidal activity of bovine neutrophils for Staphylococcus epidermidis by 53.2% and may have contributed to the lack of neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity in the weakly buffered salt solution. However, T. foetus was susceptible to bovine neutrophil-mediated destruction when a HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was used (21.8% killing by neutrophils alone). Neither specific bovine immune serum nor purified immune bovine immunoglobulin G2 alone enhanced bovine neutrophil-mediated killing. When complement-sensitized trichomonads were incubated with bovine neutrophils, killing of T. foetus was observed, a result which represented the additive effects of each treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) killing of trichomonads was observed when antibody- and complement-opsonized trichomonads were exposed to bovine neutrophils (> 70% parasite destruction), an effect which reflected the additive nature of each treatment.

  18. Efficacy of acitretin for porokeratosis in a child with chronic cutaneous graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Riccardo G; Poddighe, Dimitri; Zecca, Marco; Brazzelli, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Porokeratosis is a rare disorder of epidermal keratinization that is regarded as a precancerous. Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a greater risk of skin cancer; chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is an additional risk factor. A 16-year-old boy who had received HSCT for acute myelogenous leukemia was referred to us for sclerodermoid chronic cutaneous GVHD. Two years later, he developed disseminated porokeratosis with a few atypical lesions. Despite cryotherapy, numerous lesions of porokeratosis recurred rapidly. Acitretin resulted in good clinical response and reduced the rate of onset of new lesions. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 75 FR 30299 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... closures to facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from July 5... regulations to facilitate scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance. Under this temporary deviation the...

  20. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Holten, J.-W. van; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2014-12-15

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

  1. Deprivations, futures and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Marquis, D

    2001-12-01

    In my essay, Why abortion is immoral, I criticised discussions of the morality of abortion in which the crucial issue is whether fetuses are human beings or whether fetuses are persons. Both argument strategies are inadequate because they rely on indefensible assumptions. Why should being a human being or being a person make a moral difference? I argued that the correct account of the morality of abortion should be based upon a defensible account of why killing children and adults is wrong. I claimed that what makes killing us wrong is that our premature deaths deprive us of our futures of value, that is, the goods of life we would have experienced had we survived. This account of the wrongness of killing explains why killing is one of the worst of crimes and how killing greatly harms the victim. It coheres with the attitudes of those with cancer or HIV facing premature death. It explains why we believe it is wrong to kill infants (as personhood theories do not). It does not entail that it wrongs a human being to end her life if she is in persistent vegetative state or if her future must consist only of unbearable physical suffering and she wants to die (as sanctity of human life theories do not). This account of the wrongness of killing implies (with some defensible additional assumptions) that abortion is immoral because we were fetuses once and we know those fetuses had futures of value. Mark Brown claims that this potential future of value account is unsound because it implies that we have welfare rights to what we need to stay alive that most people would reject. I argue that Brown is incorrect in two ways: a welfare right to what we need to stay alive is not directly implied by my account and, in addition, most of us do believe that dependent human beings have substantial welfare rights to what they need to stay alive. Brown argues that depriving us of a future of value of which we have mental representations both is a better explanation of the wrongness of

  2. Parricide: Children Who Kill Their Parents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    adolescents who kill their parents. The research centers on who is the offender, why he or she has used parricide as a solution to an unresolvable problem...parricide. Conclusions Reached Based on the results of the literature review three conclusions were reached. First, adolescents who commit parricide have been...at the hands of their abuser. Secondly, the treatment of these adolescents by the criminal justice system varies greatly depending on the willingness

  3. 11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD SPLITTERS' PLATFORMS - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  4. GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  5. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  6. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood. PMID:11353851

  7. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J C; Liao, C J; Lewis, K; Klibanov, A M

    2001-05-22

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 +/- 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 +/- 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  8. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-05-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  9. Killing, letting die, and withdrawing aid.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of this article is to contribute to the identification of the empirical criteria governing the use of the concepts of killing and letting die. I will not attempt a comprehensive analysis of the concepts but will limit the inquiry to certain problematic cases -- namely, cases involving the removal or withdrawal of life-supporting aid or protection. The analysis of these cases will, however, shed light on the criteria for distinguishing killing and letting die in other cases as well. My overall aims in the article are partly constructive and partly skeptical. I hope to advance our understanding of the nature of the distinction between killing and letting die. This, I believe, will enable us to defend the moral relevance of the distinction against certain objections -- in particular, objections that claim that the distinction fails to coincide with commonsense moral intuitions. Yet I will suggest that, as we get clearer about the nature of the distinction and the sources of its intuitive appeal, it may seem that the intuitions it supports are not so well grounded as one could wish.

  10. Killing spinors, twistor - spinors and Hijazi inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichnerowicz, Andre

    Let (W, g) be a spin manifold of dimension n. In terms of the Dirac operator P of (W, g), we introduce on the spinor fields a conformally covariant first-order operator D that is strictly connected with the twistor-spinors. We show that the operator (Δ - ρ) (ρ = (n/4(n - 1))R) is positive. For a compact spin manifold of dimension n ⩾ 3, the existences of harmonic spinors and twistor-spinors ≠ O are mutually exclusive, except for the parallel spinors. By means of a universal formula, we show that the Hijazi inequality [8] holds for every spinor field such that (Pψ, Pψ) = λ 2(ψ, ψ) (λ = const). In the limiting case, the manifold admits a Killing spinor which can be evaluated in terms of ψ. Using the Yamabe-Schoen theorem [15], we prove that, if the space K of the twistor-spinors of (W, g) is not reduced to zero, there is a conformal change of the metric g giving a manifold with Killing spinors ≠ 0. Interpretation of dim K in terms of these spaces of Killing spinors. If the compact spin manifold (W, g) of dimension n ⩾ 3 is not conformally isometric with the sphere, every twistor-spinor is without zero on W.

  11. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Newcastle Disease Vaccine... Newcastle disease virus supplied by or approved by Veterinary Services and the vaccinates observed each...

  12. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  13. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  14. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  15. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  16. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jacqueline T; Mengersen, Kerrie; Abram, Nicola K; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wells, Jessie A; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI) and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI). These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  17. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  18. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  19. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  20. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  1. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  2. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  3. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  4. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  5. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  6. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  7. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  8. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  9. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  10. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  11. Noether versus Killing symmetry of conformally flat Friedmann metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Kara, A. H.

    2007-12-01

    In a recent study Noether symmetries of some static spacetime metrics in comparison with Killing vectors of corresponding spacetimes were studied. It was shown that Noether symmetries provide additional conservation laws that are not given by Killing vectors. In an attempt to understand how Noether symmetries compare with conformal Killing vectors, we find the Noether symmetries of the flat Friedmann cosmological model. We show that the conformally transformed flat Friedman model admits additional conservation laws not given by the Killing or conformal Killing vectors. Inter alia, these additional conserved quantities provide a mechanism to twice reduce the geodesic equations via the associated Noether symmetries.

  12. Clinical Concentrations of Thioridazine Kill Intracellular Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Bettencourt, Rosário; Almeida, Josefina; Martins, Marta; Kristiansen, Jette E.; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    The phenothiazines chlorpromazine (CPZ) and thioridazine (TZ) have equal in vitro activities against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These compounds have not been used as anti-M. tuberculosis agents because their in vitro activities take place at concentrations which are beyond those that are clinically achievable. In addition, chronic administration of CPZ produces frequent severe side effects. Because CPZ has been shown to enhance the killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis at concentrations in the medium that are clinically relevant, we have investigated whether TZ, a phenothiazine whose negative side effects are less frequent and serious than those associated with CPZ, kills M. tuberculosis organisms that have been phagocytosed by human macrophages, which have nominal killing activities against these bacteria. Both CPZ and TZ killed intracellular antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant M. tuberculosis organisms when they were used at concentrations in the medium well below those present in the plasma of patients treated with these agents. These concentrations in vitro were not toxic to the macrophage, nor did they affect in vitro cellular immune processes. TZ thus appears to be a serious candidate for the management of a freshly diagnosed infection of pulmonary tuberculosis or as an adjunct to conventional antituberculosis therapy if the patient originates from an area known to have a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. Nevertheless, we must await the outcomes of clinical trials to determine whether TZ itself may be safely and effectively used as an antituberculosis agent. PMID:12604522

  13. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  14. Dynamic kill: controlling wild wells a new way

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, E.M.; Soeiinah, E.

    1981-10-01

    Dynamic kill describes a technique for terminating a blowout utilizing flowing frictional pressure to supplement the hydrostatic pressure of the kill fluid being injected through the relief well and up the blowing well. Therefore, a lighter kill fluid such as water can be implemented. The objective is to allow a blowout to be killed without breaking down the formation so the maximum amount of fluid can be circulated through the relief well by not losing fluid to a fractured formation. This allows optimum control during the kill operation and stable communication between the two wells. By allowing more fluid to be applied to the kill through one relief well, dynamic kill also increases the probability that one relief well will be sufficient. When the well is dynamically dead, the initial kill fluid, which will usually be too light to hold the well dead in a static condition, is replaced with a heavier kill mud. In fact, three weights of mud may be required to allow control during the transition from low density initial dynamic kill mud to heavy final kill mud. 5 refs.

  15. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With ALL or CML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Triops (Entomostraca) eggs killed only by boiling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D B

    1968-07-19

    Temporary rainpools near Khartoum, Sudan, are inhabited by the notostracan crustacean Triops which completes its life cycle within 4 weeks. The annual rains fall in late summer, and throughout the winter and early summer the eggs of Triops remain in the dried mud or dust where they may be exposed to temperatures up to 80 degrees C. Laboratory experiments show that they can withstand temperatures up to within 1 degrees C of boiling, but are killed in partial vacuum by 70 degrees C, at atmospheric pressure by 100 degrees C, or under pressure by 105 degrees C. Exposure to high temperature seems to be necessary to break the egg diapause.

  17. The killing efficiency of soft iron shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, R.; Longcore, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    A cooperative research effort between the ammunition industry and the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is aimed at finding a suitable non-toxic substitute for lead shot. A contract study by an independent research organization evaluated ways of coating or detoxifying lead shot or replacing it with another metal. As a result of that study, the only promising candidate is soft iron. Previous tests of hard iron shot had suggested that its killing effectiveness was poor at longer ranges due to the lower density. In addition, its hardness caused excessive damage to shotgun barrels. A unique, automated shooting facility was constructed at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to test the killing effectiveness of soft iron shot under controlled conditions. Tethered game-farm mallards were transported across a shooting point in a manner simulating free flight. A microswitch triggered a mounted shotgun so that each shot was 'perfect.' A soft iron shot, in Number 4 size, was produced by the ammunition industry and loaded in 12-gauge shells to give optimum ballistic performance. Commercial loads of lead shot in both Number 4 and Number 6 size were used for comparison. A total of 2,010 ducks were shot at ranges of 30 to 65 yards and at broadside and head-on angles in a statistically designed procedure. The following data were recorded for each duck: time until death, broken wing or leg bones, and number of embedded shot. Those ducks not killed outright were held for 10 days. From these data, ducks were categorized as 'probably bagged,' 'probably lost cripples,' or survivors. The test revealed that the killing effectiveness of this soft iron shot was superior to its anticipated performance and close to that obtained with commercial lead loads containing an equal number of pellets. Bagging a duck, in terms of rapid death or broken wing, was primarily dependent on the probability of a shot striking that vital area, and therefore a function of range. There was no indication

  18. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  19. Micro-sociology of mass rampage killings.

    PubMed

    Collins, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Spectacular but very rare violent events such as mass killings by habitual non-criminals cannot be explained by factors which are very widespread, such as possession of firearms, being a victim of bullying, an introvert, or a career failure. A stronger clue is clandestine preparation of attack by one or two individuals, against randomly chosen representatives of a hated collective identity. Mass killers develop a deep back-stage, obsessed with planning their attack, overcoming social inferiority and isolation by an emotion of clandestine excitement.

  20. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  1. CD34⁺/CD38⁻ acute myelogenous leukemia cells aberrantly express Aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Nishioka, Chie; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-12-01

    We previously showed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is aberrantly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells when compared to bone marrow mononuclear cells isolated from healthy volunteers. We have also shown that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, one of compartments enriched for leukemia stem cells in most leukemia subgroups, were relatively resistant to cytarabine-mediated growth inhibition when compared to their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts. Our study attempted to identify therapeutic targets in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells and found that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells isolated from patients (n = 26) expressed larger amounts of AURKA than their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts and CD34(+) normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells isolated from healthy volunteers (n = 6), as measured by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Blockade of AURKA by the specific inhibitor MLN8237 or a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AURKA significantly inhibited proliferation, impaired self-renewal capability and induced apoptosis of CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, in association with modulation of levels of Bcl-2 family member proteins. Importantly, inhibition of AURKA in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells by MLN8237 or an shRNA significantly impaired engraftment of these cells in severely immunocompromised mice and appeared to prolong their survival. These results suggest that AURKA is a promising molecular target to eliminate chemotherapy-resistant CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells.

  2. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  3. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2017-03-01

    Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:840-850.

  4. Low toxicity and efficacy of (153)samarium-EDTMP and melphalan as a conditioning regimen for secondary acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Erlandson, Linda; Arndt, Carola A S; Wiseman, Gregory A; Anderson, Peter M

    2005-02-01

    We report the case of a 15-yr-old girl who developed secondary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) 4 yr after completion of therapy for metastatic Ewing sarcoma (primary right acetabulum with metastatic disease to the lungs). Peripheral blood stem cells were collected after the second cycle of chemotherapy with the plan for future consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue; however, because of the patient's excellent response to chemotherapy and surgery, therapy was completed without the need for high-dose chemotherapy. No human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched related donor was available for a bone marrow transplant. Because of previous lung radiation, high-dose samarium [30 mCi/kg of samarium-153 ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP) day -14] and melphalan (140 mg/m(2) day -2) were chosen as the conditioning regimen to avoid potential lung complications. The patient received an infusion of 6.1 x 10(8)/kg mononuclear autologous cells on day 0. She achieved engraftment on day +23. Three years after transplantation, she continues to have complete remission. Samarium and melphalan constitute a well-tolerated regimen with potential antileukemic activity.

  5. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR signaling network as a therapeutic target in acute myelogenous leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Alberto M.; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; McCubrey, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling axis plays a central role in cell proliferation, growth, and survival under physiological conditions. However, aberrant PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling has been implicated in many human cancers, including acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Therefore, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR network is considered as a validated target for innovative cancer therapy. The limit of acceptable toxicity for standard polychemotherapy has been reached in AML. Novel therapeutic strategies are therefore needed. This review highlights how the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling axis is constitutively active in AML patients, where it affects survival, proliferation, and drug-resistance of leukemic cells including leukemic stem cells. Effective targeting of this pathway with small molecule kinase inhibitors, employed alone or in combination with other drugs, could result in the suppression of leukemic cell growth. Furthermore, targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network with small pharmacological inhibitors, employed either alone or in combinations with other drugs, may result in less toxic and more efficacious treatment of AML patients. Efforts to exploit pharmacological inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR cascade which show efficacy and safety in the clinical setting are now underway. PMID:20671809

  6. The venom of the spider Macrothele raveni induces apoptosis in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jing; Xu, Shiyan; Liu, Changjun; Zhu, Yanghui; Liang, Songping

    2012-08-01

    Spider venoms are a rich source of bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. In traditional Chinese medicine, spiders and spider venoms have been used in the treatment of various ailments. In the present study, the venom of the spider Macrothele raveni potently suppressed cell growth in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line in a dose and time-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 5.1 μg/mL. The venom also had a low inhibitory effect on human lymphocytes with an IC(50) of approximately 36.4 μg/mL, indicating that the venom is relatively selective for leukemic cells. Venom treated K562 cells showed typical morphological indicators of apoptosis including condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of DNA. Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dual staining further demonstrated that the venom had potent apoptogenic activity. Venom treatment induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 activation in K562 cells and promoted PARP cleavage. The present results indicate that the venom of the spider M. raveni potently and selectively suppresses the growth of K562 cells by inducing apoptosis via caspase 3 and caspase 8 mediated signaling pathways.

  7. Efficacy and Biological Correlates of Response in a Phase II Study of Venetoclax Monotherapy in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Konopleva, Marina; Pollyea, Daniel A; Potluri, Jalaja; Chyla, Brenda; Hogdal, Leah; Busman, Todd; McKeegan, Evelyn; Salem, Ahmed Hamed; Zhu, Ming; Ricker, Justin L; Blum, William; DiNardo, Courtney D; Kadia, Tapan; Dunbar, Martin; Kirby, Rachel; Falotico, Nancy; Leverson, Joel; Humerickhouse, Rod; Mabry, Mack; Stone, Richard; Kantarjian, Hagop; Letai, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    We present a phase II, single-arm study evaluating 800 mg daily venetoclax, a highly selective, oral small-molecule B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (BCL2) inhibitor in patients with high-risk relapsed/refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or unfit for intensive chemotherapy. Responses were evaluated following revised International Working Group (IWG) criteria. The overall response rate was 19%; an additional 19% of patients demonstrated antileukemic activity not meeting IWG criteria (partial bone marrow response and incomplete hematologic recovery). Twelve (38%) patients had isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutations, of whom 4 (33%) achieved complete response or complete response with incomplete blood count recovery. Six (19%) patients had BCL2-sensitive protein index at screening, which correlated with time on study. BH3 profiling was consistent with on-target BCL2 inhibition and identified potential resistance mechanisms. Common adverse events included nausea, diarrhea and vomiting (all grades), and febrile neutropenia and hypokalemia (grade 3/4). Venetoclax demonstrated activity and acceptable tolerability in patients with AML and adverse features.

  8. CLINICAL ACTIVITY OF SEQUENTIAL FLAVOPIRIDOL, CYTOSINE ARABINOSIDE, AND MITOXANTRONE FOR ADULTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED, POOR RISK ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Judith E.; Blackford, Amanda; Smith, B. Douglas; Alino, Katrina; Seung, Amy Hatfield; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Gore, Steven D.; Jones, Richard J.; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Doyle, L. Austin; Wright, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is cytotoxic to leukemic blasts. In a Phase II study, flavopiridol 50 mg/m2 was given by 1-hour infusion daily × 3 beginning Day 1 followed by 2 gm/m2/72 hr ara-C beginning Day 6 and 40 mg/m2 mitoxantrone on Day 9 (FLAM) to 45 adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with multiple poor risk features. Thirty patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (9%) died. Twelve (40%) received myeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first CR. Median OS and DFS are not reached (67% alive 12.5–31 months, 58% in CR 11.4–30 months), with median follow-up 22 months. Sixteen received FLAM in CR, with median OS and DFS 9 and 13.1 months, and 36% alive at 21–31 months. Short OS and DFS correlated with adverse cytogenetics, regardless of age or treatment in CR. The addition of allogeneic BMT in CR translates into long OS and DFS in the majority of eligible patients. PMID:19962759

  9. High frequency of clonal immunoglobulin or T cell receptor gene rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia expressing terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ig and T cell receptor rearrangements have been used as irreversible markers of lineage and clonality in the study of B- and T-lymphoid populations. We have addressed the issue of lymphoid lineage specificity of these rearrangements by analyzing a panel of 25 TdT- acute myelogenous leukemias, 13 TdT+ AMLs, and 4 TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. We report that while gene rearrangements represent extremely rare events in classical TdT- AML (less than 8%), rearrangements of either the Ig or T beta locus or both were detectable in the majority of the TdT+ AMLs (greater than 60%), and rearrangements of both loci were detectable in all of the TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. These data demonstrate a significant association between TdT expression and Ig or T beta gene rearrangements even outside the lymphoid lineage, further supporting a role for TdT in Ig and T cell receptor gene assembly. These data also indicate that a coordinated program of lymphoid gene expression involving TdT-CD7-expression and Ig/T beta rearrangements can be activated before myeloid commitment. Whether the activation of this program represents a normal, albeit rare, event in early myelopoiesis or a transformation-related event present only in leukemic cells remains to be determined. PMID:3473183

  10. Identification of a melampomagnolide B analog as a potential lead molecule for treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Albayati, Zaineb A F; Janganati, Venumadhav; Chen, Zheng; Ponder, Jessica; Breen, Philip J; Jordan, Craig T; Crooks, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    A series of carbamate derivatives of the antileukemic sesquiterpene melampomagnolide B (MMB) has been synthesized utilizing a 1,2,4-triazole carbamate conjugate of MMB as an intermediate synthon. Five imidazole- and benzimidazole-carbamate analogs of MMB (8a-8e) were prepared and evaluated for anti-leukemic activity against cultured M9 ENL1 AML cells. All the analogs exhibited improved anti-leukemic activity (EC50=0.90-3.93μM) when compared to parthenolide and the parent sesquiterpene, MMB (EC50=7.0μM and 15.5μM, respectively). The imidazole carbamate analog, 8a (EC50=0.9μM), was 16 times more potent than MMB. The comparative bioavailabilities of 8a and MMB were determined in BALB/c mice following oral dosing of these compounds. It has been demonstrated that the absolute plasma bioavailabilities of MMB and 8a were 6.7±0.8%, and 45.5±2%, respectively. These results indicate that, compared to MMB, the PK parameters for 8a display significantly improved bioavailability and exposure after oral administration. Analog 8a is considered to be a potential clinical candidate for treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of fungal pathogens in a patient with acute myelogenic leukemia using a pathogen detection array technology

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sagarika; Peck, Kristen N.; Feldman, Michael D.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Alwine, James C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasive zygomycosis in immunocompromised patients results in a high mortality rate, and early identification is crucial to optimize therapy and to reduce morbidity. However, diagnosing specific species of zygomycetes fungi possess challenge in the clinical laboratories. A need for a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for early recognition of a zygomycetes fungus in clinical samples to the species level will lead to prompt and accurate therapy and the PathoChip provides one such platform. We utilized a pathogen array technology referred to as PathoChip, comprised of oligonucleotide probes that can detect all the sequenced viruses as well as known pathogenic bacteria, fungi and parasites and family-specific conserved probes, thus providing a means for detecting previously uncharacterized members of a family. We rapidly identified a zygomycetous fungus, Rhizomucor pusillus, an otherwise challenge for the clinical laboratories, predominantly in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This report highlights the value of PathoChip as a diagnostic tool to identify micro-organisms to the species level, especially for those difficult to identify in most clinical laboratories. It will also help clinicians to obtain a critical snapshot of the infection profile of a patient to plan treatment strategies. PMID:26619325

  12. Kill: boosting HIV-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Lydie

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that purging the latent HIV reservoir in virally suppressed individuals will require both the induction of viral replication from its latent state and the elimination of these reactivated HIV-infected cells ('Shock and Kill' strategy). Boosting potent HIV-specific CD8 T cells is a promising way to achieve an HIV cure. Recent studies provided the rationale for developing immune interventions to increase the numbers, function and location of HIV-specific CD8 T cells to purge HIV reservoirs. Multiple approaches are being evaluated including very early suppression of HIV replication in acute infection, adoptive cell transfer, therapeutic vaccination or use of immunomodulatory molecules. New assays to measure the killing and antiviral function of induced HIV-specific CD8 T cells have been developed to assess the efficacy of these new approaches. The strategies combining HIV reactivation and immunobased therapies to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells can be tested in in-vivo and in-silico models to accelerate the design of new clinical trials. New immunobased strategies are explored to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells able to purge the HIV-infected cells with the ultimate goal of achieving spontaneous control of viral replication without antiretroviral treatment.

  13. The Calabi complex and Killing sheaf cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2017-03-01

    It has recently been noticed that the degeneracies of the Poisson bracket of linearized gravity on constant curvature Lorentzian manifold can be described in terms of the cohomologies of a certain complex of differential operators. This complex was first introduced by Calabi and its cohomology is known to be isomorphic to that of the (locally constant) sheaf of Killing vectors. We review the structure of the Calabi complex in a novel way, with explicit calculations based on representation theory of GL(n) , and also some tools for studying its cohomology in terms of locally constant sheaves. We also conjecture how these tools would adapt to linearized gravity on other backgrounds and to other gauge theories. The presentation includes explicit formulas for the differential operators in the Calabi complex, arguments for its local exactness, discussion of generalized Poincaré duality, methods of computing the cohomology of locally constant sheaves, and example calculations of Killing sheaf cohomologies of some black hole and cosmological Lorentzian manifolds.

  14. 75 FR 62469 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from October 26, 2010... scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance previously authorized for two six-week closures from July 5...

  15. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Gable, Thomas D.; Windels, Steve K.; Bruggink, John G.; Homkes, Austin T.

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers. PMID:27992441

  16. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Gable, Thomas D; Windels, Steve K; Bruggink, John G; Homkes, Austin T

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers.

  17. Infective Endocarditis and Phlebotomies May Have Killed Mozart

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-five year-old Amadeus Mozart died in Vienna after an acute illness that lasted only 15 days but no consensus has been reached on the cause of his death. From many letters written by his farther it is almost certain that he experienced at least three episodes of acute rheumatic fever attack in his childhood, and a relapse of rheumatic fever was suggested to have killed Mozart, although death from acute rheumatic fever is very rare in adults. His last illness was characterized by high fever, massive edema, vomiting and skin rash. His last illness can be explained by infectious endocarditis and heart failure. During his last hours, he was given phlebotomy, possibly for the third time in two weeks, and soon after he became unconscious and died. As such, phlebotomy performed on a man dehydrated by high fever and vomiting may have caused systemic shock. In summary, Mozart probably died from chronic rheumatic heart disease complicated by infective endocarditis and heart failure, and repeated phlebotomy-induced hypovolemic shock. PMID:21267381

  18. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  19. Infective endocarditis and phlebotomies may have killed mozart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon Jong-Koo

    2010-12-01

    Thirty-five year-old Amadeus Mozart died in Vienna after an acute illness that lasted only 15 days but no consensus has been reached on the cause of his death. From many letters written by his farther it is almost certain that he experienced at least three episodes of acute rheumatic fever attack in his childhood, and a relapse of rheumatic fever was suggested to have killed Mozart, although death from acute rheumatic fever is very rare in adults. His last illness was characterized by high fever, massive edema, vomiting and skin rash. His last illness can be explained by infectious endocarditis and heart failure. During his last hours, he was given phlebotomy, possibly for the third time in two weeks, and soon after he became unconscious and died. As such, phlebotomy performed on a man dehydrated by high fever and vomiting may have caused systemic shock. In summary, Mozart probably died from chronic rheumatic heart disease complicated by infective endocarditis and heart failure, and repeated phlebotomy-induced hypovolemic shock.

  20. The exopolysaccharide alginate protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from IFN-gamma-mediated macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Leid, Jeff G; Willson, Carey J; Shirtliff, Mark E; Hassett, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Jeffers, Alyssa K

    2005-12-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilms and cause chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is well documented. Numerous studies have revealed that P. aeruginosa biofilms are highly refractory to antibiotics. However, dramatically fewer studies have addressed P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance to the host's immune system. In planktonic, unattached (nonbiofilm) P. aeruginosa, the exopolysaccharide alginate provides protection against a variety of host factors yet the role of alginate in protection of biofilm bacteria is unclear. To address this issue, we tested wild-type strains PAO1, PA14, the mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate, FRD1 (mucA22+), and the respective isogenic mutants which lacked the ability to produce alginate, for their susceptibility to human leukocytes in the presence and absence of IFN-gamma. Human leukocytes, in the presence of recombinant human IFN-gamma, killed biofilm bacteria lacking alginate after a 4-h challenge at 37 degrees C. Bacterial killing was dependent on the presence of IFN-gamma. Killing of the alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was mediated through mononuclear cell phagocytosis since treatment with cytochalasin B, which prevents actin polymerization, inhibited leukocyte-specific bacterial killing. By direct microscopic observation, phagocytosis of alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was significantly increased in the presence of IFN-gamma vs all other treatments. Addition of exogenous, purified alginate to the alginate-negative biofilms restored resistance to human leukocyte killing. Our results suggest that although alginate may not play a significant role in bacterial attachment, biofilm development, and formation, it may play an important role in protecting mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from the human immune system.

  1. Heterosigma bloom and associated fish kill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Postel, J.R.; Taub, F.B.

    1997-01-01

    A bloom of the harmful marine phytoplankton, Heterosigma carterae occurred in upper Case Inlet, south Puget Sound, Washington in late September, 1994, correlating with the presence of at least 35 dead salmon. This marks the first time that this alga has been closely correlated with a wild fish kill; in the past it was thought to be associated with kills of penned fish at fish farms only. We were informed of the presence of a possible harmful algal bloom and dead salinois Ilear the town of Allyn on 27 September and a team was formed to investigate. We arrived at the Allyn waterfront at 17:30 hours the same day. Prior to our arrival, state agency personnel walked approximatcly two miles of shoreline from the powerlines north of the dock, to the mouth of Sherwood Creek and conducted the only official count of dead fish present along the shore consisting of 12 coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), 11 chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), 12 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), one flat fish, and one sculpin on the morning of 9/27. Since previous harmful blooms of Heterosigma have resultedin the majority of net penreared salmon sinking to the bottom of pens, and only approximately two miles of shoreline were sampled, it is suspected that many more exposed fish may have succumbed than were counted. Witnesses who explored the east side of the bay reported seeing many dead salmon there as well, but no counts were made. State agency personnel who observed the fish kill reported seeing “dying fish coming to the beach, gulping at the surface, trying to get out of the water” Scavengers were seen consuming the salmon carcasses; these included two harbor seals, a house cat, and Hymenopteran insects. None suffered any noticeable acute ill effects. Although precise cause of death has not been ascertained, visual inspection of the reproductive organs from a deceased male chum salmon found on the shore at Allyn confirmed that the fish was not yet reproductively mature and

  2. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Using Chemoattractants to Lure Bacteria to Contact-Killing Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishabh; Faith, Nancy G; Milkowski, Andrew; Nelson, Kevin; Busche, David; Lynn, David M; Czuprynski, Charles J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-05-04

    Antimicrobial surfaces with covalently attached biocidal functionalities only kill microbes that come into direct contact with the surfaces (contact-killing surfaces). Herein, the activity of contact-killing surfaces is shown to be enhanced by using gradients in the concentration of soluble chemoattractants (CAs) to attract bacteria to the surfaces. Two natural and nonbiocidal CAs (aspartate and glucose) were used to attract bacteria to model surfaces decorated with quaternary ammonium groups (known to kill bacteria that come into contact with them). These results demonstrate the killing of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, two common pathogens, at levels 10- to 20-times greater than that of the native surfaces alone. This approach is general and provides new strategies for the design of active or dynamic contact-killing surfaces with enhanced antimicrobial activities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chronic myeloid leukemia in children: clinical findings, management, and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Nobuko; Millot, Frederic; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2015-02-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a rare disease in children. There is little evidence of biological differences between CML in children and adults, although host factors are different. Children develop distinct morbidities related to the off-target effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The goal of treatment in children should be cure rather than suppression of disease, which can be the treatment goal for many older adults. This article reviews data from the literature on the treatment of CML, discusses the issues that are unique to CML in children, and recommends management that takes these issues into consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Case of Extreme Thrombocytosis Causing Syncope and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Brittany; Kadhem, Salam; Truong, Quoc

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a hematologic malignancy characterized by unregulated growth of myelogenous leukocytes, typically presents with symptoms of fatigue, anorexia, and splenomegaly. Laboratory studies often reveal a significant leukocytosis with neutrophilia. A moderate thrombocytosis may be present, but is not usually problematic. The following case discusses a patient who presented with syncope, a convulsive episode, and non ST-segment myocardial infarction secondary to symptomatic thrombocytosis of 2.5 million cells/microL. She was treated with plateletpheresis and subsequently experienced resolution of symptoms. Ultimately, a diagnosis of CML with an atypical presentation of the disease was identified in this patient. PMID:27004153

  6. Stratification of de novo adult acute myelogenous leukemia with adverse-risk karyotype: can we overcome the worse prognosis of adverse-risk group acute myelogenous leukemia with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype is a powerful prognostic factor for complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS) in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Adverse-risk karyotype AML is now treated with intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) to overcome relapse. We attempted to stratify patients with this disease using a combination of known factors. We evaluated clinical correlates in 211 adults with AML and adverse-risk karyotypes. We divided the patients into several subgroups based on the number of chromosomal aberrations (NCAs), normal karyotype (NK) mosaicism, and monosomal karyotype (MK) status. CR rates and survival outcomes were compared among the subgroups, and the relapse rate was calculated in the allo-HSCT subgroup. The cutoff of NCA ≥ 5 showed the worst OS (P < .001) compared with NCA ≥ 3 or NCA ≥ 4 even after allo-HSCT. NK mosaicism significantly improved OS in both the NCA <5 (P = .024) and NCA ≥ 5 (P = .030) subgroups, but after allo-HSCT, it showed a favorable effect only in the NCA <5 subgroup. MK showed worse OS (P = .041), but there was no significantly worse effect after allo-HSCT compared with non-MK. Finally, we stratified patients into 4 subgroups, NCA ≥ 5 and NCA <5 with and without NK mosaicism. The most favorable OS and lower relapse rate after allo-HSCT were achieved by the NCA <5 with NK mosaicism subgroup, and the NCA ≥ 5 without NK mosaicism subgroup showed the worst prognosis in both entire group and allo-HSCT subgroup analysis. This study reveals that the combination of NCA and NK mosaicism may predict survival outcomes accurately, and suggests that novel treatment strategies for highly adverse-risk group AML should be tailored in the future.

  7. f(R)-gravity from Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2016-04-01

    We consider f(R)-gravity in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime with zero spatial curvature. We apply the Killing tensors of the minisuperspace in order to specify the functional form of f(R) and for the field equations to be invariant under Lie-Bäcklund transformations, which are linear in momentum (contact symmetries). Consequently, the field equations to admit quadratic conservation laws given by Noether’s theorem. We find three new integrable f(R)-models, for which, with the application of the conservation laws, we reduce the field equations to a system of two first-order ordinary differential equations. For each model we study the evolution of the cosmological fluid. We find that for each integrable model the cosmological fluid has an equation of state parameter, in which there is linear behavior in terms of the scale factor which describes the Chevallier, Polarski and Linder parametric dark energy model.

  8. Killing, letting die and moral perception.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant

    1994-10-01

    There are a number of arguments that purport to show, in general terms, that there is no difference between killing and letting die. These are used to justify active euthanasia on the basis of the reasons given for allowing patients to die. I argue that the general and abstract arguments fail to take account of the complex and particular situations which are found in the care of those with terminal illness. When in such situations, there are perceptions and intuitions available that do not easily find propositional form but lead most of those whose practice is in the care of the dying to resist active euthanasia. I make a plea for their intuitions to be heeded above the sterile voice of abstract premises and arguments by examining the completeness of the outline form of the pro-euthanasia argument. In doing so, I make use of Nussbaum's discussion of moral perception and general claims to be found in the literature of moral particularism.

  9. Advanced gel propulsion controls for kill vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, W. K.; Olson, A.; Finato, S.

    1993-06-01

    A gel propulsion control concept for tactical applications is reviewed, and the status of the individual component technologies currently under development at the Aerojet Propulsion Division is discussed. It is concluded that a gel propellant Divert and Attitude Control Subsystem (DACS) provides a safe, insensitive munitions compliant alternative to current liquid Theater Missile Defense (TMD) DACS approaches. The gel kill vehicle (KV) control system packages a total impulse typical of a tactical weapon interceptor for the ground- or sea-based TMD systems. High density packaging makes it possible to increase firepower and to eliminate long-term high pressure gas storage associated with bipropellant systems. The integrated control subsystem technologies encompass solid propellant gas generators, insulated composite overwrapped propellant tanks, lightweight endoatmospheric thrusters, and insensitive munition gel propellants, which meet the requirements of a deployable, operationally safe KV.

  10. Killing Sections and Sigma Models with Lie Algebroid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Andrew James

    2016-08-01

    We define and examine the notion of a Killing section of a Riemannian Lie algebroid as a natural generalisation of a Killing vector field. We show that the various expression for a vector field to be Killing naturally generalise to the setting of Lie algebroids. As an application we examine the internal symmetries of a class of sigma models for which the target space is a Riemannian Lie algebroid. Critical points of these sigma models are interpreted as generalised harmonic maps.

  11. Cholate-dependent killing of Giardia lamblia by human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Gillin, F D; Reiner, D S; Gault, M J

    1985-01-01

    We showed previously that nonimmune human milk (NHM) kills Giardia lamblia trophozoites in vitro and presented evidence that killing requires the bile salt-stimulated lipase of milk. Since this enzyme is activated by bile salts, killing should be dependent on the presence of bile salts. We now show that killing by fresh NHM or NHM stored at -70 degrees C is totally dependent on sodium cholate (a bile salt). With less than 0.4 mM cholate, no parasites were killed, whereas with 1 mM cholate, greater than 99.7% were killed by 5% NHM in 30 min. Moreover, killing activity was completely heat labile. The G. lamblia-killing activity of human milk was greatly altered by storage at -10 or -20 degrees C. In less than 23 days, the 50% lethal dose decreased, cholate dependence was lost, and killing activity became heat stable. In contrast, the activity of milk stored at -70 degrees C remained unchanged. Milk lipase activity, like killing activity, became cholate independent during storage at -10 or -20 degrees C. On the basis of these results, we hypothesize that killing of G. lamblia by fresh NHM or NHM stored at -70 degrees C depends on bile salt-stimulated lipase, which must be activated by bile salts. In contrast, NHM stored at -20 degrees C accumulated free fatty acids which kill G. lamblia. In support of this thesis, milk stored at -10 degrees C had a concentration of 18.7 mM free fatty acids compared with only 1.1 mM in an identical sample stored at -70 degrees C. PMID:3972442

  12. Roles of antibodies and complement in phagocytic killing of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Arduino, R C; Murray, B E; Rakita, R M

    1994-01-01

    The contributions of complement and antibodies to polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-mediated killing of enterococci were investigated with pooled normal human serum (PNHS) or immune human sera (IHS) from patients with serious enterococcal infections. Each IHS containing antienterococcal antibodies demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting (immunoblotting) was examined with the enterococcus strain isolated from the same patient. PNHS promoted PMN-mediated killing of enterococci similar to that for IHS. PMN-mediated killing was consistently abrogated after preopsonization with heat-inactivated PNHS, but some heat-inactivated IHS supported neutrophil bactericidal activity. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by chelation of either PNHS or IHS with Mg-EGTA [Mg-ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] did not alter PMN-mediated killing, suggesting that activation of the alternative pathway of complement is sufficient to promote killing of enterococci by PMNs. PMN-mediated killing assays were also performed with normal rabbit serum and immune rabbit serum against enterococci. Preopsonization with heat-inactivated immune rabbit serum resulted in PMN-mediated killing of enterococci, which was ablated after adsorption of the serum with the same isolate used for immunization. The influence of different phenotypic enterococcal traits on neutrophil-mediated killing was also investigated. Similar kinetics of killing were observed for derivatives of Enterococcus faecalis strains regardless of resistance to antimicrobial agents or production of beta-lactamase, hemolysin, gelatinase, or surface proteins involved in the aggregative response to pheromones. In summary, PMN-mediated killing of enterococci appears to depend primarily on complement activation by either the classical or the alternative pathway. Human antienterococcal antibodies generated during infection variably promoted neutrophil bactericidal

  13. Transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seoung Dal

    2015-04-01

    On a closed, connected Riemannian manifold with a Kähler foliation of codimension q = 2 m, any transverse Killing r(≥ 2) -form is parallel (Jung and Jung, 2012). In this paper, we study transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations. In fact, if the foliation is minimal, then for any transverse conformal Killing r-form ϕ(2 ≤ r ≤ q - 2), Jϕ is parallel. Here J is defined in Section 4.

  14. Picloram herbicide for killing chaparral species...a preliminary rating

    Treesearch

    Lisle R. Green; Joe R. Goodin; Theordore R. Plumb

    1966-01-01

    Picloram, in spray and pellet forms, was tested for its ability to kill chaparral species at several sites in southern California, in 1963. This herbicide proved to be as effective as brushkiller (2.4-D and 2,4, 5-T) or slightly more so. Both herbicides kilIed chamise readily at low rates, but failed to kill scrub oak. Kill of other species varied between these two...

  15. Killing spinors as a characterisation of rotating black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael J.; Valiente Kroon, Juan A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the implications of the existence of Killing spinors in a spacetime. In particular, we show that in vacuum and electrovacuum a Killing spinor, along with some assumptions on the associated Killing vector in an asymptotic region, guarantees that the spacetime is locally isometric to the Kerr or Kerr-Newman solutions. We show that the characterisation of these spacetimes in terms of Killing spinors is an alternative expression of characterisation results of Mars (Kerr) and Wong (Kerr-Newman) involving restrictions on the Weyl curvature and matter content.

  16. Killing-Yano tensors of order n - 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The properties of a Killing-Yano tensor of order n-1 in an n-dimensional manifold are investigated. The integrability conditions are worked out and all metrics admitting a Killing-Yano tensor of order n-1 are found. A connection between such tensors and a generalization of the concept of angular momentum is pointed out. A theorem on how to generate closed conformal Killing vectors using the symmetries of a manifold is proved and used to find all Killing-Yano tensors of order n-1 of a maximally symmetric space.

  17. Advancements in dynamic kill calculations for blowout wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouba, G.E. . Production Fluids Div.); MacDougall, G.R. ); Schumacher, B.W. . Information Technology Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses the development, interpretation, and use of dynamic kill equations. To this end, three simple calculation techniques are developed for determining the minimum dynamic kill rate. Two techniques contain only single-phase calculations and are independent of reservoir inflow performance. Despite these limitations, these two methods are useful for bracketing the minimum flow rates necessary to kill a blowing well. For the third technique, a simplified mechanistic multiphase-flow model is used to determine a most-probable minimum kill rate.

  18. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  19. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect.

    PubMed

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-23

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  20. The Prospective Collection, Storage and Reporting of Data on Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Utilizing a Standard Preparative Regimen

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-25

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Germ Cell Neoplasms; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Immunodeficiency Diseases

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Pentostatin and Low Dose TBI With Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-02

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Multiple Myeloma; Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma; Hodgkins Disease; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

  2. T-Cell Depleted Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-07

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Lymphoid Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Malignant Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Anemia, Aplastic; Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Basiliximab #2: In-Vivo Activated T-Cell Depletion to Prevent Graft-Versus_Host Disease (GVHD) After Nonmyeloablative Allotransplantation for the Treatment of Blood Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelofibrosis; Anemia, Aplastic; Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal

  4. Pooled Unrelated Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant For Hematologic Malignancy Needing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Without Related HLA-Match

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-21

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Hodgkins Disease; Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  5. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Subcutaneous Plerixafor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Related Donors Donating PBSC to a Family Member; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  6. In-Vivo Activated T-Cell Depletion to Prevent GVHD

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-26

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelofibrosis

  7. Trial of Donor Lymphocyte Infusion (DLI) and Activated DLI Following Relapse After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-26

    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  8. Haploidentical Allogeneic Transplant With Post-transplant Infusion of Regulatory T-cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    Leukemia, Acute; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

  9. On the Lie subalgebra of Killing-Milne and Killing-Cartan vector fields in Newtonian spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The Galilean (and more generally Milne) invariance of Newtonian theory allows for Killing vector fields of a general kind, whereby the Lie derivative of a field is not required to vanish but only to be cancellable by some infinitesimal Galilean (respectively Milne) gauge transformation. In this paper, it is shown that both the Killing-Milne vector fields, which preserve the background Newtonian spacetime structure and the Killing-Cartan vector fields, which in addition preserve the gravitational field, form a Lie subalgebra.

  10. Differential effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, B; Samadi, N; Baradaran, B; Rameshknia, V; Shafiei-Irannejad, V; Majidinia, M; Targhaze, N; Zarghami, N

    2015-12-30

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is still a main obstacle for the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancers. Therefore, identification of safe and effective MDR reversing compounds with minimal adverse side effects is an important approach in the cancer treatment. Studies show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARs) ligands can inhibit cell growth in many cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of different PPAR agonists include fenofibrate, troglitazone and aleglitazar on doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells. The effects of doxorubicin (DOX) following treatment with PPAR agonists on cell viability were evaluated using MTT assay and the reversal fold (RF) values. Rhodamine123 (Rh123) assays were used to determine P-gp functioning. P-gp mRNA/protein expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis after incubation with troglitazone and aleglitazar. Our results showed that troglitazone and aleglitazar significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and decreased the RF values in K562/DOX cells, however, no such results were found for fenofibrate. Troglitazone and aleglitazar significantly down regulated P-gp expression in K562/DOX cells; in addition, the present study revealed that aleglitazar elevated intracellular accumulation of Rh123in K562/DOX cells as short-term effects, which also contribute to the reversal of MDR. These findings show that troglitazone and especially aleglitazar exhibited potent effects in the reversal of P-gp-mediated MDR, suggesting that these compounds may be effective for combination therapy strategies and circumventing MDR in K562/DOX cells to other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts.

  12. Prolonged infusion of gemcitabine: clinical and pharmacodynamic studies during a phase I trial in relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Du, Min; Ayres, Mary; Estey, Elihu H

    2002-02-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated duration of infusions at the fixed gemcitabine dose rate of 10 mg/m(2)/min and to analyze the pharmacodynamic actions in leukemia blasts during gemcitabine therapy. The study was conducted in a phase I trial by escalating the duration of gemcitabine infusion at a fixed-dose rate of 10 mg/m(2)/min. Patients with relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) received gemcitabine for 8.0 (n = 3), 10.0 (n = 3), 12.5 (n = 8), 15.5 (n = 3), or 18.0 hours (n = 2). Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic investigations were undertaken in circulating AML blasts. Gemcitabine was infused for up to 18 hours at the fixed-dose rate. Four patients had grade 3 toxicities at longer infusion schedules. One patient had a partial remission; two others had a reduction in blasts and concomitant rise in neutrophils. Gemcitabine triphosphate was detectable in AML cells even at 1 hour after the start of infusion in eight patients. The concentration ranged from 130 to 900 micromol/L at the end of the infusion. Consistently, there was a rapid decline in DNA synthesis, which remained suppressed at 85% to 95% during and for at least 10 hours after the end of the infusion. Compared with levels in cells measured before therapy, at 8 hours after the start of the infusion, there was a decline in the cellular purine deoxynucleotide pools. At the fixed-dose rate of 10 mg/m(2)/min, gemcitabine could be administered for longer than 12 hours without untoward toxicity. The favorable toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features warrant combination with DNA-damaging agents.

  13. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome-acute myelogenous leukemia in patients treated for acute promyelocytic leukemia: an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Latagliata, Roberto; Petti, Maria Concetta; Fenu, Susanna; Mancini, Marco; Spiriti, Maria Antonietta Aloe; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio A; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Lo Coco, Francesco; Mandelli, Franco

    2002-02-01

    The use of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in combination with chemotherapy has markedly improved the prognosis for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL); the higher complete remission (CR) and survival rates now reported in this disease almost approach those obtained for other highly curable hematologic malignancies. Of 77 patients with APL who were consecutively treated at a single institution and who achieved CR after induction and consolidation therapy, 5 (6.5%) acquired therapy-related myelodysplasia (tMDS), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), or both (tMDS-AML). Of these, 3 of 46 (6.5%) patients received front-line chemotherapy with or without ATRA and acquired tMDS-AML while in first remission of APL. Two underwent repeated chemotherapy cycles with ATRA because of APL relapse and acquired tMDS-AML while in the second or third remission of APL. In 2 patients, clinical and biologic characteristics of tMDS-AML were as expected for postalkylating forms (long latency, MDS phase preceding AML, karyotypic aberrations involving chromosomes 5 or 7), even though one of them had not previously received alkylating drugs. Three of the 5 patients died shortly after tMDS-AML diagnosis, one is alive with tMDS, and one is alive and in CR after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The occurrence of tMDS-AML after successful therapy for APL is an emerging problem. The availability of prognostic score systems at initial diagnosis and monitoring of residual disease by polymerase chain reaction might allow better tailoring of treatment intensity in APL to spare unnecessary toxicity and to minimize the risk for tMDS-AML in patients who are presumably cured.

  14. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Fremin, Brayon J.; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Manzo, Veronica E.; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A.; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S.; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods. Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results. All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9–20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions. The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26269794

  15. Characterization of Purine-Rich Element Binding Protein B as a Novel Biomarker in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Prognostication.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Robert J; Lamba, Gurpreet S; Levis, Jamie E; Holmes, Chris E

    2017-08-23

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)(1) is an aggressive hematologic cancer characterized by infiltration of proliferative, clonal, abnormally differentiated cells of myeloid lineage in the bone marrow and blood. Malignant cells in AML often exhibit chromosomal and other genetic or epigenetic abnormalities that are useful in prognostic risk assessment. In this study, the relative expression and novel single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding function of purine-rich element binding proteins A and B (Purα and Purβ) were systematically evaluated in established leukemia cell lines and in lineage committed myeloid cells isolated from patients diagnosed with a hematologic malignancy. Western blotting revealed that the Purα and Purβ are markedly elevated in CD33(+) /CD66b(+) cells from AML patients compared to healthy subjects and to patients with other types of myeloid cell disorders. Results of in silico database analysis of PURA and PURB mRNA expression during hematopoiesis in conjunction with the quantitative immunoassay of the ssDNA-binding activities of Purα and Purβ in transformed leukocyte cell lines pointed to Purβ as the more distinguishing biomarker of myeloid cell differentiation status. Purβ ssDNA-binding activity was significantly increased in myeloid cells from AML patients but not from individuals with other myeloid-related diseases. The highest levels of Purβ activity were detected in myeloid cells from primary AML patients and from AML patients displaying other risk factors forecasting a poor prognosis. Collectively, these findings suggest that the enhanced ssDNA-binding activity of Purβ in transformed myeloid cells may serve as a unique and measurable phenotypic trait for improving prognostic risk stratification in AML. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. WP1066 disrupts Janus kinase-2 and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Van, Quin; Koch, Patricia; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Wang, Yongtao; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Priebe, Waldemar; Estrov, Zeev

    2007-12-01

    Several cytokines and growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells transduce their signals by activating the transcription factor Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2). Accordingly, the inhibition of JAK2 or of its downstream signaling pathways suppresses the proliferation of AML cells. Because (E)-3(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-((S0-1-phenylethyl)acrylamide) (WP1066) is a novel analogue of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, we tested its activity in AML cells and investigated its mechanism of action. Using clonogenic assays, we found that although WP1066 had a marginal effect on normal marrow progenitors, it inhibited the proliferation of AML colony-forming cells obtained from patients with newly diagnosed AML and that of the AML cell lines OCIM2 and K562. WP1066 inhibited OCIM2 cell multiplication by inducing accumulation of cells at the G(0)-G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Similar to its parent compound AG490, WP1066 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2, but unlike AG490, WP1066 also degraded JAK2 protein, thereby blocking its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathways. These effects resulted in the activation of the caspase pathway. Incubation of both OCIM2 and K562 cells with WP1066 activated caspase-3, induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caused caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Thus, WP1066 is a potent JAK2 inhibitor whose effects in AML and other hematologic malignancies merit further investigation.

  17. Impact of physician assistants on the outcomes of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia receiving chemotherapy in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Glotzbecker, Brett E; Yolin-Raley, Deborah S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Soiffer, Robert J; Alyea, Edwin P

    2013-09-01

    Inpatient academic medical center care historically has been delivered by faculty physicians in conjunction with physicians in training (house officers [HOs]). Alternative staffing models have emerged secondary to American Counsel for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) care provided by a physician assistant (PA) service compared with a traditional model. Data were retrospectively collected on patients admitted with AML for reinduction chemotherapy from 2008 to 2012. Primary outcome measures were inpatient mortality and length of stay (LOS). Secondary measures included readmissions, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, consults requested, and radiologic studies ordered. Ninety-five patients with AML were reviewed. Forty-seven patients (49.5%) were admitted to the HO service, and 48 patients (50.5%) were admitted to the PA service. Demographic data were similar between services. LOS was significantly different between the services, with a mean of 36.8 days with the HO model compared with 30.9 days with the PA service (P=.03). The 14-day readmission rate also differed significantly; it was 10.6% (five of 47 patients) and zero for the HO and PA models, respectively (P=.03). The mean number of consults with the HO model was 2.11 (range, zero to five) versus 1.47 (range, zero to four) with the PA service (P=.03). Mortality and ICU transfers were not significantly different. The data demonstrate equivalent mortality and ICU transfers, with a decrease in LOS, readmission rates, and consults for patients cared for in the PA service. This suggests that the PA service is associated with increased operational efficiency and decreased health service use without compromising health care outcomes.

  18. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2–M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:27563575

  19. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  20. Killing a Peacock: A Case Study of the Targeted Killing of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    operation to kill Yamamoto. Lastly, analysis of the end, the aftermath of mission, will give insight into its effectiveness. Examining the immediate...section carries the greatest significance for current and future operations of this nature. Analysis of the circumstances surrounding the decision...on his dash. Mitscher had come through. Likewise, the other pilots strapped in their aircraft as the mechanics buttoned up the last of the open