Science.gov

Sample records for kilowatt power range

  1. Kilowatt Isotope Power System: component test report for the Ground Demonstration System Alternator Stator

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, E.L.

    1978-04-25

    Results are presented of acceptance tests conducted on the Alternator Stator, S/N 002, for the Kilowatt Isotope Power System. These results show that the Alternator Stator, S/N 002 for the Kilowatt Isotope Power System has satisfactorily completed the testing set forth within Sundstrand Test Specification 2538. Test requirements of TS 2538 were extracted from the Kilowatt Isotope Power System, and Phase I Test Plan.

  2. Flowing-water optical power meter for primary-standard, multi-kilowatt laser power measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. A.; Hadler, J. A.; Cromer, C.; West, J.; Li, X.; Lehman, J. H.

    2018-06-01

    A primary-standard flowing-water optical power meter for measuring multi-kilowatt laser emission has been built and operated. The design and operational details of this primary standard are described, and a full uncertainty analysis is provided covering the measurement range from 1–10 kW with an expanded uncertainty of 1.2%. Validating measurements at 5 kW and 10 kW show agreement with other measurement techniques to within the measurement uncertainty. This work of the U.S. Government is not subject to U.S. copyright.

  3. Multi-kilowatt modularized spacecraft power processing system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. E.; Hayden, J. H.; Hedges, R. T.; Rehmann, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A review of existing information pertaining to spacecraft power processing systems and equipment was accomplished with a view towards applicability to the modularization of multi-kilowatt power processors. Power requirements for future spacecraft were determined from the NASA mission model-shuttle systems payload data study which provided the limits for modular power equipment capabilities. Three power processing systems were compared to evaluation criteria to select the system best suited for modularity. The shunt regulated direct energy transfer system was selected by this analysis for a conceptual design effort which produced equipment specifications, schematics, envelope drawings, and power module configurations.

  4. Kilowatt-Class Fission Power Systems for Science and Human Precursor Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Gibson, Marc Andrew; Poston, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power provides an enabling capability for NASA missions that might otherwise be constrained by power availability, mission duration, or operational robustness. NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing fission power technology to serve a wide range of future space uses. Advantages include lower mass, longer life, and greater mission flexibility than competing power system options. Kilowatt-class fission systems, designated "Kilopower," were conceived to address the need for systems to fill the gap above the current 100-W-class radioisotope power systems being developed for science missions and below the typical 100-k We-class reactor power systems being developed for human exploration missions. This paper reviews the current fission technology project and examines some Kilopower concepts that could be used to support future science missions or human precursors.

  5. Kilowatt-Class Fission Power Systems for Science and Human Precursor Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Gibson, Marc; Poston, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power provides an enabling capability for NASA missions that might otherwise be constrained by power availability, mission duration, or operational robustness. NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing fission power technology to serve a wide range of future space uses. Advantages include lower mass, longer life, and greater mission flexibility than competing power system options. Kilowatt-class fission systems, designated "Kilopower," were conceived to address the need for systems to fill the gap above the current 100-Wclass radioisotope power systems being developed for science missions and below the typical 100-kWe-class reactor power systems being developed for human exploration missions. This paper reviews the current fission technology project and examines some Kilopower concepts that could be used to support future science missions or human precursors.

  6. Organic Rankine Kilowatt Isotope Power System. Final phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1978-07-15

    On 1 August 1975 under Department of Energy Contract EN-77-C-02-4299, Sundstrand Energy Systems commenced development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) directed toward satisfying the higher power requirements of satellites of the 1980s and beyond. The KIPS is a /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system which will provide design output power in the range of 500 to 2000 W/sub (e)/ with a minimum of system changes. The principal objectives of the Phase 1 development effort were to: conceptually design a flight system; design a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) that is prototypic of the flight systemmore » in order to prove the feasibility of the flight system design; fabricate and assemble the GDS; and performance and endurance test the GDS using electric heaters in lieu of the isotope heat source. Results of the work performed under the Phase 1 contract to 1 July 1978 are presented.« less

  7. A 20,000-Kilowatt Nuclear Turboelectric Power Supply for Manned Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E.; Slone, Henry O.; Bernatowicz, Daniel T.; Davison, Elmer H.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1959-01-01

    A conceptual design of a nuclear turboelectric powerplant, producing 20,000 kilowatts of power suitable for manned space vehicles is presented. The study indicates that the radiator necessary for rejecting cycle waste heat is the dominant weight, and emphasis is placed on the selection of cycle operating conditions in order to reduce this weight. A thermodynamic cycle using sodium vapor as the working fluid and operating at a turbine-inlet temperature of 2500 R was selected. The total powerplant weight was calculated to be approximately 6 pounds per kilowatt. The radiator contributes approximately 2.1 pounds per kilowatt to the total weight and the reactor and reactor shield contribute approximately 0.24 and 1.2 pounds per kilowatt, respectively. The generator, turbine, and piping add significantly to the total weight (between 0.5 and 0.6 lb/kw), but the heat exchanger, pumps, and so on are less important. Several important research areas associated with the development of a reliable nuclear turboelectric powerplant of the type analyzed are discussed.

  8. Nuclear power plant 5,000 to 10,000 kilowatts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    The purpose of this proposal is to present a suggested program for the development of an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor Power Plant for the production of power in the 5000 to 10,000 kilowatt range under the terms of the Atomic Energy Commission's invitation of September 21, 1955. It envisions a research and development program prior to finalizing fabricating commitments of full scale components for the purpose of proving mechanical and hydraulic operating and chemical processing feasibility with the expectation that such preliminary effort will assure the contruction of the reactor at the lowest cost and successful operation at the earliest date.more » It proposes the construction of a reactor for an eventual net electrical output of ten megawatts but initially in conjunction with a five megawatt turbo-generating unit. This unit would be constructed at the site of the existing Hersey diesel generating plant of the Wolverine Electric Cooperative approximately ten miles north of Big Rapids, Michigan.« less

  9. Overview of Multi-Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at GRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-01

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center. Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October, 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  10. Overview of Multi-kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-01

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center. Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October, 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  11. A parametric study of motor starting for a 2- to 10-kilowatt Brayton power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantoni, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    A study of the motor starting of a Brayton cycle power system was conducted to provide estimates of system sensitivity to several controllable parameters. These sensitivity estimates were used as a basis for selection of an optimum motor-start scheme to be implemented on the 2- to 10-kilowatt Brayton power system designed and presently under test. The studies were conducted with an analog simulation of the Brayton power system and covered a range of frequencies from 400 Hz (33 percent design) to 1200 Hz (design), voltage-to-frequency ratios of 0.050 (50 percent design) to 0.100 (design), turbine-inlet temperatures of 800 K (1440 R, 70 percent design) to 1140 K (2060 deg R, design), and prestart pressure levels of 14.5 psia to 29.0 psia. These studies have shown the effect of selected system variables on motor starting. The final selection of motor-start variables can therefore be made on the basis of motor-start inverter complexity, battery size and weight, desired steady-state pressure level after startup, and other operational limitations. In general, the study showed the time required for motor starting to be inversely proportional to motor frequency, voltage, turbine-inlet temperature, and pressure level. An increase in any of these parameters decreases startup time.

  12. Kilowatt Isotope Power System: component test report for the ground demonstration system alternator stator. 78-KIPS-17

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1977-12-14

    The purpose of this test was to demonstrate that the alternator stator has satisfactorily completed sufficient testing to safisfy the requirements set forth within the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) Component Test Specification for the GDS Alternator Stator (TS 2538). The results of the acceptance tests conducted on the alternator stator, S/N 003, are presented, and show that the stator did meet specified requirements.

  13. Overview of Multi-Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-01

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center (GRC). Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  14. 13. VIEW OF WESTINGHOUSE STEAM TURBINE. 1500 kilowatt (max kw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF WESTINGHOUSE STEAM TURBINE. 1500 kilowatt (max kw 1875). AC Westinghouse generator (1875 KVA, 2400 volts, 450 amps, 3 phase, 60 cycles). - Juniata Shops, Power Plant & Boiler House, East of Fourth Avenue at Second Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  15. Demonstration of a 200-Kilowatt Biomass Fueled Power Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    300 people. Throughout the world there exists tremendous quantities of biomass waste, such as wood waste, rice husks , sugar bagasse, and coconut ...0.07 to 0.10 gallon (0.27 to 0.38 liter) of oil per kilowatt-hour generated. Even at subsidized prices of $1.00/gal ($0.26/liter), the fuel cost alone...for generating electricity amounts to $0.07 to $0.10/kW-hr generated. In many locations where diesel oil prices are $2.00 to $4.00/gal ($0.53 to $1.06

  16. The 200-kilowatt wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The three 200 kilowatt wind turbines described, compose the first of three separate systems. Proposed wind turbines of the two other systems, although similar in design, are larger in both physical size and rated power generation. The overall objective of the project is to obtain early operation and performance data while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. Several of the key issues addressed include the following: (1) impact of the variable power output (due to varying wind speeds) on the utility grid (2) compatibility with utility requirements (voltage and frequency control of generated power) (3) demonstration of unattended, fail-safe operation (4) reliability of the wind turbine system (5) required maintenance and (6) initial public reaction and acceptance.

  17. Kilowatt high-efficiency narrow-linewidth monolithic fiber amplifier operating at 1034 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Nader A.; Flores, Angel; Anderson, Brian M.; Rowland, Ken; Dajani, Iyad

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling investigation of a narrow-linewidth, Ytterbium-doped all-fiber amplifier operating at 1034 nm is presented. Nonlinear stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) effects were suppressed through the utilization of an external phase modulation technique. Here, the power amplifier was seeded with a spectrally broadened master oscillator and the results were compared using both pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) and white noise source (WNS) phase modulation formats. By utilizing an optical band pass filter as well as optimizing the length of fiber used in the pre-amplifier stages, we were able to appreciably suppress unwanted amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Notably, through PRBS phase modulation, greater than two-fold enhancement in threshold power was achieved when compared to the WNS modulated case. Consequently, by further optimizing both the power amplifier length and PRBS pattern at a clock rate of 3.5 GHz, we demonstrated 1 kilowatt of power with a slope efficiency of 81% and an overall ASE content of less than 1%. Beam quality measurements at 1 kilowatt provided near diffraction-limited operation (M2 < 1.2) with no sign of modal instability. To the best of our knowledge, the power scaling results achieved in this work represent the highest power reported for a spectrally narrow all-fiber amplifier operating at < 1040 nm in Yb-doped silica-based fiber.

  18. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  19. 46 CFR 111.52-3 - Systems below 1500 kilowatts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Systems below 1500 kilowatts. 111.52-3 Section 111.52-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Calculation of Short-Circuit Currents § 111.52-3 Systems below 1500 kilowatts. The...

  20. 46 CFR 111.52-3 - Systems below 1500 kilowatts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Systems below 1500 kilowatts. 111.52-3 Section 111.52-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Calculation of Short-Circuit Currents § 111.52-3 Systems below 1500 kilowatts. The...

  1. Introduction to Voigt's wind power plant. [energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The design and operation of a 100 kilowatt wind driven generator are reported. Its high speed three-bladed turbine operates at a height of 50 meters. Blades are rigidly connected to the hub and turbine revolutions change linearly with wind velocity, maintaining a constant speed ratio of blade tip velocity to wind velocity over the full predetermined wind range. Three generators installed in the gondola generate either dc or ac current. Based on local wind conditions, the device has a maximum output of 720 kilowatts at a wind velocity of 16 meters per second. Total electrical capacity is 750 kilowatts, and power output per year is 2,135,000 kilowatt/hours.

  2. A 400 kilowatt argon arc lamp for solar simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Pollack, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A 400 kilowatt argon arc lamp for a solar simulator has been designed, operated, and evaluated. The lamp is designed to produce one solar constant on a test area 4.6 by 9.2 meters when used with a collimator. The divergence angle of the beam is about 1 deg. The lamp is designed to operate completely within a vacuum environment. Over 80 kilowatt of directed radiation was monitored and measured for a 25-hour period during a recent test. In another test, an arc was operated at 400 kilowatt for 110 hours without removal or refurbishing of the electrodes. These tests have proven the cleanliness and integrity of the radiation source.

  3. Synchronization of the DOE/NASA 100-kilowatt wind turbine generator with a large utility network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The DOE/NASA 100 kilowatt wind turbine generator system was synchronized with a large utility network. The system equipments and procedures associated with the synchronization process were described. Time history traces of typical synchronizations were presented indicating that power and current transients resulting from the synchronizing procedure are limited to acceptable magnitudes.

  4. Power And Propulsion Systems For Mobile Robotic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layuan, Li; Haiming, Zou

    1987-02-01

    Choosing the best power and propulsion systems for mobile robotic land vehicle applications requires consideration of technologies. The electric power requirements for onboard electronic and auxiliary equipment include 110/220 volt 60 Hz ac power as well as low voltage dc power. Weight and power are saved by either direct dc power distribution, or high frequency (20 kHz) ac power distribution. Vehicle control functions are performed electronically but steering, braking and traction power may be distributed electrically, mechanically or by fluid (hydraulic) means. Electric drive is practical, even for small vehicles, provided that advanced electric motors are used. Such electric motors have demonstrated power densities of 3.1 kilowatts per kilogram with devices in the 15 kilowatt range. Electric motors have a lower torque, but higher power density as compared to hydraulic or mechanical transmission systems. Power density being comparable, electric drives were selected to best meet the other requirements for robotic vehicles. Two robotic vehicle propulsion system designs are described to illustrate the implementation of electric drive over a vehicle size range of 250-7500 kilograms.

  5. Gas-injection-start and shutdown characteristics of a 2-kilowatt to 15-kilowatt Brayton power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantoni, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Two methods of starting the Brayton power system have been considered: (1) using the alternator as a motor to spin the Brayton rotating unit (BRU), and (2) spinning the BRU by forced gas injection. The first method requires the use of an auxiliary electrical power source. An alternating voltage is applied to the terminals of the alternator to drive it as an induction motor. Only gas-injection starts are discussed in this report. The gas-injection starting method requires high-pressure gas storage and valves to route the gas flow to provide correct BRU rotation. An analog computer simulation was used to size hardware and to determine safe start and shutdown procedures. The simulation was also used to define the range of conditions for successful startups. Experimental data were also obtained under various test conditions. These data verify the validity of the start and shutdown procedures.

  6. High-Power Solar Electric Propulsion for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Hack, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NASA has sought to utilize high-power solar electric propulsion as means of improving the affordability of in-space transportation for almost 50 years. Early efforts focused on 25 to 50 kilowatt systems that could be used with the Space Shuttle, while later efforts focused on systems nearly an order of magnitude higher power that could be used with heavy lift launch vehicles. These efforts never left the concept development phase in part because the technology required was not sufficiently mature. Since 2012 the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate has had a coordinated plan to mature the requisite solar array and electric propulsion technology needed to implement a 30 to 50 kilowatt solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission. Multiple solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission concepts have been developed based on these maturing technologies with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. If implemented, the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle will form the basis for a capability that can be cost-effectively evolved over time to provide solar electric propulsion transportation for a range of follow-on mission applications at power levels in excess of 100 kilowatts.

  7. Photovoltaic power system tests on an 8-kilowatt single-phase line-commutated inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Efficiency and power factor were measured as functions of solar array voltage and current. The effects of input shunt capacitance and series inductance were determined. Tests were conducted from 15 to 75 percent of the 8 kW rated inverter input power. Measured efficiencies ranged from 76 percent to 88 percent at about 50 percent of rated inverter input power. Power factor ranged from 36 percent to 72 percent.

  8. Technology Projections for Solar Dynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    Solar Dynamic power systems can offer many potential benefits to Earth orbiting satellites including high solar-to-electric efficiency, long life without performance degradation, and high power capability. A recent integrated system test of a 2 kilowatt SD power system in a simulated space environment has successfully demonstrated technology readiness for space flight. Conceptual design studies of SD power systems have addressed several potential mission applications: a 10 kilowatt LEO satellite, a low power Space Based Radar, and a 30 kilowatt GEO communications satellite. The studies show that with moderate component development, SD systems can exhibit excellent mass and deployed area characteristics. Using the conceptual design studies as a basis, a SD technology roadmap was generated which identifies the component advances necessary to assure SD systems a competitive advantage for future NASA, DOD, and commercial missions.

  9. Multi-Kilowatt Power Module for High-Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require high-performance electric propulsion systems. Hall thrusters are being developed at NASA Glenn for high-power, high-specific impulse operation. These thrusters operate at power levels up to 50 kW of power and discharge voltages in excess of 600 V. A parallel effort is being conducted to develop power electronics for these thrusters that push the technology beyond the 5kW state-of-the-art power level. A 10 kW power module was designed to produce an output of 500 V and 20 A from a nominal 100 V input. Resistive load tests revealed efficiencies in excess of 96 percent. Load current share and phase synchronization circuits were designed and tested that will allow connecting multiple modules in parallel to process higher power.

  10. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  11. Assessment Of The Stirling Power Option for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2000-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling technology efforts in the past typically were intended to address power needs in the multi-kilowatt range. The Stirling power option was attractive primarily because of the high conversion efficiency and potential for long life. In recent years, several technology efforts have focused on the free-piston Stirling power d convertor for space power applications, however the more recent efforts are intended to provide power at levels far below one kilowatt. Through a variety of projects funded by both NASA and DOE, the free-piston Stirling convertor technology has successfully demonstrated high efficiency and long life. Other areas of concern, such as control of multi-convertor systems, and vibration reduction have also been addressed. Efforts are being initiated to address issues such as electro-magnetic interference (EMI), radiation tolerance of organic materials, and the ability to operate through launch loads and survive with integrity. The status of the technology in these areas will be briefly discussed in this paper.

  12. Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-09

    NASA Glenn Technician Mark Springowski works on a 10-kilowatt Stirling Power Conversion Unit, which is part of the Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit. This is a system level demonstration of a surface power system, which could potentially be used to support manned missions to the moon or Mars. A flight system would use 180 kilowatt nuclear fission reactor and four Stirling PCU’s to produce 40 kW of electricity for manned surface missions.

  13. Implementation and Initial Validation of a 100-Kilowatt Class Nested-Channel Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Scott J.; Florenz, Roland E.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Brown, Daniel L.; Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    The X3 is a 100-kilowatt class nested-channel Hall thruster developed by the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory at the University of Michigan in collaboration with the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA. The cathode, magnetic circuit, boron nitride channel rings, and anodes all required specific design considerations during thruster development, and thermal modeling was used to properly account for thermal growth in material selection and component design. A number of facility upgrades were required at the University of Michigan to facilitate operation of the X3. These upgrades included a re-worked propellant feed system, a completely redesigned power and telemetry break-out box, and numerous updates to thruster handling equipment. The X3 was tested on xenon propellant at two current densities, 37% and 73% of the nominal design value. It was operated to a maximum steady-state discharge power of 60.8 kilowatts. The tests presented here served as an initial validation of thruster operation. Thruster behavior was monitored with telemetry, photography and high-speed current probes. The photography showed a uniform plume throughout testing. At constant current density, reductions in mass flow rate of 18% and 26% were observed in the three-channel operating configuration as compared to the superposition of each channel running individually. The high-speed current probes showed that the thruster was stable at all operating points and that the channels influence each other when more than one is operating simultaneously. Additionally, the ratio of peak-to-peak AC-coupled discharge current oscillations to mean discharge current did not exceed 51% for any operating points reported here, and did not exceed 17% at the higher current density.

  14. 46 CFR 111.52-3 - Systems below 1500 kilowatts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Calculation of Short-Circuit Currents § 111.52-3 Systems below 1500 kilowatts. The... maximum short-circuit current of a direct current system must be assumed to be 10 times the aggregate...

  15. 46 CFR 111.52-3 - Systems below 1500 kilowatts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Calculation of Short-Circuit Currents § 111.52-3 Systems below 1500 kilowatts. The... maximum short-circuit current of a direct current system must be assumed to be 10 times the aggregate...

  16. 46 CFR 111.52-3 - Systems below 1500 kilowatts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Calculation of Short-Circuit Currents § 111.52-3 Systems below 1500 kilowatts. The following short-circuit assumptions must be made for a system with an aggregate generating capacity below... maximum short-circuit current of a direct current system must be assumed to be 10 times the aggregate...

  17. Test results and facility description for a 40-kilowatt stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelm, G. G.; Cairelli, J. E.; Walter, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 40 kilowatt Stirling engine, its test support facilities, and the experimental procedures used for these tests are described. Operating experience with the engine is discussed, and some initial test results are presented

  18. Summary Report On Design And Development Of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Power Pile

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, C. R.

    1947-09-15

    This report presents a description of a design for an experimental nuclear power plant utilizing a high temperature gas-cooled power pile as the energy source. The plant consists of the pile, a heat exchanger or boiler, a conventional steam turbine generator and their associated auxiliaries. Helium gas under pressure transfers heat from the pile to the boiler which generates steam for driving the generator. The plant is rated at a normal output of 12,000 kilowatts of heat and an electrical output of 2400 kilowatts. Provision is made for operation up to 20,000 kilowatts of heat (4000 kilowatts of electrical output)more » in the event operation of the plants proves this possible.« less

  19. A Comparison of Brayton and Stirling Space Nuclear Power Systems for Power Levels from 1 Kilowatt to 10 Megawatts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2000-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the performance and mass of Brayton and Stirling nuclear power systems for a wide range of future NASA space exploration missions. The power levels and design concepts were based on three different mission classes. Isotope systems, with power levels from 1 to 10 kW, were considered for planetary surface rovers and robotic science. Reactor power systems for planetary surface outposts and bases were evaluated from 10 to 500 kW. Finally, reactor power systems in the range from 100 kW to 10 mW were assessed for advanced propulsion applications. The analysis also examined the effect of advanced component technology on system performance. The advanced technologies included high temperature materials, lightweight radiators, and high voltage power management and distribution.

  20. ORNL Surges Forward With 20-kilowatt Wireless Charging for Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema

    Onar, Omer

    2018-01-16

    A 20-kilowatt wireless charging system demonstrated at Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has achieved 90 percent efficiency and at three times the rate of the plug-in systems commonly used for electric vehicles today.

  1. 46 CFR 111.52-5 - Systems 1500 kilowatts or above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Systems 1500 kilowatts or above. 111.52-5 Section 111.52-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC... procedure for utility or industrial applications. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR 28279, June 4, 1996, as amended by USCG...

  2. 46 CFR 111.52-5 - Systems 1500 kilowatts or above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Systems 1500 kilowatts or above. 111.52-5 Section 111.52-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC... procedure for utility or industrial applications. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR 28279, June 4, 1996, as amended by USCG...

  3. 46 CFR 111.52-5 - Systems 1500 kilowatts or above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Systems 1500 kilowatts or above. 111.52-5 Section 111.52-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC... procedure for utility or industrial applications. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR 28279, June 4, 1996, as amended by USCG...

  4. 46 CFR 111.52-5 - Systems 1500 kilowatts or above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Systems 1500 kilowatts or above. 111.52-5 Section 111.52-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC... procedure for utility or industrial applications. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR 28279, June 4, 1996, as amended by USCG...

  5. 46 CFR 111.52-5 - Systems 1500 kilowatts or above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Systems 1500 kilowatts or above. 111.52-5 Section 111.52-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC... procedure for utility or industrial applications. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR 28279, June 4, 1996, as amended by USCG...

  6. Green Power Equivalency Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Use this calculator to translate your green power use from kilowatt-hours to more understandable terms, such as the equivalent number of average American homes it could power or miles an electric car could drive.

  7. Baseline tests of the power-train electric delivery van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumannick, S.; Dustin, M. O.; Bozek, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Vehicle maximum speed, range at constant speed, range over stop-and-go driving schedules, maximum acceleration, gradeability, gradeability limit, road energy consumption, road power, indicated energy consumption, braking capability, battery charger efficiency, and battery characteristics were determined for a modified utility van powered by sixteen 6-volt batteries connected in series. A chopper controller actuated by a foot accelerator pedal changes the voltage applied to the 22-kilowatt (30-hp) series-wound drive motor. In addition to the conventional hydraulic braking system, the vehicle has hydraulic regenerative braking. Cycle tests and acceleration tests were conducted with and without hydraulic regeneration.

  8. High power density dc/dc converter: Component selection and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.

    1989-01-01

    Further work pertaining to design considerations for the new high power, high frequency dc/dc converters is discussed. The goal of the project is the development of high power, high power density dc/dc converters at power levels in the multi-kilowatt to megawatt range for aerospace applications. The prototype converter is rated for 50 kW at a switching frequency of 50 kHz, with an input voltage of 200 Vdc and an output of 2000 Vdc. The overall power density must be in the vicinity of 0.2 to 0.3 kg/kW.

  9. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  10. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  11. Study of hydraulic power recovery from New Mexico water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenmackers, R.

    1984-02-01

    The results of a survey of New Mexico water distribution systems suitable for hydroelectric power development are reported. The objectives of the survey were to determine the potential for hydraulic power recovery from existing and planned water systems, to identify potential sites, and to study and recommend promising sites for further development. The survey found eleven sites in New Mexico water distribution systems with a total hydroelectric power potential of 736 kilowatts. Seven of these sites, or 439 kilowatts, could be developed immediately, having everything necessary in place but the turbine generator. These sites are located in the Bonito pipelinemore » near Carrizozo (2 sites), Raton, Ruidoso, Santa Fe, Sugarite, and Taos. If all seven sites were developed, the annual energy production could reach 3,800,000 kilowatt hours.« less

  12. 18 CFR 420.51 - Hydroelectric power plant water use charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... increased hydraulic head available to the hydroelectric project as a result of investments by the Commission shall be charged one mill per kilowatt-hour of energy produced. (2) Owners of hydroelectric power plants... kilowatt-hour of energy produced. No charges for increased flows will be required when charges for...

  13. 18 CFR 420.51 - Hydroelectric power plant water use charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... increased hydraulic head available to the hydroelectric project as a result of investments by the Commission shall be charged one mill per kilowatt-hour of energy produced. (2) Owners of hydroelectric power plants... kilowatt-hour of energy produced. No charges for increased flows will be required when charges for...

  14. 18 CFR 420.51 - Hydroelectric power plant water use charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... increased hydraulic head available to the hydroelectric project as a result of investments by the Commission shall be charged one mill per kilowatt-hour of energy produced. (2) Owners of hydroelectric power plants... kilowatt-hour of energy produced. No charges for increased flows will be required when charges for...

  15. 18 CFR 420.51 - Hydroelectric power plant water use charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... increased hydraulic head available to the hydroelectric project as a result of investments by the Commission shall be charged one mill per kilowatt-hour of energy produced. (2) Owners of hydroelectric power plants... kilowatt-hour of energy produced. No charges for increased flows will be required when charges for...

  16. Generating a high brightness multi-kilowatt laser by dense spectral combination of VBG stabilized single emitter laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, H.; Koch, Ralf; Krusche, B.; Ferrario, F.; Grohe, Andreas; Pflueger, S.; Gries, W.

    2014-05-01

    Generating high power laser radiation with diode lasers is commonly realized by geometrical stacking of diode bars, which results in high output power but poor beam parameter product (BPP). The accessible brightness in this approach is limited by the fill factor, both in slow and fast axis. By using a geometry that accesses the BPP of the individual diodes, generating a multi kilowatt diode laser with a BPP comparable to fiber lasers is possible. We will demonstrate such a modular approach for generating multi kilowatt lasers by combining single emitter diode lasers. Single emitter diodes have advantages over bars, mainly a simplified cooling, better reliability and a higher brightness per emitter. Additionally, because single emitters can be arranged in many different geometries, they allow building laser modules where the brightness of the single emitters is preserved. In order to maintain the high brightness of the single emitter we developed a modular laser design which uses single emitters in a staircase arrangement, then coupling two of those bases with polarization combination which is our basic module. Those modules generate up to 160 W with a BPP better than 7.5 mm*mrad. For further power scaling wavelength stabilization is crucial. The wavelength is stabilized with only one Volume Bragg Grating (VBG) in front of a base providing the very same feedback to all of the laser diodes. This results in a bandwidth of < 0.5 nm and a wavelength stability of better than 250 MHz over one hour. Dense spectral combination with dichroic mirrors and narrow channel spacing allows us to combine multiple wavelength channels, resulting in a 2 kW laser module with a BPP better than 7.5 mm*mrad, which can easily coupled into a 100 μm fiber and 0.15 NA.

  17. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  18. Wind power systems for individual applications. [electric power supplies for homes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clews, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    A small windpower system is described which is suitable for electrifying a house. The self-contained unit consists of a two kilowatt wind driven generator, a set of 19 storage batteries, a small dc to ac inverter, and a gasoline generator for use as an emergency backup system in case of prolonged calm periods. Cost effectiveness of the electricity generated by this windmill system comes out to about 15 cents per kilowatt hour - assuming a 10 year life for the batteries and a 20 year life for the other components. Some other small windpower systems are also described, and it is shown that a windpowered generator in the 15- to 25-kilowatt output range coupled to a direct heated water storage system is able to heat a typical New England home.

  19. High Power Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Robert J.; Santiago, Walter; Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GRC successfully designed, built and tested a technology-push power processing unit for electric propulsion applications that utilizes high voltage silicon carbide (SiC) technology. The development specifically addresses the need for high power electronics to enable electric propulsion systems in the 100s of kilowatts. This unit demonstrated how high voltage combined with superior semiconductor components resulted in exceptional converter performance.

  20. The Hughes HS601HP spacecraft power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Krummann, W.; Ayvazian, H.

    1998-07-01

    The introduction of the Hughes HS 601HP (high power) spacecraft product line continuous the highly successful HS601 three axis stabilized geosynchronus spacecraft with increased power capabilities for larger payload applications. The enhanced power capabilities of the HS 601HP are built upon the heritage of 29 HS601 spacecraft presently in operation. The HS 601HP accommodates payload power ranges of 3 to 7 kilowatts and provides a smooth transition from the lower power HS 601 spacecraft to the HS 702 spacecraft, which has a payload capability up to 13 kilowatts. The HS 601HP spacecraft is designed for a 15 year life withmore » minimal operator interaction. The HS 601HP power subsystem provides a regulated power bus with a voltage range of 52 to 53 volts during all operational phases. The power subsystem is tailored to the specific needs of the spacecraft by selecting standard products from the HS 601HP power catalog. The solar arrays, battery, power control electronics and power distribution electronics are all modular and configurable to the requirements of the spacecraft. The HS 601HP solar array is the primary power source for the spacecraft. The solar array is comprised of two sets of planar solar panels (solar wings) which track the sun in a single spacecraft axis. The solar cells are selected from three different types based upon the spacecraft power generation requirements; silicon, single junction gallium arsenide or dual junction gallium arsenide. The maximum power capability at end of life (15 years, summer solstice) ranges from 4 to 7.7 kilowatts for the three types of solar cells. The HS 601HP battery is the power source for the spacecraft during eclipse and peak sunlight power periods. The battery is comprised of four individual battery packs connected in series to produce a single battery. Each battery pack can accommodate a maximum of eight battery cells with a capacity of 350 ampere-hours. The battery pack also provides for mounting of all

  1. Simplified High-Power Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. B.; Rippel, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solid-state inverter simplified by use of single gate-turnoff device (GTO) to commutate multiple silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR's). By eliminating conventional commutation circuitry, GTO reduces cost, size and weight. GTO commutation applicable to inverters of greater than 1-kilowatt capacity. Applications include emergency power, load leveling, drives for traction and stationary polyphase motors, and photovoltaic-power conditioning.

  2. Satellite power system operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, F. L.; Gordon, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    A projection of the electrical energy demands over the next 30 to 50 years, coupled with reasonable assessments of known or developable energy sources, indicates that a shortage of electrical energy will occur about the turn of the century. Recognizing the criticality of such a shortage, the Department of Energy is currently evaluating alternative power generation concepts. One of these candidate concepts is the Satellite Power System. The power levels considered during the evaluation of the various satellite systems have ranged from 5 to 10 GW. It is apparent that, with this power level, both the satellite and the rectenna must be very large and encompass a large number of complex operational system activities. Major elements of the Satellite Power System (SPS) consist of a power satellite placed in a geosynchronous equatorial orbit, and a dedicated ground receiving station (GRS) located at a selected site within the continental United States. The nominal power output of the SPS is established at 5 gigawatts (5 million kilowatts) although, because of various system constraints or losses, it may actually produce between 4 and 5 gigawatts.

  3. New Mexico State Energy Research and Development Program contribution to Lovington 100-Kilowatt Photovoltaic Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risser, V. V.

    1982-06-01

    In 1977 the New Mexico State Energy Research and Development (R & D) Program provided $25,000 to the New Mexico Solar Energy Institute to be used in conjunction with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding for design, engineering, and installation of a proposed 150-kilowatt peak photovoltaic (PV) system in Lovington, New Mexico. An additional $75,000 was also committed contingent on award of a contract for construction, test, and evaluation of the system. This award was made in 1979 and the PV system was completed in 1981. Even though budget constraints dictated reduction of the plant size to 100-kilowatts peak, this system has produced more energy than any other flat-plate PV system in the world. The utilization of the R & D Program funding in contributing to the success of this important New Mexico energy project is detailed.

  4. 76 FR 53437 - Free Flow Power Corporation; Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Competing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 35,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix power to a substation; and (4...

  5. 76 FR 53433 - Free Flow Power Corporation; Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Competing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... units installed in a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 110,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix's power to a...

  6. Performance of a Kilowatt-Class Stirling Power Conversion System in a Thermodynamically Coupled Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Hervol, David S.

    2011-01-01

    A pair of 1-kWe free-piston Stirling power convertors has been modified into a thermodynamically coupled configuration, and performance map testing has been completed. This is the same configuration planned for the full-scale 12-kWe power conversion unit (PCU) that will be used in the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The 1-kWe convertors were operated over a range of conditions to evaluate the effects of thermodynamic coupling on convertor performance and to identify any possible control challenges. The thermodynamically coupled convertor showed no measureable difference in performance from the baseline data collected when the engines were separate, and no major control issues were encountered during operation. The results of this test are guiding controller development and instrumentation selection for the TDU.

  7. Performance of a Kilowatt-Class Stirling Power Conversion System in a Thermodynamically-Coupled Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, S. M.; Briggs, M. H.; Hervol, D. S.

    A pair of 1kWe free-piston Stirling power convertors has been modified into a thermodynamically coupled configuration, and performance map testing has been completed. This is the same configuration planned for the full-scale 12 kWe power conversion unit (PCU) that will be used in the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The 1-kWe convertors were operated over a range of conditions to evaluate the effects of thermodynamic coupling on convertor performance and to identify any possible control challenges. The thermodynamically coupled convertor showed no measurable difference in performance from the baseline data collected when the engines were separate and no major control issues were encountered during operation. The results of this test are guiding controller development and instrumentation selection for the TDU.

  8. 2013 R&D 100 Award: New tech could mean more power for fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jay

    2014-04-03

    An LLNL team of six physicists has developed a new technology that is a stepping stone to enable some of the limitations on high-power fiber lasers to be overcome. Their technology, dubbed "Efficient Mode-Converters for High-Power Fiber Amplifiers," allows the power of fiber lasers to be increased while maintaining high beam quality. Currently, fiber lasers are used in machining, on factory floors and in a number of defense applications and can produce tens of kilowatts of power.The conventional fiber laser design features a circular core and has fundamental limitations that make it impractical to allow higher laser power unless themore » core area is increased. LLNL researchers have pioneered a design to increase the laser's core area along the axis of the ribbon fiber. Their design makes it difficult to use a conventional laser beam, so the LLNL team converted the beam into a profile that propagates into the ribbon fiber and is converted back once it is amplified. The use of this LLNL technology will permit the construction of higher power lasers for lower costs and increase the power of fiber lasers from tens of kilowatts of power to about 100 kilowatts and potentially even higher.« less

  9. 2013 R&D 100 Award: New tech could mean more power for fiber lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Dawson, Jay

    2018-01-16

    An LLNL team of six physicists has developed a new technology that is a stepping stone to enable some of the limitations on high-power fiber lasers to be overcome. Their technology, dubbed "Efficient Mode-Converters for High-Power Fiber Amplifiers," allows the power of fiber lasers to be increased while maintaining high beam quality. Currently, fiber lasers are used in machining, on factory floors and in a number of defense applications and can produce tens of kilowatts of power.The conventional fiber laser design features a circular core and has fundamental limitations that make it impractical to allow higher laser power unless the core area is increased. LLNL researchers have pioneered a design to increase the laser's core area along the axis of the ribbon fiber. Their design makes it difficult to use a conventional laser beam, so the LLNL team converted the beam into a profile that propagates into the ribbon fiber and is converted back once it is amplified. The use of this LLNL technology will permit the construction of higher power lasers for lower costs and increase the power of fiber lasers from tens of kilowatts of power to about 100 kilowatts and potentially even higher.

  10. Photovoltaics and solar thermal conversion to electricity - Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alper, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Photovoltaic power system technology development includes flat-plate silicon solar arrays and concentrating solar cell systems, which use silicon and other cell materials such as gallium arsenide. System designs and applications include small remote power systems ranging in size from tens of watts to tens of kilowatts, intermediate load-center applications ranging in size from tens to hundreds of kilowatts, and large central plant installations, as well as grid-connected rooftop applications. The thermal conversion program is concerned with large central power systems and small power applications.

  11. 76 FR 53431 - Free Flow Power Corporation; Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Competing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... generating units installed in a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 38,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix's power to a...

  12. SPIKE-2: a Practical Stirling Engine for Kilowatt Level Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beale, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in the art of free piston Stirling engine design make possible the production of 1-10kW free piston Stirling linear alternator engine, hermetically sealed, efficient, durable and simple in construction and operation. Power output is in the form of single or three phase 60 Hz. AC, or DC. The three phase capability is available from single machines without need of external conditioning. Engine voltage control regains set voltage within 5 cycles in response to any load change. The existing SPIKE-2 design has an engine alternator efficiency of 25% at 650 C heater wall temperature and a service life of over three years in solar service. The same system can be scaled over a range of at least 100 watts to 25kW.

  13. The SunShot Initiative’s 2030 Goal: 3¢ per Kilowatt Hour for Solar Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    None

    In 2011, when solar power comprised less than 0.1% of the U.S. electricity supply, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) launched the SunShot Initiative with the goal of making solar electricity cost-competitive with traditionally generated electricity by 2020 without subsidies. At the time, this meant reducing photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) prices by approximately 75% across the residential, commercial, and utility-scale sectors. For utility-scale solar, this target is a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 6¢ per kilowatt hour (kWh)1. Rapid progress has been made in accelerating achievement of these cost reductions, and DOE’s Solar Energy Technologies Officemore » (SETO) sees clear pathways to meeting the SunShot 2020 cost targets on schedule.2 Enabled by the cost reductions to date, solar-generated electricity has become mainstream. In 2014 and 2015, solar represented about one-third of new electrical generating capacity installed in the United States Halfway through 2016, solar was supplying 1% of U.S. electricity demand and growing with an installed capacity of 30 gigawatts.« less

  14. Space Shuttle Upgrades Advanced Hydraulic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Three Auxiliary Power Units (APU) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter each provide 145 hp shaft power to a hydraulic pump which outputs 3000 psi hydraulic fluid to 41 hydraulic actuators. A hydrazine fuel powered APU utilized throughout the Shuttle program has undergone many improvements, but concerns remain with flight safety, operational cost, critical failure modes, and hydrazine related hazards. The advanced hydraulic power system (AHPS), also known as the electric APU, is being evaluated as an upgrade to replace the hydrazine APU. The AHPS replaces the high-speed turbine and hydrazine fuel supply system with a battery power supply and electric motor/pump that converts 300 volt electrical power to 3000 psi hydraulic power. AHPS upgrade benefits include elimination of toxic hydrazine propellant to improve flight safety, reduction in hazardous ground processing operations, and improved reliability. Development of this upgrade provides many interesting challenges and includes development of four hardware elements that comprise the AHPS system: Battery - The battery provides a high voltage supply of power using lithium ion cells. This is a large battery that must provide 28 kilowatt hours of energy over 99 minutes of operation at 300 volts with a peak power of 130 kilowatts for three seconds. High Voltage Power Distribution and Control (PD&C) - The PD&C distributes electric power from the battery to the EHDU. This 300 volt system includes wiring and components necessary to distribute power and provide fault current protection. Electro-Hydraulic Drive Unit (EHDU) - The EHDU converts electric input power to hydraulic output power. The EHDU must provide over 90 kilowatts of stable, output hydraulic power at 3000 psi with high efficiency and rapid response time. Cooling System - The cooling system provides thermal control of the Orbiter hydraulic fluid and EHDU electronic components. Symposium presentation will provide an overview of the AHPS upgrade, descriptions of the four

  15. Evaluating the performance of a 50 kilowatt grid-connected photovoltaic system

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, B.H.; Muknahallipatn, S.; Cupal, J.J.

    A 50-kilowatt solar photovoltaic (PV) system was built at the University of Wyoming (UW) in 1996. The system comprises of three sub-systems. The first sub-system, a 10 kW roof-integrated system is located on the roof of the Engineering Building. The second sub-system is a 5 kW rack-mounted, ballasted PV system located on another part of the roof. The third sub-system is a 35 kW shade structure and is located adjacent to the university's football stadium. The three sub-systems differ in their design strategy since each is being used for research and education at the university. Each sub-system, being located atmore » some distance away from one another, supplies a different part of the campus grid. Efforts are continuing for setting up a central monitoring system, which will receive data remotely from all locations. A part of this monitoring system is complete. The system as configured provides a great deal of flexibility, which is in turn demanded by the variety of signal types measured at each installation. Each installation requires measurement of multiple dc and ac voltages and currents and one slowly varying voltage (proportional to solar insolation). The simultaneous sampling, fast sample rate, and lowpass signal conditioning allow for accurate measurement of power factor and total harmonic distortion of the inverter outputs. Panel and inverter efficiencies can be determined via simultaneous DC and AC measurements. These performance monitors provide the essential data for characterization of the PV effect at the grid input, and enable the use of intelligent power factor correction and harmonic filtering. Monitoring of the system shows that the total harmonic distortion present in the ac power output is at or below the acceptable limit as recommended by IEEE 519-1992. The harmonic distortion worsens when the ac power reaches more than 3.8 kW. A number of reliability problems with PV modules and inverters have delayed full functionality of the system.« less

  16. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One way to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Basic research on the tensile and creep properties of fibers, matrices, and composites is discussed.

  17. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advance radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  18. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Free piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advanced radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  19. High-Power, High-Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-power photovoltaic technology have enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high-specific power solar arrays. At high specific powers, power levels ranging from 50 to several hundred kilowatts are feasible. Ion thrusters offer long life and overall high efficiency (typically greater than 70 percent efficiency). In Phase I, the team at ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., built a 25-kW, 50-cm ion thruster discharge chamber and fabricated a laboratory model. This was in response to the need for a single, high-powered engine to fill the gulf between the 7-kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) system and a notional 25-kW engine. The Phase II project matured the laboratory model into a protoengineering model ion thruster. This involved the evolution of the discharge chamber to a high-performance thruster by performance testing and characterization via simulated and full beam extraction testing. Through such testing, the team optimized the design and built a protoengineering model thruster. Coupled with gridded ion thruster technology, this technology can enable a wide range of missions, including ambitious near-Earth NASA missions, Department of Defense missions, and commercial satellite activities.

  20. Design of small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Schreiber, J. G.; Withrow, C. A.; Mckissock, B. I.; Schmitz, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) technology is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. Unlike previous DIPS designs which were based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled down to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTG's. Preliminary characterization of units in the output power ranges 200-600 We indicate that on an electrical watt basis the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to an advanced RTG in size and mass but require less than a third of the isotope inventory.

  1. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  2. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  3. Electrical power integration for lunar operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Electrical power for future lunar operations is expected to range from a few kilowatts for an early human outpost to many megawatts for industrial operations in the 21st century. All electrical power must be imported as chemical, solar, nuclear, or directed energy. The slow rotation of the Moon and consequent long lunar night impose severe mass penalties on solar systems needing night delivery from storage. The cost of power depends on the cost of the power systems the cost of its transportation to the Moon, operating cost, and, of course, the life of the power system. The economic feasibility of some proposed lunar ventures depends in part on the cost of power. This paper explores power integration issues, costs, and affordability in the context of the following representative lunar ventures: (1) early human outpost (10 kWe); (2) early permanent lunar base, including experimental ISMU activities (100 kWe); (3) lunar oxygen production serving an evolved lunar base (500 kWe); (4) lunar base production of specialized high-value products for use on Earth (5 kWe); and (5) lunar mining and production of helium-3 (500 kWe). The schema of the paper is to project likely costs of power alternatives (including integration factors) in these power ranges, to select the most economic, to determine power cost contribution to the product or activities, to estimate whether the power cost is economically acceptable, and, finally, to offer suggestions for reaching acceptability where cost problems exist.

  4. Advances in high power linearly polarized fiber laser and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Huang, Long; Ma, Pengfei; Xu, Jiangming; Su, Rongtao; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-10-01

    Fiber lasers are now attracting more and more research interest due to their advantages in efficiency, beam quality and flexible operation. Up to now, most of the high power fiber lasers have random distributed polarization state. Linearlypolarized (LP) fiber lasers, which could find wide application potential in coherent detection, coherent/spectral beam combining, nonlinear frequency conversion, have been a research focus in recent years. In this paper, we will present a general review on the achievements of various kinds of high power linear-polarized fiber laser and its application. The recent progress in our group, including power scaling by using power amplifier with different mechanism, high power linearly polarized fiber laser with diversified properties, and various applications of high power linear-polarized fiber laser, are summarized. We have achieved 100 Watt level random distributed feedback fiber laser, kilowatt level continuous-wave (CW) all-fiber polarization-maintained fiber amplifier, 600 watt level average power picosecond polarization-maintained fiber amplifier and 300 watt level average power femtosecond polarization-maintained fiber amplifier. In addition, high power linearly polarized fiber lasers have been successfully applied in 5 kilowatt level coherent beam combining, structured light field and ultrasonic generation.

  5. Kilovolt dc solid state remote power controller development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The experience gained in developing and applying solid state power controller (SSPC) technology at high voltage dc (HVDC) potentials and power levels of up to 25 kilowatts is summarized. The HVDC switching devices, power switching concepts, drive circuits, and very fast acting overcurrent protection circuits were analyzed. A 25A bipolar breadboard with Darlington connected switching transistor was built. Fault testing at 900 volts was included. A bipolar transistor packaged breadboard design was developed. Power MOSFET remote power controller (RPC) was designed.

  6. Final Rule for Phase 2 Emission Standards for New Nonroad Spark-Ignition Nonhandheld Engines At or Below 19 Kilowatts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emission regulations to control emissions from new nonroad spark-ignition nonhandheld engines at or below 19 kilowatts (25 horsepower). These engines are used principally in lawn and garden equipment in applications such as lawnmowers and garden tractors.

  7. Water-power resources in upper Carson River basin, California-Nevada, A discussion of potential development of power and reservoir sites on east and west forks, Carson River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pumphrey, Harold L.

    1955-01-01

    West Fork Carson River offers the best opportunity for power development in the Carson River basin. The Hope Valley reservoir site could be developed to provide adequate storage regulation and concentration of fall would permit utilization of 1,400 feet of head in 51h miles below the clam site, or 1,900 feet of head in about 972 miles below the dam site; however, the average annual runoff susceptible of development is only about 70,000 acre-feet which limits the power that could be developed continuously in an average year with regulation to about 8,700 kilowatts utilizing 1,400 feet of head, or 12,000 kilowatts utilizing 1,900 feet of head. The method and degree of development will be determined to large extent by the method devised to supplement regulated flows from the Hope Valley reservoir to supply the water already appropriated for irrigation. If the Hope Valley site and the Watasheamu site on East Fork Carson River were developed coordinately water could be transferred to the West Fork for distribution through canals leading from that stream thus satisfying the deficiency due to regulation at Hope Valley and release of stored water on a power schedule. This would permit utilization of the entire 1,900 feet of fall. Independent development of the West Fork for optimum power production would require re-regulation of releases from Hope Valley reservoir and storage of a considerable part of the fall and winter flow for use during the irrigation season. Adequate storage capacity is apparently not available on the West Fork below Hope Valley; but offstream storage may be available in Diamond Valley which could be utilized by diversion from the West Fork near Woodfords. This would limit the utilization of the stream for power purposes to the development of the 1,400 feet of head between the Hope Valley dam site and Wood fords. In a year of average discharge East Fork Carson River and three of its principal tributaries could be developed to produce about 13

  8. Kilowatt-level cladding light stripper for high-power fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Sun, Junyi; Huang, Yusheng; Li, Dan; Wang, Xuejiao; Xiao, Qirong; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    We designed and fabricated a high-power cladding light stripper (CLS) by combining a fiber-etched CLS with a cascaded polymer-recoated CLS. The etched fiber reorganizes the numerical aperture (NA) distribution of the cladding light, leading to an increase in the leakage power and a flatter distribution of the leakage proportion in the cascaded polymer-recoated fiber. The index distribution of the cascaded polymer-recoated fiber is carefully designed to ensure an even leakage of cladding light. More stages near the index of 1.451 are included to disperse the heat. The CLS is capable of working consistently under 1187 W of cladding light with an attenuation of 26.59 dB, and the highest local temperature is less than 35°C.

  9. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the Space Shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conservation system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wires for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites are discussed.

  10. High-Power Hall Thruster Technology Evaluated for Primary Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Hofer, Richard R.

    2003-01-01

    High-power electric propulsion systems have been shown to be enabling for a number of NASA concepts, including piloted missions to Mars and Earth-orbiting solar electric power generation for terrestrial use (refs. 1 and 2). These types of missions require moderate transfer times and sizable thrust levels, resulting in an optimized propulsion system with greater specific impulse than conventional chemical systems and greater thrust than ion thruster systems. Hall thruster technology will offer a favorable combination of performance, reliability, and lifetime for such applications if input power can be scaled by more than an order of magnitude from the kilowatt level of the current state-of-the-art systems. As a result, the NASA Glenn Research Center conducted strategic technology research and development into high-power Hall thruster technology. During program year 2002, an in-house fabricated thruster, designated the NASA-457M, was experimentally evaluated at input powers up to 72 kW. These tests demonstrated the efficacy of scaling Hall thrusters to high power suitable for a range of future missions. Thrust up to nearly 3 N was measured. Discharge specific impulses ranged from 1750 to 3250 sec, with discharge efficiencies between 46 and 65 percent. This thruster is the highest power, highest thrust Hall thruster ever tested.

  11. Electric Power Generation Systems for Use in Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-07-20

    source of power . It is available from two sources, namely, nuclear fission and radioisotope decay. In both cases, the energy is available in...limitations on inventory size as well as spe- cific weight considerations will restrict radioisotope systems to power levels below about 1 kilowatt. It is... POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR USE IN SPA TIC By Henry 0. Slone and Seymour Lieblein -y 6, "IN 13 pLewis Research Center G 0 3 1994 Nation Aeronautics

  12. Energy System and Thermoeconomic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Light Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Whitney G.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2015-06-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE)’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is spearheading a program with industry to deploy and independently monitor five kilowatt-electric (kWe) combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) in light commercial buildings. This publication discusses results from PNNL’s research efforts to independently evaluate manufacturer-stated engineering, economic, and environmental performance of these CHP FCSs at installation sites. The analysis was done by developing parameters for economic comparison of CHP installations. Key thermodynamic terms are first defined, followed by an economic analysis using both a standard accounting approach and a management accounting approach. Keymore » economic and environmental performance parameters are evaluated, including (1) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of power, (2) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of energy, (3) the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollution emissions with a switch from conventional power plants and furnaces to CHP FCSs; (4) the change in GHG mitigation costs from the switch; and (5) the change in human health costs related to air pollution. From the power perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical power is estimated to span a range from $15–19,000/ kilowatt-electric (kWe) (depending on site-specific changes in installation, fuel, and other costs), while the average per unit cost of electrical and heat recovery power varies between $7,000 and $9,000/kW. From the energy perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical energy ranges from $0.38 to $0.46/kilowatt-hour-electric (kWhe), while the average per unit cost per unit of electrical and heat recovery energy varies from $0.18 to $0.23/kWh. These values are calculated from engineering and economic performance data provided by the manufacturer (not independently measured data). The GHG emissions were estimated to

  13. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  14. Position-insensitive long range inductive power transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Christopher H.; Lawson, James; Yates, David C.; Mitcheson, Paul D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents results of an improved inductive wireless power transfer system for reliable long range powering of sensors with milliwatt-level consumption. An ultra-low power flyback impedance emulator operating in open loop is used to present the optimal load to the receiver's resonant tank. Transmitter power modulation is implemented in order to maintain constant receiver power and to prevent damage to the receiver electronics caused by excessive received voltage. Received power is steady up to 3 m at around 30 mW. The receiver electronics and feedback system consumes 3.1 mW and so with a transmitter input power of 163.3 W the receiver becomes power neutral at 4.75 m. Such an IPT system can provide a reliable alternative to energy harvesters for supplying power concurrently to multiple remote sensors.

  15. Designing a Smaller Power Inverter: The Google Little Box Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, Blake

    Google's Little Box Challenge offered $1 million to the team that built the best kilowatt-scale solar inverter with a power density greater than 50 watts per cubic inch. To help determine the winner, NREL validated the entries at the Energy Systems Integration Facility.

  16. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  17. Status of Brayton Cycle Power Conversion Development at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Dolce, James L.; Cataldo, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is pursuing the development of Brayton cycle power conversion for various NASA initiatives. Brayton cycle power systems offer numerous advantages for space power generation including high efficiency, long life, high maturity, and broad scalability. Candidate mission applications include surface rovers and bases, advanced propulsion vehicles, and earth orbiting satellites. A key advantage is the ability for Brayton converters to span the wide range of power demands of future missions from several kilowatts to multi-megawatts using either solar, isotope, or reactor heat sources. Brayton technology has been under development by NASA since the early 1960's resulting in engine prototypes in the 2 to 15 kW-class that have demonstrated conversion efficiency of almost 30% and cumulative operation in excess of 40,000 hours. Present efforts at GRC are focusing on a 2 kW testbed as a proving ground for future component advances and operational strategies, and a 25 kW engine design as a modular building block for 100 kW-class electric propulsion and Mars surface power applications.

  18. Thruster Plume Plasma Diagnostics: A Ground Chamber Experiment for a 2-Kilowatt Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.; Hillard, G. Barry; Chornak, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Although detailed near field (0 to 3 cm) information regarding the exhaust plume of a two kilowatt arc jet is available (refs. 1 to 6), there is virtually little or no information (outside of theoretical extrapolations) available concerning the far field (2.6 to 6.1 m). Furthermore real information about the plasma at distances between (3 to 6 m) is of critical importance to high technology satellite companies in understanding the effect of arc jet plume exhausts on space based power systems. It is therefore of utmost importance that one understands the exact nature of the interaction between the arc jet plume, the spacecraft power system and the surrounding electrical plasma environment. A good first step in understanding the nature of the interactions lies in making the needed plume parameter measurements in the far field. All diagnostic measurements are performed inside a large vacuum system (12 m diameter by 18 m high) with a full scale arc jet and solar array panel in the required flight configuration geometry. Thus, necessary information regarding the plume plasma parameters in the far field is obtained. Measurements of the floating potential, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, number density, density distribution, debye length, and plasma frequency are obtained at various locations about the array (at vertical distances from the arc jet nozzle: 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.6, 4.0, 4.9, 5.0, 5.4, 5.75, and 6.14 m). Plasma diagnostic parameters are measured for both the floating and grounded configurations of the arc jet anode and array. Spectroscopic optical measurements are then acquired in close proximity to the nozzle, and contamination measurements are made in the vicinity of the array utilizing a mass spectrometer and two Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM's).

  19. Kilowatt-level direct-'refractive index matching liquid'-cooled Nd:YLF thin disk laser resonator.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhibin; Liu, Chong; Tu, Bo; Wang, Ke; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun; Cai, Zhen

    2016-01-25

    A direct-liquid-cooled Nd:YLF thin disk laser resonator is presented, which features the use of refractive index matching liquid (RIML) as coolant. Highly uniform pump intensity distribution with rectangular shape is realized by using metallic planar waveguides. Much attention has been paid on the design of the gain module, including how to achieve excellent cooling ability with multi-channel coolers and how to choose the doping levels of the crystals for realizing well-distributed pump absorption. The flow velocity of the coolant is found to be a key parameter for laser performance and optimized to keep it in laminar flow status for dissipating unwanted heat load. A single channel device is used to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient (CHTC) at different flow velocities. Accordingly, the thermal stress in the disk is analyzed numerically and the maximum permissible thermal load is estimated. Experimentally, with ten pieces of a-cut Nd:YLF thin disks of different doping levels, a linear polarized laser with an average output power of 1120 W is achieved at the pump power of 5202 W, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 21.5%, and a slope efficiency of 30.8%. Furthermore, the wavefront aberration of the gain module is measured to be quite weak, with a peak to valley (PV) value of 4.0 μm when it is pumped at 5202 W, which enables the feasibility of its application in an unstable resonator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of kilowatt-level direct-'refractive index matching liquid'-cooled Nd:YLF thin disk laser resonator.

  20. Range Performance of Bombers Powered by Turbine-Propeller Power Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Charles W.

    1950-01-01

    Calculations have been made to find range? attainable by bombers of gross weights from l40,000 to 300,000 pounds powered by turbine-propeller power plants. Only conventional configurations were considered and emphasis was placed upon using data for structural and aerodynamic characteristics which are typical of modern military airplanes. An effort was made to limit the various parameters invoked in the airplane configuration to practical values. Therefore, extremely high wing loadings, large amounts of sweepback, and very high aspect ratios have not been considered. Power-plant performance was based upon the performance of a typical turbine-propeller engine equipped with propellers designed to maintain high efficiencies at high-subsonic speeds. Results indicated, in general, that the greatest range, for a given gross weight, is obtained by airplanes of high wing loading, unless the higher cruising speeds associated with the high-wing-loading airplanes require-the use of thinner wing sections. Further results showed the effect of cruising at-high speeds, of operation at very high altitudes, and of carrying large bomb loads.

  1. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary requirements and technology advances required for cost effective space power management systems for multi-100 kilowatt requirements were identified. System requirements were defined by establishing a baseline space platform in the 250 KE KWe range and examining typical user loads and interfaces. The most critical design parameters identified for detailed analysis include: increased distribution voltages and space plasma losses, the choice between ac and dc distribution systems, shuttle servicing effects on reliability, life cycle costs, and frequency impacts to power management system and payload systems for AC transmission. The first choice for a power management system for this kind of application and size range is a hybrid ac/dc combination with the following major features: modular design and construction-sized minimum weight/life cycle cost; high voltage transmission (100 Vac RMS); medium voltage array or = 440 Vdc); resonant inversion; transformer rotary joint; high frequency power transmission line or = 20 KHz); energy storage on array side or rotary joint; fully redundant; and 10 year life with minimal replacement and repair.

  2. 76 FR 53450 - Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... with the power grid. The proposed project would have an average annual generation of 394.0 gigawatt...; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 45,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater...

  3. 76 FR 53447 - Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... with the power grid. The proposed project would have an average annual generation of 1,007.0 gigawatt...; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 115,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater...

  4. Designing Intervention Studies: Selected Populations, Range Restrictions, and Statistical Power

    PubMed Central

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W. Pat; Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate estimate of statistical power is critical for the design of intervention studies. Although the inclusion of a pretest covariate in the test of the primary outcome can increase statistical power, samples selected on the basis of pretest performance may demonstrate range restriction on the selection measure and other correlated measures. This can result in attenuated pretest-posttest correlations, reducing the variance explained by the pretest covariate. We investigated the implications of two potential range restriction scenarios: direct truncation on a selection measure and indirect range restriction on correlated measures. Empirical and simulated data indicated direct range restriction on the pretest covariate greatly reduced statistical power and necessitated sample size increases of 82%–155% (dependent on selection criteria) to achieve equivalent statistical power to parameters with unrestricted samples. However, measures demonstrating indirect range restriction required much smaller sample size increases (32%–71%) under equivalent scenarios. Additional analyses manipulated the correlations between measures and pretest-posttest correlations to guide planning experiments. Results highlight the need to differentiate between selection measures and potential covariates and to investigate range restriction as a factor impacting statistical power. PMID:28479943

  5. Designing Intervention Studies: Selected Populations, Range Restrictions, and Statistical Power.

    PubMed

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W Pat; Stuebing, Karla K; Fletcher, Jack M; Vaughn, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate estimate of statistical power is critical for the design of intervention studies. Although the inclusion of a pretest covariate in the test of the primary outcome can increase statistical power, samples selected on the basis of pretest performance may demonstrate range restriction on the selection measure and other correlated measures. This can result in attenuated pretest-posttest correlations, reducing the variance explained by the pretest covariate. We investigated the implications of two potential range restriction scenarios: direct truncation on a selection measure and indirect range restriction on correlated measures. Empirical and simulated data indicated direct range restriction on the pretest covariate greatly reduced statistical power and necessitated sample size increases of 82%-155% (dependent on selection criteria) to achieve equivalent statistical power to parameters with unrestricted samples. However, measures demonstrating indirect range restriction required much smaller sample size increases (32%-71%) under equivalent scenarios. Additional analyses manipulated the correlations between measures and pretest-posttest correlations to guide planning experiments. Results highlight the need to differentiate between selection measures and potential covariates and to investigate range restriction as a factor impacting statistical power.

  6. Recent Advances in Power Conversion and Heat Rejection Technology for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are jointly developing Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology for possible use in human missions to the Moon and Mars. A preliminary reference concept was generated to guide FSP technology development. The concept consists of a liquid-metal-cooled reactor, Stirling power conversion, and water heat rejection, with Brayton power conversion as a backup option. The FSP project has begun risk reduction activities on some key components with the eventual goal of conducting an end-to-end, non-nuclear, integrated system test. Several power conversion and heat rejection hardware prototypes have been built and tested. These include multi-kilowatt Stirling and Brayton power conversion units, titanium-water heat pipes, and composite radiator panels.

  7. Design definition of a microwave power reception and conversion system for use on a high altitude powered platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The design definition of a microwave power reception and conversion system for use on high altitude powered platform is presented. The study includes an initial design, construction and test effort on a thin film, printed circuit rectenna. A study of a low altitude demonstration of an airborne rectenna was made starting with the assumption that a fifty foot mechanically steerable parabolic reflector at the Wallops Flight Center would be retrofitted with a low microwave power source consisting of a five kilowatt commercially available magnetron and that a small blimp would be used to support the rectenna.

  8. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  9. 76 FR 53445 - Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... installed in a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 75,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix power to a substation; and...

  10. 76 FR 53446 - Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... installed in a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 35,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix power to a substation; and...

  11. 76 FR 53449 - Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... generating units installed in a matrix on the bottom of the river; (2) the total capacity of the installation would be up to 50,000 kilowatts; (3) shielded underwater cables would convey each matrix power to a...

  12. Solar Pumped High Power Solid State Laser for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Frederick, Kevin B.; Phillips, Dane J.

    2004-01-01

    Highly coherent laser light provides a nearly optimal means of transmitting power in space. The simplest most direct means of converting sunlight to coherent laser light is a solar pumped laser oscillator. A key need for broadly useful space solar power is a robust solid state laser oscillator capable of operating efficiently in near Earth space at output powers in the multi hundred kilowatt range. The principal challenges in realizing such solar pumped laser oscillators are: (1) the need to remove heat from the solid state laser material without introducing unacceptable thermal shock, thermal lensing, or thermal stress induced birefringence to a degree that improves on current removal rates by several orders of magnitude and (2) to introduce sunlight at an effective concentration (kW/sq cm of laser cross sectional area) that is several orders of magnitude higher than currently available while tolerating a pointing error of the spacecraft of several degrees. We discuss strategies for addressing these challenges. The need to remove the high densities of heat, e.g., 30 kW/cu cm, while keeping the thermal shock, thermal lensing and thermal stress induced birefringence loss sufficiently low is addressed in terms of a novel use of diamond integrated with the laser material, such as Ti:sapphire in a manner such that the waste heat is removed from the laser medium in an axial direction and in the diamond in a radial direction. We discuss means for concentrating sunlight to an effective areal density of the order of 30 kW/sq cm. The method integrates conventional imaging optics, non-imaging optics and nonlinear optics. In effect we use a method that combines some of the methods of optical pumping solid state materials and optical fiber, but also address laser media having areas sufficiently large, e.g., 1 cm diameter to handle the multi-hundred kilowatt level powers needed for space solar power.

  13. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  14. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 124 NISStopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  15. Space power systems technology enablement study. [for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. D.; Stearns, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The power system technologies which enable or enhance future space missions requiring a few kilowatts or less and using the space shuttle were assessed. The advances in space power systems necessary for supporting the capabilities of the space transportation system were systematically determined and benefit/cost/risk analyses were used to identify high payoff technologies and technological priorities. The missions that are enhanced by each development are discussed.

  16. Magnetic metamaterial superlens for increased range wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Huang, Da; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-10

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the "long range" regime - referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop - WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)(6); power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A "superlens", however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13-16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system.

  17. Combined Heat & Power Using the Infinia Concentrated Solar - CHP PowerDish System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    forward operating base FPSE Free Piston Stirling Engine GHG greenhouse gas IOU investor-owned utility kW kilowatt kWac kilowatt alternating...Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) for military, commercial, and space applications for almost 30 years. As Infinia developed a commercial product...6 Figure 2. Free-piston Stirling generator. ................................................................................ 6 Figure 3

  18. Predictability of Brayton electric power system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.; Hettel, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data from the first tests of the 2- to 15-kilowatt space power system in a vacuum chamber were compared with predictions of both a pretest analysis and a modified version of that analysis. The pretest analysis predicted test results with differences of no more than 9 percent of the largest measured value for each quantity. The modified analysis correlated measurements. Differences in conversion efficiency and power output were no greater than plus or minus 2.5 percent. This modified analysis was used to project space performance maps for the current test system.

  19. Power systems for production, construction, life support and operations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, Ronald J.

    1988-01-01

    As one looks to man's future in space it becomes obvious that unprecedented amounts of power are required for the exploration, colonization, and exploitation of space. Activities envisioned include interplanetary travel and LEO to GEO transport using electric propulsion, Earth and lunar observatories, advance space stations, free-flying manufacturing platforms, communications platforms, and eventually evolutionary lunar and Mars bases. These latter bases would start as camps with modest power requirements (kWes) and evolve to large bases as manufacturing, food production, and life support materials are developed from lunar raw materials. These latter activities require very robust power supplies (MWes). The advanced power system technologies being pursued by NASA to fulfill these future needs are described. Technologies discussed will include nuclear, photovoltaic, and solar dynamic space power systems, including energy storage, power conditioning, power transmission, and thermal management. The state-of-the-art and gains to be made by technology advancements will be discussed. Mission requirements for a variety of applications (LEO, GEO, lunar, and Martian) will be treated, and data for power systems ranging from a few kilowatts to megawatt power systems will be represented. In addition the space power technologies being initiated under NASA's new Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Space Leadership Planning Group Activities will be discussed.

  20. Power systems for production, construction, life support, and operations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, Ronald J.

    1988-01-01

    As one looks to man's future in space it becomes obvious that unprecedented amounts of power are required for the exploration, colonization, and exploitation of space. Activities envisioned include interplanetary travel and LEO to GEO transport using electric propulsion, earth and lunar observatories, advance space stations, free-flying manufacturing platforms, communications platforms, and eventually evolutionary lunar and Mars bases. These latter bases would start as camps with modest power requirements (kWes) and evolve to large bases as manufacturing, food production, and life support materials are developed from lunar raw materials. These latter activities require very robust power supplies (MWes). The advanced power system technologies being pursued by NASA to fulfill these future needs are described. Technologies discussed will include nuclear, photovoltaic, and solar dynamic space power systems, including energy storage, power conditioning, power transmission, and thermal management. The state-of-the-art and gains to be made by technology advancements will be discussed. Mission requirements for a variety of applications (LEO, GEO, lunar, and Martian) will be treated, and data for power systems ranging from a few kilowatts to megawatt power systems will be represented. In addition the space power technologies being initiated under NASA's new Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and Space Leadership Planning Group Activities will be discussed.

  1. Cold-air performance of free-power turbine designed for 112-kilowatt automotive gas-turbine engine. 1: Design Stator-vane-chord setting angle of 35 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Nusbaum, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A cold air experimental investigation of a free power turbine designed for a 112-kW automotive gas-turbine was made over a range of speeds from 0 to 130 percent of design equivalent speeds and over a range of pressure ratio from 1.11 to 2.45. Results are presented in terms of equivalent power, torque, mass flow, and efficiency for the design power point setting of the variable stator.

  2. Development of high-power dye laser chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konagai, Chikara; Kimura, Hironobu; Fukasawa, Teruichiro; Seki, Eiji; Abe, Motohisa; Mori, Hideo

    2000-01-01

    Copper vapor laser (CVL) pumped dye laser (DL) system, both in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration, has been developed for Atomic Vapor Isotope Separation program in Japan. Dye laser output power of about 500 W has been proved in long-term operations over 200 hours. High power fiber optic delivery system is utilized in order to efficiently transport kilowatt level CVL beams to the DL MOPA. Single model CVL pumped DL oscillator has been developed and worked for 200 hours within +/- 0.1 pm wavelength stability. Phase modulator for spreading spectrum to the linewidth of hyperfine structure has been developed and demonstrated.

  3. A proposed national wind power R and D program. [offshore wind power system for electric energy supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heronemus, W.

    1973-01-01

    An offshore wind power system is described that consists of wind driven electrical dc generators mounted on floating towers in offshore waters. The output from the generators supplies underwater electrolyzer stations in which water is converted into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen is piped to shore for conversion to electricity in fuel cell stations. It is estimated that this system can produce 159 x 10 to the ninth power kilowatt-hours per year. It is concluded that solar energy - and that includes wind energy - is the only way out of the US energy dilemma in the not too distant future.

  4. Economic viability of photovoltaic power for development assistance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the development assistance market and examines a number of specific photovoltaic (PV) development assistance field tests, including water pumping/grain grinding (Tangaye, Upper Volta), vaccine refrigerators slated for deployment in 24 countries, rural medical centers to be installed in Ecuador, Guyana, Kenya and Zimbabwe, and remote earth stations to be deployed in the near future. A comparison of levelized energy cost for diesel generators and PV systems covering a range of annual energy consumptions is also included. The analysis does not consider potential societal, environmental or political benefits associated with PV power. PV systems are shown to be competitive with diesel generators, based on life cycle cost considerations, assuming a system price of $20/W(peak), for applications having an annual energy demand of up to 6000 kilowatt-hours per year.

  5. 77 FR 25163 - Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... hydropower turbines and generators having a total combined generating capacity of 192 kilowatts; (4) an... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14335-000] Stoughton Water..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On December 7, 2011, the Stoughton Water Power Company...

  6. 77 FR 14775 - Stoughton Water Power Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... hydropower turbines and generators having a total combined generating capacity of 192 kilowatts; (4) an... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14335-000] Stoughton Water..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On December 7, 2011, the Stoughton Water Power Company...

  7. Increasing power-law range in avalanche amplitude and energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Portella, Víctor; Serra, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro; Vives, Eduard

    2018-02-01

    Power-law-type probability density functions spanning several orders of magnitude are found for different avalanche properties. We propose a methodology to overcome empirical constraints that limit the range of truncated power-law distributions. By considering catalogs of events that cover different observation windows, the maximum likelihood estimation of a global power-law exponent is computed. This methodology is applied to amplitude and energy distributions of acoustic emission avalanches in failure-under-compression experiments of a nanoporous silica glass, finding in some cases global exponents in an unprecedented broad range: 4.5 decades for amplitudes and 9.5 decades for energies. In the latter case, however, strict statistical analysis suggests experimental limitations might alter the power-law behavior.

  8. Increasing power-law range in avalanche amplitude and energy distributions.

    PubMed

    Navas-Portella, Víctor; Serra, Isabel; Corral, Álvaro; Vives, Eduard

    2018-02-01

    Power-law-type probability density functions spanning several orders of magnitude are found for different avalanche properties. We propose a methodology to overcome empirical constraints that limit the range of truncated power-law distributions. By considering catalogs of events that cover different observation windows, the maximum likelihood estimation of a global power-law exponent is computed. This methodology is applied to amplitude and energy distributions of acoustic emission avalanches in failure-under-compression experiments of a nanoporous silica glass, finding in some cases global exponents in an unprecedented broad range: 4.5 decades for amplitudes and 9.5 decades for energies. In the latter case, however, strict statistical analysis suggests experimental limitations might alter the power-law behavior.

  9. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1988-01-01

    The SP-100 Project was established to develop and demonstrate feasibility of a space reactor power system (SRPS) at power levels of 10's of kilowatts to a megawatt. To help determine systems requirements for the SRPS, a mission and spacecraft were examined which utilize this power system for a space-based radar to observe moving objects. Aspects of the mission and spacecraft bearing on the power system were the primary objectives of this study; performance of the radar itself was not within the scope. The study was carried out by the Systems Design Audit Team of the SP-100 Project.

  10. Can We Power Future Mars Missions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Sturm, Erick J., II; Woolley, Ryan C.; Jordan, James F.

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration identified the exploration of Mars as one of the key pathways. In response, NASAs Mars Program Office is developing a detailed mission lineup for the next decade that would lead to future explorations. Mission architectures for the next decade include both orbiters and landers. Existing power technologies, which could include solar panels, batteries, radioisotope power systems, and in the future fission power, could support these missions. Second and third decade explorations could target human precursor and human in-situ missions, building on increasingly complex architectures. Some of these could use potential feed forward from earlier Constellation missions to the Moon, discussed in the ESAS study. From a potential Mars Sample Return mission to human missions the complexity of the architectures increases, and with it the delivered mass and power requirements also amplify. The delivered mass at Mars mostly depends on the launch vehicle, while the landed mass might be further limited by EDL technologies, including the aeroshell, parachutes, landing platform, and pinpoint landing. The resulting in-situ mass could be further divided into payload elements and suitable supporting power systems. These power systems can range from tens of watts to multi-kilowatts, influenced by mission type, mission configuration, landing location, mission duration, and season. Regardless, the power system design should match the power needs of these surface assets within a given architecture. Consequently, in this paper we will identify potential needs and bounds of delivered mass and architecture dependent power requirements to surface assets that would enable future in-situ exploration of Mars.

  11. High power broadband millimeter wave TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bill G.

    1999-05-01

    In the early 1980's the requirement for high power broadband millimeter wave sources encouraged the development of microwave vacuum device amplifiers for radar and communication systems. Many government funded programs were implemented for the development of high power broadband millimeter wave amplifiers that would meet the needs of the high power community. The tube design capable of meeting these goals was the slow wave coupled cavity traveling wave device, which had a proven technology base at the lower frequencies (X Band). However scaling this technology to the millimeter frequencies had severe shortcomings in both thermal and manufacturing design. These shortcomings were overcome with the development of the Ladder Circuit technology. In conjunction with the circuit development high power electron beam systems had to be developed for the generation of high rf powers. These beam systems had to be capable of many megawatts of beam power density and high current densities. The cathode technology required to be capable of operating at current densities of 10 amperes per square centimeter at long pulse lengths and high duty cycle. Since the introduction of the Ladder Circuit technology a number of high power broadband millimeter wave amplifiers have been developed using this technology, and have been deployed in operating radar and communication systems. Broadband millimeter wave sources have been manufactured in the frequency range from 27 GHz to 100 GHz with power levels ranging from 100 watts to 50 kilowatts. Today the power levels achieved by these devices are nearing the limits of this technology; therefore to gain a significant increase in power at the millimeter wave frequencies other technologies will have to be considered particularly fast wave devices. This paper will briefly review the ladder circuit technology and present the designs of a number of broadband high power devices developed at Ka and W band. The discussion will include the beam systems

  12. Space Power Facility at NASA’s Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-21

    Exterior view of the Space Power Facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The $28.4-million facility, which began operations in 1969, is the largest high vacuum chamber ever built. The chamber is 100 feet in diameter and 120 feet high. It produces a vacuum deep enough to simulate the conditions at 300 miles altitude. The facility can sustain a high vacuum; simulate solar radiation via a 4-megawatt quartz heat lamp array, solar spectrum by a 400-kilowatt arc lamp, and cold environments. The Space Power Facility was originally designed to test nuclear power sources for spacecraft during long durations in a space atmosphere, but it was never used for that purpose. The facility’s first test in 1970 involved a 15 to 20-kilowatt Brayton Cycle Power System for space applications. Three different methods of simulating solar heat were employed during the Brayton tests. The facility was also used for jettison tests of the Centaur Standard Shroud. The shroud was designed for the new Titan-Centaur rocket that was scheduled to launch the Viking spacecraft to Mars. The new shroud was tested under conditions that simulated the time from launch to the separation of the stages. Test programs at the facility include high-energy experiments, shroud separation tests, Mars Lander system tests, deployable Solar Sail tests and International Space Station hardware tests.

  13. NASA Capabilities That Could Impact Terrestrial Smart Grids of the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Incremental steps to steadily build, test, refine, and qualify capabilities that lead to affordable flight elements and a deep space capability. Potential Deep Space Vehicle Power system characteristics: power 10 kilowatts average; two independent power channels with multi-level cross-strapping; solar array power 24 plus kilowatts; multi-junction arrays; lithium Ion battery storage 200 plus ampere-hours; sized for deep space or low lunar orbit operation; distribution120 volts secondary (SAE AS 5698); 2 kilowatt power transfer between vehicles.

  14. High-Power Piezoelectric Acoustic-Electric Power Feedthru for Metal Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Biederman, Will; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall by using acoustic waves. This approach allows for the removal of holes through structures. The technology is applicable to power supply for electric equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc where the holes on the wall are prohibitive or result in significant performance degrade or complex designs. In the author's previous work, 100-W electric power was transferred through a metal wall by a small, simple-structure piezoelectric device. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feedthru devices were analyzed by finite element model. An equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the power transfer characteristics to different electric loads. Based on the analysis results, a prototype device was designed, fabricated and a demonstration of the transmission of electric power up to 1-kW was successfully conducted. The methods to minimize the plate wave excitation on the wall were also analyzed. Both model analysis and experimental results are presented in detail in this presentation.

  15. High-power piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feedthru for metal walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Biederman, Will; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-03-01

    Piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall using elastic waves. This approach allows for the elimination of the need for holes through structures for cabling or electrical feed-thrus . The technology supplies power to electric equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc where holes in the wall are prohibitive or may result in significant performance degradation or requires complex designs. In the our previous work, 100-W of electric power was transferred through a metal wall by a small, piezoelectric device with a simple-structure. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feed-thru devices were analyzed by finite element modeling. An equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the characteristics of power transfer to different electric loads. Based on the analytical results, a prototype device was designed, fabricated and successfully demonstrated to transfer electric power at a level of 1-kW. Methods of minimizing plate wave excitation on the wall were also analyzed. Both model analysis and experimental results are presented in detail in this paper.

  16. Space reactor power 1986 - A year of choices and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, R. L.; Verga, R. L.; Schnyer, A. D.; Sholtis, J. A., Jr.; Wahlquist, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Both the SP-100 and Multimegawatt programs have made significant progress over the last year and that progress is the focus of this paper. In the SP-100 program the thermoelectric energy conversion concept powered by a compact, high-temperature, lithium-cooled, uranium-nitride-fueled fast spectrum reactor was selected for engineering development and ground demonstration testing at an electrical power level of 300 kilowatts. In the Multimegawatt program, activities moved from the planning phase into one of technology development and assessment with attendant preliminary definition and evaluation of power concepts against requirements of the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  17. Orbital Space Solar Power Option for a Lunar Village

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2017-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges to the implementation of a continuously manned lunar base is power. During the lunar day (14 Earth days), it is conceptually simple to deploy solar arrays to generate the estimated 35 kilowatts of continuous power required. However, generating this level of power during the lunar night (also 14 Earth days) has been an extremely difficult problem to solve. Conventional solutions range from the requirement that the base be located at the lunar south pole so as to take advantage of the continuous sunshine available there to developing a space-qualified nuclear reactor and power plant to generate the needed energy. There is a third option: Use the soon-to-be-available Space Launch System to place a space based solar power station in lunar orbit that would beam the needed energy to the lunar base. Several detailed studies have been performed by NASA, universities and others looking at the lunar south pole for locating the base. The results are encouraging: by taking advantage of the moon's orbital tilt, large solar arrays can be deployed there to track the sun continuously and generate the power needed to sustain the base. The problem with this approach is inherent to its design: it will only work at the lunar south pole. There is no other site on the Moon with geometry favorable to generating continuous solar power. NASA has also considered the development of a compact fission reactor and power plant to generate the needed power, allowing the base to be sited anywhere on the Moon. The problem with this approach is that there are no space fission reactors available, none are being planned and the cost of developing one is prohibitively expensive. Using an orbiting space based solar power station to generate electrical power and beam it to a base sited anywhere on the moon should therefore be considered. The technology to collect sunlight, generate greater than the estimated 35 kilowatts of power, and beam it to the surface using

  18. Nuclear Power: Is It a New Clear Choice for Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besar, Idris B.

    2008-05-01

    Energy is essential for socio-economic development. Any nation's standard of living is closely related to its access to energy. To put into perspective, the per capita electricity consumptions in developed countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is currently estimated at 8600 kilowatts-hour per year as compared to the consumption rates in Malaysia and some African countries of 3300 and 50 kilowatts-hour per year, respectively. Energy is therefore an important pre-requisite for achieving the Malaysian vision of becoming a developed nation by the year 2020, in that it is needed not only for industrialization programme but also in maintaining quality of life. In Malaysia, the main concern currently is still on the supply in term of adequacy, reliability and quality; and moving slowly but steadily towards security, sustainability, environmentally friendly and contribution to climate change. With this new dimension, nuclear power emerged as a good match to a possible alternative in the comprehensive national energy policy. Many studies presented the positive aspects of nuclear power while others indicated the bad sides and potential risks. This paper will highlight some of those pros and cons as well as the potential risks beside a discussion on relevant requirements for a nuclear power programme in particular those of interest to the professionals in the physical sciences.

  19. Development of a dual-field heteropoplar power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D. B.; Johnson, B.; Bliamptis, T.; St. George, E.

    1981-01-01

    The design and testing of a 400 watt, dual phase, dual rotor, field modulated inductor alternator is described. The system is designed for use as a flywheel to ac utility line or flywheel to dc bus (electric vehicle) power converter. The machine is unique in that it uses dual rotors and separately controlled fields to produce output current and voltage which are in phase with each other. Having the voltage and current in phase allows the power electronics to be made of simple low cost components. Based on analytical predictions and experimental results, development of a complete 22 kilowatt (30 Hp) power conversion system is recommended. This system would include power electronics and controls and would replace the inductor alternator with an improved electromagnetic conversion system.

  20. 50 KW Class Krypton Hall Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a 50-kilowatt-class Hall thruster designed for operation on xenon propellant was measured using kryton propellant. The thruster was operated at discharge power levels ranging from 6.4 to 72.5 kilowatts. The device produced thrust ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 newtons. The thruster was operated at discharge voltages between 250 and 1000 volts. At the highest anode mass flow rate and discharge voltage and assuming a 100 percent singly charged condition, the discharge specific impulse approached the theoretical value. Discharge specific impulse of 4500 seconds was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 1000 volts. The peak discharge efficiency was 64 percent at 650 volts.

  1. Thermal Analysis of the Mound One Kilowatt Package

    SciTech Connect

    Or, Chuen T.

    The Mound One Kilowatt (1 KW) package was designed for the shipment of plutonium (Pu-238) with not more than 1 kW total heat dissipation. To comply with regulations, the Mound 1 kW package has to pass all the requirements under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT; 38 degrees C ambient temperature) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC; package engulfed in fire for 30 minutes). Analytical and test results were presented in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1 kW package, revision 1, April 1991. Some issues remained unresolved in that revision. In March 1992, Fairchild Space and Defensemore » Corporation was commissioned by the Department of Energy to perform the thermal analyses. 3-D thermal models were created to perform the NCT and HAC analyses. Four shipping configurations in the SARP revision 3 were analyzed. They were: (1) The GPHS graphite impact shell (GIS) in the threaded product can (1000 W total heat generation); (2) The fueled clads in the welded product can (1000 W total heat generation); (3) The General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module (750 W total heat generation); and (4) The Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) spheres (810 W total heat generation). Results from the four cases show that the GIS or fuel clad in the product can is the worse case. The temperatures predicted under NCT and HAC in all four cases are within the design limits. The use of helium instead of argon as cover gas provides a bigger safety margin. There is a duplicate copy.« less

  2. Isotope Brayton electric power system for the 500 to 2500 watt range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macosko, R. P.; Barna, G. J.; Block, H. B.; Ingle, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    An extensive study was conducted at the Lewis Research Center to evaluate an isotope Brayton electric power system for use in the 500 to 2500 W power range. Overall system simplicity was emphasized in order to reduce parasitic power losses and improve system reliability. Detailed parametric cycle analysis, conceptual component designs, and evaluation of system packaging were included. A single-loop system (gas) with six major components including one rotating unit was selected. Calculated net system efficiency varies from 23 to 28 percent over the power range.

  3. Nuclear power--key to man's extraterrestrial civilization

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J.A.; Buden, D.

    1982-08-01

    The start of the Third Millennium will be highlighted by the establishment of man's extraterrestrial civilization with three technical cornerstones leading to the off-planet expansion of the human resource base. These are the availability of compact energy sources for power and propulsion, the creation of permanent manned habitats in space, and the ability to process materials anywhere in the Solar System. In the 1990s and beyond, nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. The manned and unmanned space missions of tomorrow will demand first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. Various nuclear powermore » plant technologies are discussed, with emphasis on derivatives from the nuclear rocket technology.« less

  4. 1KW Power Transmission Using Wireless Acoustic-Electric Feed-Through (WAEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, S.; Bao, X.; Badescu, M.; Aldrich, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Biederman, W.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of space applications require the delivery of power into sealed structures. Since the structural integrity can be degraded by holes for cabling we present an alternative method of delivering power and information using stress waves to the internal space of a sealed structure. One particular application of this technology is in sample return missions where it is critical to preserve the sample integrity and to prevent earth contamination. Therefore, the container has to be hermetically sealed and the integrity of the seal must be monitored in order to insure to a high degree of reliability the integrity of the sample return vessel. In this study we investigated the use of piezoelectric acoustic-electric power feed-through devices to transfer electric power wirelessly through a solid wall by using elastic or acoustic waves. The technology is applicable to a range of space and terrestrial applications where power is required by electronic equipment inside sealed containers, vacuum or pressure vessels, etc., where holes in the wall are prohibitive or may result in significant structural performance degradation or unnecessarily complex designs. To meet requirements of higher power applications, the feasibility to transfer kilowatts level power was investigated. Pre-stressed longitudinal piezoelectric feed-through devices were analyzed by finite element models and an equivalent circuit model was developed to predict the power transfer characteristics to different electric loads. Based on the results of the analysis a prototype device was designed, fabricated and a demonstration of the transmission of electric power up to 1.068-kW was successfully conducted. Efficiencies in the 80-90% range were also demonstrated and methods to increase the efficiency further are currently being considered.

  5. High power vertical stacked diode laser development using macro-channel water cooling and hard solder bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dongshan; Liang, Xuejie; Wang, Jingwei; Li, Xiaoning; Nie, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingsheng

    2017-02-01

    A novel marco channel cooler (MaCC) has been developed for packaging high power diode vertical stacked (HPDL) lasers, which eliminates many of the issues in commercially-available copper micro-channel coolers (MCC). The MaCC coolers, which do not require deionized water as coolant, were carefully designed for compact size and superior thermal dissipation capability. Indium-free packaging technology was adopted throughout product design and fabrication process to minimize the risk of solder electromigration and thermal fatigue at high current density and long pulse width under QCW operation. Single MaCC unit with peak output power of up to 700W/bar at pulse width in microsecond range and 200W/bar at pulse width in millisecond range has been recorded. Characteristic comparison on thermal resistivity, spectrum, near filed and lifetime have been conducted between a MaCC product and its counterpart MCC product. QCW lifetime test (30ms 10Hz, 30% duty cycle) has also been conducted with distilled water as coolant. A vertical 40-MaCC stack product has been fabricated, total output power of 9 kilowatts has been recorded under QCW mode (3ms, 30Hz, 9% duty cycle).

  6. Human Mars Surface Mission Nuclear Power Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2018-01-01

    A key decision facing Mars mission designers is how to power a crewed surface field station. Unlike the solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) that could retreat to a very low power state during a Martian dust storm, human Mars surface missions are estimated to need at least 15 kilowatts of electrical (kWe) power simply to maintain critical life support and spacecraft functions. 'Hotel' loads alone for a pressurized crew rover approach two kWe; driving requires another five kWe-well beyond what the Curiosity rover’s Radioisotope Power System (RPS) was designed to deliver. Full operation of a four-crew Mars field station is estimated at about 40 kWe. Clearly, a crewed Mars field station will require a substantial and reliable power source, beyond the scale of robotic mission experience. This paper explores the applications for both fission and RPS nuclear options for Mars.

  7. Scaling range of power laws that originate from fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2013-05-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties performed for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) [Physica A0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2013.01.049 392, 2384 (2013)] to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique, called modified detrended moving average analysis (MDMA), is introduced, and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy R2 of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA methods. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with a different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful for local FA in, e.g., econophysics, finances, or physiology, where the huge number of short time series has to be examined at once and wherever the preliminary check of the scaling range regime for each of the series separately is neither effective nor possible.

  8. Performance of a Brayton power system with a space type radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussle, R. C.; Prok, G. M.; Fenn, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    Test results of an experimental investigation to measure Brayton engine performance while operating at the sink temperatures of a typical low earth orbit are presented. The results indicate that the radiator area was slightly oversized. The steady state and transient responses of the power system to the sink temperatures in orbit were measured. During the orbital operation, the engine did not reach the steady state operation of either sun or shade conditions. The alternator power variation during orbit was + or - 4 percent from its mean value of 9.3 kilowatts.

  9. High Power Broadband Millimeter Wave TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bill G.

    1998-04-01

    In the early 1980's the requirement for high power broadband millimeter wave sources encouraged the development of microwave vacuum device amplifiers for radar and communication systems. Many government funded programs were implemented for the development of high power broadband millimeter wave amplifiers that would meet the needs of the high power community. The tube design capable of meeting these goals was the slow wave coupled cavity traveling wave device, which had a proven technology base at the lower frequencies (X Band). However scaling this technology to the millimeter frequencies had severe shortcomings in both thermal and manufacturing design. These shortcomings were overcome with the development of the Ladder Circuit technology. In conjunction with the circuit development high power electron beam systems had to be developed for the generation of high rf powers. These beam systems had to be capable of many megawatts of beam power density and high current densities. The cathode technology required to be capable of operating at current densities of 10 amperes per square centimeter at long pulse lengths and high duty cycle. Since the introduction of the Ladder Circuit technology a number of high power broadband millimeter wave amplifiers have been developed and deployed in operating radar and communication systems. Broadband millimeter wave sources have been manufactured in the frequency range from 27 GHz to 100 GHz with power levels ranging from 100 watts CW to 10 kilowatts Peak at W band over a 2 GHz bandwidth. Also a 50 kW peak power and 10 kW average power device at Ka band with 2 GHz bandwidth has been developed. Today the power levels achieved by these devices are nearing the limits of this technology; therefore to gain a significant increase in power at the millimeter wave frequencies, other technologies will have to be considered, particularly fast wave devices. This paper will briefly review the ladder circuit technology and present the designs of

  10. A low-power wide range transimpedance amplifier for biochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel low voltage and low power transimpedance amplifier for amperometric potentiostats. The power is optimized by having three different gain settings for different current ranges, which can be programmed with a biasing current. The voltage ranges have been optimized by using FGMOS transistors in a second voltage amplification stage that simultaneously allow for offset calibration as well as independent biasing of the gates. The circuit operates with input currents from 1 pA to 1 microA, with a maximum power supply voltage of 1.5 V and consumes 82.5 nW, 9.825 microW, 47.325 microW for currents varying from (1 pA, 0.25 nA), (0.25 nA, 62.5 nA) and (62.5 nA, 1 microA) respectively.

  11. TPV power source development for an unmanned undersea vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Holmquist, G.A.

    The thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation of electrical power promises efficiencies that are exploitable for military and commercial applications. TPV offers a combination of unique characteristics as a power source for military Unmanned Undersea Vehicles. In civilian applications TPV technology offers the potential for lightweight, rugged, and reliable power systems that can be environmentally benign. These systems can use a variety of fuels and can be scaled up in size. TPV is truly a dual use technology in which the United States appears to have a technical lead. The focus of the current Quantum program is the maturation of the technology andmore » the demonstration of a 10 kilowatt generator. Preliminary results of this project are presented.« less

  12. Designing Intervention Studies: Selected Populations, Range Restrictions, and Statistical Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W. Pat; Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate estimate of statistical power is critical for the design of intervention studies. Although the inclusion of a pretest covariate in the test of the primary outcome can increase statistical power, samples selected on the basis of pretest performance may demonstrate range restriction on the selection measure and other correlated…

  13. Applicability of 100kWe-class of space reactor power systems to NASA manned space station missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S. W.; Willenberg, H. J.; Robertson, C.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment is made of a manned space station operating with sufficiently high power demands to require a multihundred kilowatt range electrical power system. The nuclear reactor is a competitor for supplying this power level. Load levels were selected at 150kWe and 300kWe. Interactions among the reactor electrical power system, the manned space station, the space transportation system, and the mission were evaluated. The reactor shield and the conversion equipment were assumed to be in different positions with respect to the station; on board, tethered, and on a free flyer platform. Mission analyses showed that the free flyer concept resulted in unacceptable costs and technical problems. The tethered reactor providing power to an electrolyzer for regenerative fuel cells on the space station, results in a minimum weight shield and can be designed to release the reactor power section so that it moves to a high altitude orbit where the decay period is at least 300 years. Placing the reactor on the station, on a structural boom is an attractive design, but heavier than the long tethered reactor design because of the shield weight for manned activity near the reactor.

  14. An Exploratory Study of Thermoelectrostatic Power Generation for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Benjamin H.

    1960-01-01

    A study has been made of a process in which a solar heating cycle is combined with an electrostatic cycle for generating electrical power for space vehicle applications. The power unit, referred to as a thermoelectrostatic generator, is a thin film, solid dielectric capacitor alternately heated by solar radiation and cooled by radiant emission. The theory of operation to extract electrical power is presented. Results of an experiment to illustrate the principle are described. Estimates of the performance of this type of device in space in the vicinity of earth are included. Values of specific power of several kilowatts per kilogram of generator weight are calculated for such a device employing polyethylene terephthalate dielectric.

  15. Solar Pumped Solid State Lasers for Space Solar Power: Experimental Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Carrington, Connie K.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Green, Jason J. A.; Laycock, Rustin L.

    2003-01-01

    We outline an experimentally based strategy designed to lead to solar pumped solid state laser oscillators useful for space solar power. Our method involves solar pumping a novel solid state gain element specifically designed to provide efficient conversion of sunlight in space to coherent laser light. Kilowatt and higher average power is sought from each gain element. Multiple such modular gain elements can be used to accumulate total average power of interest for power beaming in space, e.g., 100 kilowatts and more. Where desirable the high average power can also be produced as a train of pulses having high peak power (e.g., greater than 10(exp 10 watts). The modular nature of the basic gain element supports an experimental strategy in which the core technology can be validated by experiments on a single gain element. We propose to do this experimental validation both in terrestrial locations and also on a smaller scale in space. We describe a terrestrial experiment that includes diagnostics and the option of locating the laser beam path in vacuum environment. We describe a space based experiment designed to be compatible with the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We anticipate the gain elements will be based on low temperature (approx. 100 degrees Kelvin) operation of high thermal conductivity (k approx. 100 W/cm-K) diamond and sapphire (k approx. 4 W/cm-K). The basic gain element will be formed by sequences of thin alternating layers of diamond and Ti:sapphire with special attention given to the material interfaces. We anticipate this strategy will lead to a particularly simple, robust, and easily maintained low mass modelocked multi-element laser oscillator useful for space solar power.

  16. 40 CFR 90.207 - Credit calculation and manufacturer compliance with emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... = Production×(Standard—FEL)×Power×Useful life×Load Factor Where: Production = eligible production as defined in this part. Annual production projections are used to project credit availability for initial... kilowatt hour. Power = the maximum modal power of the certification test engine, in kilowatts, as...

  17. Prospective technologies for using biohydrogen in power installations on the basis of fuel cells (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunikov, D. O.; Borzenko, V. I.; Malyshenko, S. P.; Blinov, D. V.; Kazakov, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    The present state of technology for obtaining hydrogen by biological methods and for purifying it is reviewed from the viewpoint of its possible use in kilowatt-class power installations. Hybrid membranesorption biohydrogen purification methods combining membrane-based pretreatment and sorption-based final treatment, also with the use of metal hydrides, should be regarded as the most efficient ones.

  18. Global rural electrification - A different race initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.

    1991-10-01

    The paper considers global rural electrification based on electric power from power stations, built in geosynchronous orbit out of lunar materials. These materials are distributed to individual villages and rural electric cooperatives via microwaves for a cost of about 6-45 cents per kilowatt-hour. Power would be available in modular increments of 25-100 kilowatts with an average capital cost as low as $5000 per kilowatt. The global rural electrification program is aimed at providing electric power from space at competitive costs, relative to current costs, to rural and agricultural areas and diverting resources from weapons development to infrastructure development.

  19. Solar Power System Options for the Radiation and Technology Demonstration Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Haraburda, Francis M.; Riehl, John P.

    2000-01-01

    The Radiation and Technology Demonstration (RTD) Mission has the primary objective of demonstrating high-power (10 kilowatts) electric thruster technologies in Earth orbit. This paper discusses the conceptual design of the RTD spacecraft photovoltaic (PV) power system and mission performance analyses. These power system studies assessed multiple options for PV arrays, battery technologies and bus voltage levels. To quantify performance attributes of these power system options, a dedicated Fortran code was developed to predict power system performance and estimate system mass. The low-thrust mission trajectory was analyzed and important Earth orbital environments were modeled. Baseline power system design options are recommended on the basis of performance, mass and risk/complexity. Important findings from parametric studies are discussed and the resulting impacts to the spacecraft design and cost.

  20. Isotope Brayton electric power system for the 500 to 2500 watt range.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macosko, R. P.; Barna, G. J.; Block, H. B.; Ingle, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    An extensive study was conducted at the Lewis Research Center to evaluate an isotope Brayton electric power system for use in the 500 to 2500 W power range. The study emphasized overall system simplicity in order to reduce parasitic power losses and improve system reliability. The study included detailed parametric cycle analysis, conceptual component designs, and evaluation of system packaging. The study has resulted in the selection of a single-loop system (gas) with six major components including one rotating unit. Calculated net system efficiency varies from 23 to 28% over the power range. The use of the Pu-238 heat source being developed for the Multi-Hundred-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator program was assumed.

  1. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS), based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE), is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. The incentive for any dynamic system is that it can save fuel and reduce costs and radiological hazard. Unlike DIPS based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTG's. Stirling conversion extends the competitive range for dynamic systems down to a few hundred watts--a power level not previously considered for dynamic systems. The challenge for Stirling conversion will be to demonstrate reliability and life similar to RTG experience. Since the competitive potential of FPSE as an isotope converter was first identified, work has focused on feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries has been performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain within acceptable operating limits. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred-watt units have been established.

  2. Solar cell power for field instrumentation at White Sands Missile range. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.W. Jr..; Reckart, D.H. Jr; Milway, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The initial phase of an Instrumentation Development Project to explore and document what solar power can do for remote field instrumentation systems is described. The work scope consisted of selection, design, construction, test, and delivery of a solar cell power system for White Sands Missile Range. A Drone Formation Control System Interrogator was selected; a power supply was built and installed in the San Andres Mountain Range at WSMR in late August 1977.

  3. 150 kW Class Solar Electric Propulsion Spacecraft Power Architecture Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Loop, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM), in conjunction with PC Krause and Associates, has created a Simulink-based power architecture model for a 50 kilo-Watt (kW) solar electric propulsion system. NASA has extended this model to investigate 150 kW solar electric propulsion systems. Increasing the power capability to 150 kW is an intermediate step to the anticipated power requirements for Mars and other deep space applications. The high-power solar electric propulsion capability has been identified as a critical part of NASA’s future beyond-low-Earth-orbit for human-crewed exploration missions. This paper presents four versions of a 150 kW architecture, simulation results, and a discussion of their merits.

  4. 150 kW Class Solar Electric Propulsion Spacecraft Power Architecture Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Loop, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission in conjunction with PC Krause and Associates has created a Simulink-based power architecture model for a 50 kilo-Watt (kW) solar electric propulsion system. NASA has extended this model to investigate 150 kW solar electric propulsion systems. Increasing the power system capability from 50 kW to 150 kW better aligns with the anticipated power requirements for Mars and other deep space explorations. The high-power solar electric propulsion capability has been identified as a critical part of NASAs future beyond-low-Earth-orbit for human-crewed exploration missions. This paper presents multiple 150 kW architectures, simulation results, and a discussion of their merits.

  5. Brayton Cycle Power System in the Space Power Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-21

    Set up of a Brayton Cycle Power System test in the Space Power Facility’s massive vacuum chamber at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The $28.4-million facility, which began operations in 1969, is the largest high vacuum chamber ever built. The chamber is 100 feet in diameter and 120 feet high. It can produce a vacuum deep enough to simulate the conditions at 300 miles altitude. The Space Power Facility was originally designed to test nuclear-power sources for spacecraft, but it was never used for that purpose. The Space Power Facility was first used to test a 15 to 20-kilowatt Brayton Cycle Power System for space applications. Three different methods of simulating solar heat were employed during the tests. Lewis researchers studied the Brayton power system extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. The Brayton engine converted solar thermal energy into electrical power. The system operated on a closed-loop Brayton thermodynamic cycle with a helium-xenon gas mixture as its working fluid. A space radiator was designed to serve as the system’s waste heat rejecter. The radiator was later installed in the vacuum chamber and tested in a simulated space environment to determine its effect on the power conversion system. The Brayton system was subjected to simulated orbits with 62 minutes of sun and 34 minutes of shade.

  6. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Chabalko, Matthew J; Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  7. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power. PMID:28199321

  8. Xenon Acquisition Strategies for High-Power Electric Propulsion NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Unfried, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) has been used for station-keeping of geostationary communications satellites since the 1980s. Solar electric propulsion has also benefitted from success on NASA Science Missions such as Deep Space One and Dawn. The xenon propellant loads for these applications have been in the 100s of kilograms range. Recent studies performed for NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have demonstrated that SEP is critically enabling for both near-term and future exploration architectures. The high payoff for both human and science exploration missions and technology investment from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) are providing the necessary convergence and impetus for a 30-kilowatt-class SEP mission. Multiple 30-50- kilowatt Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM) concepts have been developed based on the maturing electric propulsion and solar array technologies by STMD with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). Xenon is the optimal propellant for the existing state-of-the-art electric propulsion systems considering efficiency, storability, and contamination potential. NASA mission concepts developed and those proposed by contracted efforts for the 30-kilowatt-class demonstration have a range of xenon propellant loads from 100s of kilograms up to 10,000 kilograms. This paper examines the status of the xenon industry worldwide, including historical xenon supply and pricing. The paper will provide updated information on the xenon market relative to previous papers that discussed xenon production relative to NASA mission needs. The paper will discuss the various approaches for acquiring on the order of 10 metric tons of xenon propellant to support potential near-term NASA missions. Finally, the paper will discuss acquisitions strategies for larger NASA missions requiring 100s of metric tons of xenon will be discussed.

  9. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  10. Power allocation and range performance considerations for a dual-frequency EBPSK/MPPSK system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yu; Wu, Lenan; Zhao, Junhui

    2017-12-01

    Extended binary phase shift keying/M-ary position phase shift keying (EBPSK/MPPSK)-MODEM provides radar and communication functions on a single hardware platform with a single waveform. However, its range estimation accuracy is worse than continuous-wave (CW) radar because of the imbalance of power in two carrier frequencies. In this article, the power allocation method for dual-frequency EBPSK/MPPSK modulated systems is presented. The power of two signal transmitters is adequately allocated to ensure that the power in two carrier frequencies is equal. The power allocation ratios for two types of modulation systems are obtained. Moreover, considerations regarding the range of operation of the dual-frequency system are analysed. In addition to theoretical considerations, computer simulations are provided to illustrate the performance.

  11. Calculated performance of a mercury-compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R B

    1951-01-01

    An analysis was made at a flight Mach number of 1.5, an altitude of 45,000 feet, a turbine-inlet temperature of 1460 degrees R, of a mercury compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source. The calculations covered a range of turbine-exhaust and turbine-inlet pressures and condenser-inlet Mach numbers. For a turbine--inlet pressure of 40 pounds per square inch absolute, a turbine-exhaust pressure of 14 pounds per square inch absolute, and a condenser-inlet Mach number of 0.23 the calculated airplane gross weight required to carry a 20,000 pound payload was 322000 pounds and the reactor heat release per unit volume was 8.9 kilowatts per cubic inch. These do not represent optimum operating conditions.

  12. Development and Short-Range Testing of a 100 kW Side-Illuminated Millimeter-Wave Thermal Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander; Eilers, James A.; Lambot, Thomas; Parkin, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the phase described here of the Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) Project was to launch a small thermal rocket into the air using millimeter waves. The preliminary results of the first MTLS flight vehicle launches are presented in this work. The design and construction of a small thermal rocket with a planar ceramic heat exchanger mounted along the axis of the rocket is described. The heat exchanger was illuminated from the side by a millimeter-wave beam and fed propellant from above via a small tank containing high pressure argon or nitrogen. Short-range tests where the rocket was launched, tracked, and heated with the beam are described. The rockets were approximately 1.5 meters in length and 65 millimeters in diameter, with a liftoff mass of 1.8 kilograms. The rocket airframes were coated in aluminum and had a parachute recovery system activated via a timer and Pyrodex. At the rocket heat exchanger, the beam distance was 40 meters with a peak power intensity of 77 watts per square centimeter. and a total power of 32 kilowatts in a 30 centimeter diameter circle. An altitude of approximately 10 meters was achieved. Recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  13. POWOW: A Modular, High Power Spacecraft Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A robust space infrastructure encompasses a broad range of mission needs along with an imperative to reduce costs of satellites meeting those needs. A critical commodity for science, commercial and civil satellites is power at an affordable cost. The POWOW (POwer WithOut Wires) spacecraft concept was created to provide, at one end of the scale, multi-megawatts of power yet also be composed of modules that can meet spacecraft needs in the kilowatt range. With support from the NASA-sponsored Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology Program, the POWOW spacecraft concept was designed to meet Mars mission needs - while at the same time having elements applicable to a range of other missions. At Mars, the vehicle would reside in an aerosynchronous orbit and beam power to a variety of locations on the surface. It is the purpose of this paper to present the latest concept design results. The Space Power Institute along with four companies: Able Engineering, Inc., Entech, Inc., Primex Aerospace Co., and TECSTAR have produced a modular, power-rich electrically propelled spacecraft design that meets these requirements. In addition, it also meets a range of civil and commercial needs. The spacecraft design is based on multijunction Ill-V solar cells, the new Stretched Lens Aurora (SLA) module, a lightweight array design based on a multiplicity of 8 kW end-of-life subarrays and electric thrusters. The solar cells have excellent radiation resistance and efficiencies above 30%. The SLA has a concentration ratio up to 15x while maintaining an operating temperature of 80 C. The design of the 8 kW array building block will be presented and its applicability to commercial and government missions will be discussed. Electric propulsion options include Hall, MPD and ion thrusters of various power levels and trade studies have been conducted to define the most advantageous options. The present baseline spacecraft design providing 900 kW using technologies expected to be

  14. Pluto/Kuiper Missions with Advanced Electric Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, S. R.; Patterson, M. J.; Schrieber, J.; Gefert, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    In response to a request by NASA Code SD Deep Space Exploration Technology Program, NASA Glenn Research center performed a study to identify advanced technology options to perform a Pluto/Kuiper mission without depending on a 2004 Jupiter Gravity Assist, but still arriving before 2020. A concept using a direct trajectory with small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope power system was shown to allow the same or smaller launch vehicle class (EELV) as the chemical 2004 baseline and allow launch in any year and arrival in the 2014 to 2020 timeframe. With the nearly constant power available from the radioisotope power source such small ion propelled spacecraft could explore many of the outer planetary targets. Such studies are already underway. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. 1 MeV, 10 kW DC electron accelerator for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Acharya, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Bakhtsingh, R. I.; Rajan, R.; Sharma, D. K.; Dewangan, S.; Sharma, V.; Patel, R.; Tiwari, R.; Benarjee, S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Several modern applications of radiation processing like medical sterilization, rubber vulcanization, polymerization, cross-linking and pollution control from thermal power stations etc. require D.C. electron accelerators of energy ranging from a few hundred keVs to few MeVs and power from a few kilowatts to hundreds of kilowatts. To match these requirements, a 3 MeV, 30 kW DC electron linac has been developed at BARC, Mumbai and current operational experience of 1 MeV, 10 kW beam power will be described in this paper. The LINAC composed mainly of Electron Gun, Accelerating Tubes, Magnets, High Voltage source and provides 10 kW beam power at the Ti beam window stably after the scanning section. The control of the LINAC is fully automated. Here Beam Optics study is carried out to reach the preferential parameters of Accelerating as well as optical elements. Beam trials have been conducted to find out the suitable operation parameters of the system.

  16. System analysis of wavelength beam combining of high-power diode lasers for photoacoustic endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; Gallego, Daniel C.; Gawali, Sandeep B.; Sánchez, Miguel; Rodriguez, Sergio; Osiński, Marek; Sacher, Joachim; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    This paper, originally published on 27 April 2016, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 8 June 2016. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. The purpose of wavelength-beam combining (WBC) is to improve the output power of a multi-wavelength laser system while maintaining the quality of the combined beam. This technique has been primarily proposed for industrial applications, such as metal cutting and soldering, which require optical peak power between kilowatts and megawatts. In order to replace the bulkier solid-state lasers, we propose to use the WBC technique for photoacoustic (PA) applications, where a multi-wavelength focused beam with optical peak power between hundreds of watts up to several kilowatts is necessary to penetrate deeply into biological tissues. In this work we present an analytical study about the coupling of light beams emitted by diode laser bars at 808 nm, 880 nm, 910 nm, 940 nm, and 980 nm into a < 600-μm core-diameter optical fiber for PA endoscopy. In order to achieve an efficient coupling it is necessary to collimate the beams in both fast and slow axes by means of cylindrical lenses and to use partial reflection mirrors at 45° tilt. We show an example of beam collimation using cylindrical lenses in both fast and slow axes. In a real PA scenario, the resulting beam should have a sufficient peak power to generate significant PA signals from a turbid tissue>.

  17. The NASA space power technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, R. Rhoads

    1992-01-01

    NASA has a broad technology program in the field of space power. This paper describes that program, including the roles and responsibilities of the various NASA field centers and major contractors. In the power source area, the paper discusses the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Project, which has been under way for about seven years and is making substantial progress toward development of components for a 100-kilowatt power system that can be scaled to other sizes. This system is a candidate power source for nuclear electric propulsion, as well as for a power plant for a lunar base. In the energy storage area, the paper describes NASA's battery- and fuel-cell development programs. NASA is actively working on NiCd, NiH2, and lithium batteries. A status update is also given on a U.S. Air Force-sponsored program to develop a large (150 ampere-hour) lithium-thionyl chloride battery for the Centaur upper-stage launch vehicle. Finally, the area of power management and distribution (PMAD) is addressed, including power system components such as solid-state switches and power integrated circuits. Automated load management and other computer-controlled functions offer considerable payoffs. The state of the art in space power is described, along with NASA's medium- and long-term goals in the area.

  18. A compact 10 kW solid-state RF power amplifier at 352 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancila, Dragos; Hoang Duc, Long; Jobs, Magnus; Holmberg, Måns; Hjort, Adam; Rydberg, Anders; Ruber, Roger

    2017-07-01

    A compact 10 kW RF power amplifier at 352 MHz was developed at FREIA for the European Spallation Source, ESS. The specifications of ESS for the conception of amplifiers are related to its pulsed operation: 3.5 ms pulse length and a duty cycle of 5%. The realized amplifier is composed of eight kilowatt level modules, combined using a planar Gysel 8-way combiner. The combiner has a low insertion loss of only 0.2 dB, measured at 10 kW peak power. Each module is built around a commercially available LDMOS transistor in a singleended architecture. During the final tests, a total output peak power of 10.5 kW was measured.

  19. Space power distribution system technology. Volume 1: Reference EPS design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Massner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The multihundred kilowatt electrical power aspects of a mannable space platform in low Earth orbit is analyzed from a cost and technology viewpoint. At the projected orbital altitudes, Shuttle launch and servicing are technically and economically viable. Power generation is specified as photovoltaic consistent with projected planning. The cost models and trades are based upon a zero interest rate (the government taxes concurrently as required), constant dollars (1980), and costs derived in the first half of 1980. Space platform utilization of up to 30 years is evaluated to fully understand the impact of resupply and replacement as satellite missions are extended. Such lifetimes are potentially realizable with Shuttle servicing capability and are economically desirable.

  20. Surface Nuclear Power for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    The Design Reference Mission for NASA's human mission to Mars indicates the desire for in-situ propellant production and bio-regenerative life systems to ease Earth launch requirements. These operations, combined with crew habitation and science, result in surface power requirements approaching 160 kilowatts. The power system, delivered on an early cargo mission, must be deployed and operational prior to crew departure from Earth. The most mass efficient means of satisfying these requirements is through the use of nuclear power. Studies have been performed to identify a potential system concept using a mobile cart to transport the power system away from the Mars lander and provide adequate separation between the reactor and crew. The studies included an assessment of reactor and power conversion technology options, selection of system and component redundancy, determination of optimum separation distance, and system performance sensitivity to some key operating parameters. The resulting system satisfies the key mission requirements including autonomous deployment, high reliability, and cost effectiveness at a overall system mass of 12 tonnes and a stowed volume of about 63 cu m.

  1. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200more » MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.« less

  2. A High-power Electric Propulsion Test Platform in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Reed, Brian; Chavers, D. Greg; Sarmiento, Charles; Cenci, Susanna; Lemmons, Neil

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the results of the preliminary phase of a NASA design study for a facility to test high-power electric propulsion systems in space. The results of this design study are intended to provide a firm foundation for subsequent detailed design and development activities leading to the deployment of a valuable space facility. The NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate is sponsoring this design project. A team from the NASA Johnson Space Center, Glenn Research Center, the Marshall Space Flight Center and the International Space Station Program Office is conducting the project. The test facility is intended for a broad range of users including government, industry and universities. International participation is encouraged. The objectives for human and robotic exploration of space can be accomplished affordably, safely and effectively with high-power electric propulsion systems. But, as thruster power levels rise to the hundreds of kilowatts and up to megawatts, their testing will pose stringent and expensive demands on existing Earth-based vacuum facilities. These considerations and the human access to near-Earth space provided by the International Space Station (ISS) have led to a renewed interest in space testing. The ISS could provide an excellent platform for a space-based test facility with the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment and no chamber walls to modify the open boundary conditions of the propulsion system exhaust. The test platform could take advantage of the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment. Space testing would provide open boundary conditions without walls, micro-gravity and a realistic thermal environment. Testing on the ISS would allow for direct observation of the test unit, exhaust plume and space-plasma interactions. When necessary, intervention by on-board personnel and post-test inspection would be possible. The ISS can provide electrical power, a location for

  3. SU-G-TeP1-02: Analytical Stopping Power and Range Parameterization for Therapeutic Energy Intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, W; Newhauser, W; Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA

    Purpose: To develop a simple, analytic parameterization of stopping power and range, which covers a wide energy interval and is applicable to many species of projectile ions and target materials, with less than 15% disagreement in linear stopping power and 1 mm in range. Methods: The new parameterization was required to be analytically integrable from stopping power to range, and continuous across the range interval of 1 µm to 50 cm. The model parameters were determined from stopping power and range data for hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium ions incident on water, carbon, aluminum, lead and copper. Stopping power andmore » range data was taken from SRIM. A stochastic minimization algorithm was used to find model parameters, with 10 data points per energy decade. Additionally, fitting was performed with 2 and 26 data points per energy decade to test the model’s robustness to sparse Results: 6 free parameters were sufficient to cover the therapeutic energy range for each projectile ion species (e.g. 1 keV – 300 MeV for protons). The model agrees with stopping power and range data well, with less than 9% relative stopping power difference and 0.5 mm difference in range. As few as, 4 bins per decade were required to achieve comparable fitting results to the full data set. Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated that a simple analytic function can be used to fit the entire energy interval of therapeutic ion beams of hydrogen and heavier elements. Advantages of this model were the small number (6) of free parameters, and that the model calculates both stopping power and range. Applications of this model include GPU-based dose calculation algorithms and Monte Carlo simulations, where available memory is limited. This work was supported in part by a research agreement between United States Naval Academy and Louisiana State University: Contract No N00189-13-P-0786. In addition, this work was accepted for presentation at the American Nuclear Society Annual

  4. Comparison of Stopping Power and Range Databases for Radiation Transport Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Bichsel, Hans; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1997-01-01

    The codes used to calculate stopping power and range for the space radiation shielding program at the Langley Research Center are based on the work of Ziegler but with modifications. As more experience is gained from experiments at heavy ion accelerators, prudence dictates a reevaluation of the current databases. Numerical values of stopping power and range calculated from four different codes currently in use are presented for selected ions and materials in the energy domain suitable for space radiation transport. This study of radiation transport has found that for most collision systems and for intermediate particle energies, agreement is less than 1 percent, in general, among all the codes. However, greater discrepancies are seen for heavy systems, especially at low particle energies.

  5. High-power VCSEL systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Deppe, Carsten; Derra, Guenther; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Heusler, Gero; Kolb, Johanna; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Easy system design, compactness and a uniform power distribution define the basic advantages of high power VCSEL systems. Full addressability in space and time add new dimensions for optimization and enable "digital photonic production". Many thermal processes benefit from the improved control i.e. heat is applied exactly where and when it is needed. The compact VCSEL systems can be integrated into most manufacturing equipment, replacing batch processes using large furnaces and reducing energy consumption. This paper will present how recent technological development of high power VCSEL systems will extend efficiency and flexibility of thermal processes and replace not only laser systems, lamps and furnaces but enable new ways of production. High power VCSEL systems are made from many VCSEL chips, each comprising thousands of low power VCSELs. Systems scalable in power from watts to multiple ten kilowatts and with various form factors utilize a common modular building block concept. Designs for reliable high power VCSEL arrays and systems can be developed and tested on each building block level and benefit from the low power density and excellent reliability of the VCSELs. Furthermore advanced assembly concepts aim to reduce the number of individual processes and components and make the whole system even more simple and reliable.

  6. Recent Advances in Design of Low Cost Film Concentrator and Low Pressure Free Piston Stirling Engines for Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinwaechter, J.; Kleinwaechter, H.; Beale, W.

    1984-01-01

    The free piston Stirling-linear alternator was shown to be scalable to power levels of tens of kilowatts in a form which is simple, efficient, long lived and relatively inexpensive. It avoids entirely the vexing problem of high pressure shaft, and its control requirements are not severe nor do they represent a significant threat to durability. Linear alternators have demonstrated high efficiency and moderate weight, and are capable of delivering 3 phase power from single machines without great increases of cost or complexity. There remains no apparent impediments to the commercial exploitation of the free piston engine for solar electric power generation.

  7. Satellite power system concept development and evaluation program. Volume 2: System definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The system level results of the system definition studies performed by NASA as a part of the Department of Energy/NASA satellite power system concept development and evaluation program are summarized. System requirements and guidelines are discussed as well as the major elements that comprise the reference system and its design options. Alternative system approaches including different system sizes, solid state amplifier (microwave) concepts, and laser power transmission system cost summaries are reviewed. An overview of the system analysis and planning efforts is included. The overall study led to the conclusion that the reference satellite power system concept is a feasible baseload source of electrical power and, within the assumed guidelines, the minimum cost per kilowatt is achieved at the maximum output of 5 gigawatts to the utility grid. Major unresolved technical issues include maximum allowable microwave power density in the ionosphere and performance/mass characteristics of laser power transmission systems.

  8. 88 kilowatt automotive inverter with new 900 Volt silicon carbide MOSFET technology

    SciTech Connect

    Casady, Jeffrey; Olejniczak, Kraig; McNutt, Ty

    This final report is on the design and experimental verification of a 200 kVA traction inverter using three 900 V, 2.5 mΩ, SiC MOSFET-based half-bridge power modules comprising the power stage. Each dual power module contains four 900 V, 10 mΩ SiC MOSFETs per switch position and uses synchronous conduction to achieve high average and peak efficiencies over its entire operating region to meet the demands of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and extended-range electrified vehicle architectures. Significant performance improvement, via conduction, switching, and reverse-recovery loss metrics, from this SiC MOSFET-based inverter—especially at light load conditions—will be discussed.

  9. A Low-Power High-Dynamic-Range Receiver System for In-Probe 3-D Ultrasonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Attarzadeh, Hourieh; Xu, Ye; Ytterdal, Trond

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a dual-mode low-power, high dynamic-range receiver circuit is designed for the interface with a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. The proposed ultrasound receiver chip enables the development of an in-probe digital beamforming imaging system. The flexibility of having two operation modes offers a high dynamic range with minimum power sacrifice. A prototype of the chip containing one receive channel, with one variable transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and one analog to digital converter (ADC) circuit is implemented. Combining variable gain TIA functionality with ADC gain settings achieves an enhanced overall high dynamic range, while low power dissipation is maintained. The chip is designed and fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process technology. The test chip occupies an area of 76[Formula: see text] 170 [Formula: see text]. A total average power range of 60-240 [Formula: see text] for a sampling frequency of 30 MHz, and a center frequency of 5 MHz is measured. An instantaneous dynamic range of 50.5 dB with an overall dynamic range of 72 dB is obtained from the receiver circuit.

  10. A high-average-power FEL for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.

    1995-12-31

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt UV (150-1000 nm) and IR (2-25 micron) FEL driven by a recirculating, energy-recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users{endash}CEBAF`s partners in the Laser Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop-Grumman, 3M, and Xerox{endash}plan to develop applications such as polymer surface processing, metals and ceramics micromachining, and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunabilitymore » and pulse structure. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  11. Performance and Feasibility Analysis of a Wind Turbine Power System for Use on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichter, Matthew D.; Viterna, Larry

    1999-01-01

    A wind turbine power system for future missions to the Martian surface was studied for performance and feasibility. A C++ program was developed from existing FORTRAN code to analyze the power capabilities of wind turbines under different environments and design philosophies. Power output, efficiency, torque, thrust, and other performance criteria could be computed given design geometries, atmospheric conditions, and airfoil behavior. After reviewing performance of such a wind turbine, a conceptual system design was modeled to evaluate feasibility. More analysis code was developed to study and optimize the overall structural design. Findings of this preliminary study show that turbine power output on Mars could be as high as several hundred kilowatts. The optimized conceptual design examined here would have a power output of 104 kW, total mass of 1910 kg, and specific power of 54.6 W/kg.

  12. A fully integrated, wide-load-range, high-power-conversion-efficiency switched capacitor DC-DC converter with adaptive bias comparator for ultra-low-power power management integrated circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hiroki; Hirose, Tetsuya; Kojima, Yuta; Kuroki, Nobutaka; Numa, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present a wide-load-range switched-capacitor DC-DC buck converter with an adaptive bias comparator for ultra-low-power power management integrated circuit. The proposed converter is based on a conventional one and modified to operate in a wide load range by developing a load current monitor used in an adaptive bias comparator. Measurement results demonstrated that our proposed converter generates a 1.0 V output voltage from a 3.0 V input voltage at a load of up to 100 µA, which is 20 times higher than that of the conventional one. The power conversion efficiency was higher than 60% in the load range from 0.8 to 100 µA.

  13. Long-Term Reliability of a Hard-Switched Boost Power Processing Unit Utilizing SiC Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Iannello, Christopher J.; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices have demonstrated many performance advantages over their silicon (Si) counterparts. As the inherent material limitations of Si devices are being swiftly realized, wide-band-gap (WBG) materials such as SiC have become increasingly attractive for high power applications. In particular, SiC power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors' (MOSFETs) high breakdown field tolerance, superior thermal conductivity and low-resistivity drift regions make these devices an excellent candidate for power dense, low loss, high frequency switching applications in extreme environment conditions. In this paper, a novel power processing unit (PPU) architecture is proposed utilizing commercially available 4H-SiC power MOSFETs from CREE Inc. A multiphase straight boost converter topology is implemented to supply up to 10 kilowatts full-scale. High Temperature Gate Bias (HTGB) and High Temperature Reverse Bias (HTRB) characterization is performed to evaluate the long-term reliability of both the gate oxide and the body diode of the SiC components. Finally, susceptibility of the CREE SiC MOSFETs to damaging effects from heavy-ion radiation representative of the on-orbit galactic cosmic ray environment are explored. The results provide the baseline performance metrics of operation as well as demonstrate the feasibility of a hard-switched PPU in harsh environments.

  14. Computer study of emergency shutdowns of a 60-kilowatt reactor Brayton space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    A digital computer study of emergency shutdowns of a 60-kWe reactor Brayton power system was conducted. Malfunctions considered were (1) loss of reactor coolant flow, (2) loss of Brayton system gas flow, (3)turbine overspeed, and (4) a reactivity insertion error. Loss of reactor coolant flow was the most serious malfunction for the reactor. Methods for moderating the reactor transients due to this malfunction are considered.

  15. Characterization of vector stimulated Brillouin scattering gain over wide power range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqian; An, Qi; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2017-07-01

    The wide range power dependence of vector stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) gain is theoretically and experimentally characterized by a mathematical model and measurement system based on the heterodyne pump-Stokes technique. The results show that SBS phase shift is much more tolerant of pump depletion than SBS amplitude gain, hence the performance improvement of the SBS-based distributed sensing system can be achieved by measuring the SBS phase shift spectrum. The discussion about the measured Brillouin spectrum width versus pump power at different Stokes powers reveals that the occurrence of nonnegligible pump depletion imposes a restriction on the determination of pump and Stokes powers in an SBS amplitude gain-based application system. The amplitude gain and phase shift of vector SBS gain increase with the increase of pump power and decrease with the increase of Stokes power, which indicates that the design strategy with smaller Stokes power and higher pump power is reasonable. And the measured center-asymmetry of the SBS phase shift spectrum is mainly caused by the nonlinear refractive index, which puts a limitation on the maximum pump power. The obtained results can provide a useful basis for the optimal design of practical vector SBS gain-based application systems.

  16. Space power subsystem automation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The technology issues involved in power subsystem automation and the reasonable objectives to be sought in such a program were discussed. The complexities, uncertainties, and alternatives of power subsystem automation, along with the advantages from both an economic and a technological perspective were considered. Whereas most spacecraft power subsystems now use certain automated functions, the idea of complete autonomy for long periods of time is almost inconceivable. Thus, it seems prudent that the technology program for power subsystem automation be based upon a growth scenario which should provide a structured framework of deliberate steps to enable the evolution of space power subsystems from the current practice of limited autonomy to a greater use of automation with each step being justified on a cost/benefit basis. Each accomplishment should move toward the objectives of decreased requirement for ground control, increased system reliability through onboard management, and ultimately lower energy cost through longer life systems that require fewer resources to operate and maintain. This approach seems well-suited to the evolution of more sophisticated algorithms and eventually perhaps even the use of some sort of artificial intelligence. Multi-hundred kilowatt systems of the future will probably require an advanced level of autonomy if they are to be affordable and manageable.

  17. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  18. Design of Range Adaptive Wireless Power Transfer System Using Non-coaxial Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongsheng; Won, Sokhui; Hong, Huan

    2017-05-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) is a remarkable technology because of its convenience and applicability in harsh environment. Particularly, Magnetic Coupling WPT (MC-WPT) is a proper method to midrange power transfer, but the frequency splitting at over-coupling range, which is related with transfer distance, is challenge of transmission efficiency. In order to overcome this phenomenon, recently the range adaptive WPT is proposed. In this paper, we aim to the type with a set of non-coaxial driving coils, so that this may remove the connection wires from PA (Power Amplifier) to driving coil. And, when the radius of driving coil is changed, on the different gaps between driving and TX coils, coupling coefficient between these is computed in both cases of coaxial and non-coaxial configurations. In addition, the designing steps for 4-coil WPT system using non-coaxial coils are described with the example. Finally, the reliability of this topology has been proved and simulated with PSPICE.

  19. A 50 kilowatt distributed grid-connected photovoltaic generation system for the University of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, B.H.; Muknahallipatna, S.; Cupal, J.J.

    The University of Wyoming (UW) campus is serving as the site for a 50 kilowatt solar photovoltaic (PV) system. Three sub-systems were sited and built on the UW campus in 1996. The first sub-system, a 10 kW roof-integrated system of PV roof tiles is located on the roof of the Engineering building. The second sub-system--a 5 kW rack-mounted, ballasted PV system is on a walkway roof of the Engineering building. The third sub-system is a 35 kW shade structure system and located adjacent to the parking lot of the university`s football stadium. The three sub-systems differ in their design strategymore » since each is being used for research and education at the university. Each sub-system, being located at some distance away from one another, supplies a different part of the campus grid. Efforts continue at setting up a central monitoring system which will receive data remotely from all locations. A part of this monitoring system is complete. While the initial monitoring data shows satisfactory performance, a number of reliability problems with PV modules and inverters have delayed full functionality of the system.« less

  20. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2012

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-09-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2012. In FY 2012, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $195 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Armymore » Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator« less

  1. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-04-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. In FY 2011, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $167 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Armymore » Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator« less

  2. The Circuit Theory Behind Coupled-Mode Magnetic Resonance-Based Wireless Power Transmission.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-09-01

    Inductive coupling is a viable scheme to wirelessly energize devices with a wide range of power requirements from nanowatts in radio frequency identification tags to milliwatts in implantable microelectronic devices, watts in mobile electronics, and kilowatts in electric cars. Several analytical methods for estimating the power transfer efficiency (PTE) across inductive power transmission links have been devised based on circuit and electromagnetic theories by electrical engineers and physicists, respectively. However, a direct side-by-side comparison between these two approaches is lacking. Here, we have analyzed the PTE of a pair of capacitively loaded inductors via reflected load theory (RLT) and compared it with a method known as coupled-mode theory (CMT). We have also derived PTE equations for multiple capacitively loaded inductors based on both RLT and CMT. We have proven that both methods basically result in the same set of equations in steady state and either method can be applied for short- or midrange coupling conditions. We have verified the accuracy of both methods through measurements, and also analyzed the transient response of a pair of capacitively loaded inductors. Our analysis shows that the CMT is only applicable to coils with high quality factor ( Q ) and large coupling distance. It simplifies the analysis by reducing the order of the differential equations by half compared to the circuit theory.

  3. The Circuit Theory Behind Coupled-Mode Magnetic Resonance-Based Wireless Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    Inductive coupling is a viable scheme to wirelessly energize devices with a wide range of power requirements from nanowatts in radio frequency identification tags to milliwatts in implantable microelectronic devices, watts in mobile electronics, and kilowatts in electric cars. Several analytical methods for estimating the power transfer efficiency (PTE) across inductive power transmission links have been devised based on circuit and electromagnetic theories by electrical engineers and physicists, respectively. However, a direct side-by-side comparison between these two approaches is lacking. Here, we have analyzed the PTE of a pair of capacitively loaded inductors via reflected load theory (RLT) and compared it with a method known as coupled-mode theory (CMT). We have also derived PTE equations for multiple capacitively loaded inductors based on both RLT and CMT. We have proven that both methods basically result in the same set of equations in steady state and either method can be applied for short- or midrange coupling conditions. We have verified the accuracy of both methods through measurements, and also analyzed the transient response of a pair of capacitively loaded inductors. Our analysis shows that the CMT is only applicable to coils with high quality factor (Q) and large coupling distance. It simplifies the analysis by reducing the order of the differential equations by half compared to the circuit theory. PMID:24683368

  4. Laboratory Model 50 kW Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Jankovsky, Robert; Hofer, Richard

    2002-01-01

    A 0.46 meter diameter Hall thruster was fabricated and performance tested at powers up to 72 kilowatts. Thrusts up to 2.9 Newtons were measured. Discharge specific impulses ranged from 1750 to 3250 seconds with discharge efficiencies between 46 and 65 percent. Overall specific impulses ranged from 1550 to 3050 seconds with overall efficiencies between 40 and 57 percent. Performance data indicated significant fraction of multiple-charged ions during operation at elevated power levels. Cathode mass flow rate was shown to be a significant parameter with regard to thruster efficiency.

  5. Results of baseline tests of the Lucas Limousine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, R. F.; Dustin, M. O.; Sargent, N. B.

    1977-01-01

    The Lucas Limousine, an electric vehicle, was tested to assess the state-of-the-art of electric vehicles. All tests were made without the regenerative braking system and were conducted at the gross vehicle weight of 7,700 pounds. Over a 30 mph stop and go driving cycle the vehicle went 48.4 miles. The vehicle was able to accelerate to 30 mph in about 15 seconds with a gradeability limit of 16.5 percent. As determined by coast down tests the road power and road energy consumption for the vehicle were 2.92 kilowatts and 0.146 kWh/mi, respectively, at 20 mph. At 40 mph the road power requirement was 11.12 kilowatts and the road energy requirement was 0.278 kWh/mi. The maximum energy economy measured 0.45 kilowatt hours per mile at 30 mph and increased to 0.76 kilowatt hours per mile at 50 mph. Over the 30 mph stop and go driving cycle the energy economy was 0.92 kilowatt hours per mile.

  6. Multi-hundred kilowatt roll ring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Peter E.

    1985-01-01

    A program was completed to develop an evaluation unit of a high power rotary transfer device for potential application in a space environment. This device was configured around a Roll Ring concept which performs the same function as a slip ring/brush assembly with a rolling instead of sliding interface. An eight circuit Evaluation Unit (EU) and a portable Test Fixture (TF) were designed and fabricated. The EU was designed to transfer currents to 200 amperes at a potential of as high as 500 volts for an ultimate 100 kW/circuit transfer capability. The EU was evaluated in vacuum at dc transfer currents of 50 to 200 amperes at voltages to 10 volts and at 500 volts at 2 amperes. Power transfer to levels of 2 kW through each of the eight circuits was completed. Power transfer in vacuum at levels and efficiencies not previously achieved was demonstrated. The terminal-to-terminal resistance was measured to be greater than 0.42 milliohms which translates to an efficiency at 100 kW of 99.98 percent. The EU and TF have been delivered to the Lewis Research Center and are being prepared tor testing at increased power levels and for life testing, which will include both dc and ac power.

  7. DRDC Power and Energy S and T Option Analysis and Recommendations: A Response to Cross-Cutting Client S and T Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    2014 and has become very topical for lithium - ion safety issues in commercial aircraft given several events that occurred recently. DND and allies will...of the said government-only meetings and working groups include the annual Lithium battery safety working group), National Defense Industry...industry to provide energy products and power sources for a multitude of equipment from small batteries for soldier devices to 500-kilowatt electric

  8. High-temperature, high-power-density thermionic energy conversion for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretic converter outputs and efficiencies indicate the need to consider thermionic energy conversion (TEC) with greater power densities and higher temperatures within reasonable limits for space missions. Converter-output power density, voltage, and efficiency as functions of current density were determined for 1400-to-2000 K emitters with 725-to-1000 K collectors. The results encourage utilization of TEC with hotter-than-1650 K emitters and greater-than-6W sq cm outputs to attain better efficiencies, greater voltages, and higher waste-heat-rejection temperatures for multihundred-kilowatt space-power applications. For example, 1800 K, 30 A sq cm TEC operation for NEP compared with the 1650 K, 5 A/sq cm case should allow much lower radiation weights, substantially fewer and/or smaller emitter heat pipes, significantly reduced reactor and shield-related weights, many fewer converters and associated current-collecting bus bars, less power conditioning, and lower transmission losses. Integration of these effects should yield considerably reduced NEP specific weights.

  9. Experimental Investigation of a Direct-drive Hall Thruster and Solar Array System at Power Levels up to 10 kW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John S.; Brophy, John R.; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Katz, Ira

    2012-01-01

    As NASA considers future exploration missions, high-power solar-electric propulsion (SEP) plays a prominent role in achieving many mission goals. Studies of high-power SEP systems (i.e. tens to hundreds of kilowatts) suggest that significant mass savings may be realized by implementing a direct-drive power system, so NASA recently established the National Direct-Drive Testbed to examine technical issues identified by previous investigations. The testbed includes a 12-kW solar array and power control station designed to power single and multiple Hall thrusters over a wide range of voltages and currents. In this paper, single Hall thruster operation directly from solar array output at discharge voltages of 200 to 450 V and discharge powers of 1 to 10 kW is reported. Hall thruster control and operation is shown to be simple and no different than for operation on conventional power supplies. Thruster and power system electrical oscillations were investigated over a large range of operating conditions and with different filter capacitances. Thruster oscillations were the same as for conventional power supplies, did not adversely affect solar array operation, and were independent of filter capacitance from 8 to 80 ?F. Solar array current and voltage oscillations were very small compared to their mean values and showed a modest dependence on capacitor size. No instabilities or anomalous behavior were observed in the thruster or power system at any operating condition investigated, including near and at the array peak power point. Thruster startup using the anode propellant flow as the power 'switch' was shown to be simple and reliable with system transients mitigated by the proper selection of filter capacitance size. Shutdown via cutoff of propellant flow was also demonstrated. A simple electrical circuit model was developed and is shown to have good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Optimal Design of Magnetic ComponentsinPlasma Cutting Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J. F.; Zhu, B. R.; Zhao, W. N.; Yang, X. J.; Tang, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    Phase-shifted transformer and DC reactor are usually needed in chopper plasma cutting power supply. Because of high power rate, the loss of magnetic components may reach to several kilowatts, which seriously affects the conversion efficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to research and design low loss magnetic components by means of efficient magnetic materials and optimal design methods. The main task in this paper is to compare the core loss of different magnetic material, to analyze the influence of transformer structure, winding arrangement and wire structure on the characteristics of magnetic component. Then another task is to select suitable magnetic material, structure and wire in order to reduce the loss and volume of magnetic components. Based on the above outcome, the optimization design process of transformer and dc reactor are proposed in chopper plasma cutting power supply with a lot of solutions. These solutions are analyzed and compared before the determination of the optimal solution in order to reduce the volume and power loss of the two magnetic components and improve the conversion efficiency of plasma cutting power supply.

  11. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  12. Optimization of Industrial Ozone Generation with Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose; Guerrero, Daniel; Freilich, Alfred; Ramoino, Luca; Seton Hall University Team; Degremont Technologies-Ozonia Team

    2013-09-01

    Ozone (O3) is widely used for applications ranging from various industrial chemical synthesis processes to large-scale water treatment. The consequent surge in world-wide demand has brought about the requirement for ozone generation at the rate of several hundreds grams per kilowatt hour (g/kWh). For many years, ozone has been generated by means of dielectric barrier discharges (DBD), where a high-energy electric field between two electrodes separated by a dielectric and gap containing pure oxygen or air produce various microplasmas. The resultant microplasmas provide sufficient energy to dissociate the oxygen molecules while allowing the proper energetics channels for the formation of ozone. This presentation will review the current power schemes used for large-scale ozone generation and explore the use of high-voltage nanosecond pulses with reduced electric fields. The created microplasmas in a high reduced electric field are expected to be more efficient for ozone generation. This is confirmed with the current results of this work which observed that the efficiency of ozone generation increases by over eight time when the rise time and pulse duration are shortened. Department of Physics, South Orange, NJ, USA.

  13. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; hide

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  14. SP-100 design, safety, and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Carl. M.; Mahaffey, Michael M.; Smith, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The SP-100 Program is developing a nuclear reactor power system that can enhance and/or enable future civilian and military space missions. The program is directed to develop space reactor technology to provide electrical power in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. The major nuclear assembly test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and is designed to validate the performance of the 2.4-MWt nuclear and heat transport assembly.

  15. High Power mm-Wave Transmitter System for Radar or Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stride, S. L.; McMaster, R. L.; Pogorzelski, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Future NASA deep space missions able to provide tens of kilo-watts of spacecraft DC power, make it feasible to employ high power RF telecommunications systems. Traditional flight systems (e.g., Cassini), constrained by limited DC power, used a single high-gain 4m Cassegrain reflector fed by a single lower power (20W) transmitter. Increased available DC power means that high power (1000 W) transmitters can be used. Rather than continue building traditional single-transmitter systems it now becomes feasible to engineer and build multi-element active arrays that can illuminate a dish. Illuminating a 2m dish with a spherical wavefront from an offset 1kW active array can provide sufficient ERP (Effective Radiated Power) when compared to a larger Cassegrain dish. Such a system has the advantage of lower mass, lower volume, improved reliability, less stringent pointing requirements, lower cost and risk. We propose to design and build a prototype Ka-band transmit antenna with an active sub-array using 125W TWTAs. The system could be applied to a telecommunications downlink or radar transmitter used for missions such as JIMO.

  16. Stopping power and range calculations in human tissues by using the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usta, Metin; Tufan, Mustafa Çağatay

    2017-11-01

    The object of this work is to present the consequences for the stopping power and range values of some human tissues at energies ranging from 1 MeV to 1 GeV and 1-500 MeV, respectively. The considered human tissues are lung, intestine, skin, larynx, breast, bladder, prostate and ovary. In this work, the stopping power is calculated by considering the number of velocity-dependent effective charge and effective mean excitation energies of the target material. We used the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) atomic wave function to determine the charge density and the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) method for the calculation of the proton range. Electronic stopping power values of tissues results have been compared with the ICRU 44, 46 reports, SRIM, Janni and CasP data over the percent error rate. Range values relate to tissues have compared the range results with the SRIM, FLUKA and Geant4 data. For electronic stopping power results, ICRU, SRIM and Janni's data indicated the best fit with our values at 1-50, 50-250 MeV and 250 MeV-1 GeV, respectively. For range results, the best accordance with the calculated values have been found the SRIM data and the error level is less than 10% in proton therapy. However, greater 30% errors were observed in the 250 MeV and over energies.

  17. Thermal management for high power space platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualdoni, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    With future spacecraft power requirements expected to be in the order of 100 to 250 kilowatts and orbital lifetimes in the order of five to ten years, new approaches and concepts will be required that can efficiently and cost effectively provide the required heat rejection and temperature control capabilities. A plan was established to develop the commensurate technologies necessary for the thermal management of a high power space platform representative of future requirements and to achieve technology readiness by 1987. The approach taken in developing the program was to view the thermal requirements of the spacecraft as a spacecraft system rather than each as an isolated thermal problem. The program plan proposes 45 technology tasks required to achieve technology readiness. Of this total, 24 tasks were subsequently identified as being pacing technology tasks and were recommended for initiation in FY 1980 and FY 1981.

  18. Novel pulsed switched power supply for a fast field cycling NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sousa, D M; Fernandes, P A L; Marques, G D; Ribeiro, A C; Sebastião, P J

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we outline the operating principles of a pulsed switched power supply for a fast field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The power supply uses a variant of a four-quadrant chopper with a duty cycle that defines the average output current. With this topology only two semiconductors are necessary to drive hundreds of amperes with an output power of several kilowatts. The output current ripple has a well-defined shape that can be reduced to acceptable values by a careful design of the semiconductors' controlling circuits and drivers. A power supply prototype was tested with a home build air-core magnet operating with fields between 0 and 0.21 T. The system is computer controlled using pulse generator and data acquisition PC cards, and specific user-friendly home-developed software. A comparative proton relaxometry study in two well-known liquid crystal compounds 5CB and MBBA was performed to check the reproducibility of the T1 measurements.

  19. Nuclear thermionic power plants in the 50-300 kWe range.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoomissen, J. E.; Sawyer, C. D.; Prickett, W. Z.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of recent studies performed by General Electric on in-core thermionic reactor power plants in the 50-300 kWe range. In particular, a 100 kWe manned Space Base mission and a 240 kWe unmanned electric propulsion mission are singled out as representative design points for this concept.

  20. Preliminary Development of Electrodes for an Electric-Arc Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Charles E.; Boldman, Donald R.

    1959-01-01

    Two electrode configurations were tested in an electric-arc wind tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The results indicated approximately the same heat-loss rate per unit of arc power input for each of the configurations. Measured heat-loss rates were on the order of 40 percent of the arc power input. Nearly all this loss occurred at the anode. The power input and arc current limitations of the electrodes appear to be the critical design factors. Up to now, the maximum power to the stream has been 115 kilowatts with a cooled tungsten cathode and a cooled cylindrical anode incorporating a magnetic field. The maximum power input to this anode could not be established with the cooled tungsten cathode because cathode failures occurred at a gross power level of approximately 175 kilowatts. It was necessary to use a graphite cathode to seek the limitation of the anode. The results indicated that the anode limitation was primarily a function of arc current rather than power input. The anode was successfully operated at a power of 340 kilowatts at 1730 amperes; however, the anode failed with a power input of 324 kilowatts and a current of 2140 amperes. The magnetic flux density at the time of failure was 0.32 weber per square meter, or 3200 gauss. The graphite cathode was used only to establish the anode limitation; further investigation of graphite cathodes was discontinued because of the large amount of stream contamination associated with this type of electrode.

  1. Maximizing the science return of interplanetary missions using nuclear electric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    In the past, most studies dealing with the benefits of space nuclear electric power systems for solar system exploration have focused on the potential of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) to enhance missions by increasing delivered payload, decreasing LEO mass, or reducing trip time. While important, such mission enhancements have failed to go to the heart of the concerns of the scientific community supporting interplanetary exploration. To put the matter succintly, scientists don't buy delivered payload—they buy data returned. With nuclear power we can increase both the quantity of data returned, by enormously increasing data communication rates, and the quality of data by enabling a host of active sensing techniques otherwise impossible. These non-propulsive mission enhancement capabilities of space nuclear power have been known in principle for many years, but they have not been adequately documented. As a result, support for the development of space nuclear power by the interplanetary exploration community has been much less forceful than it might otherwise be. In this paper we shall present mission designs that take full advantage of the potential mission enhancements offered by space nuclear power systems in the 15 to 30 kWe range, not just for propulsion, but to radically improve, enrich, and expand the science return itself. Missions considered include orbiter missions to each of the outer planets. It will be shown that by using hybrid trajectories combining chemical propulsion with NEP and (in certain cases) gravity assists, that it is possible, using Proton, Tatan III or Titan IV-Centaur launch vehicles, for high-powered spacecraft to be placed in orbit around each of the outer planets with electric propulsion burn times of less than 4 years. Such hybrid trajectories therefore make the outer solar-system available to near-term nuclear electric power systems. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize multi-kilowatt communication systems, similar to

  2. Peak capacity analysis of coal power in China based on full-life cycle cost model optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jinfang; Huang, Xinting

    2018-02-01

    13th five-year and the next period are critical for the energy and power reform of China. In order to ease the excessive power supply, policies have been introduced by National Energy Board especially toward coal power capacity control. Therefore the rational construction scale and scientific development timing for coal power are of great importance and paid more and more attentions. In this study, the comprehensive influence of coal power reduction policies is analyzed from diverse point of views. Full-life cycle cost model of coal power is established to fully reflect the external and internal cost. Then this model is introduced in an improved power planning optimization theory. The power planning and diverse scenarios production simulation shows that, in order to meet the power, electricity and peak balance of power system, China’s coal power peak capacity is within 1.15 ∼ 1.2 billion kilowatts before or after 2025. The research result is expected to be helpful to the power industry in 14th and 15th five-year periods, promoting the efficiency and safety of power system.

  3. Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher

    2014-07-21

    Since 2001, Plug Power has installed more than 800 stationary fuel cell systems worldwide. Plug Power’s prime power systems have produced approximately 6.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity and have accumulated more than 2.5 million operating hours. Intermittent, or backup, power products have been deployed with telecommunications carriers and government and utility customers in North and South America, Europe, the United Kingdom, Japan and South Africa. Some of the largest material handling operations in North America are currently using the company’s motive power units in fuel cell-powered forklifts for their warehouses, distribution centers and manufacturing facilities. The low-temperature GenSys fuelmore » cell system provides remote, off-grid and primary power where grid power is unreliable or nonexistent. Built reliable and designed rugged, low- temperature GenSys delivers continuous or backup power through even the most extreme conditions. Coupled with high-efficiency ratings, low-temperature GenSys reduces operating costs making it an economical solution for prime power requirements. Currently, field trials at telecommunication and industrial sites across the globe are proving the advantages of fuel cells—lower maintenance, fuel costs and emissions, as well as longer life—compared with traditional internal combustion engines.« less

  4. Next generation cooled long range thermal sights with minimum size, weight, and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Ihle, T.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Situational awareness and precise targeting at day, night and severe weather conditions are key elements for mission success in asymmetric warfare. To support these capabilities for the dismounted soldier, AIM has developed a family of stand-alone thermal weapon sights based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The design driver for these sights is a long ID range <1500m for the NATO standard target to cover the operational range of a platoon with the engagement range of .50 cal rifles, 40mm AGLs or for reconnaissance tasks. The most recent sight WBZG has just entered into serial production for the IdZ enhanced system of the German army with additional capabilities like a wireless data link to the soldier backbone computer. Minimum size, weight and power (SWaP) are most critical requirements for the dismounted soldiers' equipment and sometimes push a decision towards uncooled equipment with marginal performance referring to the outstanding challenges in current asymmetric warfare, e.g. the capability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. To provide the uncompromised e/o performance with SWaP parameters close to uncooled, AIM has developed a new thermal weapon sight based on high operating temperature (HOT) MCT MWIR FPAs together with a new low power single piston stirling cooler. In basic operation the sight is used as a clip-on in front of the rifle scope. An additional eyepiece for stand-alone targeting with e.g. AGLs or a biocular version for relaxed surveillance will be available. The paper will present details of the technologies applied for such long range cooled sights with size, weight and power close to uncooled.

  5. Extended operating range of the 30-cm ion thruster with simplified power processor requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two grid 30 cm diameter mercury ion thruster was operated with only six power supplies over the baseline J series thruster power throttle range with negligible impact on thruster performance. An analysis of the functional model power processor showed that the component mass and parts count could be reduced considerably and the electrical efficiency increased slightly by only replacing power supplies with relays. The input power, output thrust, and specific impulse of the thruster were then extended, still using six supplies, from 2660 watts, 0.13 newtons, and 2980 seconds to 9130 watts, 0.37 newtons, and 3820 seconds, respectively. Increases in thrust and power density enable reductions in the number of thrusters and power processors required for most missions. Preliminary assessments of the impact of thruster operation at increased thrust and power density on the discharge characteristics, performance, and lifetime of the thruster were also made.

  6. Development of high-efficiency power amplifiers for PIP2 (Project X), Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Frederick

    The Fermi Lab PIP II (formerly Project X) accelerator will require the generation of over a megawatt of radio-frequency (RF) power at 325 and 650 MHz. This Phase-II SBIR grant developed techniques to generate this RF power efficienly. The basis of this approach is a system comprising high-efficiency RF power amplifiers, high-efficiency class-S modulators to maintain efficiency at all power levels, and low-loss power combiners. A digital signal processor adjusts signal parameters to obtain the maximum efficiency while producing a signal of the desired amplitude and phase. Components of 4-kW prototypes were designed, assembled, and tested. The 500-W modules producemore » signals at 325 MHz with an overall efficiency of 83 percent and signals at 650 MHz with an overall efficiency of 79 percent. This efficiency is nearly double that available from conventional techniques, which makes it possible to cut the power consumption nearly in half. The system is designed to be scalable to the multi-kilowatt level and can be adapted to other DoE applications.« less

  7. The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and anTenna (LISA-T) - Big Power for Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Boyd, Darren

    2017-01-01

    both cases, power generation ranges from tens of watts to several hundred with an expected specific power greater than 250 watts per kilogram and a stowed power density greater than 200 kilowatts per cubic meter. Options for leveraging both high performance, 'typical cost' triple junction thin-film solar cells as well as moderate performance, low cost cells are being developed. Alongside, both UHF (ultra high frequency) and S-band antennas are being integrated into the array to move their space claim away from the spacecraft and open the door for omnidirectional communications and electronically steered phase arrays.

  8. SRS modeling in high power CW fiber lasers for component optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, G.; Villeneuve, A.; Faucher, M.; Morin, M.; Trépanier, F.; Dionne, R.

    2017-02-01

    A CW kilowatt fiber laser numerical model has been developed taking into account intracavity stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). It uses the split-step Fourier method which is applied iteratively over several cavity round trips. The gain distribution is re-evaluated after each iteration with a standard CW model using an effective FBG reflectivity that quantifies the non-linear spectral leakage. This model explains why spectrally narrow output couplers produce more SRS than wider FBGs, as recently reported by other authors, and constitute a powerful tool to design optimized and innovative fiber components to push back the onset of SRS for a given fiber core diameter.

  9. Eye safe high power laser diode in the 1410-1550nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucart, Julien; de Largy, Brian; Kearley, Mark; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high power lasers emitting in the 14xx-15xxnm range is growing for applications in fields such as medical or homeland security. We demonstrate high power laser diodes with emission at 1430, 1470 and 1560 nm. Single multimode emitters at 1470nm emit about 3.5W in CW operation. Power conversion efficiency can reach values as high as 38.5%. With this base material, single and multi-emitter fiber coupled modules are built. Additionally, bars on passive and microchannel coolers are fabricated that deliver 25W and 38W respectively in CW mode, while obtaining more than 80 W in pulsed mode. All reliability tests show an outstanding stability of the material with no signs of wearout after 3750 hrs under strong acceleration conditions.

  10. Status of Kilowatt-Class Stirling Power Conversion Using a Pumped NaK Loop for Thermal Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Geng, Steven M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2010-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been identified as a viable option for potential Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems on the Moon and Mars. Proposed systems consist of two or more Stirling convertors, in a dual-opposed configuration, coupled to a low-temperature uranium-dioxide-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactor. To reduce developmental risks associated with liquid-metal loop integration, a test rig has been built to evaluate the performance of a pair of 1-kW free-piston Stirling convertors using a pumped sodium-potassium (NaK) loop for thermal energy input. Baseline performance maps have been generated at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) for these 1-kW convertors operating with an electric heat source. Each convertor was then retrofitted with a custom-made NaK heater head and integrated into a pumped NaK system at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This paper documents baseline testing at GRC as well as the progress made in integrating the Stirling convertors into the pumped NaK loop.

  11. Long range laser propagation: power scaling and beam quality issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2010-09-01

    This paper will address long range laser propagation applications where power and, in particular beam quality issues play a major role. Hereby the power level is defined by the specific mission under consideration. I restrict myself to the following application areas: (1)Remote sensing/Space based LIDAR, (2) Space debris removal (3)Energy transmission, and (4)Directed energy weapons Typical examples for space based LIDARs are the ADM Aeolus ESA mission using the ALADIN Nd:YAG laser with its third harmonic at 355 nm and the NASA 2 μm Tm:Ho:LuLiF convectively cooled solid state laser. Space debris removal has attracted more attention in the last years due to the dangerous accumulation of debris in orbit which become a threat to the satellites and the ISS space station. High power high brightness lasers may contribute to this problem by partially ablating the debris material and hence generating an impulse which will eventually de-orbit the debris with their subsequent disintegration in the lower atmosphere. Energy transmission via laser beam from space to earth has long been discussed as a novel long term approach to solve the energy problem on earth. In addition orbital transfer and stationkeeping are among the more mid-term applications of high power laser beams. Finally, directed energy weapons are becoming closer to reality as corresponding laser sources have matured due to recent efforts in the JHPSSL program. All of this can only be realized if he laser sources fulfill the necessary power requirements while keeping the beam quality as close as possible to the diffraction limited value. And this is the rationale and motivation of this paper.

  12. SP-100 power system conceptual design for lunar base applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Bloomfield, Harvey S.; Hainley, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a nuclear power system utilizing an SP-100 reactor and multiple Stirling cycle engines for operation on the lunar surface. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that this power plant could be a viable option for an evolutionary lunar base. The design concept consists of a 2500 kWt (kilowatt thermal) SP-100 reactor coupled to eight free-piston Stirling engines. Two of the engines are held in reserve to provide conversion system redundancy. The remaining engines operate at 91.7 percent of their rated capacity of 150 kWe. The design power level for this system is 825 kWe. Each engine has a pumped heat-rejection loop connected to a heat pipe radiator. Power system performance, sizing, layout configurations, shielding options, and transmission line characteristics are described. System components and integration options are compared for safety, high performance, low mass, and ease of assembly. The power plant was integrated with a proposed human lunar base concept to ensure mission compatibility. This study should be considered a preliminary investigation; further studies are planned to investigate the effect of different technologies on this baseline design.

  13. Highly excited bound-state resonances of short-range inverse power-law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-11-01

    We study analytically the radial Schrödinger equation with long-range attractive potentials whose asymptotic behaviors are dominated by inverse power-law tails of the form V(r)=-β _n r^{-n} with n>2. In particular, assuming that the effective radial potential is characterized by a short-range infinitely repulsive core of radius R, we derive a compact analytical formula for the threshold energy E^{ {max}}_l=E^{ {max}}_l(n,β _n,R), which characterizes the most weakly bound-state resonance (the most excited energy level) of the quantum system.

  14. Improvement of the Power Control Unit for Ion Thruster to Cope with Milli-Newton Range RIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceruti, Luca; Polli, Aldo; Galantini, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The recent development and testing activities of a miniaturized Radio-Frequency Ion Thruster, with relevant ancillary elements, in the range of 10 to 100 micro-Newtons, joined with past flight heritage in the milli-Newton range (RIT-10 for Artemis), shows an appealing capability of such an electrical propulsion technology to support thrust in a wide range of space applications from very fine attitude control up to deorbiting of small-medium satellites. As expectable, this implies that the mentioned ancillary elements (mainly Radio-Frequency Generator and Power Control Unit) require adaptation to the different requirements imposed to different missions and thrust ranges. Regarding the Power Control Unit different power levels, both the controllability requirements and the spacecraft interfaces impose non negligible adaptation leading to significant increase of development activities and associated cost (nonrecurring) increase. From that and with the main purpose to minimize such impacts and provide reliable equipments, Selex ES since a few years is devoting maximum attention in the incremental innovation of the existing design in order to maximize their reuse.

  15. Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study usingmore » a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.« less

  16. 76 FR 37806 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... 10 to 30 NC Sea Dragon or Red Hawk tidal turbines at a rated capacity of 100 kilowatts, (2) an... Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Cohansey River Energy Project, which would be.... The project is estimated to have an annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the...

  17. CMOS Amperometric ADC With High Sensitivity, Dynamic Range and Power Efficiency for Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Boling, C Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Airborne pollutants are a leading cause of illness and mortality globally. Electrochemical gas sensors show great promise for personal air quality monitoring to address this worldwide health crisis. However, implementing miniaturized arrays of such sensors demands high performance instrumentation circuits that simultaneously meet challenging power, area, sensitivity, noise and dynamic range goals. This paper presents a new multi-channel CMOS amperometric ADC featuring pixel-level architecture for gas sensor arrays. The circuit combines digital modulation of input currents and an incremental Σ∆ ADC to achieve wide dynamic range and high sensitivity with very high power efficiency and compact size. Fabricated in 0.5 [Formula: see text] CMOS, the circuit was measured to have 164 dB cross-scale dynamic range, 100 fA sensitivity while consuming only 241 [Formula: see text] and 0.157 [Formula: see text] active area per channel. Electrochemical experiments with liquid and gas targets demonstrate the circuit's real-time response to a wide range of analyte concentrations.

  18. Biosonar resolving power: echo-acoustic perception of surface structures in the submillimeter range.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ralph; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Tschapka, Marco; Schneider, Annkathrin; Passauer, Nadine; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; von Helversen, Otto

    2014-01-01

    The minimum distance for which two points still can be separated from each other defines the resolving power of a visual system. In an echo-acoustic context, the resolving power is usually measured as the smallest perceivable distance of two reflecting surfaces on the range axis and is found to be around half a millimeter for bats employing frequency modulated (FM) echolocation calls. Only few studies measured such thresholds with physical objects, most often bats were trained on virtual echoes i.e., echoes generated and played back by a computer; moreover, bats were sitting while they received the stimuli. In these studies differences in structure depth between 200 and 340 μm were found. However, these low thresholds were never verified for free-flying bats and real physical objects. Here, we show behavioral evidence that the echo-acoustic resolving power for surface structures in fact can be as low as measured for computer generated echoes and even lower, sometimes below 100 μm. We found this exceptional fine discrimination ability only when one of the targets showed spectral interferences in the frequency range of the bats' echolocation call while the other target did not. This result indicates that surface structure is likely to be perceived as a spectral quality rather than being perceived strictly in the time domain. Further, it points out that sonar resolving power directly depends on the highest frequency/shortest wavelength of the signal employed.

  19. Biosonar resolving power: echo-acoustic perception of surface structures in the submillimeter range

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ralph; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Tschapka, Marco; Schneider, Annkathrin; Passauer, Nadine; Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; von Helversen, Otto

    2014-01-01

    The minimum distance for which two points still can be separated from each other defines the resolving power of a visual system. In an echo-acoustic context, the resolving power is usually measured as the smallest perceivable distance of two reflecting surfaces on the range axis and is found to be around half a millimeter for bats employing frequency modulated (FM) echolocation calls. Only few studies measured such thresholds with physical objects, most often bats were trained on virtual echoes i.e., echoes generated and played back by a computer; moreover, bats were sitting while they received the stimuli. In these studies differences in structure depth between 200 and 340 μm were found. However, these low thresholds were never verified for free-flying bats and real physical objects. Here, we show behavioral evidence that the echo-acoustic resolving power for surface structures in fact can be as low as measured for computer generated echoes and even lower, sometimes below 100 μm. We found this exceptional fine discrimination ability only when one of the targets showed spectral interferences in the frequency range of the bats′ echolocation call while the other target did not. This result indicates that surface structure is likely to be perceived as a spectral quality rather than being perceived strictly in the time domain. Further, it points out that sonar resolving power directly depends on the highest frequency/shortest wavelength of the signal employed. PMID:24616703

  20. 47 CFR 74.796 - Modification of digital transmission systems and analog transmission systems for digital operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Subtract the value determined in the previous step from the authorized effective radiated power (“ERP”) of... ERP must be expressed in decibels above one kilowatt: ERP(dBk) = 10 log ERP(kW); (4) Convert the ERP calculated in the previous step to units of kilowatts; and (5) The ERP value determined through the above...

  1. Temperature Dependence of Power Reflectivity of the First-Wall Materials in the Synchrotron Radiation Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Noriharu; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Shimada, Michiya

    1995-07-01

    The temperature dependence of power reflectivity in the synchrotron radiation range was measured for candidate first-wall materials of the fusion reactor, such as B4C-coated isotropic graphite, C/C composite material, silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W), molybdenum (Mo) and SUS-316. The measurements were carried out using a vacuum vessel with a pressure of about 3 mTorr to avoid oxidation. Distinct temperature dependence of reflectivity was observed only for B4C-coated isotropic graphite. For the other materials, power reflectivities were insensitive to temperature in the range from 300 K to ˜900 K. Theoretical analysis of the results is also presented.

  2. Economic feasibility of converting cow manure to electricity: a case study of the CVPS Cow Power program in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Thompson, E; Parsons, R; Rogers, G; Dunn, D

    2011-10-01

    A case study of the Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS) Cow Power program examines the economic feasibility for dairy farms to convert cow manure into electricity via anaerobic methane digestion. The study reviews the mechanism for CVPS, dairy farms, electricity customers, and government agencies to develop and operate the program since 2004, examines the costs and returns for the participating dairy farms, and assesses their cash flow over a period of 7 yr under different scenarios. With 6 dairy farms generating about 12 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year and more than 4,600 CVPS electricity customers voluntarily paying premiums of $0.04 per kilowatt-hour, or a total of about $470,000 per year, the CVPS Cow Power program represents a successful and locally sourced renewable energy project with many environmental and economic benefits. Factors for the successful development and operation of the program include significant grants from government agencies and other organizations, strong consumer support, timely adjustments to the basic electricity price paid to the farms, and close collaboration among the participating parties. This study confirms that it is technically feasible to convert cow manure to electricity on farms, but the economic returns depend highly on the base electricity price, premium rate, financial supports from government agencies and other organizations, and sales of the byproducts of methane generation. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Status Report on the CEBAF IR and UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Christoph; Bisognano, Joseph; Douglas, David

    1993-07-01

    The CEBAF five pass recirculating, superconducting linac, being developed as a high power electron source for nuclear physics, is also an ideal FEL driver.The 45 MeV front end linac is presently operational with a CW (low peak current) nuclear physics gun and has met all CEBAF performance specifications including low emittance and energy spread (< 1 * 10^-4). Progress will be reported in commissioning.This experience leads to predictions of excellent FEL performance.Initial designs reported last year have been advanced.Using the output of a high charge DC photoemission gun under development with a 6 cm period wiggler produces kilowatt output powersmore » in the 3.6 to 17 micrometer range in the fundamental.Third harmonic operation extends IR performance down to 1.2 micrometer.Beam at energies up to 400 MeV from the first full CEBAF linac will interact in a similar but longer wiggler to yield kilowatt UV light production at wavelengths as short as 0.15 micrometers.Full power FEL« less

  4. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions.

    PubMed

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D; Ziegler, James F

    2016-09-07

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u(-1) to 450 MeV u(-1) or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  5. Analytical model for ion stopping power and range in the therapeutic energy interval for beams of hydrogen and heavier ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, William; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Ziegler, James F.

    2016-09-01

    Many different approaches exist to calculate stopping power and range of protons and heavy charged particles. These methods may be broadly categorized as physically complete theories (widely applicable and complex) or semi-empirical approaches (narrowly applicable and simple). However, little attention has been paid in the literature to approaches that are both widely applicable and simple. We developed simple analytical models of stopping power and range for ions of hydrogen, carbon, iron, and uranium that spanned intervals of ion energy from 351 keV u-1 to 450 MeV u-1 or wider. The analytical models typically reproduced the best-available evaluated stopping powers within 1% and ranges within 0.1 mm. The computational speed of the analytical stopping power model was 28% faster than a full-theoretical approach. The calculation of range using the analytic range model was 945 times faster than a widely-used numerical integration technique. The results of this study revealed that the new, simple analytical models are accurate, fast, and broadly applicable. The new models require just 6 parameters to calculate stopping power and range for a given ion and absorber. The proposed model may be useful as an alternative to traditional approaches, especially in applications that demand fast computation speed, small memory footprint, and simplicity.

  6. Southeastern Power Administration 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2007-12-28

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am proud to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2007 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this report reflects Southeastern’s programs, accomplishments, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2006 and ending September 30, 2007. Southeastern marketed more than 5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 492 wholesale Federal power customers in an 11-state marketing area in FY 2007. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $219 million. Drought conditions continued to plague the southeast region of the United States during 2007 placing strains on our naturalmore » and financial resources. Southeastern purchased more than $40 million in replacement power to meet customer contract requirements to ensure the continued reliability of our nation’s power grid. With the financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, continued funding for capitalized equipment replacements at various Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security program continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and requirements. Plans for the upcoming year include communication and cooperation with DOE, Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our nation’s water resources. Competition for the use of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency. The employees at Southeastern will be proactive in meeting these challenges and providing reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator« less

  7. A consortium of three brings real geothermal power for California's Imperial valley -- at last

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlage, E.F.

    1983-04-01

    Imperial Valley's geothermal history gets a whole new chapter with dedication ceremony for southern California's unusual 10,000 kilowatt power station-SCE in joint corporate venture with Southern Pacific and Union Oil. America's newest and unique electric power generation facility, The Salton Sea Geothermal-Electric Project, was the the site of a formal dedication ceremony while the sleek and stainless jacketed piping and machinery were displayed against a flawlessly brilliant January sky - blue and flecked with a few whisps of high white clouds, while plumes of geothermal steam rose across the desert. The occasion was the January 19, 1983, ceremonial dedication ofmore » the unique U.S.A. power generation facility constructed by an energy consortium under private enterprise, to make and deliver electricity, using geothermal steam released (with special cleaning and treatment) from magma-heated fluids produced at depths of 3,000 to 6,000 feet beneath the floor of the Imperial Valley near Niland and Brawley, California.« less

  8. Quantum dot SOA input power dynamic range improvement for differential-phase encoded signals.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Bonk, R; Guetlein, J; Hillerkuss, D; Li, J; Brenot, R; Lelarge, F; Duan, G H; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2010-03-15

    Experimentally we find a 10 dB input power dynamic range advantage for amplification of phase encoded signals with quantum dot SOA as compared to low-confinement bulk SOA. An analysis of amplitude and phase effects shows that this improvement can be attributed to the lower alpha-factor found in QD SOA.

  9. Evaluation of DCS III Transmission Alternatives. Phase 1A Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-26

    to be used to construct the waveguide. Most commonly used measures are straight and precision tubing, dielectric lining, and helix construction. These...controlled L5E. 3-11 The broadband signal, either analog or digital, can be transmitted over a coaxial cable. Although economic reasons as well as high...or another with power capability ranging from milliwatts up to several hundred kilowatts. One kind of mm source is travelling wave tubes ( TWT ) which

  10. Mod-1 Wind Turbine at Boone, North Carolina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-06-21

    A Mod-1 2000-kilowatt wind turbine designed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center and constructed in Boone, North Carolina. The wind turbine program was a joint program between NASA and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) during the 1970s to develop less expensive forms of energy. NASA Lewis was assigned the responsibility of developing large horizontal-axis wind turbines. The program included a series of increasingly powerful wind turbines, designated: Mod-0A, Mod-1, WTS-4, and Mod-5. The program’s first device was a Mod-0 100-kilowatt wind turbine test bed at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. There were four Mod-0A 200-kilowatt turbines built in New Mexico, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Rhode Island. The 2000-kilowatt wind turbine in North Carolina, seen here, was the only Mod-1 machine constructed. The two-bladed, 200-foot diameter device was built in May 1979 and began operation that September. The Mod-1 turbine performed exceedingly well and was fully integrated into the local power grid. NASA researchers also used the North Carolina device to study its effect on noise and television transmission.

  11. Communication Range Dynamics and Performance Analysis for a Self-Adaptive Transmission Power Controller.

    PubMed

    Lucas Martínez, Néstor; Martínez Ortega, José-Fernán; Hernández Díaz, Vicente; Del Toro Matamoros, Raúl M

    2016-05-12

    The deployment of the nodes in a Wireless Sensor and Actuator Network (WSAN) is typically restricted by the sensing and acting coverage. This implies that the locations of the nodes may be, and usually are, not optimal from the point of view of the radio communication. Additionally, when the transmission power is tuned for those locations, there are other unpredictable factors that can cause connectivity failures, like interferences, signal fading due to passing objects and, of course, radio irregularities. A control-based self-adaptive system is a typical solution to improve the energy consumption while keeping good connectivity. In this paper, we explore how the communication range for each node evolves along the iterations of an energy saving self-adaptive transmission power controller when using different parameter sets in an outdoor scenario, providing a WSAN that automatically adapts to surrounding changes keeping good connectivity. The results obtained in this paper show how the parameters with the best performance keep a k-connected network, where k is in the range of the desired node degree plus or minus a specified tolerance value.

  12. A Wirelessly Powered Smart Contact Lens with Reconfigurable Wide Range and Tunable Sensitivity Sensor Readout Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Hsu, Shun-Hsi; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Yeh, Guan-Ting; Liou, Wei-Ting; Kuei, Cheng-Kai

    2017-01-01

    This study presented a wireless smart contact lens system that was composed of a reconfigurable capacitive sensor interface circuitry and wirelessly powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) addressable system for sensor control and data communication. In order to improve compliance and reduce user discomfort, a capacitive sensor was embedded on a soft contact lens of 200 μm thickness using commercially available bio-compatible lens material and a standard manufacturing process. The results indicated that the reconfigurable sensor interface achieved sensitivity and baseline tuning up to 120 pF while consuming only 110 μW power. The range and sensitivity tuning of the readout circuitry ensured a reliable operation with respect to sensor fabrication variations and independent calibration of the sensor baseline for individuals. The on-chip voltage scaling allowed the further extension of the detection range and prevented the implementation of large on-chip elements. The on-lens system enabled the detection of capacitive variation caused by pressure changes in the range of 2.25 to 30 mmHg and hydration level variation from a distance of 1 cm using incident power from an RFID reader at 26.5 dBm. PMID:28067859

  13. High power broadband all fiber super-fluorescent source with linear polarization and near diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-25

    In this manuscript, a high power broadband superfluorescent source (SFS) with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality is achieved based on an ytterbium-doped (Yb-doped), all fiberized and polarization-maintained master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The MOPA structure generates a linearly polarized output power of 1427 W with a slope efficiency of 80% and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 11 nm, which is power scaled by an order of magnitude compared with the previously reported SFSs with linear polarization. In the experiment, both the polarization extinction ratio (PER) and beam quality (M(2) factor) are degraded little during the power scaling process. At maximal output power, the PER and M(2) factor are measured to be 19.1dB and 1.14, respectively. The root-mean-square (RMS) and peak-vale (PV) values of the power fluctuation at maximal output power are just 0.48% and within 3%, respectively. Further power scaling of the whole system is limited by the available pump sources. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of kilowatt level broadband SFS with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

  14. Stream power framework for predicting geomorphic change: The 2013 Colorado Front Range flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochum, Steven E.; Sholtes, Joel S.; Scott, Julian A.; Bledsoe, Brian P.

    2017-09-01

    The Colorado Front Range flood of September 2013 induced a diverse range of geomorphic changes along numerous stream corridors, providing an opportunity to assess responses to a large flood in a semiarid landscape. We defined six classes of geomorphic change related to peak unit stream power and valley confinement for 531 stream reaches over 226 km, spanning a gradient of channel scales and slope. Geomorphic change was generally driven by erosion of channel margins in confined reaches and by a combination of deposition and erosion in unconfined reaches. The magnitude of geomorphic change typically increased with unit stream power (ω), with greater responses observed in unconfined channels. Cumulative logit modeling indicated that total stream power or unit stream power, unit stream power gradient, and valley confinement are significant predictors of geomorphic response for this flood event. Based on this dataset, thresholds for geomorphic adjustment were defined. For channel slopes < 3%, we noted a credible potential for substantial channel widening with ω > 230 W/m2 (16 lb/ft-s; at least 10% of the investigated sites experienced substantial channel widening) and a credible potential for avulsions, braiding, and loss of adjacent road embankments associated with ω > 480 W/m2 (33 lb/ft-s; at least 10% of the investigated sites experienced such geomorphic change). Infrequent to numerous eroded banks were very likely with ω > 700 W/m2 (48 lb/ft-s), with substantial channel widening or major geomorphic change shifting from credible to likely. Importantly, in reaches where there were large reductions in ω as the valley form shifted from confined to relatively unconfined, large amounts of deposition-induced, reach-scale geomorphic change occurred in some locations at relatively low ω. Additionally, alluvial channels with slopes > 3% had greater resistance to geomorphic change, likely caused by armoring by larger bed material and increased flow resistance from

  15. Honey Lake Power Facility under construction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal energy and wood waste are primary energy sources for the 30 megawatt, net, Honey Lake Power Facility, a cogeneration power plant. The facility 60% completed in January 1989, will use 1,300 tons per day of fuel obtained from selective forest thinnings and from logging residue combined with mill wastes. The power plant will be the largest industrial facility to use some of Lassen County's geothermal resources. The facility will produce 236 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually. The plant consists of a wood-fired traveling grate furnace with a utility-type high pressure boiler. Fluids from a geothermal well will pass throughmore » a heat exchange to preheat boiler feedwater. Used geothermal fluid will be disposed of in an injection well. Steam will be converted to electrical power through a 35.5-megawatt turbine generator and transmitted 22 miles to Susanville over company-owned and maintained transmission lines. The plant includes pollution control for particulate removal, ammonia injection for removal of nitrogen oxides, and computer-controlled combustion systems to control carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. The highly automated wood yard consists of systems to remove metal, handle oversized material, receive up to six truck loads of wood products per hour, and continuously deliver 58 tons per hour of fuel through redundant systems to ensure maximum on-line performance. The plant is scheduled to become operational in mid-1989.« less

  16. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  17. Waste-Heat-Driven Cooling Using Complex Compound Sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocketfeller, Uwe; Kirol, Lance; Khalili, Kaveh

    2004-01-01

    Improved complex-compound sorption pumps are undergoing development for use as prime movers in heat-pump systems for cooling and dehumidification of habitats for humans on the Moon and for residential and commercial cooling on Earth. Among the advantages of sorption heat-pump systems are that they contain no moving parts except for check valves and they can be driven by heat from diverse sources: examples include waste heat from generation of electric power, solar heat, or heat from combustion of natural gas. The use of complex compound sorbents in cooling cycles is not new in itself: Marketing of residential refrigerators using SrCl2 was attempted in the 1920s and 30s and was abandoned because heat- and mass-transfer rates of the sorbents were too low. Addressing the issue that gave rise to the prior abandonment of complex compound sorption heat pumps, the primary accomplishment of the present development program thus far has been the characterization of many candidate sorption media, leading to large increases in achievable heat- and mass-transfer rates. In particular, two complex compounds (called "CC260-1260" and "CC260-2000") were found to be capable of functioning over the temperature range of interest for the lunar-habitat application and to offer heat- and mass-transfer rates and a temperature-lift capability adequate for that application. Regarding the temperature range: A heat pump based on either of these compounds is capable of providing a 95-K lift from a habitable temperature to a heat-rejection (radiator) temperature when driven by waste heat at an input temperature .500 K. Regarding the heat- and mass-transfer rates or, more precisely, the power densities made possible by these rates: Power densities observed in tests were 0.3 kilowatt of cooling per kilogram of sorbent and 2 kilowatts of heating per kilogram of sorbent. A prototype 1-kilowatt heat pump based on CC260-2000 has been built and demonstrated to function successfully.

  18. Accelerating 21st Century Economic Growth by Implementation of the Lunar Solar Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The World Energy Council (1) makes this declaration. "Given this dramatically uneven distribution and the limited evidence of improvement in economic growth in many developing countries, WEC at the 17th World Congress in Houston in September 1998 concluded that the number one priority in sustainable energy development today for all decision-makers in all countries is to extend access to commercial energy services to the people who do not now have it and to those who will come into the world in the next two decades, largely in developing countries, without such access." By ~2050 the global systems should supply 10 billion people approximately 6.7 kilowatts of thermal power per person or 61,360 kWt-h/y-person of energy. The economic equivalent is ~2 - 3 kWe of electric power per person. The energy must be environmentally clean. The energy must be sufficiently low in cost that the 2 billion poorest people, who now make 1,000 /y-person, can be provided with the new power. A survey of twenty-five options for providing adequate commercial electric power, including solar power satellites in orbit about Earth, concludes that only the Lunar Solar Power System can meet the WEC challenge (2, 3, 4, 5). Maurice Strong is the former CEO of Ontario Hydro and organizer of the 1992 Rio Environmental Summit. Quoting Strong - "I have checked it (LSP System) out with a number of experts, all of whom confirmed that the idea, which has been mooted for some time, may now be ripe to carry forward. --- The project would deliver net new energy to the Earth that is independent of the biosphere, would produce no CO2 or other polluting emissions and have minimal environmental impact compared with other energy sources." (6). Electric energy provided by the LSP System can accelerate terrestrial economic growth in several ways. A cost of less than 1 cent per kilowatt electric hour seems achievable. This allows poor nations to buy adequate energy. Increasing per capita use of electric power is

  19. Constant power speed range extension of surface mounted PM motors

    DOEpatents

    Lawler, Jack Steward; Bailey, John Milton

    2001-01-01

    A circuit and method for controlling a rotating machine (11) in the constant horsepower range above base speed uses an inverter (15) having SCR's (T1-T6) connected in series with the primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) to control turn off of the primary commutation switches and to protect the primary commutation switches from faults. The primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) are controlled by a controller (14), to fire in advance or after a time when the back emf equals the applied voltage, and then to turn off after a precise dwell time, such that suitable power is developed at speeds up to at least six times base speed.

  20. Beyond Electric Propulsion: Non-Propulsive Benefits of Nuclear Power for the Exploration of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1994-07-01

    In the past, most studies dealing with the benefits of space nuclear electric power systems for solar system exploration have focused on the potential of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) to enhance missions by increasing delivered payload, decreasing LEO mass, or reducing trip time. While important, such mission enhancements have failed to go to the heart of the concerns of the scientific community supporting interplanetary exploration. To put the matter succinctly, scientists don't buy delivered payload - they buy data returned. With nuclear power we can increase both the quantity of data returned, by enormously increasing data communication rates, and the quality of data by enabling a host of active sensing techniques otherwise impossible. These non-propulsive mission enhancement capabilities of space nuclear power have been known in principle for many years, but they have not been adequately documented. As a result, support for the development of space nuclear power by the interplanetary exploration community has been much less forceful than it might otherwise be. In this paper we shall present mission designs that take full advantage of the potential mission enhancements offered by space nuclear power systems in the 10 to 100 kWe range, not just for propulsion, but to radically improve, enrich, and expand the science return itself. Missions considered include orbiter missions to each of the outer planets. It will be shown that be using hybrid trajectories combining chemical propulsion with NEP and (in certain cases) gravity assists, that it is possible, using a Titan IV-Centaur launch vehicle, for high-powered spacecraft to be placed in orbit around each of the outer planets with electric propulsion burn times of less than 4 years. Such hybrid trajectories therefore make the outer solar-system available to near-term nuclear electric power systems. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize multi-kilowatt communication systems, similar to those now employed by

  1. Ultra High Power and Efficiency Space Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Power Combiner with Reduced Size and Mass for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Force, Dale A.

    2009-01-01

    In the 2008 International Microwave Symposium (IMS) Digest version of our paper, recent advances in high power and efficiency space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) for NASA s space-to-Earth communications are presented. The RF power and efficiency of a new K-Band amplifier are 40 W and 50 percent and that of a new Ka-Band amplifier are 200 W and 60 percent. An important figure-of-merit, which is defined as the ratio of the RF power output to the mass (W/kg) of a TWT, has improved by a factor of ten over the previous generation Ka-Band devices. In this extended paper, a high power, high efficiency Ka-band combiner for multiple TWTs, based on a novel hybrid magic-T waveguide circuit design, is presented. The measured combiner efficiency is as high as 90 percent. In addition, at the design frequency of 32.05 GHz, error-free uncoded BPSK/QPSK data transmission at 8 megabits per second (Mbps), which is typical for deep space communications is demonstrated. Furthermore, QPSK data transmission at 622 Mbps is demonstrated with a low bit error rate of 2.4x10(exp -8), which exceeds the deep space state-of-the-art data rate transmission capability by more than two orders of magnitude. A potential application of the TWT combiner is in deep space communication systems for planetary exploration requiring transmitter power on the order of a kilowatt or higher.

  2. Modular high power diode lasers with flexible 3D multiplexing arrangement optimized for automated manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könning, Tobias; Bayer, Andreas; Plappert, Nora; Faßbender, Wilhelm; Dürsch, Sascha; Küster, Matthias; Hubrich, Ralf; Wolf, Paul; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens

    2018-02-01

    A novel 3-dimensional arrangement of mirrors is used to re-arrange beams from 1-D and 2-D high power diode laser arrays. The approach allows for a variety of stacking geometries, depending on individual requirements. While basic building blocks, including collimating optics, always remain the same, most adaptations can be realized by simple rearrangement of a few optical components. Due to fully automated alignment processes, the required changes can be realized in software by changing coordinates, rather than requiring customized mechanical components. This approach minimizes development costs due to its flexibility, while reducing overall product cost by using similar building blocks for a variety of products and utilizing a high grade of automation. The modules can be operated with industrial grade water, lowering overall system and maintenance cost. Stackable macro coolers are used as the smallest building block of the system. Each cooler can hold up to five diode laser bars. Micro optical components, collimating the beam, are mounted directly to the cooler. All optical assembly steps are fully automated. Initially, the beams from all laser bars propagate in the same direction. Key to the concept is an arrangement of deflectors, which re-arrange the beams into a 2-D array of the desired shape and high fill factor. Standard multiplexing techniques like polarization- or wavelengths-multiplexing have been implemented as well. A variety of fiber coupled modules ranging from a few hundred watts of optical output power to multiple kilowatts of power, as well as customized laser spot geometries like uniform line sources, have been realized.

  3. WTG Energy Systems' Rotor: Steel at 80 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design, specifications, and performance of the 80 foot diameter fixed pitch rotor operating on the MP1-200 wind turbine generator installed as part of the Island of Cuttyhunk's electric power utility grid system are described. This synchronous generating system rated 200 kilowatts at 28 mph wind velocity, and produces constant 60 Hz, 480 VAC current at +/- 1 percent accuracy throughout the machine's operating range. Future R & D requirements and suggestions are included with cost data.

  4. Exploring high power, extreme wavelength operating potential of rare-earth-doped silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Li, Ruixian; Xiao, Hu; Huang, Long; Zhang, Hanwei; Leng, Jinyong; Chen, Zilun; Xu, Jiangmin; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiong

    2017-08-01

    Ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) and Thulium doped fiber laser (TDFL) have been two kinds of the most widely studied fiber laser in recent years. Although both silica-based Ytterbium-doped fiber and Thulium doped fiber have wide emission spectrum band (more than 200 nm and 400 nm, respectively), the operation spectrum region of previously demonstrated high power YDFL and TDFL fall into 1060-1100 nm and 1900-2050nm. Power scaling of YDFL and TDFL operates at short-wavelength or long-wavelength band, especially for extreme wavelength operation, although is highly required in a large variety of application fields, is quite challenging due to small net gain and strong amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). In this paper, we will present study on extreme wavelength operation of high power YDFL and TDFL in our group. Comprehensive mathematical models are built to investigate the feasibility of high power operation and propose effective technical methods to achieve high power operation. We have achieved (1) Diodepumped 1150nm long wavelength YDFL with 120-watt level output power (2) Diode-pumped 1178nm long wavelength YDFL operates at high temperature with 30-watt level output power (3) Random laser pumped 2153nm long wavelength TDFL with 20-watt level output power (4) Diode-pumped 1018nm short wavelength YDFL with a record 2 kilowatt output power is achieved by using home-made fiber combiner.

  5. NREL`s variable speed test bed: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, P.W.; Fingersh, L.J.; Fuchs, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    Under an NREL subcontract, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of Colorado (CU) designed a 20-kilowatt, 12-pole, permanent-magnet, electric generator and associated custom power electronics modules. This system can supply power over a generator speed range from 60 to 120 RPM. The generator was fabricated and assembled by the Denver electric-motor manufacturer, Unique Mobility, and the power electronics modules were designed and fabricated at the University. The generator was installed on a 56-foot tower in the modified nacelle of a Grumman Windstream 33 wind turbine in early October 1995. For checkout it was immediately loaded directly intomore » a three-phase resistive load in which it produced 3.5 kilowatts of power. Abstract only included. The ten-meter Grumman host wind machine is equipped with untwisted, untapered, NREL series S809 blades. The machine was instrumented to record both mechanical hub power and electrical power delivered to the utility. Initial tests are focusing on validating the calculated power surface. This mathematical surface shows the wind machine power as a function of both wind speed and turbine rotor speed. Upon the completion of this task, maximum effort will be directed toward filling a test matrix in which variable-speed operation will be contrasted with constant-speed mode by switching the variable speed control algorithm with the baseline constant speed control algorithm at 10 minutes time intervals. Other quantities in the test matrix will be analyzed to detect variable speed-effects on structural loads and power quality.« less

  6. Narrow linewidth power scaling and phase stabilization of 2-μm thulium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodno, Gregory D.; Book, Lewis D.; Rothenberg, Joshua E.; Weber, Mark E.; Benjamin Weiss, S.

    2011-11-01

    Thulium-doped fiber lasers (TFLs) emitting retina-safe 2-μm wavelengths offer substantial power-scaling advantages over ytterbium-doped fiber lasers for narrow linewidth, single-mode operation. This article reviews the design and performance of a pump-limited, 600 W, single-mode, single-frequency TFL amplifier chain that balances thermal limitations against those arising from stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). A simple analysis of thermal and SBS limits is anchored with measurements on kilowatt class Tm and Yb fiber lasers to highlight the scaling advantage of Tm for narrow linewidth operation. We also report recent results on active phase-locking of a TFL amplifier to an optical reference as a precursor to further parallel scaling via coherent beam combining.

  7. Monte Carlo calculation of proton stopping power and ranges in water for therapeutic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2017-09-01

    Monte Carlo is a statistical technique for obtaining numerical solutions to physical or mathematical problems that are analytically impractical, if not impossible, to solve. For charged particle transport problems, it presents many advantages over deterministic methods since such problems require a realistic description of the problem geometry, as well as detailed tracking of every source particle. Thus, MC can be considered as a powerful alternative to the well-known Bethe-Bloche equation where an equation with various corrections is used to obtain stopping power and ranges of electrons, positrons, protons, alphas, etc. This study presents how a stochastic method such as MC can be utilized to obtain certain quantities of practical importance related to charged particle transport. Sample simulation geometries were formed for water medium where disk shaped thin detectors were employed to compute average values of absorbed dose and flux at specific distances. For each detector cell, these quantities were utilized to evaluate the values of the range and the stopping power, as well as the shape of Bragg curve, for mono-energetic point source pencil beams of protons. The results were found to be ±2% compared to the data from the NIST compilation. It is safe to conclude that this approach can be extended to determine dosimetric quantities for other media, energies and charged particle types.

  8. Eight Kilowatt Hall Thruster System Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    divergence13,14 and maximize thrust efficiency. Electrical isolation of the anode from the propellant line is achieved with a custom high voltage ceramic ... Electric Co., Inc. 55 A, 730 V (40 kW) (+) (-) Hall Effect Thruster Hollow Cathode b h k Figure 4. T8 test facility and nominal power supply diagram...may be 700-V or higher. Electrical isolation of the anode from the propellant line is provided by a custom ceramic break developed by Busek. The

  9. New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Converter Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has recently funded development of a 5 kW (or greater) free-piston Stirling conversion system for reactor power systems. A nominal 5 kW converter allows two of these units to be dynamically balanced. A group of three dual-convertor combinations would yield the desired 30 kW. The status of this program will be presented. Goals include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the converter level, lifetime in excess of five years and AC output. The initial step is the design and development of a nominal 5 kW per cylinder Stirling converter assembly (SCA) which will serve as a prototype of one or more SCAs that will make up the final 30 kW Stirling Converter Power System. Assumed requirements for this new converter for lunar fission power systems will be presented. The primary objective of this development effort will be to demonstrate a 5 kW SCA that can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems.

  10. New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has recently funded development of a 5 kW (or greater) free-piston Stirling conversion system for reactor power systems. A nominal 5 kW convertor allows two of these units to be dynamically balanced. A group of three dual-convertor combinations would yield the desired 30 kW. The status of this program will be presented. Goals include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and AC output. The initial step is the design and development of a nominal 5 kW per cylinder Stirling convertor assembly (SCA) which will serve as a prototype of one or more SCAs that will make up the final 30 kW Stirling Convertor Power System. Assumed requirements for this new convertor for lunar fission power systems will be presented. The primary objective of this development effort will be to demonstrate a 5 kW SCA that can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems.

  11. On solar thermal electric power capacity sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.

    1984-03-01

    The commercialization of parabolic dish/generator modules are investigated. Design analysis indicates that a 10 sq m/ three kilowatt generator configuration is simple and easy to maintain, manufacturing is easily adaptable, the demand is already established, the unit is cost effective and the hardware is readily available.

  12. Skylab Shroud in the Space Power Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-12-21

    The 56-foot tall, 24,400-pound Skylab shroud installed in the Space Power Facility’s vacuum chamber at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station. The Space Power Facility, which began operations in 1969, is the largest high vacuum chamber ever built. The chamber is 100 feet in diameter and 120 feet high. It can produce a vacuum deep enough to simulate the conditions at 300 miles altitude. The Space Power Facility was originally designed to test nuclear-power sources for spacecraft during long durations in a space atmosphere, but it was never used for that purpose. Payload shrouds are aerodynamic fairings to protect the payload during launch and ascent to orbit. The Skylab mission utilized the largest shroud ever attempted. Unlike previous launches, the shroud would not be jettisoned until the spacecraft reached orbit. NASA engineers designed these tests to verify the dynamics of the jettison motion in a simulated space environment. Fifty-four runs and three full-scale jettison tests were conducted from mid-September 1970 to June 1971. The shroud behaved as its designers intended, the detonators all fired, and early design issues were remedied by the final test. The Space Power Facility continues to operate today. The facility can sustain a high vacuum; simulate solar radiation via a 4-megawatt quartz heat lamp array, solar spectrum by a 400-kilowatt arc lamp, and cold environments. Test programs at the facility include high-energy experiments, shroud separation tests, Mars Lander system tests, deployable Solar Sail tests and International Space Station hardware tests.

  13. Communication Range Dynamics and Performance Analysis for a Self-Adaptive Transmission Power Controller †

    PubMed Central

    Lucas Martínez, Néstor; Martínez Ortega, José-Fernán; Hernández Díaz, Vicente; del Toro Matamoros, Raúl M.

    2016-01-01

    The deployment of the nodes in a Wireless Sensor and Actuator Network (WSAN) is typically restricted by the sensing and acting coverage. This implies that the locations of the nodes may be, and usually are, not optimal from the point of view of the radio communication. Additionally, when the transmission power is tuned for those locations, there are other unpredictable factors that can cause connectivity failures, like interferences, signal fading due to passing objects and, of course, radio irregularities. A control-based self-adaptive system is a typical solution to improve the energy consumption while keeping good connectivity. In this paper, we explore how the communication range for each node evolves along the iterations of an energy saving self-adaptive transmission power controller when using different parameter sets in an outdoor scenario, providing a WSAN that automatically adapts to surrounding changes keeping good connectivity. The results obtained in this paper show how the parameters with the best performance keep a k-connected network, where k is in the range of the desired node degree plus or minus a specified tolerance value. PMID:27187397

  14. 808nm high-power high-efficiency GaAsP/GaInP laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Ye; Qin, Li; Wang, Chao; Yao, Di; Liu, Yun; Wang, Lijun

    2008-11-01

    808nm high power diode lasers, which is rapidly maturing technology technically and commercially since the introduction in 1999 of complete kilowatt-scale diode laser systems, have important applications in the fields of industry and pumping solid-state lasers (DPSSL). High power and high power conversion efficiency are extremely important in diode lasers, and they could lead to new applications where space, weight and electrical power are critical. High efficiency devices generate less waste heat, which means less strain on the cooling system and more tolerance to thermal conductivity variation, a lower junction temperature and longer lifetimes. Diode lasers with Al-free materials have superior power conversion efficiency compared with conventional AlGaAs/GaAs devices because of their lower differential series resistance and higher thermal conductivity. 808nm GaAsP/GaInP broad-waveguide emitting diode laser bars with 1mm cavity length have been fabricated. The peak power can reach to 100.9W at 106.5A at quasicontinuous wave operation (200μs, 1000Hz). The maximum power conversion efficiency is 57.38%. Based on these high power laser bars, we fabricate a 1x3 arrays, the maximum power is 64.3W in continuous wave mode when the current is 25.0A. And the threshold current is 5.9A, the slope efficiency is 3.37 W/A.

  15. Economical photovoltaic power generation with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three designs for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and thermal energy are analyzed. The objective of these converters is to increase the electric and thermal output for each photovoltaic array so as to lower the cell cost relative to the amount of energy delivered. An analysis of the economical aspects of conversion by photovoltaic cells with heat recovery is carried out in terms of hypothetical examples. Thus, it is shown that the original cost of say $40,000 per generated kilowat can be reduced to $572.00 per kilowatt by increasing the original electric output of 1 kW to 10 kW in electricity and 60 kW in thermal energy. The newly derived specific cost is only 1.4 percent of the original one. It is expected that a cost reduction of roughly 2% of the present specific cost per kilowatt will greatly stimulate public acceptance of photovoltaic terrestrial conversion to electricity.

  16. Backward pumping kilowatt Yb3+-doped double-clad fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. H.; Lin, X. C.; Hou, W.; Yu, H. J.; Zhou, S. Z.; Li, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    A ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber laser generating up to 1026 W of continuous-wave output power at 1085 nm with a slope efficiency of 74% by single-ended backward pumping configuration is reported. The core diameter was 20 μm with a low numerical aperture of 0.06, and a good beam quality (BPP < 1.8 mm mrad) is achieved without special mode selection methods. No undesirable roll-over was observed in output power with increasing pump power, and the maximum output power was limited by the available pump power. The instability of maximum output power was better than ±0.6%. Different pumping configurations were also compared in experiment, which shows good agreements with theoretical analyses.

  17. Beaming Electricity via Relay Satellites in Support of Deployed Combat Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Power kHz Kilohertz km Kilometer kW Kilowatt kW/h Kilowatt/hour LEO Low Earth Orbit MEO Medium Earth Orbit MW Megawatt RF Radio Frequency STK ...using the Satellite Tool Kit ( STK ) software suite. D. CHAPTER SUMMARY 1. Chapter II - Background This chapter contains background information to...are modeled using STK . The results of those models are presented. A description of how each model took shape was developed is provided followed

  18. Thermoelectric energy conversion with solid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cole, T

    1983-09-02

    The alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) is a device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy. The sodium ion conductor beta"- alumina is used to form a high-temperature regenerative concentration cell for elemental sodium. An AMTEC of mature design should have an efficiency of 20 to 40 percent, a power density of 0.5 kilowatt per kilogram or more, no moving parts, low maintenance requirements, high durability, and efficiency independent of size. It should be usable with high-temperature combustion, nuclear, or solar heat sources. Experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the AMTEC and confirmed the theoretical analysis of the device. A wide range of applications from aerospace power to utility power plants appears possible.

  19. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOEpatents

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  20. 76 FR 2892 - City of Ouray; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Ready for Environmental Analysis, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... feet of new pipeline to direct water to a new power plant. The power plant will house one Pelton turbine and induction motor generator with a maximum output of 20 kilowatt. g. Location: Ouray, Colorado...

  1. 75 FR 24942 - Osprey I, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... kilowatts (kW); (5) a new transmission line connecting to an existing Central Maine Power distribution line..., pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the New Mills Dam...

  2. Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, Mark; Turchi, Craig; Vidal, Judith

    Today's power-tower concentrating solar power (CSP) technology exists in large part as a result of Department of Energy (DOE) and utility industry funding of demonstration systems in the 1980s and 1990s. Today's most advanced towers are integrated with molten-salt thermal energy storage, delivering thermal energy at 565 degrees C for integration with conventional steam-Rankine cycles. The supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle has been identified as a likely successor to the steam-Rankine power cycle due to its potential for high efficiency when operating at elevated temperatures of 700 degrees C or greater. Over the course of the SunShot Initiative, DOE hasmore » supported a number of technology pathways that can operate efficiently at these temperatures and that hold promise to be reliable and cost effective. Three pathways - molten salt, particle, and gaseous - were selected for further investigation based on a two-day workshop held in August of 2016. The information contained in this roadmap identifies research and development challenges and lays out recommended research activities for each of the three pathways. DOE foresees that by successfully addressing the challenges identified in this roadmap, one or more technology pathways will be positioned for demonstration and subsequent commercialization within the next ten years. Based on current knowledge of the three power tower technologies, all three have the potential to achieve the SunShot goal of 6 cents/kilowatt-hour. Further development, modeling, and testing are now required to bring one or more of the technologies to a stage where integrated system tests and pilot demonstrations are feasible.« less

  3. A NEW CONCEPT FOR HIGH POWER RF COUPLING BETWEEN WAVEGUIDES AND RESONANT RF CAVITIES

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Wang, Haipeng; ...

    2017-01-01

    Microwave engineering of high average-power (hundreds of kilowatts) devices often involves a transition from a waveguide to a device, typically a resonant cavity. This is a basic operation, which finds use in various application areas of significance to science and industry. At relatively low frequencies, L-band and below, it is convenient, sometimes essential, to couple the power between the waveguide and the cavity through a coaxial antenna, forming a power coupler. Power flow to the cavity in the fundamental mode leads to a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC). High-order mode power generated in the cavity by a particle beam leads tomore » a high-order mode power damper. Coupling a cryogenic device, such as a superconducting cavity to a room temperature power source (or damp) leads to additional constraints and challenges. We propose a new approach to this problem, wherein the coax line element is operated in a TE11 mode rather than the conventional TEM mode. We will show that this method leads to a significant increase in the power handling capability of the coupler as well as a few other advantages. As a result, we describe the mode converter from the waveguide to the TE11 coax line, outline the characteristics and performance limits of the coupler and provide a detailed worked out example in the challenging area of coupling to a superconducting accelerator cavity.« less

  4. A NEW CONCEPT FOR HIGH POWER RF COUPLING BETWEEN WAVEGUIDES AND RESONANT RF CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Wang, Haipeng

    Microwave engineering of high average-power (hundreds of kilowatts) devices often involves a transition from a waveguide to a device, typically a resonant cavity. This is a basic operation, which finds use in various application areas of significance to science and industry. At relatively low frequencies, L-band and below, it is convenient, sometimes essential, to couple the power between the waveguide and the cavity through a coaxial antenna, forming a power coupler. Power flow to the cavity in the fundamental mode leads to a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC). High-order mode power generated in the cavity by a particle beam leads tomore » a high-order mode power damper. Coupling a cryogenic device, such as a superconducting cavity to a room temperature power source (or damp) leads to additional constraints and challenges. We propose a new approach to this problem, wherein the coax line element is operated in a TE11 mode rather than the conventional TEM mode. We will show that this method leads to a significant increase in the power handling capability of the coupler as well as a few other advantages. As a result, we describe the mode converter from the waveguide to the TE11 coax line, outline the characteristics and performance limits of the coupler and provide a detailed worked out example in the challenging area of coupling to a superconducting accelerator cavity.« less

  5. Evaluation of Low Power Hall Thruster Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Oleson, Steve; Sankovic, John; Haag, Tom; Semenkin, Alexander; Kim, Vladimir

    1996-01-01

    Hall thruster systems based on the SPT-50 and the TAL D-38 were evaluated and mission studies were performed. The 0.3 kilowatt SPT-50 operated with a specific impulse of 1160 seconds and an efficiency of 0.32. The 0.8 kilowatt D-38 provided a specific impulse above 1700 seconds at an efficiency of 0.5. The D-38 system was shown to offer a 56 kilogram propulsion system mass savings over a 101 kilogram hydrazine monopropellant system designed to perform North-South station keeping maneuvers on board a 430 kilogram geostationary satellite. The SPIT-50 system offered a greater than 50% propulsion system mass reduction in comparison to the chemical system on board a 200 kilogram low Earth orbit spacecraft performing two orbit raises and drag makeup over two years. The performance characteristics of the SPF-50 were experimentally evaluated at a number of operating conditions. The ion current density distribution of this engine was measured. The performance and system mass benefits of advanced systems based on both engines were considered.

  6. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983 - 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-01

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987-88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  7. Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Forsbacka, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. "virtual" reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of van'ous core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then dusted accordingly via kinetics calculations, The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kilowatt(sub t), to 10 kilowatts(sub t), held approximately constant at 10 kilowatts (sub t), and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient.

  8. Sizing Power Components of an Electrically Driven Tail Cone Thruster and a Range Extender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Bowman, Cheryl; Jankovsky, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The aeronautics industry has been challenged on many fronts to increase efficiency, reduce emissions, and decrease dependency on carbon-based fuels. This paper provides an overview of the turboelectric and hybrid electric technologies being developed under NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) Project and discusses how these technologies can impact vehicle design. The discussion includes an overview of key hybrid electric studies and technology investments, the approach to making informed investment decisions based on key performance parameters and mission studies, and the power system architectures for two candidate aircraft. Finally, the power components for a single-aisle turboelectric aircraft with an electrically driven tail cone thruster and for a hybrid-electric nine-passenger aircraft with a range extender are parametrically sized, and the sensitivity of these components to key parameters is presented.

  9. Fully integrated Q-switch for commercial high-power resonator with solitary XLMA-fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R.; Bachert, C.; Rehmann, G.; Weber, H.; Luxen, R.; Enns, H.; Schenk, M.; Hosdorf, S.; Marfels, S.; Bay, M.; Kösters, A.; Krause, V.; Giesberts, M.; Fitzau, O.; Hoffmann, H.-D.

    2018-02-01

    In surface processing applications the correlation of laser power to processing speed demands a further enhancement of the performance of short-pulsed laser sources with respect to the investment costs. The frequently applied concept of master oscillator power amplifier relies on a complex structure, parts of which are highly sensitive to back reflected amplified radiation. Aiming for a simpler, robust source using only a single ytterbium doped XLMA fiber in a q-switched resonator appears as promising design approach eliminating the need for subsequent amplification. This concept requires a high power-tolerant resonator which is provided by the multikilowatt laser platform of Laserline including directly water-cooled active fiber thermal management. Laserline GmbH and Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology joined their forces1 to upgrade standard high power laser sources for short-pulsed operation exceeding 1 kW of average power. Therefor a compact, modular qswitch has been developed. In this paper the implementation of a polarization independent q-switch into an off-the-shelf multi-kilowatt diodepumped continuous wave fiber source is shown. In this early step of implementation we demonstrated more than 1000 W of average power at pulse lengths below 50 ns FWHM and 7.5 mJ pulse energy. The M2 corresponds to 9.5. Reliability of the system is demonstrated based on measurements including temperature and stability records. We investigated the variation possibilities concerning pulse parameters and shape as well as upcoming challenges in power up-scaling.

  10. Thermoelectric energy conversion with solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, T.

    1983-09-01

    The alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) is a device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy. The sodium ion conductor beta-double prime-alumina is used to form a high-temperature regenerative concentration cell for elemental sodium. An AMTEC of mature design should have an efficiency of 20 to 40 percent, a power density of 0.5 kilowatt per kilogram or more, no moving parts, low maintenance requirements, high durability, and efficiency independent of size. It should be usable with high-temperature combustion, nuclear, or solar heat sources. Experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the AMTEC and confirmed the theoretical analysis of the device. A wide range of applications from aerospace power to utility power plants appears possible.

  11. Thermoelectric energy conversion with solid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, T.

    1983-09-02

    The alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) is a device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy. The sodium ion conductor beta''-alumina is used to form a high-temperature regenerative concentration cell for elemental sodium. An AMTEC of mature design should have an efficiency of 20 to 40%, a power density of 0.5 kilowatt per kilogram or more, no moving parts, low maintenance requirements, high durability, and efficiency independent of size. It should be usable with high-temperature combustion, nuclear, or solar heat sources. Experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the AMTEC and confirmed the theoretical analysis of the device. Amore » wide range of applications from aerospace power to utility power plants appears possible.« less

  12. High power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkkälä, Jarkko; Boucart, Julien; Krejci, Martin; Crum, Trevor; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of the latest generation of high power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range suitable for industrial applications such as plastics welding and medical applications including acne treatment, skin rejuvenation and surgery. The paper presents the newest chip generation developed at II-VI Laser Enterprise, increasing the output power and the power conversion efficiency while retaining the reliability of the initial design. At an emission wavelength around 1440 nm we applied the improved design to a variety of assemblies exhibiting maximum power values as high as 7 W for broad-area single emitters. For 1 cm wide bars on conductive coolers and for bars on active micro channel coolers we have obtained 50 W and 72 W in continuous wave (cw) operation respectively. The maximum power measured for a 1 cm bar operated with 50 μs pulse width and 0.01% duty cycle was 184 W, demonstrating the potential of the chip design for optimized cooling. Power conversion efficiency values as high as 50% for a single emitter device and over 40% for mounted bars have been demonstrated, reducing the required power budget to operate the devices. Both active and conductive bar assembly configurations show polarization purity greater than 98%. Life testing has been conducted at 95 A, 50% duty cycle and 0.5 Hz hard pulsed operation for bars which were soldered to conductive copper CS mounts using our hard solder technology. The results after 5500 h, or 10 million "on-off" cycles show stable operation.

  13. New 5 Kilowatt Free-piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Chapman, Peter A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the moon may someday require a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kW. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology Inc. s Stirling Engine Systems Division (some of whose Stirling personnel are now at Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kW free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kW engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 W and 80 W Stirling convertor systems for potential use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kW, single convertor for potential use in a lunar surface reactor power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kW Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  14. Micro-cogen AMTEC systems for residential and transportation opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, R.; Rasmussen, J.R.; Hunt, T.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the design and anticipated performance of high efficiency AMTEC systems suitable for natural gas fired micro-cogeneration for residential and transportation applications. AMTEC systems have a relatively flat efficiency curve from a few tens of watts to several kilowatts. This unique quality of AMTEC makes it well suited for micro-cogen as opposed to other technologies, such as internal combustion (IC) engines, which lose efficiency at low power levels. AMTEC also offers additional advantages of high efficiency, high reliability, low noise and low emissions. Combustion heated AMTEC cogeneration systems can also be used in trucks and trailers to keepmore » the diesel engines and cabs warm, provide electrical power for charging the battery and maintain power to the electrical systems during stand down periods. A market study indicates that residential micro-cogen units should have a design generating capacity between 0.5--2 kW. AMTEC systems producing 500 W net electric power have been designed and are presently being built. A 350 W prototype unit is being manufactured for a European firm as a trial unit for central heat and power from a home furnace. Modular one kilowatt units are also being designed that will allow combination into multi-kilowatt systems. The results of feasibility studies focused on price/Watt, efficiency, noise, emission, vibrations, expected lifetime and maintenance cost are also presented in this paper.« less

  15. Solar Electric Propulsion Concepts for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Mcguire, Melissa L.; Oleson, Steven R.; Barrett, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in solar array and electric thruster technologies now offer the promise of new, very capable space transportation systems that will allow us to cost effectively explore the solar system. NASA has developed numerous solar electric propulsion spacecraft concepts with power levels ranging from tens to hundreds of kilowatts for robotic and piloted missions to asteroids and Mars. This paper describes nine electric and hybrid solar electric/chemical propulsion concepts developed over the last 5 years and discusses how they might be used for human exploration of the inner solar system.

  16. Solar Electric Propulsion Concepts for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Oleson, Steven R.; Barrett, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in solar array and electric thruster technologies now offer the promise of new, very capable space transportation systems that will allow us to cost effectively explore the solar system. NASA has developed numerous solar electric propulsion spacecraft concepts with power levels ranging from tens to hundreds of kilowatts for robotic and piloted missions to asteroids and Mars. This paper describes nine electric and hybrid solar electric/chemical propulsion concepts developed over the last 5 years and discusses how they might be used for human exploration of the inner solar system.

  17. Development and Testing of a Laser-Powered Cryobot for Outer Planet Icy Moon Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, V.; Stone, W.; Hogan, B.; Lelievre, S.; Flesher, C.

    2013-12-01

    Project VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer) is a NASA-funded effort to develop the first laser powered cryobot - a self-contained intelligent ice penetrator capable of delivering science payloads through ice caps of the outer planet icy moons. The long range objective is to enable a full-scale Europa lander mission in which an autonomous life-searching underwater vehicle is transported by the cryobot and launched into the sub-surface Europan ocean. Mission readiness testing will involve an Antarctic sub-glacial lake cryobot sample return through kilometers of ice cap thickness. A key element of VALKYRIE's design is the use of a high energy laser as the primary power source. 1070 nm laser light is transmitted at a power level of 5 kW from a surface-based laser and injected into a custom-designed optical waveguide that is spooled out from the descending cryobot. Light exits the downstream end of the fiber, travels through diverging optics, and strikes a beam dump, which channels thermal power to hot water jets that melt the descent hole. Some beam energy is converted, via photovoltaic cells, to electricity for running onboard electronics and jet pumps. Since the vehicle can be sterilized prior to deployment and the melt path freezes behind it, preventing forward contamination, expansions on VALKYRIE concepts may enable cleaner and faster access to sub-glacial Antarctic lakes. Testing at Stone Aerospace between 2010 and 2013 has already demonstrated high power optical energy transfer over relevant (kilometer scale) distances as well as the feasibility of a vehicle-deployed optical waveguide (through which the power is transferred). The test vehicle is equipped with a forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that can detect obstacles out to 1 kilometer from the vehicle. The initial ASTEP test vehicle will carry a science payload consisting of a DUV flow cytometer and a water sampling sub-system that will be

  18. Control of Vibratory Energy Harvesters in the Presence of Nonlinearities and Power-Flow Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Ian L.

    Over the past decade, a significant amount of research activity has been devoted to developing electromechanical systems that can convert ambient mechanical vibrations into usable electric power. Such systems, referred to as vibratory energy harvesters, have a number of useful of applications, ranging in scale from self-powered wireless sensors for structural health monitoring in bridges and buildings to energy harvesting from ocean waves. One of the most challenging aspects of this technology concerns the efficient extraction and transmission of power from transducer to storage. Maximizing the rate of power extraction from vibratory energy harvesters is further complicated by the stochastic nature of the disturbance. The primary purpose of this dissertation is to develop feedback control algorithms which optimize the average power generated from stochastically-excited vibratory energy harvesters. This dissertation will illustrate the performance of various controllers using two vibratory energy harvesting systems: an electromagnetic transducer embedded within a flexible structure, and a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam. Compared with piezoelectric systems, large-scale electromagnetic systems have received much less attention in the literature despite their ability to generate power at the watt--kilowatt scale. Motivated by this observation, the first part of this dissertation focuses on developing an experimentally validated predictive model of an actively controlled electromagnetic transducer. Following this experimental analysis, linear-quadratic-Gaussian control theory is used to compute unconstrained state feedback controllers for two ideal vibratory energy harvesting systems. This theory is then augmented to account for competing objectives, nonlinearities in the harvester dynamics, and non-quadratic transmission loss models in the electronics. In many vibratory energy harvesting applications, employing a bi-directional power electronic drive to actively

  19. Sizing Power Components of an Electrically Driven Tail Cone Thruster and a Range Extender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Bowman, Cheryl; Jankovsky, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The aeronautics industry has been challenged on many fronts to increase efficiency, reduce emissions, and decrease dependency on carbon-based fuels. The NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate has identified a suite of investments to meet long term research demands beyond the purview of commercial investment. Electrification of aviation propulsion through turboelectric or hybrid electric propulsion is one of many exciting research areas which has the potential to revolutionize the aviation industry. This paper will provide an overview of the turboelectric and hybrid electric technologies being developed under NASAs Advanced Air Transportation Technology (AATT) Project, and how these technologies can impact vehicle design. An overview will be presented of vehicle system studies and the electric drive system assumptions for successful turboelectric and hybrid electric propulsion in single aisle size commercial aircraft. Key performance parameters for electric drive system technologies will be reviewed, and the technical investment made in materials, electric machines, power electronics, and integrated power systems will be discussed. Finally, power components for a single aisle turboelectric aircraft with an electrically driven tail cone thruster and a hybrid electric nine passenger aircraft with a range extender will be parametrically sized.

  20. Closed-Cycle Engine Program Used to Study Brayton Power Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2005-01-01

    One form of power conversion under consideration in NASA Glenn Research Center's Thermal Energy Conversion Branch is the closed-Brayton-cycle engine. In the tens-of-kilowatts to multimegawatt class, the Brayton engine lends itself to potential space nuclear power applications such as electric propulsion or surface power. The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch has most recently concentrated its Brayton studies on electric propulsion for Prometheus. One piece of software used for evaluating such designs over a limited tradeoff space has been the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP). The CCEP originated in the mid-1980s from a Fortran aircraft engine code known as the Navy/NASA Engine Program (NNEP). Components such as a solar collector, heat exchangers, ducting, a pumped-loop radiator, a nuclear heat source, and radial turbomachinery were added to NNEP, transforming it into a high-fidelity design and performance tool for closed-Brayton-cycle power conversion and heat rejection. CCEP was used in the 1990s in conjunction with the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration conducted at Glenn. Over the past year, updates were made to CCEP to adapt it for an electric propulsion application. The pumped-loop radiator coolant can now be n-heptane, water, or sodium-potassium (NaK); liquid-metal pump design tables were added to accommodate the NaK fluid. For the reactor and shield, a user can now elect to calculate a higher fidelity mass estimate. In addition, helium-xenon working-fluid properties were recalculated and updated.

  1. Conceptual design study of a 5 kilowatt solar dynamic Brayton power system using a dome Fresnel lens solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Mark J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Spears, Don H.

    1989-01-01

    The primary project objective was to generate a conceptual design for a nominal 5 kW solar dynamic space power system, which uses a unique, patented, transmittance-optimized, dome-shaped, point-focus Fresnel lens as the optical concentrator. Compared to reflective concentrators, the dome lens allows 200 times larger slope errors for the same image displacement. Additionally, the dome lens allows the energy receiver, the power conversion unit (PCU), and the heat rejection radiator to be independently optimized in configuration and orientation, since none of these elements causes any aperture blockage. Based on optical and thermal trade studies, a 6.6 m diameter lens with a focal length of 7.2 m was selected. This lens should provide 87 percent net optical efficienty at 800X geometric concentration ratio. The large lens is comprised of 24 gores, which compactly stow together during launch, and automatically deploy on orbit. The total mass of the microglass lens panels, the graphite/epoxy support structure, and miscellaneous hardware is about 1.2 kg per square meter of aperture. The key problem for the dome lens approach relates to the selection of a space-durable lens material. For the first time, all-glass Fresnel lens samples were successfully made by a sol-gel casting process.

  2. Brain oscillatory subsequent memory effects differ in power and long-range synchronization between semantic and survival processing.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Marie-Christin; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T; Hanslmayr, Simon

    2013-10-01

    Memory crucially depends on the way information is processed during encoding. Differences in processes during encoding not only lead to differences in memory performance but also rely on different brain networks. Although these assumptions are corroborated by several previous fMRI and ERP studies, little is known about how brain oscillations dissociate between different memory encoding tasks. The present study therefore compared encoding related brain oscillatory activity elicited by two very efficient encoding tasks: a typical deep semantic item feature judgment task and a more elaborative survival encoding task. Subjects were asked to judge words either for survival relevance or for animacy, as indicated by a cue presented prior to the item. This allowed dissociating pre-item activity from item-related activity for both tasks. Replicating prior studies, survival processing led to higher recognition performance than semantic processing. Successful encoding in the semantic condition was reflected by a strong decrease in alpha and beta power, whereas successful encoding in the survival condition was related to increased alpha and beta long-range phase synchrony. Moreover, a pre-item subsequent memory effect in theta power was found which did not vary with encoding condition. These results show that measures of local synchrony (power) and global long range-synchrony (phase synchronization) dissociate between memory encoding processes. Whereas semantic encoding was reflected in decreases in local synchrony, increases in global long range synchrony were related to elaborative survival encoding, presumably reflecting the involvement of a more widespread cortical network in this task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative efficiency and driving range of light- and heavy-duty vehicles powered with biomass energy stored in liquid fuels or batteries

    PubMed Central

    Laser, Mark; Lynd, Lee R.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question, “When using cellulosic biomass for vehicular transportation, which field-to-wheels pathway is more efficient: that using biofuels or that using bioelectricity?” In considering the question, the level of assumed technological maturity significantly affects the comparison, as does the intended transportation application. Results from the analysis indicate that for light-duty vehicles, over ranges typical in the United States today (e.g., 560–820 miles), field-to-wheels performance is similar, with some scenarios showing biofuel to be more efficient, and others indicating the two pathways to be essentially the same. Over the current range of heavy-duty vehicles, the field-to-wheels efficiency is higher for biofuels than for electrically powered vehicles. Accounting for technological advances and range, there is little basis to expect mature bioelectricity-powered vehicles to have greater field-to-wheels efficiency (e.g., kilometers per gigajoule biomass or per hectare) compared with mature biofuel-powered vehicles. PMID:24550477

  4. Laboratory 15 kV high voltage solar array facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, J. C.; Gooder, S. T.

    1976-01-01

    The laboratory high voltage solar array facility is a photoelectric power generating system. Consisting of nine modules with over 23,000 solar cells, the facility is capable of delivering more than a kilowatt of power. The physical and electrical characteristics of the facility are described.

  5. Energy Efficient Demonstration Proves Powerful in Home Retrofits -

    Science.gov Websites

    project team that included key Navy stakeholders at the regional and Naval Base Guam installation levels was Naval Base Guam in Apra Harbor, which has 1,369 houses for its active-duty Navy and family members millions." Given Naval Base Guam's high electricity rates of $0.50 per kilowatt hour, the efficiency

  6. Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transportedmore » and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.« less

  7. Investigating the effective range of vacuum ultraviolet-mediated breakdown in high-power microwave metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chien-Hao, E-mail: cliu82@wisc.edu; Neher, Joel D., E-mail: jdneher@wisc.edu; Booske, John H., E-mail: booske@engr.wisc.edu

    2014-10-14

    Metamaterials and periodic structures operating under high-power excitations are susceptible to breakdown. It was recently demonstrated that a localized breakdown created in a given region of a periodic structure can facilitate breakdown in other regions of the structure where the intensity of the incident electromagnetic fields may not be high enough to cause breakdown under normal circumstances. It was also demonstrated that this phenomenon is due to the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the location of the initial discharge, which propagates to the neighboring regions (e.g., other unit cells in a periodic structure) and facilitates the generation of amore » discharge at a lower incident power level. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental study conducted to determine the effective range of this physical phenomenon for periodic structures that operate in air and in pure nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure levels. It is demonstrated that when breakdown is induced in a periodic structure using a high-power pulse with a frequency of 9.382 GHz, duration of 0.8 μs, and peak power level of 25 kW, this phenomenon is highly likely to happen in radii of approximately 16–17 mm from the location of the initial discharge under these test conditions. The results of this study are significant in designing metamaterials and periodic structures for high-power microwave applications as they suggest that a localized discharge created in such a periodic structure with a periodicity less than 16–17 mm can spread over a large surface and result in a distributed discharge.« less

  8. Lunar base thermoelectric power station study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, William; Frye, Patrick; Mondt, Jack; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Johnson, Ken; Stapfer, G.; Brooks, Michael D.; Heshmatpour, Ben

    2006-01-01

    Under NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Teledyne Energy Systems have teamed with a number of universities, under the Segmented Thermoelectric Multicouple Converter (STMC) program, to develop the next generation of advanced thermoelectric converters for space reactor power systems. Work on the STMC converter assembly has progressed to the point where the lower temperature stage of the segmented multicouple converter assembly is ready for laboratory testing and the upper stage materials have been identified and their properties are being characterized. One aspect of the program involves mission application studies to help define the potential benefits from the use of these STMC technologies for designated NASA missions such as the lunar base power station where kilowatts of power are required to maintain a permanent manned presence on the surface of the moon. A modular 50 kWe thermoelectric power station concept was developed to address a specific set of requirements developed for this mission. Previous lunar lander concepts had proposed the use of lunar regolith as in-situ radiation shielding material for a reactor power station with a one kilometer exclusion zone radius to minimize astronaut radiation dose rate levels. In the present concept, we will examine the benefits and requirements for a hermetically-sealed reactor thermoelectric power station module suspended within a man-made lunar surface cavity. The concept appears to maximize the shielding capabilities of the lunar regolith while minimizing its handling requirements. Both thermal and nuclear radiation levels from operation of the station, at its 100-m exclusion zone radius, were evaluated and found to be acceptable. Site preparation activities are reviewed and well as transport issues for this concept. The goal of the study was to review the entire life cycle of the unit to assess its technical problems and technology

  9. Short Range Photoassociation of Rb2 by a high power fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ventura, Paulo; Bouloufa, Nadia; Dulieu, Olivier; Marcassa, Luis

    2016-05-01

    Photoassociation has been studied using cold trapped atomic samples for the last 20 years. Due to poor Franck-Condon overlap, a free-to-bound transition followed by spontaneous decay results in a small production of electronic ground state molecules. If the photoassociation is done at short range, deeply bound ground state molecules can be formed. Optical pumping schemes can be used to populate a single state. In our experiment, we have performed trap loss spectroscopy on trapped 85 Rb atoms in a MOT using a high power fiber laser. Our single mode fiber laser (linewidth < 1 MHz) produces about 50 W, which can be tuned in the 1060-1070 nm range. Two vibrational bound states of the 0u+ potential were observed (ν = 137 and 138). The frequency positions as well as the rotational constants of these states are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We have also measured the lifetime of a crossed optical dipole trap using such fiber laser. The lifetime on resonance is shorter than off resonance as expected. A simple theoretical model indicates that the molecules decay to deeply bound vibrational levels in the ground state. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  10. Extending the Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor through Dual Mode Inverter Control -- Part I: Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.

    2001-10-29

    An inverter topology and control scheme has been developed that can drive low-inductance, surface-mounted permanent magnet motors over the wide constant power speed range required in electric vehicle applications. This new controller is called the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) [1]. The DMIC can drive either the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) with sinusoidal back emf, or the brushless dc machine (BDCM) with trapezoidal emf in the motoring and regenerative braking modes. In this paper we concentrate on the BDCM under high-speed motoring conditions. Simulation results show that if all motor and inverter loss mechanisms are neglected, the constant power speedmore » range of the DMIC is infinite. The simulation results are supported by closed form expressions for peak and rms motor current and average power derived from analytical solution to the differential equations governing the DMIC/BDCM drive for the lossless case. The analytical solution shows that the range of motor inductance that can be accommodated by the DMIC is more than an order of magnitude such that the DMIC is compatible with both low- and high-inductance BDCMs. Finally, method is given for integrating the classical hysteresis band current control, used for motor control below base speed, with the phase advance of DMIC that is applied above base speed. The power versus speed performance of the DMIC is then simulated across the entire speed range.« less

  11. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressedmore » from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.« less

  12. [The algorithm based on wavelet for canceling muscle electricity and wide range frequency of power line hum in ECG].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hua, Mei

    2004-06-01

    To develop a wavelet noise canceller that cancels muscle electricity and power line hum in wide range of frequency. According to the feature that the QRS complex has higher frequency components, and the T, P wave have lower frequency components, the biorthogonal wavelet was selected to decompose the original signals. An interference-eliminated signal ECG was formed by reconstruction from the changed coefficients of wavelet. By using the canceller, muscle electricity and power line interference between 49 Hz and 61 Hz were eliminated from the ECG signals. This canceller works well in canceling muscle electricity, and basic and harmonic frequencies of power line hum. The canceller is also insensitive to the frequency change of power line, the same procedure is good for both 50 and 60 Hz power line hum.

  13. Ultra-low power high-dynamic range color pixel embedding RGB to r-g chromaticity transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecca, Michela; Gasparini, Leonardo; Gottardi, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a novel color pixel topology that converts the three chromatic components from the standard RGB space into the normalized r-g chromaticity space. This conversion is implemented with high-dynamic range and with no dc power consumption, and the auto-exposure capability of the sensor ensures to capture a high quality chromatic signal, even in presence of very bright illuminants or in the darkness. The pixel is intended to become the basic building block of a CMOS color vision sensor, targeted to ultra-low power applications for mobile devices, such as human machine interfaces, gesture recognition, face detection. The experiments show that significant improvements of the proposed pixel with respect to standard cameras in terms of energy saving and accuracy on data acquisition. An application to skin color-based description is presented.

  14. Regulatory impact analysis and regulatory support document: Control of air pollution; determination of significance for nonroad sources and emission standards for new nonroad compression-ignition engines at or above 37 kilowatts (50 horsepower). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, T.; North, D.R.; Green, K.A.H.

    1994-05-27

    The regulatory impact analysis and support document provides additional information in support of the Final Rulemaking (FRM). This FRM will regulate all new nonroad compression-ignition engines greater than or equal to 37 kilowatts (50 hp), except engines which propel or are used on marine vessels, aircraft engines, engines which propel locomotives, and engines regulated by the Mining, Safety, and Health Administration. The regulated engines are hereafter referred to as nonroad large CI engines. The goal of this regulation is to substantially reduce NOx emission and smoke from nonroad large CI engines beginning in the 1996 model year.

  15. Low-power low-noise mixed-mode VLSI ASIC for infinite dynamic range imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Hu, Y.; Zinzius, Y.; Colledani, C.; Loge, A.

    1998-11-01

    Solid state solutions for imaging are mainly represented by CCDs and, more recently, by CMOS imagers. Both devices are based on the integration of the total charge generated by the impinging radiation, with no processing of the single photon information. The dynamic range of these devices is intrinsically limited by the finite value of noise. Here we present the design of an architecture which allows efficient, in-pixel, noise reduction to a practically zero level, thus allowing infinite dynamic range imaging. A detailed calculation of the dynamic range is worked out, showing that noise is efficiently suppressed. This architecture is based on the concept of single-photon counting. In each pixel, we integrate both the front-end, low-noise, low-power analog part and the digital part. The former consists of a charge preamplifier, an active filter for optimal noise bandwidth reduction, a buffer and a threshold comparator, and the latter is simply a counter, which can be programmed to act as a normal shift register for the readout of the counters' contents. Two different ASIC's based on this concept have been designed for different applications. The first one has been optimized for silicon edge-on microstrips detectors, used in a digital mammography R and D project. It is a 32-channel circuit, with a 16-bit binary static counter.It has been optimized for a relatively large detector capacitance of 5 pF. Noise has been measured to be equal to 100 + 7*Cd (pF) electron rms with the digital part, showing no degradation of the noise performances with respect to the design values. The power consumption is 3.8mW/channel for a peaking time of about 1 microsecond(s) . The second circuit is a prototype for pixel imaging. The total active area is about (250 micrometers )**2. The main differences of the electronic architecture with respect to the first prototype are: i) different optimization of the analog front-end part for low-capacitance detectors, ii) in- pixel 4-bit comparator

  16. HEPS4Power - Extended-range Hydrometeorological Ensemble Predictions for Improved Hydropower Operations and Revenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Konrad; Monhart, Samuel; Liniger, Mark; Spririg, Christoph; Jordan, Fred; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    In recent years large progresses have been achieved in the operational prediction of floods and hydrological drought with up to ten days lead time. Both the public and the private sectors are currently using probabilistic runoff forecast in order to monitoring water resources and take actions when critical conditions are to be expected. The use of extended-range predictions with lead times exceeding 10 days is not yet established. The hydropower sector in particular might have large benefits from using hydro meteorological forecasts for the next 15 to 60 days in order to optimize the operations and the revenues from their watersheds, dams, captions, turbines and pumps. The new Swiss Competence Centers in Energy Research (SCCER) targets at boosting research related to energy issues in Switzerland. The objective of HEPS4POWER is to demonstrate that operational extended-range hydro meteorological forecasts have the potential to become very valuable tools for fine tuning the production of energy from hydropower systems. The project team covers a specific system-oriented value chain starting from the collection and forecast of meteorological data (MeteoSwiss), leading to the operational application of state-of-the-art hydrological models (WSL) and terminating with the experience in data presentation and power production forecasts for end-users (e-dric.ch). The first task of the HEPS4POWER will be the downscaling and post-processing of ensemble extended-range meteorological forecasts (EPS). The goal is to provide well-tailored forecasts of probabilistic nature that should be reliable in statistical and localized at catchment or even station level. The hydrology related task will consist in feeding the post-processed meteorological forecasts into a HEPS using a multi-model approach by implementing models with different complexity. Also in the case of the hydrological ensemble predictions, post-processing techniques need to be tested in order to improve the quality of the

  17. Technical and economic feasibility of development innovative technological solutions for expansion the adjustment range of high-power CCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, E. K.; Andryushin, A. V.; Burtsev, S. Y.; Andryushin, K. A.

    2017-11-01

    The analysis of technical and parametric constraints on the adjustment range of highpower CCP and recommended technological solutions in the technical literature for their elimination. Established that in the conditions of toughening the requirements for economy, reliability and maneuverability on the part of the system operator with the participation of CCP in control the frequency and power in the power system, existing methods do not ensure the fulfillment of these requirements. The current situation in the energy sector — the lack of highly manoeuvrable power equipment leads to the need participate in control of power consumption diagrams for all types of power plants, including CCP, although initially they were intended primarily for basic loads. Large-scale research conducted at the department of Automated control systems of technological processes, showed the possibility of a significant expansion of the adjustment range of CCP when it operating in the condensing mode and in the heating mode. The report presents the main results of these research for example the CCP-450 and CCP-450T. Various technological solutions are considered: when CCP in the condensation mode — the use of bypass steam distribution schemes, the transfer of a part of the steam turbine into a low-steam mode; when CCP operation in the heating mode — bypass steam distribution and the transfer CCP to gas turbine unit — power heating plants mode with the transfer the steam turbine to the motor mode. Data on the evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed innovative technological solutions are presented in comparison with the methods used to solve this problem, which are used in practice, such as passing through the failures of the electric load graphs by transferring the CCP to the mode of operation with incomplete equipment. When comparing, both the economics, and the maneuverability and reliability of the equipment are considered.

  18. Thermal wave interference with high-power VCSEL arrays for locating vertically oriented subsurface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Erik; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Studemund, Taarna; Ziegler, Mathias

    2018-04-01

    Among the photothermal methods, full-field thermal imaging is used to characterize materials, to determine thicknesses of layers, or to find inhomogeneities such as voids or cracks. The use of classical light sources such as flash lamps (impulse heating) or halogen lamps (modulated heating) led to a variety of nondestructive testing methods, in particular, lock-in and flash-thermography. In vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), laser light is emitted perpendicularly to the surface with a symmetrical beam profile. Due to the vertical structure, they can be arranged in large arrays of many thousands of individual lasers, which allows power scaling into the kilowatt range. Recently, a high-power yet very compact version of such a VCSEL-array became available that offers both the fast timing behavior of a laser as well as the large illumination area of a lamp. Moreover, it allows a spatial and temporal control of the heating because individual parts of the array can be controlled arbitrarily in frequency, amplitude, and phase. In conjunction with a fast infrared camera, such structured heating opens up a field of novel thermal imaging and testing methods. As a first demonstration of this approach, we chose a testing problem very challenging to conventional thermal infrared testing: The detection of very thin subsurface defects perpendicularly oriented to the surface of metallic samples. First, we generate destructively interfering thermal wave fields, which are then affected by the presence of defects within their reach. It turned out that this technique allows highly sensitive detection of subsurface defects down to depths in excess of the usual thermographic rule of thumb, with no need for a reference or surface preparation.

  19. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  20. Operating results of a KU30 diesel cogeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Shioda, Kiyoshi; Kakinuma, Takashi; Nishido, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    Diesel cogeneration plants provide high generation ratios, the ability to operate on heavy fuel oil, small space requirements, short delivery terms and easy starting and stopping. The Mitsubishi type KU30 diesel engine is well-suited for meeting the demands of these applications. The KU30 engine (bore 300 x stroke 380 mm) covers an output range from 3500 to 5000 kW at 720 or 750 r/min. Performance results show that total power failures have completely disappeared, thanks to improvements in stable power supply and the reliability of the power source. They also show that the rate of private power generation has accountedmore » for more than 90% of total power consumption in the plant, and that the unit cost of electric power could be reduced by three yen (per kilowatt hour) compared with that of purchased power. This paper describes the design and operating results from a typical plant.« less

  1. Innovative Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery system (FREE-D System) for a ventricular assist device using wireless power.

    PubMed

    Waters, Benjamin H; Smith, Joshua R; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovation of a smaller, single moving part has an advantage over earlier large pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) prone to mechanical failure. Drivelines limit the potential for extended patient survival durations with newer pumps and act as source for infection, increased morbidity, rehospitalizations, and reduced quality of life. The Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery (FREE-D) wireless power system uses magnetically coupled resonators to efficiently transfer power. We demonstrate the efficiency over distance of this system. The experimental setup consists of an radiofrequency amplifier and control board which drives the transmit resonator coil, and a receiver unit consisting of a resonant coil attached to a radiofrequency rectifier and power management module. The power management module supplies power to the axial pump, which was set at 9,600 rpm. To achieve a seamless wireless delivery in any room size, we introduced a third relay coil. This relay coil can be installed throughout a room, whereas a single relay coil could be built into a jacket worn by the patient, which would always be within range of the receive coil implanted in the patient's body. The power was delivered over a meter distance without interruptions or fluctuations with coil, rectifier, and regulator efficiency more than 80% and overall system efficiency of 61%. The axial pump worked well throughout the 8 hours of continuous operation. Having same setup on the opposite side can double the distance. A tether-free operation of a VAD can be achieved by FREE-D system in room-size distances. It has the potential to make the VAD therapy more acceptable from the patient perspective.

  2. Methods for slow axis beam quality improvement of high power broad area diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Xiong, Yihan; Jiang, Ching-Long J.; Schmidt, Berthold; Treusch, Georg

    2014-03-01

    For high brightness direct diode laser systems, it is of fundamental importance to improve the slow axis beam quality of the incorporated laser diodes regardless what beam combining technology is applied. To further advance our products in terms of increased brightness at a high power level, we must optimize the slow axis beam quality despite the far field blooming at high current levels. The later is caused predominantly by the built-in index step in combination with the thermal lens effect. Most of the methods for beam quality improvements reported in publications sacrifice the device efficiency and reliable output power. In order to improve the beam quality as well as maintain the efficiency and reliable output power, we investigated methods of influencing local heat generation to reduce the thermal gradient across the slow axis direction, optimizing the built-in index step and discriminating high order modes. Based on our findings, we have combined different methods in our new device design. Subsequently, the beam parameter product (BPP) of a 10% fill factor bar has improved by approximately 30% at 7 W/emitter without efficiency penalty. This technology has enabled fiber coupled high brightness multi-kilowatt direct diode laser systems. In this paper, we will elaborate on the methods used as well as the results achieved.

  3. 75 FR 11104 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... energy produced (wind, solar, and manure/methane digester), installation cost, year installed, if any energy was sold onto a power grid, and the average payment received per kilowatt hour or total amount of...

  4. Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2012-01-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2012 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 5.4 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 487 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled about $263 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corpsmore » of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2012. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in funding infrastructure renewal efforts of powerplants feeding the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems. This funding, which totaled more than $71 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rainfall strained our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2012 in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System totaled approximately $29 million. About $8 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the

  5. Hall Thruster Technology for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Oh, David; Aadland, Randall

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a prototype Hall thruster designed for Discovery-class NASA science mission applications was evaluated at input powers ranging from 0.2 to 2.9 kilowatts. These data were used to construct a throttle profile for a projected Hall thruster system based on this prototype thruster. The suitability of such a Hall thruster system to perform robotic exploration missions was evaluated through the analysis of a near Earth asteroid sample return mission. This analysis demonstrated that a propulsion system based on the prototype Hall thruster offers mission benefits compared to a propulsion system based on an existing ion thruster.

  6. 77 FR 21977 - Whitestone Power and Communications; Notice Concluding Pre-Filing Process and Approving Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ...) pontoon and a 34- foot-long, 3-foot-diameter HDPE pontoon; (3) a 100-kilowatt turbine/ generator unit; (4..., 16-foot- diameter Poncelet undershot water wheel; (2) a 34-foot-long, 19- to 24- foot-wide aluminum...

  7. Noise and range considerations for close-range radar sensing of life signs underwater.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Noah; Lubecke, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Close-range underwater sensing of motion-based life signs can be performed with low power Doppler radar and ultrasound techniques. Corresponding noise and range performance trade-offs are examined here, with regard to choice of frequency and technology. The frequency range examined includes part of the UHF and microwave spectrum. Underwater detection of motion by radar in freshwater and saltwater are demonstrated. Radar measurements exhibited reduced susceptibility to noise as compared to ultrasound. While higher frequency radar exhibited better signal to noise ratio, propagation was superior for lower frequencies. Radar detection of motion through saltwater was also demonstrated at restricted ranges (1-2 cm) with low power transmission (10 dBm). The results facilitate the establishment of guidelines for optimal choice in technology for the underwater measurement motion-based life signs, with respect to trade offs involving range and noise.

  8. 75 FR 30388 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... operate in-stream tidal turbines to power the office building and marina on site. Natural Currents Red... of the tides. The initial installations would consist of ten in-stream 20-kilowatt (kW) turbines with...

  9. NREL Solar Research Garners Two Prestigious R&D 100 Awards | News | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    efficient bulk power generator that produces 40 percent more energy than conventional fixed photovoltaic panels. The 53-kilowatt photovoltaic power generator is based on the MegaModule, a turnkey unit pairing a wafers more efficient and a mammoth power generator that sets a new standard for the production of solar

  10. Advancements in high-power high-brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Haiyan; Jiang, Ching-Long J.; Xiong, Yihan; Zhang, Qiang; Inyang, Aloysius; Felder, Jason; Lewin, Alexander; Roff, Robert; Heinemann, Stefan; Schmidt, Berthold; Treusch, Georg

    2015-03-01

    We have continuously optimized high fill factor bar and packaging design to increase power and efficiency for thin disc laser system pump application. On the other hand, low fill factor bars packaged on the same direct copper bonded (DCB) cooling platform are used to build multi-kilowatt direct diode laser systems. We have also optimized the single emitter designs for fiber laser pump applications. In this paper, we will give an overview of our recent advances in high power high brightness laser bars and single emitters for pumping and direct diode application. We will present 300W bar development results for our next generation thin disk laser pump source. We will also show recent improvements on slow axis beam quality of low fill factor bar and its application on performance improvement of 4-5 kW TruDiode laser system with BPP of 30 mm*mrad from a 600 μm fiber. Performance and reliability results of single emitter for multiemitter fiber laser pump source will be presented as well.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the SPT-140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Sarmiento, Charles; Sankovic, John; Haag, Tom

    1997-01-01

    As part of an on-going cooperative program with industry, an engineering model SPT-140 Hall thruster, which may be suitable for orbit insertion and station-keeping of geosynchronous communication satellites, was evaluated with respect to thrust and radiated electromagnetic interference at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Performance measurements were made using a laboratory model propellant feed system and commercial power supplies. The engine was operated in a space simulation chamber capable of providing background pressures of 4 x 10(exp -6) Torr or less during thruster operation. Thrust was measured at input powers ranging from 1.5 to 5 kilowatts with two different output filter configurations. The broadband electromagnetic emission spectra generated by the engine was also measured for a range of frequencies from 0.01 to 18,000 Mhz. These results are compared to the noise threshold of the measurement system and MIL-STD-461C where appropriate.

  12. Silicon solar cells with a total power capacity of 30 kilowatts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The bulk of the contract effort was carried out in the following two phases: Phase 1 -- module design, Pre-production module fabrication, inspection and test. Phase 2 -- Production, test and delivery. Effort during the first two months of the contract concentrated on design of a solar module to meet specification. Basic module design resulting from this effort is as follows: (1) frame design; (2) cell pan design; (3) cell interconnection; (4) encapsulation; (5) electrical performance.

  13. 77 FR 2290 - Modern Hydro; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... proposed Delhi Milldam Water Power Project No. 14311 to be located at the existing Delhi Dam, on the south... three 25-foot- wide vertical sluice gates; (4) two refurbished 2,400-volt Westinghouse generator units powered by two refurbished S. Morgan Smith turbines with a combined generating capacity of 1,500 kilowatts...

  14. Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, D.G.

    1982-03-10

    The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight systemmore » design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance. (LCL)« less

  15. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-12-01

    Dear Secretary Chu, I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008. In FY 2008, Southwestern delivered over 7.3 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers – nearly 31% more than average due to numerous record rainfall amounts in the southwest region. These record amounts produced revenues which exceeded the average annual revenue requirement by nearly $20 million and resulted in over $200 million in economic benefits to the region. Yet even as Southwestern exceeded its goals of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power to our customers,more » we stayed focused on safety, security, and reliability. For example, we maintained our nearly 1,400 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites while achieving a Recordable Accident Frequency Rate of 0.0, a record that reflects Southwestern’s safety achievement of no recordable injuries for every 200,000 hours worked. We kept our rights-of-way secure from vegetation and other obstacles, work that not only supports our mission but also promotes reliability of the regional and National grid. We exceeded all North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Control Performance Standards (CPS- 1 and CPS-2), and maintained regulation and reserve obligations and reactive reserve margins to ensure the reliability of the bulk electric system, even during extended periods of restricted hydro operations due to unusually high project inflows. Finally, we continued our partnerships with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, our customers, and other Federal power stakeholders, partnerships that are vital to our continued success in marketing and delivering carbon-free, renewable, and domestically produced energy to our customers and to the Nation. Sincerely, Jon Worthington Administrator« less

  16. Microwave Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    High-power microwave radiation is used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) for uplink communications with spacecraft and for monitoring asteroids and space debris, respectively. Intense X-band (7.1 to 8.6 GHz) microwave signals are produced for these applications via klystron and traveling-wave microwave vacuum tubes. In order to achieve higher data rate communications with spacecraft, the DSN is planning to gradually furnish several of its deep space stations with uplink systems that employ Ka-band (34-GHz) radiation. Also, the next generation of planetary radar, such as Ka-Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM), is considering frequencies in the Ka-band range (34 to 36 GHz) in order to achieve higher target resolution. Current commercial Ka-band sources are limited to power levels that range from hundreds of watts up to a kilowatt and, at the high-power end, tend to suffer from poor reliability. In either case, there is a clear need for stable Ka-band sources that can produce kilowatts of power with high reliability. In this article, we present a new concept for high-power, high-frequency generation (including Ka-band) that we refer to as the microwave frequency multiplier (MFM). The MFM is a two-cavity vacuum tube concept where low-frequency (2 to 8 GHz) power is fed into the input cavity to modulate and accelerate an electron beam. In the second cavity, the modulated electron beam excites and amplifies high-power microwaves at a frequency that is a multiple integer of the input cavity's frequency. Frequency multiplication factors in the 4 to 10 range are being considered for the current application, although higher multiplication factors are feasible. This novel beam-wave interaction allows the MFM to produce high-power, high-frequency radiation with high efficiency. A key feature of the MFM is that it uses significantly larger cavities than its klystron counterparts, thus greatly reducing power density and arcing

  17. High duty cycle hard soldered kilowatt laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Oppenheim, Jacob; Berk, Yuri; Shamay, Moshe; Tessler, Renana; Cohen, Shalom

    2010-02-01

    High-brightness laser diode arrays operating at a duty cycle of 10% - 20% are in ever-increasing demand for the optical pumping of solid state lasers and directed energy applications. Under high duty-cycle operation at 10% - 20%, passive (conductive) cooling is of limited use, while micro-coolers using de-ionized cooling water can considerably degrade device reliability. When designing and developing actively-cooled collimated laser diode arrays for high duty cycle operation, three main problems should be carefully addressed: an effective local and total heat removal, a minimization of packaging-induced and operational stresses, and high-precision fast axis collimation. In this paper, we present a novel laser diode array incorporating a built-in tap water cooling system, all-hard-solder bonded assembly, facet-passivated high-power 940 nm laser bars and tight fast axis collimation. By employing an appropriate layout of water cooling channels, careful choice of packaging materials, proper design of critical parts, and active optics alignment, we have demonstrated actively-cooled collimated laser diode arrays with extended lifetime and reliability, without compromising their efficiency, optical power density, brightness or compactness. Among the key performance benchmarks achieved are: 150 W/bar optical peak power at 10% duty cycle, >50% wallplug efficiency and <1° collimated fast axis divergence. A lifetime of >0.5 Ghots with <2% degradation has been experimentally proven. The laser diode arrays have also been successfully tested under harsh environmental conditions, including thermal cycling between -20°C and 40°C and mechanical shocks at 500g acceleration. The results of both performance and reliability testing bear out the effectiveness and robustness of the manufacturing technology for high duty-cycle laser arrays.

  18. Direct Drive Solar-Powered Arcjet Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt; Martin, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Electric thrusters typically require a power processing unit (PPU) to convert the spacecraft-provided power to the voltage and current that a thruster needs for operation. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has initiated fundamental studies on whether an arcjet thruster can be operated directly with the power produced by solar arrays without any additional conversion. Elimination of the PPU significantly reduces system-level complexity of the propulsion system, and lowers developmental cost and risk. The proposed work will aim to refine the proof-of-concept presently being assembled and begin to identify and address technical questions related to power conditioning and noise suppression in the system, and heating of the thruster in long-duration operation. The apparatus proposed for investigation has a target power level of 400 to 1,000 W. The proposed direct-drive arcjet is potentially a highly scalable concept, applicable to spacecraft with up to hundreds of kilowatts and beyond. The design of the arcjet built for this effort was based on previous low power (1 kW class) arcjets.1-3 It has a precision machined 99.95% pure tungsten anode that also serves as the nozzle with a 0.040-in- (1-mm-) diameter, 0.040-in-long constrictor region. An additional anode with a 0.020-in- (0.5-mm-) diameter, 0.020-inlong constrictor region was purchased, but has not yet been used. The cathode is a 0.125-in-diameter tungsten welding electrode doped with lanthum-oxygen; its tip was precision ground to a 308deg angle and terminates in a blunt end. The two electrodes are separated by a boron-nitride insulator that also serves as the propellant manifold; it ends in six small holes which introduce the propellant gas in the diverging section of the nozzle, directly adjacent to the cathode. The electrodes and insulator are housed in a stainless-steel outer body, with a Macor insulator at the mid-plane to provide thermal isolation between the front and back halves of the device. The gas

  19. 75 FR 6380 - Provo River Project Rate Order No. WAPA-149

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... kilowatts. The PRP power is marketed according to a marketing plan that was approved and published in the Federal Register on November 21, 1994. This marketing plan allows Western to market the output of the PRP... Secretary of Energy the power marketing functions of the Secretary of the Department of the Interior and the...

  20. A 194 kilowatt solar photovoltaic flat panel power system for the combined Beverly High School/C. H. Patten Vocational High School, Beverly, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addiss, R. R., Jr.; Lawson, P. A.

    1980-06-01

    The design and performance of a photovoltaic power system is discussed. The 194 kW system consists of the photovoltaic array, the inverter/control subsystem, the building and utility interface, and the monitoring subsystem. The photovoltaic array consists of 56 separate subarrays of 112 photovoltaic modules each, deployed in rows on the southerly facing slope north of the school building. The wiring scheme permits individual modules to be disconnected without a radical change in subarray output current. Power is transmitted at 4160 V from the inverters and a step up transformer to the main 4160 V utility feed line in the school. Separate metering measures power bought and sold. At the optimum tilt angle of 40 deg, the array provides 232 MWH of AC energy annually, or 17 percent of the school load. The immediate impact is an $8000 saving in the annual utility bill. Levelized busbar energy costs are reduced from $2/kWH to $1/kWH when site specific parameters are used in the analysis instead of the JPL specified nominal values. A fault detection and isolation scheme which can find a single modulus failure is incorporated into the monitoring subsystem.

  1. 40 CFR 1054.740 - What special provisions apply for generating and using emission credits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) × (Avg. Power) × (Avg. UL) × (LF) ×(10−3) Where: Emissions Delta = 1.6 g/kW-hr for Class I and 2.1 g/kW... volumes. Avg. Power = the production-weighted average value of the maximum modal power for all your engine families in the engine class, as described in § 1054.705(a), in kilowatts. Avg. UL = the production...

  2. Project Echo: 960-Megacycle, 10-Kilowatt Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, J. P.; Brandt, R. H.

    1961-01-01

    A 10-kw transmitter operating at 960 to 961 Mc was used at the eastern terminus of the Project Echo communications experiment. This transmitter is located on Crawford's Hill near Holmdel, New Jersey. The 10-kw output feeds into a waveguide line leading to a 60-foot dish antenna. Exciter-driver units are available to drive the power amplifier with various modulations, such as wide-deviation FM, low-index phase modulation, single-sideband or double-sideband modulation with or without carrier, 960.05 or 961.05 Mc constant-frequency CW, and radar on-off pulses at 961.05 Mc. The main output amplifier consists primarily of a four-stage, externally-tuned-cavity, water-cooled klystron, operating at a beam voltage of 16 to 18 kv. The transmitter has been operated during many Moonbounce, tropospheric scatter, and Echo I tests with very satisfactory results. This paper describes its use before March 1, 1961.

  3. Paralleling power MOSFETs in their active region: Extended range of passively forced current sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1989-01-01

    A simple passive circuit that improves current balance in parallelled power MOSFETs that are not precisely matched and that are operated in their active region from a common gate drive are exhibited. A nonlinear circuit consisting of diodes and resistors generates the differential gate potential required to correct for unbalance while maintaining low losses over a range of current. Also application of a thin tape wound magnetic core to effect dynamic current balance is reviewed, and a simple theory is presented showing that for operation in the active region the branch currents tend to revert to their normal unbalanced values even if the core is not driven into saturation. Results of several comparative experiments are given.

  4. Power and efficiency scaling of diode pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers: 770-1110 nm tuning range and frequency doubling to 387-463 nm.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Umit; Baali, Ilyes

    2015-10-15

    We report significant average power and efficiency scaling of diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers in continuous-wave (cw), cw frequency-doubled, and mode-locked regimes. Four single-emitter broad-area laser diodes around 660 nm were used as the pump source, which provided a total pump power of 7.2 W. To minimize thermal effects, a 20 mm long Cr:LiSAF sample with a relatively low Cr-concentration (0.8%) was used as the gain medium. In cw laser experiments, 2.4 W of output power, a slope efficiency of 50%, and a tuning range covering the 770-1110 nm region were achieved. Intracavity frequency doubling with beta-barium borate (BBO) crystals generated up to 1160 mW of blue power and a record tuning range in the 387-463 nm region. When mode locked with a saturable absorber mirror, the laser produced 195 fs pulses with 580 mW of average power around 820 nm at a 100.3 MHz repetition rate. The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of the system was 33% in cw, 16% in cw frequency-doubled, and 8% in cw mode-locked regimes.

  5. Chirp-aided power fading mitigation for upstream 100 km full-range long reach PON with DBR DML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo; He, Hao; Xin, Haiyun; Hu, Weisheng; Liang, Song; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2018-01-01

    The DML is a promising option for cost-sensitive ONUs in optical access networks, but suffers from severe power fading due to dispersion and chirp. In this work, we investigate to mitigate the power fading by optimizing the chirp. Theoretical analysis indicates, a see-saw effect, influenced by the bias, exists between the adiabatic notch-induced fading (A-fading) and the transient notch-induced fading (T-fading). High bias can mitigate T-fading, but causes large A-fading. Low bias can avoid A-fading, but cannot completely mitigate T-fading. For each transmission distance, balance should be achieved to favor transmission. The ∼20 km short distance requires high bias to obtain large adiabatic chirp to counteract the T-fading, while the ∼100 km long distance requires relatively low bias to avoid the A-fading. With this power fading mitigation technique, we conduct upstream transmission experiment of LR-PON. Experiments show that, although signal contamination is inevitable, clear ;1; and ;0; are obtained with this power fading mitigation scheme for any 0 ∼100 km distance with 10 Gb/s OOK signal and DBR DML. The optical power budget penalty induced by 0 ∼100 km fiber is limited within only 2.2 dB, with optimum bias for each distance. More than 10 and 15 dB improvement is achieved when BER is 10-3 and 10-6. A method is also proposed to automatically obtain optimum bias from the ranging procedure of PON protocol.

  6. On a growth model for complex networks capable of producing power-law out-degree distributions with wide range exponents

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Gómez, J.; Arjona-Villicaña, P. D.; Stevens-Navarro, E.; Pineda-Rico, U.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Acosta-Elias, J.

    2015-01-01

    The out-degree distribution is one of the most reported topological properties to characterize real complex networks. This property describes the probability that a node in the network has a particular number of outgoing links. It has been found that in many real complex networks the out-degree has a behavior similar to a power-law distribution, therefore some network growth models have been proposed to approximate this behavior. This paper introduces a new growth model that allows to produce out-degree distributions that decay as a power-law with an exponent in the range from 1 to ∞. PMID:25765763

  7. Muscle coordination limits efficiency and power output of human limb movement under a wide range of mechanical demands

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cycle frequency and workload on muscle coordination and the ensuing relationship with mechanical efficiency and power output of human limb movement. Eleven trained cyclists completed an array of cycle frequency (cadence)-power output conditions while excitation from 10 leg muscles and power output were recorded. Mechanical efficiency was maximized at increasing cadences for increasing power outputs and corresponded to muscle coordination and muscle fiber type recruitment that minimized both the total muscle excitation across all muscles and the ineffective pedal forces. Also, maximum efficiency was characterized by muscle coordination at the top and bottom of the pedal cycle and progressive excitation through the uniarticulate knee, hip, and ankle muscles. Inefficiencies were characterized by excessive excitation of biarticulate muscles and larger duty cycles. Power output and efficiency were limited by the duration of muscle excitation beyond a critical cadence (120–140 rpm), with larger duty cycles and disproportionate increases in muscle excitation suggesting deteriorating muscle coordination and limitations of the activation-deactivation capabilities. Most muscles displayed systematic phase shifts of the muscle excitation relative to the pedal cycle that were dependent on cadence and, to a lesser extent, power output. Phase shifts were different for each muscle, thereby altering their mechanical contribution to the pedaling action. This study shows that muscle coordination is a key determinant of mechanical efficiency and power output of limb movement across a wide range of mechanical demands and that the excitation and coordination of the muscles is limited at very high cycle frequencies. PMID:26445873

  8. US Department of Energy`s high-temperature and high-pressure particulate cleanup for advanced coal-based power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    The availability of reliable, low-cost electricity is a cornerstone for the United States` ability to compete in the world market. The Department of Energy (DOE) projects the total consumption of electricity in the US to rise from 2.7 trillion kilowatt-hours in 1990 to 3.5 trillion in 2010. Although energy sources are diversifying, fossil fuel still produces 90 percent of the nation`s energy. Coal is our most abundant fossil fuel resource and the source of 56 percent of our electricity. It has been the fuel of choice because of its availability and low cost. A new generation of high-efficiency power systemsmore » has made it possible to continue the use of coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems greatly reduce the pollutants associated with cola-fired plants built before the 1970s. To realize this high efficiency and superior environmental performance, advanced coal-based power systems will require gas stream cleanup under high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) process conditions. Presented in this paper are the HTHP particulate capture requirements for the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) power systems, the HTHP particulate cleanup systems being implemented in the PFBC and IGCC Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Projects, and the currently available particulate capture performance results.« less

  9. The Army’s Operational Energy Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    battery chargers . Solar Hybrid—a system capable of providing up to 10 kilowatts of power continuously while reducing gen- erator running time by 20...granted. Army vehicles consume unprecedented amounts of fuel for mobility and onboard power. Average fuel demand per soldier has increased from about 1... electric power. This depen- dence translates to a vulnerability as fuel and water com- pose the vast majority of resupply volume, which, in turn

  10. Designing a 25-kilowatt high frequency series resonant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robson, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of processing 25 kW of power with a single, transistorized, 20 kHz, series resonant converter stage has been demonstrated by the successful design, development, fabrication, and testing of such a device. It employs four Westinghouse D7ST transistors in a full-bridge configuration and operates from a 250-to-350-Vdc input bus. The unit has an overall worst-case efficiency of 93.5% at its full rated output of 1000 V and 25 A dc. A solid-state dc input circuit breaker and output-transient-current limiters are included in and integrated into the design. Circuit details of the converter are presented along with test data.

  11. Extended Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor Through Dual Mode Inverter Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.

    2000-06-23

    The trapezoidal back electromotive force (emf) brushless direct current (dc) motor (BDCM) with surface-mounted magnets has high-power density and efficiency especially when rare-earth magnet materials are used. Traction applications, such as electric vehicles, could benefit significantly from the use of such motors. Unfortunately, a practical means for driving the motor over a constant power speed ratio (CPSR) of 5:1 or more has not yet been developed. A key feature of these motors is that they have low internal inductance. The phase advance method is effective in controlling the motor power over such a speed range, but the current at highmore » speed may be several times greater than that required at the base speed. The increase in current during high-speed operation is due to the low motor inductance and the action of the bypass diodes of the inverter. The use of such a control would require increased current rating of the inverter semiconductors and additional cooling for the inverter, where the conduction losses increase proportionally with current, and especially for the motor, where the losses increase with the square of the current. The high current problems of phase advance can be mitigated by adding series inductance; however, this reduces power density, requires significant increase in supply voltage, and leaves the CPSR performance of the system highly sensitive to variations in the available voltage. A new inverter topology and control scheme has been developed that can drive low-inductance BDCMs over the CPSR that would be required in electric vehicle applications. This new controller is called the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC). It is shown that the BDCM has an infinite CPSR when it is driven by the DMIC.« less

  12. Next generation diode lasers with enhanced brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ried, S.; Rauch, S.; Irmler, L.; Rikels, J.; Killi, A.; Papastathopoulos, E.; Sarailou, E.; Zimer, H.

    2018-02-01

    High-power diode lasers are nowadays well established manufacturing tools in high power materials processing, mainly for tactile welding, surface treatment and cladding applications. Typical beam parameter products (BPP) of such lasers range from 30 to 50 mm·mrad at several kilowatts of output power. TRUMPF offers a product line of diode lasers to its customers ranging from 150 W up to 6 kW of output power. These diode lasers combine high reliability with small footprint and high efficiency. However, up to now these lasers are limited in brightness due to the commonly used spatial and coarse spectral beam combining techniques. Recently diode lasers with enhanced brightness have been presented by use of dense wavelength multiplexing (DWM). In this paper we report on TRUMPF's diode lasers utilizing DWM. We demonstrate a 2 kW and a 4 kW system ideally suited for fine welding and scanner welding applications. The typical laser efficiency is in the range of 50%. The system offers plug and play exchange of the fiber beam delivery cable, multiple optical outputs and integrated cooling in a very compact package. An advanced control system offers flexible integration in any customer's shop floor environment and includes industry 4.0 capabilities (e.g. condition monitoring and predictive maintenance).

  13. A Study of LoRa: Long Range & Low Power Networks for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Aloÿs; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas; Townsley, William Mark

    2016-09-09

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power, low-bitrate, wireless telecommunications system, promoted as an infrastructure solution for the Internet of Things: end-devices use LoRa across a single wireless hop to communicate to gateway(s), connected to the Internet and which act as transparent bridges and relay messages between these end-devices and a central network server. This paper provides an overview of LoRa and an in-depth analysis of its functional components. The physical and data link layer performance is evaluated by field tests and simulations. Based on the analysis and evaluations, some possible solutions for performance enhancements are proposed.

  14. A Study of LoRa: Long Range & Low Power Networks for the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Aloÿs; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas; Townsley, William Mark

    2016-01-01

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power, low-bitrate, wireless telecommunications system, promoted as an infrastructure solution for the Internet of Things: end-devices use LoRa across a single wireless hop to communicate to gateway(s), connected to the Internet and which act as transparent bridges and relay messages between these end-devices and a central network server. This paper provides an overview of LoRa and an in-depth analysis of its functional components. The physical and data link layer performance is evaluated by field tests and simulations. Based on the analysis and evaluations, some possible solutions for performance enhancements are proposed. PMID:27618064

  15. Stopping power and dose calculations with analytical and Monte Carlo methods for protons and prompt gamma range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usta, Metin; Tufan, Mustafa Çağatay; Aydın, Güral; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2018-07-01

    In this study, we have performed the calculations stopping power, depth dose, and range verification for proton beams using dielectric and Bethe-Bloch theories and FLUKA, Geant4 and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes. In the framework, as analytical studies, Drude model was applied for dielectric theory and effective charge approach with Roothaan-Hartree-Fock charge densities was used in Bethe theory. In the simulations different setup parameters were selected to evaluate the performance of three distinct Monte Carlo codes. The lung and breast tissues were investigated are considered to be related to the most common types of cancer throughout the world. The results were compared with each other and the available data in literature. In addition, the obtained results were verified with prompt gamma range data. In both stopping power values and depth-dose distributions, it was found that the Monte Carlo values give better results compared with the analytical ones while the results that agree best with ICRU data in terms of stopping power are those of the effective charge approach between the analytical methods and of the FLUKA code among the MC packages. In the depth dose distributions of the examined tissues, although the Bragg curves for Monte Carlo almost overlap, the analytical ones show significant deviations that become more pronounce with increasing energy. Verifications with the results of prompt gamma photons were attempted for 100-200 MeV protons which are regarded important for proton therapy. The analytical results are within 2%-5% and the Monte Carlo values are within 0%-2% as compared with those of the prompt gammas.

  16. Variable wide range of lens power and its improvement in a liquid-crystal lens using highly resistive films divided into two regions with different diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Marenori; Sato, Susumu

    2018-05-01

    The variable range of lens power of a liquid-crystal (LC) lens driven by two voltages is discussed on the basis of calculated and experimental results. The LC lens has two electrodes, which are a circularly hole-patterned electrode and a circular electrode, in addition to a common electrode, and highly resistive transparent films. The variable range of lens power increases with increasing driving voltage applied across the circularly hole-patterned electrode and the common electrode, and with decreasing diameter of highly resistive films. However, the optical-phase retardation profile tends to deviate from a parabolic curve in these cases. As a method to improve the trade-off properties, the highly resistive film is divided into two regions with different diameters, where the sheet resistance of an outer film is larger than that of an inner one. The improved LC lens has a lens power that varies in a wide range, and it exhibits a good parabolic phase retardation profile.

  17. Snow Cover, Snowmelt Timing and Stream Power in the Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Riggs, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier onset of springtime weather, including earlier snowmelt, has been documented in the western United States over at least the last 50 years. Because the majority (is greater than 70%) of the water supply in the western U.S. comes from snowmelt, analysis of the declining spring snowpack (and shrinking glaciers) has important implications for the management of streamflow. The amount of water in a snowpack influences stream discharge which can also influence erosion and sediment transport by changing stream power, or the rate at which a stream can do work, such as move sediment and erode the stream bed. The focus of this work is the Wind River Range (WRR) in west-central Wyoming. Ten years of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover, cloud-gap-filled (CGF) map products and 30 years of discharge and meteorological station data are studied. Streamflow data from streams in WRR drainage basins show lower annual discharge and earlier snowmelt in the decade of the 2000s than in the previous three decades, though no trend of either lower streamflow or earlier snowmelt was observed within the decade of the 2000s. Results show a statistically-significant trend at the 95% confidence level (or higher) of increasing weekly maximum air temperature (for three out of the five meteorological stations studied) in the decade of the 1970s, and also for the 40-year study period as a whole. The extent of snow-cover (percent of basin covered) derived from the lowest elevation zone (2500-3000 m) of the WRR, using MODIS CGF snow-cover maps, is strongly correlated with maximum monthly discharge on 30 April, where Spearman's Rank correlation, rs,=0.89 for the decade of the 2000s. We also investigated stream power for Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake; and found a trend (significant at the 90% confidence level) toward reduced stream power from 1970 to 2009. Observed changes in streamflow and stream power may be related to increasing weekly maximum air temperature

  18. Power modulation based fiber-optic loop-sensor having a dual measurement range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Q.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2009-08-01

    A fiber-optic sensor is investigated in this work for potential applications in structural health monitoring. The sensor, called fiber-loop-sensor, is based on bending an optical fiber beyond a critical radius to obtain intensity losses and calibrating the losses with respect to the applied force or displacement. Additionally, in the present case, the use of single-mode optical fibers allows the appearance of several resonance peaks in the transmitted power-displacement graph. The intensity of one of these resonances can be tracked in a narrow range to obtain high sensitivity. Experimental results show that the resolution of 10-4 N for force and 10-5 m for displacement can be obtained in these sensors. The sensors are calibrated for various loop radii and for various loading rates. They are also tested under loading-unloading conditions for over 104 cycles to observe their fatigue behavior. The sensors show very repeatable response and no degradation in performance under these test conditions. Simple construction and instrumentation, high sensitivity, and low cost are the advantages of these sensors.

  19. The Mercury Project: A High Average Power, Gas-Cooled Laser For Inertial Fusion Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A; Armstrong, P; Ault, E

    Hundred-joule, kilowatt-class lasers based on diode-pumped solid-state technologies, are being developed worldwide for laser-plasma interactions and as prototypes for fusion energy drivers. The goal of the Mercury Laser Project is to develop key technologies within an architectural framework that demonstrates basic building blocks for scaling to larger multi-kilojoule systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications. Mercury has requirements that include: scalability to IFE beamlines, 10 Hz repetition rate, high efficiency, and 10{sup 9} shot reliability. The Mercury laser has operated continuously for several hours at 55 J and 10 Hz with fourteen 4 x 6 cm{sup 2} ytterbium doped strontiummore » fluoroapatite (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier slabs pumped by eight 100 kW diode arrays. The 1047 nm fundamental wavelength was converted to 523 nm at 160 W average power with 73% conversion efficiency using yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB).« less

  20. The LRCM: (the Long-Range Strategic Cruise Missile) Asymmetries, Deterrence and SAL (Strategic Arms Limitation)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    about the same pro- portion of the useful payload. The J-85-4A non- afterburning turbojet engines installed in the F5 aircraft occupy about 25% of the...about one kiloton TNT equivalent yield per 1 5 Pretty and Archer, op. cit. 32 pound of warhead weight. Thus, a 200 KT warhead will weigh about 200...explosion is equivalent to a conventional unit of energy release equal to one thousand short tons of TNT , or about 10 calories, 1.15 x 10 kilowatt

  1. 78 FR 52172 - Don W. Gilbert Hydro Power, LLC; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... kilowatts (kW) and would utilize the flow from several unnamed springs that converge into an unnamed channel... to the existing stream channel that flows into the Bear River; (5) a 150-foot-long, 480-volt... Construction Implement industry-standard erosion control measures to minimize erosion and sedimentation; Stop...

  2. Power electronics for low power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.

    1991-01-01

    In anticipation of the needs of future light-weight, low-power spacecraft, arcjet power electronics in the 100 to 400 W operating range were developed. Limited spacecraft power and thermal control capacity of these small spacecraft emphasized the need for high efficiency. Power topologies similar to those in the higher 2 kW and 5 to 30 kW power range were implemented, including a four transistor bridge switching circuit, current mode pulse-width modulated control, and an output current averaging inductor with an integral pulse generation winding. Reduction of switching transients was accomplished using a low inductance power distribution network, and no passive snubber circuits were necessary for power switch protection. Phase shift control of the power bridge was accomplished using an improved pulse width modulation to phase shift converter circuit. These features, along with conservative magnetics designs allowed power conversion efficiencies of greater than 92.5 percent to be achieved into resistive loads over the entire operating range of the converter. Electromagnetic compatibility requirements were not considered in this work, and control power for the converter was derived from AC mains. Addition of input filters and control power converters would result in an efficiency of on the order of 90 percent for a flight unit. Due to the developmental nature of arcjet systems at this power level, the exact nature of the thruster/power processor interface was not quantified. Output regulation and current ripple requirements of 1 and 20 percent respectively, as well as starting techniques, were derived from the characteristics of the 2 kW system but an open circuit voltage in excess of 175 V was specified. Arcjet integration tests were performed, resulting in successful starts and stable arcjet operation at power levels as low as 240 W with simulated hydrazine propellants.

  3. Highly efficient X-range AlGaN/GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tural'chuk, P. A.; Kirillov, V. V.; Osipov, P. E.; Vendik, I. B.; Vendik, O. G.; Parnes, M. D.

    2017-09-01

    The development of microwave power amplifiers (PAs) based on transistors with an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction are discussed in terms of the possible enhancement of their efficiency. The main focus is on the synthesis of the transforming circuits, which ensure the reactive load at the second- and third-harmonic frequencies and complex impedance at the fundamental frequency. This makes it possible to optimize the complex operation mode of a PA; i.e., to reduce the scattering power and enhance the efficiency. A microwave PA based on the Schottky-barrier-gate field-effect transistor with 80 electrodes based on the GaN pHEMT transistor with a gate length of 0.25 nm and a gate width of 125 nm is experimentally investigated. The amplifier has a pulse output power of 35 W and a power-added efficiency of at least 50% at a working frequency of 9 GHz.

  4. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  5. High-range resolution spectral analysis of precipitation through range imaging of the Chung-Li VHF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shih-Chiao; Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Chu, Yen-Hsyang; Su, Ching-Lun; Chen, Jui-Hsiang

    2018-01-01

    Multi-frequency range imaging (RIM) has been operated in the Chung-Li very high-frequency (VHF) radar, located on the campus of National Central University, Taiwan, since 2008. RIM processes the echo signals with a group of closely spaced transmitting frequencies through appropriate inversion methods to obtain high-resolution distribution of echo power in the range direction. This is beneficial to the investigation of the small-scale structure embedded in dynamic atmosphere. Five transmitting frequencies were employed in the radar experiment for observation of the precipitating atmosphere during the period between 21 and 23 August 2013. Using the Capon and Fourier methods, the radar echoes were synthesized to retrieve the temporal signals at a smaller range step than the original range resolution defined by the pulse width, and such retrieved temporal signals were then processed in the Doppler frequency domain to identify the atmosphere and precipitation echoes. An analysis called conditional averaging was further executed for echo power, Doppler velocity, and spectral width to verify the potential capabilities of the retrieval processing in resolving small-scale precipitation and atmosphere structures. Point-by-point correction of range delay combined with compensation of range-weighting function effect has been performed during the retrieval of temporal signals to improve the continuity of power spectra at gate boundaries, making the small-scale structures in the power spectra more natural and reasonable. We examined stratiform and convective precipitation and demonstrated their different structured characteristics by means of the Capon-processed results. The new element in this study is the implementation of RIM on spectral analysis, especially for precipitation echoes.

  6. Summary Report: NMSBA CY 2016 - AEgis Technologies Group Inc. #12458.

    SciTech Connect

    Bellum, John Curtis; Field, Ella Suzanne

    2016-12-01

    AEgis requires large area partial mirror optics consisting of partially reflecting optical coatings on large dimension substrates for high energy laser (HEL) applications. The partial mirrors should transmit nearly the same small fraction of HEL radiation incident from a wide range of angles of incidence (AOIs), and the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the coatings should be high enough for them to be able to withstand direct exposure to near infrared CW HEL radiation at multi-kilowatt/cm2 power levels. The transmitted fraction of incident HEL radiation should reach an array of detectors at power levels high enough for reliable detection butmore » low enough to not damage the detectors. The reflected fraction of incident HEL radiation should scatter into a divergent pattern so as to be eye safe at a distance of ~ 200 m from the mirror in the case of 100 kilowatt incident laser power. The detector array together with the partial mirror optic and possible additional optics that provide divergent scattering of reflected HEL radiation constitute what AEgis refers to as a target board. The target board use environment may vary from benign, indoor laboratory conditions to harsh, outdoor conditions in tests on the ground as well as in air. Under this NMSBA project, Sandia agreed to apply its extensive expertise and capability in the design and production of high LIDT coatings on large dimension optics for high power pulsed laser radiation to advise and assist AEgis in the design and development of high LIDT coatings for the partial mirror optic. Sandia and AEgis met several times to discuss the partial mirror and target board requirements, and Sandia was guided in its work by these discussions as well as by the partial mirror and target board requirement summaries of Tables 1 and 2, respectively, that were provided by AEgis.« less

  7. Energy conservation principles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper and presentation discuss preliminary findings from energy audits conducted in cotton gins in six states including the allocation of motor horse power and kilowatt hours energy consumption per bale. General inferences will be drawn from information collected at gin plants of various bale...

  8. Ultralow-power and ultrafast all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials at optical communication range.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Hu, Xiaoyong; Fu, Yulan; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Actively all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials paves the way for achieving ultrahigh-speed quantum information processing chips. Unfortunately, up to now, very small experimental progress has been made for all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials in the visible and near-infrared range because of small third-order optical nonlinearity of conventional materials. The achieved operating pump intensity was as high as several GW/cm(2) order. Here, we report an ultralow-power and ultrafast all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials coated on polycrystalline indium-tin oxide layer at the optical communication range. Compared with previous reports, the threshold pump intensity is reduced by four orders of magnitude, while an ultrafast response time of picoseconds order is maintained. This work not only offers a way to constructing photonic materials with large nonlinearity and ultrafast response, but also opens up the possibility for realizing quantum solid chips and ultrafast integrated photonic devices based on metamaterials.

  9. Ultralow-power and ultrafast all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials at optical communication range

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Hu, Xiaoyong; Fu, Yulan; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Actively all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials paves the way for achieving ultrahigh-speed quantum information processing chips. Unfortunately, up to now, very small experimental progress has been made for all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials in the visible and near-infrared range because of small third-order optical nonlinearity of conventional materials. The achieved operating pump intensity was as high as several GW/cm2 order. Here, we report an ultralow-power and ultrafast all-optical tunable plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials coated on polycrystalline indium-tin oxide layer at the optical communication range. Compared with previous reports, the threshold pump intensity is reduced by four orders of magnitude, while an ultrafast response time of picoseconds order is maintained. This work not only offers a way to constructing photonic materials with large nonlinearity and ultrafast response, but also opens up the possibility for realizing quantum solid chips and ultrafast integrated photonic devices based on metamaterials. PMID:23903825

  10. Multiphase High-Frequency Isolated DC-DC Converter for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Rakesh; Srivastava, S. P.; Agarwal, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Industrial applications such as welding, plasma cutting, and surface hardening require a large DC current at low voltage. In such applications, the rating of power supply varies from few kilowatts to hundreds of kilowatts. The power supply employs in such applications particularly in arc welding process is expected to operate from open-circuit (no-load) to short-circuit (when the electrode sticks to the workpiece for a short span of time) quickly. In this paper, high-frequency isolated multiphase DC-DC converter is proposed which is well suited for aforementioned applications. Based on mathematical analysis, a simulation study with 5 kW, 5 V/1,000 A proposed model is carried out using Simulink block set and Sim Power System tool box and its performances are evaluated under symmetrical control methods. To verify the simulation results, scaled prototype model of rating 1.5 V/100 A is developed and tested with aforementioned control method under different operating conditions. In comparison with conventional welding power supply employed in many industries, the performance of proposed converter is improved significantly in terms of size and weight, efficiency and dynamic response.

  11. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  12. Analog synthesized fast-variable linear load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1991-01-01

    A several kilowatt power level, fast-variable linear resistor was synthesized by using analog components to control the conductance of power MOSFETs. Risetimes observed have been as short as 500 ns with respect to the control signal and 1 to 2 microseconds with respect to the power source voltage. A variant configuration of this load that dissipates a constant power set by a control signal is indicated. Replacement of the MOSFETs by static induction transistors (SITs) to increase power handling, speed and radiation hardness is discussed.

  13. Clarks Hill Lake Water Quality Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    multipurpose project designed to reduce flooding on the Savannah River, generate electric power and increase the depth of the Savannah River for... power plant at the dam has seven generators, each with a capacity of 40,000 kilowatts. The average annual energy output of Clarks Hill Power Plant is 700...feet) from the top of power pool elevation of 100.6 meters (330 feet msl) to a minimum pool elevation of 95.1 meters (312 feet msl). Because of below

  14. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Department of the Navy Near Term Energy-Efficient Technologies Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-23

    contract; information required to be in the offeror’s proposal; and factors and significant subfactors, and their relative importance, which will...development and testing, alternative fuels, alternative fuel sources, and small-scale cogeneration . 1. On-Board Vehicle Power The purpose of the On...savings of 20 percent, greater heating and cooling capacity , and provision of full 30 kilowatts of electrical power output in all environments

  15. U.S. Army Hybrid Propulsion System R&D Overview ATA/Technology & Maintenance Council 2011 Fall Meeting, Hybrid Powertrain Task Force Session

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-19

    Integration – Non-Thermal Plasma JP8 reformer & SOFC system – Lithium-Iron Phosphate Battery Technology – Lithium Ion Battery & energy storage systems...regeneration and includes a lithium ion battery energy storage – Export power capabilities meeting mission requirements (5-50 kilowatt [kW]) – Air

  16. 75 FR 17404 - Twin Valleys Public Power District; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ...; (2) a powerhouse containing one Kaplan generating unit having an installed capacity of 800 kilowatts... Commission's website ( http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/ferconline.asp ) under the ``eFiling'' link. For a... this project, including a copy of the application, can be viewed or printed on the ``eLibrary'' link of...

  17. Effect of reactor coolant radioactivity upon configuration feasibility for a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffer, L.; Wright, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary shielding analysis was carried out for a conceptual nuclear electric propulsion vehicle designed to transport payloads from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. The vehicle employed a thermionic nuclear reactor operating at 1575 kilowatts and generated 120 kilowatts of electricity for a round-trip mission time of 2000 hours. Propulsion was via axially directed ion engines employing 3300 pounds of mercury as a propellant. The vehicle configuration permitted a reactor shadow shield geometry using LiH and the mercury propellant for shielding. However, much of the radioactive NaK reactor coolant was unshielded and in close proximity to the power conditioning electronics. An estimate of the radioactivity of the NaK coolant was made and its unshielded dose rate to the power conditioning equipment calculated. It was found that the activated NaK contributed about three-fourths of the gamma dose constraint. The NaK dose was considered a sufficiently high fraction of the allowable gamma dose to necessitate modifications in configuration.

  18. 76 FR 4097 - Verdant Power, LLC (Verdant); Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... facilities would include: (1) Three 35-kilowatt (kW), 5-meter-diameter axial flow Kinetic System turbine...; (2) nine additional 5-meter-diameter axial flow Kinetic System turbine generator units mounted on...-meter-diameter axial flow Kinetic System turbine generator units mounted on six triframe mounts, with a...

  19. Progress in Developing a New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the Moon envisions a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology, Inc.'s Stirling Engine Systems Division (now a part of Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kWe free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 We and 80 We Stirling convertor systems for use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in the Lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  20. Design and Development of an Engineering Prototype Compact X-Ray Scanner (FMS 5000)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-31

    machined by "wire-EDM" (electro discharge machining ). Three different slice thicknesses can be selected from the scan menu. The set of slice thicknesses...circuit. This type of circuit is used whenever more than ten kilowatts of power are needed by a machine . For example, lathes and milling machines in a... machine shop usually use this type of input power. A three- phase circuit delivers power more efficiently than a single-phase circuit because three

  1. Flight experience of solar mesosphere explorer's power system over high temperatures ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faber, Jack; Hurley, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    The performance of the power system on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite for the life of the mission and the techniques used to ensure power system health are summarized. Early in the mission high cell imbalances in one of the batteries resulted in a loading scheme which attempted to minimize the cell imbalances without causing an undervoltage condition. A short term model of the power system allowed planners to predict depth of discharge using the latest available data. Due to expected orbital shifts the solar arrays experience extended periods of no eclipse. This has required special conditioning schemes to keep the batteries healthy when the eclipses return. Analysis of the SME data indicates long term health of the SME power system as long as the conditioning scheme is continued.

  2. 78 FR 56222 - New York Power Authority; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... Reservoir--City of New York Aqueduct, lower part of the Catskill Water Distribution System, which is owned... turbine generator units each with a rated capacity of 1,000 kilowatts installed in the existing bays... intent to cease the delivery of water through a portion of the Catskill Aqueduct required by the NYPA's...

  3. Mod-2 wind turbine system concept and preliminary design report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The configuration development of the MOD-2 wind turbine system is presented. The MOD-2 is design optimized for commercial production rates which, in multi-unit installations, will be integrated into a utility power grid and achieve a cost of electricity at less than 4 cents per kilowatt hour.

  4. A conceptual study of the potential for automotive-derived and free-piston Stirling engines in 30- to 400-kilowatt stationary power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsky, A.; Chen, H. S.; Dineen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The technical feasibility of applying automotive-derived kinematic and free-piston Stirling engine concepts for stationary applications was explored. Automotive-derived engines offer cost advantages by providing a mature and developd engine technology base with downrating and parts commonality options for specific applications. Two engine sizes (30 and 400 kW), two Stirling engine configurations (kinematic and free-piston), and two output systems (crankshaft and hydraulic pump) were studied. The study includes the influences of using either hydrogen or helium as the working gas. The first kinematic configuration selects an existing Stirling engine design from an automotive application and adapts it to stationary requirements. A 50,000-hour life requirement was established by downrating the engine to 40 kW and reducing auxiliary loads. Efficiency improvements were gained by selective material and geometric variations and peak brake efficiency of 36.8 percent using helium gas was achieved. The second design was a four-cylinder, 400 kW engine, utilizing a new output drive system known as the z-crank, which provides lower friction losses and variable stroke power control. Three different material and working gas combinations were considered. Brake efficiency levels varied from 40.5 percent to 45.6 percent. A 37.5 kW single-cycle, free-piston hydraulic output design was generated by scaling one cylinder of the original automotive engine and mating it to a counterbalanced reciprocal hydraulic pump. Metallic diaphragms were utilized to transmit power.

  5. A conceptual study of the potential for automotive-derived and free-piston Stirling engines in 30- to 400-kilowatt stationary power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatsky, A.; Chen, H. S.; Dineen, J.

    1982-05-01

    The technical feasibility of applying automotive-derived kinematic and free-piston Stirling engine concepts for stationary applications was explored. Automotive-derived engines offer cost advantages by providing a mature and developd engine technology base with downrating and parts commonality options for specific applications. Two engine sizes (30 and 400 kW), two Stirling engine configurations (kinematic and free-piston), and two output systems (crankshaft and hydraulic pump) were studied. The study includes the influences of using either hydrogen or helium as the working gas. The first kinematic configuration selects an existing Stirling engine design from an automotive application and adapts it to stationary requirements. A 50,000-hour life requirement was established by downrating the engine to 40 kW and reducing auxiliary loads. Efficiency improvements were gained by selective material and geometric variations and peak brake efficiency of 36.8 percent using helium gas was achieved. The second design was a four-cylinder, 400 kW engine, utilizing a new output drive system known as the z-crank, which provides lower friction losses and variable stroke power control. Three different material and working gas combinations were considered. Brake efficiency levels varied from 40.5 percent to 45.6 percent. A 37.5 kW single-cycle, free-piston hydraulic output design was generated by scaling one cylinder of the original automotive engine and mating it to a counterbalanced reciprocal hydraulic pump. Metallic diaphragms were utilized to transmit power.

  6. Storm surge and tidal range energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Robins, Peter; Evans, Paul; Neill, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The need to reduce carbon-based energy sources whilst increasing renewable energy forms has led to concerns of intermittency within a national electricity supply strategy. The regular rise and fall of the tide makes prediction almost entirely deterministic compared to other stochastic renewable energy forms; therefore, tidal range energy is often stated as a predictable and firm renewable energy source. Storm surge is the term used for the non-astronomical forcing of tidal elevation, and is synonymous with coastal flooding because positive storm surges can elevate water-levels above the height of coastal flood defences. We hypothesis storm surges will affect the reliability of the tidal range energy resource; with negative surge events reducing the tidal range, and conversely, positive surge events increasing the available resource. Moreover, tide-surge interaction, which results in positive storm surges more likely to occur on a flooding tide, will reduce the annual tidal range energy resource estimate. Water-level data (2000-2012) at nine UK tide gauges, where the mean tidal amplitude is above 2.5m and thus suitable for tidal-range energy development (e.g. Bristol Channel), were used to predict tidal range power with a 0D modelling approach. Storm surge affected the annual resource estimate by between -5% to +3%, due to inter-annual variability. Instantaneous power output were significantly affected (Normalised Root Mean Squared Error: 3%-8%, Scatter Index: 15%-41%) with spatial variability and variability due to operational strategy. We therefore find a storm surge affects the theoretical reliability of tidal range power, such that a prediction system may be required for any future electricity generation scenario that includes large amounts of tidal-range energy; however, annual resource estimation from astronomical tides alone appears sufficient for resource estimation. Future work should investigate water-level uncertainties on the reliability and

  7. CONVERSION OF WIND POWER TO HYDROGEN FUEL: DESIGN OF AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SYSTEM FOR AN INJECTION MOLDING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Injection molding plants are large consumers of electricity. At its current level of operations, Harbec Plastics (Ontario, NY) uses about 2,000,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year. Based on the US average fuel mix, approximately 1.5 pounds of CO2

  8. Critical technology areas of an SPS development and the applicability of European technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassing, D.; Ruth, J.

    1980-01-01

    Possible system development and implementation scenarios for the hypothetical European part of a cooperative Satellite Power System effort are discussed, and the technology and systems requirements which could be used as an initial guideline for further evaluation studies are characterized. Examples of advanced European space technologies are described including high power microwave amplifiers, antennas, advanced structures, multi-kilowatt solar arrays, attitude and orbit control systems, and electric propulsion.

  9. Feasibility of Hybrid Retrofits to Off-Grid Diesel Power Plants in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Flowers, L. T.; Benavidez, P. J.

    1999-08-01

    The Strategic Power Utilities Group (SPUG) of the National Power Corporation (NPC) in the Philippines owns and operates about 100 power plants, mostly fueled by diesel, ranging in energy production from about 15 kilowatt-hours (kWh)/day to 106,000 kWh/day. Reducing the consumption of diesel fuel in these plants, along with the associated financial losses, is a priority for SPUG. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential fuel and cost savings that might be achieved by retrofitting hybrid power systems to these existing diesel plants. As used in this report, the term ''hybrid system'' refers to any combination ofmore » wind turbine generators (WTGs), photovoltaic (PV) modules, lead-acid batteries, and an AC/DC power converter (either an electronic inverter or a rotary converter), in addition to the existing diesel gensets. The resources available for this study did not permit a detailed design analysis for each of the plants. Instead, the following five-step process was used: (1) Tabulate some important characteristics of all the plants. (2) Group the plants into categories (six classes) with similar characteristics. (3) For each class of system, identify one plant that is representative of the class. (4) For each representative plant, perform a moderately detailed prefeasibility analysis of design options. (5) Summarize and interpret the results. The analysis of each representative plant involved the use of time-series computer simulation models to estimate the fuel usage, maintenance expenses, and cash flow resulting from various designs, and to search the domain of possible designs for the one leading to the lowest life-cycle cost. Cost items that would be unaffected by the retrofit, such as operator salaries and the capital cost of existing equipment, were not included in the analysis. Thus, the results are reported as levelized cost of energy (COE) savings: the difference between the cost of the existing diesel-only system and that of an optimized

  10. The Effects of Cold Whirlpool on Power, Speed, Agility, and Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Stephen M.; Udermann, Brian E.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Reineke, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to determine if cold whirlpool treatment decreases functional performance equally regardless of gender. A secondary aim was to determine if there is a gradual increase in functional performance across time. Twenty-one college-aged subjects volunteered to participate in this study and were required to perform four measures of functional performance including: counter movement vertical jump, T-test, 36.58-meter dash (40-yard), and active range of motion of the ankle. Participants were treated with a 20 minute, 10 degree Celsius cold whirlpool following the pre-test of a given functional performance measure. Participants demonstrated significant decreases in counter movement vertical jump, T-test, and 40-yard dash performance immediately following treatment. Vertical jump performance remained impaired for at least 32 minutes. While both the T-test and 40-yard dash were affected for 7 and 22 minutes post- treatment, respectively. Participants also demonstrated significant decreases in peak power and average power immediately after and for 32 minutes post-treatment. Dorsiflexion was significantly decreased 7 and 12 minutes following treatment. There were no differences for plantar flexion, inversion, or eversion. These data suggest functional performance was affected immediately following and for up to 32 minutes after cold whirlpool treatment. It was also evident that there is a gradual performance increase for each measure of functional performance across time. Therefore, the consequences should be carefully considered before returning athletes to activity following cold whirlpool treatment. Key pointsCryotherapy is a common and highly effective modality in treating acute and chronic athletic injuries.The results indicated that cold whirlpool does have an immediate and subsequent effect on functional performance.Understanding how cold whirlpool adversely affects functional performance allows clinicians to continue using this modality before vigorous

  11. Extending the wavelength range in the Oclaro high-brightness broad area modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Susanne; Guarino, Andrea; Sverdlov, Boris; Müller, Jürgen; Button, Christopher; Arlt, Sebastian; Jaeggi, Dominik; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high power laser diode modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm has been growing continuously over the last several years. Progress in eye-safe fiber lasers requires reliable pump power at 793 nm, modules at 808 nm are used for small size DPSSL applications and fiber-coupled laser sources at 830 nm are used in printing industry. However, power levels achieved in this wavelength range have remained lower than for the 9xx nm range. Here we report on approaches to increasing the reliable power in our latest generations of high power pump modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm.

  12. 76 FR 21891 - Seneca Nation of Indians; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to... total installed capacity of 32,000 kilowatts, (2) a proposed 4,500-foot-long, 230-kilovolt transmission...: yo' Way, Salamanca, NY 14779; phone (716) 945-1790. FERC Contact: Timothy Looney; phone: (202) 502...

  13. 76 FR 76155 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the installation of 10 units. Applicant... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Maurice River Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Maurice River...

  14. 76 FR 70720 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the installation of 10 units. Applicant... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Avalon Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Ingram Thoroughfare...

  15. 75 FR 80046 - ORPC Alaska, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... study the feasibility of the Nenana RivGen Power Project (Nenana Project) to be located on the Tanana... RivGen turbine-generator modules with a combined capacity of 300 kilowatts; (2) an approximately 450... north bank of the Tanana River, or an alternate transmission cable configuration that is yet to be...

  16. Tank Investigation of a Powered Dynamic Model of a Large Long-Range Flying Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B; Olson, Roland E; Harr, Marvin I

    1947-01-01

    Principles for designing the optimum hull for a large long-range flying boat to meet the requirements of seaworthiness, minimum drag, and ability to take off and land at all operational gross loads were incorporated in a 1/12-size powered dynamic model of a four-engine transport flying boat having a design gross load of 165,000 pounds. These design principles included the selection of a moderate beam loading, ample forebody length, sufficient depth of step, and close adherence to the form of a streamline body. The aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of the model were investigated in Langley tank no. 1. Tests were made to determine the minimum allowable depth of step for adequate landing stability, the suitability of the fore-and-aft location of the step, the take-off performance, the spray characteristics, and the effects of simple spray-control devices. The application of the design criterions used and test results should be useful in the preliminary design of similar large flying boats.

  17. Numerical Exposure Assessment Method for Low Frequency Range and Application to Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, SangWook; Kim, Minhyuk

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical exposure assessment method is presented for a quasi-static analysis by the use of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. The proposed method is composed of scattered field FDTD method and quasi-static approximation for analyzing of the low frequency band electromagnetic problems. The proposed method provides an effective tool to compute induced electric fields in an anatomically realistic human voxel model exposed to an arbitrary non-uniform field source in the low frequency ranges. The method is verified, and excellent agreement with theoretical solutions is found for a dielectric sphere model exposed to a magnetic dipole source. The assessment method serves a practical example of the electric fields, current densities, and specific absorption rates induced in a human head and body in close proximity to a 150-kHz wireless power transfer system for cell phone charging. The results are compared to the limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the IEEE standard guidelines.

  18. Optical Amplifier for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.; Keys, Andrew S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an optical amplifier designed to amplify a spatially sampled component of an optical wavefront to kilowatt average power. The goal is means for implementing a strategy of spatially segmenting a large aperture wavefront, amplifying the individual segments, maintaining the phase coherence of the segments by active means, and imaging the resultant amplified coherent field. Applications of interest are the transmission of space solar power over multi-megameter distances, as to distant spacecraft, or to remote sites with no preexisting power grid.

  19. Research and Development of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Junction Recovery Diodes for Picosecond Range, High Power Opening Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekhov, Igor V.

    2002-07-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Ioffe Institute as follows: The purpose of the proposed project is to develop, fabricate, test, and characterize silicon carbide power semiconductor opening switches operating in the picosecond range of switch time. Special SiC diode structures will be fabricated and investigated, including Junction Recovery Diodes (JRD). The operation of such diodes is founded on the superfast recovery of the junction's blocking ability after switching the device from forward to reverse bias conditions. Our estimations show that the parameters of JRD devices can be substantially improved in case of SiC devices, compared to both Si and GaAs capabilities. We expect i) to increase the speed of switch operation, the specific commutated power, and the operation frequency repetition; ii) to reduce the weight and size of pulse devices; and iii) to achieve better reliability of the devices due to the unique thermal conductivity and radiation hardness of SiC.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Zhu, X R; Park, PC; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, R; Virshup, G; Clayton, J; Dong, L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0–3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield Numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction. PMID:22678123

  1. Broadband Sources in the 1-3 THz Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Ward, John; Maestrini, Alain; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Thomas, Bertrand; Lin, Robert; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John

    2009-01-01

    Broadband electronically tunable sources in the terahertz range are a critical technology for enabling space-borne as well as ground-based applications. By power-combining MMIC amplifier and frequency tripler chips, we have recently demonstrated >1 mW of output power at 900 GHz. This source provides a stepping stone to enable sources in the 2-3 THz range than can sufficiently pump multi-pixel imaging arrays.

  2. Microprocessor control system for 200-kilowatt Mod-OA wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyland, T. W.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The microprocessor system and program used to control the operation of the 200-kW Mod-OA wind turbines is described. The system is programmed to begin startup and shutdown sequences automatically and to control yaw motion. Rotor speed and power output are controlled with integral and proportional control of the blade pitch angle. Included in the report are a description of the hardware and a discussion of the software programming technique. A listing of the PL/M software program is given.

  3. Power supply with air core transformer and seperated power supplies for high dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, Otto (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Aalami, Dean (Inventor); Darrach, Murray (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A power supply for a quadrupole mass spectrometer which operates using an RF signal. The RF signal is controllable via a feedback loop. The feedback loop is from the output, through a comparator, and compared to a digital signal. An air core transformer is used to minimize the weight. The air core transformer is driven via two out of phase sawtooth signals which drive opposite ends of the transformer.

  4. The Next Generation of Space Cells for Diverse Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Landis, Geoffrey; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2002-01-01

    Future science, military and commercial space missions are incredibly diverse. Military and commercial missions range from large arrays of hundreds of kilowatt to small arrays of ten watts in various Earth orbits. While science missions also have small to very large power needs there are additional unique requirements to provide power for near-sun missions and planetary exploration including orbiters, landers and rovers both to the inner planets and the outer planets with a major emphasis in the near term on Mars. These mission requirements demand cells for low intensity, low temperature applications, high intensity, high temperature applications, dusty environments and often high radiation environments. This paper discusses mission requirements, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin-film cells as well as new technologies that may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a specific mission application.

  5. 76 FR 71004 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... estimated to have an annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the installation of 10 units... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Margate Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Beach Thoroughfare...

  6. 76 FR 67726 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... estimated to have an annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the installation of 10 units... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Dorchester--Maurice Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Maurice...

  7. 76 FR 76154 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... annual minimum generation of 3,504,000 kilowatt-hours with the installation of 10 units. Applicant... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Cape May Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Cape May Canal in...

  8. 40 CFR 89.401 - Scope; applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart B of this part. (b) Exhaust gases, either raw or dilute, are sampled while the test engine is operated using the appropriate test cycle on an engine dynamometer. The exhaust gases receive specific... the power output during each mode. Emissions are reported as grams per kilowatt hour (g/kW-hr). (c...

  9. 75 FR 51512 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... in Items I and II below, which Items have been prepared by the Exchange. The Commission is publishing... data center in Mahwah, New Jersey, from which it will offer co-location services. The Exchange will offer space at the data center in cabinets with power usage capability of either four or eight kilowatts...

  10. Community Anaerobic Digester: Powered by Students and Driving Practical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond Hall, Joan; O'Leary, Mary

    The Vermont Tech Community Anaerobic Digester (VTCAD) was conceived and funded by a partnership of educational, agricultural, waste management and environmental groups to create a living laboratory demonstrating the value of recycling nutrients, renewable energy and agricultural co-products from organic wastes. VTCAD was constructed on the Randolph Center, Vermont campus of Vermont Tech, a public college offering engineering technology, agricultural, renewable energy education and workforce training. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Vermont State Colleges and others, construction was completed in early 2014 and the facility has been operational since April 2014. At full power, VTCADmore » uses 16,000 gallons of manure and organic residuals to produce 8,880 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity per day, ‘waste’ heat that will be used to heat four campus buildings, bedding material for the college dairy herds and recycled nutrients used as crop fertilizer. VTCAD uses a mixture of manure from co-managed farms and organic residuals collected from the community. Feedstock materials include brewery residuals, the glycerol by-product of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil, grease trap waste, and waste paper and, soon, locally collected pre- and post-consumer food residuals.« less

  11. 7 CFR 1710.303 - Power cost studies-power supply borrowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power cost studies-power supply borrowers. 1710.303... AND GUARANTEES Long-Range Financial Forecasts § 1710.303 Power cost studies—power supply borrowers. (a... facilities shall be supported by a power cost study to demonstrate that the proposed generation and...

  12. 3D Long-Range Triplet Migration in a Water-Stable Metal-Organic Framework for Upconversion-Based Ultralow-Power in Vivo Imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Xu, Ming; Li, Fuyou; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2018-04-25

    Triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion (TTA-UC) has gained increasing attention because it allows for harvesting of low-energy photons in the solar spectrum with high efficiency in relevant applications including solar cells and bioimaging. However, the utilization of conventional TTA-UC systems for low-power bioapplications is significantly hampered by their general incompatibility and low efficiency in aqueous media. Herein we report a metal-organic framework (MOF) as a biocompatible nanoplatform for TTA-UC to realize low-power in vivo imaging. Our MOF consists of a porphyrinic sensitizer in an anthracene-based Zr-MOF as a TTA-UC platform. In particular, closely aligned chromophores in the MOF facilitate a long-range 3D triplet diffusion of 1.6 μm allowing efficient energy migration in water. The tunable ratio between sensitizer and annihilator by our synthetic method also allows an optimization of the system for maximized TTA-UC efficiency in water at a very low excitation power density. Consequently, the low-power imaging of lymph node in a live mouse was successfully demonstrated with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR > 30 at 5 mW cm -2 ).

  13. Multibin long-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Zalewski, K.

    2011-06-01

    A new method to study the long-range correlations in multiparticle production is developed. It is proposed to measure the joint factorial moments or cumulants of multiplicity distribution in several (more than two) bins. It is shown that this step dramatically increases the discriminative power of data.

  14. 77 FR 61598 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study... tidal turbines at a rated capacity of 100 kilowatts, (2) an estimated 2.5 kilometers in length of... a minimum of 17,520 megawatt hours per year with the installation of 50 units. Applicant Contact: Mr...

  15. An Array of Opportunities: Building a Sustainable Future at Leech Lake Tribal College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    With support from Leech Lake Tribal College (LLTC) in Cass Lake, Minnesota, solar energy infrastructure--as well as specialized training and well-paying jobs--are coming to the Leech Lake Nation. Rather than power LLTC's facilities, a 40- kilowatt solar garden installed on the college's campus during the 2017 fall semester, along with four similar…

  16. Relocating Energy in the Social Commons: Ideas for a Sustainable Energy Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, John; Martinez, Cecilia; Ruggero, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Climate change, rising energy costs, and other dilemmas raise the prospect for major change in energy-ecology-society relations. Two prominent proposals for change include: a nuclear power renaissance; and mega-scale renewable energy development. Both suggest that modern society will receive a rising stream of less CO2-rich kilowatt-hours, so that…

  17. A Low-Power Wide Dynamic-Range Current Readout Circuit for Ion-Sensitive FET Sensors.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyunwoo; Cho, Hwasuk; Koo, Jahyun; Ji, Youngwoo; Kim, Byungsub; Park, Hong-June; Sim, Jae-Yoon

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an amplifier-less and digital-intensive current-to-digital converter for ion-sensitive FET sensors. Capacitance on the input node is utilized as a residue accumulator, and a clocked comparator is followed for quantization. Without any continuous-time feedback circuit, the converter performs a first-order noise shaping of the quantization error. In order to minimize static power consumption, the proposed circuit employs a single-ended current-steering digital-to-analog converter which flows only the same current as the input. By adopting a switching noise averaging algorithm, our dynamic element matching not only mitigates mismatch of current sources in the current-steering DAC, but also makes the effect of dynamic switching noise become an input-independent constant. The implemented circuit in 0.35 μm CMOS converts the current input with a range of 2.8 μ A to 15 b digital output in about 4 ms, showing a DNL of +0.24/-0.25 LSB and an INL of + 1.98/-1.98 LSB while consuming 16.8 μW.

  18. Numerical Exposure Assessment Method for Low Frequency Range and Application to Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minhyuk

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical exposure assessment method is presented for a quasi-static analysis by the use of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. The proposed method is composed of scattered field FDTD method and quasi-static approximation for analyzing of the low frequency band electromagnetic problems. The proposed method provides an effective tool to compute induced electric fields in an anatomically realistic human voxel model exposed to an arbitrary non-uniform field source in the low frequency ranges. The method is verified, and excellent agreement with theoretical solutions is found for a dielectric sphere model exposed to a magnetic dipole source. The assessment method serves a practical example of the electric fields, current densities, and specific absorption rates induced in a human head and body in close proximity to a 150-kHz wireless power transfer system for cell phone charging. The results are compared to the limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the IEEE standard guidelines. PMID:27898688

  19. 20 MW Flywheel frequency regulation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Arseneaux, James

    Hazle designed, built, commissioned, and operates a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania (the Hazle Facility) using flywheel technology developed by its affiliate, Beacon Power, LLC (Beacon Power). The Hazle Facility provides frequency regulation services to the regional transmission organization, PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM), through its participation in PJM’s Regulation Market (a market-based system for the purchase and sale of the Regulation ancillary service). The zero emission Hazle Facility is designed for a 20 year-life over which it is capable of performing at least 100,000 full depth of discharge cycles. To achieve its 20 MWmore » capacity, the Hazle Facility is comprised of two hundred of Beacon Power’s 100 kilowatt (kW)/25 kilowatt/hour (kWh) flywheels connected in parallel. The Hazle Facility can fully respond to a signal from PJM in less than 2 seconds. The Hazle facility was constructed in an economic development zone designated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its construction relied on local contractors and labor for completion.« less

  20. 1-kilowatt CW all-fiber laser oscillator pumped with wavelength-beam-combined diode stacks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Brunet, F; Kanskar, M; Faucher, M; Wetter, A; Holehouse, N

    2012-01-30

    We have demonstrated a monolithic cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped single all-fiber laser oscillator generating 1 kW of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% slope efficiency and near diffraction-limited beam quality. Fiber components were highly integrated on "spliceless" passive fibers to promote laser efficiency and alleviate non-linear effects. The laser was pumped through a 7:1 pump combiner with seven 200-W 91x nm fiber-pigtailed wavelength-beam-combined diode-stack modules. The signal power of such a single all-fiber laser oscillator showed no evidence of roll-over, and the highest output was limited only by available pump power.

  1. Improving the Lieb-Robinson Bound for Long-Range Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Takuro; Koma, Tohru; Nakamura, Shu

    2017-02-01

    We improve the Lieb-Robinson bound for a wide class of quantum many-body systems with long-range interactions decaying by power law. As an application, we show that the group velocity of information propagation grows by power law in time for such systems, whereas systems with short-range interactions exhibit a finite group velocity as shown by Lieb and Robinson.

  2. Laser one-dimensional range profile and the laser two-dimensional range profile of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Laser one-dimensional range profile, that is scattering power from pulse laser scattering of target, is a radar imaging technology. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called laser range profile(LRP). The laser range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser range profile of cylinder based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cylinders are given. Laser range profiles of cylinder, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of cylinder are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width, attitude on the range profiles are analyzed.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF DISSIPATION RANGE POWER SPECTRA AND PLASMA-WAVE POLARIZATION ON COSMIC-RAY SCATTERING MEAN FREE PATH

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Lazar, M.; Vukcevic, M., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.d, E-mail: mlazar@tp4.ruhr-uni-bochum.d, E-mail: vuk.mira@gmail.co

    2010-08-20

    The influence of the polarization state and the dissipation range spectral steepening of slab plasma waves on the scattering mean free path of single-charged cosmic-ray particles is investigated in a turbulence model, where the crucial scattering of cosmic-ray particles with small pitch-angle cosines is caused by resonant cyclotron interactions with slab plasma waves. Analytical expressions for the mean free path of protons, antiprotons, negatrons, and positrons are derived for the case of constant frequency-independent magnetic helicity values {sigma} and different values of the dissipation range spectral index k for characteristic interplanetary and interstellar plasma conditions. The positron mean free pathmore » is not affected by the dissipation range spectral index k as these particles can only cyclotron-resonate for rigidity values larger than R {sub 0} = m{sub p}c = 938 MV. Proton and antiproton mean free paths are only slightly affected by the dissipation range spectral index k at small rigidities R < R {sub 0}. The negatron mean free path is severely affected by the dissipation range spectral index k at rigidities smaller than R {sub 0}. At high rigidities R >> R {sub 0}, all particle species approach the same power-law dependence {proportional_to}R {sup 2-s} determined by the inertial range spectral index s = 5/3. The magnetic helicity value {sigma} affects the value of the mean free path. At all rigidities, the ratio of the antiproton to proton mean free paths equals the constant (1 + {sigma})/(1 - {sigma}), which also agrees with the ratio of the negatron to the proton and positron mean free paths at relativistic rigidities. At relativistic rigidities the positron and proton mean free paths agree, as do the negatron and antiproton mean free paths.« less

  4. Hollow cathode, quasi-steady MPD arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, N.; Jahn, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been operated with four different hollow cathodes over a power range from 5 kilowatts to 5 megawatts. The absolute level of the argon mass flow, as well as the fractional division of the flow between the cathode and the six standard chamber injectors, is varied over a range of 1 to 12 grams per second. For a fixed total current, it is observed that the voltage increases monotonically with mass flow rate, compared to the usual experience with solid cathodes where the voltage decreases with mass flow rate. For a fixed percentage of flow through the cathode, each hollow cathode configuration displays a minimum impedance at a particular value of the total mass flow. It is asserted that in order to keep the discharge inside the hollow cathode the magnetic pressure and gasdynamic pressure have to match inside the cavity.

  5. 10 CFR 140.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (ii) For indemnification from $399 million to $300 million inclusive, a fee of $24 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity... $18 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (iv) For...

  6. 10 CFR 140.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (ii) For indemnification from $399 million to $300 million inclusive, a fee of $24 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity... $18 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (iv) For...

  7. 10 CFR 140.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (ii) For indemnification from $399 million to $300 million inclusive, a fee of $24 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity... $18 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (iv) For...

  8. 10 CFR 140.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (ii) For indemnification from $399 million to $300 million inclusive, a fee of $24 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity... $18 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (iv) For...

  9. 10 CFR 140.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (ii) For indemnification from $399 million to $300 million inclusive, a fee of $24 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity... $18 per year per thousand kilowatts of thermal capacity authorized in the license; (iv) For...

  10. Reliable, Practical Kilowatt-class Cryogenics for Superconducting Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Spoor, Philip

    2016-12-15

    Following the successful development of a Flexibly-Attached Remote cryocooler for ~200W at 80K under a Phase II DOE grant, Clever Fellows Innovation Consortium, Inc. (dba CFIC-Qdrive; acquired by Chart Industries in 2012) was invited by the DOE to scale up this technology to ~1000W/80K in a Phase III program. This target is responsive to the “Cryogenics Roadmap” developed by the DOE to accelerate the development of cryogenic cooling necessary to support the emerging superconducting power applications. Mirroring the Roadmap, our proposal included a capacity target (1000W at 80K) and a cost target (<$40/watt, at 80K), but unlike the Roadmap, wemore » did not formally propose to meet a specific efficiency target. We achieved 75% of the capacity target, with a record-size coaxial “pulse-tube” coldfinger, but only by working on the project well beyond the original “period of performance” on unfunded extension. We believe 100% of the capacity target was within reach, but our own budget and time constraints forbade additional effort. We were less successful in meeting the cost targets. Ultimately, the specific configuration that was the subject of Phase III was not commercialized, largely because the market for superconducting devices has not been nearly as robust as was expected at the advent of the Roadmap.« less

  11. Installation of an ENERGEO Biomass Power Plant at a Lumber Company

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    people. Throughout the world there exists tremendous quantities, of biomass waste, such as wood waste, rice husks , sugar bagasse, and coconut ...0.27 to 0.38 liter) of oil per kilowatt-hour generated. Even at subsidized prices of $1.00/gal ($0.26/liter), the fuel cost alone for generating...electricity amounts to $0.07 to $0.10/kW-hr generated In many locations where diesel oil prices are $2.00 to $4.00/aal’ ($0.53 to $1.06/liter) the

  12. Energy Resiliency for Marine Corps Logistics Base Production Plant Barstow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    13 1. Biomass, Landfill Gas, and Biogas ...value in dollar per kilowatts ($/kW) peak of an outage cost obtained from the CDF curve for a specified duration of the interruption” (Giraldez, Booth...length of outages for inclusion in the VEES calculation, we needed to obtain power interruption and circuit reliability data from PPB’s utility

  13. 78 FR 26359 - Community of Elfin Cove, DBA Elfin Cove Utility Commission; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...-kilowatt (kW) power recovery turbine; (4) a 25-foot-long, 8-foot- wide, 3-foot-deep cobble-lined tailrace... 150-foot-long, 8- foot-wide, 3-foot-deep cobble-lined tailrace discharging flows into Port Althorp... electronically via the Internet. See 18 CFR 385.2001(a)(1)(iii) and the instructions on the Commission's Web site...

  14. 10 CFR 140.11 - Amounts of financial protection for certain reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...,000,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at a thermal power level not exceeding ten kilowatts; (2) In the amount of $1,500,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at... amount of $2,500,000 for each nuclear reactor other than a testing reactor or a reactor licensed under...

  15. 10 CFR 140.11 - Amounts of financial protection for certain reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...,000,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at a thermal power level not exceeding ten kilowatts; (2) In the amount of $1,500,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at... amount of $2,500,000 for each nuclear reactor other than a testing reactor or a reactor licensed under...

  16. 10 CFR 140.11 - Amounts of financial protection for certain reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...,000,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at a thermal power level not exceeding ten kilowatts; (2) In the amount of $1,500,000 for each nuclear reactor he is authorized to operate at... amount of $2,500,000 for each nuclear reactor other than a testing reactor or a reactor licensed under...

  17. Advanced spacecraft fuel cell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of advanced spacecraft fuel cell systems are discussed. The system is designed to operate on low pressure, propulsion grade hydrogen and oxygen. The specific goals are 10,000 hours of operation with refurbishment, 20 pounds per kilowatt at a sustained power of 7 KW, and 21 KW peaking capability for durations of two hours. The system rejects waste heat to the spacecraft cooling system at power levels up to 7 KW. At higher powers, the system automatically transfers to open cycle operation with overboard steam venting.

  18. Design of a Sub-Picosecond Jitter with Adjustable-Range CMOS Delay-Locked Loop for High-Speed and Low-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I.; Ibrahim, Omar J.; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M.; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md.; Lee, Lini; Halin, Izhal Abdul

    2016-01-01

    A Delay-Locked Loop (DLL) with a modified charge pump circuit is proposed for generating high-resolution linear delay steps with sub-picosecond jitter performance and adjustable delay range. The small-signal model of the modified charge pump circuit is analyzed to bring forth the relationship between the DLL’s internal control voltage and output time delay. Circuit post-layout simulation shows that a 0.97 ps delay step within a 69 ps delay range with 0.26 ps Root-Mean Square (RMS) jitter performance is achievable using a standard 0.13 µm Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) process. The post-layout simulation results show that the power consumption of the proposed DLL architecture’s circuit is 0.1 mW when the DLL is operated at 2 GHz. PMID:27690040

  19. Results of module electrical measurement of the DOE 46-kilowatt procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    Current-voltage measurements have been made on terrestrial solar cell modules of the DOE/JPL Low Cost Silicon Solar Array procurement. Data on short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and maximum power for the four types of modules are presented in normalized form, showing distribution of the measured values. Standard deviations from the mean values are also given. Tests of the statistical significance of the data are discussed.

  20. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. 8 figs.

  1. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies.

  2. Design and evaluation of wide-range and low-power analog front-end enabling body-implanted devices to monitor charge injection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Keita; Uno, Shoma; Goto, Tatsuya; Takezawa, Yoshiki; Harashima, Takuya; Morikawa, Takumi; Nishino, Satoru; Kino, Hisashi; Kiyoyama, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2017-04-01

    For safe electrical stimulation with body-implanted devices, the degradation of stimulus electrodes must be considered because it causes the unexpected electrolysis of water and the destruction of tissues. To monitor the charge injection property (CIP) of stimulus electrodes while these devices are implanted, we have proposed a charge injection monitoring system (CIMS). CIMS can safely read out voltages produced by a biphasic current pulse to a stimulus electrode and CIP is calculated from waveforms of the acquired voltages. In this paper, we describe a wide-range and low-power analog front-end (AFE) for CIMS that has variable gain-frequency characteristics and low-power analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion to adjust to the degradation of stimulus electrodes. The designed AFE was fabricated with 0.18 µm CMOS technology and achieved a valuable gain of 20-60 dB, an upper cutoff frequency of 0.2-10 kHz, and low-power interleaving A/D conversion. In addition, we successfully measured the CIP of stimulus electrodes for body-implanted devices using CIMS.

  3. A Review of Solar-Powered Aircraft Flight Activity at the Pacific Missile Range Test Facility, Kauai, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Donohue, Casey; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    A series of solar-powered aircraft have been designed and operated by AeroVironment, Inc. (Monrovia, CA) as a part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) objectives to develop energy-efficient high-altitude long-endurance platforms for earth observations and communications applications. Flight operations have been conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards CA and at the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands, Kauai, HI. These aircraft flown at PMRF are named Pathfinder , Pathfinder Plus and Helios . Sizes of these three aircraft range from 560 lb with a 99-ft wingspan to 2300 lb with a 247-ft wingspan. Available payload capacity reaches approximately 200 lb. Pathfinder uses six engines and propellers: Pathfinder Plus 8; and Helios 14. The 2003 Helios fuel cell configurations used 10 engines and propellers. The PMRF was selected as a base of operations because if offers optimal summertime solar exposure, low prevailing wind-speeds on the runway, modest upper-air wind-speeds and the availability of suitable airspace. Between 1997 and 2001, successive altitude records of 71,530 ft, 80,200 ft, and 96,863 ft were established. Flight durations extended to 18 hours.

  4. Efficient Radio Frequency Inductive Discharges in Near Atmospheric Pressure Using Immittance Conversion Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzak, M. Abdur; Takamura, Shuichi; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ohno, Noriyasu

    A radio frequency (rf) inductive discharge in atmospheric pressure range requires high voltage in the initial startup phase and high power during the steady state sustainment phase. It is, therefore, necessary to inject high rf power into the plasma ensuring the maximum use of the power source, especially where the rf power is limited. In order to inject the maximum possible rf power into the plasma with a moderate rf power source of few kilowatts range, we employ the immittance conversion topology by converting a constant voltage source into a constant current source to generate efficient rf discharge by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique at a gas pressure with up to one atmosphere in argon. A novel T-LCL immittance circuit is designed for constant-current high-power operation, which is practically very important in the high-frequency range, to provide high effective rf power to the plasma. The immittance conversion system combines the static induction transistor (SIT)-based radio frequency (rf) high-power inverter circuit and the immittance conversion elements including the rf induction coil. The basic properties of the immittance circuit are studied by numerical analysis and verified the results by experimental measurements with the inductive plasma as a load at a relatively high rf power of about 4 kW. The performances of the immittance circuit are also evaluated and compared with that of the conventional series resonance circuit in high-pressure induction plasma generation. The experimental results reveal that the immittance conversion circuit confirms injecting higher effective rf power into the plasma as much as three times than that of the series resonance circuit under the same operating conditions and same dc supply voltage to the inverter, thereby enhancing the plasma heating efficiency to generate efficient rf inductive discharges.

  5. Surface-emitting terahertz quantum cascade lasers with continuous-wave power in the tens of milliwatt range

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Gangyi, E-mail: gangyi.xu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083; Li, Lianhe

    2014-03-03

    We demonstrate efficient surface-emitting terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers with continuous wave output powers of 20–25 mW at 15 K and maximum operating temperatures of 80–85 K. The devices employ a resonant-phonon depopulation active region design with injector, and surface emission is realized using resonators based on graded photonic heterostructures (GPHs). GPHs can be regarded as energy wells for photons and have recently been implemented through grading the period of the photonic structure. In this paper, we show that it is possible to keep the period constant and grade instead the lateral metal coverage across the GPH. This strategy ensures spectrally single-mode operationmore » across the whole laser dynamic range and represents an additional degree of freedom in the design of confining potentials for photons.« less

  6. Start-Stop Moment Optimization of Range Extender and Control Strategy Design for Extended -Range Electric Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing-bo; Han, Bing-yuan; Bei, Shao-yi

    2017-10-01

    Range extender is the core component of E-REV, its start-stop control determines the operation modes of vehicle. This paper based on a certain type of E-REV, researched constant power control strategy of range extender in extended-range model, to target range as constraint condition, combined with different driving cycle conditions, by correcting battery SOC for range extender start-stop moment, optimized the control strategy of range extender, and established the vehicle and range extender start-stop control simulation model. Selected NEDC and UDDS conditions simulation results show that: under certain target mileage, the range extender running time reduced by 37.2% and 28.2% in the NEDC condition, and running time UDDS conditions were reduced by 40.6% and 33.5% in the UDDS condition, reached the purpose of meeting the vehicle mileage and reducing consumption and emission.

  7. Accelerating the introduction of HTS products for a broad range of electric power and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Russell

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, is successfully pursuing the development of electric power and industrial devices, incorporating significant high-temperature superconducting (HTS) components or subsystems, through its innovative Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI). The objective of the SPI is to accelerate the commercial introduction of the HTS products for a broad range of electric power and industrial applications. DOE's approach to accomplishing the SPI objective is to support cost shared projects carried out by industry led teams. DOE will fund projects to develop HTS devices that are either in (1) the research and development stage (Phase 1), (2) the pre-commercialization stage (Phase II), or (3) the commercial entry stage (Phase III). DOE's industry partners must contribute at least half a project's costs. These teams will include capabilities needed to develop the device as well as to develop the business plan for the commercial product introduction. DOE's partners consist of vertically integrated teams consisting of equipment manufacturers, HTS wire and coil suppliers, national laboratories, and end users, primarily utilities. These partners carry out the multi-year technology development efforts, consisting generally of design, construction, and testing of the HTS system. Finally, commercialization of HTS products will be discussed primarily in terms of benefits these products will have over competing products based upon conventional conductors and the critical need for affordable, practical HTS materials and conductors for these applications. .

  8. Laser-powered Martian rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Meador, W. E.; Miner, G. A.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Walker, G. H.; Williams, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Two rover concepts were considered: an unpressurized skeleton vehicle having available 4.5 kW of electrical power and limited to a range of about 10 km from a temporary Martian base and a much larger surface exploration vehicle (SEV) operating on a maximum 75-kW power level and essentially unrestricted in range or mission. The only baseline reference system was a battery-operated skeleton vehicle with very limited mission capability and range and which would repeatedly return to its temporary base for battery recharging. It was quickly concluded that laser powering would be an uneconomical overkill for this concept. The SEV, on the other hand, is a new rover concept that is especially suited for powering by orbiting solar or electrically pumped lasers. Such vehicles are visualized as mobile habitats with full life-support systems onboard, having unlimited range over the Martian surface, and having extensive mission capability (e.g., core drilling and sampling, construction of shelters for protection from solar flares and dust storms, etc.). Laser power beaming to SEV's was shown to have the following advantages: (1) continuous energy supply by three orbiting lasers at 2000 km (no storage requirements as during Martian night with direct solar powering); (2) long-term supply without replacement; (3) very high power available (MW level possible); and (4) greatly enhanced mission enabling capability beyond anything currently conceived.

  9. Laser-powered Martian rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, W. L.; Meador, W. E.; Miner, G. A.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Walker, G. H.; Williams, M. D.

    1989-07-01

    Two rover concepts were considered: an unpressurized skeleton vehicle having available 4.5 kW of electrical power and limited to a range of about 10 km from a temporary Martian base and a much larger surface exploration vehicle (SEV) operating on a maximum 75-kW power level and essentially unrestricted in range or mission. The only baseline reference system was a battery-operated skeleton vehicle with very limited mission capability and range and which would repeatedly return to its temporary base for battery recharging. It was quickly concluded that laser powering would be an uneconomical overkill for this concept. The SEV, on the other hand, is a new rover concept that is especially suited for powering by orbiting solar or electrically pumped lasers. Such vehicles are visualized as mobile habitats with full life-support systems onboard, having unlimited range over the Martian surface, and having extensive mission capability (e.g., core drilling and sampling, construction of shelters for protection from solar flares and dust storms, etc.). Laser power beaming to SEV's was shown to have the following advantages: (1) continuous energy supply by three orbiting lasers at 2000 km (no storage requirements as during Martian night with direct solar powering); (2) long-term supply without replacement; (3) very high power available (MW level possible); and (4) greatly enhanced mission enabling capability beyond anything currently conceived.

  10. Proposed modification of the criterion for the region of validity of the inverse-power expansion in diatomic long-range potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bing; Tsai, Chin-Chun; Stwalley, William C.

    1995-04-01

    A modified internuclear distance criterion, RLR- m, as the lower bound for the region of validity of the inverse-power expansion of the diatomic long-range potential is proposed. This new criterion takes into account the spatial orientation of the atomic orbitals while retaining the simplicity of the traditional Le Roy radius, RLR for the interaction of S state atoms. Recent experimental and theoretical results for various excited states in Na 2 suggest that this proposed RLR- m is an appropriate generalization of RLR.

  11. Promise, pitfalls of rate reform shown in Vermont experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1977-03-01

    Both utilities and customers are unhappy with the way existing rate structures are handling rapidly rising fixed plant expenses and operating costs. Results of an experiment by Green Mountain Power in Vermont are discussed. The residential sector one-year study tested six rates: an off-peak rate, an interruptible rate, a peak-kilowatt demand rate, a three-part demand rate, an inverted demand rate, and a contract demand rate. The most successful of the kilowatt-related rates was the peak demand rate, and the most effective rate was probably the interruptible rate. The off-peak rate provided some savings for all who tried it, although theremore » are some who would have lost money in comparison to the conventional rate. The other three rate experiments proved unsuccessful because customers could not adapt to them. (MCW)« less

  12. Monitoring Statistics Which Have Increased Power over a Reduced Time Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, S. M.; MacNeill, I. B.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of monitoring trends for changes at unknown times is considered. Statistics that permit one to focus high power on a segment of the monitored period are studied. Numerical procedures are developed to compute the null distribution of these statistics. (Author)

  13. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings.

  14. Short range micro-power impulse radar with high resolution swept range gate with damped transmit and receive cavities

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-30

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with atypical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. 20 figs.

  15. Individual differences in long-range time representation.

    PubMed

    Agostino, Camila S; Caetano, Marcelo S; Balci, Fuat; Claessens, Peter M E; Zana, Yossi

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of experimental data, long-range time representation has been proposed to follow a highly compressed power function, which has been hypothesized to explain the time inconsistency found in financial discount rate preferences. The aim of this study was to evaluate how well linear and power function models explain empirical data from individual participants tested in different procedural settings. The line paradigm was used in five different procedural variations with 35 adult participants. Data aggregated over the participants showed that fitted linear functions explained more than 98% of the variance in all procedures. A linear regression fit also outperformed a power model fit for the aggregated data. An individual-participant-based analysis showed better fits of a linear model to the data of 14 participants; better fits of a power function with an exponent β > 1 to the data of 12 participants; and better fits of a power function with β < 1 to the data of the remaining nine participants. Of the 35 volunteers, the null hypothesis β = 1 was rejected for 20. The dispersion of the individual β values was approximated well by a normal distribution. These results suggest that, on average, humans perceive long-range time intervals not in a highly compressed, biased manner, but rather in a linear pattern. However, individuals differ considerably in their subjective time scales. This contribution sheds new light on the average and individual psychophysical functions of long-range time representation, and suggests that any attribution of deviation from exponential discount rates in intertemporal choice to the compressed nature of subjective time must entail the characterization of subjective time on an individual-participant basis.

  16. A study of cathode erosion in high power arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William Jackson, III

    Cathode erosion continues to be one of the predominant technology concerns for high power arcjets. This study will show that cathode erosion in these devices is significantly affected by several mitigating factors, including propellant composition, propellant flowrate, current level, cathode material, and power supply current ripple. In a series of 50-hour and 100-hour long duration experiments, using a water-cooled 30 kilowatt laboratory arcjet, variations in the steady-state cathode erosion rate were characterized for each of these factors using nitrogen propellant at a fixed arc current of 250 Amperes. A complementary series of measurements was made using hydrogen propellant at an arc current of 100 Amperes. The cold cathode erosion rate was also differentiated from the steady-state cathode erosion rate in a series of multi-start cathode erosion experiments. Results of these measurements are presented, along with an analysis of the significant effects of current ripple on arcjet cathode erosion. As part of this study, over a dozen refractory cathode materials were evaluated to measure their resistance to arcjet cathode erosion. Among the materials tested were W-ThO2(1%, 2%, 4%), poly and mono-crystalline W, W-LaB6, W-La2O3, W-BaO2, W-BaCaAl2O4, W-Y2O3, and ZrB2. Based on these measurements, several critical material properties were identified, such work function, density, porosity, melting point, and evaporation rate. While the majority of the materials failed to outperform traditional W-ThO2, these experimental results are used to develop a parametric model of the arcjet cathode physics. The results of this model, and the results of a finite-element thermal analysis of the arcjet cathode, are presented to better explain the relative performance of the materials tested.

  17. 40 CFR 91.419 - Raw emission sampling calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a test [g/kW-hr]. Wi = Average mass flow rate (WHC, WCO, WNOx) of an emission from the test engine during mode i, [g/hr]. fi = Weighting factors for each mode according to § 91.410(a) Pi = Average power... brake-specific fuel consumption in grams of fuel per kilowatt-hour (g/kW-hr). Fi = Fuel mass flow rate...

  18. 40 CFR 91.419 - Raw emission sampling calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a test [g/kW-hr]. Wi = Average mass flow rate (WHC, WCO, WNOx) of an emission from the test engine during mode i, [g/hr]. fi = Weighting factors for each mode according to § 91.410(a) Pi = Average power... brake-specific fuel consumption in grams of fuel per kilowatt-hour (g/kW-hr). Fi = Fuel mass flow rate...

  19. 40 CFR 91.419 - Raw emission sampling calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a test [g/kW-hr]. Wi = Average mass flow rate (WHC, WCO, WNOx) of an emission from the test engine during mode i, [g/hr]. fi = Weighting factors for each mode according to § 91.410(a) Pi = Average power... brake-specific fuel consumption in grams of fuel per kilowatt-hour (g/kW-hr). Fi = Fuel mass flow rate...

  20. 40 CFR 91.419 - Raw emission sampling calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a test [g/kW-hr]. Wi = Average mass flow rate (WHC, WCO, WNOx) of an emission from the test engine during mode i, [g/hr]. fi = Weighting factors for each mode according to § 91.410(a) Pi = Average power... brake-specific fuel consumption in grams of fuel per kilowatt-hour (g/kW-hr). Fi = Fuel mass flow rate...

  1. 40 CFR 91.419 - Raw emission sampling calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a test [g/kW-hr]. Wi = Average mass flow rate (WHC, WCO, WNOx) of an emission from the test engine during mode i, [g/hr]. fi = Weighting factors for each mode according to § 91.410(a) Pi = Average power... brake-specific fuel consumption in grams of fuel per kilowatt-hour (g/kW-hr). Fi = Fuel mass flow rate...

  2. Assessment of tidal range energy resources based on flux conservation in Jiantiao Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Wu, He; Yu, Huaming; Lv, Ting; Li, Jiangyu; Yu, Yujun

    2017-12-01

    La Rance Tidal Range Power Station in France and Jiangxia Tidal Range Power Station in China have been both long-term successful commercialized operations as kind of role models for public at large for more than 40 years. The Sihwa Lake Tidal Range Power Station in South Korea has also developed to be the largest marine renewable power station with its installed capacity 254 MW since 2010. These practical applications prove that the tidal range energy as one kind of marine renewable energy exploitation and utilization technology is becoming more and more mature and it is used more and more widely. However, the assessment of the tidal range energy resources is not well developed nowadays. This paper summarizes the main problems in tidal range power resource assessment, gives a brief introduction to tidal potential energy theory, and then we present an analyzed and estimated method based on the tide numerical modeling. The technical characteristics and applicability of these two approaches are compared with each other. Furthermore, based on the theory of tidal range energy generation combined with flux conservation, this paper proposes a new assessment method that include a series of evaluation parameters and it can be easily operated to calculate the tidal range energy of the sea. Finally, this method is applied on assessment of the tidal range power energy of the Jiantiao Harbor in Zhejiang Province, China for demonstration and examination.

  3. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:27630706

  4. Probing the role of long-range interactions in the dynamics of a long-range Kitaev chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Dutta, Amit

    2017-09-01

    We study the role of long-range interactions (more precisely, the long-range superconducting gap term) on the nonequilibrium dynamics considering a long-range p -wave superconducting chain in which the superconducting term decays with distance between two sites in a power-law fashion characterized by an exponent α . We show that the Kibble-Zurek scaling exponent, dictating the power-law decay of the defect density in the final state reached following a slow (in comparison to the time scale associated with the minimum gap in the spectrum of the Hamiltonian) quenching of the chemical potential μ across a quantum critical point, depends nontrivially on the exponent α as long as α <2 ; on the other hand, for α >2 , we find that the exponent saturates to the corresponding well-known value of 1 /2 expected for the short-range model. Furthermore, studying the dynamical quantum phase transitions manifested in the nonanalyticities in the rate function of the return possibility I (t ) in subsequent temporal evolution following a sudden change in μ , we show the existence of a new region; in this region, we find three instants of cusp singularities in I (t ) associated with a single sector of Fisher zeros. Notably, the width of this region shrinks as α increases and vanishes in the limit α →2 , indicating that this special region is an artifact of the long-range nature of the Hamiltonian.

  5. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Nelms, R. Mark; Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray

    1994-01-01

    Silicon based power devices can be used at 200 C. The device measurements made during this program show a predictable shift in device parameters with increasing temperature. No catastrophic or abrupt changes occurred in the parameters over the temperature range. As expected, the most dramatic change was the increase in leakage currents with increasing temperature. At 200 C the leakage current was in the milliAmp range but was still several orders of magnitude lower than the on-state current capabilities of the devices under test. This increase must be considered in the design of circuits using power transistors at elevated temperature. Three circuit topologies have been prototyped using MOSFET's and IGBT's. The circuits were designed using zero current or zero voltage switching techniques to eliminate or minimize hard switching of the power transistors. These circuits have functioned properly over the temperature range. One thousand hour life data have been collected for two power supplies with no failures and no significant change in operating efficiency. While additional reliability testing should be conducted, the feasibility of designing soft switched circuits for operation at 200 C has been successfully demonstrated.

  6. SP-100 ground engineering system test site description and progress update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, William F.; Burchell, Gail P.; Fitzgibbon, Davis G.; Swita, Walter R.

    1991-01-01

    The SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site will provide the facilities for the testing of an SP-100 reactor, which is technically prototypic of the generic design for producing 100 kilowatts of electricity. This effort is part of the program to develop a compact, space-based power system capable of producing several hundred kilowatts of electrical power. The test site is located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The site is minimizing capital equipment costs by utilizing existing facilities and equipment to the maximum extent possible. The test cell is located in a decommissioned reactor containment building, and the secondary sodium cooling loop will use equipment from the Fast Flux Test Facility plant which has never been put into service. Modifications to the facility and special equipment are needed to accommodate the testing of the SP-100 reactor. Definitive design of the Ground Engineering System Test Site facility modifications and systems is in progress. The design of the test facility and the testing equipment will comply with the regulations and specifications of the U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Washington.

  7. A Flight Demonstration of Plasma Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schwenterly, WIlliam; Hitt, Michael; Lepore, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been engaged in the development of a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (V ASIMR) for several years. This type of rocket could be used in the future to propel interplanetary spacecraft and has the potential to open the entire solar system to human exploration. One feature of this propulsion technology is the ability to vary its specific impulse so that it can be operated in a mode that maximizes propellant efficiency or a mode that maximizes thrust. Variation of specific impulse and thrust enhances the ability to optimize interplanetary trajectories and results in shorter trip times and lower propellant requirements than with a fixed specific impulse. In its ultimate application for interplanetary travel, the VASIMR would be a multi-megawatt device. A much lower power system is being designed for demonstration in the 2004 timeframe. This first space demonstration would employ a lO-kilowatt thruster aboard a solar powered spacecraft in Earth orbit. The 1O-kilowatt V ASIMR demonstration unit would operate for a period of several months with hydrogen or deuterium propellant with a specific impulse of 10,000 seconds.

  8. Viability of long range dragonfly migration across the Indian Ocean: An energetics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sandeep; Nirwal, Satvik

    2016-11-01

    Recently Pantala flavescens (dragonflies) have been reported to migrate in millions from India to Eastern Africa on a multigenerational migratory circuit of length 14000-18000 kms. We attempt to understand the ability of dragonflies to perform long range migration by examining the energetics using computer simulations. In absence of a theory for long range insect migrations, we resort to the extensive literature on long range bird migration from the energetics perspective. The flight energetics depends upon instantaneous power and velocity. The mechanical flight power is computed from the power curve which is then converted to mass depletion using Brequet's equation. However, the mechanical flight power itself depends upon the instantaneous velocity which can vary depending upon the current mass. In order to predict the range in our simulations, we assume that the insect progressively tries to achieve the maximum range velocity. The results indicate that the migration range is approximately 1260 kms in 70 hours based on the true airspeed. However, our analysis is restricted by the lack of data and certain caveats in drag prediction and basal metabolism rate.

  9. Reconfigurable Resonant Regulating Rectifier With Primary Equalization for Extended Coupling- and Loading-Range in Bio-Implant Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Meng, Xiaodong; Tsui, Chi-Ying; Ki, Wing-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Wireless power transfer using reconfigurable resonant regulating (R(3)) rectification suffers from limited range in accommodating varying coupling and loading conditions. A primary-assisted regulation principle is proposed to mitigate these limitations, of which the amplitude of the rectifier input voltage on the secondary side is regulated by accordingly adjusting the voltage amplitude Veq on the primary side. A novel current-sensing method and calibration scheme track Veq on the primary side. A ramp generator simultaneously provides three clock signals for different modules. Both the primary equalizer and the R(3) rectifier are implemented as custom integrated circuits fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process, with the global control implemented in FPGA. Measurements show that with the primary equalizer, the workable coupling and loading ranges are extended by 250% at 120 mW load and 300% at 1.2 cm coil distance compared to the same system without the primary equalizer. A maximum rectifier efficiency of 92.5% and a total system efficiency of 62.4% are demonstrated.

  10. Advanced Power Sources for Space Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Range indicate that extremely high power levels hav- ing fast time-ramping capabilities must be provided during the tests. Only highly efficient prime...system efficiency results from advantages in thermal storage versus battery storage and from the increased conversion efficiency of a solar-dynamic... thermal manage- ment, power flow, and voltage levels, and may be in the same power range already experienced in the very- high -power radar and fusion

  11. The space station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  12. Ranging Consistency Based on Ranging-Compensated Temperature-Sensing Sensor for Inter-Satellite Link of Navigation Constellation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Zhou, Yongbin

    2017-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System performance can be significantly enhanced by introducing inter-satellite links (ISLs) in navigation constellation. The improvement in position, velocity, and time accuracy as well as the realization of autonomous functions requires ISL distance measurement data as the original input. To build a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency among navigation satellites is an urgent problem to be solved. In this study, we focus on the variation in the ranging delay caused by the sensitivity of the ISL payload equipment to the ambient temperature in space and propose a simple and low-power temperature-sensing ranging compensation sensor suitable for onboard equipment. The experimental results show that, after the temperature-sensing ranging compensation of the ISL payload equipment, the ranging consistency becomes less than 0.2 ns when the temperature change is 90 °C. PMID:28608809

  13. Variable frequency iteration MPPT for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Qian; Bataresh, Issa; Chen, Lin

    2015-06-30

    A method of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) uses an MPPT algorithm to determine a switching frequency for a resonant power converter, including initializing by setting an initial boundary frequency range that is divided into initial frequency sub-ranges bounded by initial frequencies including an initial center frequency and first and second initial bounding frequencies. A first iteration includes measuring initial powers at the initial frequencies to determine a maximum power initial frequency that is used to set a first reduced frequency search range centered or bounded by the maximum power initial frequency including at least a first additional bounding frequency. A second iteration includes calculating first and second center frequencies by averaging adjacent frequent values in the first reduced frequency search range and measuring second power values at the first and second center frequencies. The switching frequency is determined from measured power values including the second power values.

  14. Water-cooled hard-soldered kilowatt laser diode arrays operating at high duty cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Oppenhaim, Jacob; Berk, Yuri; Shamay, Moshe; Tessler, Renana; Cohen, Shalom; Risemberg, Shlomo

    2010-04-01

    High brightness laser diode arrays are increasingly found in defense applications either as efficient optical pumps or as direct energy sources. In many instances, duty cycles of 10- 20 % are required, together with precise optical collimation. System requirements are not always compatible with the use of microchannel based cooling, notwithstanding their remarkable efficiency. Simpler but effective solutions, which will not involve high fluid pressure drops as well as deionized water, are needed. The designer is faced with a number of challenges: effective heat removal, minimization of the built- in and operational stresses as well as precise and accurate fast axis collimation. In this article, we report on a novel laser diode array which includes an integral tap water cooling system. Robustness is achieved by all around hard solder bonding of passivated 940nm laser bars. Far field mapping of the beam, after accurate fast axis collimation will be presented. It will be shown that the design of water cooling channels , proper selection of package materials, careful design of fatigue sensitive parts and active collimation technique allow for long life time and reliability, while not compromising the laser diode array efficiency, optical power density ,brightness and compactness. Main performance characteristics are 150W/bar peak optical power, 10% duty cycle and more than 50% wall plug efficiency with less than 1° fast axis divergence. Lifetime of 0.5 Gshots with less than 10% power degradation has been proved. Additionally, the devices have successfully survived harsh environmental conditions such as thermal cycling of the coolant temperature and mechanical shocks.

  15. Small- Geo Solar Array: New Generation Of Solar Arrays For Commercial Telecom Satellites For Power Ranges Between 2,5 KW And 7,5 KW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paarmann, Carola; Muller, Jens; Mende, Thomas; Borner, Carsten; Mascher, Rolf

    2011-10-01

    In the frame of the ESA supported Artes 11 program a new generation of GEO telecommunication satellites is under development. This platform will cover the power range from 2 to 5 kW. ASTRIUM GmbH is contracted to develop and design the Solar Array for this platform. Furthermore the manufacturing and the qualification of a PFM wing for the first flight model is foreseen. The satellite platform, called Small-GEO, is developed under the responsibility of OHB System. This first Small-GEO satellite is designated to be delivered to HISPASAT for operation. The concept of ASTRIUM GmbH is to use all the experiences from the very successful EUROSTAR 2000+, EUROSTAR-3000 and the ALPHABUS platform and to adapt the technologies to the Small- GEO Solar Array. With the benefit of the huge in-orbit heritage of these programs, the remaining risks for the Small-GEO Solar Array can be minimized. The development of the Small-GEO Solar Array extends the ASTRIUM GmbH product portfolio by covering now the complete power range between 2 kW and 31 kW. This paper provides an overview of the different configurations, their main design features and parameters.

  16. Agreement of Power Measures between Garmin Vector and SRM Cycle Power Meters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Andrew R.; Dascombe, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if the Garmin Vector (Schaffhausen, Switzerland) power meter produced acceptable measures when compared with the Schoberer Rad Messetechnik (SRM; Julich, Germany) power meter across a range of high-intensity efforts. Twenty-one well-trained cyclists completed power profiles (seven maximal mean efforts between 5 and…

  17. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  18. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  19. Aerobic power and peak power of elite America's Cup sailors.

    PubMed

    Neville, Vernon; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    Big-boat yacht racing is one of the only able bodied sporting activities where standing arm-cranking ('grinding') is the primary physical activity. However, the physiological capabilities of elite sailors for standing arm-cranking have been largely unreported. The purpose of the study was to assess aerobic parameters, VO(2peak) and onset of blood lactate (OBLA), and anaerobic performance, torque-crank velocity and power-crank velocity relationships and therefore peak power (P (max)) and optimum crank-velocity (omega(opt)), of America's Cup sailors during standing arm-cranking. Thirty-three elite professional sailors performed a step test to exhaustion, and a subset of ten grinders performed maximal 7 s isokinetic sprints at different crank velocities, using a standing arm-crank ergometer. VO(2peak) was 4.7 +/- 0.5 L/min (range 3.6-5.5 L/min) at a power output of 332 +/- 44 W (range 235-425 W). OBLA occurred at a power output of 202 +/- 31 W (61% of W(max)) and VO(2) of 3.3 +/- 0.4 L/min (71% of VO(2peak)). The torque-crank velocity relationship was linear for all participants (r = 0.9 +/- 0.1). P (max) was 1,420 +/- 37 W (range 1,192-1,617 W), and omega(opt) was 125 +/- 6 rpm. These data are among the highest upper-body anaerobic and aerobic power values reported. The unique nature of these athletes, with their high fat-free mass and specific selection and training for standing arm cranking, likely accounts for the high values. The influence of crank velocity on peak power implies that power production during on-board 'grinding' may be optimised through the use of appropriate gear-ratios and the development of efficient gear change mechanisms.

  20. Low power arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to evaluate arc jet operation at low power. A standard, 1 kW, constricted arc jet was run using nozzles with three different constrictor diameters. Each nozzle was run over a range of current and mass flow rates to explore stability and performance in the low power engine. A standard pulse-width modulated power processor was modified to accommodate the high operating voltages required under certain conditions. Stable, reliable operation at power levels below 0.5 kW was obtained at efficiencies between 30 and 40 percent. The operating range was found to be somewhat dependent on constrictor geometry at low mass flow rates. Quasi-periodic voltage fluctuations were observed at the low power end of the operating envelope, The nozzle insert geometry was found to have little effect on the performance of the device. The observed performance levels show that specific impulse levels above 350 seconds can be obtained at the 0.5 kW power level.

  1. Low power arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to evaluate arcjet operation at low power. A standard, 1 kW, constricted arcjet was run using nozzles with three different constrictor diameters. Each nozzle was run over a range of current and mass flow rates to explore stability and performance in the low power regime. A standard pulse-width modulated power processor was modified to accommodate the high operating voltages required under certain conditions. Stable, reliable operation at power levels below 0.5 kW was obtained at efficiencies between 30 and 40 percent. The operating range was found to be somewhat dependent on constrictor geometry at low mass flow rates. Quasi-periodic voltage fluctuations were observed at the low power end of the operating envelope. The nozzle insert geometry was found to have little effect on the performance of the device. The observed performance levels show that specific impulse levels above 350 seconds can be obtained at the 0.5 kW power level.

  2. Memory traces of long-range coordinated oscillations in the sleeping human brain.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Jensen, Ole; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2015-01-01

    Cognition involves coordinated activity across distributed neuronal networks. Neuronal activity during learning triggers cortical plasticity that allows for reorganization of the neuronal network and integration of new information. Animal studies have shown post-learning reactivation of learning-elicited neuronal network activity during subsequent sleep, supporting consolidation of the reorganization. However, no previous studies, to our knowledge, have demonstrated reactivation of specific learning-elicited long-range functional connectivity during sleep in humans. We here show reactivation of learning-induced long-range synchronization of magnetoencephalography power fluctuations in human sleep. Visuomotor learning elicited a specific profile of long-range cortico-cortical synchronization of slow (0.1 Hz) fluctuations in beta band (12-30 Hz) power. The parieto-occipital part of this synchronization profile reappeared in delta band (1-3.5 Hz) power fluctuations during subsequent sleep, but not during the intervening wakefulness period. Individual differences in the reactivated synchronization predicted postsleep performance improvement. The presleep resting-state synchronization profile was not reactivated during sleep. The findings demonstrate reactivation of long-range coordination of neuronal activity in humans, more specifically of reactivation of coupling of infra-slow fluctuations in oscillatory power. The spatiotemporal profile of delta power fluctuations during sleep may subserve memory consolidation by echoing coordinated activation elicited by prior learning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Accounting for Every Kilowatt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    accountability of individual load con- sumption, forewarning of maintenance problems, and aware- ness of human activity based on electrical activity...accountability and maintenance examples were identified from our desks at MIT. Tech support can be anywhere and do the same. Human Activity DepNILM...provides awareness of human activity within a net- work. Each device has an electrical fingerprint, and specific de- vices imply associated human actions

  4. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled "Affordable Fission Surface Power Study" recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling conversion for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW converters allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-converter combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the FSPE convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  5. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Engine Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled "Affordable Fission Surface Power Study" recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling convertors for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW convertors allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-convertor combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  6. On-Shore Central Hydraulic Power Generation for Wind and Tidal Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lim, Steven; Murray, Luke; Armstrong, Richard; Kimball, Richard; Cook-Chenault, Kimberly; DeGennaro, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Tidal energy, offshore wind energy, and onshore wind energy can be converted to electricity at a central ground location by means of converting their respective energies into high-pressure hydraulic flows that are transmitted to a system of generators by high-pressure pipelines. The high-pressure flows are then efficiently converted to electricity by a central power plant, and the low-pressure outlet flow is returned. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently supporting a project led by Sunlight Photonics to demonstrate a 15 kilowatt tidal hydraulic power generation system in the laboratory and possibly later submerged in the ocean. All gears and submerged electronics are completely eliminated.A second portion of this DOE project involves sizing and costing a 15 megawatt tidal energy system for a commercial tidal energy plant. For this task, Atlantis Resources Corporation's 18-m diameter demonstrated tidal blades are rated to operate in a nominal 2.6 m/sec tidal flow to produce approximately one megawatt per set of tidal blades. Fifteen units would be submerged in a deep tidal area, such as in Maine's Western Passage. All would be connected to a high-pressure (20 megapascals, 2900 pounds per square inch) line that is 35 cm ID. The high-pressure HEPG fluid flow is transported 500-m to on-shore hydraulic generators. HEPG is an environmentally-friendly, biodegradable, water-miscible fluid. Hydraulic adaptations to ORPC's cross-flow turbines are also discussed.For 15 megawatt of wind energy that is onshore or offshore, a gearless, high efficiency, radial piston pump can replace each set of top-mounted gear-generators. The fluid is then pumped to a central, easily serviceable generator location. Total hydraulic/electrical efficiency is 0.81 at full rated wind or tidal velocities and increases to 0.86 at 1/3 rated velocities.

  7. Wide speed range turboshaft study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, Martin

    1995-01-01

    NASA-Lewis and NASA-Ames have sponsored a series of studies over the last few years to identify key high speed rotorcraft propulsion and airframe technologies. NASA concluded from these studies that for near term aircraft with cruise speeds up to 450 kt, tilting rotor rotorcraft concepts are the most economical and technologically viable. The propulsion issues critical to tilting rotor rotorcraft are: (1) high speed cruise propulsion system efficiency and (2) adequate power to hover safely with one engine inoperative. High speed cruise propeller efficiency can be dramatically improved by reducing rotor speed, yet high rotor speed is critical for good hover performance. With a conventional turboshaft, this wide range of power turbine operating speeds would result in poor engine performance at one or more of these critical operating conditions. This study identifies several wide speed range turboshaft concepts, and analyzes their potential to improve performance at the diverse cruise and hover operating conditions. Many unique concepts were examined, and the selected concepts are simple, low cost, relatively low risk, and entirely contained within the power turbine. These power turbine concepts contain unique, incidence tolerant airfoil designs that allow the engine to cruise efficiently at 51 percent of the hover rotor speed. Overall propulsion system efficiency in cruise is improved as much as 14 percent, with similar improvements in engine weight and cost. The study is composed of a propulsion requirement survey, a concept screening study, a preliminary definition and evaluation of selected concepts, and identification of key technologies and development needs. In addition, a civil transport tilting rotor rotorcraft mission analysis was performed to show the benefit of these concepts versus a conventional turboshaft. Other potential applications for this technology are discussed.

  8. Study of multi-kilowatt solar arrays for Earth orbit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator (MCC) solar array concept is being developed with the objective of significantly reducing the recurring cost of multikilowatt solar arrays. The desired cost reduction is obtained as a result of using very small high efficiency solar cells in conjuction with low cost optics. The MCC single element concept incident slar radiation is reflected rom a primary parabolic reflector to a secondary hyperbolic reflector and finally to a 4 millimeter diameter solar cell. A light catcher cone is used to improve off axis performance. The solar cell is mounted to a heat fin. An element is approximately 13 millimeters thick which permits efficient launch stowage of the concentrator system panels without complex optical component deployments or retractions. The MCC elements are packed in bays within graphite epoxy frames and are electrically connected into appropriate series-parallel circuits. A MCC sngle element with a 21 sq cm entrance aperture and a 20 efficient, 0.25 sq cm gallium arsenide solar cell has the same power output as 30 sq cm of 11-percent efficiency (at 68 C) silicon solar cells.

  9. Wind Turbine Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbine generators, ranging in size from a few kilowatts to several megawatts, are producing electricity both singly and in wind power stations that encompass hundreds of machines. Many installations are in uninhabited areas far from established residences, and therefore there are no apparent environmental impacts in terms of noise. There is, however, the potential for situations in which the radiated noise can be heard by residents of adjacent neighborhoods, particularly those neighborhoods with low ambient noise levels. A widely publicized incident of this nature occurred with the operation of the experimental Mod-1 2-MW wind turbine, which is described in detail elsewhere. Pioneering studies which were conducted at the Mod-1 site on the causes and remedies of noise from wind turbines form the foundation of much of the technology described in this chapter.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to stopping-power-ratio estimation using dual-energy CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Lee, H. C.; Duan, X.; Shen, C.; Zhou, L.; Jia, X.; Yang, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dual-energy CT-based (DECT) approach holds promise in reducing the overall uncertainty in proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimation as compared to the conventional stoichiometric calibration approach. The objective of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to uncertainty in SPR estimation using the DECT-based approach and to derive a comprehensive estimate of the range uncertainty associated with SPR estimation in treatment planning. Two state-of-the-art DECT-based methods were selected and implemented on a Siemens SOMATOM Force DECT scanner. The uncertainties were first divided into five independent categories. The uncertainty associated with each category was estimated for lung, soft and bone tissues separately. A single composite uncertainty estimate was eventually determined for three tumor sites (lung, prostate and head-and-neck) by weighting the relative proportion of each tissue group for that specific site. The uncertainties associated with the two selected DECT methods were found to be similar, therefore the following results applied to both methods. The overall uncertainty (1σ) in SPR estimation with the DECT-based approach was estimated to be 3.8%, 1.2% and 2.0% for lung, soft and bone tissues, respectively. The dominant factor contributing to uncertainty in the DECT approach was the imaging uncertainties, followed by the DECT modeling uncertainties. Our study showed that the DECT approach can reduce the overall range uncertainty to approximately 2.2% (2σ) in clinical scenarios, in contrast to the previously reported 1%.

  11. Microwave transmission system for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A small total system model and a large subsystem element similar to those that could be eventually used for wireless power transmission experiments in space have been successfully demonstrated by NASA. The short range, relatively low-power laboratory system achieved a dc-to-dc transmission efficiency of 54%. A separate high-power-level receiving subsystem, tested over a 1.54-km range at Goldstone, California, has achieved the transportation of over 30 kW of dc output power. Both tests used 12-cm wavelength microwaves.

  12. Fabrication and assembly of the ERDA/NASA 100 kilowatt experimental wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puthoff, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) wind-energy program, NASA Lewis Research Center has designed and built an experimental 100-kW wind turbine. The two-bladed turbines drives a synchronous alternator that generates its maximum output of 100 kW of electrical power in a 29-km/hr (18-mph) wind. The design and assembly of the wind turbine were performed at Lewis from components that were procured from industry. The machine was installed atop the tower on September 3, 1975.

  13. In Brief: Hidden environment and health costs of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-10-01

    The hidden costs of energy production and use in the United States amounted to an estimated $120 billion in 2005, according to a 19 October report by the U.S. National Research Council. The report, “Hidden Costs of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use,” examines hidden costs, including the cost of air pollution damage to human health, which are not reflected in market prices of energy sources, electricity, or gasoline. The report found that in 2005, the total annual external damages from sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter created by coal-burning power plants that produced 95% of the nation's coal-generated electricity were about $62 billion, with nonclimate damages averaging about 3.2 cents for every kilowatt-hour of energy produced. It is estimated that by 2030, nonclimate damages will fall to 1.7 cents per kilowatt-hour. The 2030 figure assumes that new policies already slated for implementation are put in place.

  14. kW-class diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, S. G.; Erbert, G.; Meissner-Schenk, A. H.; Lommel, M.; Schmidt, B.; Kaul, T.; Karow, M.; Crump, P.

    2017-02-01

    Progress will be presented on ongoing research into the development of ultra-high power and efficiency bars achieving significantly higher output power, conversion efficiency and brightness than currently commercially available. We combine advanced InAlGaAs/GaAs-based epitaxial structures and novel lateral designs, new materials and superior cooling architectures to enable improved performance. Specifically, we present progress in kilowatt-class 10-mm diode laser bars, where recent studies have demonstrated 880 W continuous wave output power from a 10 mm x 4 mm laser diode bar at 850 A of electrical current and 15°C water temperature. This laser achieves < 60% electro-optical efficiency at 880 W CW output power.

  15. Cost Performance Estimating Relationships for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-31

    Permanent magnet motors are more likely to be used as generators, while AC induction motors are more efficiently used as motors. Inverters/controllers can...than permanent magnet motors . Switched Reluctance motors are also used on hybrid electric vehicles, but are not used as widely as either AC...induction or permanent magnet motors , and are not analyzed here. Methodology The motor estimates are based on power, with kilowatts being the unit of

  16. The effects of extraterrestrial environments on high voltage distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1990-01-01

    The problems encountered in the transmission of high-power (kilowatts to megawatts) in extraterrestrial environments are reviewed. A summary of the work at Auburn University in the study of these problems is presented. These studies include high-voltage breakdown in the space environment as influenced by gas contamination and thermal stress, the modeling of lunar transmission lines, particle contamination, and material degradation by the hypervelocity impact of microparticles.

  17. MOD-2 wind turbine system concept and preliminary design report. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The configuration development of the MOD-2 wind turbine system (WTS) is documented. The MOD-2 WTS project is a continuation of DOE programs to develop and achieve early commercialization of wind energy. The MOD-2 is design optimized for commercial production rates which, in multiunit installations, will be integrated into a utility power grid and achieve a cost of electricity at less than four cents per kilowatt hour.

  18. Preliminary design of an advanced Stirling system for terrestrial solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. A.; Noble, J. E.; Emigh, S. G.; Ross, B. A.; Lehmann, G. A.

    A preliminary design was generated for an advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) that will be capable of delivering about 25 kW of electric power to an electric utility grid. Stirling engines are being evaluated for terrestrial solar applications. A two-year task to complete detailed design, fabrication, assembly and testing of an ASCS prototype began in April, 1990. The ASCS is designed to deliver maximum power per year over a range of solar inputs with a design life of 30 years (60,000 h). The ACSC has a long-term cost goal of about $450 per kilowatt, exclusive of the 11-m parabolic dish concentrator. The proposed system includes a Stirling engine with high-pressure hydraulic output, coupled with a bent axis variable displacement hydraulic motor and a rotary induction generator. The major thrusts of the preliminary design are described, including material selection for the hot-end components, heat transport system (reflux pool boiler) design, system thermal response, improved manufacturability, FMECA/FTA analysis, updated manufacturing cost estimate, and predicted system performance.

  19. Preliminary design of an advanced Stirling system for terrestrial solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. A.; Noble, J. E.; Emigh, S. G.; Ross, B. A.; Lehmann, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design was generated for an advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) that will be capable of delivering about 25 kW of electric power to an electric utility grid. Stirling engines are being evaluated for terrestrial solar applications. A two-year task to complete detailed design, fabrication, assembly and testing of an ASCS prototype began in April, 1990. The ASCS is designed to deliver maximum power per year over a range of solar inputs with a design life of 30 years (60,000 h). The ACSC has a long-term cost goal of about $450 per kilowatt, exclusive of the 11-m parabolic dish concentrator. The proposed system includes a Stirling engine with high-pressure hydraulic output, coupled with a bent axis variable displacement hydraulic motor and a rotary induction generator. The major thrusts of the preliminary design are described, including material selection for the hot-end components, heat transport system (reflux pool boiler) design, system thermal response, improved manufacturability, FMECA/FTA analysis, updated manufacturing cost estimate, and predicted system performance.

  20. PV system field experience and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Steven; Rosenthal, Andrew; Thomas, Mike

    1997-02-01

    Hybrid power systems consisting of battery inverters coupled with diesel, propane, or gasoline engine-driven electrical generators, and photovoltaic arrays are being used in many remote locations. The potential cost advantages of hybrid systems over simple engine-driven generator systems are causing hybrid systems to be considered for numerous applications including single-family residential, communications, and village power. This paper discusses the various design constraints of such systems and presents one technique for reducing hybrid system losses. The Southwest Technology Development Institute under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories has been installing data acquisition systems (DAS) on a number of small and large hybrid PV systems. These systems range from small residential systems (1 kW PV - 7 kW generator), to medium sized systems (10 kW PV - 20 kW generator), to larger systems (100 kW PV - 200 kW generator). Even larger systems are being installed with hundreds of kilowatts of PV modules, multiple wind machines, and larger diesel generators.