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Sample records for kilp ulrich knauer

  1. Analyzing Current Serials in Virginia: An Application of the Ulrich's Serials Analysis System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Paul; Gasser, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    VIVA (the Virtual Library of Virginia) was one of the first subscribers to R. R. Bowker's Ulrich's Serials Analysis System (USAS). Creating a database that combined a union report of current serial subscriptions within most academic libraries in the state with the data elements present in Ulrich's made possible a comprehensive analysis designed…

  2. Official portrait of STS-55 SL-D2 Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter poses for his Official portrait. Walter is assigned to the STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) mission. This is the second dedicated German Spacelab flight. United States and German flags and a space shuttle orbiter model in launch configuration create the backdrop.

  3. The DFVLR wind-energy test facility 'Ulrich Huetter' on Schnittlinger Berg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmann, Alfred

    1986-11-01

    The DFVLR test facility for wind-energy systems (named after Ulrich Huetter, the designer of the 100-kW GFRP-rotor W 34 wind turbine first manufactured and tested in the 1950s) is described and illustrated with photographs. The history of the facility is traced, and current operations in gathering, archiving, processing, interpreting, and documenting performance-test data are outlined. The facility includes instrumentation for rotor telemetry, gondola motion measurements, and ground measurements and provides testing services to private users on both contract and leasing bases.

  4. Problems with bins: A critical reassessment of Gotelli and Ulrich's Bayes approach using bird data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gagern, Melanie; von Gagern, Martin; Schmitz Ornés, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Null model analyses are a common technique used to detect co-occurrence patterns in presence-absence matrices of species. One method which aims to identify interesting pairs of species has been introduced by Gotelli and Ulrich (2010). Based on the "fixed-fixed" null model constraint, it uses a pair-wise C-Score measure and partitions pairs into a number of bins in an attempt to reduce the number of false positives. Applying this technique to ornithological observations from Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, provided some insights into the suitability of the method for this kind of data in particular, and raised some more fundamental questions about the method in general. Specifically, the number of bins, which can be chosen arbitrarily, is shown to have significant impact on the number and identity of the returned species pairs. Other parameters, like the number of null model iterations, or the algorithm used to generate these null model matrices, have less impact as long as certain minimal requirements are met. The computations have been performed using different implementations of the method mentioned, "Pairs" by Ulrich and our own code "RePairs". The latter also introduces a randomization algorithm based on a network flow model. Comparing these implementations exposed an error in "Pairs", which might invalidate results obtained using it.

  5. Correlation of neutrino fluxes in the standard Bahcall-Ulrich solar model in connection with the solar-neutrino problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    The ratios of the fluxes of solar neutrinos from the CNO cycle to those of boron neutrinos are less model-dependent than the fluxes themselves in the standard Bahcall-Ulrich solar model. The uncertainties for these ratios are calculated at the level of three standard deviations. Their importance in the overall formulation of the problem of detecting solar neutrinos is discussed.

  6. Reminder and 2AFC tasks provide similar estimates of the difference limen: a reanalysis of data from Lapid, Ulrich, and Rammsayer (2008) and a discussion of Ulrich and Vorberg (2009).

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2010-05-01

    Lapid, Ulrich, and Rammsayer (2008) reported that estimates of the difference limen (DL) from a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) task are higher than those obtained from a reminder task. This article reanalyzes their data in order to correct an error in their estimates of the DL from 2AFC data. We also extend the psychometric functions fitted to data from both tasks to incorporate an extra parameter that has been shown to allow obtaining accurate estimates of the DL that are unaffected by lapses. Contrary to Lapid et al.'s conclusion, our reanalysis shows that DLs estimated with the 2AFC task are only minimally (and not always significantly) larger than those estimated with the reminder task. We also show that their data are contaminated by response bias, and that the small remaining difference between DLs estimated with 2AFC and reminder tasks can be reasonably attributed to the differential effects that response bias has in either task as they were defined in Lapid et al.'s experiments. Finally, we discuss a novel approach presented by Ulrich and Vorberg (2009) for fitting psychometric functions to 2AFC discrimination data.

  7. The Mysterious Case of the Pervasive Choice Biography: Ulrich Beck, Structure/Agency, and the Middling State of Theory in the Sociology of Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Dan

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the emergence of the concept of choice biography, as it is linked to the work of Ulrich Beck, in youth research. The concept has been called a current pervasive theoretical orthodoxy. However, this article argues that the concept is most often taken up to critique, and Beck used mostly as a foil, through arguing that he…

  8. Better P-curves: Making P-curve analysis more robust to errors, fraud, and ambitious P-hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller (2015).

    PubMed

    Simonsohn, Uri; Simmons, Joseph P; Nelson, Leif D

    2015-12-01

    When studies examine true effects, they generate right-skewed p-curves, distributions of statistically significant results with more low (.01 s) than high (.04 s) p values. What else can cause a right-skewed p-curve? First, we consider the possibility that researchers report only the smallest significant p value (as conjectured by Ulrich & Miller, 2015), concluding that it is a very uncommon problem. We then consider more common problems, including (a) p-curvers selecting the wrong p values, (b) fake data, (c) honest errors, and (d) ambitiously p-hacked (beyond p < .05) results. We evaluate the impact of these common problems on the validity of p-curve analysis, and provide practical solutions that substantially increase its robustness.

  9. Reflections on Hypothesis Testing in Response to Ulrich.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarefsky, David

    1984-01-01

    Responds that hypothesis testing is not a formula for judging debates but an attempt to model the nature of argumentation itself. Addresses criticisms of hypothesis testing and the role of paradigms in argumentation theory and practice. (PD)

  10. [Severe hydrops fetalis in a first trimester pregnancy with Ulrich-Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klare, P; Sydow, P; Körner, H

    1992-01-01

    We report about a case of abundant hydropic evolution of a fetus in the first trimester of gestation. Already in the 8th week of gestation we diagnosed the first references of failure with transvaginal ultrasound. In the following three weeks we observed the progression of the hydrops. The genetic research of fetal tissue after induced abortion show the karyotype 45 X0.

  11. The "Individualized" (Woman) in the Academy: Ulrich Beck, Gender and Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Christine

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the tensions and struggles that exist between men and women and between women and women in the academic workplace. The research reported here is a small-scale case study of 22 academic women from two generations who were interviewed about their career experiences. The theoretical framework is materialist feminism and draws…

  12. Friendship and Thomas More: Using Erasmus's Letter to Ulrich von Hutten as a Tool in Developing a Classroom Management Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joshua W.; Rud, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    The development of course management plans and student behavioral guidelines are a necessary component for the foundation of any school or learning community. In this article the authors explore a few of the principal foundations of creating these plans based on the qualities Erasmus described in his great friend Thomas More. Teachers and…

  13. Marine Science Building Dedicated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Officials cut the ribbon during dedication ceremonies of the George A. Knauer Marine Science Building on Oct. 17 at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC). The $2.75 million facility, the first building at the test site funded by the state of Mississippi, houses six science labs, classrooms and office space for 40 faculty and staff. Pictured are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; SSC Assistant Director David Throckmorton; Dr. George A. Knauer, founder of the Center of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM); Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; and USM President Dr. Shelby Thames.

  14. Laser Plasma Instability Experiments with KrF Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    L. Phillips, A. J. Schmitt, J. D. Sethain, R . K. McCrory, W. Seka, C. Verdon, J. P. Knauer, B. B. Afeyan, H. T . Powell, Physics of Plasmas, 5, 5...Physics of Plasmas. 8 R . Betti, K. Anderson, J. Knauer, T . J. B. Collins, R . L. McCrory, R . W. McKenty, S. Skupsky, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 4, 042703...2005). 9 W. L. Kruer, The Physics of Laser Plasma Interactions (Addison-Wesley, Boulder, 1988). 10 J. M. McMahon, R . P. Burns, T . H. DeRieux, R

  15. Optimizing Glassy Polymer Network Morphology for Nano-particle Dispersion, Stabilization and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-03

    dispersity and polymerization pathway, Moskowitz, Jeremy and Wiggins, Jeffrey, Polymer Degradation and Stability 2016, 125, 76 iv. High Molecular... polymerization pathway, Moskowitz, Jeremy and Wiggins, Jeffrey, Polymer Degradation and Stability 2016, 125, 76 iv. High Molecular Weight and Low Dispersity... Applications Jessica Piness, Katrina Knauer, Jeffrey Wiggins, SAMPE Tech 2015, Baltimore, MD, May 2015 xxvi. Cure behavior and polymer chain dynamics of

  16. Development of Landscape Metrics to Support Process-Driven Ecological Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    driver in ecosystem dynamics and can control system-level functions such as nutrient cycling, connectivity, biodiversity , carbon sequestration, etc...important driver in ecosystem dynamics and can control system-level functions such as nutrient cycling, connectivity, biodiversity , carbon...Wiegand, T., E. Revilla, and F. Knauer. 2004. Dealing with uncertainty in spatially explicit population models. Biodiversity and Conservation 13:53-78

  17. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Goldberg. Nonlinear imaging with a new contrast agent. Ultrasound Med Biol, vol. 29, pp. S97, 2003. R. J. Ro, F. Forsberg, M. Knauer, W. T. Shi, P. A ... Lewin , R. Bernardi. On the temperature and concentration dependency of excitation-enhanced imaging. Proc Biomed Eng Soc Ann Fall Meetg, abstract no

  18. Serials Information on CD-ROM: A Reference Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karch, Linda S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes Ulrich's PLUS (a CD-ROM version of Ulrich's serials directories) and EBSCO's CD-ROM version of "The Serials Directory," and compares the two in terms of their use as reference tools. Areas discussed include database content, user aids, system features, search features, and a comparison of search results. Equipment requirements…

  19. On the Situation in the Near East: Fleet Activities in the Indian Ocean: Summary from July 1980 to August 1982 (Zur Lage im Mittleren Osten: Flottenaktivataeten in Indischen Ozean: Ueberblick vom Juli 1980 bis August 1982).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-16

    3, by Ulrich Schulz- Torge , Verlag Wehr und Wissen, Bonn, 1981. 21. Warship International, No. 4/1980, and Rivista Militare and Marine- Rundschau, No...1/1981, p. 57. 22. The Soviet Navy, Vol. 3, by Ulrich Schulz- Torge . 23. OB at 11,500 t and 150 m in length has about 400 to 500 beds and about 200

  20. From Jefferson to Metallica to Your Campus: Copyright Issues in Student Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesarini, Lisa McHugh; Cesarini, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When Lars Ulrich, drummer for the rock group Metallica, testified before Congress about his group's lawsuit against Napster in 2000, many people who followed copyright issues in the music industry were not surprised (Ulrich, 2000). Ever since downloading audio files became as easy as clicking a few buttons on a personal computer, charges of…

  1. Modeling and Analyzing Terrain Data Acquired by Modern Mapping Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-22

    Edelsbrunner, J. Harer, and Y. Wang, Extreme elevation on a 2-manifold, Discrete Comput. Geom., 36 (2006), 553–572. [4] P. K. Agarwal, R . Klein, C...A Review,” in Surveys on Computational Geometry: Twenty Years Later (J. Goodman, J. Pach, and R . Pollack, eds.), American Mathematical Society...by point sets in space,” Discrete Appl. Math., 156 (2008), 42–54. [14] P. K. Agarwal, R . Klein, C. Knauer, S. Langerman, P. Morin, M. Sharir, and M

  2. Effects of Thin High-z Layers on the Hydrodynamics of Laser-Accelerated Plastic Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    support. We acknowledge very helpful discussions with John Sethian, Andrew Mostovych and Stephen Bodner. We thank Tom Walsh and Ed Hsiegh, Schafer...Kalantar, M.H. Key, B. A. Remington, J. E. Rothenberg, E. Wulfrum, C. P. Verdon , and J. P. Knauer, Phys. Plasmas 4, 1978 (1997). 4 Andrew J. Schmitt, A...823 (1984). 10 Nathan Metzler, Alexander Velikovitch, and John H, Gardner, Phys. Plasmas 8, (1999) 11 M. Desselberger, T. Afshar-rad, F. Khattak, S

  3. 76 FR 3145 - Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program (P50)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... promote pediatric device development by providing grants to nonprofit consortia whose business model and... Information and Additional Requirements Contact: Linda C. Ulrich or Debra Y. Lewis, Office of Orphan...

  4. The Primacy of Standards for Paradigm Evaluation: A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    Considers the positions developed by Lichtman and Rohrer and by Ulrich, and then focuses on Zarefsky's indictment of the proposed standards for evaluating debate paradigms. (See CS 705 841-705 844). (PD)

  5. Political Soldiers and Democratic Institution-Building in Bosnia-Herzegovina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Bruneau and Scott Tollefson, (Austin: The University of Texas Press, 2006), 3. 72 Mary Beth Ulrich, Democratizing Communist Militaries – The Cases of...had appointed.” 79 Mary Beth Ulrich, Democratizing Communist Militaries – The Cases of the Czech and Russian Armed Forces (Ann Arbor: The University...Bosnian Serbs has warned that if Kosovo is granted independence it could cause trouble in the Republika Srpska.236 Maj. Gen. David Leakey , commander

  6. Comparison of UHPLC and HPLC in Benzodiazepines Analysis of Postmortem Samples

    PubMed Central

    Behnoush, Behnam; Sheikhazadi, Ardeshir; Bazmi, Elham; Fattahi, Akbar; Sheikhazadi, Elham; Saberi Anary, Seyed Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare system efficiency and analysis duration regarding the solvent consumption and system maintenance in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). In a case–control study, standard solutions of 7 benzodiazepines (BZs) and 73 biological samples such as urine, tissue, stomach content, and bile that screened positive for BZs were analyzed by HPLC and UHPLC in laboratory of forensic toxicology during 2012 to 2013. HPLC analysis was performed using a Knauer by 100-5 C-18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm) and Knauer photodiode array detector (PAD). UHPLC analysis was performed using Knauer PAD detector with cooling autosampler and Eurospher II 100-3 C-18 column (100 mm × 3 mm) and also 2 pumps. The mean retention time, standard deviation, flow rate, and repeatability of analytical results were compared by using 2 methods. Routine runtimes in HPLC and UHPLC took 40 and 15 minutes, respectively. Changes in mobile phase composition of the 2 methods were not required. Flow rate and solvent consumption in UHPLC decreased. Diazepam and flurazepam were detected more frequently in biological samples. In UHPLC, small particle size and short length of column cause effective separation of BZs in a very short time. Reduced flow rate, solvent consumption, and injection volume cause more efficiency and less analysis costs. Thus, in the detection of BZs, UHPLC is an accurate, sensitive, and fast method with less cost of analysis. PMID:25860209

  7. The Early Counterpulse Technique Applied to Vacuum Interrupters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    H.’ "Theory and Application of the Commutation Principle ~ for HVDC Circuit Breakers ," IEEE Transactions on PAS, Vol· 91, No. 4, Jul./Aug. 1972...l w Circuit Breaker for 73 kA, 24 kV," 0::: 0::: Elektrotechnische Z, ETZ-A ]_, 97’ 499 (76). ::> (.) 5. Knauer, w., Hughes Research Lab., Malibu...ounterpulse circuit that injects into the switch an oppositely-directed current pulse large enough to create a transient current zero• For several years

  8. The first record of Lower Carboniferous bryozoa from the eastern margin of the Burma Tertiary Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aye Ko Aung

    Lower Carboniferous (Tournaisian-Visean) bryozoa from Tonkyauktaung about 6 km west of Zithaung village, Tigyaing Township, on the western margin of the Burma Tertiary Belt were collected from a limestone unit previously mapped as the Ngapyawdaw Chaung Formation and assigned to a Lower Cretaceous (Albian) age. Five species of fenestellid bryozoans are described: Fenestella cf. F. triserialis Ulrich, Fenestella sp. A cf. Fenestella nododorsalis Ulrich, Fenestella sp. B, Fenestella sp. C, Polypora sp. The former two have a close affinity with Lower Carboniferous bryozoa from central Thailand and Japan.

  9. Oxygen Transport to Human Tissues.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Respiration and CSF Acid-Base Balance John W. Severinghaus As my part of this delightful festival honoring Ulrich Luft. I plan to summarize the role of high...Tobias, M.C. and Drasdo. H.. eds. Woodstock . N.Y.: Overlook Press. pp. 117-124. Formand, S.A., Lansdowne, M.. Follansbee, J.N., and Hansen. J.E. 1968

  10. The Arts 3D VLE Metaverse as a Network of Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauch, Ulrich; Cohodas, Marvin; Wang, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Ulrich Rauch, Marvin Cohodas, and Tim Wang describe the Arts Metaverse, a Croquet-based virtual learning environment under development at the University of British Columbia. The Arts Metaverse allows three-dimensional virtual reconstruction of important artifacts and sites of classical, ancient, and indigenous American art, thereby allowing…

  11. Simulation-based Decision Support for Acquisition Policy and Process Design: The Effect of System and Enterprise Characteristics on Acquisition Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-22

    Research Policy , 30(7), 1019-1039. Ford, D.N., & Dillard, J.T. (2008). Modeling the integration of open systems and evolutionary acquisition in DoD...manufacturing firm. Research Policy 24(3), 419- 440. Ulrich, K., & Tung, K. (1991). Fundamentals of product modularity. In Issues in Design/Manufacture

  12. An Experiment in Software Development Risk Information Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    Law, J.; & Rip, A. "Quantitative Scientometrics ." Mapping of the Dynamics of Science and Technology, London: McMillian, 1986. [Callon 91...Research: The Case of Polymer Chemistry." Scientometrics 22,1 (January 1991): 153-203. [Carr 93] Carr, Marvin; Konda, Suresh; Monarch, Ira; Ulrich, Carol

  13. Comment on ``Cluster Formation of Transmembrane Proteins Due to Hydrophobic Mismatching''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meyer, Frédérick; Smit, Berend

    2009-05-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Ulrich Schmidt, Gernot Guigas, and Matthias Weiss, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 101, 128104 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.128104. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  14. Lessons We Can Learn from Other Countries. IAB Labour Market Research Topics No. 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walwei, Ulrich; Werner, Heinz; Konig, Ingeborg

    This document contains three papers from an international conference on "ways and means for more employment." The first paper, "Employment Policy Comparisons and Policy Advice" (Ulrich Walwei), covers the German labor market in the second half of the 1990s and requirements for longer-term employment success through coping with…

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Test of Gross Motor Development-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ka Yee Allison; Cheung, Siu Yin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the underlying structure of the second edition of the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (Ulrich, 2000) as applied to Chinese children. The Test of Gross Motor Development-2 was administered to 626 Hong Kong Chinese children. The outlier test with standard scoring was utilized. After data screening, a total…

  16. Sparking Innovative Learning & Creativity. 2007 NMC Summer Conference Proceedings (Indianapolis, IN, Jun 6-9, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel S., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The conference proceedings include the following papers: (1) The Arts Metaverse in Open Croquet: Exploring an Open Source 3-D Online Digital World (Ulrich Rauch and Tim Wang); (2) Beyond World of Warcraft: the Universe of MMOGs (Ruben R. Puentedura); (3) ClevelandPlus in Second Life (Wendy Shapiro, Lev Gonick, and Sue Shick); (4) Folksemantic:…

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1989. Division of Collections and Services. Open Forum of the Division; Section on Acquisition and Exchange; Section on Interlending and Document Delivery; Section on Serial Publications; Section on Rare and Precious Books and Documents. Booklet 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1989

    There are 20 papers in this collection from the Division of Collections and Services: "IFLA Division of Collections and Services" (Hope E. A. Clement); "Divisional Open Forum Reports" ("Section of Acquisition and Exchange" by Ulrich Montag; "Section of Government Information and Official Publications" by Bernadine Abbott Hoduski; "Section on…

  18. PILOT PROJECT CLOSE UP: ORD RESEARCH INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, Jim and Elin Ulrich. 2004. Pilot Project Close Up: ORD Research Inventory. Changing Times. Pp. 1. (ERL,GB R1022).

    At the January 2003 summit, many people were drawn to our vision of improving ORD's internal communications by creating a "go-to" page that consolicat...

  19. Warrior or Pundit: Ethical Struggle of Army Senior Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-06

    the course of future events becomes. Crystal balls that work reliably are hard to find, while astrology , alas is apt to disappoint also. But...contacted Dr. Ulrich and asked for a hardcopy of the slides, her case study. She provided all material , but did not authorize release of her material as it

  20. How Strongly Linked Are Mental Time and Space along the Left-Right Axis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eikmeier, Verena; Alex-Ruf, Simone; Maienborn, Claudia; Ulrich, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Different lines of research suggest that our mental representations of time and space are linked, though the strength of this linkage has only recently been addressed for the front-back mental timeline (Eikmeier, Schröter, Maienborn, Alex-Ruf, & Ulrich, 2013). The present study extends this investigation to the left-right mental timeline. In…

  1. Freedom's Children: A Gender Perspective on the Education of the Learner-Citizen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnot, Madeleine

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on Ulrich Beck's theory of "freedom's children," the present contribution examines contemporary concerns about educating young people "for" citizenship as well as educating them "about" citizenship. Under the first theme, the author focuses on the "citizen as learner," highlighting some of the gender- and class-related inequalities that…

  2. Some Have Credit Cards and Others Have Giro Cheques: A Study of New Labour's 'Individuals' and 'People' as Lifelong Learners in Late Modernity. Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Alison

    The linguistic behavior of individuals and people in the official literature on lifelong learning (LL) was examined and interpreted in light of the theories of individualization in late modern culture and society, particularly the theories of Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens. The analysis was performed to shed light on that literature's ideological…

  3. Dystopian Visions of Global Capitalism: Philip Reeve's "Mortal Engines" and M.T Anderson's "Feed"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullen, Elizabeth; Parsons, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article examines Philip Reeve's novel for children, "Mortal Engines", and M.T. Anderson's young adult novel, "Feed", by assessing these dystopias as prototypical texts of what Ulrich Beck calls risk society. Through their visions of a fictional future, the two narratives explore the hazards created by contemporary techno-economic progress,…

  4. Confidence-Based Robot Policy Learning from Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-05

    Shavlik. Creating advice-taking reinforcement learners. Mach. Learn., 22(1-3):251–281, 1996. [55] Gail F. Melson, Peter H. Kahn, Jr., Alan M. Beck ...adaptation of biped locomotion. Robotics and Autonomous Systems, 47:79–91, 2004. [60] Ulrich Nehmzow, Otar Akanyeti, Cristoph Weinrich, Theocharis

  5. Misrepresenting "Choice Biographies"?: A Reply to Woodman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a reply to Woodman's (2009) recent argument that youth studies often incorrectly attribute the concept of "choice biographies" to the work of Ulrich Beck. Drawing heavily on Beck's own words, this paper contends that youth researchers might not be making this association unduly. Consideration is paid to some conceptual issues…

  6. The "Self-Interested" Woman Academic: A Consideration of Beck's Model of the "Individualised Individual"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The work of Ulrich Beck, particularly his concept of the "individualised individual", is increasingly cited by educational social scientists. As yet, there have been few empirical investigations that consider how applicable and relevant is the notion of the "individualised individual" in understanding how people make sense of…

  7. Sulfur Mustard Induces Apoptosis in Lung Epithelial Cells via a Caspase Amplification Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    absolute requirement for removal of caspase-6 prodomain. Cell Death Differ. 9, 1046–1056. Dabrowska, M.I., Becks , L.L., Lelli Jr., J.L., Levee, M.G...Breton, P., Bren- ner, C., Boisvieux- Ulrich , E., Marano, F., 2006. Inhibition of caspase-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition protects airway

  8. "Where Are We Going? Mini Sessions on Maxi Concerns."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women, Albany, NY.

    The proceedings of the fall conference of the Eastern Association for Physical Education of College Women includes articles and overviews of mini-sessions. In "Journey Proud," Celeste Ulrich provides observations about human interaction, teaching/learning environments, techniques and methods, and administrative patterns and scholarship. In…

  9. The Limits of Institutional Reflexivity in Bulgarian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slantcheva, Snejana

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the notion of institutional reflexivity. Its theoretical framework is based on the views of a group of sociologists--Anthony Giddens, Ulrich Beck, Scott Lash--who developed the concept of reflexive modernization. The article applies the notion of institutional reflexivity to the field of higher education and reviews the…

  10. Re-Modernities: Or the Volcanic Landscapes of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinzent, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Is theology dead or dying? Or can we confidently do theology? Since the 1990s Ulrich Beck, one of the best known living sociologists both in Europe and beyond, has promoted the critical reading of the contemporary discourse as "reflexive modernization". He has recently looked into the "fascinating byways" of religion. Based on Beck's re-assessment…

  11. Disability and the Open City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleeson, Brendan

    2001-01-01

    Contributes to the social theorization of physical access for people with disabilities by critically exploring how Ulrich Beck's "reflexive modernisation" thesis might be applied to the geographical understanding of disability. Demonstrates how Beck's theoretical framework can be used to enrich people's understanding of the genesis and mediation…

  12. Recent Trends in German Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Claudius

    1996-01-01

    Discusses trends in German higher education over the last decade, focusing on the expansion and differentiation of postsecondary education, societal changes in the student population, and the relationship between education and social class in light of the "individualization thesis" of sociologist Ulrich Beck. (MDM)

  13. Nanotechnology and the Developing World: Lab-on-Chip Technology for Health and Environmental Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that advances in nanotechnology in general, and lab-on-chip technology in particular, have the potential to benefit the developing world in its quest to control risks to human health and the environment. Based on the "risk society" thesis of Ulrich Beck, it is argued that the developed world must realign its science and…

  14. Global Justice and Education: From Nation to Neuron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between education and global justice? This question is addressed within Ulrich Beck's notion of global "goods" and "bads", through a multidisciplinary approach, which E.O. Wilson terms "consilience"--a "jumping together" of knowledge from international relations to neuroscience. A critical political analysis proposes that…

  15. Persistence of Zinc-Binding Bacterial Superantigens at the Surface of Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators Dorothy D. Pless,† Gordon Ruthel, Emily K. Reinke, Robert G. Ulrich, and Sina...immunoglobulin G, and the cells were analyzed with a FACSort flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson , Mountain View, CA). To measure off rates, 1 or 5 g of SE or

  16. Gender, Career and "Individualisation" in the Audit University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Ulrich Beck's model of the "individualised individual" in a second modernity has generated interest from social scientists in education, particularly in terms of what he has to say about the demise of social class. What has attracted less attention from educationalists is his argument regarding transformations in the nature of work. This article…

  17. Combining Different NLP Methods for HUMINT Report Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    JENGE, Silverius KAWALETZ, Ulrich SCHADE Fraunhofer-Institut für Kommunikation, Informationsverarbeitung und Ergonomie (FKIE) Neuenahrer Str. 20 53343...ES) Fraunhofer-Institut für Kommunikation, Informationsverarbeitung und Ergonomie (FKIE) Neuenahrer Str. 20 53343 Wachtberg-Werthhoven Germany 8

  18. The "Financial Counseling and Planning" Indexing Project: Establishing a Correlation between Indexing, Total Citations, and Library Holdings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    The researcher hypothesized that increasing the number of indexing services covering a journal would increase library holdings and total citations for the journal. A sample group of 40 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) journals in the "Business, Finance" category was identified and checked for the number of times indexed in Ulrich's…

  19. Generational Differences and Participant Experiences in Leadership Development: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remedies, Suzanne E.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study examines generational cohort perceptions as they apply to civilian leadership training within the DOD. Zenger, Ulrich and Smallwood (2000) describe that a new approach for developing future leaders is necessary. Identifying whether generational perceptions of ELDP members positively or negatively impact DOD…

  20. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Collections and Services: Open Forum of Division of Collections and Services; Section of Acquisition and Exchange; Section of Interlending and Document Delivery; Section of Serial Publications; Newspapers; Section of Government Information and Official Publications; Section of Rare [Books] and Manuscripts. Booklet 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 14 papers in this collection were presented at 6 sections of the Division of Collections and Services: (1) "Open Forum of the Division of Collections and Services Report of the Section on Acquisition and Exchange" (Ulrich Montag); (2) "Acquisition Policy of the USSR National Library Collection" (Z. P. Sorokina and S. M.…

  1. The Gross Motor Skills of Children with Mild Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonis, Karen P.; Jernice, Tan Sing Yee

    2014-01-01

    Many international studies have examined the gross motor skills of children studying in special schools while local studies of such nature are limited. This study investigated the gross motor skills of children with Mild Learning Disabilities (MLD; n = 14, M age = 8.93 years, SD = 0.33) with the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (TGMD-2, Ulrich,…

  2. Recent Developments in the Theory and Practice of Policy Debate: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadely, Dean

    Shifting theoretical perspectives of intercollegiate policy debate, especially the changing affirmative case constructs, warrant reformulations of various strategies open to the negative case such as those developed by W. Ulrich, R. Dempsey, and D. Hartmann. Options open to the affirmative have increased, e.g., the comparative advantages case, the…

  3. National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education Annual Conference Proceedings (San Diego, CA, January 8-10, 1982). Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedvilas, Leo L., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 26 papers delivered at the National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (NAPEHE) Annual Conference (1982). Section 1, "NAPEHE's Image," contains two papers, one by Don Hellison, the other by Celeste Ulrich. "The Splintering of Physical Education" is the topic of the next section, and it contains papers by…

  4. Scientific Journal Publishing: Yearly Volume and Open Access Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Bo-Christer; Roos, Annikki; Lauri, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We estimate the total yearly volume of peer-reviewed scientific journal articles published world-wide as well as the share of these articles available openly on the Web either directly or as copies in e-print repositories. Method: We rely on data from two commercial databases (ISI and Ulrich's Periodicals Directory) supplemented by…

  5. OVERVIEW OF AN INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATION ON EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MODEL HEPATOTOXICANTS ON HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the Effects of Methapyrilene and Clofibrate on Hepatic Gene Expression: A Collaboration Between Laboratories and a Comparison of Platform and Analytical Approaches

    Roger G. Ulrich1, John C. Rockett2, G. Gordon Gibson3 and Syril Pettit4

    1 Rosetta Inpharmat...

  6. Combating Transnational Terrorism in Southeast Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-06

    Methodology This research project was conducted utilizing library and Internet based research of subject matter experts from primary source terrorist analysts...modern day Islamic transnational terrorism as the Sicilians were to the American Italian Mafia or Cosa Nostra: which translates to: “our thing.” Like...14 September 2001, accessed 09October 2002); available from http://www.cdi.org/terrorism/terrorist-network.cfm; Internet . Beck, Ulrich. 2000. What is

  7. Move Affords Many Advantages to EML | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Ulrich Baxa, Ph.D., director of the Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML), enjoys finally having his staff all in one place. “Our lab is now all in one location, as compared to our previous situation, with two different locations,” he said. “This will make daily work much easier, in particular for me since I am able to have an office next to the other EML staff.”

  8. Lapses in Alertness: Brain-Evoked Responses to Task-Irrelevant Auditory Probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    attention has been given to changes in the appearance (Santarnaria and Chiappa , 1987), topography (Ulrich and Frick, 1986), or spectrum (Townsend and John...Further, across subjects the appearance of these signs varies substantially (Santamaria and Chiappa , 1987), limiting the potential success of subject... Chiappa , K.H. (1987). The EEG of drowsiness in normal adults. J Clin Neu- rophysiolog 4, 327-382. Torsvall, L. & Akerstedt, T. (1988). Extreme

  9. Toxicity Comparison of Eight Repellents Against Four Species of Female Mosquitoes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    TOXICITY COMPARISON OF EIGHT REPELLENTS AGAINST FOUR SPECIES OF FEMALE MOSQUITOES JULIA W. PRIDGEON, ULRICH R. BERNIER AND JAMES J. BECNEL Center for...repellents (DMP, Rutgers 612, DEET, IR3535, Picardin, PMD, AI3-35765, and AI3-37220) were evaluated by topical application against females of Aedes aegypti...repellent toxicity, topical application INTRODUCTION Females of the mosquito species Aedes aegypti (L.) transmit viral pathogens to humans, resulting in

  10. Ray picture for prism-film coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, H. J. W. M.; van't Spijker, J. C.; Koerkamp, H. M. M. Klein

    1993-10-01

    Tien and Ulrich introduced a description of the prism-film coupler, with use of the ray picture. The model given is discussed, and it is argued that the effect of the Goss-Hanchen shift cannot be neglected in general. Relatively simple expressions are given for the computation of the coupling efficiency of a prism-loaded planar structure as a function of the angle of incidence of the incoming beam. Computational results are presented and compared with those of other methods.

  11. Trade Associations and Their Environment from an Efficiency Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Machires, Alcoa Foundation. William G. Ouchi. Jay Barney and Dave Ulrich have been helpful in developing the concepts in this draft. I A B S T RA C T... Lorsch 1967: Thompson, 1967; Perrow, 1970; Duncan, 1972; and Leblebici and Salancik, 1981), acquiring scarce resources (Yuchtman and Seashore, 1967...and C. Shields. 1971. Trade Association Law and Practice. Boston, Mass: Little, Brown & Co. Lawrence, P. and J. Lorsch . 1967. Organizations and

  12. Systems Engineering and Project Management for Product Development: Optimizing Their Working Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    guide to the project management body of knowledge ( PMBOK (R) GUIDE). Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute, Inc. Ulrich, K., & Eppinger, S...activities to meet the project requirements. (Project Management Institute, Inc., 2013, p. 6) The PMBOK states that project management requires a set of...The PMBOK , however, does not address the product processes (i.e., processes required to ensure the project’s deliverable meets the customer’s needs

  13. Eo-Ulrichian to Neo-Ulrichian views: The renaissance of "layer-cake stratigraphy"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, Carlton E.; McLaughlin, P.I.; Baird, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    Classical notions of "layer-cake stratigraphy" have been denigrated as representing an antiquated "Neptunian" view of the geologic record with the American paleontologist-stratigrapher E.O. Ulrich vilified as its quintessential advocate. Some of the extreme "layer-cake" interpretations of E.O. Ulrich are demonstrably incorrect, especially where applied in marginal marine and terrestrial settings. However, close scrutiny of Ulrich's work suggests that the bulk was correct and demonstrated considerable insight for the time. Subsequent development of facies concepts revolutionized geologists' view of time-space relationships in stratigraphy, but rather than focusing on facies patterns within the established stratigraphic (layer-cake) frameworks many geologists in North America came to view strata as parts of diachronous facies mosaics. Recent advances in the development of event and sequence stratigraphic paradigms are beginning to swing the pendulum back the other way. Possible causes of "layer-cake" patterns are numerous and varied, including: (1) parallelism of depositional strike and outcrop belts, especially in foreland basins, (2) very widespread environmental belts developed in low-relief cratonic areas, (3) time-averaging homogenizes facies to a limited extent, resulting in a very subtle signature of lateral change, (4) condensed beds (hardgrounds, bone beds, ironstones, etc.) often form in responses to extrabasinal forces, thus they cross-cut facies, and (5) large events (i.e. hurricanes, floods, tsunamis, eruptions, etc.) are "over represented" in the rock record. A revised ("Neo-Ulrichian") layer-cake paradigm carries many of the original correct empirical observations of pattern, noted by Ulrich, recast in terms of event and sequence stratigraphy.

  14. US Japan Workshop. Hybrid 2000 Conference Held in Ithaca, New York on May 7-12, 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    Illinois University) 10:30-10:45 BREAK 10:45-11:30 " Nano -Objects With Controlled Shape, Size and Composition From Block Copolymer-Ceramic Hybrid...discussed. Nano -objects with controlled shape, size and composition from block copolymer - ceramic hybrid materials. ULRICH WIESNER Materials Science...organic and inorganic components [2] which can be employed to prepare ’hairy’ nano -objects of controlled shape, size and composition (Fig.l). This

  15. Evaluation of the Cepheid GeneXpert System for Detecting Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-25

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Evaluation of the Cepheid GeneXpert system for detecting Bacillus anthracis M.P. Ulrich1, D.R. Christensen1, S.R. Coyne1, P.D...Knepp et al. 2003). In addition, Keywords anthrax, automated system, Bacillus anthracis, GeneXpert, nucleic acid, real-time PCR, sample processing...system. In this study, the capability of the GeneX- pert to isolate and detect nucleic acid from Bacillus anthracis Ames spores was assessed. Methods

  16. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel...of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0184 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...tumors using a brain selective cell line, 231-BR, derived from human breast cancer . Therefore, the experimental model to be used must be immune

  17. Migration and its risks.

    PubMed

    O'brien, P

    1996-01-01

    "This essay applies the theories of Ulrich Beck...to the politics of migration in Germany. In particular, the essay focuses on Beck's notion of the waning influence, indeed even relevancy, of science and scientists regarding postmodern risk phenomena. The essay argues that migration to Germany can be understood as a Beckian risk phenomenon, helping to explain the decreasing influence of social scientists over the politics of migration in the Federal Republic."

  18. Automated Attacker Correlation for Malicious Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-22

    Thomas Dullien, Ero Carrera, Soeren-Meyer Eppler, Sebastian Porst Ruhr-University Bochum zynamics GmbH Grosse Beck Str 3. 44787 Bochum Germany March...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Ruhr-University Bochum,zynamics GmbH,Grosse Beck Str 3,44787...Halvar Flake. Structural comparison of executable objects. In Ulrich Flegel and Michael Meier, editors, DIMVA, volume 46 of LNI, pages 161–173. GI

  19. Scarab/Bandit-D Multi-Vehicle Proximity Operations Using a University Nanosatellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-31

    the project, either through course work or volunteering in the summer: Rashied Amini, Erin Beck , Fiona Turett, Anne Schneider, Doug Beattie, Charles...Gronek, Brad Kukurza, BettyLynn Ulrich , Justin Char, Erik Karulf and Lane Haury. Publications M.A. Swartwout. The First One Hundred University-Class...Spacecraft 1981-2008, IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 24(3), 2008. Interactions/Transitions The PI and five students ( Beck

  20. U.S. Democratization Strategy: Origins and Obstacles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Lewis White Beck (Indianapolis and New York: Bobbs- Merrill Company, 1957), p. 11. 3 Michael W. Doyle, “Liberal Internationalism: Peace, War and...2008). 74 Ulrich Fichtner, “Mr. Tapfer, der Retter der Welt,” Der Spiegel, 11 June 2001, p. 76; and Carlos Widmann, “USA/Mit Schirm und Charme,” Der...157 Kant, Perpetual Peace, ed. Lewis White Beck (Indianapolis and New York: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1957), p. 13. 158 Doyle, p. 206. 159 Ibid

  1. NSWC Library of Mathematics Subroutines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Eckhardt, Ulrich,"Algorithm 549, Weierstrass’ Ellip’ic Functions," ACM Trans. Matk . Software 4 (1980’, pp. 112-i20. (2) ,"A Rational Approximation to...ill-conditioned. lII such situatioMS one 0C inst use a more gen eral equation solver. Ih T()tPIX and I)T()IPI,X 4(11 1)( floating additions and 4n (n 1

  2. STS-55 crewmembers pose with U.S. and German flags in SL-D2 module on OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 crewmembers pose with United States and German flags inside the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module located in the payload bay (PLB) of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Wearing communications kit assembly headsets (HDSTs) are (left to right) Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, and Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel.

  3. Cashing In Stars: Does the Professional Ethic Apply in Retirement?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    US Air Force Academy. She is a retired USAF colonel. “Cashing In” Stars Does the Professional Ethic Apply in Retirement? Marybeth Peterson Ulrich...the service professional ethic . It concerns the trend to offer professional expertise in such a way that it exploits active duty experience to sup...Responsibility and Ethics in Washington “Strategic Maneuvers” Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the

  4. Workbook for Predicting Pressure Wave and Fragment Effect of Exploding Propellent Tanks and Gas Storage Vessels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    White, Clayton S., "The Scope of Blast and Shock Biology and Prob- tlem Areas in Relating Physical and Biological Parameters," Annals of the New York...abdominal cavity is biologically equivalent to, the ballistic limit velccity V 5 0 fcr penetrating isolated human skin. This assumption is true...34iucatiun and Research, AD 70997Z. March 1970, Dainin. Edý\\ard G., John T. Yelverton, Ulrich C. Lutt , and Robert K. Jones. "Recovery of the Respiratory System

  5. Learning In A Hierarchical Control System: 4D/RCS In The DARPA LAGR Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Santa Barbara, CA, 1999. [20] I. Ulrich and I. Nourbakhsh, "Appearance- Based Obstacle Detection with Monocu- lar Color Vision ," Proceedings of the...the vehicle will learn to do without stereo vision at times, so it must learn to distinguish traversable terrain from non- traversable terrain based on...of the local traversability. Learning has been applied to computer vision for a variety of applications, including traversability prediction

  6. Lightning Initiation and Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Comparison of Thunderstonn Systems that Produce or Lack RHESSI Identified Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes , EOS Transactions, AGU, Vol. 90, Fall Meeting...Cramer, M. Schaal, Z. H. Saleh, W. Ulrich, B. Grefenstette, B. 1. Hazelton 8. A Ground-Based Campaign in Search of Terrestrial Gamma -ray Flashes ...to develop sophisticated Monte Carlo simulations and runaway electron transport models of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash (TGF), which are providing new

  7. Death, the Military and Society: Casualties and Civil-Military Relations in Germany

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    has been socially toned down. In this, he is joined by others who - like, inter alia, Norbert Fischer (2001) and the authors in the anthology by Blum...also propelled by processes renowned sociologists like Ulrich Beck, Norbert Elias, Anthony Giddens, and Ronald Inglehart came to call individualization...At around 1:00 p.m. local time on 29 May 2003 German soldiers were driving in two unar- mored Wolf vehicles on patrol in heavy terrain far out from

  8. Female Captive Stories in the United States from the Colonial Era to Present: A Study in the Pervasive Elements of the Traditional Narrative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750. (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1982). 53Ulrich, 173. 54 John Warner...which women were seen as too delicate for violence, Dustan’s actions were evaluated differently. John Warner Barber in his Historical Collections...58 Ibid, 169. 59 John Warner Barber, Historical Collections, Being a General Collection of Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches

  9. A Preliminary Study of Reducing the Cost of Blast Shelter for Critical Workers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    23 2.1.6 Luscher Study ..... ................. .... 28 2.1.7 Krupka Study ..... ................. .... 29 2.1.9 Haaland Study...a more reasonable cost/space number had been reported. 2.1.6 Ulrich Luscher - Behavior of Flexible Underground Cylinders, 1965 This study ( Luscher ...information about the utilization of corrugated culverts as blast shelters and modes of hardening. No cost analyses were discussed by Luscher . 2.1.7 R. A

  10. Analytic solutions to the accretion of a rotating finite cloud towards a central object - I. Newtonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, S.; Tejeda, E.; Nagel, E.

    2009-02-01

    We construct a steady analytic accretion flow model for a finite rotating gas cloud that accretes material to a central gravitational object. The pressure gradients of the flow are considered to be negligible, and so the flow is ballistic. We also assume a steady flow and consider the particles at the boundary of the spherical cloud to be rotating as a rigid body, with a fixed amount of inwards radial velocity. This represents a generalization to the traditional infinite gas cloud model described by Ulrich. We show that the streamlines and density profiles obtained deviate largely from the ones calculated by Ulrich. The extra freedom in the choice of the parameters on the model can naturally account for the study of protostars formed in dense clusters by triggered mechanisms, where a wide variety of external physical mechanisms determine the boundary conditions. Also, as expected, the model predicts the formation of an equatorial accretion disc about the central object with a radius different from the one calculated by Ulrich.

  11. Improving the estimation of psychometric functions in 2AFC discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Ulrich and Vorberg (2009) presented a method that fits distinct functions for each order of presentation of standard and test stimuli in a two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task, which removes the contaminating influence of order effects from estimates of the difference limen. The two functions are fitted simultaneously under the constraint that their average evaluates to 0.5 when test and standard have the same magnitude, which was regarded as a general property of 2AFC tasks. This constraint implies that physical identity produces indistinguishability, which is valid when test and standard are identical except for magnitude along the dimension of comparison. However, indistinguishability does not occur at physical identity when test and standard differ on dimensions other than that along which they are compared (e.g., vertical and horizontal lines of the same length are not perceived to have the same length). In these cases, the method of Ulrich and Vorberg cannot be used. We propose a generalization of their method for use in such cases and illustrate it with data from a 2AFC experiment involving length discrimination of horizontal and vertical lines. The resultant data could be fitted with our generalization but not with the method of Ulrich and Vorberg. Further extensions of this method are discussed.

  12. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A.; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J.; Schupp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.—Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis. PMID:27811061

  13. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J; Schupp, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.-Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

  14. Detection of HEMA in self-etching adhesive systems with high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Hameršak, Z.; Stipetić, I.; Matosevic, D.; Negovetić-Mandić, V.; Prskalo, K.

    2009-04-01

    One of the factors that can decrease hydrolytic stability of self-etching adhesive systems (SEAS) is 2-hydroxymethylmethacrylate (HEMA). Due to hydrolytic instability of acidic methacrylate monomers in SEAS, HEMA can be present even if the manufacturer did not include it in original composition. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of HEMA because of decomposition by hydrolysis of methacrylates during storage, resulting with loss of adhesion strength to hard dental tissues of the tooth crown. Three most commonly used SEAS were tested: AdheSE ONE, G-Bond and iBond under different storage conditions. High performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed on a Nucleosil C 18-100 5 μm (250 × 4.6 mm) column, Knauer K-501 pumps and Wellchrom DAD K-2700 detector at 215 nm. Data were collected and processed by EuroCrom 2000 HPLC software. Calibration curves were made related eluted peak area to known concentrations of HEMA (purchased from Fluka). The elution time for HEMA is 12.25 min at flow rate 1.0 ml/min. Obtained results indicate that no HEMA was present in AdheSE ONE because methacrylates are substituted with methacrylamides that seem to be more stable under acidic aqueous conditions. In all other adhesive systems HEMA was detected.

  15. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L

    2006-10-15

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si(Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3 keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3 keV ({approx}50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  16. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for the Analysis of Sirolimus in Drug Products

    PubMed Central

    Islambulchilar, Ziba; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Emami, Shahram; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a simple, rapid and sensitive reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for quantification of sirolimus (SRL) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. Methods: The chromatographic system employs isocratic elution using a Knauer- C18, 5 mm, 4.6 × 150 mm. Mobile phase consisting of acetonitril and ammonium acetate buffer set at flow rate 1.5 ml/min. The analyte was detected and quantified at 278nm using ultraviolet detector. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines. Results: The standard curve was found to have a linear relationship (r2 > 0.99) over the analytical range of 125–2000ng/ml. For all quality control (QC) standards in intraday and interday assay, accuracy and precision range were -0.96 to 6.30 and 0.86 to 13.74 respectively, demonstrating the precision and accuracy over the analytical range. Samples were stable during preparation and analysis procedure. Conclusion: Therefore the rapid and sensitive developed method can be used for the routine analysis of sirolimus such as dissolution and stability assays of pre- and post-marketed dosage forms. PMID:24312784

  17. 2009 Annual Report TATRC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Samueli Institute ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������113 Vision Research Program...through a common problem set (e�g�, cancer genomics, NETPR, Samueli Insititute, vision research)� In each of the examples we have chosen to highlight...TATRC we can make their lives better, then our mission has been successful�” Brenda Bart-Knauer, M�D� TATRC Program Manager 113 Samueli  Institute

  18. Theory and Experiment on Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2005-07-01

    The current generation of high-energy-density research facilities has enabled the beginnings of experimental studies of radiation hydrodynamic systems, common in astrophysics but difficult to produce in the laboratory. Radiative shock experiments specifically have been a topic of increasing effort in recent years. Our group and collaborators [1] have emphasized the radiographic observation of structure in radiative shocks. These shocks have been produced on the Omega laser by driving a Be piston through Xenon at velocities above 100 km/s. The talk will summarize these experiments and their results. Interpreting these and other experiments is hampered by the limited range of assumptions used in published theories, and by the limitations in readily available simulation tools. This has motivated an examination of radiative shock theory [2]. The talk will summarize the key issues and present results for specific cases. [ 1 ] Gail Glendinning, Ted Perry, Bruce Remington, Jim Knauer, Tom Boehly, and other members of the NLUF Experimental Astrophysics Team. Publications: Reighard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. submitted; Leibrandt, et al., Ap J., in press, Reighard et al., IFSA 03 Proceedings, Amer. Nucl. Soc. (2004). [2] Useful discussions with Dmitri Ryutov and Serge Bouquet. Supported by the NNSA programs via DOE Grants DE-FG52-03NA00064 and DE FG53 2005 NA26014

  19. A new mandate for human resources.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D

    1998-01-01

    Should we do away with HR? In recent years, a number of people who study and write about business--along with many who run businesses--have been debating that question. The debate arises out of serious and widespread doubts about HR's contribution to organizational performance. Dave Ulrich acknowledges that HR, as it is configured today in many companies, is indeed ineffective, incompetent, and costly. But he contends that it has never been more necessary. The solution, he believes, is to create an entirely new role for the field that focuses it not on traditional HR activities, such as staffing and compensation, but on business results that enrich the company's value to customers, investors, and employees. Ulrich elaborates on four broad tasks for HR that would allow it to help deliver organizational excellence. First, HR should become a partner in strategy execution. Second, it should become an expert in the way work is organized and executed. Third, it should become a champion for employees. And fourth, it should become an agent of continual change. Fulfilling this agenda would mean that every one of HR's activities would in some concrete way help a company better serve its customers or otherwise increase shareholder value. Can HR transform itself on its own? Certainly not--in fact, the primary responsibility for transforming the role of HR, Ulrich says, belongs to the CEO and to every line manager who works with the HR staff. Competitive success is a function of organizational excellence, and senior managers must hold HR accountable for delivering it.

  20. Critical thinking at the bedside: providing safe passage to patients.

    PubMed

    Robert, Ruth R; Petersen, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The critical thinking ability of health care professionals can affect patient safety directly (Buerhaus, Donelan, Ulrich, Norman, & Dittus, 2005). The National League for Nursing (NLN, 2006) expects nursing graduates to be able to demonstrate critical thinking. Nursing programs are required to measure critical thinking as an outcome criterion for accreditation. This process of program accreditation is considered an indicator that a professional program offers a quality product. Based on NLN expectations, health care disciplines should diligently seek opportunities to enhance critical thinking by promoting qualitative and quantitative research that focuses on curriculum evaluation, enhancing educators' and faculty knowledge, and improving patient care outcomes.

  1. The faint young sun-climate paradox - Volcanic influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Endal, A. S.

    1982-12-01

    It has been suggested that the early earth may have frozen over as a result of a fainter early sun (see Ulrich, 1975). If this had happened, climate models suggest the earth would have remained frozen through the present epoch and into the distant future. We suggest that volcanic influences could allow a passage from the frozen branch into the unfrozen branch of climate models should conditions on earth be suitable for the latter climate change. A broad equatorial belt of volcanic ash is one scenario which would allow a transfer from the frozen earth state into the unfrozen one.

  2. The faint young sun-climate paradox - Volcanic influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Endal, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that the early earth may have frozen over as a result of a fainter early sun (see Ulrich, 1975). If this had happened, climate models suggest the earth would have remained frozen through the present epoch and into the distant future. We suggest that volcanic influences could allow a passage from the frozen branch into the unfrozen branch of climate models should conditions on earth be suitable for the latter climate change. A broad equatorial belt of volcanic ash is one scenario which would allow a transfer from the frozen earth state into the unfrozen one.

  3. On the Origin and Evolution of s-PROCESS Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, David N.; Tinsley, Beatrice M.

    The evolution of s-process abundances in the solar neighborhood is studied, using alternative stellar production sites and Galactic models. Production in either low-mass or medium-mass stars, as suggested in Ulrich's alternative models for FG Sge for example, can account for the solar-system abundances. Either case is consistent with independent limits on subsequent neutron exposure of nuclei produced in explosive oxygen and silicon burning and of r-process material. The cases could be distinguished by observations of the ratios of s-process to primary metal abundances in stars of different ages. The predictions are not strongly dependent on the model used for Galactic evolution.

  4. Introducing Systems Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Martin; Holwell, Sue

    Systems Approaches to Managing Change brings together five systems approaches to managing complex issues, each having a proven track record of over 25 years. The five approaches are: System Dynamics (SD) developed originally in the late 1950s by Jay Forrester Viable Systems Model (VSM) developed originally in the late 1960s by Stafford Beer Strategic Options Development and Analysis (SODA: with cognitive mapping) developed originally in the 1970s by Colin Eden Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) developed originally in the 1970s by Peter Checkland Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) developed originally in the late 1970s by Werner Ulrich

  5. A simple accretion model of a rotating gas sphere onto a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Mendoza, S.

    2007-04-01

    We construct a simple accretion model of a rotating gas sphere onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We show how to build analytic solutions in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. This construction represents a general relativistic generalisation of the Newtonian accretion model first proposed by Ulrich (1976). In exactly the same form as it occurs for the Newtonian case, the flow naturally predicts the existence of an equatorial rotating accretion disc about the hole. However, the radius of the disc increases monotonically without limit as the flow reaches its minimum allowed angular momentum for this particular model.

  6. Bayesian Automatic Classification Of HMI Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Beck, John G.

    2011-05-01

    The Bayesian automatic classification system known as "AutoClass" finds a set of class definitions based on a set of observed data and assigns data to classes without human supervision. It has been applied to Mt Wilson data to improve modeling of total solar irradiance variations (Ulrich, et al, 2010). We apply AutoClass to HMI observables to automatically identify regions of the solar surface. To prevent small instrument artifacts from interfering with class identification, we apply a flat-field correction and a rotationally shifted temporal average to the HMI images prior to processing with AutoClass. Additionally, the sensitivity of AutoClass to instrumental artifacts is investigated.

  7. The Animal Pathogen-Like Type III Secretion System is Required for the Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia mallei within J774.2 Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-30

    E -mail: Ricky.Ulrich @AMEDD.ARMY.MIL. 4349 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...counterbioterrorism. The Humana Press, Inc., Totowa, N.J. 4. DeShazer, D., D. M. Waag, D. L. Fritz, and D. E . Woods. 2001. Identification of a Burkholderia...Microb. Pathog. 30:253–269. 5. Galan, J. E . 2001. Salmonella interactions with host cells: type III secretion at work. Annu. Rev. Cell Dev. Biol. 17:53

  8. Stimulated Cerenkov-Raman Scattering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-14

    Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 3,253. 11. Coleman, P., and Enderby, C. (1960). J. AppI. Phys. 31, 1695. 12. Danos , M. ( 1953 ). J. Appl. Phys. 26,2. *1f 13...made by Coleman, by Danos , by Lashinsky,13 and by Ulrich.14 In these experiments, no provision was made for feeding back the emitted radia- I tion on...latio e ted ltiple Scattering’ * Pts. Is.; Vol. 8I(2), pp. 245-248. Jan. 11, 19S2. d . Jelly, J. V., Cerefo U diation nd its A liti rgqam sess, 1953

  9. Cerenkov Maser and Cerenkov Laser Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Nauk. SSSR 3,253. 11. Coleman, P., and Enderby, C. (1960). J. Appl. Phys. 31, 1695. 12. Danos , M. ( 1953 ). J. Appl. Phys. 26,2. 13. Lashinsky, H. (1956...by Danos , by Lashinsky, 1 3 and by Ulrich. 14 In these experiments, no provision was made for feeding back the emitted radia- tion on subsequent...Ginzburg, Dok. Akad. Nauk SSSR 56,253 (1947). 4M. Abele, Nouvo Cimento 9, 207 (1952). In conclusion, the above experiments have demonstrat- ’M. Danos , S

  10. Biting Deterrence and Insecticidal Activity of Hydrazide-Hydrazones and Their Corresponding 3-acetyl-2,5-disubstituted-2,3-dihydro-1,3,4-oxadiazoles Against Aedes aegypti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-11

    2,5-disubstituted-2,3-dihydro-1,3,4- oxadiazoles against Aedes aegypti Nurhayat Tabanca,a∗ Abbas Ali,a Ulrich R Bernier,b Ikhlas A Khan,a,c,d Bedia...biting deterrent and larvicidal activities against Aedes aegypti for the first time. RESULTS: The compound 3-acetyl-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-[4-(dimethylamino...phenyl]-2,3-dihydro-1,3,4-oxadiazole (17) produced the highest biting deterrent activity (BDI = 1.025) against Ae. Aegypti , followed by 4

  11. Honoring Jean-David Rochaix.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Redding, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    We honor Jean-David Rochaix, an outstanding scholar of chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthesis, who received the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research at its 17th International Photosynthesis Congress held in Maastricht, The Netherlands (August 5-12, 2016). With this award he joins other major discoverers in the field of photosynthesis: Pierre Joliot (of France, 2013); Ulrich W. Heber* (of Germany, 2010) and Kenneth Sauer (of USA, 2010); Jan M. Anderson* (of Australia, 2007); and Horst T. Witt* (of Germany, 2004). See "Appendix 1" for the list of those who have received the ISPR Communication, Innovation, Calvin-Benson, and Hill awards.

  12. [Risk also requires treatment].

    PubMed

    Hørby, Helle Rørbæk

    2014-06-09

    According to the sociologist Ulrich Beck we live in a risk society. Every day we are introduced to many risks which can only be seen by the help of science and are not immediately experienced by the individual. When the individual shall decide how to act on the screening results the statistical knowledge is inapt. The philosopher and theologian Peter Kemp points out that the mathematical calculus of probability does not take the risk of the individual into account. Ethically, our use of screening lacks considerations regarding contents of the good life.

  13. Property Predictions for Nitrate Salts with Nitroxy-Functionalized Cations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    unstable”* to be employed as rocket propellant ingredients (Dunn, 1952; Naoum and Ulrich , 1929; Medard, 1954; Urbanski, 1965). The EQBR and SERDP efforts...from models that combine the B3LYP hybrid functional ( Becke , 1993; Lee et al., 1988; Stephens et al., 1994; Vosko et al., 1980) with a 6-31+G(d,p), 6...1989, 122, 1963–1967. Becke , A. D. Density-Functional Thermochemistry. 3. The Role of Exact Exchange. Journal of Chemical Physics 1993, 98, 5648

  14. Risk and outbreak communication: lessons from alternative paradigms.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Risk communication guidelines widely used in public health are based on the psychometric paradigm of risk, which focuses on risk perception at the level of individuals. However, infectious disease outbreaks and other public health emergencies are more than public health events and occur in a highly charged political, social and economic environment. This study examines other sociological and cultural approaches from scholars such as Ulrich Beck and Mary Douglas for insights on how to communicate in such environments. It recommends developing supplemental tools for outbreak communication to deal with issues such as questions of blame and fairness in risk distribution and audiences who do not accept biomedical explanations of disease.

  15. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  16. STS-55 Payload Specialist Walter and backups at KSC Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter (center) discusses preflight procedures with backup payload specialists Dr. P. Gerhard Thiele (left) and Renate Brummer at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. The entire seven-member flight crew and the two alternates are learning pad procedures and structures during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Walter, Thiele, and Brummer are representatives for Germany's DLR. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-318.

  17. STS-55 German payload specialist Schlegel and MS3 Harris work in SL-D2 module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 German Payload Specialist 2 Ulrich Walter, wearing special head gear, finds plenty of room to 'spread out' (head to the floor, feet at the ceiling) while conducting Tissue Thickness and Compliance Along Body Axis salt-water balance experiment in the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Schlegel represents the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR). In the background, Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr monitors an experiment in Rack 11, an experiment rack.

  18. Electrocatalytic Reduction of Molecular Oxygen by Mononuclear and Binuclear Cobalt Phthalocyanines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    in activity may be attributed to electronic coupling between the phthalocyanine rings. 1 -- S~ 5d ’ ON .ALAdIL,_ e ~ 0; AaS7RACT 21 A8BSTRACT SEC...Wien Morris Plains, NJ 07950 AUSTRIA Dr. Ulrich StiumingDr. E . Yeager Department of Chemical EngineeringDepartment of Chemistry Columbia UniversityCase...Box 531 Baltimore, Maryland 21218 Baltimore, Maryland 21218 S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden Dr’. D. E . Irish Dr. John Owen Department of Chemistry Department

  19. Metrics of Justice. A Sundial's Nomological Figuration.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines a polyhedral dial from the British Museum made by the instrument maker Ulrich Schniep, and discusses the status of multifunctional scientific instruments. It discerns a multifaceted iconic meaning considering different dimensions such as scientific functionality (astronomy), the complex allegorical figure of Justice (iconography), and the representation of the sovereign (politics), the court and the Kunstkammer of Albrecht v of Bavaria. As a numen mixtum the figure of "Justicia" touches different fields that go far beyond pure astronomical measurement and represents the power of the ruler as well as the rules of economic justice.

  20. STS-55 MS1/PLC Ross and Payload Specialist Walter work in SL-D2 module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross floats near cycle ergometer and Rack 9 Anthrorack (AR) (Human Physiology Laboratory) as German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter reviews a checklist in front of Rack 11 Experiment Rack. These experiment stations and the crewmembers are in the shirt-sleeve environment of the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. In the background is the SL-D2 aft end cone. Behind Ross and Walter is Rack 12 Experiment Rack with Baroreflex (BA).

  1. STS-55 Columbia, OV-102, crew poses for onboard portrait in SL-D2 module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crewmembers pose for their traditional onboard (inflight) portrait in the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module. Front (left to right) are Pilot Terence T. Henricks, Commander Steven R. Nagel, German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, and Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt. In the rear (left to right) are MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, and MS1 and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross. Walter and Schlegel represent the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR).

  2. Interaction of Anchors with Soil and Anchor Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Cro7wn fluke 79 ank f LK j3 a STATO Mooring Ancoer a. placed on seafloor b. flukes keying C. in dense/stiff $@afloor d. in soft seafloor into seafloor 01o4...friction has been found to peak at pile embedment -20 diameter. -Recommnended value of f, for long piles compiled from Ehlers (1977), Angemeer (1975...Laboratory, PO No. M-R450. Port Hueneme, Calif., Oct 1978. Ehlers , C. J., and E. J. Ulrich, Jr. (1977). "Design criteria for grouted piles in sand," in

  3. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  4. COMMITTEES: SQM2004 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Organising Committee Jean Cleymans (Chairman) Zeblon Vilakazi Roger Fearick Peter Steinberg Rory Adams Bruce Becker Sarah Blyth Gareth de Vaux Heather Gray Mark Horner Nawahl Razak Artur Szostak Spencer Wheaton International Advisory Committee Federico Antinori Tim Hallman John Harris Tetsuo Hatsuda Ulrich Heinz Huan Z Huang Sonja Kabana Volker Koch Rob Lacey Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Maurizio Morando Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Josef Pochodzalla Johann Rafelski Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Georges Stephans Horst Stoecker Herbert Stroebele Thomas Ullrich Orlando Villalobos-Baillie Bill Zajc Joseph Zimanyi

  5. LC/MS/MS data analysis of the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig C.; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Burkin, Heather R.; Buxton, Iain L.O.

    2015-01-01

    The data described in this article is the subject of an article in the American Journal of Physiology: Cell Physiology, titled “The Human Uterine Smooth Muscle S-nitrosoproteome Fingerprint in Pregnancy, Labor, and Preterm Labor” (doi:10.1152/ajpcell.00198.2013) (Ulrich et al., 2013) [1]. The data described is a large scale mass spectrometry data set that defines the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome differences among laboring, non-laboring, preterm laboring tissue after treatment with S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:26322325

  6. Microdesigning of Lightweight/High Strength Ceramic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    pp. 199-204. Mat. Res. Sx). Symp. Proc., 32 Amsterdam: North-Hlolland. 23. See, e.g., Matijevic , E~. 1976. Progr. Coloid & Polymer Sd. 61:24-35. 24...Johnson, D,. W, 1987. Adv. Ceram. 21:3. 25. Matijevic , E. 1984. Ultrastructure Processing of Ceramics, Classes, and Composites, pp. 334-352. L. L...Ilench, 1). R. Ulrich, ed., New York: Wiley. 26. Matijevic , E. 1987. Personal communication. 27. Pak, S. F)88. M.S. Thesis. University of Washington

  7. [Theodor Kocher and Zurich].

    PubMed

    Ritzmann, K

    1992-01-01

    Theodor Kocher was linked to Zurich by many relationships. It was in this town that he spent his last semester at university, and his contacts with his teachers Friedrich Horner and Theodor Billroth were of some importance with regard to his election as a professor at Berne. Kocher was on friendly terms with his Zurich colleagues Rudolf Ulrich Krönlein and Ferdinand Sauerbruch. In spite of many common views, however, the two Swiss surgeons Kocher and Krönlein were not always of the same opinion.

  8. STS-55 crewmembers work in the SL-D2 module onboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Working in the shirt-sleeve research environment of the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module are STS-55 Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, and German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter. Ross examines sample tube at Rack 8 Werkstofflabor (WL) (left). Harris, holding his arm, waits to have his blood drawn by Schlegel (right). Wearing the baroreflex (BA) collar at Rack 12 Experiment Rack and waving is Walter. The SL-D2 module is located in the payload bay (PLB) of the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  9. STS-55 SL-D2 crew reviews preflight CEIT procedures in KSC conference room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) crewmembers, seated at a conference table, discuss Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) procedures in a briefing room at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). From left are Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, Commander Steven R. Nagel, MS3 Bernard J. Harris, Jr, German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, and MS2 Charles J. Precourt. Seated in the foreground are KSC technicians and payload integration officers. Walter and Schlegel are representatives from DLR. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-212.

  10. COMMITTEES: SQM2006 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Organising Committee Kenneth Barish Huan Zhong Huang Joseph Kapusta Grazyna Odyniec Johann Rafelski Charles A Whitten Jr International Advisory Committee Jörg Aichelin Federico Antinori Tamas Biró Jean Cleymans Lazlo Csernai Tim Hallman Ulrich Heinz Sonja Kabana Rob Lacey Yu-Gang Ma Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Johann Rafelski Hans Ritter Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Wen-Qing Shen Georges Stephans Horst Stöcker Thomas Ullrich Bill Zajc

  11. Stress exposure, food intake and emotional state.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Fulton, Stephanie; Wilson, Mark; Petrovich, Gorica; Rinaman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the proceedings of the symposium entitled, "Stress, Palatable Food and Reward", that was chaired by Drs. Linda Rinaman and Yvonne Ulrich-Lai at the 2014 Neurobiology of Stress Workshop held in Cincinnati, OH. This symposium comprised research presentations by four neuroscientists whose work focuses on the biological bases for complex interactions among stress, food intake and emotion. First, Dr Ulrich-Lai describes her rodent research exploring mechanisms by which the rewarding properties of sweet palatable foods confer stress relief. Second, Dr Stephanie Fulton discusses her work in which excessive, long-term intake of dietary lipids, as well as their subsequent withdrawal, promotes stress-related outcomes in mice. Third, Dr Mark Wilson describes his group's research examining the effects of social hierarchy-related stress on food intake and diet choice in group-housed female rhesus macaques, and compared the data from monkeys to results obtained in analogous work using rodents. Finally, Dr Gorica Petrovich discusses her research program that is aimed at defining cortical-amygdalar-hypothalamic circuitry responsible for curbing food intake during emotional threat (i.e. fear anticipation) in rats. Their collective results reveal the complexity of physiological and behavioral interactions that link stress, food intake and emotional state, and suggest new avenues of research to probe the impact of genetic, metabolic, social, experiential and environmental factors on these interactions.

  12. Stress Exposure, Food Intake, and Emotional State

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Fulton, Stephanie; Wilson, Mark; Petrovich, Gorica; Rinaman, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the proceedings of the symposium entitled, “Stress, Palatable Food and Reward”, that was chaired by Drs. Linda Rinaman and Yvonne Ulrich-Lai at the 2014 Neurobiology of Stress Workshop held in Cincinnati, OH. This symposium comprised research presentations by four neuroscientists whose work focuses on the biological bases for complex interactions among stress, food intake and emotion. First, Dr. Ulrich-Lai describes her rodent research exploring mechanisms by which the rewarding properties of sweet palatable foods confer stress relief. Second, Dr. Stephanie Fulton discusses her work in which excessive, long-term intake of dietary lipids, as well as their subsequent withdrawal, promotes stress-related outcomes in mice. Third, Dr. Mark Wilson describes his group’s research examining the effects of social hierarchy-related stress on food intake and diet choice in group-housed female rhesus macaques, and compared the data from monkeys to results obtained in analogous work using rodents. Lastly, Dr. Gorica Petrovich discusses her research program that is aimed at defining cortical–amygdalar–hypothalamic circuitry responsible for curbing food intake during emotional threat (i.e., fear anticipation) in rats. Their collective results reveal the complexity of physiological and behavioral interactions that link stress, food intake and emotional state, and suggest new avenues of research to probe the impact of genetic, metabolic, social, experiential, and environmental factors. PMID:26303312

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report July-September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2000, begins with an article by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, O. Gotchev, J. P. Knauer, D. D. Meyerhofer, D. Oron, S. P. Regan, Y. Srebro, W. Seka, D. Shvarts, S. Skupsky, and V.A. Smalyuk, who describe measurements of the effect of beam smoothing and pulse shape on imprinting. (Imprinting is defined as the imposition of pressure perturbations on the target by spatial variations in the laser intensity.) A principal result is the observation of reduced levels of imprint with the higher beam smoothing afforded by 1-THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Additional highlights of research presented in this issue are: (1) P. W. McKenty, V. N. Goncharov, R. P. J. Town, S. Skupsky, R. Betti, and R. L. McCrory describe calculations of directly driven ignition capsule performance on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The authors detail how the various contributors to implosion disruption (laser imprint, power imbalance, and target roughness) affect target performance and final gain. The conclusions are obtained by examining the simulated target evolution with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics computer code ORCHID. (2) D. D. Meyerhofer, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. Yu. Glebov, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. Keck, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, F. J. Marshall, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, S. Roberts, W. Seka, S. Skupsky, V. A. Smalyuk, C. Sorce, C. Stoeckl, J. M. Soures, R. P. J. Town, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel, J. Frenje, C. K. L1,R. D. Petrasso, F. Seguin, K. Fletcher, S. Padalino, C. Freeman, N. Izumi, R. Lerche, T. W. Phillips, and T. C. Sangster describe the results of a series of direct-drive implosions of gas-fusion-fuel-filled plastic shells performed on the OMEGA laser system. The experiments include those performed with 1-THZ SSD and high-quality power balance. (3) V. Yu. Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, C. Stoeckl, and J. D. Zuegel describe the technique of measuring secondary neutron yield (DT neutron yield from D

  14. The “particle” flux: Origins and biological components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Mary W.; Gowing, Marcia M.

    Sedimentation of organic matter from the ocean's surface layers is intimately tied to biological events within the euphotic zone. Although the sedimentation rate is usually found to be positively correlated with primary production, the biological basis for the correlation is not well understood. In eutrophic environments, algal populations or large fecal pellets can account for high mass fluxes. The types of particles leaving oligotrophic systems, in contrast, are less clear. Similarly, various mechanisms have been invoked to explain the loss of particles with depth, but little direct evidence is available to distinguish among the possibilities. The fundamental causes of differences in export rates and of the rapid loss of particles at depth, however, will be reflected in the changing composition of particles across a productivity gradient and down through the water column. We have attempted to investigate the biological processes leading to the productivity-flux relationship and the depth-related losses, using VERTEX samples from particle interceptor traps deployed in the Northeastern Pacific between 1980 and 1984. We found the previously reported correlation between production and flux in the VERTEX data set ( PACE, KNAUER, KARL and MARTIN, 1987) to result from related changes in intact and presumably living organisms in trap samples, not from non-living particles. The production-flux correlation depended, however, entirely on results from an upwelling station: when data from this station were excluded, no pattern was observed among the remaining 6 stations. Phytoplankton flux at the base of the euphotic zone was likewise significantly correlated with primary production, and the relationship persisted even after data from the upwelling station were removed. Important live contributors to traps also included sarcodine protozoans (foraminiferans and radiolarians), eggs of invertebrates, and invertebrate larvae too small to be removed as “swimmers”. (The present

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions with Seeded Magnetic Fields on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments applying laser-driven magnetic-flux compression to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to enhance the fuel-assembly performance are described. Spherical CH targets filled with 10 atm of deuterium gas were imploded by the OMEGA laser in polar-drive geometry. The targets were embedded with an 80-kG magnetic seed field. Upon laser irradiation, the high-implosion velocities and ionization of the target fill lead to trapping of the magnetic field inside the capsule and its amplification through flux compression to up to tens of megagauss. At such strong magnetic fields, the hot spot inside a spherical target becomes strongly magnetized, reducing the heat losses through electron confinement. The experimentally observed ion temperature was enhanced by 15% and the neutron yield was increased by 30%, compared to nonmagnetized implosions. This represents the first experimental verification of performance enhancement resulting from embedding a strong magnetic field into an ICF capsule. The compressed field was probed via proton deflectometry using the 14.7-MeV protons generated in the D+3He fusion reactions from a laser-imploded glass microballoon. Experimental data for the fuel-assembly performance and magnetic field are compared to numerical results from combining the 1-D hydrodynamics code LILAC with a 2-D, azimuthal symmetry MHD postprocessor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with P.-Y. Chang, G. Fiksel, J. P. Knauer, R. Betti, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester), and F. H. Séguin and R. D. Petrasso (PSFC, MIT).

  16. T(t,2n)4He Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Dennis; Bacher, Andy; Brune, Carl; Caggiano, Jac; Gatu-Johnson, Maria; Sayre, Dan; ICF Stellar Rates Team

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the T(t,2n)4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in ICF implosions at the NIF and OMEGA facilities. Neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer. The nTOF spectra represent a significant improvement in energy resolution and statistics over previous measurements, and afford the first definitive observation of a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint resulting from sequential decay through the ground state of 5He at low reaction energies Ecm < 100 keV. However, most of the TT reaction produces a broad neutron spectrum from 0-9.5 MeV. To describe the spectrum, an R-matrix model that accounts for interferences from fermion symmetry and intermediate states has been developed. This model can describe the entire spectrum via sequential decay through l = 1 states in 5He, which differs from previous interpretations. Work is in collaboration with V. Yu Glebov, R. Hatarik, D. L. Bleuel, D. T. Casey, C. J. Cerjan, M. J. Eckart, R. J. Fortner, J. A. Frenje, G. P. Grim, C. Hagmann, J. P. Knauer, J. L. Kline, J. M. McNaney, J. M. Mintz, M. J. Moran, A. Nikroo, T. Phillips, J. E. Pino, B. A. Remington, D. P. Rowley, D. H. Schneider, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Stoeffl, R. E. Tipton, S. V. Weber, C. B. Yeamans, C. K. Li, M. J.-E. Manuel, D. D. Meyerhofer, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, T. C. Sangster, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, and A. B. Zylstra.

  17. Gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana: violation of the sine- and resultant-law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Paul

    We investigated the gravitropic bending of hypocotyls and roots of seedlings of Arabidopsis tha-liana in response to long-term centrifugal accelerations in a range of 5 x 10-3 to 4 x g. The so-cal-led resultant law of gravitropism, a corollary of the so called sine law, claims that during centri-fugation a gravitropic organ aligns itself parallel to the resultant stimulus vector. We show here that neither of the two empirical “laws” is apt to describe the complex gravitropic behaviour of seedlings of Arabidopsis. Hypocotyls obey reasonably well the resultant law while roots display a complex behaviour that is clearly at variance with it. Horizontally centrifuged seedlings sense minute accelerations acting parallel to the longitudinal axis. If the centrifugal vector points to-ward the cotyledons, then the bending of hypocotyls and roots is greatly enhanced. If the centri-fugal vector points, however, toward the root tip, then only the bending of roots is enhanced by accelerations as low as 5 x 10-3 x g (positive tonic effect). The absolute gravitropic thresholds were determined for hypocotyls and roots in a clinostat-centrifuge and found to be near 1.5 x 10-2 x g. A behavioural mutant, ehb1-2 (Knauer et al. 2011), displays a lower gravitropic threshold for roots, not however, for hypocotyls. The complex gravitropic behaviour of seedlings of Arabi-dopsis is at odds with the classical sine- as well as the resultant law and can indicates the eminent role that is played by the acceleration vector operating longitudinally to the seedling axis.

  18. 'Small change of the universal': beyond modernity?

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Sarat

    2010-09-01

    The paper is a sounding of Ulrich Beck's and Edgar Grande's conceptual map of the varieties of second modernity - Western and Non-Western, European and beyond - that makes up today's world. Their mapping is examined in the light of two, striking analytical perspectives associated with Ulrich Beck: everyday 'cosmopolitization' and his call for a methodological cosmopolitanism. A line of inquiry explores whether contemporary modernities are essentially expressions of a single, underlying modernization drive or whether they are utterly disparate entities. The implications of treating them as 'variants and variations' are unpacked with reference to musical models and how they generate difference. The probe into methodological cosmopolitanism touches on 'de-provincialization' that is somewhat at odds with the postcolonial project of 'provincializing' Europe. It looks at the attempt to go beyond 'nation-bound' sociological dualisms in determining the appropriate 'unit of analysis' for our ever-morphing current reality. Does this imply engaging with 'singularity'- with a mode of conceptualization that sidesteps the universal/particular couple and related either/or thinking? References to the making of the 'first modernity' under unequal centre/periphery relations of colonial power are aired for possible lessons in mappings of the second. Ulrich Beck's 'impure, really-existing cosmopolitanism'- in contrast to its speculative counterpart derived from the realm of pure ideas - springs from humdrum global economic and political links and institutions that span out across, above and beyond the 'container of the national space'. With the inadvertent cosmopolitical impact of the migrations it amounts in practice to a functioning 'cosmopolitan realpolitik'. Is there room for it to develop or will it stall as a mere front for national, tribal-territorial interests - going the way of 'multiculturalism and diversity' that seem increasingly to serve as governmental ideologies for

  19. A probabilistic estimate of maximum acceleration in rock in the contiguous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore; Perkins, David M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a probabilistic estimate of the maximum ground acceleration to be expected from earthquakes occurring in the contiguous United States. It is based primarily upon the historic seismic record which ranges from very incomplete before 1930 to moderately complete after 1960. Geologic data, primarily distribution of faults, have been employed only to a minor extent, because most such data have not been interpreted yet with earthquake hazard evaluation in mind.The map provides a preliminary estimate of the relative hazard in various parts of the country. The report provides a method for evaluating the relative importance of the many parameters and assumptions in hazard analysis. The map and methods of evaluation described reflect the current state of understanding and are intended to be useful for engineering purposes in reducing the effects of earthquakes on buildings and other structures.Studies are underway on improved methods for evaluating the relativ( earthquake hazard of different regions. Comments on this paper are invited to help guide future research and revisions of the accompanying map.The earthquake hazard in the United States has been estimated in a variety of ways since the initial effort by Ulrich (see Roberts and Ulrich, 1950). In general, the earlier maps provided an estimate of the severity of ground shaking or damage but the frequency of occurrence of the shaking or damage was not given. Ulrich's map showed the distribution of expected damage in terms of no damage (zone 0), minor damage (zone 1), moderate damage (zone 2), and major damage (zone 3). The zones were not defined further and the frequency of occurrence of damage was not suggested. Richter (1959) and Algermissen (1969) estimated the ground motion in terms of maximum Modified Mercalli intensity. Richter used the terms "occasional" and "frequent" to characterize intensity IX shaking and Algermissen included recurrence curves for various parts of the country in the paper

  20. Mediating subpolitics in US and UK science news.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The development of therapeutic cloning research sparked a scientific controversy pitting patients' hopes for cures against religious and anti-abortion opposition. The present study investigates this controversy by examining the production and content of Anglo-American print media coverage of the branch of embryonic stem cell research known as "therapeutic cloning." Data collection included press articles about therapeutic cloning (n = 5,185) and qualitative interviews with journalists (n = 18). Patient activists and anti-abortion groups emerged as key news sources in this coverage. Significant qualitative differences in the mediation of these subpolitical groups and their arguments for and against therapeutic cloning are identified. Results suggest that the perceived human interest news value of narratives of patient suffering may give patient advocacy groups a privileged position in journalistic coverage. Finally, Ulrich Beck's theoretical arguments about subpolitics are critically applied to the results to elicit further insights.

  1. ESCIMO.spread - a spreadsheet-based point snow surface energy balance model to calculate hourly snow water equivalent and melt rates for historical and changing climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, U.; Marke, T.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the spreadsheet-based point energy balance model ESCIMO.spread which simulates the energy and mass balance as well as melt rates of a snow surface. The model makes use of hourly recordings of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, global and longwave radiation. The effect of potential climate change on the seasonal evolution of the snow cover can be estimated by modifying the time series of observed temperature and precipitation by means of adjustable parameters. Model output is graphically visualized in hourly and daily diagrams. The results compare well with weekly measured snow water equivalent (SWE). The model is easily portable and adjustable, and runs particularly fast: hourly calculation of a one winter season is instantaneous on a standard computer. ESICMO.spread can be obtained from the authors on request (contact: ulrich.strasser@uni-graz.at).

  2. Time-course analysis of temporal preparation on central processes.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Tanja; Bratzke, Daniel; Schröter, Hannes; Ulrich, Rolf

    2012-03-01

    Participants usually respond faster to a response signal (RS) when this signal is preceded by a warning stimulus than when it is not. A question of theoretical importance is the locus of this facilitating effect within the information processing stream. Recently, Los and Schut (Cogn Psychol 57:20-55, 2008) suggested that temporal preparation acts on central processes while perception of the RS is under way. The present study provides a stochastic model (central preparation model, CPM) based on this hypothesis and presents three experiments testing this model. To track the complete time-course of temporal preparation, the warning signal could either precede or follow the RS. The data show some systematic deviation from the model's predictions, questioning CPM's assumption that temporal preparation acts only on central processes. An alternative mechanism of temporal preparation based on the parallel grains model [Miller and Ulrich (Cogn Psychol 46:101-151, 2003)] is discussed.

  3. The kinematics of the high velocity bipolar nebulae NGC 6537 and HB 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; Schwarz, Hugo E.

    1993-03-01

    The velocity structure of the bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6537 and Hb 5 has been investigated by means of medium dispersion long slit spectra. We have derived kinematical parameters and the deprojected shapes of the two nebulae by applying the kinematical model introduced by Solf and Ulrich (1985). In the direction of the polar axis of the nebulae, the deprojected expansion velocity is computed to be 300 km/s for NGC 6537 and about 250 km/s for Hb 5. These are very high velocities, but not unusual in the class of bipolar nebulae. The observed shapes and the velocity fields, in particular the one of Hb 5, are nicely reproduced by the interacting winds models by Icke et al. (1989). These imply a strongly aspherical initial mass distribution, i.e. equatorial to polar density contrasts larger than five. We espouse the idea that these initial conditions are created in interacting binary systems.

  4. Universal and scaled relaxation of interacting magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Sahoo, S.; Kleemann, W.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2004-11-01

    The logarithmic relaxation rate of the thermoremanent magnetic moment m(t) of interacting magnetic nanoparticles in discontinuous Co80Fe20/Al2O3 multilayers follows a universal power law, whose exponent n increases with increasing particle concentration as predicted by recent simulations [Ulrich , Phys. Rev. B 67, 024416 (2003)]. While n<1 characterizes the stretched exponential decay of the dilute superspin glass (SSG) regime, n>1 refers to algebraic decay with finite remanence for t→∞ as observed in more concentrated superferromagnets (SFM). In the crossover regime from SSG to SFM, an increase from n<1 at low temperature to n>1 at T⪅Tc violates Tln(t/τ0) scaling and seems to indicate a crossover from random-field domain state to SFM behavior.

  5. Accretion model of a rotating gas sphere onto a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, S.; Huerta, E. A.

    2008-04-01

    We construct a simple accretion model of a rotating pressureless gas sphere onto a Schwarzschild black hole. Far away from the hole, the flow is assumed to rotate as a rigid body. We show how to build analytic solutions in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. This construction represents a general relativistic generalization of the Newtonian accretion model first proposed by Ulrich (1976). In exactly the same form as it occurs for the Newtonian case, the flow naturally predicts the existence of an equatorial rotating accretion disk about the hole. However, the radius of the disk increases monotonically without limit as the flow reaches the angular momentum corresponding to the maximum limit allowed by the model.

  6. Testing solar models with global solar oscillations in the 5-minute band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Frequencies of solar oscillation for normal modes described by spherical harmonics with l-values between 0 and 4 are computed. The method of computation is discussed and some of the theoretical uncertainties are examined. It is shown that the standard solar model has eigenfrequencies which do not agree with the frequencies observed for the low l-modes to within the estimated accuracy of either the observed or theoretical frequencies. Four non-standard models are considered: (1) the interior Z abundance is lower than the surface abundance; (2) the interior Z abundance is higher than the surface abundance; (3) the interior Z abundance is altered by mixing; and (4) a large primordial magnetic field remains in the solar core. The effect of all these models on the solar neutrino flux is considered, with the result that the high-Z model is rejected. The conclusions of Bahcall and Ulrich (1971) that a primordial magnetic field increases the neutrino flux are disputed.

  7. DLs in reminder and 2AFC tasks: data and models.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    García-Pérez and Alcalá-Quintana (2010) dispute the conclusion of Lapid, Ulrich, and Rammsayer (2008) that the two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) task yields meaningfully larger estimates of the difference limen (DL) than does the reminder task. García-Pérez and Alcalá-Quintana overlook, however, fundamental properties of 2AFC psychometric functions and Type B order errors in their reanalysis. In addition, their favored theory (i.e., the difference model with guessing) does not provide a plausible account for why the 2AFC task tends to yield larger DLs (by about 50%) than does the reminder task. In trying to clarify these issues, I hope to advance the proper assessment of discrimination performance in 2AFC tasks.

  8. Solar Implications of ULYSSES Interplanetary Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Recent observations by the Ulysses magnetometer team have shown that the strength of the radial interplanetary field component, |Br| , is essentially independent of latitude, a result which implies that the heliospheric currents are confined entirely to thin sheets. Using such a current sheet model, we extrapolate the observed photospheric field to 1 AU and compare the predicted magnitude and sign of Br with spacecraft measurements during 1970--1993. Approximate agreement can be obtained if the solar magnetograph measurements in the Fe I lambda 5250 line are scaled upward by a latitude-dependent factor, similar to that derived by Ulrich from a study of magnetic saturation effects. The correction factor implies sharply peaked polar fields near sunspot minimum, with each polar coronal hole having a mean field strength of 10 G.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  10. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  11. Current topics on inhibitors of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-07-01

    There are a variety of chemicals which regulate the functions of bacterial and mitochondrial complex I. Some of them, such as rotenone and piericidin A, have been indispensable molecular tools in mechanistic studies on complex I. A large amount of experimental data characterizing the actions of complex I inhibitors has been accumulated so far. Recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of entire complex I may be helpful to carefully interpret this data. We herein focused on recent hot topics on complex I inhibitors and the subjects closely connected to these inhibitors, which may provide useful information not only on the structural and functional aspects of complex I, but also on drug design targeting this enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  12. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  13. Beck, individualization and the death of class: a critique.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Will

    2007-09-01

    Ulrich Beck has argued that the changing logic of distribution and, more importantly, the 'individualization' of social processes in reflexive modernity have killed off the concept of social class and rendered the analysis of its effects a flawed endeavour. The present paper takes issue with this perspective by exposing its key weaknesses, namely its ambivalence and contradiction over what exactly constitutes individualization and the extent to which it has really displaced class, its inconsistent and caricaturized description of what actually constitutes class, its erroneous and unsatisfactory depiction of class analysis, and its self-defeating reasoning on the motors of individualization. The intention is not to conservatively deny that social change is occurring nor to advocate any particular model of class, but only to illustrate the aporias of Beck's position with the aim of vindicating the enterprise of class analysis.

  14. Beck, Asia and second modernity.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Craig

    2010-09-01

    The work of Ulrich Beck has been important in bringing sociological attention to the ways issues of risk are embedded in contemporary globalization, in developing a theory of 'reflexive modernization', and in calling for social science to transcend 'methodological nationalism'. In recent studies, he and his colleagues help to correct for the Western bias of many accounts of cosmopolitanism and reflexive modernization, and seek to distinguish normative goals from empirical analysis. In this paper I argue that further clarification of this latter distinction is needed but hard to reach within a framework that still embeds the normative account in the idea that empirical change has a clear direction. Similar issues beset the presentation of diverse patterns in recent history as all variants of 'second modernity'. Lastly, I note that ironically, given the declared 'methodological cosmopolitanism' of the authors, the empirical studies here all focus on national cases.

  15. Toxic waste in our midst: towards an interdisciplinary analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Intractable industrial legacies present new challenges to governance. Amongst the persistent organic pollutants, now managed internationally under the Stockholm Convention, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) stands out in all three classes of chemicals (pesticides, industrial chemicals and unintended by-products). This paper introduces twelve interdisciplinary papers contributing to our understanding of decision-making processes using a case study of HCB and industry-community relations in Sydney's industrial heartland. In this collection, authors align new political theory and emerging management theory, and they analyse the case study from several disciplines. Disputes such as that over HCB destablilise the political/administrative/technoscientific regime that is the modern state. Citizens engage in 'sub-political' processes which require recognition of what Ulrich Beck and others have termed 'individualisation'. This sees decision-forming and decision-making functions push outwards into community-driven structures. There we find new styles of public participation, resolution of asymmetries between knowledge and expertise, and new corporate behaviour.

  16. Freedom's Children: A Gender Perspective on the Education of the Learner-Citizen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnot, Madeleine

    2006-03-01

    Drawing on Ulrich Beck's theory of "freedom's children", the present contribution examines contemporary concerns about educating young people for citizenship as well as educating them about citizenship. Under the first theme, the author focuses on the citizen as learner, highlighting some of the gender- and class-related inequalities that are typically associated with individualisation. Under the second theme, she looks at the learner as citizen in view of the fact that citizenship education courses often prepare learners for a gender-divided world - even though the processes of individualisation have themselves significantly reshaped contemporary gender relations. In light of current challenges facing citizenship education, the study concludes by reflecting on gender-related dimensions of individualisation and their implications for democracy and the learner-citizen.

  17. Freedom's Children: A gender perspective on the education of the learner-citizen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnot, Madeleine

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on Ulrich Beck's theory of "freedom's children", the present contribution examines contemporary concerns about educating young people for citizenship as well as educating them about citizenship. Under the first theme, the author focuses on the citizen as learner, highlighting some of the gender- and class-related inequalities that are typically associated with individualisation. Under the second theme, she looks at the learner as citizen in view of the fact that citizenship education courses often prepare learners for a gender-divided world — even though the processes of individualisation have themselves significantly reshaped contemporary gender relations. In light of current challenges facing citizenship education, the study concludes by reflecting on gender-related dimensions of individualisation and their implications for democracy and the learner-citizen.

  18. Cell scientist to watch - Christian Behrends.

    PubMed

    2016-08-15

    Christian Behrends studied biology at the University of Konstanz in Germany, but did his Diploma thesis externally with Michael Ehrmann in the School of Bioscience at Cardiff University, UK. He then pursued his PhD degree in Franz-Ulrich Hartl's group at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. For his postdoctoral work Christian received a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung, with which he moved to the US and joined the laboratory of J. Wade Harper at Harvard Medical School. In 2011, he received an Emmy Noether Research Grant from the German Research Foundation (DFG) and started his own independent group at the Medical School of Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. He is also a recipient of an ERC starting grant. Research in Christian's lab is focused on the basic mechanisms of autophagy, particularly concentrating on the role of ubiquitin signalling in autophagy, and the crosstalk between autophagy and other vesicular trafficking pathways.

  19. Physical activity measurement among individuals with disabilities: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Carlos M; Porretta, David L

    2010-07-01

    This review examined the literature on physical activity measurement among individuals with disabilities utilizing Yun and Ulrich's (2002) view on measurement validity. Specific inclusion criteria were identified. The search produced 115 articles; however, only 28 met all specified criteria. Findings revealed that self-reports and accelerometers were the most common approaches to measuring physical activity, and individuals with orthopedic impairments, those with mental retardation, and those with other health impairments received the most attention. Of the 28 articles, 17 (61%) reported validity and reliability evidence. Among those studies reporting validity, criterion-related evidence was the most common; however, a number of methodological limitations relative to validity were observed. Given the importance of using multiple physical activity measures, only five (18%) studies reported the use of multiple measures. Findings are discussed relative to conducting future physical activity research on persons with disabilities.

  20. Unraveling the complexity of mitochondrial complex I assembly: A dynamic process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Nijtmans, Leo

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian complex I is composed of 44 different subunits and its assembly requires at least 13 specific assembly factors. Proper function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme is of crucial importance for cell survival due to its major participation in energy production and cell signaling. Complex I assembly depends on the coordination of several crucial processes that need to be tightly interconnected and orchestrated by a number of assembly factors. The understanding of complex I assembly evolved from simple sequential concept to the more sophisticated modular assembly model describing a convoluted process. According to this model, the different modules assemble independently and associate afterwards with each other to form the final enzyme. In this review, we aim to unravel the complexity of complex I assembly and provide the latest insights in this fundamental and fascinating process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  1. Refuse and the ‘Risk Society’: The Political Ecology of Risk in Inter-war Britain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Timothy; Bulmer, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This article responds to current critiques of Ulrich Beck's ‘risk society’ thesis by historians of science and medicine. Those who have engaged with the concept of risk society have been content to accept the fundamental categories of Beck's analysis. In contrast, we argue that Beck's risk society thesis underplays two key themes. First, the role of capitalist social relations as the driver of technological change and the transformation of everyday life; and second, the ways in which hegemonic discourses of risk can be appropriated and transformed by counter-hegemonic forces. In place of ‘risk society’, we propose an approach based upon a ‘political ecology of risk’, which emphasises the social relations that are fundamental to the everyday politics of environmental health. PMID:24771975

  2. Identifying and Addressing Stakeholder Interests in Design Science Research: An Analysis Using Critical Systems Heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venable, John R.

    This paper utilises the Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) framework developed by Werner Ulrich to critically consider the stakeholders and design goals that should be considered as relevant by researchers conducing Design Science Research (DSR). CSH provides a philosophically and theoretically grounded framework and means for critical consideration of the choices of stakeholders considered to be relevant to any system under design consideration. The paper recommends that legitimately undertaken DSR should include witnesses to represent the interests of the future consumers of the outcomes of DSR, i.e., the future clients, decision makers, professionals, and other non-included stakeholders in the future use of the solution technologies to be invented in DSR. The paper further discusses options for how witnesses might be included, who should be witnessed for and obstacles to implementing the recommendations.

  3. STS-55 MS1/PLC Ross monitors Payload Specialist Walter's Anthrorack activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter breathes into Rack 9 Anthrorack (AR) (Human Physiology Laboratory) device for Pulmonary Perfusion and Ventilation During Rest and Exercise experiment while working inside the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Seated on the bicycle ergometer, Walter utilizes the respiratory monitoring system, part of a broad battery of experiments designed to investigate human physiology under microgravity conditions. In the background, Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross monitors Walter's activity. Walter represents the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) on the 10-day SL-D2 mission. Visible on the aft end cone are a fire extinguisher and the Crew Telesupport Experiment (CTE) Macintosh portable computer mounted on an adjustable work platform.

  4. STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab D2 Official crew portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, crewmembers, wearing their launch and entry suits (LESs), pose for their Official crew portrait. Five NASA astronauts and two German payload specialists, assigned to fly aboard OV-102 in support of Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2), are pictured. On the front row (left to right) are Pilot Terence T. Henricks (holding launch and entry helmet (LEH)), Commander Steven R. Nagel (holding crew insignia), and Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt (holding LEH). In the back are (left to right) MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, and Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter. In the background are the United States and German flags. Portrait made by NASA JSC contract photographer Robert L. Walck.

  5. Is the cosmopolitanization of science emerging in China?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joy Yueyue

    2013-01-01

    China is one among many other countries that have recognised the necessity in aligning national scientific progress with that of global development. As China is striding along the path of scientific development with determination and initial success, a key concern confronted by international scientific community is how China, a rising scientific power, will transform existing global scientific atlas. Based on a project carried out in six Chinese cities between 2006 to 2009, this paper mainly employs Ulrich Beck’s cosmopolitan theory in examining China’s life sciences’ development in the last decade to investigate how Chinese stakeholders have developed a (cosmopolitan) sensibility to rival ways of scientific reasoning, and in what way, Chinese stakeholders have contributed to the cosmopolitanization of science. PMID:24244045

  6. Phonon-dressed Mollow triplet in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics: excitation-induced dephasing and nonperturbative cavity feeding effects.

    PubMed

    Roy, C; Hughes, S

    2011-06-17

    We study the resonance fluorescence spectra of a driven quantum dot placed inside a high-Q semiconductor cavity and interacting with an acoustic phonon bath. The dynamics is calculated using a time-convolutionless master equation in the polaron frame. We predict pronounced spectral broadening of the Mollow sidebands through off-resonant cavity emission which, for small cavity-coupling rates, increases quadratically with the Rabi frequency in direct agreement with recent experiments using semiconductor micropillars [S. M. Ulrich et al., preceding Letter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 247402 (2011)]. We also demonstrate that, surprisingly, phonon coupling actually helps resolve signatures of the elusive second rungs of the Jaynes-Cummings ladder states via off-resonant cavity feeding. Both multiphonon and multiphoton effects are shown to play a qualitatively important role on the fluorescence spectra.

  7. STS-55 crew examines emergency egress system (slidewire) mechanism at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) crewmembers examine emergency egress system (slidewire) mechanism and listen to training instructor's briefing on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) tower 39A. In the slidewire basket (litter) are Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel (left) and Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt. On either side of the basket are (left to right) Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, MS1 and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross (kneeling), Commander Steven R. Nagel, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, the instructor, and MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr. Schlegel and Walter are representatives for Germany's DLR. The crewmembers are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-316.

  8. Refuse and the 'Risk Society': The Political Ecology of Risk in Inter-war Britain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Timothy; Bulmer, Sarah

    2013-05-01

    This article responds to current critiques of Ulrich Beck's 'risk society' thesis by historians of science and medicine. Those who have engaged with the concept of risk society have been content to accept the fundamental categories of Beck's analysis. In contrast, we argue that Beck's risk society thesis underplays two key themes. First, the role of capitalist social relations as the driver of technological change and the transformation of everyday life; and second, the ways in which hegemonic discourses of risk can be appropriated and transformed by counter-hegemonic forces. In place of 'risk society', we propose an approach based upon a 'political ecology of risk', which emphasises the social relations that are fundamental to the everyday politics of environmental health.

  9. Lyapunov exponent and surrogation analysis of patterns of variability: profiles in new walkers with and without down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Beth A; Stergiou, Nick; Ulrich, Beverly D

    2010-01-01

    In previous studies we found that preadolescents with Down syndrome (DS) produce higher amounts of variability (Smith et al., 2007) and larger Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values (indicating more instability) during walking than their peers with typical development (TD) (Buzzi & Ulrich, 2004). Here we use nonlinear methods to examine the patterns that characterize gait variability as it emerges, in toddlers with TD and with DS, rather than after years of practice. We calculated Lyapunov exponent (LyE) values to assess stability of leg trajectories. We also tested the use of 3 algorithms for surrogation analysis to investigate mathematical periodicity of toddlers' strides. Results show that toddlers' LyE values were not different between groups or with practice and strides of both groups become more periodic with practice. The underlying control strategies are not different between groups at this point in developmental time, although control strategies do diverge between the groups by preadolescence.

  10. Pyroelectricity in Polycrystalline Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, R.; Jiménez, B.

    The first reference to pyroelectric effect is by Theophrastus in 314 BC, who noted that tourmaline becomes charged because it attracted bits of straw and ash when heated. Tourmaline's properties were reintroduced in Europe in 1707 by Johann George Schmidt, who also noted the attractive properties of the mineral when heated. Pyroelectricity was first described by Louis Lemery in 1717. In 1747, Linnaeus first related the phenomenon to electricity, although this was not proven until 1756 by Franz Ulrich Thodor Aepinus. In 1824, Sir David Brewster gave the effect the name it has today. William Thomson in 1878 and Voight in 1897 helped develop a theory for the processes behind pyroelectricity. Pierre Curie and his brother, Jacques Curie, studied pyroelectricity in the 1880s, leading to their discovery of some of the mechanisms behind piezoelectricity.

  11. Nucularcidae: A new family of palaeotaxodont Ordovician pelecypods (Mollusca) from North America and Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J.; Stott, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The new Ordovician palaeotaxodont family Nucularcidae and the new genus Nucularca are described. Included in Nucularca are four previously described species that have taxodont dentition: N. cingulata (Ulrich) (the type species), N. pectunculoides (Hall), N. lorrainensis (Foerste), and N. gorensis (Foerste). All four species are of Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian; Katian) age and occur in eastern Canada and the northeastern USA. Ctenodonta borealis Foerste is regarded as a subjective synonym of Nucularca lorrainensis. No new species names are proposed. The Nucularcidae includes the genera Nucularca and Sthenodonta Pojeta and Gilbert-Tomlinson (1977). Sthenodonta occurs in central Australia in rocks of Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) age. The 12 family group names previously proposed for Ordovician palaeotaxodonts having taxodont dentition are reviewed and evaluated in the Appendix. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  12. STS-55 SL-D2 crew poses in front of ET/SRB at KSC Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) crewmembers pose for a group portrait in front of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. Towering above them in the background are the external tank (ET) and solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Wearing flight coveralls are (left to right) Mission Specialist 2 (MS) Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, Commander Steven R. Nagel, German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, MS1 and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, and MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr. The crew is at KSC for the Terminal Countdown Demostration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-319.

  13. STS-55 crew and backups listen to emergency egress briefing on KSC LC tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) crewmembers and backup (alternate) payload specialists listen to emergency egress system briefing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. Clockwise from the lower right corner are backup Payload Specialist Renate Brummer, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt, Commander Steven R. Nagel, backup Payload Specialist Dr. P. Gerhard Thiele, MS1 and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, Pilot Terence T. Henricks, MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel, and Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter. Other members of the ground team look on. Brummer, Thiele, Schlegel, and Walter are representatives of Germany's DLR. The crew and two alternates are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-314.

  14. STS-55 SL-D2 crew, in LESs, rehearse launch procedures during TCDT at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), depart the Operations and Checkout (O and C) Building for Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. Leading the way are Pilot Terence T. Henricks (left) and Commander Steven R. Nagel; behind them are, from left Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt, MS3 Bernard A. Harris, Jr, MS1 and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross, German Payload Specialist 1 Ulrich Walter, and German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel. This is the final portion of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch which cumulates with a simulated T-0. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-93PC-310.

  15. [Analysis of the continuity, circulation and productivity of the Revista Española de Quimioterapia].

    PubMed

    Gimeno Sieres, E

    2007-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare some of the bibliometric indicators of the continuity, circulation and productivity of the Revista Espanola de Quimioterapia up to 2003 with other spanish journals of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. This was done by reviewing periodicals directories, such as the ISSN (International Standard Serial Number/Número Internacional Normalizado de Publicaciones Seriadas) and ULRICH'S (Periodicals Directory), as well as the CDU (Classification Universal Decimal), national and international databases including IME (Indice Médico Español), ICYT (Indice Espanol de Ciencia y Tecnologia), IPA (International Pharmaceutical Abstracts), SCI Expanded (Science Citation Index Expanded), MEDLINE (Index Medicus), EMBASE (Excerpta Medica), BIOSIS PREVIEWS, ANALYTICAL ABSTRACTS, FSTA (Food Science and Technology Abstracts), SCIFINDER SCHOLAR and CHEMISTRY CITATION INDEX. According to the results, the Revista Española de Quimioterapia, in publication for 15 years, is widely distributed and has a good rating among other scientific journals of the same discipline.

  16. Comparison Of Solar Surface Features In HMI Images And Mount Wilson Images Found By The Automatic Bayesian Classification System AutoClass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. G.; Ulrich, R. K.; Beck, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Bayesian automatic classification system AutoClass has been applied to daily solar magnetogram and intensity images taken at the 150 Foot Solar Tower at Mount Wilson to find and identify classes of solar surface features which are associated with variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and, using those identifications, to improve modeling of TSI variations over time. (Ulrich, et al, 2010) AutoClass does this by a two step process in which it: (1) finds, without human supervision, a set of class definitions based on specified attributes of a sample of the image data pixels, such as magnetic field and intensity in the case of MWO images, and (2) applies the class definitions thus found to new data sets to identify automatically in them the classes found in the sample set. HMI high resolution images embody four observables-magnetic field, continuum intensity, line depth and line width-in contrast to MWO's two-magnetic field and intensity. In this study, we apply AutoClass to the HMI image observables to derive solar surface feature classes and compare the characteristic statistics of those classes to the MWO classes. The ability to categorize automatically surface features in the HMI images holds out the promise of consistent, relatively quick and manageable analysis of the large quantity of data available in these images. Given that the classes found in MWO images using AutoClass have been found to improve modeling of TSI, application of AutoClass to the more complex HMI images should enhance understanding of the physical processes at work in solar surface features and their implications for the solar-terrestrial environment. Ulrich, R.K., Parker, D, Bertello, L. and Boyden, J. 2010, Solar Phys. , 261 , 11.

  17. Application of the AutoClass Automatic Bayesian Classification System to HMI Solar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. G.; Beck, J. G.; Ulrich, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    When applied to a sample set of observed data, the Bayesian automatic classification system known as AutoClass finds a set of class definitions based on specified attributes of the data, such as magnetic field and intensity, without human supervision. These class definitions can then be applied to new data sets to identify automatically in them the classes found in the sample set. AutoClass can be applied to solar magnetic and intensity images to identify surface features associated with different values of magnetic and intensity fields in a consistent manner without the need for human judgment. AutoClass has been applied to Mt. Wilson magnetograms and intensity-grams to identify solar surface features associated with variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and, using those identifications, to improve modeling of TSI variations over time. (Ulrich, et al, 2010) Here, we apply AutoClass to observables derived from the high resolution 4096 x 4096 HMI magnetic, intensity continuum, line width and line depth images to identify solar surface regions which may be associated with variations in TSI and other solar irradiance measurements. To prevent small instrument artifacts from interfering with class identification, we apply a flat-field correction and a rotationally shifted temporal average to the HMI images prior to processing with AutoClass. This pre-processing also allows an investigation of the sensitivity of AutoClass to instrumental artifacts. The ability to categorize automatically surface features in the HMI images holds out the promise of consistent, relatively quick and manageable analysis of the large quantity of data available in these highly resolved images and the use of that analysis to enhance understanding of the physical processes at work in solar surface features and their implications for the solar-terrestrial environment. Reference Ulrich, R.K., Parker, D, Bertello, L. and Boyden, J. 2010, Solar Phys., 261, 11.

  18. Upper Cambrian chitons (Mollusca, polyplacophora) from Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J.; Vendrasco, M.J.; Darrough, G.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new specimens reveal a greater presence of chitons in Upper Cambrian rocks than previously suspected. Evidence is presented showing that the chiton esthete sensory system is present in all chiton species in this study at the very beginning of the known polyplacophoran fossil record. The stratigraphic occurrences and paleobiogeography of Late Cambrian chitons are documented. The 14 previously-named families of Cambrian and Ordovician chitons are reviewed and analyzed. Aulochitonidae n. fam. is defined, based on Aulochiton n. gen.; A. sannerae n. sp. is also defined. The long misunderstood family Preacanthochitonidae and its type genus Preacanthochiton Bergenhayn, 1960, are placed in synonymy with Mattheviidae and Chelodes Davidson & King, 1874, respectively; Eochelodes Marek, 1962, also is placed in synonymy with Chelodes, and Elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is placed in synonymy with Hemithecella Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. At the species level, H. elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, and Elongata perplexa Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, are placed in synonymy with H. eminensis Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995. The Ordovician species H. abrupta Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is transferred to the genus Chelodes as C. abrupta (Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995). The Ordovician species Preacanthochiton baueri Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Helminthochiton as H. ? baueri (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). The Ordovician species H. marginatus Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Litochiton as L. marginatus (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). Matthevia walcotti Runnegar, Pojeta, Taylor, & Collins, 1979, is treated as a synonym of Hemithecella expansa Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. In addition, other multivalved Cambrian mollusks are discussed; within this group, Dycheiidae n. fam. is defined, as well as Paradycheia dorisae n. gen. and n. sp. Cladistic analysis indicates a close relationship among the genera here assigned to the Mattheviidae, and between Echinochiton Pojeta

  19. Low temperature elastic behavior of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, T. J.; Darling, T. W.; McCall, K. R.; Fenn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The resonant frequencies of a material sample are directly related to the elastic constants characterizing the sample. Thus, by studying trends in resonant frequencies as a function of temperature, the elastic behavior of the sample may be inferred, and changes in the physical properties of the material may be tracked (for example, phase changes). Historically, tracking the resonant frequencies of a crystalline sample as a function of temperature is one of the most sensitive methods for identifying phase changes in the sample. We are using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) to track the resonant frequencies of rock samples at low temperatures. Our initial measurements showed unexpected behavior in a millimeter-sized sample of Berea sandstone in the temperature range from 77 K to 300 K [Ulrich and Darling, 2001], including hysteresis in the temperature dependence of the resonant frequencies, and softening rather than hardening as the temperature decreases. A second experimental apparatus has been developed to make RUS measurements on samples up to 2 cm by 3 cm by 8 cm in size, and over the temperature range 77 K - 400 K. RUS measurements using the new experimental system have been made on several rock samples, as well as several standards, and will be described in this talk. In general, the rock samples exhibit anomalous elastic behavior, consistent with the initial measurements on much smaller samples. Similar elastic phenomena, with similar activation energies, are seen in these rocks in room temperature measurements of resonant frequency versus strain [Tencate and Shankland, 1996]. Thus, low temperature measurements could provide insight into the mechanisms for the nonlinear elastic behavior of rocks and other materials. Ulrich T.J., Darling T.W., Observation of anomalous elastic behavior in rock at low temperatures. Geophys. Res. Let., Vol. 28, No. 11, pgs. 2293-2296, June 1, 2001. Tencate J.A., Shankland, T.J., Slow dynamics in the nonlinear response of

  20. Evaluating our understanding of the biological carbon pump using the transport matrix method and global nutrient distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardello, Raffaele; Martin, Adrian; Khatiwala, Samar; Kriest, Iris; Henson, Stephanie; Dunne, John; Totterdell, Ian; Allen, Icarus; Yool, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    -observation intercomparison. References Khatiwala, S.: A computational framework for simulation of biogeochemical tracers in the ocean, Glob. Biogeochem. Cy., 21, GB3001, doi:10.1029/2007GB002923, 2007. Kriest, I., Khatiwala, S., Oschlies, A., 2010. Towards an assessment of simple global marine biogeochemical models of different complexity. Prog. Oceanogr. 86, 337-360. doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2010.05.002. Martin, J.H., Knauer, G.A., Karl, D.M., Broenkow, W.W., 1987. VERTEX: carbon cycling in the northeast Pacific. Deep-Sea Res. 34 (2), 267-285.

  1. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  2. Measurements of Direct Drive Laser Imprint in Thin Foils by XUV Radiography Using an X-Ray Laser Backlighter.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar, D. H.

    1996-11-01

    In direct drive ICF, beam smoothing and uniformity of illumination play an important role in the seeding of instabilities at the ablation front. We have developed a novel technique for studying the imprint of a direct drive laser beam on a thin foil using an x-ray laser as an XUV backlighter. We use multilayer XUV optics to relay the x-ray laser onto the directly driven foil, and then to image the foil modulation onto a CCD camera. This technique allows us to measure small variations (< 50 nm) in the foil thickness which makes it possible to measure modulations due to imprint before significant Rayleigh-Taylor growth. We measured the imprinted modulation and subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor growth due to a low intensity 0.35μm drive beam incident on a 3μm Si foil using an yttrium x-ray laser on the Nova laser.footnote D. Kalantar, et al, Phys. Rev. Letter 76, 3574 (1996). We used a similar technique to measure the imprinted modulation and growth due to a low intensity 0.53μm drive beam incident on a 2μm Al foil using a germanium x-ray laser at the Vulcan laser facility. We present measurements of the imprinted modulation due to static RPP and SSD smoothed speckle patterns at both 0.35μm and 0.53μm irradiation. We also present measurements using ISI smoothing at 0.53μm, as well as measurements of the modulation due to a single mode optical imprint generated by a narrow slit interference pattern. We compare the experiment with simulations of laser imprint due to both multimode and single mode optical speckle patterns. *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-ENG. ^In collaboration with L.B. DaSilva, A. Demir, S.G. Glendinning, M.H. Key, N.S. Kim, J.P. Knauer, C.L.S. Lewis, J. Lin, A. MacPhee, D. Neely, B.A. Remington, R. Smith, G.J. Tallents, J.S. Wark, J. Warwick, F. Weber, S.V. Weber, E. Wolfrum, J. Zhang.

  3. Cryogenic DT and D2 Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.

    2006-10-01

    the first DT-cryogenic target shots will be presented, including neutron yields, ion temperature and fuel-areal-density measurements, and the dependence of target performance on ice smoothness. Contributors: R. S. Craxton, J. A. Delettrez, D. H. Edgell, R. Epstein, V. Yu. Glebov, V. N. Goncharov, D. R. Harding, R. L. Keck, J. D. Kilkenny, J. P. Knauer, S. J. Loucks, L. D. Lund, J. A. Marozas, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, D. D. Meyerhofer, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, W. Seka, V. A. Smalyuk, J. M. Soures, C. Stoeckl, and S. Skupsky, UR/LLE; J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Séguin, MIT.

  4. 1-MJ, Wetted-Foam Target-Design Performance for the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.

    2006-10-01

    . Betti, P. W. McKenty, P. B. Radha, V. N. Goncharov, D. R. Harding, J. P. Knauer, J. A. Marozas, R. L. McCrory, UR/LLE.

  5. Bayesian Analysis of Hmi Images and Comparison to Tsi Variations and MWO Image Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. G.; Ulrich, R. K.; Beck, J.; Tran, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    We have previously applied the Bayesian automatic classification system AutoClass to solar magnetogram and intensity images from the 150 Foot Solar Tower at Mount Wilson to identify classes of solar surface features associated with variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and, using those identifications, modeled TSI time series with improved accuracy (r > 0.96). (Ulrich, et al, 2010) AutoClass identifies classes by a two-step process in which it: (1) finds, without human supervision, a set of class definitions based on specified attributes of a sample of the image data pixels, such as magnetic field and intensity in the case of MWO images, and (2) applies the class definitions thus found to new data sets to identify automatically in them the classes found in the sample set. HMI high resolution images capture four observables-magnetic field, continuum intensity, line depth and line width-in contrast to MWO's two observables-magnetic field and intensity. In this study, we apply AutoClass to the HMI observables for images from June, 2010 to December, 2014 to identify solar surface feature classes. We use contemporaneous TSI measurements to determine whether and how variations in the HMI classes are related to TSI variations and compare the characteristic statistics of the HMI classes to those found from MWO images. We also attempt to derive scale factors between the HMI and MWO magnetic and intensity observables.The ability to categorize automatically surface features in the HMI images holds out the promise of consistent, relatively quick and manageable analysis of the large quantity of data available in these images. Given that the classes found in MWO images using AutoClass have been found to improve modeling of TSI, application of AutoClass to the more complex HMI images should enhance understanding of the physical processes at work in solar surface features and their implications for the solar-terrestrial environment.Ulrich, R.K., Parker, D, Bertello, L. and

  6. Bayesian Analysis Of HMI Solar Image Observables And Comparison To TSI Variations And MWO Image Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. G.; Ulrich, R. K.; Beck, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously applied the Bayesian automatic classification system AutoClass to solar magnetogram and intensity images from the 150 Foot Solar Tower at Mount Wilson to identify classes of solar surface features associated with variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and, using those identifications, modeled TSI time series with improved accuracy (r > 0.96). (Ulrich, et al, 2010) AutoClass identifies classes by a two-step process in which it: (1) finds, without human supervision, a set of class definitions based on specified attributes of a sample of the image data pixels, such as magnetic field and intensity in the case of MWO images, and (2) applies the class definitions thus found to new data sets to identify automatically in them the classes found in the sample set. HMI high resolution images capture four observables-magnetic field, continuum intensity, line depth and line width-in contrast to MWO's two observables-magnetic field and intensity. In this study, we apply AutoClass to the HMI observables for images from May, 2010 to June, 2014 to identify solar surface feature classes. We use contemporaneous TSI measurements to determine whether and how variations in the HMI classes are related to TSI variations and compare the characteristic statistics of the HMI classes to those found from MWO images. We also attempt to derive scale factors between the HMI and MWO magnetic and intensity observables. The ability to categorize automatically surface features in the HMI images holds out the promise of consistent, relatively quick and manageable analysis of the large quantity of data available in these images. Given that the classes found in MWO images using AutoClass have been found to improve modeling of TSI, application of AutoClass to the more complex HMI images should enhance understanding of the physical processes at work in solar surface features and their implications for the solar-terrestrial environment. Ulrich, R.K., Parker, D, Bertello, L. and

  7. The Current Status and Future Direction of Asteroseismology of Sun-like Stars from Ground and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, D. B.

    It was the Summer of 1986 in AArhus, Denmark. Several hundred astronomers gathered together to talk about the new and promising field of solar and stellar seismology (Christensen-Dalsgaard & Frandsen 1986). Elsworth et al. talked about their two station network to observe oscillations on the Sun. On the stellar front, we heard reports on attempts to observe five- minute oscillations on Procyon (Isaak & Jones), on α Centauri (Gelly, Grec, & Fossat; Balona & Marang), and on ɛ Eridani (Soderblom & Däppen). Harvey explained to us why it was going to be difficult to observe stellar oscillations regardless of whether we used Doppler shift velocities, intensity variations, or other specific spectral-line feature variations. But then Ulrich (among many others) explained to us why it was worth all the effort. Finally, Widget reminded us that stellar oscillations on white dwarfs have already been seen. A lot, of course, has happened since then. Several working networks of telescopes surrounding the earth are currently observing the Sun. White dwarf seismologists are using the Whole Earth Telescope network (Widget et al. 1994). Harvey was right about how difficult it is to observe solar-type oscillations on stars but so was Ulrich about it being worth the effort. And so, not yet successful (e.g., a confirmed independent identification of the large spacing on a star), we are continuing to try to observe oscillations on stars. In this presentation, I will remind you of why we are still trying, that is, I will discuss some of the science that can be done with stellar p-mode oscillation data: with single stars, with binaries, and with clusters of stars. I will, also briefly review two active programs: COROT (Convection and Rotation: Catala, Auvergne, & Baglin, et al. 1995), a proposed mission to put a small telescope in space to observe luminosity variations on stars, and AFOE (Advanced Fiber-Optic Echelle), an echelle spectrograph attached to the 1.5 m Whipple Observatory

  8. The assessment of the relationship between various waterscapes and outdoor activities: Edirne, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sakıcı, Çiğdem

    2014-06-01

    The environment is very important in terms of the behaviours and actions of human beings, and activity-environment correlation is used frequently in outdoor arrangements. The environment must meet the requirements and expectations of society. Outdoor activities are the activities that contribute to the well-being of human beings in physical (heartbeat, respiration, blood pressure, etc.) (Ulrich, Journal of Environmental Psychology 11:210-230, 1991), psychological (fear, anxiety, depression, loneliness, stress, etc.) (Marcus and Barnes 1999) and behavioural (insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, passivity, etc.) (Ulrich 1999) terms. It is known that human beings are affected significantly by the environments they are in, and more importantly, it is known that the environment they are in affects their happiness status. The causes of this effect are the features and appearances of the spatial elements and components that mainly make up such environments. One of the elements that is used frequently in landscape is water. If one examines designed or natural open spaces, it may be observed that water has very distinctive features. Dynamic (in the form of a leak, with intense flow rate, cascade, foamy, squirting, jet, graded, etc.) and still water elements may be used with sculptures, plants, rocks and elevations (on land). This study aims to reveal which age groups of students enjoy the different types of activities with regards to water features and emotional associations that motion and characteristics of water bring out in human beings and also to reveal the water preferences of human beings, including their reasons for such preference. Thus, 20 different water compositions located in Edirne Province were selected, and in 2-min camera reels, the students of various age groups assessed water with various characteristic features via a survey. As a result, it was revealed that human beings from various age groups wish to perform different activities with water elements

  9. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  10. Updates and achievements in virology.

    PubMed

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-07-01

    The 4th European Congress of Virology, hosted by the Italian Society for Virology, attracted approximately 1300 scientists from 46 countries worldwide. It also represented the first conference of the European Society for Virology, which was established in Campidoglio, Rome, Italy in 2009. The main goal of the meeting was to share research activities and results achieved in European virology units/institutes and to strengthen collaboration with colleagues from both western and developing countries. The worldwide representation of participants is a testament to the strength and attraction of European virology. The 5-day conference brought together the best of current virology; topics covered all three living domains (bacteria, archaea and eucarya), with special sessions on plant and veterinary virology as well as human virology, including two oral presentations on mimiviruses. The conference included five plenary sessions, 31 workshops, one hepatitis C virus roundtable, ten special workshops and three poster sessions, as well as 45 keynote lectures, 191 oral presentations and 845 abstracts. Furthermore, the Gesellschaft fur Virologie Loeffler-Frosch medal award was given to Peter Vogt for his long-standing career and achievements; the Gardner Lecture of the European Society for Clinical Virology was presented by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, and the Pioneer in Virology Lecture of the Italian Society for Virology was presented by Ulrich Koszinowski.

  11. Locus of the intensity effect in simple reaction time tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Kurczewska, Marta; Nowik, Agnieszka; van der Lubbe, Rob H J; Verleger, Rolf

    2007-11-01

    Evidence is still inconclusive regarding the locus of the stimulus intensity effect on information processing in reaction tasks. Miller, Ulrich, and Rinkenauer (1999) addressed this question by assessing the intensity effect on stimulus- and response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) as indices of the sensory and motor parts of reaction time (RT). In the case of visual stimuli, they observed that application of brighter stimuli resulted in a shortening of RT and stimulus-locked LRP (S-LRP), but not of response-locked LRP (R-LRP). The results for auditory stimuli, however, were unclear. In spite of a clear RT reduction due to increased loudness, neither S-LRP nor R-LRP onset was affected. A reason for this failure might have been a relatively small range of intensity variation and the type of task. To check for this possibility, we performed three experiments in which broader ranges of stimulus intensities and simple, rather than choice, response tasks were used. Although the intensity effect on the R-LRP was negligible, S-LRP followed RT changes, irrespective of stimulus modality. These findings support the conclusion that stimulus intensity exerts its effect before the start of motoric processes. Finally, S-LRP and R-LRP findings are discussed within a broader information-processing perspective to check the validity of the claim that S-LRP and R-LRP can, indeed, be considered as pure estimates of the duration of sensory and motor processes.

  12. Heliophysics: Evolving Solar Activity and the Climates of Space and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2012-01-01

    Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun-like stars Carolus J. Schrijver; 3. Formation and early evolution of stars and proto-planetary disks Lee W. Hartmann; 4. Planetary habitability on astronomical time scales Donald E. Brownlee; 5. Solar internal flows and dynamo action Mark S. Miesch; 6. Modeling solar and stellar dynamos Paul Charbonneau; 7. Planetary fields and dynamos Ulrich R. Christensen; 8. The structure and evolution of the 3D solar wind John T. Gosling; 9. The heliosphere and cosmic rays J. Randy Jokipii; 10. Solar spectral irradiance: measurements and models Judith L. Lean and Thomas N. Woods; 11. Astrophysical influences on planetary climate systems Juerg Beer; 12. Evaluating the drivers of Earth's climate system Thomas J. Crowley; 13. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Stanley C. Solomon; 14. Long-term evolution of the geospace climate Jan J. Sojka; 15. Waves and transport processes in atmospheres and oceans Richard L. Walterscheid; 16. Solar variability, climate, and atmospheric photochemistry Guy P. Brasseur, Daniel Marsch and Hauke Schmidt; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index.

  13. Solar model uncertainties, MSW analysis, and future solar neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Naoya; Langacker, Paul

    1994-07-01

    Various theoretical uncertainties in the standard solar model and in the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) analysis are discussed. It is shown that two methods give consistent estimations of the solar neutrino flux uncertainties: (a) a simple parametrization of the uncertainties using the core temperature and the ncuelar production cross sections; (b) the Monte Carlo method of Bahcall and Ulrich. In the MSW analysis, we emphasize proper treatments of correlations of theoretical uncertainties between flux components and between different detectors, the Earth effect, and multiple solutions in a combined χ2 procedure. In particular the large-angle solution of the combined observation is allowed at 95% C.L. only when the theoretical uncertainties are included. If their correlations were ignored, the region would be overestimated. The MSW solutions for various standard and nonstandard solar models are also shown. The MSW predictions of the global solutions for the future solar neutrino experiments are given, emphasizing the measurement of the energy spectrum and the day-night effect in Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and Super-Kamiokande to distinguish the two solutions.

  14. Systematic biases and Type I error accumulation in tests of the race model inequality.

    PubMed

    Kiesel, Andrea; Miller, Jeff; Ulrich, Rolf

    2007-08-01

    In simple, go/no-go, and choice reaction time (RT) tasks, responses are faster to two redundant targets than to a single target. This redundancy gain has been explained in terms of a race model assuming that whichever target is processed faster determines RT (Raab, 1962). Miller (1982) presented a race model inequality to test the race model by comparing the RT distributions of single and redundant target conditions. Here, we present simulations indicating that the standard tests of this inequality (for a description of the testing algorithm, see Ulrich, Miller, & Schröter, 2007) are afflicted with systematic biases and Type I error accumulation. Systematic biases tend to produce violations of the race model inequality, but they decrease as the numbers of observations increase. Reasonably unbiased tests of the race model inequality are obtained for sample sizes of at least 20 for each target condition. In addition, Type I error accumulates because of testing the inequality at multiple percentiles. To reduce Type I error, the race model inequality should be tested in a restricted range of percentiles, preferably in the percentile range 10% to 25%.

  15. Thermohaline mixing: a physical mechanism governing the photospheric composition of low-mass giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, C.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:Numerous spectroscopic observations provide compelling evidence for a non-canonical mixing process that modifies the surface abundances of Li, C and N of low-mass red giants when they reach the bump in the luminosity function. Eggleton and collaborators have proposed that a molecular weight inversion created by the ^3He(^3He, 2p)^4He reaction may be at the origin of this mixing, and relate it to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We argue that one is actually dealing with a double diffusive instability referred to as thermohaline convection and we discuss its influence on the red giant branch. Methods: We compute stellar models of various initial metallicities that include thermohaline mixing, which is treated as a diffusive process based on the prescription given originally by Ulrich for the turbulent diffusivity produced by the thermohaline instability in stellar radiation zones. Results: Thermohaline mixing simultaneously accounts for the observed behaviour of the carbon isotopic ratio and of the abundances of Li, C and N in the upper part of the red giant branch. It significantly reduces the ^3He production with respect to canonical evolution models as required by measurements of ^3He/H in galactic HII regions. Conclusions: Thermohaline mixing is a fundamental physical process that must be included in stellar evolution modeling.

  16. Time-dependent dynamics of intense laser-induced above threshold Coulomb explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2007-06-01

    We use our recently proposed model [1] to extract information about the nuclear dynamics from the recent Coulomb explosion data of Staudte et al. taken with 40 fs pulses [2]. That data, taken at multiple intensities near the ionization appearance intensity for both H2 and D2 in linearly and circularly polarized light, shows remarkable structure and regularity not easily explained by conventional models. Because our model does fit the spectra well, we can infer the qualitative time-dependent evolution of the system. In addition, we speculate about the possibility of rescattering leading to above threshold Coulomb explosion. [1] B.D. Esry, A.M. Sayler, P.Q. Wang, K.D. Carnes, and I. Ben-Itzhak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 013003 (2006). [2] A. Staudte, D. Pavici'c, S. Chelkowski, D. Zeidler, M. Meckel, H. Niikura, M. Sch"offler, S. Sch"ossler, B. Ulrich, P. P. Rajeev, Th. Weber, T. Jahnke, D.M. Villeneuve, A.D. Bandrauk, C.L. Cocke, P.B. Corkum, and R. D"orner, Phys. Rev. Lett. (accepted).

  17. Climate Change at the Poles: Research Immersion Experience at Bellingshausen, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Repina, I. A.; Baeseman, J. L.; Fernandoy, F.; Bart, S.

    2010-12-01

    We brought a party of 15 scientists, graduate students, and educators to King George Island, the largest of the South Shetland Islands, just off the Antarctic Peninsula, for an international workshop on Antarctica and global climate change in January 2010. Participants included professors, young scientists and graduate students from the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, the University of Maryland, the University of Wisconsin, and the Michigan Technological University. Lindsay Bartholomew, an education and outreach specialist at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago connected the workshop via video and Internet with an audience of museum visitors. Scientists living and working at Bellingshausen, including Hans-Ulrich Peter, an eminent ecologist from Jena University (Germany), and Bulat Movlyudov (Institute of Geography, Moscow), a distinguished glaciologist, participated in the workshop. Field trips led by Peter and Movlyudov and others were made by day and lectures were held by night. Professors and graduate students made cutting-edge presentations on such subjects as permafrost, glaciology, and global climate models. Three workshop teams conducted field research projects at the foot of the Bellingshausen Dome icecap - two on carbon cycling and one on permafrost. Major funding sources for the workshop included the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Russia), Wilderness Research Foundation (USA), NSF, University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, Alfred Wegener Institute (Germany) and Museum for Science and Industry (Chicago). INACH, the Chilean Antarctic Institute, and IAU, the Uruguayan Antarctic Institute, provided air charter services. On King George Island, our group was billeted at Russia’s Bellingshausen science station.

  18. Circumstellar Hydrodynamics and Spectral Radiation in ALGOLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Dirk Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Algols are the remnants of binary systems that have undergone large scale mass transfer. This dissertation presents the results of the coupling of a hydrodynamical model and a radiative model of the flow of gas from the inner Lagrangian point. The hydrodynamical model is a fully Lagrangian, three-dimensional scheme with a novel treatment of viscosity and an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to compute pressure gradients. Viscosity is implemented by allowing particles within a specified interaction length to share momentum. The hydrodynamical model includes a provision for computing the self-gravity of the disk material, although it is not used in the present application to Algols. Hydrogen line profiles and equivalent widths computed with a code by Drake and Ulrich are compared with observations of both short and long period Algols. More sophisticated radiative transfer computations are done with the escape probability code of Ko and Kallman which includes the spectral lines of thirteen elements. The locations and velocities of the gas particles, and the viscous heating from the hydro program are supplied to the radiative transfer program, which computes the equilibrium temperature of the gas and generates its emission spectrum. Intrinsic line profiles are assumed to be delta functions and are properly Doppler shifted and summed for gas particles that are not eclipsed by either star. Polarization curves are computed by combining the hydro program with the Wilson-Liou polarization program. Although the results are preliminary, they show that polarization observations show great promise for studying circumstellar matter.

  19. Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomena in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Jeremy D.; Lincoln, Derek M.; Shima Edelstein, Ruth; Prigodin, Vladimir N.; Epstein, Arthur J.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena with temperature and bias dependence in organic semiconductor thin films with either nonmagnetic or magnetic contacts through high field reaching 9T. For nonmagnetic organic thin films such as Alq3 we find a low field MR up to 15%. A similar magnetic field effect has been reported earlier^1 but, as noted, the mechanism remains unclear. We propose a model of the anomalous MR where charge transport is space-charge limited. The current is determined by the e-h recombination rate. The recombination rate is field dependent, analogous to the chemical yield for radical pairs^2. Using an organic- based magnetic semiconductor^3, V[TCNE]x, and Co as magnetic contacts, with a nonmagnetic organic semiconductor (α-6T) leads to an order-of-magnitude broader zero-centered MR peak superimposed on a spin-valve effect. Possible origins of this broader MR will be discussed. 1. Francis, et al., New J. Phys. 6 185 (2004); Frankevich, et al., Phys. Rev. B 53 4498 (1996) 2. Steiner and Ulrich, Chem. Rev. 89 51 (1989) 3. Pokhodnya, et al., Adv. Mater. 12 410 (2000); Prigodin, et al., Adv. Mater. 14 1230 (2002); Shima Edelstein, et al., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 871E I7.3 (2005)

  20. Heliophysics: Evolving Solar Activity and the Climates of Space and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2010-09-01

    Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun-like stars Carolus J. Schrijver; 3. Formation and early evolution of stars and proto-planetary disks Lee W. Hartmann; 4. Planetary habitability on astronomical time scales Donald E. Brownlee; 5. Solar internal flows and dynamo action Mark S. Miesch; 6. Modeling solar and stellar dynamos Paul Charbonneau; 7. Planetary fields and dynamos Ulrich R. Christensen; 8. The structure and evolution of the 3D solar wind John T. Gosling; 9. The heliosphere and cosmic rays J. Randy Jokipii; 10. Solar spectral irradiance: measurements and models Judith L. Lean and Thomas N. Woods; 11. Astrophysical influences on planetary climate systems Juerg Beer; 12. Evaluating the drivers of Earth's climate system Thomas J. Crowley; 13. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Stanley C. Solomon; 14. Long-term evolution of the geospace climate Jan J. Sojka; 15. Waves and transport processes in atmospheres and oceans Richard L. Walterscheid; 16. Solar variability, climate, and atmospheric photochemistry Guy P. Brasseur, Daniel Marsch and Hauke Schmidt; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index.

  1. Sequential Data-assimilation in a Flux-transport Dynamo Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; de Toma, G.; Gilman, P. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Boyden, J. E.

    2009-05-01

    Applying a very simplified data-nudging technique in a flux-transport dynamo, Dikpati, de Toma and Gilman predicted solar cycle amplitude and onset-timing of cycle 24 seperately. In order to simultaneously predict cycle amplitude and timing we have developed a sequential data-assimilation technique, in a similar way used in atmospheric and oceanic prediction models. However two major difficulties in applying this technique in solar dynamo models are, (i) equatorward return meridional circulation is unknown, (ii) time-varying surface flow measurements have not been available for years prior to 1996. With recent progress of Mount Wilson Observatory's flow-data analysis by Ulrich and colleagues, we can now go back to 1985. We build sequential data-assimilation into a flux-transport dynamo model by (i) solving mean and perturbation equations by incorporating time-varying meridional flow since 1985; (ii) investigating transport of assimilated poloidal magnetic fields from surface to tachocline, where they are sheared by differential rotation to create spot-producing fields; (iii) updating model after a finite time-interval, by comparing model-output with observations; (iv) forecasting simultaneously cycle-amplitude, duration and shape. We form an ensemble of model-runs whose outputs calibrate best with surface magnetic observations. The ensemble-average gives the simultaneous prediction of solar cycle timing, amplitude and shape. This work is partially supported by NASA grant NNX08AQ34G.

  2. Fragmentation dynamics of Ar2^+ dimers in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Wu, J.; Dörner, R.; Thumm, U.

    2012-06-01

    We studied the fragmentation dynamics of the Ar2 dimers in 790 nm pump and 1400 nm probe pulses with intensities of 10^14 W/cm^2 by analyzing kinetic energy release (KER) spectra as a function of the pump probe delay. The KER spectra are measured by detecting Ar-ion fragments in a COLTRIMS [1] setup and are compared with model calculations based on the numerical propagations of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation [2]. The measured spectra are best reproduced by two-state calculations that include the adiabatic electronic states I(1/2)u and II(1/2)g of Ar2^+, dipole coupled in the pump- and probe-laser electric fields. [4pt] [1] J. Wu, A. Vredenborg, B. Ulrich, L. Ph. H. Schmidt, M. Meckel, S. Voss, H. Sann, H. Kim, T. Jahnke, and R. D"orner, PRA 83, 061403(R) (2011) [0pt] [2] M. Magrakvelidze, F. He, Th. Niederhausen, I. V. Litvinyuk, and U. Thumm, PRA 79, 033410 (2009).

  3. The Comparison of Spectroscopic Measurements of the Solar Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejčič, S.; Čadež, A.

    We studied the velocity field on the surface of the Sun measured by the Doppler shift of Fraunhofer Sodium lines Na-D_{2} at 5891.583 Å, Na-D_{1} at 5897.557 Å and Nickel line Ni I at 5894.505 Å. All the spectroscopic measurements were done at Ljubljana observatory on September 9, 10, 13 and 14 1999 using double monochromator DFS-12. The calibration was done through five telluric water lines in the vicinity of Sodium lines. With respect to telluric water lines Fraunhofer lines were analysed and through their Doppler velocity we determined the velocity field on the surface of the Sun. The data were fitted to the rotation model to determine the average solar angular (sidereal) coefficients, the average gravitational redshift velocity and the average parameters of the systematic limb shift for each line separately. Solar rotation coefficients determined by our measurements are compared with those of Howard and Harvey, Snodgrass and Ulrich, and Wittmann.

  4. Solar p-mode oscillations as a tracer of radial differential rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deubner, F.-L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of solar p-modes obtained with improved wavenumber and frequency resolution are presented. The observations are compared with model calculations of the p-modes, and the degree of spatial and temporal coherence of the observed wave pattern is investigated. It is found that the p-mode oscillations pervade the visible surface of the sun with a high degree of coherence in space and time, so that the whole complex pattern of standing waves with its nodes and antinodes can be regarded as a fixed pattern corotating with the solar surface layers. The p-modes are introduced as a tracer of solar rotational flow velocities. The equatorial differential rotation is estimated as a function of effective depth on the basis of the theoretical contribution functions for the p-modes recently derived by Ulrich et al. (1978). The results strongly indicate that the angular speed of rotation is not uniform even in the relatively shallow layer extending about 20,000 km below the photosphere.

  5. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  6. History, causality, and sexology.

    PubMed

    Money, John

    2003-08-01

    In 1896, Krafft-Ebing published Psychopathia Sexualis. Popularly defined as hereditary weakness or taintedness in the family pedigree, degeneracy was called upon as a causal explanation for perversions of the sexual instinct. Although Krafft-Ebing accepted Karl Ulrichs proposal that homosexuality could be innate and probably located in the brain, he paid little attention to neuropathological sexology. Alfred Binet challenged Krafft-Ebing's orthodoxy by explaining fetishism in terms of associative learning, to which Krafft-Ebing's response was that only those with a hereditary taint would be vulnerable. Thus did the venerable nature-nurture antithesis maintain its rhetoric, even to the present day. Krafft-Ebing died too soon to meet the Freudian challenge of endopsychic determinism, and too soon also to encounter the idea of a developmental multivariate outcome of what I have termed the lovemap. Like other brain maps, for example the languagemap, the lovemap requires an intact human brain in which to develop. The personalized content of the lovemap has access to the brain by way of the special senses.

  7. [New diagnostic aids in automatic perimetry].

    PubMed

    Weber, J; Papoulis, C; Schmitz, A

    1993-04-01

    The Conformity Analysis is a new procedure for objective recognition of specific defect patterns in automated perimetry. The "Conformity Index," the measure of conformity between the distribution of defect values and several standard defect patterns, is calculated from the ratio of global variance and mean variance in particular regions. Using 68 visual fields from 68 normal persons, we determined normal values and limits of the Conformity Index for seven standard defect patterns: hemifields right-left, hemifields upper-lower, quadrants, sectors, rings with 5 degrees and 10 degrees radius interval and the perimetric nerve fiber bundles of Weber and Ulrich. The evaluation of 148 visual fields (68 normal eyes, 80 eyes with chronic glaucoma and all stages of damage) by both the Conformity Index and two experienced clinicians revealed an identical result in 89%. Using the Conformity Analysis in 37 cases of pituitary adenoma, we could objectively identify quadrants, sectors and hemifields right-left to be the most common defect patterns in this disease. In glaucoma fields with marked damage (n = 46), the most frequent pathological Conformity Index was the index for perimetric nerve fiber bundles.

  8. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  9. [Stent, endovascular prosthesis, net or strut? What would British dentist Charles Stent (1807-1885) have to say on all this?].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The word stent appears in the Index Medicus as of 1952, while in Croatian articles as of 1993. The origin of the word has been attributed to British dentist Charles. T. Stent (1807-1885), maker of the compound for dental impressions (Stent's compound). Viennese surgeon, Johannes F. S. Esser (1877-1946) used the compound in plastic surgery of the face calling it an eponym Stent's mould. During the 1950's, William H. ReMine and John H. Grindlay used Stent's principle for omentum lined plastic tubes in the bile duct of a dog. The development of today's vascular stents began in 1912 when French Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) implanted glass tubes in the arteries of dogs. The first metal spirals were implanted in the arteries of dogs by Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985), while the first stents in human arteries were implanted by French doctors Ulrich Sigwart and Jacques Puel in Toulouse in 1986. Some authors claim that the origin of the word stent is associated with the Scotish word stynt or stent, meaning stretched out river fishing nets.

  10. 1927 reference in the new millennium: where is the Automat?

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Sunny Lynn; Rethlefsen, Melissa Lyle

    2003-01-01

    James Ballard, director at the Boston Medical Library, tracked questions he received at the reference desk in 1927 to recognize the trend of queries and to record the information for future use. He presented a paper on reference services that listed sixty of his reference questions at the Thirtieth Annual Meeting of the Medical Library Association (MLA) in 1927. During a two-month period in 2001, the authors examined Ballard's questions by attempting to answer them with print sources from the 1920s and with the Internet. The searchers answered 85% of the questions with the Internet and 80% with 1920s reference sources. The authors compared Internet and 1920s print resources for practical use. When answering the questions with 1920s resources, the searchers rediscovered a time in health sciences libraries when there was no Ulrich's Periodicals Directory, no standardized subject headings, and no comprehensive listings of available books. Yet, the authors found many of the 1920s reference materials to be quite useful and often multifunctional. The authors recorded observations regarding the impact of automation on answering reference questions. Even though the Internet has changed the outward appearance of reference services, many things remain the same. PMID:12883575

  11. Food panics in history: corned beef, typhoid and “risk society”

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David F

    2007-01-01

    An outline of the “risk society” thesis of the German social theorist Ulrich Beck is given, and some points that he has taken from food safety examples are discussed. The potential for exploring the viability and utility of the thesis, via a comparative study of historical food safety episodes is illustrated through an account and discussion of the large corned beef‐associated typhoid outbreak which occurred in 1964 in Aberdeen, Scotland. The outcome of the Aberdeen affair, in terms of public and political interest in food safety, and impact on the official food safety system, is compared with the outcome and impact of the series of food safety episodes of the 1980s and 1990s. The interactions between the latter episodes and the new food movement, the proactive responses of corporate interests, and the dramatic changes in the food safety regime represented by the formation of the Food Standards Agency in Britain, are contrasted with the relative lack of impact of the Aberdeen outbreak. Despite criticisms of Beck's thesis, this comparative study highlights, in particular, the value of his concept of “subpolitics”, and his expectation that the transition to risk society will involve the emergence of new social institutions. Such insights may help orientate epidemiologists and community health specialists who are currently active in food safety and regulation. PMID:17568045

  12. Cosmopolitics: towards a new articulation of politics, science and critique.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiro

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores how Ulrich Beck's world-risk-society theory (WRST) and Bruno Latour's Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can be combined to advance a theory of cosmopolitics. On the one hand, WRST helps to examine 'cosmopolitan politics', how actors try to inject cosmopolitanism into existing political practices and institutions anchored in the logic of nationalism. On the other hand, ANT sheds light on 'cosmological politics', how scientists participate in the construction of reality as a reference point for political struggles. By combining the WRST and ANT perspectives, it becomes possible to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of cosmopolitics that takes into account both political and ontological dimensions. The proposed synthesis of WRST and ANT also calls for a renewal of critical theory by making social scientists aware of their performative involvement in cosmopolitics. This renewal prompts social scientists to explore how they can pragmatically support certain ideals of cosmopolitics through continuous dialogues with their objects of study, actors who inhabit different nations and different cosmoses.

  13. Risk society and the distribution of bads: theorizing class in the risk society.

    PubMed

    Curran, Dean

    2013-03-01

    Ulrich Beck states in the Risk Society (1992) that the rise of the social production of risks in the risk society signals that class ceases to be of relevance; instead the hierarchical logic of class will be supplanted by the egalitarian logic of the distribution of risks. Several trenchant critiques of Beck's claim have justified the continued relevance of class to contemporary society. While these accounts have emphasized continuity, they have not attempted to chart, as this paper will, how the growing social production of risk increases the importance of class. This paper argues that it is Beck's undifferentiated, catastrophic account of risk that undergirds his rejection of class, and that by inserting an account of risk involving gradations in both damages and calculability into Beck's framework, his theory of risk society may be used to develop a critical theory of class. Such a theory can be used to reveal how wealth differentials associated with class relations actually increase in importance to individuals' life-chances in the risk society. With the growing production and distribution of bads, class inequalities gain added significance, since it will be relative wealth differentials that both enables the advantaged to minimize their risk exposure and imposes on others the necessity of facing the intensified risks of the risk society.

  14. A commentary on decision-making and organisational legitimacy in the Risk Society.

    PubMed

    Benn, Suzanne; Brown, Paul; North-Samardzic, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Key concepts of Risk Society as elaborated by Ulrich Beck and others (Beck, U., 1992 (trans. Mark Ritter). The Risk Society. Sage Publications, London. Beck, U., 1995, Ecological Politics in the Age of Risk. Polity Press, Cambridge. Beck, U., 1999, World Risk Society. Polity Press, Cambridge. Giddens, A., 1994, Beyond Left and Right. Polity Press, Oxford. Beck, U., Giddens, A. and Lash, S., 1994, Reflexive Modernisation: Politics, Tradition and Aesthetics in the Modern Social Order. Stanford University Press, Stanford. Beck, U., Bonss, W. and Lau, C., 2003, Theory, Culture & Society 2003, Sage, London, 20(2), pp. 1-33.) are illuminated though a case study of managed environmental risk, namely the hexachlorobenzene (HCB) controversy at Botany, a southeast suburb of Sydney. We observe the way multiple stakeholder decision-making plays out a number of Risk Society themes, including the emergence of 'unbounded risk' and of highly 'individualised' and 'reflexive' risk communities. Across several decades, the events of the HCB story support Risk Society predictions of legitimacy problems faced by corporations as they harness technoscientific support for innovation in their products and industrial processes without due recognition of social and environmental risk. Tensions involving identity, trust and access to expert knowledge advance our understanding of democratic 'sub-political' decision-making and ways of distributing environmental risk.

  15. Regulating dangerous futures: the German Embryo Protection Act of 1990--legislation in risk society.

    PubMed

    Augst, C

    2000-06-01

    This article summarises the outcome of a research project which analyses the legislative debate about the German Embryonenschutzgesetz (Embryo Protection Act) in 1990. From 1988 to 1990 the German Parliament discussed legislation for the practice of assisted contraception and embryo research. The term 'risk' is central to the discourse. For Ulrich Beck (1986) this emphasis on risk is a sign of the reflexivity which contemporary western societies have reached. This article reads back into the risk discourse the values hidden in risk terminology: they are identified as fears about modernisation processes. The focus on risk in this article allows observation of late modernity's unease about its own potential and a growing ambiguity about modern ideas of progress and control (Bauman, 1991). This ambiguity also becomes apparent in the strategies of policing which the German legislature offers as solutions to the perceived risks: different legislative strategies are developed to tackle the contradictory risk scenarios. These different strategies of policing are understood as the construction of 'places of safety' in the face of identified dangers: the 'traditional family', the 'good doctor', 'professional' judgement. Defining those boundaries allows the German legislature to juggle contradictory agendas. This explains the inconsistent and fragmented nature of the Embryo Protection Act 1990.

  16. Food panics in history: corned beef, typhoid and "risk society".

    PubMed

    Smith, David F

    2007-07-01

    An outline of the "risk society" thesis of the German social theorist Ulrich Beck is given, and some points that he has taken from food safety examples are discussed. The potential for exploring the viability and utility of the thesis, via a comparative study of historical food safety episodes is illustrated through an account and discussion of the large corned beef-associated typhoid outbreak which occurred in 1964 in Aberdeen, Scotland. The outcome of the Aberdeen affair, in terms of public and political interest in food safety, and impact on the official food safety system, is compared with the outcome and impact of the series of food safety episodes of the 1980s and 1990s. The interactions between the latter episodes and the new food movement, the proactive responses of corporate interests, and the dramatic changes in the food safety regime represented by the formation of the Food Standards Agency in Britain, are contrasted with the relative lack of impact of the Aberdeen outbreak. Despite criticisms of Beck's thesis, this comparative study highlights, in particular, the value of his concept of "subpolitics", and his expectation that the transition to risk society will involve the emergence of new social institutions. Such insights may help orientate epidemiologists and community health specialists who are currently active in food safety and regulation.

  17. Cosmopolitan sociology and the classical canon: Ferdinand Tönnies and the emergence of global Gesellschaft.

    PubMed

    Inglis, David

    2009-12-01

    How relevant are figures from the classical sociological canon for present day efforts to found cosmopolitan forms of sociological thought? According to the critique of Ulrich Beck, the classical sociologists remain far too wedded to nation-state-centred ways of thinking to play an important role in the development of cosmopolitan sociology. This paper argues that such a critique fails to account for the ways in which certain classical sociologists were attuned to the emerging cosmopolitical conditions of their own time, were not wholly wedded to nation-state-based conceptualizations, and thus can function as both groundings of, and inspirations for, cosmopolitan sociological endeavours. The apparently unpromising case of Tönnies is focused on, the paper showing how he outlined an account of how and why a planet-spanning condition of Gesellschaft developed a position which diverges from and counterpoints Marx's analysis of similar phenomena in important ways. The stereotype of Tönnies as an arch-conservative is also dissolved, allowing him to be considered as one of the most important antecedents of contemporary cosmopolitan sociological practice and a canonical figure still relevant for present-day purposes.

  18. Plant mitochondrial Complex I composition and assembly: A review.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanian, Nitya; Remacle, Claire; Hamel, Patrice Paul

    2016-07-01

    In the mitochondrial inner membrane, oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP via the operation of several multimeric enzymes. The proton-pumping Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first and most complicated enzyme required in this process. Complex I is an L-shaped enzyme consisting of more than 40 subunits, one FMN molecule and eight Fe-S clusters. In recent years, genetic and proteomic analyses of Complex I mutants in various model systems, including plants, have provided valuable insights into the assembly of this multimeric enzyme. Assisted by a number of key players, referred to as "assembly factors", the assembly of Complex I takes place in a sequential and modular manner. Although a number of factors have been identified, their precise function in mediating Complex I assembly still remains to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current knowledge of plant Complex I composition and assembly derived from studies in plant model systems such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Plant Complex I is highly conserved and comprises a significant number of subunits also present in mammalian and fungal Complexes I. Plant Complex I also contains additional subunits absent from the mammalian and fungal counterpart, whose function in enzyme activity and assembly is not clearly understood. While 14 assembly factors have been identified for human Complex I, only two proteins, namely GLDH and INDH, have been established as bona fide assembly factors for plant Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  19. 25 Years Of Holography The Development Of Holographic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenkolber, H.

    1988-06-01

    It was of course Dennis Gabor who, as long ago as 1948, published the fundamental work the principle of holography. But it was not until Theodore Maiman's invention of the laser in 1960 that the practical realisation of holography became possible. This was achieved by Leith and Upatnicks between 1962 and 1964, with the crucial impetus being provided by Vander Lugt (the author wishes to acknowledge the assistence of A. Vander Lugt, who, while performing work of a relatet nature, showed him the value of the gas laser as a light source). 1964 was the year in which Denisyuk presented his first portrait holograms in Leningrad. The many publications of Stroke of the University of New York were a source of numerous impulses. It is to this period, too, that my own first experiences date back. Together with my teacher. Ulrich Grigull, whom I hold in the highest regard, I constructed the first laser interferometer for the study of heat transfer and developed the initial ideas for holo-graphic interferometry. Then, in 1965, came the work of Hildebrandt and Haines and of Powell and Stetson in the United States in this field, and it was around this time, too, that Nassenstein and his colleagues Riek and Bestenreiner began their work in this new area in Germany.

  20. Environmental risks and environmental justice, or how titanic risks are not so titanic after all.

    PubMed

    Alario, Margarita V; Freudenburg, William R

    2010-01-01

    Some of the best-known social scientific theories of risks are those that have been elaborated by Anthony Giddens and Ulrich Beck. Although their arguments differ greatly, they agree in seeing the technologically induced risks of today's "Risk Society" as global - so pervasive that they transcend all socioeconomic as well as geopolitical and national boundaries. Most empirical work, however, provides greater support for a theoretical tradition exemplified by Short and Erikson. In this paper, we argue that many of the technological mega-risks described by Giddens and Beck as "transcending" social boundaries are better described as "Titanic risks," referring not so much to their colossal impact as to the fact that - as was the case for the majority of the victims on the Titanic - actual risks are related to victims' socioeconomic as well as sociogeographic locations. Previous research has shown this to be the case with high-risk technologies, such as nuclear energy and weaponry, and also with localized ones, such as toxic waste disposal. This article illustrates that the same is true even for the most genuinely "global" risks of all, namely those associated with global climate disruption.

  1. The Cosmopolitanization of Science: Experience from Chinese Stem Cell Scientists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Joy Yueyue

    2010-09-01

    It is commonly perceived that the 'globalization of science' may result in a 'Westernization of science'. In this paper, however, I use the case of stem cell science in China to demonstrate that developing countries are sometimes able to effectively shape the norms of global/local scientific exchange. Based on interviews with 38 stem cell scientists in six Chinese cities in early 2008, this paper elucidates Chinese scientists' outlook towards cross-border collaborations and the effects that the internationalization of science has had on everyday laboratory operations. Findings suggest that although there still exists an asymmetry of scientific influence, and in many aspects China is still 'catching-up' to the West, there is also a changing nature of communication beyond borders. One key aspect of recent international scientific development is the growing necessity for local stakeholders to acquire a global mindset and to compare, reflect and accommodate diverse interests. This is what I define as the 'cosmopolitanization of science'. The study empirically examines the sociological and methodological implications of the cosmopolitanization process and further develops Ulrich Beck's cosmopolitan theory by delineating four main features of the 'cosmopolitanization of science': shared future benefits, passive ethicization, reflexive negotiation, and continuous performance.

  2. Growth, productivity, and scientific impact of sources of HIV/AIDS research information, with a focus on eastern and southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Bosire Onyancha, Omwoyo

    2008-05-01

    As channels of communicating HIV/AIDS research information, serial publications and particularly journals are increasingly used in response to the pandemic. The last few decades have witnessed a proliferation of sources of HIV/AIDS-related information, bringing many challenges to collection-development librarians as well as to researchers. This study uses an informetric approach to examine the growth, productivity and scientific impact of these sources, during the period 1980 to 2005, and especially to measure performance in the publication and dissemination of HIV/AIDS research about or from eastern or southern Africa. Data were collected from MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SCI), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), and Ulrich's Periodical Directory. The analysis used Sitkis version 1.5, Microsoft Office Access, Microsoft Office Excel, Bibexcel, and Citespace version 2.0.1. The specific objectives were to identify the number of sources of HIV/AIDS-related information that have been published in the region, the coverage of these in key bibliographic databases, the most commonly used publication type for HIV/AIDS research, the countries in which the sources are published, the sources' productivity in terms of numbers of papers and citations, the most influential sources, the subject coverage of the sources, and the core sources of HIV/AIDS-information.

  3. The Cosmopolitanization of Science1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Joy Yueyue

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly perceived that the ‘globalization of science’ may result in a ‘Westernization of science’. In this paper, however, I use the case of stem cell science in China to demonstrate that developing countries are sometimes able to effectively shape the norms of global/local scientific exchange. Based on interviews with 38 stem cell scientists in six Chinese cities in early 2008, this paper elucidates Chinese scientists’ outlook towards cross-border collaborations and the effects that the internationalization of science has had on everyday laboratory operations. Findings suggest that although there still exists an asymmetry of scientific influence, and in many aspects China is still ‘catching-up’ to the West, there is also a changing nature of communication beyond borders. One key aspect of recent international scientific development is the growing necessity for local stakeholders to acquire a global mindset and to compare, reflect and accommodate diverse interests. This is what I define as the ‘cosmopolitanization of science’. The study empirically examines the sociological and methodological implications of the cosmopolitanization process and further develops Ulrich Beck’s cosmopolitan theory by delineating four main features of the ‘cosmopolitanization of science’: shared future benefits, passive ethicization, reflexive negotiation, and continuous performance. PMID:24409002

  4. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  5. The greater temporal acuity in the reminder task than in the 2AFC task is independent of standard duration and sensory modality.

    PubMed

    Rammsayer, Thomas; Ulrich, Rolf

    2012-03-01

    The present study compared estimates of the difference limen (DL) from the reminder and the two-alternative forced-choice task (2AFC) task. Both tasks used exactly the same set of stimulus values and also the same adaptive method for estimating DL. The magnitude of the standard stimulus was varied over a large range. In two experiments, participants discriminated the duration of two successively presented auditory and visual stimuli, respectively. The results are unambiguous. DL estimates from the 2AFC task were considerably larger than the ones from the reminder task. This difference between the two performance estimates was rather stable across the range of standards used and across both sensory modalities. These results reinforce the conclusion by Lapid, Ulrich, and Rammsayer (2008) that the 2AFC task produces consistently higher values of DL than the reminder task. Furthermore and most important, the present data indicate that the observed shape of the Weber function is not influenced by the psychophysical method applied.

  6. Diversity of ophiolites and obduction processes: examples from Eastern Tethyan regions and New Caledonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitechurch, Hubert; Agard, Philippe; Ulrich, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of ophiolites and obduction processes: examples from Eastern Tethyan regions and New Caledonia. Whitechurch H.(1) Agard P.(2), Ulrich M.(1) (1) EOST - University of Strasbourg (France) (2) ISTeP - University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France) Ophiolites are considered as pieces of oceanic lithosphere that escaped subduction to be obducted on continental margins. After the Penrose Conference in 1972, they have all been regarded as issued from mid-ocean ridges of large oceans. Subsequently, most of ophiolites have been considered as generated in supra-subduction zone (SSZ) environment, mainly on the basis of geochemical arguments. However, this characterization encompasses very different geological situations, somewhat in contradiction with a univocal geochemical interpretation, both in terms of where ophiolite formed (i.e., ocean-continent transition zones, ocean ridges, marginal basins) and were obducted (contrasting nature of the margins). Examples from eastern Mesozoic Tethyan ophiolites (Cyprus, Turkey, Syria, Iran, Oman) and tertiary New Caledonia ophiolites all show this diversity, both in their internal structures and geological setting of obduction. Several questions will be addressed in this debate: the relationships and paradoxes between the nature of ophiolites, their geodynamic environment of formation, their geochemistry, their modality of obduction and ultimately the mountain range style where they are found.

  7. ASTROMETRIC JITTER OF THE SUN AS A STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Parker, D.; Ulrich, R. K.

    2010-07-10

    The daily variation of the solar photocenter over some 11 yr is derived from the Mount Wilson data reprocessed by Ulrich et al. to closely match the surface distribution of solar irradiance. The standard deviations of astrometric jitter are 0.52 {mu}AU and 0.39 {mu}AU in the equatorial and the axial dimensions, respectively. The overall dispersion is strongly correlated with solar cycle, reaching 0.91 {mu}AU at maximum activity in 2000. The largest short-term deviations from the running average (up to 2.6 {mu}AU) occur when a group of large spots happen to lie on one side with respect to the center of the disk. The amplitude spectrum of the photocenter variations never exceeds 0.033 {mu}AU for the range of periods 0.6-1.4 yr, corresponding to the orbital periods of planets in the habitable zone. Astrometric detection of Earth-like planets around stars as quiet as the Sun is not affected by star spot noise, but the prospects for more active stars may be limited to giant planets.

  8. Spectral definition of the ArTeMiS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Vic; Maffei, Bruno; Pisano, Giampaolo; Dubreuil, Didier; Delisle, Cyrille; Le Pennec, Jean; Hurtado, Norma

    2014-07-01

    ArTeMiS is a sub-millimetre camera to be operated, on the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Telescope (APEX). The ultimate goal is to observe simultaneously in three atmospheric spectral windows in the region of 200, 350 and 450 microns. We present the filtering scheme, which includes the cryostat window, thermal rejection elements, band separation and spectral isolation, which has been adopted for this instrument. This was achieved using a combination of scattering, Yoshinaga filters, organic dyes and Ulrich type embedded metallic mesh devices. Design of the quasi-optical mesh components has been developed by modelling with an in-house developed code. For the band separating dichroics, which are used with an incidence angle of 35 deg, further modelling has been performed with HFSS (Ansoft). Spectral characterization of the components for the 350 and 450 bands have been performed with a Martin-Puplett Polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer. While for the first commissioning and observation campaign, one spectral band only was operational (350 microns), we report on the design of the 200, 350 and 450 micron bands.

  9. Does semantic redundancy gain result from multiple semantic priming?

    PubMed

    Schröter, Hannes; Bratzke, Daniel; Fiedler, Anja; Birngruber, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Fiedler, Schröter, and Ulrich (2013) reported faster responses to a single written word when the semantic content of this word (e.g., "elephant") matched both targets (e.g., "animal", "gray") as compared to a single target (e.g., "animal", "brown"). This semantic redundancy gain was explained by statistical facilitation due to a race of independent memory retrieval processes. The present experiment addresses one alternative explanation, namely that semantic redundancy gain results from multiple pre-activation of words that match both targets. In different blocks of trials, participants performed a redundant-targets task and a lexical decision task. The targets of the redundant-targets task served as primes in the lexical decision task. Replicating the findings of Fiedler et al., a semantic redundancy gain was observed in the redundant-targets task. Crucially, however, there was no evidence of a multiple semantic priming effect in the lexical decision task. This result suggests that semantic redundancy gain cannot be explained by multiple pre-activation of words that match both targets.

  10. High-foot Implosion Workshop (March 22-24, 2016) Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.

    2016-05-06

    that the High-Foot experimental series has been a success. It has fulfilled the original goal of being an implosion platform that could separate the low-mode effects from the high-mode effects. Just because we now know when the High-Foot implosions break, it does not mean that they have served their purpose. This will be a very useful platform to study hohlraum coupling, to determine if controlling shape reduces residual kinetic energy, and testing hypotheses of how the hot-spot assembles.” – J. Knauer (LLE) “The LLNL "base camp" strategy for hohlraums was finally presented. Goals are to understand the safe operating space for the hohlraum and to find designs with good enough symmetry inside NIF's envelope, varying the CCR, pulse length and capsule designs. LLNL has a draft set of drive asymmetry requirements.” – P. Gauthier (CEA)

  11. MDI and GOLF simulation and intercomparison via the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott Edward

    A 24 channel analyzer (Evans and Ulrich, 1995) was designed and built for the Mt. Wilson 150-foot solar tower. This instrument has 4 channels dedicated to the continuance of the existing dataset for the CrII and FeI solar lines. Additionally, the instrument employs 10 channels each for NaD1 and NiI. The latter two lines are those studied by the SOHO instruments GOLF and MDI respectively. Ten-point line profiles are taken for both Ni and NaD1 and analyzed using computer simulations of both the MDI and GOLF instruments. Since the data are taken simultaneously and for a resolved sun, the signal derived from the MDI simulation can be compared on a pixel by pixel basis to the GOLF single wing signal. A correlation is found between MDI Id and GOLF single wing intensity. By removing the Id contribution to the GOLF signal, we hope to achieve a purer velocity signal in GOLF and hence raise the signal to noise ratio. The roll angle of MDI has not been accurately measured due to the failure of SOHO's gyros. At present, a single guide star is being used for spacecraft pointing and the error in roll angle is unkown. Previously (Ulrich and Henney, 1994) the MDI roll angle was estimated by comparing magnetograms from MDI and Mt. Wilson. Observations derived from the new multichannel system at Mt. Wilson can measure the roll angle directly by comparing MDI proxy images to a Mt. Wilson proxy derived from the MDI data. The 38 roll angle measurements spanning selected time frames covering nearly the entire SOHO mission average -.32 degrees. This suggests that a steady, equator-crossing flow of ~-10 m/s would exist due to the error in MDI coordinates. A Southward, equator-crossing flow has been observed (Giles, et al. 1997) whose magnitude is roughly -7 m/s. Thus some or even all of such a flow may be explainable by the MDI roll angle. Sources of error in the Mt. Wilson determination of the MDI roll angle are discussed and found to be relatively small (~3-4 are minutes) when estimated

  12. Character and Effective Leadership of the Knowledge Worker

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, Anne E.

    2005-04-20

    Ulrich in the forward to the Zenger and Folkman (2002) book, ''The Extraordinary Leader'', wrote about the importance of character in leadership stating, ''Everything about great leaders radiates from character. Character improves the probability of exhibiting strong interpersonal skill. Some of this perceived character is innate . . . but more is driven by the leader's self-awareness and interactions with others'' (p. ix). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership effectiveness and character using leader-managers of knowledge workers as the subject sample. Findings indicated that character, particularly those factors associated with honesty, setting the example, and valuing and strengthening others, were what set the most effective leader-managers apart from their peers. Technical competence and self-efficacy were found to be common characteristics of the study sample as was a drive for results. Who a leader-manager is, his/her substance, was found in this study to differentiate the ''best'' leader-managers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. By their character, leader-managers establish the environment in which knowledge workers contribute and grow. As found by Pfeiffer (2000), Leaders of companies that experience smaller gaps between what they know and what they do (to turn knowledge into action), understand that their most important task is not necessarily to make strategic decisions, or, for that matter any decisions at all. Their task is to help build systems of practice that produce a more reliable transformation of knowledge into action. Leaders create environments, reinforce norms, and help set expectations through what they do. (p. 261) In other words, as confirmed by this research study, their task is to model the way. Study results also confirmed Ulrich's (1996) supposition that to create the ''air'' in which employees work, leaders have the personal characteristics that engender trust and commitment. In

  13. RE-EXAMINING SUNSPOT TILT ANGLE TO INCLUDE ANTI-HALE STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, B. H.; Norton, A. A.; Li, J. E-mail: aanorton@stanford.edu

    2014-12-20

    Sunspot groups and bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) serve as an observational diagnostic of the solar cycle. We use Debrecen Photohelographic Data (DPD) from 1974-2014 that determined sunspot tilt angles from daily white light observations, and data provided by Li and Ulrich that determined sunspot magnetic tilt angle using Mount Wilson magnetograms from 1974-2012. The magnetograms allowed for BMR tilt angles that were anti-Hale in configuration, so tilt values ranged from 0 to 360° rather than the more common ±90°. We explore the visual representation of magnetic tilt angles on a traditional butterfly diagram by plotting the mean area-weighted latitude of umbral activity in each bipolar sunspot group, including tilt information. The large scatter of tilt angles over the course of a single cycle and hemisphere prevents Joy's law from being visually identified in the tilt-butterfly diagram without further binning. The average latitude of anti-Hale regions does not differ from the average latitude of all regions in both hemispheres. The distribution of anti-Hale sunspot tilt angles are broadly distributed between 0 and 360° with a weak preference for east-west alignment 180° from their expected Joy's law angle. The anti-Hale sunspots display a log-normal size distribution similar to that of all sunspots, indicating no preferred size for anti-Hale sunspots. We report that 8.4% ± 0.8% of all bipolar sunspot regions are misclassified as Hale in traditional catalogs. This percentage is slightly higher for groups within 5° of the equator due to the misalignment of the magnetic and heliographic equators.

  14. Testing the validity of conflict drift-diffusion models for use in estimating cognitive processes: A parameter-recovery study.

    PubMed

    White, Corey N; Servant, Mathieu; Logan, Gordon D

    2017-03-29

    Researchers and clinicians are interested in estimating individual differences in the ability to process conflicting information. Conflict processing is typically assessed by comparing behavioral measures like RTs or error rates from conflict tasks. However, these measures are hard to interpret because they can be influenced by additional processes like response caution or bias. This limitation can be circumvented by employing cognitive models to decompose behavioral data into components of underlying decision processes, providing better specificity for investigating individual differences. A new class of drift-diffusion models has been developed for conflict tasks, presenting a potential tool to improve analysis of individual differences in conflict processing. However, measures from these models have not been validated for use in experiments with limited data collection. The present study assessed the validity of these models with a parameter-recovery study to determine whether and under what circumstances the models provide valid measures of cognitive processing. Three models were tested: the dual-stage two-phase model (Hübner, Steinhauser, & Lehle, Psychological Review, 117(3), 759-784, 2010), the shrinking spotlight model (White, Ratcliff, & Starns, Cognitive Psychology, 63(4), 210-238, 2011), and the diffusion model for conflict tasks (Ulrich, Schröter, Leuthold, & Birngruber, Cogntive Psychology, 78, 148-174, 2015). The validity of the model parameters was assessed using different methods of fitting the data and different numbers of trials. The results show that each model has limitations in recovering valid parameters, but they can be mitigated by adding constraints to the model. Practical recommendations are provided for when and how each model can be used to analyze data and provide measures of processing in conflict tasks.

  15. Abundance Determinations for Nova V1974 Cygni 1992 Using the Metropolis Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Scott J.; Starrfield, Sumner; Wagner, R. Mark; Bertram, Ray; Shore, Steven N.; Sonneborn, George

    1994-05-01

    Nova Cygni 1992 was the brightest nova, Vmax ~4.4, to appear since Nova V1500 Cygni 1975. It is one of the three well studied slow ``neon'' novae, the others being QU Vul, and Nova Pup 1991. We have spectroscopically monitored Nova Cygni 1992 in both the optical (using the OSU CCD spectrograph on the Perkins 1.8-m telescope at Lowell Observatory) and in the UV with IUE. We have done extensive photoionization modeling of the emission line fluxes for epochs 300, 400, and 500 days after maximum. We determined from line diagnostics that the electron density during this time was above the critical densities for many of the observed transitions. Since collisional de-excitations were important, detailed modeling was necessary to determine the physical conditions and elemental abundances of the ejected material. In order to determine both the sensitivity of the abundances to the various model parameters and the uniqueness of our solutions, we mapped the relevant parameter space (Bahcall & Ulrich 1988, Rev Mod Phys, 60, 297) with the photoionization code CLOUDY 84.06 (Ferland 1993) using the Metropolis algorithm (Metropolis et al. 1953, J Chem Phys, vol. 21). The results have allow us to determine the accuracy of the abundances. Our line profiles show that the ejected material has a non-spherical but axially symmetric configuration. We, therefore, included the filling and covering factors among the parameters in our study and also allowed the density to vary as a function of the radius. Our results demonstrate that the abundances cannot be constrained any better than factors of two but do show that helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon are enhanced above solar. Neon and oxygen in particular are shown to be enhanced to the point where an underlying ONeMg white dwarf must be the progenitor.

  16. Star Formation in NGC 6531-Evidence From the age Spread and Initial Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Douglas

    1996-09-01

    The results of a photometric UBV study of the young open cluster NGC 6531 are presented. The cluster is found to have a mean reddening E(B-V)=0.28±0.04 (s.d.) and distance modulus (V0-Mv)=10.70±0.13 (s.e.), and 105±11 likely cluster members have been identified within the cluster coronal radius of 9 arcmin. A comparison of the high-luminosity end of the cluster color-magnitude diagram to the evolutionary models by Maeder & Meynet [A&AS, 76, 411(1988)] suggests a nuclear age of (8±2) Myr. The very clear gap in the distribution of stars with 0≤(B-V)0≤0.20, corresponding to the "burn-off" of 3He in stars contracting to the main sequence [Ulrich, ApJ, 168, 57 (1971)], implies a contraction age of (8±3) Myr. There would seem to be no evidence of a spread in the ages of cluster stars, as has been observed in several other young open clusters [Herbst & Miller, AJ, 87, 1478 (1982)]. The initial mass function (IMF) constructed from the cluster luminosity function and the mass-luminosity relation given by Scab (1986) shows good agreement with the field star IMF, and with the IMFS of a number of clusters of similar age and richness. The relative deficiency of low-mass stars seen by Herbst and Miller in NGC 3293 (a cluster of quite similar age and reddening) is not evident in NGC 6531.

  17. Notes on the cultural significance of the sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchting, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    ‘Cultural’ in the title is intended to allude to the bearing of the sciences on humanity's general orientation in the world. Questions about this are distinguished from ones about the sciences' instrumental aspect, as means to ends extrinsic to them qua sciences, and also from ones about their intrinsic character, except to the extent that these bear on the central topic of the paper. It is argued that the sciences, ethical/moral reflection and the arts are distinct but inseparable. The sciences may be regarded as ‘first among equals’ substantively, insofar they are a privileged source of a certain specially important sort of factual knowledge, and, methodologically, insofar as they provide a particularly clear model for understanding a purely naturalistic approach to the world. ...Ulrich...loved mathematics because of the people who could not endure it. He was not so much scientifically as humanly in love with science...many people for whom mathematics or natural science is a job feel it is almost an outrage if someone goes in for science for reasons like [his]. ...[He]...hated...all those who give up half-way, the faint-hearted, the soft, those who comfort their souls with flummery about the soul and who feed it, because the intellect allegedly gives it stones instead of bread, on religious, philosophical and fictitious emotions, which are like buns soaked in milk. ...soul is...easily defined negatively: it is simply what curls up and hides when there is any mention of an algebraic series. Robert Musil, The Man Without Qualities, Bk. I, Chs. 11, 13, 25.

  18. Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humlum, O.; Christiansen, H.; Neumann, U.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Sjöblom, A.; Stalsberg, K.; Rubensdotter, L.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard Ole Humlum 1,3, Hanne H. Christiansen 1, Ulrich Neumann 1, Markus Eckerstorfer 1, Anna Sjöblom 1, Knut Stalsberg 2 and Lena Rubensdotter 2. 1: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). 2: Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) 3: University of Oslo Ground based transportation in Svalbard landscape all takes place across mountainous terrain affected by different geomorphological slope processes. Traffic in and around the Svalbard settlements is increasing, and at the same time global climate models project substantial increases in temperature and precipitation in northern high latitudes for coming century. Therefore improved knowledge on the effect of climatic changes on slope processes in such high arctic landscapes is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by this, the CRYOSLOPE Svalbard research project since 2007 has carried out field observations on snow avalanche frequency and associated meteorological conditions. Snow avalanches are important geomorphic agents of erosion and deposition, and have long been a source of natural disasters in many mid-latitude mountain areas. Avalanches as a natural hazard has thereby been familiar to inhabitants of the Alps and Scandinavia for centuries, while it is a more recent experience in high arctic Svalbard. In addition, overall climate, topography and especially high winter wind speeds makes it difficult to apply snow avalanche models (numerical or empirical) developed for use at lower latitudes, e.g. in central Europe. In the presentation we examplify results from the ongoing (since winter 2006-07) monitoring of snow avalanches in Svalbard along a 70 km long observational route in the mountains. In addition, we present observations on the geomorphological impact of avalanches, with special reference to the formation of rock glaciers. Finally, we also present some initial results from numerical attempts of snow avalanche risk modelling within the study area.

  19. The effects of particle-size distribution and chloride depletion of sea-salt aerosols on estimating atmospheric deposition at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkel, M. J. Ten

    Estimating atmospheric deposition in a coastal region cannot be done without taking care of the size distribution and amount of chloride depletion of sea-salt aerosols. Size distribution of the dry deposition particles is important when the approach of Ulrich (1983, Effects of Accumulation of Air Pollutants in Forest Ecosystems, pp. 33-45. Reidel, Dordrecht) is used to estimate total atmospheric deposition levels in a coastal area. A sodium deposition model demonstrated that the presumption of an equal size of sodium aerosols and chloride, potassium, magnesium and calcium aerosols is not valid in the coastal zone. Modelled aerosol diameter distribution showed that more than 50% of the aerosols deposited in this zone is larger than 20 μm. Besides an anthropogenic source, the reaction of nitric or sulphuric acid with sea-salt aerosols, by which HCl (g) is formed, can be a second source of an excess of chloride in throughflow compared to sodium. The newly formed HCl can deposit as dry deposition on a vegetation, and not as dry bulk deposition. Chloride loss in the bulk deposition at the coastal sites was up to 35% in summertime. Chloride depletion also affects the calculation of potential acid deposition (PAD) in the coastal zone. Part of the NO 3- and excess SO 42- deposition should not be taken into account when calculating the PAD, because it is neutralized by the sea-salt. This effect decreases very soon with increasing distance to the sea. Implementing chloride depletion in calculating yearly PAD at 500 m from the coastline decreased the PAD with 26%. At 2000 m this decrease was 14%. However, in some cases PAD values on a fortnightly base were observed to decrease more than 50% after implementing chloride depletion.

  20. Calculation of stellar structure. IV. Results using a detailed energy generation subroutine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, C. A.

    1995-12-01

    The results from two solar model calculations using the "energy.for" energy generation and neutrino flux code (Bahcall & Pinsonneault 1992) are presented. The models of the present Sun were generated using the program described in the first three papers of this series and using only the helium abundance profile from the Bahcall & Ulrich (1988) (BU) standard model in the present model structure calculations. One model is a simulation of the BU model and yields a ^37^Cl solar neutrino counting rate of 7.0SNU (compared to 7.9SNU for the BU model) and a ^71^Ga neutrino experiment counting rate between 112 and 137SNU (compared to 132SNU for the BU model). The second model has a postulated small high-Z core (Rouse 1983) and yields a ^37^Cl neutrino experiment counting rate of 2.45SNU that is within one sigma of the Homestake Collaboration observed rate of (2.55+/-0.25)SNU (see Parke 1995). It yields a ^71^Ga neutrino experiment counting rate between 89 and 103SNU that is within one sigma of the GALLEX Collaboration neutrino experiment observed rate of (79+/-12)SNU (see Parke 1995). The theoretical ^8^B solar neutrino flux and the observed Kamiokande ^8^B flux (Hirata et al. 1989) are discussed regarding the puzzle of explaining both the chlorine experiment results and the Kamiokande results. The modification of the energy.for code for use in the current Rouse program is described. Consistency of a high-Z core solar model with theories of star formation from pre-stellar nuclei (Krat 1952; Urey 1956; Huang 1957) is suggested.

  1. Mitochondrial complex I-linked disease.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most frequently encountered single mitochondrial single enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial disorder. Although specific genotype-phenotype correlations are very difficult to identify, the majority of patients present with symptoms caused by leukodystrophy. The poor genotype-phenotype correlations can make establishing a diagnosis a challenge. The classical way to establish a complex I deficiency in patients is by performing spectrophotometric measurements of the enzyme in a muscle biopsy or other patient-derived material (liver or heart biopsy, cultured skin fibroblasts). Complex I is encoded by both the mtDNA and nuclear DNA and pathogenic mutations have been identified in the majority of the 44 genes encoding the structural subunits of complex I. In recent years, the increasing possibilities for diagnostic molecular genetic tests of large gene panels, exomes, and even entire genomes has led to the identification of many novel genetic defects causing complex I deficiency. Complex I mutations not only result in a reduced enzyme activity but also induce secondary effects at the cellular level, such as elevated reactive oxygen species production, altered membrane potential and mitochondrial morphology. At this moment there is no cure for complex I deficiency and the treatment options for complex I patients are restricted to symptomatic treatment. Recent developments, amongst others based on the treatment of the secondary effects of complex I deficiency, have shown to be promising as new therapeutic strategies in vitro and have entered clinical trials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  2. Ischemic A/D transition of mitochondrial complex I and its role in ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Dröse, Stefan; Stepanova, Anna; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a key enzyme in cellular energy metabolism and provides approximately 40% of the proton-motive force that is utilized during mitochondrial ATP production. The dysregulation of complex I function--either genetically, pharmacologically, or metabolically induced--has severe pathophysiological consequences that often involve an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Slow transition of the active (A) enzyme to the deactive, dormant (D) form takes place during ischemia in metabolically active organs such as the heart and brain. The reactivation of complex I occurs upon reoxygenation of ischemic tissue, a process that is usually accompanied by an increase in cellular ROS production. Complex I in the D-form serves as a protective mechanism preventing the oxidative burst upon reperfusion. Conversely, however, the D-form is more vulnerable to oxidative/nitrosative damage. Understanding the so-called active/deactive (A/D) transition may contribute to the development of new therapeutic interventions for conditions like stroke, cardiac infarction, and other ischemia-associated pathologies. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the mechanism of A/D transition of mitochondrial complex I considering recently available structural data and site-specific labeling experiments. In addition, this review discusses in detail the impact of the A/D transition on ROS production by complex I and the S-nitrosation of a critical cysteine residue of subunit ND3 as a strategy to prevent oxidative damage and tissue damage during ischemia-reperfusion injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  3. The origin of the supernumerary subunits and assembly factors of complex I: A treasure trove of pathway evolution.

    PubMed

    Elurbe, Dei M; Huynen, Martijn A

    2016-07-01

    We review and document the evolutionary origin of all complex I assembly factors and nine supernumerary subunits from protein families. Based on experimental data and the conservation of critical residues we identify a spectrum of protein function conservation between the complex I representatives and their non-complex I homologs. This spectrum ranges from proteins that have retained their molecular function but in which the substrate specificity may have changed or have become more specific, like NDUFAF5, to proteins that have lost their original molecular function and critical catalytic residues like NDUFAF6. In between are proteins that have retained their molecular function, which however appears unrelated to complex I, like ACAD9, or proteins in which amino acids of the active site are conserved but for which no enzymatic activity has been reported, like NDUFA10. We interpret complex I evolution against the background of molecular evolution theory. Complex I supernumerary subunits and assembly factors appear to have been recruited from proteins that are mitochondrial and/or that are expressed when complex I is active. Within the evolution of complex I and its assembly there are many cases of neofunctionalization after gene duplication, like ACAD9 and TMEM126B, one case of subfunctionalization: ACPM1 and ACPM2 in Yarrowia lipolytica, and one case in which a complex I protein itself appears to have been the source of a new protein from another complex: NDUFS6 gave rise to cytochrome c oxidase subunit COX4/COX5b. Complex I and its assembly can therewith be regarded as a treasure trove for pathway evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  4. An analysis of toxicology and medical journal conflict-of-interest polices.

    PubMed

    Krimsky, Sheldon; Sweet, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Basic science and medical journals are increasingly requiring authors to disclose financial interests they have in the subject matter of contributed articles and letters. A comparison of journal conflict-of-interest (COI) policies can provide insight into published reports of low compliance rates and inconsistencies in disclosures by the same author found in different journals. The objective of this article is to compare the criteria, specificity, and scope of COI polices in toxicology and medical journals. We studied the COI policies of 47 toxicology and 180 medical journals catalogued in Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory for criteria of competing interests, types of submissions covered, monetary or time thresholds for reporting, and penalties for violations. Indicators were constructed for rating policy specificity, author discretion, and policy scope. Written COI policies were found in 87% if the toxicology and 84% of the medical journals; 15% and 28% of the toxicology and medical journals, respectively, were explicit about the type of content covered by the policy; 20% and 29%, respectively, included a monetary threshold for reporting purposes; the level of author discretion for reporting COIs was found to be high in 46% of the toxicology and 41% of the medical journals respectively. The level of specificity for more than 75% of the written journal COI policies for both fields was minimal or practically nil, and the scope of more than 80% of the policies was minimal to narrow. Lack of specificity, high author discretion, and restricted scope were found to be prevalent among COI policies of toxicology and medical journals.

  5. Building a leadership brand.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2007-01-01

    How do some firms produce a pipeline of consistently excellent managers? Instead of concentrating merely on strengthening the skills of individuals, these companies focus on building a broad organizational leadership capability. It's what Ulrich and Smallwood--cofounders of the RBL Group, a leadership development consultancy--call a leadership brand. Organizations with leadership brands take an "outside-in" approach to executive development. They begin with a clear statement of what they want to be known for by customers and then link it with a required set of management skills. The Lexus division of Toyota, for instance, translates its tagline--"The pursuit of perfection"--into an expectation that its leaders excel at managing quality processes. The slogan of Bon Secours Health System is "Good help to those in need." It demands that its managers balance business skills with compassion and caring. The outside-in approach helps firms build a reputation for high-quality leaders whom customers trust to deliver on the company's promises. In examining 150 companies with strong leadership capabilities, the authors found that the organizations follow five strategies. First, make sure managers master the basics of leadership--for example, setting strategy and grooming talent. Second, ensure that leaders internalize customers' high expectations. Third, incorporate customer feedback into evaluations of executives. Fourth, invest in programs that help managers hone the right skills, by tapping customers to participate in such programs. Finally, track the success of efforts to build leadership bench strength over the long-term. The result is outstanding management that persists even when individual executives leave. In fact, companies with the strongest leadership brands often become "leader feeders"--firms that regularly graduate leaders who go on to head other companies.

  6. The natural, the normal and the normative: contested terrains in ageing and old age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Higgs, Paul F

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in health and longevity in countries such as the UK and USA have radically destabilised notions of ageing and old age. From the 19th century onwards the idea of a natural lifecourse following normatively understood stages ending in infirmity and death has been challenged by social and bio-medical developments. Breakthroughs in bio-gerontology and in bio-medicine have created the possibility of an increasingly differentiated idea of normal ageing. The potential to overcome or significantly reduce the age-associated effects of bodies growing older has led many social gerontologists to argue for a return to a more 'normatively' based conception of ageing and old age. This paper examines and outlines the tensions between these different discourses and points out that our understanding of the norm is also fast changing as it intersects with the somatic diversity inherent in contemporary consumer society. Drawing on the theoretical work of Ulrich Beck and Zygmunt Bauman, this paper argues that the normalization of diversity leads to a reworking of the idea of normativity which in turn is reflected in profound transformations at the level of institutional arrangements and legal systems. Such changes not only lead to more discussion of what is legally and socially acceptable but also potentially lead to greater calls for regulation concerning outcomes. In this paper we argue that we need to distinguish between the newly reconfigured domains of the natural, the normal and the normative now being utilised in the understanding of ageing if we are to understand this important field of health.

  7. [Veterinary double-monsters historically viewed].

    PubMed

    Baljet, B; Heijke, G C

    1997-01-01

    A large number of duplication monstrosities have been observed in cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, goats, cats and dogs, ever since the publication of the famous woodcut of a swine double monster by J. S. Brant in Basel in 1496, better known as the "wunderbare Sau von Landser im Elsass". Albrecht Dürer also made a woodcut of this double monster in front of the village Landser in 1496. A picture of a deer double monster was published in 1603 by Heinrich Ulrich in Germany. In the monograph De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis ..., published by the Italian Fortunius Licetus in 1616 pictures of double monsters being half man half dog are found. These fantasy figures have been popular for a long time and were supposed to be really in existence. Apart from these fantasy figures many pictures are known from real veterinary double monsters. U. Aldrovandus described in 1642 in his Monstrorum historia, besides many fantasy figures, also real human and veterinary double monsters and he gave also good pictures of them. In the 19th century examples of veterinary duplication monstrosities were published by I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1832-37), E. F. Gurlt (1832), W. Vrolik (1840) and C. Taruffi (1881); they proposed also concepts concerning the etiology. In the second volume of his famous handbook of teratology (1907), E. Schwalbe described many veterinary double monsters and discussed the theories of the genesis of congenital malformations. Various theories concerning the genesis of double monsters have been given since Aristotle (384-322 B.C.). ...

  8. Calculating Formulas of Coefficient and Mean Neutron Exposure in the Exponential Expression of Neutron Exposure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. H.; Zhou, G. D.; Ma, K.; Ma, W. J.; Cui, W. Y.; Zhang, B.

    2015-11-01

    Present studies have shown that, in the main stages of the development and evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star s-process models, the distributions of neutron exposures in the nucleosynthesis regions can all be expressed by an exponential function ({ρ_{AGB}}(τ) = C/{τ_0}exp ( - τ/{τ_0})) in the effective range of values. However, the specific expressions of the proportional coefficient C and the mean neutron exposure ({τ_0}) in the formula for different models are not completely determined in the related literatures. Through dissecting the basic solving method of the exponential distribution of neutron exposures, and systematically combing the solution procedure of exposure distribution for different stellar models, the general calculating formulas as well as their auxiliary equations for calculating C and ({τ_0}) are reduced. Given the discrete distribution of neutron exposures ({P_k}), i.e. the mass ratio of the materials which have exposed to neutrons for (k) ((k = 0, 1, 2 \\cdots )) times when reaching the final distribution with respect to the materials of the He intershell, (C = - {P_1}/ln R), and ({τ_0} = - Δ τ /ln R) can be obtained. Here, (R) expresses the probability that the materials can successively experience neutron irradiation for two times in the He intershell. For the convective nucleosynthesis model (including the Ulrich model and the ({}^{13}{C})-pocket convective burning model), (R) is just the overlap factor r, namely the mass ratio of the materials which can undergo two successive thermal pulses in the He intershell. And for the (^{13}{C})-pocket radiative burning model, (R = sumlimits_{k = 1}^∞ {{P_k}} ). This set of formulas practically give the corresponding relationship between C or ({τ_0}) and the model parameters. The results of this study effectively solve the problem of analytically calculating the distribution of neutron exposures in the low-mass AGB star s-process nucleosynthesis model of (^{13}{C

  9. Special Section on Synchronization in Nonlinear Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeguchi, Tohru; Tokuda, Isao

    Synchronization is a ubiquitous phenomenon of coupled nonlinear oscillators, commonly found in physics, engineering, biology, and other diverse disciplines. It has a long research history back to Christiaan Huygens, who discovered synchronized motion of two pendulum clocks in 1673. It is very easy to observe synchronization in our daily life: e.g., metronomes, candle fires, pet-bottle oscillators, saltwater oscillators, and so on(See, for example, experimental movies at http://www.youtube.com/user/IkeguchiLab?feature=watch). For the last few decades, significant development has been made from both theories and experiments on synchronization of coupled limit cycle oscillators as well as coupled chaotic oscillators. Applications have been also developed to communication technologies, controlling techniques, and data analysis. Combined with the idea from complex network theory, neuroscience, and systems biology, the research speed of synchronization has been even accelerated. This Special Section of NOLTA is primarily dedicated to the recent advanced development of basics and applications of synchronization in science and engineering. A number of qualified works is included, ranging from experimental study on synchronization of Huygens' system, analog circuits, and singing voice to applied study of synchronization in communication networks. One invited paper is devoted to comprehensive reviews on generalized synchronization of chaotic oscillators. On behalf of the editorial committee of the special section, the guest editors would like to express their sincere thanks to all the authors for their excellent contributions. In particular, they are grateful to Prof. Dr. Ulrich Parlitz for contributing his distinguished review article. They would also like to thank the reviewers and the members of the guest editorial committee, especially Prof. Hiroo Sekiya of Chiba University and the editorial staffs of the NOLTA journal, for their supports on publishing this Special

  10. ACTIVE-REGION TILT ANGLES: MAGNETIC VERSUS WHITE-LIGHT DETERMINATIONS OF JOY'S LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Colaninno, R. C.; Baranyi, T.; Li, J. E-mail: robin.colaninno@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu

    2015-01-01

    The axes of solar active regions are inclined relative to the east-west direction, with the tilt angle tending to increase with latitude ({sup J}oy's law{sup )}. Observational determinations of Joy's law have been based either on white-light images of sunspot groups or on magnetograms, where the latter have the advantage of measuring directly the physically relevant quantity (the photospheric field), but the disadvantage of having been recorded routinely only since the mid-1960s. White-light studies employing the historical Mount Wilson (MW) database have yielded tilt angles that are smaller and that increase less steeply with latitude than those obtained from magnetic data. We confirm this effect by comparing sunspot-group tilt angles from the Debrecen Photoheliographic Database with measurements made by Li and Ulrich using MW magnetograms taken during cycles 21-23. Whether white-light or magnetic data are employed, the median tilt angles significantly exceed the mean values, and provide a better characterization of the observed distributions. The discrepancy between the white-light and magnetic results is found to have two main sources. First, a substantial fraction of the white-light ''tilt angles'' refer to sunspots of the same polarity. Of greater physical significance is that the magnetograph measurements include the contribution of plage areas, which are invisible in white-light images but tend to have greater axial inclinations than the adjacent sunspots. Given the large uncertainties inherent in both the white-light and the magnetic measurements, it remains unclear whether any systematic relationship exists between tilt angle and cycle amplitude during cycles 16-23.

  11. Children with low motor ability have lower visual-motor integration ability but unaffected perceptual skills.

    PubMed

    Bonifacci, Paola

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceptual, visual-motor abilities and intellectual skills in children with low, average and above average motor abilities. The participants were 144 children (aged 6-10 years) attending elementary school. Three groups of children were identified on the basis of their performance at the TGMD (Test of Gross Motor Development; [Ulrich, D.A. (1985). TGMD, Test of Gross Motor Development. Austin, Texas: PRO-ED. Edizione Italiana a cura di D. Ianes, TEST TGM. Test di valutazione delle abilita grosso-motorie. 1994, Trento: Edizioni Centro Studi Erickson]). Each child received an intelligence test (K-BIT; [Kaufman, A.S., & Kaufman, N.L. (1990). K-BIT. Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service]) and was evaluated for perceptual and visual-motor integration abilities (DTVP; [Hammill, D.D., Pearson, N.A., & Voress, J.K. (1993). Developmental Test of Visual Perception (2nd ed.). Austin, Texas: PRO-ED. Edizione Italiana a cura di D. Ianes, TEST TPV. Test di percezione visiva e integrazione visuo-motoria. Trento: Edizioni Centro Studi Erickson]). Results highlight a significant difference in visual-motor integration between children with high and low gross-motor abilities, in the absence of significant differences in perceptual skills or intellectual ability. The findings are discussed with reference to the concept of atypical brain development [Gilger, J.W., & Kaplan, B.J. (2001). Atypical brain development: A conceptual framework for understanding developmental learning disabilities. Developmental Neuropsychology, 20, 465].

  12. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z

  13. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich W. Heinz

    2012-11-09

    In the course of this project the Ohio State University group led by the PI, Professor Ulrich Heinz, developed a comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamical evolution of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions and of the numerous experimental observables that can be used to diagnose the evolving and short-lived hot and dense fireball created in such collisions. Starting from a qualitative understanding of the main features based on earlier research during the last decade of the twentieth century on collisions at lower energies, the group exploited newly developed theoretical tools and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to arrive at an increasingly quantitative description of the experimentally observed phenomena. Work done at Ohio State University (OSU) was instrumental in the discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear collisions at RHIC behaves like an almost perfect liquid with minimal viscosity. The tool of relativistic fluid dynamics for viscous liquids developed at OSU in the years 2005-2007 opened the possibility to quantitatively determine the value of the QGP viscosity empirically from experimental measurements of the collective flow patterns established in the collisions. A first quantitative extraction of the QGP shear viscosity, with controlled theoretical uncertainty estimates, was achieved during the last year of this project in 2010. OSU has paved the way for a transition of the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics from a qualitative discovery stage to a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. To gain confidence in the precision of our theoretical understanding of quark-gluon plasma dynamics, one must test it on a large set of experimentally measured observables. This achievement report demonstrates that we have, at

  14. Physics in Berlin I: The Historical City Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    Hans-Jürgen Treder has written that, “During the nearly 60 years that spanned the call of Hermann Helmholtz to become professor of physics in the Berlin University ... in 1871, and Erwin Schrödinger’s call to the chair of theoretical physics [in 1927] ..., the general history of physics was closely connected to the history of physics in Berlin.”1 Besides Helmholtz and Schrödinger, the list of famous physicists who worked in Berlin during those six decades includes Albert Einstein, Max Planck, Max von Laue, Walther Nernst, Gustav Hertz, James Franck, and Lise Meitner, to name but some of them.2 But the heyday of physics in Berlin arose neither by chance nor out of the blue: It resulted from a long historical process that began with the foundation of the Brandenburg Academy of Science in 1700 by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz; the present Academy of Science in Berlin is the direct descendent of that society. With the founding of the Academy in the capital of Prussia, science established itself in Berlin as a constituent part of its social life. It was predominantly in the context of mathematical research and the fields of mechanics and astronomy that physics was practiced at first. The names of such renowned scientists as Leonhard Euler, Joseph Louis Lagrange, Johann Heinrich Lambert, and Franz Ulrich Theodosius Aepinus bear witness to the remarkably high level that mathematical and physical research had reached in Berlin as early as the 18th century. There was no other city in Germany at that time where there was such a large and extraordinary community of mathematicians, physicists, and chemists teaching and carrying out research. You will find a reminder of this early period in the history of physics in Berlin at Behrenstrasse 21 (a street parallel to the western part of Unter den Linden), where Leonhard Euler lived during his Berlin period from 1743 to 1766. Of course, this is not Euler’s original house, since large parts of Berlin were totally destroyed by

  15. Comparison of growth in compensation for hospital administrators and nurses in Kansas, 2003 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Anno, Tony; Hornberger, Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    The current nursing shortage is reaching a critical level (Buerhaus, Donelan, Ulrich, Norman, & Dittus, 2006). As baby boomers reach an age when they will require increased healthcare the demand for nurses will accelerate over the foreseeable future. One issue impacting the desirability of nursing as a career is salary compensation. Nurse salaries have not kept up with the rate of inflation (American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2005) while hospital Chief Executive Officer (CEO) compensation has increased (Westfall, 2005). The purpose of this study was to examine the compensation growth of hospital CEO's compared to nurses over the past three years in Kansas. Hospital CEO data was obtained from the Internal Revenue Service form 990 retrieved from the public domain. Nursing salary data was obtained from archival data published by the Kansas Department of Labor Statistics. Data analyses described differences in the salaries of nurses and chief executive officers in Kansas over a three-year period and within subgroups defined by geographical region. During this three year period Kansas hospital CEOs' compensation increased 23.2% compared to a national increase of 9%. Registered Nurses' compensation in Kansas increased 17.39% compared to a national average of 11%. Licensed Practical Nurse compensation in Kansas increased 6.28% compared to a national average of 9%. The population in the United States is growing older at the same time demand for nurses will accelerate (Lovell, 2006). The shortage of nurses is reaching a critical level as hospitals try to provide care. Causes of the shortage are multifaceted and include the demand for nurses outpacing supply and compensation trends. In Kansas, the supply of nurses is hampered by a present shortage of nursing faculty that will be exacerbated by the impending retirement of a sizable portion of the faculty in the next decade (Hornberger, Hess, & Thompson, 2005). The lack of faculty impairs nursing programs

  16. Physics-based Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for Probable M>7.0 earthquakes in the Marmara Sea Region (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, Aybige; Aochi, Hideo; Herrero, Andre; Pischiutta, Marta; Karanikas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    The city of Istanbul is characterized by one of the highest levels of seismic risk in Europe and the Mediterranean region. The important source of the increased risk in Istanbul is the remarkable probability of the occurrence of a large earthquake, which stands at about 65% during the coming years due to the existing seismic gap and the post-1999 earthquake stress transfer at the western portion of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). In this study, we have simulated hybrid broadband time histories from two selected scenario earthquakes having magnitude M>7.0 in the Marmara Sea within 10-20 km of Istanbul believed to have generated devastating 1509 event in the region. The physics-based rupture scenarios, which may be an indication of potential future events, are adopted to estimate the ground motion characteristics and its variability in the region. Two simulation techniques (a full 3D wave propagation method to generate low-frequency seismograms, <~1 Hz and a stochastic technique to simulate high-frequency seismograms, >1Hz) are used to compute more realistic time series associated with scenario earthquakes having magnitudes Mw >7.0 in the Marmara Sea Region. A dynamic rupture is generated and computed with a boundary integral equation method and the propagation in the medium is realized through a finite difference approach (Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). The high frequency radiation is computed using stochastic finite-fault model approach based on a dynamic corner frequency (Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005; Boore, 2009). The results from the two simulation techniques are then merged by performing a weighted summation at intermediate frequencies to calculate broadband synthetic time series. The hybrid broadband ground motions computed with the proposed approach are validated by comparing peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and spectral acceleration (SA) with recently proposed ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) in the region. Our

  17. Fractal Fragmentation triggered by meteor impact: The Ries Crater (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Perugini, Diego; Rossi, Stefano; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    FRACTAL FRAGMENTATION TRIGGERED BY METEOR IMPACT: THE RIES CRATER (GERMANY) Joali Paredes (1), Stefano Rossi (1), Diego Perugini (1), Ulrich Kueppers (2) 1. Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Italy 2. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Munich, Germany The Nördlinger Ries is a large circular depression in western Bavaria, Germany. The depression was caused by a meteor impact, which occurred about 14.3 million-14.5 million years ago. The original crater rim had an estimated diameter of 24 kilometers. Computer modeling of the impact event indicates that the impact or probably had diameters of about 1.5 kilometers and impacted the target area at an angle around 30 to 50 degrees from the surface in a west- southwest to east-northeast direction. The impact velocity is thought to have been about 20 km/s. The meteor impact generated extensive fragmentation of preexisting rocks. In addition, melting of these rocks also occurred. The impact melt was ejected at high speed provoking its extensive fragmentation. Quenched melt fragments are ubiquitous in the outcrops. Here we study melt fragment size distributions with the aim of understanding the style of melt fragmentation during ejection and to constrain the rheological properties of such melts. Digital images of suevite (i.e. the rock generated after deposition and diagenesis of ash and fragments produced by the meteor impact) were obtained using a high-resolution optical scanner. Successively, melt fragments were traced by image analysis and the images segmented in order to obtain binary images on which impact melt fragments are in black color, embedded on a white background. Hence, the size of fragments was determined by image analysis. Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to fragment size distributions of melt fragments in the Ries crater. Results indicate that melt fragments follow fractal distributions indicating that fragmentation of melt generated by the

  18. Imaging polarimetry of class I young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Roche, P. F.

    1998-09-01

    We present near-infrared imaging polarimetry of three class I young stellar objects in the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud. We use Monte Carlo simulations to analyse the flux distributions and polarization patterns of these three sources and five others from an earlier paper. In addition, we present high-resolution polarimetry of HL Tau using the shift and add technique. Most young stellar objects in the sample display sharp, unresolved, peaks in the scattered light distribution. This is most simply explained by a strong concentration of matter in the centre, which we model by applying the rho~r^-1.5 power law throughout the envelope. In terms of the Ulrich/Terebey, Shu and Cassen solution for the late stages of contraction of an initially spherical non-magnetic cloud, this corresponds to r_c<10 au. However, this almost spherically symmetric density distribution is inconsistent with observations of flattened, disc-like structures, so we conclude that this solution is not appropriate and different initial conditions apply. The multiple-scattering models with spherical grains do not reproduce some features of the observed polarization patterns, in particular the broad regions of aligned vectors seen in some sources. We interpret this as evidence for elongated aligned grains. The weak wavelength dependence of nebular morphology shows that the dust grains in circumstellar envelopes obey a much shallower extinction law than interstellar grains in the near-infrared, which we describe by the opacity ratio kappa(J/K)=1.8+/-0.3, compared to the interstellar value of 3.25. We place an upper limit on albedo of omega<0.6 from 1.25 to 2.2 μm and we find 0.1<0.4. With the addition of two more observables derived from the observed degrees of linear and circular polarization, we identify five

  19. Time-Reversal Location of the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield Earthquake Using the Vertical Component of Seismic Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Johnson, P.; Huang, L.; Randall, G.; Patton, H.; Montagner, J.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we describe Time Reversal experiments applying seismic waves recorded from the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield Earthquake. The reverse seismic wavefield is created by time-reversing recorded seismograms and then injecting them from the seismograph locations into a whole entire Earth velocity model. The concept is identical to acoustic Time-Reversal Mirror laboratory experiments except the seismic data are numerically backpropagated through a velocity model (Fink, 1996; Ulrich et al, 2007). Data are backpropagated using the finite element code SPECFEM3D (Komatitsch et al, 2002), employing the velocity model s20rts (Ritsema et al, 2000). In this paper, we backpropagate only the vertical component of seismic data from about 100 broadband surface stations located worldwide (FDSN), using the period band of 23-120s. We use those only waveforms that are highly correlated with forward-propagated synthetics. The focusing quality depends upon the type of waves back- propagated; for the vertical displacement component the possible types include body waves, Rayleigh waves, or their combination. We show that Rayleigh waves, both real and artifact, dominate the reverse movie in all cases. They are created during rebroadcast of the time reverse signals, including body wave phases, because we use point-like-force sources for injection. The artifact waves, termed "ghosts" manifest as surface waves, do not correspond to real wave phases during the forward propagation. The surface ghost waves can significantly blur the focusing at the source. We find that the ghosts cannot be easily eliminated in the manner described by Tsogka&Papanicolaou (2002). It is necessary to understand how they are created in order to remove them during TRM studies, particularly when using only the body waves. For this moderate magnitude of earthquake we demonstrate the robustness of the TRM as an alternative location method despite the restriction to vertical component phases. One advantage of TRM location

  20. NMSPEC: A Fortran code for the sparticle and Higgs masses in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwanger, Ulrich; Hugonie, Cyril

    2007-08-01

    NMSPEC is a Fortran code that computes the sparticle and Higgs masses, as well as Higgs decay widths and couplings in the NMSSM, with soft SUSY breaking terms specified at M. Exceptions are the soft singlet mass ms2 and the singlet self-coupling κ, that are both determined in terms of the other parameters through the minimization equations of the Higgs potential. We present a first analysis of the NMSSM parameter space with universal SUSY breaking terms at M—except for m and A—that passes present experimental constraints on sparticle and Higgs masses. We discuss in some detail a region in parameter space where a SM-like Higgs boson decays dominantly into two CP odd singlet-like Higgs states. Program summaryManuscript title: NMSPEC: A Fortran code for the sparticle and Higgs masses in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions Authors: Ulrich Ellwanger, Cyril Hugonie Program title: NMSPEC Catalogue identifier: ADZD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 121 539 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 560 340 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN Computer: Mac, PC, Sun, Dec, Alpha Operating system: Mac OSC, Linux, Unix, Windows RAM: 2M bytes Keywords: Supersymmetry, Higgs masses, sparticle masses, NMSSM PACS: 12.60.Jv, 14.80.Cp, 14.80.Ly Classification: 11.6 Nature of problem: Computation of the Higgs and Sparticle spectrum in the NMSSM with GUT scale boundary conditions, check of theoretical and experimental constraints. Solution method: Integration of the RGEs for all couplings and mass terms from the GUT scale to the Susy scale using a modified Runge-Kutta method; computation and diagonalization of all mass matrices including up to two loop

  1. The Observational Helioseismology Programs at the Sacramento Peak and Mount Wilson Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    2013-12-01

    The starting point for the study of the solar interior using helioseismology can be identified with the observational confirmation by Deubner (1975) and independently by Rhodes (1977); Rhodes et al. (1976a,b, 1977a) of the standing wave nature of the solar “5-minute” oscillations as proposed by Ulrich (1970) and independently by Leibacher & Stein (1971). The pioneering observations of the Rhodes et al. (1977a) study were obtained using what is now the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) at the Sacramento Peak National Observatory in early 1975. Subsequent helioseismic observations were also obtained at the DST, but one of the major drawbacks of all of these early studies was the fact that the DST could only be dedicated to these studies for a few days at a time. Consequently, the 60-Foot Solar Tower of the Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) was converted into a dedicated helioseismology telescope. The initial observations there were obtained in 1984. These observations were employed later in several studies of solar internal rotation. An important outcome of these early observations was the discovery of the Solar Subsurface Shear Layer (SSL). The 60-Foot Tower was upgraded with the installation of a one-mega-pixel camera during 1986 and 1987. High-resolution observations using this instrumentation were taken on a regular basis beginning in 1988. Inversions of the frequency-splitting coefficients derived from these observations confirmed the existence of the SSL. More recently, the 60-Foot Tower data were used to study the solar torsional oscillations and the solar cycle dependence of both the intermediate- and high-degree p-mode frequencies during Solar Cycles 21, 22, and 23. Observations from this program were also employed in ring-diagram studies to demonstrate the existence of helical flows within the SSL. Observations obtained with the 60-Foot Tower's imaging program between 1988 and 2009 are now being employed in a retrospective study of internal zonal and meridional

  2. Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Xie, Z.; Kecorius, S.; McMeeking, G. R.; Yu, X.; Pöhlker, C.; Zhang, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kuhn, U.; Poeschl, U.; Huffman, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities Zhibin Wang1, Xiawei Yu1,3, Simonas Kecorius2, Zhouqing Xie3, Gavin McMeeking4, Christopher Pöhlker1, Minghui, Zhang1, Alfred Wiedensohler2, Uwe Kuhn1, Yafang Cheng1, Ulrich Pöschl1, Hang Su1,*1Multiphase Chemistry and Biogeochemistry Departments, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz 55128, Germany2Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig 04318, Germany3School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China4Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder 80301, USA ABSTRACTBioaerosols are the main subset of super-micron particles, and significantly influence the evolution of cloud and precipitation, as well as the public health. Currently, the detection of ambient biological materials in real-time is mainly based on the presence of fluorophores in the particles. In this study, we present the wideband integrated bioaerosol spectrometer (WIBS) measurement results to characterize the fluorescent aerosol particles (FAP) at a polluted regional site (Xianghe, 39.80 °N, 116.96 °E) in the North China Plain. We observed substantially much higher number concentration of FAP as compared with those of previous studies in clean environments. We found the good agreement between the FAP number fraction in coarse mode particles (> 1 mm) and BC mass fraction in fine particles (< 1 mm), possibly indicating a majority of the observed FAP is to a certain extent related to the anthropogenic burning activities nearby. This interference and uncertainty should be especially noticed when performing fluorescence measurements in the polluted area, where the certain non-biological compounds (such as SOA, PAH and soot) may significantly lead to a positive fluorescence measurement artifacts and an overestimation of actual fluorescent biological aerosol particles. We also

  3. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic), Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice), Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin), Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich), Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt), Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner Spital, Wien). In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a number that is currently increasing. To determine the HIV-status early in pregnancy voluntary HIV-testing of all pregnant women is recommended in Germany and Austria as part of prenatal care. In those cases, where HIV1-infection was known during pregnancy, since 1995 the rate of vertical transmission of HIV1 was reduced to 1-2%. This low transmission rate has been achieved by the combination of anti-retroviral therapy of pregnant women, caesarean section scheduled before onset of labour, anti-retroviral post exposition prophylaxis in the newborn and refraining from breast-feeding by the HIV1-infected mother. To keep pace with new results in research, approval of new anti-retroviral drugs and changes in the general treatment recommendations for HIV1-infected adults, in 1998, 2001, 2003 and 2005 an interdisciplinary consensus meeting was held. Gynaecologists, infectious disease specialists, paediatricians, pharmacologists, virologists and members of the German AIDS Hilfe (NGO) were participating in this conference to update the prevention strategies. A fifth update became necessary in 2008. The updating process was started in January 2008 and was terminated in September 2008. The guidelines provide new recommendations on the indication and the starting point for HIV-therapy in pregnancies without complications, drugs and drug combinations to be used preferably in these

  4. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 242/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Marek; Mierzejewski, Marcin; Lisowski, Mariusz

    2005-02-01

    This issue contains the Proceedings of the 28th International Conference of Theoretical Physics, ICTP2004 - Electron Correlations in Nano- and Macrosystems, which was held in Ustro, Poland, from 2-7 September 2004. ICTP2004 followed the series of conferences organized by the Institute of Physics of the University of Silesia in Katowice, devoted biannually to the physics of condensed matter.The main objective of the Conference was to bring together specialists working on the physics of electron correlations in nano- and macro-regimes, with the intention of enhancing their mutual understanding and cooperation. The Conference was an international forum for the presentation and discussion of novel scientific ideas and experimental results. The programme of the conference consisted of 25 invited lectures, 11 contributed lectures and 27 papers presented during poster session. The contributions were devoted to problems related to the following subjects: Transport in low dimensional systems Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes Non Fermi liquid systems Superconductivity and Magnetism Quantum phase transitions New materials in magnetoelectronics Among the participants were 88 scientists from 10 countries and 3 continents. The invited talks were presented by distinguished physicists: Hélène Bouchiat, Liviu Chibotaru, Ulrich Eckern, Klaus Ensslin, Jim Freericks, Raymond Frésard, Peter Hänggi, Heike Herper, Carsten Honerkamp, Helmut Keiter, Stefan Krompiewski, Tadeusz Lulek, Kazumi Maki, Nina Markovi, Roman Micnas, Volker Meden, Andrzej M. Ole, Thomas Pruschke, Marek Przybylski, Ken-ichi Sasaki, Uri Sivan, Józef Spaek, Frank Steglich, Michael Thorwart and Roland Zeyher. The Organizing Committee would like to express our gratitude to the International Scientific Committee and to all the speakers and contributors for their talks and posters. Special thanks are addressed to all the participants for their valuable discussions and stimulating atmosphere of the meeting. We express

  5. [Wonder matter and assassin. The perception of the asbestos danger as a mirror of the time 1930-1990].

    PubMed

    Janssen, J H M

    2005-01-01

    In the seventies and eighties of the twentieth century the ideas of the dangers concerning the use of asbestos changed dramatically. The mineral, which had, more than half a century before been introduced in the Netherlands as a miraculous mineral, was completely banned from use. Asbestos became known as a 'silent killer' and 'the blue sand of death', and as a symbol of the hidden hazards of a deteriorating environment caused by unscrupulous companies and indolent authorities. Asbestos seems to fit perfectly into the ubiquitous hazards which Ulrich Beck defines in his concept of the 'risk society' as the dangerous side effects of industrial production. Yet the perception of the risk associated with asbestos depended more on socio-cultural characteristics than on scientifically risk assessments. In the first half of the twentieth century the use of asbestos was limited and therefore did not cause any concern. Economic crisis and war silenced the first alarming signals of asbestos related disease from foreign experts and a handful of Dutch physicians. The asbestos workers themselves were held responsible for their own health and safety. In the 1951 asbestosis became recognised as an industrial disease. Preventive measures with regard to the industrial use of asbestos were prescribed by law. Workers shared the responsibilities for a safe use with employers and authorities. However, during this period, all the attention was directed towards economic growth. Supervision by the labour inspection was scarce and workers and employers were not very interested in upholding the safety measures. Among asbestos workers the use of protective clothes and dust masks was generally seen as unmanly. In the sixties the foreign literature on the connection between the exposure to asbestos and the occurrence of lung cancer and mesothelioma became known among Dutch specialists. The results of these studies were confirmed by research among Dutch insulation workers. At the same time the

  6. Roles for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) expression and signaling in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the behavioral consequences of chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Sayamwong E; Roman, Carolyn W; Lezak, Kimberly R; Kocho-Shellenberg, Margaret; Grimmig, Bethany; Falls, William A; Braas, Karen; May, Victor

    2010-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently long-lasting and debilitating for more than 40 million American adults. Although stressor exposure plays an important role in the etiology of some anxiety disorders, the mechanisms by which exposure to stressful stimuli alters central circuits that mediate anxiety-like emotional behavior are still unknown. Substantial evidence has implicated regions of the central extended amygdala, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and the central nucleus of the amygdala as critical structures mediating fear- and anxiety-like behavior in both humans and animals. These areas organize coordinated fear- and anxiety-like behavioral responses as well as peripheral stress responding to threats via direct and indirect projections to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and brainstem regions (Walker et al. Eur J Pharmacol 463:199-216, 2003, Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 33(8):1291-1308, 2009; Ulrich-Lai and Herman Nat Rev Neurosci 10:397-409, 2009). In particular, the BNST has been argued to mediate these central and peripheral responses when the perceived threat is of long duration (Waddell et al. Behav Neurosci 120:324-336, 2006) and/or when the anxiety-like response is sustained (Walker and Davis Brain Struct Funct 213:29-42, 2008); hence, the BNST may mediate pathological anxiety-like states that result from exposure to chronic stress. Indeed, chronic stress paradigms result in enhanced BNST neuroplasticity that has been associated with pathological anxiety-like states (Vyas et al. Brain Res 965:290-294, 2003; Pego et al. Eur J Neurosci 27:1503-1516, 2008). Here we review evidence that suggests that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) work together to modulate BNST function and increase anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, we have shown that BNST PACAP as well as its cognate PAC1 receptor is substantially upregulated following chronic stress

  7. North American Paleozoic Oceanography: Overview of Progress Toward a Modern Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Markes E.

    1987-04-01

    Three fundamental questions have confronted paleoceanographers from the beginning of their North American explorations. What was the size and timing of ancient epicontinental seas: large and long-lasting or small and brief? What characterized the distribution of biotas and sediments at any one point in time: a multitude of complex facies patterns or a more spacially homogeneous cover? What promoted continental foundering: eustatic changes in sea level or relative changes in sea level brought about by regional tectonics? These questions have been debated by North Americans since the middle 1800s in response to various new insights, usually coming from abroad but often elaborated into substantial contributions of equal standing. Contemporary facies zones in Mediterranean biota found by the Englishman E. Forbes attracted the notice of geologists as early as 1844. C. Whittlesey was among the first to apply the bathymetric scheme of Forbes to the interpretation of American Paleozoic strata in 1851. The outstanding "native" innovation of the period was J. Hall's geosyncline concept, which is reflected in the earliest map of Paleozoic North America made by T. C. Chamberlin in 1881. Another wave of influence spread from the late 19th century work on stratigraphic facies patterns by the German J. Walther. A. W. Grabau is best remembered as Walther's foremost American champion against the formidable layer-caker E. O. Ulrich in the first decades of the 20th century, but he also made pioneering contributions of his own on Paleozoic sea level studies and global paleogeographic reconstructions. Charles Schuchert was the consummate paleogeographer of this period. Meanwhile, the term "cyclothem" was coined by J. Marvin Weller in 1930 for recurrent Carboniferous strata in Illinois. Controversy fast erupted over a glacial as opposed to tectonic mode of origin for these cycles. In 1964, A. B. Shaw restimulated interest in Paleozoic oceanography through his reformulation of Walther

  8. Factors contributing to the internal loading of phosphorus from anoxic sediments in six Maine, USA, lakes.

    PubMed

    Lake, Bjorn A; Coolidge, Kyle M; Norton, Stephen A; Amirbahman, Aria

    2007-02-15

    Phosphorus (P) is the limiting macronutrient for primary production in most lakes. Seasonal anoxia in the hypolimnion of lakes has been strongly correlated with internal P loading to the water column. Gravimetric sediment cores were collected before and after the onset of anoxia in six Maine (USA) lakes during the summer of 2003. This study investigates the relative importance of P sequestration by aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3(s)), and ferric (oxy)hydroxide (Fe(OH)3(S)) dissolution with subsequent P release in lakes with varying trophic status. Two lakes, Pennesseewassee and Highland, are oligotrophic. The remaining lakes, China, Cobbosseecontee, Webber and Salmon, have varying levels of productivity. Sediment P, Al and Fe in the top 10 cm were extracted sequentially using ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), bicarbonate-dithionite (BD), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 25 degrees C. The results suggest that a sediment [NH4Cl-Al+BD-Al+NaOH25-Al]:[NH4Cl-Fe+BD-Fe] molar ratio >3 and a sediment [NaOH25-Al]:[NH4Cl-P+BD-P] molar ratio >25 predict low P flux from sediments during the development of anoxia, as proposed by Kopácek et al. [Kopácek J, Borovec J, Hejzlar J, Ulrich K, Norton S, Amirbahman A. Aluminum control of Phosphorus Sorption in Lake Sediments. Environ Sci Technol 2005; 39: 8784-8789.], despite the development of anoxia in and the release of Fe(II) from the hypolimnia of the two study lakes. However, when these molar ratios are not exceeded the model does not adequately describe sedimentary P flux. The application of the model proposed by Kopácek et al. to Cobbosseecontee Lake suggests that its sediment may be a source of P to the water column. However, water column data indicate little to no sedimentary P flux. Therefore, the lack of P flux may be attributed to the absence of Fe(III) reduction in the Cobbosseecontee Lake sediment or perhaps to the slow diagenesis of organically-bound P.

  9. Memories of Maurice Jacob (1933-2007) Proceedings of the Maurice Jacob Memorial Meeting (CERN, 11 September 2007) Memories of Maurice Jacob (1933-2007) Proceedings of the Maurice Jacob Memorial Meeting (CERN, 11 September 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-07-01

    Maurice Jacob passed away unexpectedly on 2 May 2007. Soon after the terrible news arrived, it was thought appropriate to organize a memorial meeting at CERN. The meeting took place on 11 September 2007, and a large number of friends and colleagues participated in the event. The idea was to have brief presentations on the many scientific activities in which Maurice had been engaged, to provide a sketch of his personal trajectory. We also had spontaneous anecdotes and recollections from the audience which, unfortunately, did not make it into this special issue but enriched all of us present. The meeting took place in an afternoon, hence we were faced with the difficult task of selecting from the many presentations that could have been made by his colleagues and collaborators. The end results are the papers contained in this special issue. They provide a short overview of the breadth and depth of Maurice's physics, on the one hand, and of his deep commitment to European and world physics and to the interface between science and society, on the other hand. The first two talks were given by his fellow students and life-long friends Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Robert Pick. These were mostly personal recollections, less focussed on scientific issues per se but reminding us how Maurice grew into the renowned scientist he later became. Cecilia Jarlskog, a longtime collaborator and friend, provided us with a beautiful view of the wonderfully multifaceted activities Maurice was able to accomplish. Peter Landshoff also spoke about his more than 35 years of personal and scientific interaction with Maurice. The talks presented during the second part of the meeting went a bit more into the technical details of the wide spectrum of scientific activities pursued by Maurice. We had contributions by Helmut Satz (whose transparencies were kindly presented by Urs Wiedemann) and Ulrich Heinz, with the closing talk presented by John Ellis. We have lost a great friend and an excellent

  10. The G8-global healthcare applications project (GHAP) - recommendations for the way into the information society

    PubMed

    Dietzel

    1999-12-16

    The Global Healthcare Applications Project has sought to demonstrate the potential of telematics in the field of medicine and healthcare and to promote joint approaches to issues such as the setting of standards. This has been done through 10 sub-projects covering a range of applications and issues: 1. Towards a global public health information network - Coordinator: Germany (Ulrich Laaser, ulaaser@mail.uni-bielefeld.de; URL: http://health.ibs.uni-bielefeld. de/i-jphe/database/documents/abstract/laaser-g7.htm(C45-60_laaser-g7. pdf) 2. Improving prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. - Coordinator: France (Gerard Brugal, gerard. brugal@imag.fr; URL: http://pathconsult.imag.fr/G7/G7_index.html) 3. Improving prevention, diagnosis and treatment of major cardiovascular diseases. - Coordinator: Italy (Attilio Maseri, amaseri@rm.unicatt.it; URL: http://www.g7cardio.org) 4. International concerted action for collaboration in telemedicine. - Coordinator: Canada (Andre Lacroix, lacroixa@ere.umontreal.ca; URL: http:// www.g7sp4.org) 5. Enabling mechanisms for a global healthcare network, including Internet connectivity. - Coordinator: UK (Ray Rogers, r.rogers@mcmail.com; URL: http://www.ehto.be/sp5) 6. International harmonisation of the use of data cards in healthcare: Internet Connectivity Coordinator: USA (Elliot R. Siegel, siegel@nlm.nih.gov; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/) - Smart Cards and information exchange security in health care Joint Coordinators: France, European Commission, Italy and Germany (Jacques Sauret, jacques.sauret@sante.gouv.fr and G8-HC@sesam-vitale.fr; URL: http:/www.sesam-vitale.fr/Projects/Netlink-G7-En/) 7. Evidence and effectiveness. - Coordinator: Canada (Andrew Penn, andrew. penn@ualberta.ca; URL: http://www.medlib.com/spi/web.htm) 8. Multilingual anatomical digital database. - Coordinator: USA (Michael J. Ackermann; URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov) 9. Medical image reference centre. - Coordinator: Japan (Eturo Kashiwagi

  11. Gold and Copper Partitioning Between Vapor and Brine at 800° C and 100 MPa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Candela, P.; Piccoli, P.; Pettke, T.; Heinrich, C.

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies of fluid inclusions from porphyry-type ore deposits indicate that, although a magmatic brine may have been responsible for the generation of these deposits, high-concentrations of Au and Cu may exist in low-salinity vapor-bearing fluid inclusions as well (Ulrich et al., 1999, Nature, 399, 676). Experimental studies of Au (Frank et al., 2001, 11th Goldschmidt Conf., #3773) and Cu (Williams et al., 1995, CMP, v. 121, 388) have indicated that those elements will partition into a high-salinity brine relative to a low-salinity vapor in a sulfur-poor environment. To this point, the conditions under which Au and Cu will partition into a vapor relative to a brine have not been reproduced experimentally. Therefore, the question we wish to address is: Under what conditions will Au and Cu partition preferentially into a vapor relative to a brine? In an attempt to answer this, we performed experiments in the brine-vapor-haplogranitic melt-intermediate solid solution-pyrrhotite-quartz system at 800° C, 100 MPa and oxygen fugacity buffered by Ni-NiO. The coexisting brine ( ~68wt.% NaCl equivalent) and vapor ( ~3wt.% NaCl equivalent) were composed of NaCl+KCl+HCl+H2O, with starting HCl set to either ~160 or ~1600 ppm in the aqueous mixture. Vapor and brine bearing fluid inclusions were trapped in quartz during the experiment. Select fluid inclusions were drilled out of polished quartz samples using an ArF Excimer laser (output energy of 220 mJ at 30 kV) and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ELAN 6000). Counts of Au, Cu, Fe, and K were related to those of Na (internal standard) to calculate concentrations of those elements in the fluid inclusions. Analyses revealed that at ~160 ppm HCl in the aqueous mixture, Au and Cu partitioned preferentially into the brine with partition coefficients of ~14 and ~7, respectively. Au and Cu partition coefficients were ~2 and ~8 at ~1600 ppm HCl in the aqueous mixture. These data indicate that Au and Cu

  12. An interpretation of the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results based on new permittivity measurements of porous water ice and ice-basaltic/organic dust mixtures suggests an increase of porosity with depth in 67P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Yann; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Sabouroux, Pierre; Neves, Luisa; Encrenaz, Pierre; Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas; Kofman, Wlodek; Le Gall, Alice; Ciarletti, Valérie; Hérique, Alain; Lethuillier, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    The CONSERT bistatic radar on Rosetta and Philae sounded the interior of the small lobe of 67P/C-G at 90 MHz and determined the average of the real part of the complex permittivity (hereafter ɛ') to be equal to 1.27±0.05 [1,2]. The permittivity probe (PP) of the SESAME package sounded the near-surface in the 400-800 Hz range and derived a lower limit of ɛ' equal to 2.45±0.20 [3,4]. At the time of the measurements, the temperature was found to be below 150 K at Philae's location and expected to be close or below 100 K inside the nucleus [4-6].The complex permittivity depends of the frequency, the composition, the porosity and the temperature of the material [7,8,9]. These parameters have to be taken into account to interpret the permittivity values. The non-dispersive behavior of ɛ' below 150 K [9], allows us to compare the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results and to interpret their difference in terms of porosity and/or composition. For this purpose we use a semi-empirical formula obtained from reproducible permittivity measurements performed in the laboratory at 243 K on water ice particles and ice-basaltic dust mixtures [10], with a controlled porosity in the 26-91% range and dust-to-ice volumetric ratios in the 0.1-2.8 range. The influence of the presence of organic materials on ɛ' is also discussed based on new measurements of analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter [11]. Our results suggest an increase of the porosity of the small lobe of 67P with depth [11], in agreement Lethuillier et al. [4]'s conclusion using a different method.[1]Kofman et al., 1998. Adv. Space Res., 21, 1589.[2]Ciarletti et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A40.[3]Seidensticker et al., 2007. Space Sci. Rev., 128, 301.[4]Lethuillier et al., 2016. A&A, 591, A32.[5]Spohn et al., 2015. Science, 349, aab0464.[6]Festou et al. (Eds.), Comets II. Univ. of Arizona Press.[7]Campbell and Ulrichs, 1969. J. Geophys. Res., 74, 5867.[8]Brouet et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A39.[9]Mattei et al., 2014. Icarus

  13. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Have Cardiac Repolarization Disturbances when Travelling to Altitude: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acetazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Latshang, Tsogyal Daniela; Kaufmann, Barbara; Nussbaumer-Ochsner, Yvonne; Ulrich, Silvia; Furian, Michael; Kohler, Malcolm; Thurnheer, Robert; Saguner, Ardan Muammer; Duru, Firat; Bloch, Konrad Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) promotes myocardial electrical instability and may predispose to nocturnal sudden cardiac death. We evaluated whether hypobaric hypoxia during altitude travel further impairs cardiac repolarization in patients with OSA, and whether this is prevented by acetazolamide, a drug known to improve oxygenation and central sleep apnea at altitude. Methods: Thirty-nine OSA patients living < 600 m, discontinued continuous positive airway pressure therapy during studies at 490 m and during two sojourns of 3 days at altitude (2 days at 1860 m, 1 day at 2590 m). During one altitude sojourn, patients took acetazolamide, during the other placebo, or vice versa, according to a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Twelve-lead electrocardiography and pulse oximetry (SpO2) were recorded during nocturnal polysomnography. Heart rate corrected mean QT intervals during the entire night (meanQTc) and during 1 min of the night with the longest meanQTc (maxQTc) were determined. Results: At 490 m the median nocturnal SpO2 was 93%, medians of meanQTc and maxQTc were 420 ms and 478 ms. At 2590 m, on placebo, SpO2 was lower (85%), and meanQTc and maxQTc were prolonged to 430 ms and 510 ms (P < 0.02 vs. 490 m, all corresponding comparisons). At 2590 m on acetazolamide, median SpO2 was increased to 88% (P < 0.05 vs. placebo), meanQTc was reduced to 427 ms (P < 0.05 vs. placebo), whereas maxQTc remained increased at 502 ms (P = ns vs. placebo). Conclusions: At 2590 m OSA patients experienced cardiac repolarization disturbances in association with hypoxemia. Prolongation of meanQTc at altitude was prevented and hypoxemia was improved by acetazolamide, whereas maxQTc remained increased suggesting imperfect protection from repolarization disturbances. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NTC-00714740. URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov Citation: Latshang TD, Kaufmann B, Nussbaumer-Ochsner Y, Ulrich S, Furian M, Kohler M, Thurnheer R

  14. The Lithological Constraint To Gas Hydrate Formation: Evidence OF Grain Size Of Sediments From IODP 311 On CASCADIA Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2006-12-01

    A total of 614 sediment samples at intervals of about 1.5 m from all 5 sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on Cascadia Margin were analyzed using a Beckman Coulter LS-230 Particle Analyzer. The grain-size data were then plotted in depth and compared with other proxies of gas hydrate- occurrence such as soupy/mousse-like structures in sediments, gas hydrate concentration (Sh) derived from LWD data using Archie's relation, IR core images (infrared image) and the recovered samples of gas hydrate¨Cbearing sediments. A good relationship between the distribution of coarse grains in size of 31-63¦Ìm and 63-125¦Ìm sediments and the potential occurrence of gas hydrate was found across the entire gas hydrate stability zone. The depth distribution of grain size from the Site U1326 shows clear excursions at depths of 5-8, 21-26, 50- 123, 132-140, 167-180, 195-206 and 220-240 mbsf, which coincide with the potential occurrence of gas hydrate suggested by soupy/mousse-like structures, logging-derived gas hydrate concentrations (Sh) and the recovered samples of the gas hydrate¨Cbearing sand layers. The lithology of sediments significantly affects the formation of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate forms preferentially within relatively coarse grain-size sediments above 31 ¦Ìm. Key words: grain size of sediments, constraint, occurrence of gas hydrate, IODP 311 IODP Expedition 311 Scientists: Michael Riedel (Co-chief Scientist), Timothy S. Collett (Co-chief Scientist), Mitchell Malone (Expedition Project Manager/Staff Scientist), Gilles Gu¨¨rin, Fumio Akiba, Marie-Madeleine Blanc-Valleron, Michelle Ellis, Yoshitaka Hashimoto, Verena Heuer, Yosuke Higashi, Melanie Holland, Peter D. Jackson, Masanori Kaneko, Miriam Kastner, Ji-Hoon Kim, Hiroko Kitajima, Philip E. Long, Alberto Malinverno, Greg Myers, Leena D. Palekar, John Pohlman, Peter Schultheiss, Barbara Teichert, Marta E. Torres, Anne M. Tr¨¦hu, Jiasheng Wang, Ulrich G. Wortmann, Hideyoshi

  15. OBITUARY: Maurice Jacob (1933 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quercigh, Emanuele; Šándor, Ladislav

    2008-04-01

    Maurice Jacob passed away on 2 May 2007. With his death, we have lost one of the founding fathers of the ultra-relativistic heavy ion programme. His interest in high-energy nuclear physics started in 1981 when alpha alpha collisions could first be studied in the CERN ISR. An enthusiastic supporter of ion beam experiments at CERN, Maurice was at the origin of the 1982 Quark Matter meeting in Bielefeld [1] which brought together more than 100 participants from both sides of the Atlantic, showing a good enthusiastic constituency for such research. There were twice as many the following year at Brookhaven. Finally in the mid-eighties, a heavy ion programme was approved both at CERN and at Brookhaven involving as many nuclear as particle physicists. It was the start of a fruitful interdisciplinary collaboration which is nowadays continuing both at RHIC and at LHC. Maurice followed actively the development of this field, reporting at a number of conferences and meetings (Les Arcs, Bielefeld, Beijing, Brookhaven, Lenox, Singapore, Taormina,...). This activity culminated in 2000, when Maurice, together with Ulrich Heinz, summarized the main results of the CERN SPS heavy-ion experiments and the evidence was obtained for a new state of matter [2]. Maurice was a brilliant theoretical physicist. His many contributions have been summarized in a recent article in the CERN Courier by two leading CERN theorists, John Ellis and Andre Martin [3]. The following is an excerpt from their article: `He began his research career at Saclay and, while still a PhD student, he continued brilliantly during a stay at Brookhaven. It was there in 1959 that Maurice, together with Giancarlo Wick, developed the helicity amplitude formalism that is the basis of many modern theoretical calculations. Maurice obtained his PhD in 1961 and, after a stay at Caltech, returned to Saclay. A second American foray was to SLAC, where he and Sam Berman made the crucial observation that the point-like structures

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Masahiro; Watson, Alan A.

    2009-06-01

    regard to the energy spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays. The remaining contributions are of a more theoretical nature and discuss propagation (T Stanev), the time structure of multi-messenger signals (G H W Sigl), ultra-high energy cosmic ray production near black holes (A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev), production in jets associated with black holes (C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J Finke and A Atoyan) and emission from a specific object, Cen A (M Kachelriess, S S Ostapchenko and R Tomas). Additionally the potential of high energy cosmic rays to give information about features of hadronic interactions, specifically the cross-section for p-air collisions, is discussed in the paper by R Ulrich et al. We thank all our authors most sincerely for their efforts and Tim Smith and his editorial team for their hard work. We believe that this collection of articles will be of great value to workers in the field: further contributions to this focus issue will be published during the course of 2009. Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays Contents The cosmic ray energy spectrum as measured using the Pierre Auger Observatory Giorgio Matthiae The northern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory Johannes Blümer and the Pierre Auger Collaboration Searching for new physics with ultrahigh energy cosmic rays Floyd W Stecker and Sean T Scully On the measurement of the proton-air cross section using air shower data R Ulrich, J Blümer, R Engel, F Schüssler and M Unger High energy radiation from Centaurus A M Kachelrieß, S Ostapchenko and R Tomàs Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays from black hole jets of radio galaxies C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J D Finke and A Atoyan Ultra-high energy cosmic ray production in the polar cap regions of black hole magnetospheres A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev Time structure and multi-messenger signatures of ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources Günter Sigl Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays Todor Stanev Search for the end of the energy

  17. PREFACE: A Short History of the Surphon Workshop Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, J. Peter

    2004-07-01

    It all began in 1979 when Bruce Doak decided to leave MIT after a year of graduate school to come to Göttingen to do something new. Within a year he succeeded in putting together a novel helium atom surface scattering apparatus, with which the first surface phonon dispersion curves were measured on the LiF surface out to the zone boundary [1]. To help us understand these results we invited Giorgio Benedek to Göttingen in June 1980. Giorgio then was a regular guest in the lattice dynamics theory group of Heinz Bilz, a director at the Max Planck Institut für Festköroperforschung in Stuttgart. Heinz Bilz at that time was developing models for phonons in metals in which the electron degrees of freedom were modeled by assigning multipole deformabilities to the ion cores [2]. This explains his excitement, when in 1983 he heard through Giorgio Benedek that another PhD student, Ulrich Harten [3], had succeeded in another apparatus (HUGO I) in our Institut to measure the surface phonon dispersion curves on Ag(111) [4]. Both Benedek and Bilz were especially fascinated by the discovery of a second dispersion curve at frequencies above the ubiquitous Rayligh mode. This prompted Bilz to organize on short notice an informal gathering in his Institut on `Oberflächenstatistik and dynamik'. My opening lecture on the new experiments was followed by six half hour theoretical lectures including talks by Fritz de Wette and by Giorgio Benedek, the pioneers in realistic calculations of surface dispersion curves on alkali halide surfaces. This was the birthday of the Surphon Series. The official conference names, organizers, venues, dates and numbers of participants of all the Surphon meetings held since are listed below: Statics and Dynamics of Surfaces, H Bilz (Max-Planck-Insitut für Festkörperforschung, Stuttgart, 27 September 1983) 7 speakers Statics and Dynamics of Surfaces, J P Toennies (Max-Planck-Insitut für Strömungsforschung, Göttingen, 15 June 1984) 11 speakers, 31

  18. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    . Also available in the online edition are (i) an interactive conference picture, (ii) the abstract book, and (iii) material on the special session `Waves, Waves and Waves'. Additional articles related to both the HELAS II and the SOHO 19/GONG 2007 conferences can be found in a topical issue of Solar Physics, volume 251, nos 1-2. Financial support was provided by the HELAS Network, the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (through Ulrich Christensen and Sami Solanki) and the University of Göttingen (through Stefan Dreizler). We thank the local organizers, and in particular Sabine Deutsch, for their outstanding efforts in making the conference a success. We are also grateful to Graham Douglas and Jacky Mucklow of IoP Publishing for their help in the production of this volume. Laurent Gizon and Markus Roth Editors Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany

  19. Standard solar models, with and without helium diffusion, and the solar neutrino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-10-01

    We first show that, with the same input parameters, the standard solar models of Bahcall and Ulrich; of Sienkiewicz, Bahcall, and Paczyński of Turck-Chièze, Cahen, Cassé, and Doom; and of the current Yale code all predict event rates for the chlorine experiment that are the same within +/-0.1 SNU (solar neutrino units), i.e., approximately 1% of the total calculated rate. We then construct new standard solar models using the Yale stellar evolution computer code supplemented with a more accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine, an improved equation of state, recent determinations of element abundances, and the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity calculations. We evaluate the individual effects of different improvements by calculating a series of precise models, changing only one aspect of the solar model at a time. We next add a new subroutine that calculates the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen with the aid of the Bahcall-Loeb formalism. Finally, we compare the neutrino fluxes computed from our best solar models constructed with and without helium diffusion. We find that helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11% of the total rate, in the chlorine experiment; by about 3.5 SNU, or 3%, in the gallium experiments; and by about 12% in the Kamiokande and SNO experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, radiative opacity, and equation of state predicts a value of 8.0+/-3.0 SNU for the 37Cl experiment and 132+21-17 SNU for the 71Ga experiment. The quoted errors represent the total theoretical range and include the effects on the model predictions of 3σ errors in measured input parameters. All 15 calculations since 1968 of the predicted rate in the chlorine experiment given in this series of papers are consistent with both the range estimated in the present work and the 1968 best-estimate value of 7.5+/-2.3 SNU. Including the

  20. The Martian Geomorphology as mapped by the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC): Implications for Geological Processes and Climate Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    very dynamic surface environment, characterized by widespread erosion, transport, and redeposition [26]. References: [1]Jaumann et al., 2007, PSS 55; [2]Gwinner et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [3]Neukum et al., 2004, Nature 432; [4]Neukum et al., EPSL 294;[5] Hauber et al., 2005, Nature 434; [6]Hauber et al., 2009 PSS 57; [7]Platz and Michael, 2011, EPSL 312, [8]Jaumann et al., 2005, GRL 32; [9]Jaumann et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [10]Erkeling et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [11]Erkeling et al., 2012, Icarus, 219; [12]Kleinhans et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [13]Reiss et al., 2009, PSS 57; [14]Kneissl et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [15]Di Achille et al., 2006, JGR 111; [16]Di Achille et al., 2006, GRL 33; [17]Head et al., 2005 Nature 434; [18]Murray et al., 2005 Nature 434; [19]Pacifici et al., 2009, Icarus 202; [20]Rossi et al., 2011, Geol. Soc. Am.356; [21]Marchant and Head, 2007, Icarus; [22]Ulrich et al., 2011 Geomorphology 134;[23] Le Deit et al., 2010, Icarus 208; [24]Le Deit et al., 2012, JGR 117; [25]Bishop et al., 2013, JGR 118; [26]Tirsch et al., 2011, JGR 116;

  1. Unexpected mechanical properties of very dry Berea sandstone near 45°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Darling, T. W.; TenCate, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Office of Basic Energy Sciences]. [1] B. R. Tittmann, L. Ahlberg, and J. Curnow, "Internal friction and velocity measurements," Proc. of 7th Lunar Science Conference , pp. 3123-3132, 1997. [2] K. E.-A. Van Den Abeele, J. Carmeliet, P. A. Johnson, and B. Zinszner, "Influence of water saturation on the nonlinear elastic mesoscopic response in Earth materials and the implications to the mechanism of nonlinearity," Journal of Geophysical Research 107, p. 2121, June 2002. [3] "Dynamic Measures of Elastic Nonlinear (Anelastic) Behavior: Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (DAET)," G. Renaud, P-Y Le Bas, J. A. TenCate, T. J. Ulrich, J. W. Carey, J. Han, T.W. Darling and P. A. Johnson, AGU Fall Meeting, Dec. 2011. [4] "Water and CO2 chemistry influences on the mechanical integrity of rocks," T.W. Darling, P-Y Le Bas, J. W. Carey, P. A. Johnson and R. A. Miller, AGU Fall Meeting, Dec. 2010.

  2. Amine-Promoted Organosilicate Hydrolysis Mechanism at Near-Neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delak, K. M.; Sahai, N.

    2006-12-01

    ., Deutzmann R. and Sumper M. (1999) Science 286, 1129. [2] Cha J.N., Shimizu K., Zhou Y., Christiansen S.C., Chmelka B. F., Stucky G. D. and Morse D. E. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 96, 361. [3] Delak K.M. and Sahai N. (2006) J. Phys. Chem. B., 110, DOI: 10.1021/jp062054m [4] Delak K.M. and Sahai N. (2005a) Chem. Materials, 17, 3221. [5] Delak K.M., Farrar T.C. and Sahai N. (2005b) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 351, 2244. [6] Corriu R.J.P., Leclercq D., Vioux A., Pauthe M., Phalippou J. (1988) In Ultrastructure Processing of Advanced Ceramics; Eds. Mackenzie J.D. and Ulrich D.R., Wiley, New York; pp.113-126. [7] Delak K.M. and Sahai N. (2006) unpublished results. [8] Iler R. K. (1979) The Chemistry of Silica. Wiley, New York, p. 174.

  3. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    from receipt-to-first decision of a paper is only 50 days. In 2014 we will continue to support the low-temperature plasma physics community through the publication of special topical issues. Those already scheduled for next year are: Transport in B-fields in low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Rod Boswell and Igor D Kaganovich Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, Guest Editors: Mikhail S Benilov and Ulrich Kogelschatz Interaction of electromagnetic waves with low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Osamu Sakai and Shahid Rauf We will also launch a new feature: LabTalks, a way in which our authors can showcase their group's work and communicate their research published in PSST to a wider audience. Full details are on the PSST website. Along with the leadership team, made up of Associate Editors, Anne, Nick and Richard and the great PSST staff at Institute of Physics Publishing, led by Alice Malhador, I will strive to grow, improve and deliver a journal which reflects the excellent science from the low-temperature plasma community. We hope we can continue to count on your vital support as authors and referees.

  4. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2005-08-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  5. Opening address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnoli, C.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen My cordial thanks to you for participating in our workshop and to all those who have sponsored it. When in 1957 I attended the International Congress on Fundamental Constants held in Turin on the occasion of the first centenary of the death of Amedeo Avogadro, I did not expect that about thirty-five years later a small but representative number of distinguished scientists would meet here again, to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal figure of the Avogadro constant. At that time, the uncertainty of the value of this constant was linked to the fourth decimal figure, as reported in the book by DuMond and Cohen. The progress made in the meantime is universally acknowledged to be due to the discovery of x-ray interferometry. We are honoured that one of the two founding fathers, Prof. Ulrich Bonse, is here with us, but we regret that the other, Prof. Michael Hart, is not present. After Bonse and Hart's discovery, the x-ray crystal density method triggered, as in a chain reaction, the investigation of two other quantities related to the Avogadro constant—density and molar mass. Scientists became, so to speak, resonant and since then have directed their efforts, just to mention a few examples, to producing near-perfect silicon spheres and determining their density, to calibrating, with increasing accuracy, mass spectrometers, and to studying the degree of homogeneity of silicon specimens. Obviously, I do not need to explain to you why the Avogadro constant is important. I wish, however, to underline that it is not only because of its position among fundamental constants, as we all know very well its direct links with the fine structure constant, the Boltzmann and Faraday constants, the h/e ratio, but also because when a new value of NA is obtained, the whole structure of the fundamental constants is shaken to a lesser or greater extent. Let me also remind you that the second part of the title of this workshop concerns the silicon

  6. The Martian geomorphology as mapped by the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC): Implications for Geological Processes and Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Roatsch, T.; Gwinner, K.; Scholten, F.; Di Achille, G.; Duxbury, T.; Erkeling, G.; van Gasselt, S.; Gupta, S.; Head, J. W.; Hiesinger, H.; Ip, W.; Keller, H.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Kneissl, T.; Le Deit, L.; McCord, T. B.; Muller, J.; Murray, J. J.; Pacifici, A.; Platz, T.; Pinet, P. C.; Reiss, D.; Rossi, A.; Spohn, T.; Tirsch, D.; Williams, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    and volcanic processes, respectively. References: [1]Jaumann et al., 2007, PSS 55; [2]Gwinner et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [3]Neukum et al., 2004, Nature 432; [4]Neukum et al., EPSL 294;[5] Hauber et al., 2005, Nature 434; [6]Hauber et al., 2009 PSS 57; [7]Platz and Michael, 2011, EPSL 312, [8]Jaumann et al., 2005, GRL 32; [9]Jaumann et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [10]Erkeling et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [11]Erkeling et al., 2012, Icarus, 219; [12]Kleinhans et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [13]Reiss et al., 2009, PSS 57; [14]Kneissl et al., 2010, EPSL 294; [15]Di Achille et al., 2006, JGR 111; [16]Di Achille et al., 2006, GRL 33; [17]Head et al., 2005 Nature 434; [18]Murray et al., 2005 Nature 434; [19]Pacifici et al., 2009, Icarus 202; [20]Rossi et al., 2011, Geol. Soc. Am.356; [21]Marchant and Head, 2007, Icarus; [22]Ulrich et al., 2011 Geomorphology 134;[23] Le Deit et al., 2010, Icarus 208; [24]Le Deit et al., 2012, JGR 117; [25]Bishop et al., 2013, JGR 118; [26]Tirsch et al., 2011, JGR 116; [27]Hauber et al., 2011, Geol. Soc. Am. 483.

  7. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  8. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    initial contact with the journal. Leopoldo Soto President, Chilean Physical Society Head of Plasma Department, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission Editors: Leopoldo Soto, José Moreno, Ricardo Ávila, Karla Cubillos Scientific Committee Physicists from various research institutions, specialty areas, and regions of the country were invited by the Board of SOCHIFI to join the Symposium Scientific Committee, which was formed by: Julio Yánez, Universidad de Antofagasta Sergio del Campo, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Patricio Vargas, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María Rodrigo Soto, Universidad de Chile Ulrich Volkmann, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Víctor Muñoz, Universidad de Chile Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Luis Huerta, Universidad de Talca Patricio Salgado, Universidad de Concepción Luis Roa, Universidad de Concepción Asticio Vargas, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco Cristian Martínez, Centro de Estudios Científicos, Valdivia Organizing Commitee Leopoldo Soto (Chairman), Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Erik Herrera, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear José Moreno, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Andrea Rozas, Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear Rodrigo Aros, Universidad Andrés Bello Gonzalo Gutiérrez, Universidad de Chile Executive Board, Chilean Physical Society April 2006 - April 2008 Leopoldo Soto, President Joel Saavedra, Secretary Rodrigo Aros: Treasurer Rodolfo Figueroa: Director Luis Huerta: Director Conference photograph

  9. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2012 - Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Emmanuel-Costa, D.; González Felipe, R.; Joaquim, F. R.; Lavoura, L.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Rebelo, M. N.; Romão, J. C.; Silva, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    The Third Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries (DISCRETE 2012) was held at Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal, from 3-7 December 2012 and was organised by Centro de Física Teórica de Partículas (CFTP) of Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa. This is the sequel to the Symposia that was successfully organised in Valéncia in 2008 and in Rome in 2010. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking Discrete symmetries and models of flavour mixing Baryogenesis, leptogenesis Neutrino physics Electroweak symmetry breaking and physics beyond the Standard Model Accidental symmetries (B, L conservation) Experimental prospects at LHC Dark matter searches Super flavour factories, and other new experimental facilities The Symposium was organised in plenary sessions with a total of 24 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 70 talks, including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Ignatios Antoniadis, Abdelhak Djouadi, Rabindra Mohapatra, André Rubbia, Alexei Yu Smirnov, José Bernabéu, Marco Cirelli, Apostolos Pilaftsis, Antonio Di Domenico, Robertus Potting, João Varela, Frank Rathmann, Michele Gallinaro, Dumitru Ghilencea, Neville Harnew, John Walsh, Patrícia Conde Muíño, Juan Aguilar-Saavedra, Nick Mavromatos, Ulrich Nierste, Ferruccio Feruglio, Vasiliki Mitsou, Masanori Yamauchi, and Marcello Giorgi. The Symposium was attended by about 140 participants. Among the social events, there was a social dinner in the historical Associação Comercial de Lisboa, which included a musical performance of 'Fado', the traditional music from Lisbon. The next symposium of the series will be organised by King's College, London University, UK, from 1-5 December 2014. Guest Editors G C Branco, D Emmanuel-Costa, R González Felipe, F R Joaquim, L Lavoura, S Palomares-Ruiz, M N Rebelo, J C

  10. EDITORIAL: The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páll Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Uhrenfeldt, Christian

    2012-03-01

    AndersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Pia BomholtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hafliði P GíslasonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Haraldur Páll GunnlaugssonAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark John HansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Britta JohansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Volodymyr KhranovskyyLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Arne Nylandsted LarsenAarhus University, Denmark Helge MalmbekkUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik Stensrud MarsteinInstitute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway Antonio MartiUniversidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain Torben MølholtUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Sveinn ÓlafssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Thomas PedersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Thomas Garm PedersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Dirch Hjorth PetersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Vincent QuemenerUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Henry RadamsonKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Bahman RaeissiUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Jonatan SlotteAalto University, Aalto, Finland Xin SongUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Einar Örn SveinbjörnssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Mikael SyväjärviLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Chi Kwong TangUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik V ThomsenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Christian UhrenfeldtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hans Ulrik UlriksenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Muhammad UsmanKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Lasse VinesUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Ulrich WahlUnidade de Física e Aceleradores, Sacavém, Portugal Helge WemanNTNU, Trondheim, Norway Gerd WeyerAarhus University, Denmark

  11. Detailed thermal fingerprinting of obduction-related processes: insights from Northern New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, A.; Agard, P.; Monié, P.; Chauvet, A.

    2012-04-01

    ): geodynamic implications. Tectonophysics 340 (1-2), 23-59. [2] Ulrich, M., Picard C., Guillot S., Chauvel C., Cluzel D., Meffre S. (2010) The New Caledonia Ophiolite : multiple Stage of melting and refertilisation process as indicators of ridge to subduction formation. Lithos. doi 10.1016/j.lithos.2009.12.011. [3] Brothers, R. N. & Blake, M. C., 1972. Tertiary plate tectonics and high-pressure metamorphism in New Caledonia. Tectonophysics, 17, 359-391. [4] Fitzherbert, J. A., Clarke, G. L. & Powell, R., 2003. Lawsonite- omphacite bearing metabasites of the Pam Peninsula, NE New Caledonia: Evidence for disrupted blueschist to eclogite facies conditions. Journal of Petrology, 44, 1805-1831. [5] Spandler, C., & Hermann, J., 2006. High-pressure veins in eclogite from New Caledonia and their significance for fluid migration in subduction zones. Lithos, 89 (1-2). pp. 135-153. ISSN 1872-6143 [6] Beyssac, O., Goffé, B., Chopin, C. & Rouzaud, J.N., 2002. Raman spectra of carbonaceous material in metasediments: a new geothermometer. J. Metamorph. Geol., 20, 859-871. [7] Lahfid, A., Beyssac, O., Deville, E., Negro, F., Chopin, C. & Goffé, B., 2010. Evolution of the Raman spectrum of carbonaceous material in low-grade metasediments of the Glarus Alps (Switzerland). Terra Nova, 22: 354-360. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3121.2010.00956.x

  12. Utilizing the International GeoSample Number Concept during ICDP Expedition COSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Ulbricht, Damian; Gorgas, Thomas; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    facility. This CurationDIS assigns IGSNs on samples newly taken in the repository in the identical fashion as done in the field. Thereby, the parent-child linkage of the IGSNs is ensured consistently throughout the entire sampling process. The only difference between ExpeditionDIS and CurationDIS sample curation is using the name space ICDP and BGRB respectively as part of the corresponding ID string. To prepare the IGSN registry, a set of metadata is generated for every assigned IGSN using the DIS, which is then exported from the DIS into one common xml-file. The xml-file is based on the SESAR schema and a proposal of IGSN e.V. (http://schema.igsn.org). This systematics has been recently extended for drilling data to achieve additional information for future retrieval options. The two allocation agents GFZ Potsdam und PANGAEA are currently involved in the registry of IGSNs in the case of COSC drill campaigns. An example for the IGSN registration of the COSC-1 drill hole A (5054_1_A) is "ICDP5054EEW1001" and can be resolved using the URL http://hdl.handle.net/10273/ICDP5054EEW1001. Opening the landing page for the complete COSC core material for this particular hole showcases graphically a hierarchical tree entitled "Sample Family". An example of an IGSN citation associated with a COSC sample set is featured on an EGU-2016 poster presentation by Ulrich Harms, Johannes Hierold et al. (EGU2016-8646).

  13. Heliophysics 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2010-11-01

    -like stars Carolus J. Schrijver; 3. Formation and early evolution of stars and proto-planetary disks Lee W. Hartmann; 4. Planetary habitability on astronomical time scales Donald E. Brownlee; 5. Solar internal flows and dynamo action Mark S. Miesch; 6. Modeling solar and stellar dynamos Paul Charbonneau; 7. Planetary fields and dynamos Ulrich R. Christensen; 8. The structure and evolution of the 3D solar wind John T. Gosling; 9. The heliosphere and cosmic rays J. Randy Jokipii; 10. Solar spectral irradiance: measurements and models Judith L. Lean and Thomas N. Woods; 11. Astrophysical influences on planetary climate systems Juerg Beer; 12. Evaluating the drivers of Earth's climate system Thomas J. Crowley; 13. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Stanley C. Solomon; 14. Long-term evolution of the geospace climate Jan J. Sojka; 15. Waves and transport processes in atmospheres and oceans Richard L. Walterscheid; 16. Solar variability, climate, and atmospheric photochemistry Guy P. Brasseur, Daniel Marsch and Hauke Schmidt; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Heliophysics 3 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2013-03-01

    -like stars Carolus J. Schrijver; 3. Formation and early evolution of stars and proto-planetary disks Lee W. Hartmann; 4. Planetary habitability on astronomical time scales Donald E. Brownlee; 5. Solar internal flows and dynamo action Mark S. Miesch; 6. Modeling solar and stellar dynamos Paul Charbonneau; 7. Planetary fields and dynamos Ulrich R. Christensen; 8. The structure and evolution of the 3D solar wind John T. Gosling; 9. The heliosphere and cosmic rays J. Randy Jokipii; 10. Solar spectral irradiance: measurements and models Judith L. Lean and Thomas N. Woods; 11. Astrophysical influences on planetary climate systems Juerg Beer; 12. Evaluating the drivers of Earth's climate system Thomas J. Crowley; 13. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Stanley C. Solomon; 14. Long-term evolution of the geospace climate Jan J. Sojka; 15. Waves and transport processes in atmospheres and oceans Richard L. Walterscheid; 16. Solar variability, climate, and atmospheric photochemistry Guy P. Brasseur, Daniel Marsch and Hauke Schmidt; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index.

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Correlations in Tailored Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Alejandro; Pfau, Tilman

    2008-04-01

    molecules L Wang, A Rastelli, S Kiravittaya, P Atkinson, F Ding, C C Bof Bufon, C Hermannstädter, M Witzany, G J Beirne, P Michler and O G Schmidt Effective parameters for weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates S Giovanazzi, J Esteve and M K Oberthaler Current statistics of correlated charge tunnelling through an impurity in a 1D wire Alexander Herzog and Ulrich Weiss Sideband cooling and coherent dynamics in a microchip multi-segmented ion trap Stephan A Schulz, Ulrich Poschinger, Frank Ziesel and Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler The trapped two-dimensional Bose gas: from Bose-Einstein condensation to Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless physics Z Hadzibabic, P Krüger, M Cheneau, S P Rath and J Dalibard Dynamical protection of quantum computation from decoherence in laser-driven cold-ion and cold-atom systems Goren Gordon and Gershon Kurizki Spin-flip and spin-conserving optical transitions of the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond Ph Tamarat, N B Manson, J P Harrison, R L McMurtrie, A Nizovtsev, C Santori, R G Beausoleil, P Neumann, T Gaebel, F Jelezko, P Hemmer and J Wrachtrup Superconductivity in the attractive Hubbard model: functional renormalization group analysis R Gersch, C Honerkamp and W Metzner Quantum stability of Mott-insulator states of ultracold atoms in optical resonators Jonas Larson, Sonia Fernández-Vidal, Giovanna Morigi and Maciej Lewenstein

  16. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    , Di Cao and Stuart Lindsay Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers L J Steinbock, O Otto, D R Skarstam, S Jahn, C Chimerel, J L Gornall and U F Keyser Fabrication of nanopores with embedded annular electrodes and transverse carbon nanotube electrodes Zhijun Jiang, Mirna Mihovilovic, Jason Chan and Derek Stein Fabrication and electrical characterization of a pore-cavity-pore device D Pedone, M Langecker, A M Münzer, R Wei, R D Nagel and U Rant Use of tunable nanopore blockade rates to investigate colloidal dispersions G R Willmott, R Vogel, S S C Yu, L G Groenewegen, G S Roberts, D Kozak, W Anderson and M Trau Facilitated translocation of polypeptides through a single nanopore Robert Bikwemu, Aaron J Wolfe, Xiangjun Xing and Liviu Movileanu Mechanistic insight into gramicidin-based detection of protein-ligand interactions via sensitized photoinactivation Tatyana I Rokitskaya, Michael X Macrae, Steven Blake, Natalya S Egorova, Elena A Kotova, Jerry Yang and Yuri N Antonenko Sequence-dependent unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins studied by nanopore force spectroscopy Stephan Renner, Andrey Bessonov, Ulrich Gerland and Friedrich C Simmel Hydration properties of mechanosensitive channel pores define the energetics of gating A Anishkin, B Akitake, K Kamaraju, C-S Chiang and S Sukharev Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers Andy Sischka, Andre Spiering, Maryam Khaksar, Miriam Laxa, Janine König, Karl-Josef Dietz and Dario Anselmetti Force fluctuations assist nanopore unzipping of DNA V Viasnoff, N Chiaruttini, J Muzard and U Bockelmann Control and reversal of the electrophoretic force on DNA in a charged nanopore Binquan Luan and Aleksei Aksimentiev The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD Raimund Haarmann, Mohamed Ibrahim, Mara Stevanovic, Rolf Bredemeier and Enrico Schleiff Structural and dynamical properties of the porins OmpF and OmpC: insights from

  17. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  19. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Couvert, B Georgeot and D Guéry-Odelin Analysis of the entanglement between two individual atoms using global Raman rotations A Gaëtan, C Evellin, J Wolters, P Grangier, T Wilk and A Browaeys Spin polarization transfer in ground and metastable helium atom collisions D Vrinceanu and H R Sadeghpour A fiber Fabry-Perot cavity with high finesse D Hunger, T Steinmetz, Y Colombe, C Deutsch, T W Hänsch and J Reichel Atomic wave packets in amplitude-modulated vertical optical lattices A Alberti, G Ferrari, V V Ivanov, M L Chiofalo and G M Tino Atom interferometry with trapped Bose-Einstein condensates: impact of atom-atom interactions Julian Grond, Ulrich Hohenester, Igor Mazets and Jörg Schmiedmayer Storage of protonated water clusters in a biplanar multipole rf trap C Greve, M Kröner, S Trippel, P Woias, R Wester and M Weidemüller Single-atom detection on a chip: from realization to application A Stibor, H Bender, S Kühnhold, J Fortágh, C Zimmermann and A Günther Ultracold atoms as a target: absolute scattering cross-section measurements P Würtz, T Gericke, A Vogler and H Ott Entanglement-assisted atomic clock beyond the projection noise limit Anne Louchet-Chauvet, Jürgen Appel, Jelmer J Renema, Daniel Oblak, Niels Kjaergaard and Eugene S Polzik Towards the realization of atom trap trace analysis for 39Ar J Welte, F Ritterbusch, I Steinke, M Henrich, W Aeschbach-Hertig and M K Oberthaler Resonant superfluidity in an optical lattice I Titvinidze, M Snoek and W Hofstetter Interference of interacting matter waves Mattias Gustavsson, Elmar Haller, Manfred J Mark, Johann G Danzl, Russell Hart, Andrew J Daley and Hanns-Christoph Nägerl Magnetic trapping of NH molecules with 20 s lifetimes E Tsikata, W C Campbell, M T Hummon, H-I Lu and J M Doyle Imprinting patterns of neutral atoms in an optical lattice using magnetic resonance techniques Michal Karski, Leonid Förster, Jai-Min Choi, Andreas Steffen, Noomen Belmechri, Wolfgang Alt, Dieter Meschede and Artur Widera

  20. EDITORIAL: From reciprocal space to real space in surface science From reciprocal space to real space in surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2012-09-01

    Triest.let's finish—aus basta Some move atoms around to hear how they sound.Karl-Heinz Rieder, Erice, 6 April 1998 From reciprocal space to real space in surface science contents From reciprocal space to real space in surface scienceLudwig Bartels and Karl-Heinz Ernst Karl-Heinz Reider: the quiet pioneerGiorgio Benedek Scattering of CO and N2 molecules by a graphite surfaceJunepyo Oh, Takahiro Kondo, Keitaro Arakawa, Yoshihiko Saito, Junji Nakamura, W W Hayes and J R Manson Helium, neon and argon diffraction from Ru(0001)M Minniti, C Díaz, J L Fernández Cuñado, A Politano, D Maccariello, F Martín, D Farías and R Miranda Enhanced charge transfer in a monolayer of the organic charge transfer complex TTF-TNAP on Au(111)T R Umbach, I Fernandez-Torrente, J N Ladenthin, J I Pascual and K J Franke Extended pattern recognition scheme for self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo simulationsSyed Islamuddin Shah, Giridhar Nandipati, Abdelkader Kara and Talat S Rahman Acetylene on Cu(111): imaging a molecular surface arrangement with a constantly rearranging tipYeming Zhu, Jonathan Wyrick, Kamelia D Cohen, Katie Marie Magnone, Connor Holzke, Daniel Salib, Quan Ma, Dezheng Sun and Ludwig Bartels Coulomb attraction during the carpet growth mode of NaClFriederike Matthaei, Sarah Heidorn, Konrad Boom, Cord Bertram, Ali Safiei, Jörg Henzl and Karina Morgenstern Molecular self-assembly on an insulating surface: interplay between substrate templating and intermolecular interactionsMarkus Kittelmann, Philipp Rahe and Angelika Kühnle Vertical manipulation of native adatoms on the InAs(111)A surfaceJ Yang, C Nacci, J Martínez-Blanco, K Kanisawa and S Fölsch Charge transfer between isomer domains on n+-doped Si(111)-2 × 1: energetic stabilizationR M Feenstra, G Bussetti, B Bonanni, A Violante, C Goletti, P Chiaradia, M G Betti and C Mariani Probing the properties of metal-oxide interfaces: silica films on Mo and Ru supportsLeonid Lichtenstein, Markus Heyde, Stefan Ulrich, Niklas Nilius

  1. http://www.esa.int/esaSC/Pr_21_2004_s_en.html

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    , tossing galaxies far from their paths and churning shock waves of 100-million-degree gas through intergalactic space. This unprecedented view of a merger in action crystallises the theory that the Universe built its magnificent hierarchal structure from the ‘bottom up’ - essentially through mergers of smaller galaxies and galaxy clusters into bigger ones. "Here before our eyes we see the making of one of the biggest objects in the Universe," said Dr Patrick Henry of the University of Hawaii, who led the study. "What was once two distinct but smaller galaxy clusters 300 million years ago is now one massive cluster in turmoil.” Henry and his colleagues, Alexis Finoguenov and Ulrich Briel of the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, present these results in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The forecast for the new super-cluster, they said, is 'clear and calm' now that the worst of the storm has passed. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in Universe, containing hundreds to thousands of galaxies. Our Milky Way galaxy is part of a small group of galaxies but is not gravitationally bound to the closest cluster, the Virgo Cluster. We are destined for a collision in a few thousand million years, though. The cluster named Abell 754 in the constellation Hydra has been known for decades. However, to the scientists' surprise, the new observation reveals that the merger may have occurred from the opposite direction than what was thought. They found evidence for this by tracing the wreckage today left in the merger's wake, spanning a distance of millions of light years. While other large mergers are known, none has been measured in such detail as Abell 754. For the first time, the scientists could create a complete ‘weather map’ of Abell 754 and thus determine a forecast. This map contains information about the temperature, pressure and density of the new cluster. As in all clusters, most the ordinary matter

  2. First Circumstellar Disk around a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    Observations with an infrared-sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla have for the first time shown the presence of a disk around a hot and massive star, known as G339.88-1.26 . Until now, disks have only been found around less massive stars. Planets are formed in such disks. The new discovery may thus have important implications for our understanding of the formation of planetary systems around stars. TIMMI observations Observations at mid-infrared wavelengths were carried out in July 1997 by Bringfried Stecklum (Landessternwarte Thüringen, Tautenburg, Germany) and Hans-Ulrich Käufl (ESO), using the TIMMI instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. Additional measurements were carried out in March 1998. TIMMI ( T hermal I nfrared M ulti M ode I nstrument) is a general-purpose camera spectrometer operating at a wavelength of 10 µm. To reach sufficient sensitivity, the camera must be cooled to approx. -260 o C, i.e. a few degrees above the absolute minimum, by use of liquid Helium. Astronomical objects whose temperatures are between -120 o C and 300 o C radiate most of their energy at this wavelength. In addition, dust and haze that are absolutely impenetrable for light visible to the human eye, are often found to be nearly transparent at this wavelength. This is why fire-fighters now use similar equipment to look through smoke. G339.88-1.26: A very special object ESO PR Photo 22a/98 ESO PR Photo 22a/98 [JPEG, 800k] This image is a true-color composite of near-infrared observations of the sky region around the radio source G339.88-1.26 with the ESO/MPI 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. In this image, the visible colors red, green and blue have been used to represent the infrared filters J, H and K (at 1.25, 1.63 and 2.2 µm wavelength, respectively). No object is visible at the position of the radio source, even at these near-infrared wavelengths. A dark band of absorbing dust is clearly visible, exactly at the position of the object (indicated by an

  3. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    measured (by obtaining spectra of the arcs and measuring their redshift). The masses of galaxy clusters are important for the determination, for instance of the mean density and distribution of matter in the universe. This is because these clusters are the most massive, clearly defined objects known and as such trace these parameters in the universe on very large scales. Another possibility to derive the cluster mass is offered by X-ray observations, because the distribution of the hot, X-ray emitting gas traces the gravitational field of the cluster. Recently, in some clusters there has been a discrepancy between the mass determined in this way and that found from gravitational lensing effects. The team of astronomers now hopes that follow-up X-ray observations of RXJ1347.5-1145 will help to solve this puzzle. Moreover, the combination of extremely high X-ray brightness and the possibility to perform a rather accurate mass determination by the gravitational lensing effect makes this particular cluster a truly unique object. In view of the exceptional X-ray brightness, a very high mass is expected. The exact determination will be possible, as soon as spectra have been obtained of the two arcs. Contrary to what is the case in other clusters, this will not be so difficult, due to their unusual brightness and their ideal geometrical configuration. [1] This is a joint Press Release of ESO and the Max-Planck-Society. It is accompanied by a B/W photo. [2] The investigation described in this Press Release is the subject of a Letter to the Editor which will soon appear in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, with the following authors: Sabine Schindler (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching, Germany), Hans Boehringer, Doris M. Neumann and Ulrich G. Briel (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany), Luigi Guzzo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate, Italy), Guido Chincarini

  4. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  5. Maverick Comet Splits during Dramatic Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    encounters with this giant planet. For instance, it passed Jupiter at a distance of about 30 million kilometers in 1882 and 1894, and again at 40 million kilometres in 1965. SW-3 belongs to the so-called ``Jupiter family'' of comets. Some time ago, SW-3 was chosen as a back-up target for the upcoming Rosetta space mission by the European Space Agency (ESA) because the elliptical orbit of this particular comet may be reached with a relatively small expenditure of rocket fuel (the prime target is Comet Wirtanen). That allows to carry more scientific instruments on this extraordinary mission which aims at a long-term study of a cometary nucleus from a spacecraft in circum-cometary orbit. Rosetta will be launched early in the next century and will also carry two landing modules which will descend on the surface of the nucleus. The Dramatic Outburst of SW-3 In order to study this potential Rosetta target comet, Hermann Boehnhardt (Astronomical Institute of the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany) and Hans-Ulrich Kaufl (ESO-Garching) early in 1995 applied for simultaneous observing time at the ESO 3.6-m telescope and 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory. In May 1995, the ESO Observing Programmes Committee (OPC) granted the astronomers some nights for these observations in mid-December 1995 with the TIMMI and EMMI instruments at the 3.6-m and the NTT, respectively, i.e. not quite two months after the predicted perihelion passage on September 22, when the comet would be closest to the Sun (140 million kilometres). Meanwhile, SW-3 was moving closer towards the Sun. After its recovery in December 1994 with the 3.5-metre reflector at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain, Kurt Birkle and Hermann Boehnhardt collected a series of almost monthly images with that telescope until late June 1995, showing that the comet developed normally with respect to its brightness and the coma and tail. On August 20, it was observed by a Japanese amateur astronomer at

  6. Bewehrte Betonbauteile unter Betriebsbedingungen: Forschungsbericht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eligehausen, Rolf; Kordina, Karl; Schießl, Peter

    2000-09-01

    .6 Literatur. Teil II: Verbundfragen (Rolf Eligehausen). 1 Ein mechanisches Modell zur Beschreibung des Verbundverhaltens zwischen Stahl und Beton (Gert König, Nguyen V. Tue und Wolfgang Kurz). 1.1 Einleitung. 1.2 Beschreibung der Kraftübertragung zwischen Stahl und Beton. 1.3 Vorstellung des Modells. 1.4 Materialgesetze für die Berechnung der Verformung des Fachwerks. 1.5 Vergleich zwischen Versuch und Modell. 1.6 Zusammenfassung und Ausblick. 1.7 Literatur. 2 Verbund unter nicht ruhender Beanspruchung (Rainer Koch und György L. Balázs). 2.1 Übersicht über die durchgeführten Versuche. 2.2 Versuchkörper und Materialien. 2.3 Versuchseinrichtungen. 2.4 Versuche und Ergebnisse. 2.5 Zusammenfassung und Ausblick. 2.6 Literatur. 3 Trag- und Verformungsverhalten von Stahlbetontragwerken unter Betriebsbelastung (Thomas M. Sippel und Rolf Eligehausen). 3.1 Einleitung. 3.2 Allgemeines. 3.3 Rechenmodell und Materialmodelle. 3.4 Vergleich zwischen Versuchen und Rechnung. 3.5 Parameterstudien. 3.6 Vereinfachtes Rechenmodell. 3.7 Zusammenfassung. 3.8 Literatur. 4 Verbundverhalten von Spanngliedern mit nachträglichem Verbund unter Betriebsbedingungen (Josef Hegger, Norbert Will und Heiner Cordes). 4.1 Einführung. 4.2 Verbundverhalten von Spanngliedern. 4.3 Zeitabhängige Effekte des Verbunds. 4.4 Versuche unter statischer Langzeitbeanspruchung. 4.5 Versuche unter dynamischer Langzeitbeanspruchung. 4.6 Bemessungsvorschlag für Verbundkennwerte. 4.7 Zusammenfassung. 4.8 Literatur. 5 Spannungsumlagerungen in gemischt bewehrten Querschnitten (Josef Hegger, Heiner Cordes und Matthias Rudlof). 5.1 Problemstellung und Zielsetzung. 5.2 Spannungsumlagerungen bei gemischter Bewehrung. 5.3 Versuche an zentrischen Zugkörpern. 5.4 Versuchsergebnisse. 5.5 Ermittlung und Vergleich von Verbundkennwerten. 5.6 Zusammenfassung. 5.7 Literatur. Teil III: Bauteile (Karl Kordina). 1 Einfluß von Längsbeanspruchungen auf den Neigungswinkel der Schubrisse (Marek Los und Ulrich Quast). 1.1 Einleitung. 1

  7. Obituary: John Norris Bahcall, 1934-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striker, Jeremiah P.; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2007-12-01

    particle physics was uncovered. A fuller idea of his exceptional scientific scope is indicated by the fact that the standard model for a massive black hole surrounded by a cluster of stars is still called the Bahcall-Wolf model; the most widely quoted model for our Galaxy was for decades the Bahcall-Soneira model; the now common use of quasars as flashlights to illuminate and study the intervening intergalactic medium was originated by Bahcall and Salpeter; and the most accurate models for the solar interior were those developed by Bahcall with Roger Ulrich, Marc Pinsonneault, and others. John Bahcall was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, on 30 December 1934, to Mildred and Malcolm Bahcall. Mildred was a pianist, and both parents worked in business. John Bahcall had one brother, Robert Bahcall, now deceased. At Byrd High School in Shreveport, John became interested in sports, especially tennis; with persistence and dedication — traits he exemplified throughout his life — he became the tennis champion of his state. John continued to play and love tennis his entire life. As a high school senior, Bahcall became interested in debate and joined the school's Debate Team. With the same persistence, dedication, and hard work, Bahcall became a National Debate Team winner — the first time ever for this Louisiana high school. Bahcall's debate skills served him well throughout his life, as all of those who tried to debate him know well. Bahcall's love of physics had a non-traditional beginning. He never took science classes in high school; he was excused to play tennis in the afternoons when science courses were offered. After one year at Louisiana State University, Bahcall transferred to the University of California in Berkeley on a tennis scholarship and support from an uncle who saw the promise in the young Bahcall. At Berkeley he began studying philosophy. Berkeley's graduation requirement of a science course led Bahcall to take a physics class, the first science class he ever

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Molecular Electronics FOCUS ON MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Elke; Reineker, Peter

    2008-06-01

    : American Scientific Publishers) [7] Petty M C 2007 Molecular Electronics, (Weinheim: Wiley-VCH) [8] 2006 Molecular Wires and Nanoscale Conductors Faraday Discuss. 131 1-420 Focus on Molecular Electronics Contents Model of mixed Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons in donor-acceptor molecular crystals: investigation of vibronic spectra I J Lalov, C Warns and P Reineker Suppressing the current through molecular wires: comparison of two mechanisms GuangQi Li, Michael Schreiber and Ulrich Kleinekathöfer Charge-memory effect in a polaron model: equation-of-motion method for Green functions Pino D'Amico, Dmitry A Ryndyk, Gianaurelio Cuniberti and Klaus Richter Determination of transport levels of organic semiconductors by UPS and IPS S Krause, M B Casu, A Schöll and E Umbach Electrical characterization of alkane monolayers using micro-transfer printing: tunneling and molecular transport C Kreuter, S Bächle, E Scheer and A Erbe Correlated charge transfer along molecular chains L Mühlbacher and J Ankerhold Non-equilibrium Green's functions in density functional tight binding: method and applications A Pecchia, G Penazzi, L Salvucci and A Di Carlo Asymmetric Coulomb blockade and Kondo temperature of single-molecule transistors Florian Elste and Felix von Oppen Electron-phonon scattering in molecular electronics: from inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy to heating effects Alessio Gagliardi, Giuseppe Romano, Alessandro Pecchia, Aldo Di Carlo, Thomas Frauenheim and Thomas A Niehaus Interlinking Au nanoparticles in 2D arrays via conjugated dithiolated molecules Jianhui Liao, Markus A Mangold, Sergio Grunder, Marcel Mayor, Christian Schönenberger and Michel Calame Conductance values of alkanedithiol molecular junctions M Teresa González, Jan Brunner, Roman Huber, Songmei Wu, Christian Schönenberger and Michel Calame Particularities of surface plasmon-exciton strong coupling with large Rabi splitting C Symonds, C Bonnand, J C Plenet, A Bréhier, R Parashkov, J S Lauret, E

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Iron-Based Superconductors FOCUS ON IRON-BASED SUPERCONDUCTORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Ren, Zhi-An

    2009-02-01

    Elastic theory for the vortex-lattice melting in iron-based high-Tc superconductors Q-H Chen, Q-M Nie, J-P Lv and T-C Au Yeung Electronic properties of LaO1-xFxFeAs in the normal state probed by NMR/NQR H-J Grafe, G Lang, F Hammerath, D Paar, K Manthey, K Koch, H Rosner, N J Curro, G Behr, J Werner, N Leps, R Klingeler, H-H Klauss, F J Litterst and B Büchner AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu) and SrFe2-xTMxAs2 (TM = Mn, Co, Ni): crystal structure, charge doping, magnetism and superconductivity Deepa Kasinathan, Alim Ormeci, Katrin Koch, Ulrich Burkhardt, Walter Schnelle, Andreas Leithe-Jasper and Helge Rosner Impurity states in a family of antiferromagnetic iron arsenides Qiang Han and Z D Wang Coherence-incoherence crossover in the normal state of iron oxypnictides and importance of Hund's rule coupling K Haule and G Kotliar Electronic structure of heavily electron-doped BaFe1.7Co0.3As2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission Y Sekiba, T Sato, K Nakayama, K Terashima, P Richard, J H Bowen, H Ding, Y-M Xu, L J Li, G H Cao, Z-A Xu and T Takahashi Absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of rare-earth oxypnictides T Kroll, F Roth, A Koitzsch, R Kraus, D R Batchelor, J Werner, G Behr, B Büchner and M Knupfer Superconductivity in LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr and Nd) single crystals R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, L Shu, D A Zocco, N M Crisosto and M B Maple Unconventional pairing originating from disconnected Fermi surfaces in the iron-based superconductor Kazuhiko Kuroki, Seiichiro Onari, Ryotaro Arita, Hidetomo Usui, Yukio Tanaka, Hiroshi Kontani and Hideo Aoki Near-degeneracy of several pairing channels in multiorbital models for the Fe pnictides S Graser, T A Maier, P J Hirschfeld and D J Scalapino Investigation of superconducting gap structure in TbFeAsO0.9F0.1 using point contact Andreev reflection K A Yates, K Morrison, J A Rodgers, G B S Penny, J-W G Bos, J P Attfield and L F Cohen Competition of magnetism and superconductivity in underdoped (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 Marianne Rotter, Marcus

  10. New VLT Observations Address the Age of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    consists of Sabine Moehler (Principal Investigator), Ulrich Heber and Ralf Napiwotzki (all at Dr. Remeis Sternwarte, Astronomisches Institut der Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany), Detlev Koester (Institut für Theoretische Physik and Astrophysik, Kiel, Germany) and Alvio Renzini (European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany). [2] This method to determine astronomical distances is based on the fact that the brightness of an object is inversely proportionate to the square of the distance. If two stars are identical in all respects, and if the distance to one of them is known, the distance to the other one can therefore be accurately determined from the measured (apparent) brightness difference. However, if they are not absolutely identical, e.g. if their masses and thus their intrinsic brightness differ, a suitable correction will have to be applied. [3] One spectacular example of a planetary nebula with a central White Dwarf star is the Dumbbell Nebula, observed last year with the VLT, cf. ESO PR Photos 38a-b/98. How to obtain ESO Press Information ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http://www.eso.org../ ). ESO Press Photos may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory.

  11. TIMMI2 Images the Heart of the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    valuable tool for studying the birth of stars and the formation of circumstellar disks and planets. As such it is complementary to submm observations, e.g. with the future ALMA facility. Later, an extremely large telescope with similar instrumentation - like the 100-m OWL for which a concept study is now underway at ESO - may be used to image earth-size planets orbiting stars in our cosmic neighbourhood. Notes [1]: The team consists of Rolf Chini and Markus Nielbock (Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany), Ralf Siebenmorgen and Hans-Ulrich Käufl (ESO-Garching, Germany). [2]: A more exhaustive description of TIMMI2 is available in the ESO Messenger (No. 102, page 4). Technical information about the photos PR Photo 12a/01 covers an area of approx. 3 x 3 arcmin 2. PR Photo 12b/01 shows an N-band (10.3 µm) mosaic image of the Orion BN/KL Complex, composed of 80 co-added exposures, lasting a total of 3 min, obtained with the 240 x 320 Raytheon detector array of the TIMMI2 camera. The observations were made in the night of January 27-28, 2001. Individual exposures have a scale of 0.2 arcsec/pixel and were taken with the standard chopping and nodding technique with a nodding amplitude of 30 arcsec. The colours are displayed on a logarithmic intensity scale in order to enhance the faintest structures. PR Photo 12c/01 shows a similar Q-band (20.0 µm) mosaic, obtained with the same observing procedure. Both photos show diffraction limited structures in a 30 x 42 arcsec 2 sky field. PR Photo 12d/01 shows the observed 20.0 µm to 10.3 µm brightness ratio and hence the distribution of the colour temperature. The lowest observed ratio corresponds to the highest temperature (a de-reddened colour temperature of about 460K, or +190 °C); it occurs at the location of the BN object .